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Sample records for regional vascular geometry

  1. Geometry optimization of branchings in vascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamassi, Jamel; Bierwisch, Claas; Pelz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Progress has been made in developing manufacturing technologies which enable the fabrication of artificial vascular networks for tissue cultivation. However, those networks are rudimentary designed with respect to their geometry. This restricts long-term biological functionality of vascular cells which depends on geometry-related fluid mechanical stimuli and the avoidance of vessel occlusion. In the present work, a bioinspired geometry optimization for branchings in artificial vascular networks has been conducted. The analysis could be simplified by exploiting self-similarity properties of the system. Design rules in the form of two geometrical parameters, i.e., the branching angle and the radius ratio of the daughter branches, are derived using the wall shear stress as command variable. The numerical values of these parameters are within the range of experimental observations. Those design rules are not only beneficial for tissue engineering applications. Moreover, they can be used as indicators for diagnoses of vascular diseases or for the layout of vascular grafts.

  2. Regional anesthesia for major vascular surgery.

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, D. P.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The relative merits of general vs regional anesthesia for patients undergoing major vascular surgery has been the subject of debate over the past decade. Previous studies of regional vs general anesthesia often were deficient in experimental design and, therefore, did not produce definitive answers. Some of these deficiencies related to non-standardized, poorly conducted, and/or described general anesthetic techniques, nonstandardized methods of postoperative analgesia in the general anesthesia groups, and variations in preoperative cardiac status in the study groups. Furthermore, most studies did not conclusively demonstrate a cause and effect relationship between the proposed mechanisms of the beneficial effect of regional anesthesia and outcome. Recent studies, however, have claimed improvements in outcome following regional anesthesia in patients undergoing peripheral vascular procedures. The reported beneficial effects have included amelioration of the neuroendocrine stress response to surgery, improvement in pulmonary function, cardiovascular stability, enhancement of lower limb blood flow, reduction in the incidence of graft thrombosis, and a reduction in the thrombic response to surgery. Skeptics still question whether recent studies have the power to determine whether regional anesthesia decreases the incidence of cardiac and pulmonary complications following major vascular surgery. Furthermore, the issue of whether the beneficial effects of regional anesthesia on the incidence of graft thrombosis and the thrombotic response to surgery relating to intraoperative or postoperative regional anesthesia/analgesia, to regional anesthesia per se, or to the systemic effects of absorbed local anesthetics remains unresolved. PMID:7825346

  3. Hand biometric recognition based on fused hand geometry and vascular patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, GiTae; Kim, Soowon

    2013-01-01

    A hand biometric authentication method based on measurements of the user's hand geometry and vascular pattern is proposed. To acquire the hand geometry, the thickness of the side view of the hand, the K-curvature with a hand-shaped chain code, the lengths and angles of the finger valleys, and the lengths and profiles of the fingers were used, and for the vascular pattern, the direction-based vascular-pattern extraction method was used, and thus, a new multimodal biometric approach is proposed. The proposed multimodal biometric system uses only one image to extract the feature points. This system can be configured for low-cost devices. Our multimodal biometric-approach hand-geometry (the side view of the hand and the back of hand) and vascular-pattern recognition method performs at the score level. The results of our study showed that the equal error rate of the proposed system was 0.06%. PMID:23449119

  4. Effect of ocular shape and vascular geometry on retinal hemodynamics: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Dziubek, Andrea; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Harris, Alon; Hirani, Anil N; Rusjan, Edmond; Thistleton, William

    2016-08-01

    A computational model for retinal hemodynamics accounting for ocular curvature is presented. The model combines (i) a hierarchical Darcy model for the flow through small arterioles, capillaries and small venules in the retinal tissue, where blood vessels of different size are comprised in different hierarchical levels of a porous medium; and (ii) a one-dimensional network model for the blood flow through retinal arterioles and venules of larger size. The non-planar ocular shape is included by (i) defining the hierarchical Darcy flow model on a two-dimensional curved surface embedded in the three-dimensional space; and (ii) mapping the simplified one-dimensional network model onto the curved surface. The model is solved numerically using a finite element method in which spatial domain and hierarchical levels are discretized separately. For the finite element method, we use an exterior calculus-based implementation which permits an easier treatment of non-planar domains. Numerical solutions are verified against suitably constructed analytical solutions. Numerical experiments are performed to investigate how retinal hemodynamics is influenced by the ocular shape (sphere, oblate spheroid, prolate spheroid and barrel are compared) and vascular architecture (four vascular arcs and a branching vascular tree are compared). The model predictions show that changes in ocular shape induce non-uniform alterations of blood pressure and velocity in the retina. In particular, we found that (i) the temporal region is affected the least by changes in ocular shape, and (ii) the barrel shape departs the most from the hemispherical reference geometry in terms of associated pressure and velocity distributions in the retinal microvasculature. These results support the clinical hypothesis that alterations in ocular shape, such as those occurring in myopic eyes, might be associated with pathological alterations in retinal hemodynamics. PMID:26445874

  5. Micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators with complex geometries obtained by laser stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Chacón Tanarro, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    In our work we present the complete development process of geometrically complex micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators. The complex geometries and three-dimensional networks are designed by means of computer aided design resources. Manufacture is accomplished, in a single step, by means of laser stereolithography, directly from the computer-aided design files with the three dimensional geometries of the different actuators under development. To our knowledge, laser stereolithography is applied here for the first time to the development of shape memory polymer devices with complex geometries and inner micro-vasculatures for their activation using a thermal fluid. Final testing of the developed actuators helps to validate the approach and to put forward some present challenges.

  6. Relationship between regional spending on vascular care and amputation rate

    PubMed Central

    Goodney, Philip P.; Travis, Lori L.; Brooke, Benjamin S.; DeMartino, Randall R.; Goodman, David C.; Fisher, Elliott S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Importance While lower extremity revascularization is effective in preventing amputation, the relationship between spending on vascular care and regional amputation rates remains unclear. Objective To test the hypothesis that higher regional spending on vascular care is associated with lower amputation rates in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting United States Medicare patients, 2003-2010 Participants 18,463 patients who underwent major PAD-related amputation. Exposures Price-adjusted Medicare spending on revascularization procedures and related vascular care in the year before lower extremity amputation, across hospital referral regions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Correlation coefficient between regional spending on vascular care and regional rates of PAD-related amputation. Results Among patients ultimately subject to amputation, 64% were admitted to the hospital in the year prior to amputation for revascularization, wound-related care, or both; 36% were admitted only for their amputation. The mean cost of inpatient care in the year before amputation, including the amputation itself, was $22,405, but varied from $11,077 (Bismarck, North Dakota) to $42,613 (Salinas, California) (p<0.001). Patients in high-spending regions were more likely to undergo vascular procedures in crude analyses (12.0 procedures per 10,000 patients in the lowest quintile of spending, 20.4 procedures per 10,000 patients in the highest quintile of spending, p<0.0001), as well as in risk-adjusted analyses (adjusted OR for receiving a vascular procedure in highest quintile of spending = 3.5, 95 % CI 3.2-3.8, p<0.0001). While revascularization was associated with higher spending (R=0.38, p<0.001), higher spending was not associated with lower regional amputation rates (R=0.10, p=0.06). Regions most aggressive in the use of endovascular interventions which most likely to have high spending (R=0.42, p=0.002) and high amputation rates (R

  7. Coupled Simulation of Hemodynamics and Vascular Growth and Remodeling in a Subject-Specific Geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiacheng; Shadden, Shawn C

    2015-07-01

    A computational framework to couple vascular growth and remodeling (G&R) with blood flow simulation in a 3D patient-specific geometry is presented. Hyperelastic and anisotropic properties are considered for the vessel wall material and a constrained mixture model is used to represent multiple constituents in the vessel wall, which was modeled as a membrane. The coupled simulation is divided into two time scales-a longer time scale for G&R and a shorter time scale for fluid dynamics simulation. G&R is simulated to evolve the boundary of the fluid domain, and fluid simulation is in turn used to generate wall shear stress and transmural pressure data that regulates G&R. To minimize required computation cost, the fluid dynamics are only simulated when G&R causes significant vascular geometric change. For demonstration, this coupled model was used to study the influence of stress-mediated growth parameters, and blood flow mechanics, on the behavior of the vascular tissue growth in a model of the infrarenal aorta derived from medical image data. PMID:25731141

  8. Coupled simulation of hemodynamics and vascular growth and remodeling in a subject-specific geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiacheng; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    A computational framework to couple vascular growth and remodeling (G&R) with blood flow simulation in a 3D patient-specific geometry is presented. Hyperelastic and anisotropic properties are considered for the vessel wall material and a constrained mixture model is used to represent multiple constituents in the vessel wall, which was modeled as a membrane. The coupled simulation is divided into two time scales–a longer time scale for G&R and a shorter time scale for fluid dynamics simulation. G&R is simulated to evolve the boundary of the fluid domain, and fluid simulation is in turn used to generate wall shear stress and transmural pressure data that regulates G&R. To minimize required computation cost, the fluid dynamics are only simulated when G&R causes significant vascular geometric change. For demonstration, this coupled model was used to study the influence of stress-mediated growth parameters, and blood flow mechanics, on the behavior of the vascular tissue growth in a model of the infrarenal aorta derived from medical image data. PMID:25731141

  9. Regional changes of placental vascularization in preeclampsia: a review.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Akriti S; Sundrani, Deepali P; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-08-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by vascular dysfunction and results in maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The placenta plays a critical role in the growth and development of the fetus, and recent studies indicate that placental architecture, oxygen availability, and oxidative stress indices vary across different regions of the placenta. Our earlier studies have reported altered maternal angiogenesis and differential placental gene expression and methylation patterns of angiogenic factors in women with preeclampsia when compared with normotensive women. We have also demonstrated lower maternal and placental neurotrophin (NT) levels in women with preeclampsia. Studies suggest that oxidative stress is associated with proteases like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and growth factors like NTs and angiogenic factors known to be involved in the process of angiogenesis. Recently, we have reported regionwise differential oxidative stress, antioxidant enzyme activity, and NT levels in placenta from normotensive control women and women with preeclampsia. The current review describes the regional changes in the placenta and highlights the role of placental oxidative stress in influencing regional differences in the expression of angiogenic factors, MMPs, and NTs. This review discusses the need for further research on various growth factors and proteins involved in the process of placental development across different regions of the placenta. This would help to understand whether regional differences in these factors affect the growth and development of the fetus. PMID:26269153

  10. Guidelines for Surveying Bankfull Channel Geometry and Developing Regional Hydraulic-Geometry Relations for Streams of New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Rocky O.; Miller, Sarah J.; Westergard, Britt E.; Mulvihill, Christiane I.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Gallagher, Anne S.; Starr, Richard R.

    2004-01-01

    Many disturbed streams within New York State are being restored in an effort to provide bank and bed stability and thereby decrease sedimentation and erosion. Efforts to identify and provide accurate indicators for stable-channel characteristics for ungaged streams have been hampered by the lack of regional equations or relations that relate drainage area to bankfull discharge and to channel depth, width, and cross-sectional area (bankfull hydraulic-geometry relations). Regional equations are needed to confirm bankfull hydraulic-geometry, assess stream stability, evaluate restoration needs, and verify restoration design for ungaged streams that lack stage-to-discharge ratings or historic peak-flow records. This report presents guidelines for surveying bankfull channel geometry at USGS stream gages and developing regional hydraulic-geometry relations (equations) for wadeable streams in New York. It summarizes methods to (1) compile and assess existing hydrologic, geometric, photographic, and topographic data, (2) conduct stream-reconnaissance inspections, (3) identify channel-bankfull characteristics, (4) conduct longitudinal and cross-section surveys, (5) measure stream discharge, (6) develop and refine bankfull hydraulic-geometry equations, and (7) analyze and assure data completeness and quality. The techniques primarily address wadeable streams with either active or discontinued surface-water and crest-stage gages. The relations can be applied to ungaged or actively gaged streams that are wadeable, and may be extended to non-wadeable streams (with some limitations) if they have drainage areas comparable to those used to develop the relations.

  11. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  12. Vascular geometry and oxygen diffusion in the vicinity of artery-vein pairs in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Jennifer P; Kar, Saptarshi; Kett, Michelle M; Gardiner, Bruce S; Pearson, James T; Smith, David W; Ludbrook, John; Bertram, John F; Evans, Roger G

    2014-11-15

    Renal arterial-to-venous (AV) oxygen shunting limits oxygen delivery to renal tissue. To better understand how oxygen in arterial blood can bypass renal tissue, we quantified the radial geometry of AV pairs and how it differs according to arterial diameter and anatomic location. We then estimated diffusion of oxygen in the vicinity of arteries of typical geometry using a computational model. The kidneys of six rats were perfusion fixed, and the vasculature was filled with silicone rubber (Microfil). A single section was chosen from each kidney, and all arteries (n = 1,628) were identified. Intrarenal arteries were largely divisible into two "types," characterized by the presence or absence of a close physical relationship with a paired vein. Arteries with a close physical relationship with a paired vein were more likely to have a larger rather than smaller diameter, and more likely to be in the inner-cortex than the mid- or outer cortex. Computational simulations indicated that direct diffusion of oxygen from an artery to a paired vein can only occur when the two vessels have a close physical relationship. However, even in the absence of this close relationship oxygen can diffuse from an artery to periarteriolar capillaries and venules. Thus AV oxygen shunting in the proximal preglomerular circulation is dominated by direct diffusion of oxygen to a paired vein. In the distal preglomerular circulation, it may be sustained by diffusion of oxygen from arteries to capillaries and venules close to the artery wall, which is subsequently transported to renal veins by convection. PMID:25209866

  13. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niyanta N.; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J.; Wolak, Daniel J.; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13–17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  14. Relative vascular permeability and vascularity across different regions of the rat nasal mucosa: implications for nasal physiology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niyanta N; Gautam, Mohan; Lochhead, Jeffrey J; Wolak, Daniel J; Ithapu, Vamsi; Singh, Vikas; Thorne, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal administration provides a non-invasive drug delivery route that has been proposed to target macromolecules either to the brain via direct extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways or to the periphery via absorption into the systemic circulation. Delivering drugs to nasal regions that have lower vascular density and/or permeability may allow more drug to access the extracellular cranial nerve-associated pathways and therefore favor delivery to the brain. However, relative vascular permeabilities of the different nasal mucosal sites have not yet been reported. Here, we determined that the relative capillary permeability to hydrophilic macromolecule tracers is significantly greater in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Mean capillary density in the nasal mucosa was also approximately 5-fold higher in nasal respiratory regions than in olfactory regions. Applying capillary pore theory and normalization to our permeability data yielded mean pore diameter estimates ranging from 13-17 nm for the nasal respiratory vasculature compared to <10 nm for the vasculature in olfactory regions. The results suggest lymphatic drainage for CNS immune responses may be favored in olfactory regions due to relatively lower clearance to the bloodstream. Lower blood clearance may also provide a reason to target the olfactory area for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:27558973

  15. ESTIMATING STREAMFLOW AND ASSOCIATED HYDRAULIC GEOMETRY, THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to estimate streamflow and channel hydraulic geometry were developed for ungaged streams in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Observed mean annual streamflow and associated hydraulic geometry data from 75 gaging stations located in the Appalachian Plateau, the Ridge and Valley, an...

  16. Increased regional vascular albumin permeation in the rat during anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, W.; Chang, K.; Williamson, J.R.; Jakschik, B.A.

    1989-03-15

    The changes in vascular albumin permeation induced by systemic anaphylaxis were studied simultaneously in 21 different tissues of the same animal. Before Ag challenge sensitized rats were injected i.v. with 125I-albumin (test tracer), 51Cr-RBC (vascular space marker) and 57Co-EDTA (extravascular space marker). The index of vascular permeation used was the tissue to blood isotope ratio (tbir), which was obtained by dividing the ratio of 125I/51Cr counts in each tissue by the ratio of the same isotopes in the arterial blood sample. After Ag challenge, the increase in the tbir varied considerably among the different tissues. The most pronounced increase was noted in the lymph node (ninefold) followed by the aorta and mesentery (six- to sevenfold) and the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract (four- to sixfold). In the skin less than skeletal muscle less than lung less than liver and eye two- to fourfold increases occurred. Relatively minor increases in albumin permeation (less than twofold) were observed in the brain less than kidney less than heart and less than spleen. The testis was the only organ in which no significant change occurred. For some of the tissues there was also an increase in the tbir for 57Co/51Cr (an index of the extracellular fluid space) suggesting edema formation. The highest increase was noted in the aorta (fourfold). Minor increases occurred in the atrium of the heart, stomach, duodenum, and lymph nodes. There was also a 36% increase in hematocrit. Therefore, systemic anaphylaxis caused extensive extravasation of albumin and hemoconcentration.

  17. Bankfull-channel geometry and discharge curves for the Rocky Mountains Hydrologic Region in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Katharine

    2012-01-01

    Regional curves relate bankfull-channel geometry and bankfull discharge to drainage area in regions with similar runoff characteristics and are used to estimate the bankfull discharge and bankfull-channel geometry when the drainage area of a stream is known. One-variable, ordinary least-squares regressions relating bankfull discharge, cross-sectional area, bankfull width, and bankfull mean depth to drainage area were developed from data collected at 35 streamgages in or near Wyoming. Watersheds draining to these streamgages are within the Rocky Mountains Hydrologic Region of Wyoming and neighboring states.

  18. The association between retinal vascular geometry changes and diabetic retinopathy and their role in prediction of progression – an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The study describes the relationship of retinal vascular geometry (RVG) to severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and its predictive role for subsequent development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Methods The research project comprises of two stages. Firstly, a comparative study of diabetic patients with different grades of DR. (No DR: Minimal non-proliferative DR: Severe non-proliferative DR: PDR) (10:10: 12: 19). Analysed RVG features including vascular widths and branching angles were compared between patient cohorts. A preliminary statistical model for determination of the retinopathy grade of patients, using these features, is presented. Secondly, in a longitudinal predictive study, RVG features were analysed for diabetic patients with progressive DR over 7 years. RVG at baseline was examined to determine risk for subsequent PDR development. Results In the comparative study, increased DR severity was associated with gradual vascular dilatation (p = 0.000), and widening of the bifurcating angle (p = 0.000) with increase in smaller-child-vessel branching angle (p = 0.027). Type 2 diabetes and increased diabetes duration were associated with increased vascular width (p = <0.05 In the predictive study, at baseline, reduced small-child vascular width (OR = 0.73 (95% CI 0.58-0.92)), was predictive of future progression to PDR. Conclusions The study findings suggest that RVG alterations can act as novel markers indicative of progression of DR severity and establishment of PDR. RVG may also have a potential predictive role in determining the risk of future retinopathy progression. PMID:25001248

  19. Upper limb vascular trauma in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Wali, Mahmoud A

    2002-10-01

    Upper limb vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in the Asir region of southern Saudi Arabia. During the five and a half-year period from May 1996 to December 2001, 27 patients were admitted to Asir Central Hospital (ACH), Abha, Saudi Arabia with upper limb vascular injury. The patients were 21 males and 6 females with a mean age of 27+/-12.6 years. Although penetrating trauma was more frequent than blunt trauma (59%), road traffic accident (RTA) was the most common single mechanism of trauma (33%). The brachial artery was the most frequently affected artery and interposition vein grafting was the most commonly employed type of vascular repair. Fifty-two percent of the patients had associated orthopedic injury and 60% had associated nerve injury. One patient underwent delayed above-elbow amputation and two patients died from other associated injuries. Vascular repair was successful in 24 out of the 26 patients in whom it was attempted (92%). However, the functional outcome of the limbs depended on the presence of associated nerve injury. PMID:12472413

  20. Macro-to-micro cortical vascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain.

    PubMed

    Dziennis, Suzan; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify hemodynamic responses down to the capillary level is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of neurovascular disorders, including stroke. We developed an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLS) was used as a guiding tool for optical microangiography (OMAG) to test whether detailed vascular responses to experimental stroke in male mice can be evaluated with wide range sensitivity from arteries and veins down to the capillary level. DWLS enabled rapid identification of cerebral blood flow (CBF), prediction of infarct area and hemoglobin oxygenation over the whole mouse brain and was used to guide the OMAG system to hone in on depth information regarding blood volume, blood flow velocity and direction, vascular architecture, vessel diameter and capillary density pertaining to defined regions of CBF in response to ischemia. OMAG-DWLS is a novel imaging platform technology to simultaneously evaluate multiple vascular responses to ischemic injury, which can be useful in improving our understanding of vascular responses under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitating clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases. PMID:25941797

  1. Macro-to-micro cortical vascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziennis, Suzan; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-05-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify hemodynamic responses down to the capillary level is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of neurovascular disorders, including stroke. We developed an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLS) was used as a guiding tool for optical microangiography (OMAG) to test whether detailed vascular responses to experimental stroke in male mice can be evaluated with wide range sensitivity from arteries and veins down to the capillary level. DWLS enabled rapid identification of cerebral blood flow (CBF), prediction of infarct area and hemoglobin oxygenation over the whole mouse brain and was used to guide the OMAG system to hone in on depth information regarding blood volume, blood flow velocity and direction, vascular architecture, vessel diameter and capillary density pertaining to defined regions of CBF in response to ischemia. OMAG-DWLS is a novel imaging platform technology to simultaneously evaluate multiple vascular responses to ischemic injury, which can be useful in improving our understanding of vascular responses under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitating clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases.

  2. Macro-to-micro cortical vascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    PubMed Central

    Dziennis, Suzan; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify hemodynamic responses down to the capillary level is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of neurovascular disorders, including stroke. We developed an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLS) was used as a guiding tool for optical microangiography (OMAG) to test whether detailed vascular responses to experimental stroke in male mice can be evaluated with wide range sensitivity from arteries and veins down to the capillary level. DWLS enabled rapid identification of cerebral blood flow (CBF), prediction of infarct area and hemoglobin oxygenation over the whole mouse brain and was used to guide the OMAG system to hone in on depth information regarding blood volume, blood flow velocity and direction, vascular architecture, vessel diameter and capillary density pertaining to defined regions of CBF in response to ischemia. OMAG-DWLS is a novel imaging platform technology to simultaneously evaluate multiple vascular responses to ischemic injury, which can be useful in improving our understanding of vascular responses under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitating clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases. PMID:25941797

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL GEOMETRIES AND THE ANALYSIS OF H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Kenneth; Barnes, J. E.; Ercolano, Barbara; Haffner, L. M.; Reynolds, R. J.; Dale, J.

    2013-06-20

    We compare emission line intensities from photoionization models of smooth and fractal shell geometries for low density H II regions, with particular focus on the low-ionization diagnostic diagram [N II]/H{alpha} versus H{alpha}. Building on previously published models and observations of Barnard's Loop, we show that the observed range of intensities and variations in the line intensity ratios may be reproduced with a three-dimensional shell geometry. Our models adopt solar abundances throughout the model nebula, in contrast with previous one-dimensional modeling which suggested the variations in line intensity ratios could only be reproduced if the heavy element abundances were increased by a factor of {approx}1.4. For spatially resolved H II regions, the multiple sightlines that pierce and sample different ionization and temperature conditions within smooth and fractal shells produce a range of line intensities that are easily overlooked if only the total integrated intensities from the entire nebula model are computed. Our conclusion is that inference of H II region properties, such as elemental abundances, via photoionization models of one-dimensional geometries must be treated with caution and further tested through three-dimensional modeling.

  4. Effect of geometry on the nose-region flow-field of shuttle entry-configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Faria, H. T.

    1973-01-01

    In order to determine the convective heat-transfer distribution for the nose region of the space shuttle entry configurations, a three-dimensional flow-field is described which may include extensive regions of separated flow. Because of the complexity of the flow field for the nose region, experimental data are needed to define the relation between the nose geometry and the resultant flow field. According to theoretical solutions of the three-dimensional boundary layer, the boundary layer separates from the leeward generator of a blunted cone at an alpha equal to the cone half-angle. Separation results from the transverse pressure gradient, i.e., the velocity derivative due to crossflow. The boundary layer limiting streamlines converge toward the singular point of sep aration. The separated region is bounded by an ordinary line of separation.

  5. Downstream effects of dams on channel geometry and bottomland vegetation: Regional patterns in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Osterkamp, W.R.; Scott, M.L.; Auble, G.T.

    1998-01-01

    The response of rivers and riparian forests to upstream dams shows a regional pattern related to physiographic and climatic factors that influence channel geometry. We carried out a spatial analysis of the response of channel geometry to 35 dams in the Great Plains and Central Lowlands, USA. The principal response of a braided channel to an upstream dam is channel-narrowing, and the principal response of a meandering channel is a reduction in channel migration rate. Prior to water management, braided channels were most common in the southwestern Plains where sand is abundant, whereas meandering channels were most common in the northern and eastern Plains. The dominant response to upstream dams has been channel-narrowing in the southwestern Plains (e.g., six of nine cases in the High Plains) and reduction in migration rate in the north and east (e.g., all of twelve cases in the Missouri Plateau and Western Lake Regions). Channel-narrowing is associated with a burst of establishment of native and exotic woody riparian pioneer species on the former channel bed. In contrast, reduction in channel migration rate is associated with a decrease in reproduction of woody riparian pioneers. Thus, riparian pioneer forests along large rivers in the southwestern Plains have temporarily increased following dam construction while such forests in the north and east have decreased. These patterns explain apparent contradictions in conclusions of studies that focused on single rivers or small regions and provide a framework for predicting effects of dams on large rivers in the Great Plains and elsewhere. These conclusions are valid only for large rivers. A spatial analysis of channel width along 286 streams ranging in mean annual discharge from 0.004 to 1370 cubic meters per second did not produce the same clear regional pattern, in part because the channel geometries of small and large streams are affected differently by a sandy watershed.

  6. Precise renal artery segmentation for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenglong; Kagajo, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Oda, Masahiro; Yoshino, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel renal artery segmentation method combining graph-cut and template-based tracking methods and its application to estimation of renal vascular dominant region. For the purpose of giving a computer assisted diagnose for kidney surgery planning, it is important to obtain the correct topological structures of renal artery for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions. Renal artery has a low contrast, and its precise extraction is a difficult task. Previous method utilizing vesselness measure based on Hessian analysis, still cannot extract the tiny blood vessels in low-contrast area. Although model-based methods including superellipsoid model or cylindrical intensity model are low-contrast sensitive to the tiny blood vessels, problems including over-segmentation and poor bifurcations detection still remain. In this paper, we propose a novel blood vessel segmentation method combining a new Hessian-based graph-cut and template modeling tracking method. Firstly, graph-cut algorithm is utilized to obtain the rough segmentation result. Then template model tracking method is utilized to improve the accuracy of tiny blood vessel segmentation result. Rough segmentation utilizing graph-cut solves the bifurcations detection problem effectively. Precise segmentation utilizing template model tracking focuses on the segmentation of tiny blood vessels. By combining these two approaches, our proposed method segmented 70% of the renal artery of 1mm in diameter or larger. In addition, we demonstrate such precise segmentation can contribute to divide renal regions into a set of blood vessel dominant regions utilizing Voronoi diagram method.

  7. Cell biology of Smad2/3 linker region phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Hossein B; Kamato, Danielle; Ansari, Ghazaleh; Osman, Narin; Little, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily of ligands regulates a diverse set of cellular functions. Transforming growth factor-β induces its biological effects through Type I and Type II transmembrane receptors that have serine/threonine kinase activities and weak tyrosine kinase activity. In vascular smooth muscle, TGF-β binds to the TGF-β Type II receptor (TβRII) at the cell surface, recruiting the Type I receptor (TβRI) to form a heterocomplex. Consequently, after phosphorylation and activation of TβRI, the transcription factors receptor activated (R-) Smad2 and Smad3 are recruited and activated through phosphorylation of C terminal residues. Overall, Smad2/3 and co-Smad4 have similar structures consisting of three regions an N-terminal MH1 domain, a C-terminal MH2 domain and a central linker region. Phosphorylation of the Smad linker region appears to have an important role in the regulation of Smad activity and function. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, CDK2, CDK4 and calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase are the main kinases that phosphorylate sites in the linker region. The role of the linker region includes enabling the formation of Smad homo-oligomers and provision of phosphorylation sites for MAPK and other kinases. In some instances, linker region phosphorylation regulates the inhibition of the nuclear translocation of Smads. In the present review, we describe TGF-β signalling through Smad2/3 and the importance of the linker region in the regulation and expression of genes induced by TGF-β superfamily ligands in the context of vascular smooth muscle. PMID:21883378

  8. Effects of Regional Topography and Spacecraft Observation Geometry on Surface Soil Moisture Estimation Accuracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; West, R. D.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Dunbar, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active-Passive Mission (SMAP), launched in January 2015, provides near-daily global surface soil moisture estimates via combined Active Radar and Passive Radiometer observations at various spatial resolutions. The goal of this mission is to enhance our understanding of global carbon and water cycles. This presentation will focus on a comprehensive assessment of the SMAP high resolution radar backscatter data (formally the L1C_S0_HiRes data product) obtained over a 3 km Woody Savanna region in north-central California during a 2.5 month period starting late May 2015. The effects of spacecraft observation geometry (fore- and aft-looks as well as ascending and descending obits) along with regional topography on soil moisture estimation abilities will be examined. Furthermore surface soil moisture retrievals, obtained through utilization of different combinations of observation geometries, will be compared to an existing network of in situsensors. Current electromagnetic scattering and emission models do not properly account for surface topography, therefore physical forward model predictions and observations have unaccounted mismatch errors which also affect soil moisture estimation accuracies. The goal of this study is to quantify these soil moisture prediction errors and highlight the need for new and complete Electromagnetic modeling efforts.

  9. Disentangling the determinants of species richness of vascular plants and mammals from national to regional scales.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haigen; Cao, Mingchang; Wu, Yi; Cai, Lei; Cao, Yun; Wu, Jun; Lei, Juncheng; Le, Zhifang; Ding, Hui; Cui, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the spatial patterns in species richness gets new implication for biodiversity conservation in the context of climate change and intensified human intervention. Here, we created a database of the geographical distribution of 30,519 vascular plant species and 565 mammal species from 2,376 counties across China and disentangled the determinants that explain species richness patterns both at national and regional scales using spatial linear models. We found that the determinants of species richness patterns varied among regions: elevational range was the most powerful predictor for the species richness of plants and mammals across China. However, species richness patterns in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau Region (QTR) are quite unique, where net primary productivity was the most important predictor. We also detected that elevational range was positively related to plant species richness when it is less than 1,900 m, whereas the relationship was not significant when elevational range is larger than 1,900 m. It indicated that elevational range often emerges as the predominant controlling factor within the regions where energy is sufficient. The effects of land use on mammal species richness should attract special attention. Our study suggests that region-specific conservation policies should be developed based on the regional features of species richness. PMID:26902418

  10. Disentangling the determinants of species richness of vascular plants and mammals from national to regional scales

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haigen; Cao, Mingchang; Wu, Yi; Cai, Lei; Cao, Yun; Wu, Jun; Lei, Juncheng; Le, Zhifang; Ding, Hui; Cui, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the spatial patterns in species richness gets new implication for biodiversity conservation in the context of climate change and intensified human intervention. Here, we created a database of the geographical distribution of 30,519 vascular plant species and 565 mammal species from 2,376 counties across China and disentangled the determinants that explain species richness patterns both at national and regional scales using spatial linear models. We found that the determinants of species richness patterns varied among regions: elevational range was the most powerful predictor for the species richness of plants and mammals across China. However, species richness patterns in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau Region (QTR) are quite unique, where net primary productivity was the most important predictor. We also detected that elevational range was positively related to plant species richness when it is less than 1,900 m, whereas the relationship was not significant when elevational range is larger than 1,900 m. It indicated that elevational range often emerges as the predominant controlling factor within the regions where energy is sufficient. The effects of land use on mammal species richness should attract special attention. Our study suggests that region-specific conservation policies should be developed based on the regional features of species richness. PMID:26902418

  11. Reducing the data: Analysis of the role of vascular geometry on blood flow patterns in curved vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Siggers, Jennifer H.; Peiffer, Véronique; Doorly, Denis J.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow usually produce such large quantities of data that they are unlikely to be of clinical use unless methods are available to simplify our understanding of the flow dynamics. We present a new method to investigate the mechanisms by which vascular curvature and torsion affect blood flow, and we apply it to the steady-state flow in single bends, helices, double bends, and a rabbit thoracic aorta based on image data. By calculating forces and accelerations in an orthogonal coordinate system following the centreline of each vessel, we obtain the inertial forces (centrifugal, Coriolis, and torsional) explicitly, which directly depend on vascular curvature and torsion. We then analyse the individual roles of the inertial, pressure gradient, and viscous forces on the patterns of primary and secondary velocities, vortical structures, and wall stresses in each cross section. We also consider cross-sectional averages of the in-plane components of these forces, which can be thought of as reducing the dynamics of secondary flows onto the vessel centreline. At Reynolds numbers between 50 and 500, secondary motions in the directions of the local normals and binormals behave as two underdamped oscillators. These oscillate around the fully developed state and are coupled by torsional forces that break the symmetry of the flow. Secondary flows are driven by the centrifugal and torsional forces, and these are counterbalanced by the in-plane pressure gradients generated by the wall reaction. The viscous force primarily opposes the pressure gradient, rather than the inertial forces. In the axial direction, and depending on the secondary motion, the curvature-dependent Coriolis force can either enhance or oppose the bulk of the axial flow, and this shapes the velocity profile. For bends with little or no torsion, the Coriolis force tends to restore flow axisymmetry. The maximum circumferential and axial wall shear stresses along the centreline

  12. Acute responses of regional vascular conductance to oral ingestion of fructose in healthy young humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, it was reported in healthy young subjects that fructose containing drinks increased blood pressure acutely, without any apparent change in total vascular conductance (TVC). However, because it is well known that the splanchnic vasculature is dilated by oral fructose ingestion, it is assumed to be the concomitant vasoconstriction in other peripheral region(s) that is responsible for this finding. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the acute response of regional VC to oral fructose ingestion in young healthy humans. Results In 12 healthy young subjects, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate, cardiac output, and blood flow (BF) in the superior mesenteric (SMA), brachial (BA), and popliteal (PA) arteries, in addition to forearm skin BF, were measured continuously for 2 h after ingestion of 400 ml fructose solution (containing 50 g fructose). Regional VC was calculated as BF/MAP. MAP increased for 120 min after fructose ingestion without any change in TVC. While VC in the SMA was elevated after ingestion, VC in BA and PA and forearm skin decreased. Conclusions While TVC was apparently unchanged during the 2 h after fructose ingestion, there were coincident changes in regional VCs in the peripheral circulation, but no net change in TVC. PMID:24887175

  13. Seismicity and Plate Geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction Region, Northern California (1986-2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, B. C.; Pryor, I. S.; Williams, T. B.

    2007-12-01

    The Mendocino triple junction is an unstable triple junction located at the convergence of the North American (NAP), Pacific, and Gorda lithospheric plates near Cape Mendocino, northern California. Thirty years of seismic data (1976 - 2006) was analyzed to characterize plate geometry and stress orientations affecting the region. A simple 3-D model of plate geometry was developed to separate earthquake events occurring in the NAP or Gorda plate. Upper- hemisphere focal mechanism solutions were hand plotted for select earthquake events in the study area. NAP solutions north of the MTJ are primarily reverse mechanisms. P and T axes for these solutions indicate north-northeast (~N45E) directed pressure consistent with geodetic and geologic data. NAP solutions south of the MTJ are strike-slip solutions consistent with northwest striking faults of the northern San Andreas fault zone. Gorda plate solutions east of the MTJ are primarily normal fault solutions indicating downslab tension in the subducting plate. East-west cross section plots indicate a very dense cloud of seismicity at the MTJ and demonstrate a shallow dip angle (~8° - 12°) for the top of the Gorda plate to longitude 123.5 W. East of this longitude dip angle increases and Gorda plate seismicity phases out. North-south cross sections show a clear gap in seismicity coincident with an interpreted southern extent of the Gorda plate at latitude 40.25 N as well as the aseismic nature of both the Pacific plate and northern San Andreas fault proper.

  14. THE ROLE OF ACTIVE REGION LOOP GEOMETRY. I. HOW CAN IT AFFECT CORONAL SEISMOLOGY?

    SciTech Connect

    Selwa, M.; Ofman, L.; Solanki, S. K. E-mail: leon.ofman@nasa.gov

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical results of coronal loop oscillation excitation using a three-dimensional (3D) MHD model of an idealized active region (AR) field. The AR is initialized as a potential dipole magnetic configuration with gravitationally stratified density and contains a loop with a higher density than its surroundings. We study different ways of excitation of vertical kink oscillations of this loop by velocity: as an initial condition, and as an impulsive excitation with a pulse of a given position, duration, and amplitude. We vary the geometry of the loop in the 3D MHD model and find that it affects both the period of oscillations and the synthetic observations (difference images) that we get from oscillations. Due to the overestimated effective length of the loop in the case of loops which have maximum separation between their legs above the footpoints (>50% of observed loops), the magnetic field obtained from coronal seismology can also be overestimated. The 3D MHD model shows how the accuracy of magnetic field strength determined from coronal seismology can be improved. We study the damping mechanism of the oscillations and find that vertical kink waves in 3D stratified geometry are damped mainly due to wave leakage in the horizontal direction.

  15. Regional bankfull geometry relationships for southern California mountain streams and hydrologic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modrick, Theresa M.; Georgakakos, Konstantine P.

    2014-09-01

    This study develops and intercompares regional relationships for bankfull channel width, hydraulic depth, and cross-sectional area for southern California mountain streams based on several data sources: surveyed streams, US Geological Survey stream survey reports, and existing literature. Although considerable uncertainty exists in estimating bankfull conditions, the relationships developed from the varying data sources show significant agreement. For small watersheds with drainage area ranging from 15 to ~ 2000 km2, the estimates of bankfull top width ranged from 7.2 to 44.5 m and hydraulic depth estimates ranged from 0.35 to 1.15 m. The utility of the developed bankfull geometry regional curves is demonstrated for southern California catchments through (a) the computation of the bankfull discharge and (b) the estimation of the surface runoff response necessary to produce bankfull conditions in the streams at the outlet of these catchments. For selected locations with instantaneous flow records, the occurrence frequency of events exceeding bankfull flow was examined for the available 10-15 year span of observational records. Bankfull discharge estimates for all small watersheds in the region ranged from 1.3 to 74 m3/s, while the range at the selected gauged stream locations was from 2.6 to 16.4 m3/s. Stream locations along the Transverse Mountains of southern California showed an average occurrence frequency of less than 1 year, whereas along the Peninsular Mountains the average return period tended to be greater than 1 year. The application of the regional curves to the estimation of the surface runoff response necessary to produce bankfull conditions at the channel outlets of small catchments may be used as an index for conditions of minor flooding with saturated soils. This surface runoff response index ranges from 2.0 to 5.5 mm for a 3-hour rainfall duration for southern California watersheds greater than 15 km2 in area. Differences between the values for the

  16. Systematic Receiver Function Analysis of the Moho Geometry in the Southern California Plate-Boundary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozakin, Yaman; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the geometry of the Moho interface in the southern California region including the San Andreas fault (SAF), San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), Elsinore fault (EF) and Eastern California Shear Zone with systematic analysis of receiver functions. The data set consists of 145 teleseismic events recorded at 188 broadband stations throughout the region. The analysis utilizes a 3D velocity model associated with detailed double-difference tomographic results for the seismogenic depth section around the SAF, SJFZ, and EF combined with a larger scale community model. A 3D ray tracing algorithm is used to produce effective 1D velocity models along each source-receiver teleseismic ray. Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacks are calculated using the set of velocity models extracted for each ray. The CCP stacks are analyzed with volumetric plots, maps of maximum CCP stack values, and projections along profiles that cross major faults and other features of interest. The results indicate that the Moho geometry in the study area is very complex and characterized by large prominent undulations along the NE-SW direction. A zone of relatively deep Moho (~35-40 km) with overall N-S direction crosses the SAF, SJFZ, and EF. A section of very shallow Moho (~10 km) below and to the SE of the Salton Trough, likely associated with a young oceanic crust, produces large Moho offsets at its margins. Locations with significant changes of Moho depth appear to be correlated with fault complexity in the brittle crust. The observations also show vertical Moho offsets of ~8 km across the SAF and SJFZ close to Cajon pass, and sections with no clear Moho phase underneath Cajon pass and adjacent to the SJFZ near Anza likely produced by complex local velocity structures in the brittle upper crust. These features are robust with respect to various parameters of the analysis procedure.

  17. Convective-region geometry as the cause of Uranus' and Neptune's unusual magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sabine; Bloxham, Jeremy

    2004-03-11

    The discovery of Uranus' and Neptune's non-dipolar, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields destroyed the picture--established by Earth, Jupiter and Saturn--that planetary magnetic fields are dominated by axial dipoles. Although various explanations for these unusual fields have been proposed, the cause of such field morphologies remains unexplained. Planetary magnetic fields are generated by complex fluid motions in electrically conducting regions of the planets (a process known as dynamo action), and so are intimately linked to the structure and evolution of planetary interiors. Determining why Uranus and Neptune have different field morphologies is not only critical for studying the interiors of these planets, but also essential for understanding the dynamics of magnetic-field generation in all planets. Here we present three-dimensional numerical dynamo simulations that model the dynamo source region as a convecting thin shell surrounding a stably stratified fluid interior. We show that this convective-region geometry produces magnetic fields similar in morphology to those of Uranus and Neptune. The fields are non-dipolar and non-axisymmetric, and result from a combination of the stable fluid's response to electromagnetic stress and the small length scales imposed by the thin shell. PMID:15014493

  18. Fractal regional myocardial blood flows pattern according to metabolism, not vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yipintsoi, Tada; Kroll, Keith; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2016-02-01

    Regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous. Fractal analysis shows strong near-neighbor correlation. In experiments to distinguish control by vascular anatomy vs. local vasomotion, coronary flows were increased in open-chest dogs by stimulating myocardial metabolism (catecholamines + atropine) with and without adenosine. During control states mean left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flows (microspheres) were 0.5-1 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) and increased to 2-3 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with catecholamine infusion and to ∼4 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with adenosine (Ado). Flow heterogeneity was similar in all states: relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean) was ∼25%, using LV pieces 0.1-0.2% of total. During catecholamine infusion local flows increased in proportion to the mean flows in 45% of the LV, "tracking" closely (increased proportionately to mean flow), while ∼40% trended toward the mean. Near-neighbor regional flows remained strongly spatially correlated, with fractal dimension D near 1.2 (Hurst coefficient 0.8). The spatial patterns remain similar at varied levels of metabolic stimulation inferring metabolic dominance. In contrast, adenosine vasodilation increased flows eightfold times control while destroying correlation with the control state. The Ado-induced spatial patterns differed from control but were self-consistent, inferring that with full vasodilation the relaxed arterial anatomy dominates the distribution. We conclude that vascular anatomy governs flow distributions during adenosine vasodilation but that metabolic vasoregulation dominates in normal physiological states. PMID:26589329

  19. Closed-Cell Stent-Assisted Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms: Evaluation of Changes in Vascular Geometry Using Digital Subtraction Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Ebba; Klopp, David; Göttler, Jens; Kaesmacher, Johannes; Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S.; Prothmann, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Background Stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) plays an important role in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to investigate geometrical changes caused by closed-cell design stents in bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms. Methods 31 patients with 34 aneurysms underwent SACE with closed-cell design stents. Inflow angle α, determined by aneurysm neck and afferent vessel, and angle between afferent and efferent vessel close to (δ1), respectively, more remote from the aneurysm neck (δ2) were graphically determined in 2D angiography projections. Results Stent assisted coiling resulted in a significant increase of all three angles from a mean value (±SEM) of α = 119° (±6.5°) pretreatment to 130° (±6.6°) posttreatment (P ≤ .001), δ1 = 129° (±6.4°) to 139° (±6.1°), (P ≤ .001) and δ2 = 115° (±8.4°) to 126° (±7.5°), (P ≤ .01). Angular change of δ1 in AcomA aneurysms was significant greater compared to sidewall aneurysms (26°±4.9° versus 8°± 2.3°, P ≤ .05). The initial angle of δ1 and δ2 revealed a significantly inverse relationship to the angle increase (δ1: r = -0.41, P ≤ .05 and δ2: r = -0.47, P ≤ .01). Moreover, angle δ1 was significantly higher in unruptured compared to ruptured aneurysms (135°±7.1° versus 103°±10.8°, P ≤ .05). Conclusion Stent deployment modulates the geometry of the aneurysm-vessel complex, which may lead to favorable hemodynamic changes more similar to unruptured than to ruptured aneurysms. Our findings also suggest that the more acute-angled aneurysm-vessel anatomy, the larger the angular change. Further studies are needed to investigate whether these changes improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27073908

  20. Possible Geometry and Implications for Potential Blind Thrusts Beneath the Marin County - Mt. Tamalpais Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Furlong, K. P.; Kirby, E.

    2004-12-01

    The cause of high elevations in the Marin County - Mt. Tamalpais region is enigmatic. Because the region is adjacent to a segment of the San Andreas fault with essentially no transpression, fault-normal shortening is unlikely to be the cause of the uplift. Rather it has been proposed that the uplift may be associated with blind thrust(s) in the area (Furlong and Kirby 2004, this meeting). If such structures do indeed exist, then their extent and orientation would be a key component in assessing earthquake potential for the area. This study examines the specific geometries of possible blind thrusts that could produce the Mt. Tamalpais uplift, and the seismogenic implications. The study area, bounded by the Point Reyes - Tomales Bay segment of the San Andreas (on the west) and the Hayward/Rodgers Creek fault system (on the east), increases in elevation significantly from north to south. Mt. Tamalpais sits at the southernmost extent of the uplifted area with the highest elevations at 780 meters above sea level. We have utilized 2-D and 3-D elastic deformation models to evaluate the orientation and spatial extent of possible blind thrusts that could generate the uplift. The combination of potential fault area and rate of deformation (shortening across the structure) allows us to place limits on the possible size of earthquakes that could occur on such blind faults. Preliminary analyses indicate that structures in the Marin County - Mt. Tamalpais could host up to a M = 6 event with a recurrence time of 1000 years.

  1. Regional MRI Diffusion, White-Matter Hyperintensities, and Cognitive Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Scrascia, Federica; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Errante, Yuri; Gangemi, Emma; Curcio, Giuseppe; Ursini, Francesca; Silvestrini, Mauro; Maggio, Paola; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Falsetti, Lorenzo; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose An increase in brain water diffusivity as measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been recently reported in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients affected by cognitive impairment. However, it remains to be clarified if this reflects an overt neuronal tissue disruption that leads to degenerative or microvascular lesions. This question was addressed by comparing the regional MRI apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of NAWM in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD). The relationships of ADCs with the white-matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden, carotid atherosclerosis, and cognitive performance were also investigated. Methods Forty-nine AD and 31 VaD patients underwent brain MRI to assess the WMH volume and regional NAWM ADCs, neuropsychological evaluations, and carotid ultrasound to assess the plaque severity and intima-media thickness (IMT). Results Regional ADCs in NAWM did not differ between VaD and AD patients, while the WMH volume was greater in VaD than in AD patients. The ADC in the anterior corpus callosum was related to the WMH volume, while a greater carotid IMT was positively correlated with the temporal ADC and WMH volume. The memory performance was worse in patients with higher temporal ADCs. Constructional praxis scores were related to ADCs in the frontal, and occipital lobes, in the anterior and posterior corpus callosum as well as to the WMH volume. Abstract reasoning was related to frontal, parietal, and temporal ADCs. Conclusions Our data show that higher regional ADCs in NAWM are associated with microcirculatory impairment, as depicted by the WMH volume. Moreover, regional ADCs in NAWM are differently associated with the neuropsychological performances in memory, constructional praxia, and abstract reasoning domains. PMID:27074295

  2. Constraining the geometry, size scale and physical conditions of outflowing broad absorption line regions in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sui Chi

    Quasars are known for generating luminosities of up to 1047 erg s--1 in volumes of scales smaller than 2 x 10 15 cm. The optical/UV continuum emission is generally believed to arise from a rotating accretion disk (AD) surrounding a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of ˜ 108 M⊙ . Such emission can be calculated by treating the AD as a multi-temperature blackbody. While the continuum emitting region is well defined, the properties, location and kinematics of the broad emission line regions (BELRs) and broad absorption line regions (BALRs) remain unclear. On one hand, the reverberation mapping technique can give constraints on the location of the BELRs, but not the kinematics. On the other hand, the line-of-sight kinematics of the BALRs is directly observable, but their locations are not well constrained, resulting in a large range of inferred distances, from 0.01 pc to tens of kpc. Therefore, I combined observational results to investigate the geometry, size, and physical conditions of the BELRs and BALRs. I verified that the Lyalpha and CIV BELRs are located at a similar distance. Using these findings, I was able to constrain the size of the Lyalpha BELR and place a lower limit on the size of the N V BALR. I built an empirical model with the optical/UV continuum emission from the AD, the BELR from the chromosphere of the AD, and the outflowing BALR. In the continuum region, I found that over 95 percent of the total flux comes from the region at ~ 125rg, where rg is the gravitational radius of the SMBH. For the BELRs, I computed a disk-wind model with relativistic effects to explain the often-observed single-peaked BEL profiles. However, I show that such a model cannot explain the observed blue asymmetries in the high-ionization BELs or their blueshifted peaks relative to low-ionization BELs. Using results on time variability of BALR gas, and assuming the variability is caused by the gas moving perpendicular across the line-of-sight over a time scale of about a year

  3. [Vascular anomaly in the midcheek region of an infant--review of the diagnostic procedure].

    PubMed

    Rossler, L; Sander, V; Teuber, I; Stücker, M; Kreuter, A; Stricker, I; Hamelmann, E

    2015-05-01

    Clinical history, physical examination, evolution and imaging findings (Colour Doppler sonography, MRI if available) are of pivotal importance in the diagnostic pathway of an infantile vascular anomaly. Histopathology with specific stains and markers is contributive in difficult cases. Differentiation between vascular tumors (hemangioma) and vascular malformations is now well known and integrated into the ISSVA classification. We report here a 6-months-old boy, who presented with a localized cutaneous and expansive vascular birthmark in the left cheek and developed bleedings at the age of 18 months. Diagnostic features of a hemangioma were not evident, and the final diagnosis of a venous malformation was confirmed by histopathology. PMID:25985453

  4. Region-specific vascular remodeling and its prevention by artificial gravity in weightless environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan

    2013-12-01

    Evidence from recent ground and spaceflight studies with animals and humans supports the notion that microgravity-induced vascular remodeling contributes to postflight orthostatic intolerance. In the vascular beds of lower body, such as in splanchnic and lower limb circulation, resistance vessels would undergo hypotrophy and decrement in myogenic tone and vasoreactivity. Thus, despite the concurrent sympathetic activation, the increase in peripheral vascular resistance would still be compromised while astronauts were re-exposed to Earth's 1-G gravity, since ~75 % of the total vascular conductance lies below the heart. On the contrary, cerebral arteries would undergo hypertrophy and vasoreactivity enhancement due to adaptation to cerebral hypertension, which protects the down-stream microcirculation in the brain during spaceflight. However, the enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebral vessels might also aggravate postflight orthostatic intolerance, particularly after long-duration spaceflight. Animal studies have indicated that the underlying mechanisms may involve ion-channel remodeling in vascular smooth muscle cells and vascular NO-NOS and local renin-angiotensin system (L-RAS). Furthermore, vascular remodeling and associated ion-channel and L-RAS changes can be prevented by a countermeasure of daily short-duration restoring to normal standing posture. These findings substantiate in general the hypothesis that redistribution of transmural pressure along the arterial vasculature due to the removal of gravity might be the primary factor that initiates vascular remodeling in microgravity, and daily short-duration restoring its normal distribution by intermittent artificial gravity (IAG) can effectively prevent the vascular adaptation and hence postflight cardiovascular deconditioning. IAG might also be beneficial in maintaining vascular health during future long-duration space flight. PMID:23525669

  5. Regional Hydraulic Geometry Curves of the Northern Cascade Mountains, Chelan and King Counties, Washington State, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperi, J. T.; McClung, J. M.; Hanson, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service has developed regional hydraulic geometry curves relating drainage area to bankfull top width, mean depth and cross-sectional area for the east and west sides of the northern Cascade Mountains in Chelan and King Counties, Washington. NRCS surveyed 10 channel reaches with drainage areas from 1 to 1000 square miles within the Wenatchee River drainage of Chelan County and 10 channel reaches with drainage areas of 1 to 100 square miles within the Cedar and Green River drainages of King County. Selection criteria for stream reaches required a minimum of 20 years of USGS stream gage discharge records, unregulated flows and safe access. Survey data were collected with a Sokkia Total Station during low flow conditions from August 2004 to September 2005. NRCS measured a channel cross-section at each of the USGS stream gage sites and two or three additional cross-sections up and downstream. The authors also collected samples of bed material for gradation analysis and estimation of Manning's roughness coefficient, n. Bankfull elevations were estimated based on visual identification of field indicators and USGS flood discharges for the 50% exceedance probability event. Field data were evaluated with the Ohio DNR Reference Reach spreadsheet to determine bankfull top width, mean depth and cross-sectional area. We applied a simple linear regression to the data following USGS statistical methods to evaluate the closeness of fit between drainage area and bankfull channel dimensions. The resulting R2 values of 0.83 to 0.93 for the eastern Cascade data of Chelan County and 0.71 to 0.88 for the western Cascade data of King County indicate a close association between drainage area and bankfull channel dimensions for these two sets of data.

  6. Estimated Bankfull Discharge for Selected Michigan Rivers and Regional Hydraulic Geometry Curves for Estimating Bankfull Characteristics in Southern Michigan Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rachol, Cynthia M.; Boley-Morse, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Regional hydraulic geometry curves are power-function equations that relate riffle dimensions and bankfull discharge to drainage-basin size. They are defined by data collected through surveys conducted at stable stream reaches and can be used to aid watershed managers, design engineers, and others involved in determination of the best course of action for an unstable stream. Hydraulic geometry curves provide a mechanism through which comparisons can be made between riffle dimensions collected at an unstable stream to those collected at stable streams within the same region. In 2005, a study was initiated to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves for Michigan. After in-office review of 343 U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations and an extensive field reconnaissance effort, 44 stable reaches were selected for this study. Detailed surveys that included cross-sectional and longitudinal profiles and pebble counts were conducted at selected streamgages, which were distributed throughout Michigan. By use of survey data from riffle cross sections and water-surface slope, bankfull discharge was estimated and compared to flood-recurrence intervals using regional flood equations. This comparison shows that bankfull discharges in Michigan recur more frequently than every 2 years. Regional hydraulic geometry curves were developed rather than statewide curves owing to large differences in factors that control channel geometry across the State. However, after the data were subdivided according to ecoregions, it was determined that there were enough data to delineate regional hydraulic geometry curves only for the Southern Lower Michigan Ecoregion. For this ecoregion, geometry curve equations and their coefficients of determination are: Width = 8.19 x DA0.44; R2 = 0.69, Depth = 0.67 x DA0.27; R2 = 0.28, Area = 4.38 x DA0.74; R2 = 0.59, where DA is the drainage area and R2 is the coefficient of determination. By use of discharge estimates for the Southern Lower Michigan

  7. Comprehensive assessment of the global and regional vascular responses to food ingestion in humans using novel rapid MRI.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Jakob A; Muthurangu, Vivek; Steeden, Jennifer A; Taylor, Andrew M; Jones, Alexander

    2016-03-15

    Ingestion of food is known to increase mesenteric blood flow. It is not clear whether this increased flow demand is compensated by a rise in cardiac output (CO) alone or by redistribution of blood flow from other organs. We used a new comprehensive imaging method to assess the human cardiovascular response to food ingestion. Following a 12-h fast, blood flow in segments of the aorta and in organ-specific arteries, and ventricular volumes were assessed in 20 healthy adults using MRI at rest and following ingestion of a high-energy liquid meal. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR) fell substantially and CO rose significantly. Blood pressure remained stable. These changes were predominantly driven by a rapid fall in mesenteric vascular resistance, resulting in over four times more intestinal blood flow. Renal vascular resistance also declined but less dramatically. No changes in blood flow to the celiac territory, the brain, or the limbs were observed. In conclusion, this is the first study to fully characterize systemic and regional changes in vascular resistance after food ingestion in humans. Our findings show that the postprandial drop in SVR is fully compensated for by increased CO and not by redistribution of blood from other organs. With the exception of a modest increase in renal blood flow, there was no evidence of altered blood flow to nondigestive organs. The proposed oral food challenge protocol can be applied safely in an MRI environment and may be useful for studying the involvement of the gut in systemic or cardiovascular disease. PMID:26764056

  8. Uteroplacental insufficiency programs regional vascular dysfunction and alters arterial stiffness in female offspring.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Marc Q; Wlodek, Mary E; Dragomir, Nicoleta M; Parkington, Helena C; Tare, Marianne

    2010-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction caused by uteroplacental insufficiency increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Vascular mechanisms in female offspring are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of uteroplacental insufficiency on blood pressure, vascular reactivity and arterial stiffness in four vascular beds in female offspring born growth restricted. Uteroplacental insufficiency was induced on day 18 of gestation in Wistar Kyoto rats by bilateral uterine vessel ligation (Restricted) or sham surgery (Controls). Wire and pressure myography were used to test endothelial and smooth muscle function, and passive mechanical wall properties, respectively, in uterine, mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries of 18-month-old female offspring. Collagen and elastin fibres were quantified using circular crossed-polarized light microscopy and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Restricted female offspring were born 10-15% smaller. Restricted females were normotensive, had plasma triglycerides 2-fold elevated and had uterine endothelial dysfunction, attributed to a 23% reduction in the maximal relaxation produced by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Uterine artery stiffness was increased, with an augmented proportion of thick and decreased proportion of thin collagen fibres. Vascular reactivity and mechanical wall properties were preserved in mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries in growth restricted females. Female offspring born growth restricted have selective uterine artery endothelial dysfunction and increased wall stiffness. The preserved vascular function in other arteries may explain the lack of hypertension in these females. The uterine artery specific dysfunction has potential implications for impaired pregnancy adaptations and a compromised intrauterine environment of the next generation. PMID:20403978

  9. Exploiting MODIS Observation Geometry To Identify Crop Specific Time Series For Regional Agriculture Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveiller, Gregory; Lopez-Lozano, Raul

    2013-12-01

    Due to its spatial resolution, the MODIS instrument offers much potential to monitor specific crops from space. However, only some time series fall adequately in the target crop specific fields while others straddle across different land uses, which consequently dilutes the signal. According to the daily change in orbit, the MODIS observation footprint changes considerably from one day to the next, sampling the vicinity of the grid cell. This study proposes a method to identify which time series are suitable based on the temporal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of such daily observations, which are acquired with different observation geometries. The approach is demonstrated over a 30 by 30 km study site in South Dakota (USA) where the time series with high SNR are classified in an unsupervised way into clusters almost exclusively composed of crop specific time series.

  10. The 3D geometry of regional-scale dolerite saucer complexes and their feeders in the Secunda Complex, Karoo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzee, André; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Dolerites in the Karoo Basin of South Africa commonly represent kilometre-scale, interconnected saucer-shaped structures that consist of inner sills, bounded by inclined sheets connected to stratigraphically higher outer sills. Based on information from over 3000 boreholes and mining operations extending over an area of ca. 500 km2 and covering a > 3 km vertical section from Karoo strata into underlying basement rocks, this paper presents the results of a 3D modelling exercise that describes the geometry and spatial relationships of a regional-scale saucer complex, locally referred to as the number 8 sill, from the Secunda (coal mine) Complex in the northern parts of the Karoo Basin. The composite number 8 sill complex consists of three main dolerite saucers (dolerites A to C). These dolerite saucers are hosted by the Karoo Supergroup and the connectivity and geometry of the saucers support a lateral, sill-feeding-sill relationship between dolerite saucers A, B and C. The saucers are underlain and fed by a shallowly-dipping sheet (dolerite D) in the basement rocks below the Karoo sequence. The 3D geometric strata model agrees well with experimental results of saucer formation from underlying feeders in sedimentary basins, but demonstrates a more intricate relationship where a single feeder can give rise to several split level saucers in one regionally extensive saucer complex. More localised dome- or ridge-shape protrusions are common in the flat lying sill parts of the regional-scale saucers. We suggest a mode of emplacement for these kilometre-scale dome- and ridge structures having formed as a result of lobate magma flow processes. Magma lobes, propagating in different directions ahead of the main magma sheet, undergo successive episodes of lobe arrest and inflation. The inflation of lobes initiates failure of the overlying strata and the formation of curved faults. Magma exploiting these faults transgresses the stratigraphy and coalesces to form a ring

  11. MODELING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION CORONA USING NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2012-11-20

    We test a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) optimization code in spherical geometry using an analytical solution from Low and Lou. Several tests are run, ranging from idealized cases where exact vector field data are provided on all boundaries, to cases where noisy vector data are provided on only the lower boundary (approximating the solar problem). Analytical tests also show that the NLFFF code in the spherical geometry performs better than that in the Cartesian one when the field of view of the bottom boundary is large, say, 20 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 20 Degree-Sign . Additionally, we apply the NLFFF model to an active region observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) both before and after an M8.7 flare. For each observation time, we initialize the models using potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolations based on either a synoptic chart or a flux-dispersal model, and compare the resulting NLFFF models. The results show that NLFFF extrapolations using the flux-dispersal model as the boundary condition have slightly lower, therefore better, force-free, and divergence-free metrics, and contain larger free magnetic energy. By comparing the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we find that the NLFFF performs better than the PFSS not only for the core field of the flare productive region, but also for large EUV loops higher than 50 Mm.

  12. EFFICIENT ALGORITHMS FOR THE OPTIMAL-RATIO REGION DETECTION PROBLEMS IN DISCRETE GEOMETRY WITH APPLICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study several interesting optimal-ratio region detection (ORD) problems in d-D (d ≥ 3) discrete geometric spaces, which arise in high dimensional medical image segmentation. Given a d-D voxel grid of n cells, two classes of geometric regions that are enclosed by a single or two coupled smooth heighfield surfaces defined on the entire grid domain are considered. The objective functions are normalized by a function of the desired regions, which avoids a bias to produce an overly large or small region resulting from data noise. The normalization functions that we employ are used in real medical image segmentation. To our best knowledge, no previous results on these problems in high dimensions are known. We develop a unified algorithmic framework based on a careful characterization of the intrinsic geometric structures and a nontrivial graph transformation scheme, yielding efficient polynomial time algorithms for solving these ORD problems. Our main ideas include the following. We observe that the optimal solution to the ORD problems can be obtained via the construction of a convex hull for a set of O(n) unknown 2-D points using the hand probing technique. The probing oracles are implemented by computing a minimum s-t cut in a weighted directed graph. The ORD problems are then solved by O(n) calls to the minimum s-t cut algorithm. For the class of regions bounded by a single heighfield surface, our further investigation shows that the O(n) calls to the minimum s-t cut algorithm are on a monotone parametric flow network, which enables to detect the optimal-ratio region in the complexity of computing a single maximum flow. PMID:25414538

  13. On the Geometry of the X-Ray--Emitting Region in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Poutanen, Juri; Svensson, Roland; Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-08-01

    For the first time, detailed radiative transfer calculations of Comptonized X-ray and gamma -ray radiation in a hot pair plasma above a cold accretion disk are performed using two independent codes and methods. The simulations include both energy and pair balance as well as reprocessing of the X- and gamma -rays by the cold disk. We study both plane-parallel coronae as well as active dissipation regions having shapes of hemispheres and pill boxes located on the disk surface. It is shown, contrary to earlier claims, that plane-parallel coronae in pair balance have difficulties in self-consistently reproducing the ranges of 2--20 keV spectral slopes, high-energy cutoffs, and compactnesses inferred from observations of type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Instead, the observations are consistent with the X-rays coming from a number of individual active regions located on the surface of the disk. A number of effects such as anisotropic Compton scattering, the reflection hump, feedback to the soft photon source by reprocessing, and an active region in pair equilibrium all conspire to produce the observed ranges of X-ray slopes, high-energy cutoffs, and compactnesses. The spread in spectral X-ray slopes can be caused by a spread in the properties of the active regions such as their compactnesses and their elevations above the disk surface. Simplified models invoking isotropic Comptonization in spherical clouds are no longer sufficient when interpreting the data.

  14. Solids flow pattern in the exit region of a CFB -- Furnace influence of exit geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, F.; Leckner, B.; Vrager, A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of the exit geometry on the flow pattern in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was studied in a cold 1/9 scale model of the Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. The model, which is made of transparent perspex, was operated according to the simplified scaling laws proposed by Glicksman et al. (1993). 12 different exit configurations were compared at different fluidization velocities. Two bed materials were used: iron and steel. In order to verify the scaling laws, vertical pressure and density profiles, net solids flux and pressure fluctuations measured in the model were compared with corresponding results from the 12 MW boiler. The exit configurations were evaluated by comparing the net solids fluxes and the vertical pressure and density profiles of the riser. The overall flow behavior of the scale-model was found to be similar to that of the boiler: A dense bottom bed, a splash zone and a transport zone could be identified. The dynamics (in-bed pressure fluctuations) of the bottom bed were in agreement with those of the boiler. Differences between net solids fluxes during operation with different exits were in some cases of an order of magnitude. However, there were almost no difference in solids flux between an abrupt exit, an extended exit (such as that of the boiler) and an enhanced extension. A decrease in the net solids flux (increase in the internal back-mixing) could be obtained by inserting obstacles in the upper part of the riser, and an increase in the net solids flux was achieved by narrowing the duct from the riser to the cyclone inlet (increasing the average velocity in the duct). The original configuration of the duct with an inclined bottom results in back-mixing from the duct to the furnace, thereby reducing the net (external) solids flux.

  15. A Survey of Reynolds Number and Wing Geometry Effects on Lift Characteristics in the Low Speed Stall Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, Edward C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of the effects of Reynolds number on the low- speed lift characteristics of wings encountering separated flows at their leading and side edges, with emphasis on the region near the stall. The influence of leading-edge profile and Reynolds number on the stall characteristics of two- dimensional airfoils are reviewed first to provide a basis for evaluating three- dimensional effects associated with various wing planforms. This is followed by examples of the effects of Reynolds number and geometry on the lift characteristics near the stall for a series of three-dimensional wings typical of those suitable for high-speed aircraft and missiles. Included are examples of the effects of wing geometry on the onset and spanwise progression of turbulent reseparation near the leading edge and illustrations of the degree to which simplified theoretical approaches can be useful in defining the influence of the various geometric parameters. Also illustrated is the manner in which the Reynolds number and wing geometry parameters influence whether the turbulent reseparation near the leading edge results in a sudden loss of lift, as in the two-dimensional case, or the formation of a leading-edge vortex with Rs increase in lift followed by a gentle stall as in the highly swept wing case. Particular emphasis is placed on the strong influence of 'induced camber' on the development of turbulent reseparation. R is believed that the examples selected for this report may be useful in evaluating viscous flow solutions by the new computational methods based on the Navier-Stokes equations as well as defining fruitful research areas for the high-Reynolds-number wind tunnels.

  16. Relations between the dynamo region geometry and the magnetic behavior of stars and planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudard, L.; Dormy, E.

    2008-09-01

    The geo and solar magnetic fields have long been thought to be very different objects both in terms of spatial structure and temporal behavior. The recently discovered field structure of a fully convective star is more reminiscent of planetary magnetic fields than the Sun's magnetic field (Donati J.-F. et al., Science, 311 (2006) 633), despite the fact that the physical and chemical properties of these objects clearly differ. This observation suggests that a simple controlling parameter could be responsible for these different behaviors. We report here the results of three-dimensional simulations which show that varying the aspect ratio of the active dynamo region can yield a sharp transition from Earth-like steady dynamos to Sun-like dynamo waves.

  17. 3-D velocity structure around tehri region of the garhwal lesser himalaya: constraints on geometry of the underthrusting indian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaujia, Jyotima; Kumar, Ashwani; Gupta, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the upper crustal velocity structure beneath the Tehri region of the Garhwal Himalaya. The investigated region is situated within the 700-km-long central seismic gap of the Himalaya that has experienced three gap-filling earthquakes since 1991 including the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake (Mw 7.8). The local tomographic inversion is based on a dataset of 1365 events collected from January 2008 to December 2012 by a 12-station local network that covers an area of about 100 × 80 km around Tehri Dam. We perform a simultaneous inversion for P- and S-wave velocity anomalies. Tomograms are interpreted in the backdrop of the regional geological and tectonic framework of the region. The spatial distribution of relocated events from the 3- D velocity model has shed new light on the pattern of seismicity in the vicinity of the Main Central thrust (MCT), and has elucidated the structure of the underthrusting Indian plate. Our model exhibits a significant negative velocity anomaly up to ˜5 per cent beneath the central part of the Garhwal Inner Lesser Himalaya, and a P-wave low velocity anomaly near the Chamoli region. The seismicity zone around the Chamoli region may be attributed to the presence of fluid filled rocks. Furthermore, an area with˜3-4 per cent positive velocity anomaly is delineated to the northwest of the Uttarkashi thrust in the vicinity of the MCT. Significant findings of the study include: a flat-ramp-flat type sub-surface geometry of the underthrusting Indian plate below the Garhwal Himalaya, high velocity images representing the trend and configuration of Delhi-Haridwar-ridge below the Sub Himalaya and Lesser Himalaya, and a seismically active zone representing geometrical asperity on the basement thrust in the vicinity of the MCT.

  18. Extensional geometries as a result of regional scale thrusting: tectonic slides of the Dunlewy-NW Donegal area, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Donald H. W.; Alsop, G. Ian

    1995-09-01

    The synmetamorphic ductile dislocations, known in the British Caledonian literature as 'Tectonic Slides', pose a classical structural problem. That is, despite being associated with synchronous contractional folds and cleavages the low angle dislocations have the effect, in many celebrated cases, of juxtaposing younger over older rocks: a geometry normally associated with extensional rather than contractional deformation. Recent models have attempted to demonstrate that this is the result of thrust reactivation of original, sedimentary, extensional growth faults. The Appin Group Dalradian metasediments of the complex and small Dunlewy area of NW Donegal, Ireland, contain the following geometric elements: (a) an early strike-swing-related stratigraphic facies change; (b) a major inter-deformational dolerite sheet; (c) major regional recumbent folds and slides; (d) major structures related to the 400 Ma sinistral Main Donegal Granite shear zone. This solution to the structural geometry reveals that the early mid-crustal (~11 km depth) D2 Ardsbeg-Dunlewy Slide is a thrust to the northwest. Its hangingwall contains rocks two-thirds of which are younger than the rocks of the footwall, together with major recumbent folds, coeval with the underlying thrust, which face downwards into the thrust in the direction of transport. Rather than thrust reactivation of an original extensional growth fault, we find that both stratigraphic and structural constraints are satisfied by a double thrusting model, with fault-bend folding onto an upper ramp of an earlier formed but penecontemporaneous and kinematically linked major fold pair. This solution to the geology also allows us to recognize that the regional (pre-granite) structure of the Dalradian of NW Donegal is a series of major D2 synmetamorphic thrust bounded nappes possibly involving up to 250 km of northwesterly overthrusting.

  19. Cross-Scale Analysis of the Region Effect on Vascular Plant Species Diversity in Southern and Northern European Mountain Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Jonathan; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Guisan, Antoine; Vittoz, Pascal; Wohlgemuth, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Dullinger, Stefan; Pauli, Harald; Willner, Wolfgang; Grytnes, John-Arvid; Virtanen, Risto; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Background The divergent glacial histories of southern and northern Europe affect present-day species diversity at coarse-grained scales in these two regions, but do these effects also penetrate to the more fine-grained scales of local communities? Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a cross-scale analysis to address this question for vascular plants in two mountain regions, the Alps in southern Europe and the Scandes in northern Europe, using environmentally paired vegetation plots in the two regions (n = 403 in each region) to quantify four diversity components: (i) total number of species occurring in a region (total γ-diversity), (ii) number of species that could occur in a target plot after environmental filtering (habitat-specific γ-diversity), (iii) pair-wise species compositional turnover between plots (plot-to-plot β-diversity) and (iv) number of species present per plot (plot α-diversity). We found strong region effects on total γ-diversity, habitat-specific γ-diversity and plot-to-plot β-diversity, with a greater diversity in the Alps even towards distances smaller than 50 m between plots. In contrast, there was a slightly greater plot α-diversity in the Scandes, but with a tendency towards contrasting region effects on high and low soil-acidity plots. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that there are strong regional differences between coarse-grained (landscape- to regional-scale) diversity components of the flora in the Alps and the Scandes mountain ranges, but that these differences do not necessarily penetrate to the finest-grained (plot-scale) diversity component, at least not on acidic soils. Our findings are consistent with the contrasting regional Quaternary histories, but we also consider alternative explanatory models. Notably, ecological sorting and habitat connectivity may play a role in the unexpected limited or reversed region effect on plot α-diversity, and may also affect the larger-scale diversity components. For

  20. Effects of ridge geometry on mantle dynamics in an oceanic triple junction region: Implications for the Azores Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.; Sankar, Ravi D.

    2010-09-01

    Plate boundary geometry can affect the nature of magmatism along a mid-ocean ridge. The Azores Plateau is located in a complex geological setting that includes a triple junction (TJ), an oblique and recently-formed ultra-slow-spreading ridge, a zone of diffuse seafloor deformation, a major fracture zone, and a postulated hotspot. The precise character of the hotspot is somewhat debated, as some lines of evidence indicate it may not be a classic deep-seated plume. However, seismic and gravity data suggest plateau crustal thicknesses of ˜ 8 km or more, implying some mechanism for excess melting. To assess the role of ridge geometry in creating the Azores Plateau, this study uses a finite element numerical model to isolate the effects of selected aspects of plate boundary configuration on mantle flow and melt production in a TJ kinematically similar to the Azores TJ. The model focuses on the slowest-spreading ridge in the TJ, analogous to the Terceira Rift. The effect of the varying ridge obliquity observed along the Terceira Rift is also assessed using an independent 1-D melting model. In general, relatively little melt production is predicted along the Terceira Rift analogue, except for regions closest to the TJ where the proximity of a faster-spreading ridge increases temperatures within the melting zone. In the 1-D melting model with mantle temperatures of 1350 °C, melt thicknesses of ˜ 2 km are calculated for the least oblique segments, while more oblique segments produce little to no melt. The presence of a long discontinuity (simulating the Gloria FZ) has little effect on mantle dynamics for axial distances < 350 km from the TJ, although crustal production is predicted to diminish to zero within ˜ 150 km of the discontinuity. When several ridge geometrical effects are combined (i.e., a TJ, time-limited spreading, a ridge discontinuity, and depressed spreading rates within ˜ 100 km of the TJ point), ˜ 2.5 km of variability in melt thickness can be produced

  1. EXTINCTION AND DUST GEOMETRY IN M83 H II REGIONS: AN HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WFC3 STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guilin; Calzetti, Daniela; Hong, Sungryong; Whitmore, Bradley; Chandar, Rupali; O'Connell, Robert W.; Blair, William P.; Cohen, Seth H.; Kim, Hwihyun; Frogel, Jay A.

    2013-12-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 narrow-band imaging of the starburst galaxy M83 targeting the hydrogen recombination lines (Hβ, Hα, and Paβ), which we use to investigate the dust extinction in the H II regions. We derive extinction maps with 6 pc spatial resolution from two combinations of hydrogen lines (Hα/Hβ and Hα/Paβ), and show that the longer wavelengths probe larger optical depths, with A{sub V} values larger by ≳1 mag than those derived from the shorter wavelengths. This difference leads to a factor ≳2 discrepancy in the extinction-corrected Hα luminosity, a significant effect when studying extragalactic H II regions. By comparing these observations to a series of simple models, we conclude that a large diversity of absorber/emitter geometric configurations can account for the data, implying a more complex physical structure than the classical foreground ''dust screen'' assumption. However, most data points are bracketed by the foreground screen and a model where dust and emitters are uniformly mixed. When averaged over large (≳100-200 pc) scales, the extinction becomes consistent with a ''dust screen'', suggesting that other geometries tend to be restricted to more local scales. Moreover, the extinction in any region can be described by a combination of the foreground screen and the uniform mixture model with weights of 1/3 and 2/3 in the center (≲2 kpc), respectively, and 2/3 and 1/3 for the rest of the disk. This simple prescription significantly improves the accuracy of the dust extinction corrections and can be especially useful for pixel-based analyses of galaxies similar to M83.

  2. Geometry of miocene extensional deformation, lower Colorado River Region, Southeastern California and Southwestern Arizona: Evidence for the presence of a regional low-angle normal fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosdal, R. M.; Sherrod, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The geometry of Miocene extensional deformation, which changes along a 120 km-long, northeast-trending transect from the southestern Chocolate Mountains, southeastern California, to the Trigo and southern Dome Rock Mountains, southwestern Arizona is discussed. Based upon regional differences in the structural response to extension and estimated extensional strain, the transet can be divided into three northwesterly-trending structural domains. From southwest to northeast, these domains are: (1) southestern Chocolate-southernmost Trigo Mountains; (2) central to northern Trigo Mountains; and (3) Trigo Peaks-southern Dome Rock Mountains. All structures formed during the deformation are brittle in style; fault rocks are composed of gouge, cohesive gouge, and local microbreccia. In each structural domain, exposed lithologic units are composed of Mesozoic crystalline rocks unconformably overlain by Oligocene to Early Miocene volcanic and minor interbedded sedimentary rocks. Breccia, conglomerate, and sandstone deposited synchronously with regional extension locally overlie the volcanic rocks. Extensional deformation largely postdated the main phase of volcanic activity, but rare rhyolitic tuff and flows interbedded with the syndeformational clastic rocks suggest that deformation began during the waning stages of valcanism. K-Ar isotopic ages indicate that deformation occurred in Miocene time, between about 22 and m.y. ago.

  3. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  4. Characterization of human vascular smooth muscle cells transformed by the early genetic region of SV40 virus.

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, A.; Greenspan, P.; Nagpal, M. L.; Nachtigal, S. A.; Nachtigal, M.

    1991-01-01

    Human arterial smooth muscle cells transfected with the plasmid pSV3-neo, which contains the SV40 virus early region and the neor gene, developed colonies of morphologically transformed cells. Five cell strains were initiated from these colonies and could be subcultivated for up to 9 months before entering a stage of crisis that ended their life span. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules containing viral sequences were found free and integrated in the transformed cells. The intranuclear SV40 large T antigen and the p53 cellular protein were expressed in the transformed cells. Most of the transformed cells were spindle shaped but some were large and multinucleated. The modal chromosome numbers were in the triploid range, and aberrations, particularly dicentrics, were common. The transcripts for smooth muscle actins were significantly reduced and there were less alpha-actin filaments detected by immunofluorescence. Cytochemical staining disclosed a large accumulation of lipid droplets in the transformed cells incubated with rabbit hypercholesterolemic beta-very-low-density lipoprotein. Chemical analysis showed that cholesteryl esters were significantly elevated in these cells. Phenotypic changes induced in human vascular smooth muscle cells by SV40 early genes are similar to those found in smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic lesions and may indicate common pathogenetic mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1653520

  5. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  6. Transformation of rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells by transfection with the early region of SV40 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nachtigal, M.; Legrand, A.; Nagpal, M. L.; Nachtigal, S. A.; Greenspan, P.

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and Rb-1 cells, a continuous line of the same origin, were transformed by transfection with pSV3-neo DNA, a plasmid containing the SV40 early region linked to the neoR resistance gene. Transformed clones were selected in G418-containing medium at a rate of 10(-4) per cell. All transformed clones were immortalized and contained in the early passages two free recombined plasmids derived from pSV3-neo. At advanced passages pSV3-neo sequences were found integrated in the cellular genome. Transformed cells had an altered morphology and growth pattern that differed among clones. Some clones reached high density in low-serum medium. All the clones stained positively for the intranuclear T antigen. Some clones had distinct transcripts for the large T and small t antigens, while in others only larger or truncated transcripts were found. Alpha-actin filaments were visualized by immunofluorescent staining in all the clones, but Northern blot analysis revealed a significant reduction in transcripts for this actin. All the transformed clones accumulated, to a variable extent, cholesteryl esters after incubation with beta very low-density lipoprotein. Six of the eight transformed clones maintained a diploid chromosome number, but there was an increase in structural chromosome aberrations, predominantly dicentrics. Transfection of pSV3-neo into rabbit vascular SMCs is an efficient model for obtaining transformed clonal populations. These clones show some phenotypic changes that may be relevant to the study of atherogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2154928

  7. Binding of vascular heparan sulfate proteoglycan to Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein is mediated in part by the N-terminal region of A4 peptide.

    PubMed

    Buée, L; Ding, W; Anderson, J P; Narindrasorasak, S; Kisilevsky, R; Boyle, N J; Robakis, N K; Delacourte, A; Greenberg, B; Fillit, H M

    1993-11-12

    The exact mechanisms of deposition and accumulation of amyloid in senile plaques and in blood vessels in Alzheimer's disease remain unknown. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans may play an important role in amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease. Previous investigations have demonstrated high affinity binding between heparan sulfate proteoglycans and the amyloid precursor, as well as with the A4 peptide. In the current studies, a specific vascular heparan sulfate proteoglycan found in senile plaques bound with high affinity to two amyloid protein precursors (APP695 and APP770). Vascular heparan sulfate proteoglycan also bound the Alzheimer's amyloid A4 peptide, and not other amyloid protein precursor regions studied, with high affinity. Both heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains and chemically deglycosylated vascular heparan sulfate proteoglycan protein core bound to A4. High affinity interactions between vascular heparan sulfate proteoglycan and the A4 peptide may play a role in the process of amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease, by localizing the site of deposition of A4, protecting A4 from further proteolysis, or by promoting aggregation and fibril formation. PMID:8298962

  8. Comparison of atmospheric transmittance measurements in the 3- to 5-um and 8- to 12-um spectral regions with MODTRAN: considerations for long near-horizontal path geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkowski, Anthony J.; Anderson, Gail P.; Chetwynd, James H.; Nadile, Richard M.; Devir, Adam D.; Conley, T. D.

    1998-01-01

    Radiance measurements conducted during tropospheric operations to detect objects on the Earth's surface from a manned aircraft or from an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) will involve long, near-horizontal viewing geometries. The computer code MODTRAN is widely used for the prediction of the propagation of infrared radiation through the lower atmosphere. Consequently, we have undertaken to test the predictions of MODTRAN for the 3 - 5 and 8 - 12 micron spectral regions under mid-Eastern desert conditions.

  9. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  10. Regional and Stage-Specific Effects of Prospectively Purified Vascular Cells on the Adult V-SVZ Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Elizabeth E.; Liu, Chang; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells reside in specialized niches. In the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) become activated (aNSCs), and generate transit amplifying cells (TACs), which give rise to neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb. The vasculature is an important component of the adult neural stem cell niche, but whether vascular cells in neurogenic areas are intrinsically different from those elsewhere in the brain is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of pericytes to the neural stem cell niche has not been defined. Here, we describe a rapid FACS purification strategy to simultaneously isolate primary endothelial cells and pericytes from brain microregions of nontransgenic mice using CD31 and CD13 as surface markers. We compared the effect of purified vascular cells from a neurogenic (V-SVZ) and non-neurogenic brain region (cortex) on the V-SVZ stem cell lineage in vitro. Endothelial and pericyte diffusible signals from both regions differentially promote the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of qNSCs, aNSCs, and TACs. Unexpectedly, diffusible cortical signals had the most potent effects on V-SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis, highlighting the intrinsic capacity of non-neurogenic vasculature to support stem cell behavior. Finally, we identify PlGF-2 as an endothelial-derived mitogen that promotes V-SVZ cell proliferation. This purification strategy provides a platform to define the functional and molecular contribution of vascular cells to stem cell niches and other brain regions under different physiological and pathological states. PMID:25788671

  11. Statistical modeling of the arterial vascular tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Thomas; Godenschwager, Christian; Bauer, Miriam; Bernhardt, Dominik; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2011-03-01

    Automatic examination of medical images becomes increasingly important due to the rising amount of data. Therefore automated methods are required which combine anatomical knowledge and robust segmentation to examine the structure of interest. We propose a statistical model of the vascular tree based on vascular landmarks and unbranched vessel sections. An undirected graph provides anatomical topology, semantics, existing landmarks and attached vessel sections. The atlas was built using semi-automatically generated geometric models of various body regions ranging from carotid arteries to the lower legs. Geometric models contain vessel centerlines as well as orthogonal cross-sections in equidistant intervals with the vessel contour having the form of a polygon path. The geometric vascular model is supplemented by anatomical landmarks which are not necessarily related to the vascular system. These anatomical landmarks define point correspondences which are used for registration with a Thin-Plate-Spline interpolation. After the registration process, the models were merged to form the statistical model which can be mapped to unseen images based on a subset of anatomical landmarks. This approach provides probability distributions for the location of landmarks, vessel-specific geometric properties including shape, expected radii and branching points and vascular topology. The applications of this statistical model include model-based extraction of the vascular tree which greatly benefits from vessel-specific geometry description and variation ranges. Furthermore, the statistical model can be applied as a basis for computer aided diagnosis systems as indicator for pathologically deformed vessels and the interaction with the geometric model is significantly more user friendly for physicians through anatomical names.

  12. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  13. Multimodal cardiovascular magnetic resonance quantifies regional variation in vascular structure and function in patients with coronary artery disease: Relationships with coronary disease severity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the vessel wall is highly reproducible and can evaluate both changes in plaque burden and composition. It can also measure aortic compliance and endothelial function in a single integrated examination. Previous studies have focused on patients with pre-identified carotid atheroma. We define these vascular parameters in patients presenting with coronary artery disease and test their relations to its extent and severity. Methods and Results 100 patients with CAD [single-vessel (16%); two-vessel (39%); and three-vessel (42%) non-obstructed coronary arteries (3%)] were studied. CAD severity and extent was expressed as modified Gensini score (mean modified score 12.38 ± 5.3). A majority of carotid plaque was located in the carotid bulb (CB). Atherosclerosis in this most diseased segment correlated modestly with the severity and extent of CAD, as expressed by the modified Gensini score (R = 0.251, P < 0.05). Using the AHA plaque classification, atheroma class also associated with CAD severity (rho = 0.26, P < 0.05). The distal descending aorta contained the greatest plaque, which correlated with the degree of CAD (R = 0.222; P < 0.05), but with no correlation with the proximal descending aorta, which was relatively spared (R = 0.106; P = n. s.). Aortic distensibility varied along its length with the ascending aorta the least distensible segment. Brachial artery FMD was inversely correlated with modified Gensini score (R = -0.278; P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, distal descending aorta atheroma burden, distensibility of the ascending aorta, carotid atheroma class and FMD were independent predictors of modified Gensini score. Conclusions Multimodal vascular CMR shows regional abnormalities of vascular structure and function that correlate modestly with the degree and extent of CAD. PMID:22017860

  14. Development of regional curves relating bankfull-channel geometry and discharge to drainage area for streams in Pennsylvania and selected areas of Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Natural-stream designs are commonly based on the dimensions of the bankfull channel, which is capable of conveying discharges that transport sediment without excessive erosion or deposition. Regional curves relate bankfull-channel geometry and discharge to drainage area in watersheds with similar runoff characteristics and commonly are utilized by practitioners of natural-stream design to confirm or refute selection of the field-identified bankfull channel. Data collected from 66 streamflow-gaging stations and associated stream reaches between December 1999 and December 2003 were used in one-variable ordinary least-squares regression analyses to develop regional curves relating drainage area to cross-sectional area, discharge, width, and mean depth of the bankfull channel. Watersheds draining to these stations are predominantly within the Piedmont, Ridge and Valley, and Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Provinces of Pennsylvania and northern Maryland. Statistical analyses of physiography, percentage of watershed area underlain by carbonate bedrock, and percentage of watershed area that is glaciated indicate that carbonate bedrock, not physiography or glaciation, has a controlling influence on the slope of regional curves. Regional curves developed from stations in watersheds underlain by 30 percent or less carbonate bedrock generally had steeper slopes than the corresponding relations developed from watersheds underlain by greater than 30 percent carbonate bedrock. In contrast, there is little evidence to suggest that regional curves developed from stations in the Piedmont or Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province are different from the corresponding relations developed from stations in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province. On the basis of these findings, regional curves are presented to represent two settings that are independent of physiography: (1) noncarbonate settings characterized by watersheds with carbonate bedrock underlying 30 percent or less

  15. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  16. Spectropolarimetry of V854 Centauri at minimum light - Clues to the geometry of the dust and emission-line region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Meade, Marilyn R.

    1992-01-01

    The RCB star V854 Cen is observed during a very deep decline (Delta m = 8.2) at the AAT. The continuum polarization is very high, ranging from 14 percent at 4200 A to about 4 percent at 6500 A. The polarization decreases across the emission lines, but the polarized flux remains constant. This indicates that the emission lines are unpolarized, so the emission probably arises in a region unobscured by dust. In such a deep minimum, the visible continuum flux is probably almost entirely scattered light, which explains its high polarization. The scattered flux may arise in the same clouds contributing to the observed IR flux if the albedo is low and the grains forward throwing. The emission-line spectrum itself is very unusual for an RCB star in decline, with strong C2 bands and Balmer lines.

  17. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  18. Three-dimensional velocity structure around Tehri region of the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya: constraints on geometry of the underthrusting Indian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaujia, Jyotima; Kumar, Ashwani; Gupta, S. C.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the upper crustal velocity structure beneath the Tehri region of the Garhwal Himalaya. The investigated region is situated within the 700-km-long central seismic gap of the Himalaya that has experienced three gap-filling earthquakes since 1991 including the recent 2015 Nepal earthquake (Mw 7.8). The local tomographic inversion is based on a data set of 1365 events collected from 2008 January to 2012 December by a 12-station local network that covers an area of about 100 × 80 km around Tehri Dam. We perform a simultaneous inversion for P- and S-wave velocity anomalies. Tomograms are interpreted in the backdrop of the regional geological and tectonic framework of the region. The spatial distribution of relocated events from the 3-D velocity model has shed new light on the pattern of seismicity in the vicinity of the Main Central thrust (MCT), and has elucidated the structure of the underthrusting Indian plate. Our model exhibits a significant negative velocity anomaly up to ˜5 per cent beneath the central part of the Garhwal Inner Lesser Himalaya, and a P-wave low velocity anomaly near the Chamoli region. The seismicity zone around the Chamoli region may be attributed to the presence of fluid-filled rocks. Furthermore, an area with ˜3-4 per cent positive velocity anomaly is delineated to the northwest of the Uttarkashi thrust in the vicinity of the MCT. Significant findings of the study include: a flat-ramp-flat-type subsurface geometry of the underthrusting Indian plate below the Garhwal Himalaya, high-velocity images representing the trend and configuration of Delhi-Haridwar ridge below the Sub Himalaya and Lesser Himalaya and a seismically active zone representing geometrical asperity on the basement thrust in the vicinity of the MCT.

  19. Linear gyrokinetic simulations of microinstabilities within the pedestal region of H-mode NSTX discharges in a highly shaped geometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coury, M.; Guttenfelder, W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Canik, J. M.; Canal, G. P.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.

    2016-06-30

    Linear (local) gyrokinetic predictions of edge microinstabilities in highly shaped, lithiated and non-lithiated NSTX discharges are reported using the gyrokinetic code GS2. Microtearing modes dominate the non-lithiated pedestal top. The stabilization of these modes at the lithiated pedestal top enables the electron temperature pedestal to extend further inwards, as observed experimentally. Kinetic ballooning modes are found to be unstable mainly at the mid-pedestal of both types of discharges, with un- stable trapped electron modes nearer the separatrix region. At electron wavelengths, ETG modes are found to be unstable from mid-pedestal outwards for ηe, exp ~2.2 with higher growth rates formore » the lithiated discharge. Near the separatrix, the critical temperature gradient for driving ETG modes is reduced in the presence of lithium, re ecting the reduction of the lithiated density gradients observed experimentally. A preliminary linear study in the edge of non-lithiated discharges shows that the equilibrium shaping alters the electrostatic modes stability, found more unstable at high plasma shaping.« less

  20. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  1. Numerical Simulation of the Flow in Vascular Grafts for Surgical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    Numerical simulation of the human blood vessels, is becoming an important tool in surgical planning and research. Accurate vascular simulations might grant physicians the predictive capability to perform pre-surgical planning. We focus our attention on the implantation of vascular grafts. The high rate of failure of this common vascular interaction is intimately related to the fluid mechanics in the affected region and the subsequent wall tissue remodeling. Here, we will present our current work in developing a methodology for the numerical simulation of vascular grafts which incorporates physiologically realistic geometries and flow boundary conditions. In particular, we seek to correlate the wall shear stress and its spatial (WSSG) and temporal (OSI) variability to wall remodeling as observed in patient specific longitudinal studies. The pulsatility (Remean= 800 , Repeak= 2000, Wo = 2) of the flow gives rise to additional fluid dynamics phenomena such as instability, flow separation, transition, and unsteadiness. Our goal is to describe and evaluate their effect on the wall physiology.

  2. Normal Fault Basin Geometries From Gravity Analyses in the La Paz - Los Cabos Region, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, M. M.; Coyan, J. A.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Martinez-Gutierrez, G.

    2008-12-01

    The southern cape region of the Baja California peninsula is ruptured by an array of roughly north-striking, left-stepping active normal faults, which accommodate regional transtension. Dominant faults within this system include the Carrizal, San Juan de los Planes (SJP) (and offshore Espiritu Santo fault), La Gata, and San Jose del Cabo (SJC) faults. We conducted gravity surveys across the basins bounded by these faults to gain insight into fault slip rates and basin evolution to better understand the role of upper-crustal processes during development of an obliquely rifted plate margin. The geodetic location of each gravity observation station was measured to cm-scale accuracy with real-time kinematic GPS and the relative gravity was measured with a LaCoste and Romberg Model G gravity meter to an accuracy of 0.01 mgal. Gravity data were modeled as a 2D two-layer model with a bedrock density of 2.67 g/cm3 and a basin fill density of 2.1 or 2.2 g/cm3. The hanging wall of the east-dipping Carrizal fault hosts the La Paz basin. In the subsurface, this basin is a half-graben that is manifest as two smaller basins (few hundred meters deep) separated by a bedrock high, which likely reflects the two main east-dipping splays (Carrizal and Centenario faults). The SJP basin is a graben bound by the SJP fault on the west and the La Gata fault on the east and has a modeled maximum depth of approximately 1.5 km. This basin is marked by a series of relict normal faults dipping toward the basin center. The maximum depth to bedrock is just northwest of center, asymmetric toward the SJP fault, indicating that slip may be greater along the SJP than along the La Gata fault. It might also mark the possible location of basin inception, indicating that as the basin evolved, faulting moved outward to the presently active SJP and La Gata Faults. The SJC basin has a maximum depth of approximately 2.5 km. The favored gravity model depicts the SJC basin as resulting from slip along a series

  3. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  4. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  5. Dark Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.

    Extra-dimensional theories contain additional degrees of freedom related to the geometry of the extra space which can be interpreted as new particles. Such theories allow to reformulate most of the fundamental problems of physics from a completely different point of view. In this essay, we concentrate on the brane fluctuations which are present in brane-worlds, and how such oscillations of the own space-time geometry along curved extra dimensions can help to resolve the Universe missing mass problem. The energy scales involved in these models are low compared to the Planck scale, and this means that some of the brane fluctuations distinctive signals could be detected in future colliders and in direct or indirect dark matter searches.

  6. Linkages of fluvial terrace formation and geometry to Milankovitch-scale climate change revealed by the chronostratigraphy of the Colorado River above Moab, UT, and regional correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, A. P.; Pederson, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    deposits also form during pulses of dryland tributary sediment loading with markedly different timing (M3y and M4). Conversely, we suggest incision is driven by higher peak flows, such as during the current interglacial. In terms of strath/fill geometry, the spatial patterns of terraces in the study area rule out any simple climate versus tectonic relationship. Rather, local canyon geometry, bedrock resistance, and neotectonics control terrace form. For example, thick (7-13 m) fill terraces are unexpectedly found in broad Professor Valley, whereas thin (2-3 m) strath terraces are found in the canyon upstream. Long-profile survey data show that terraces may exhibit warping on the flanks of the Cache Valley graben and other potentially active salt tectonic features of the Paradox Basin. This and variations in local bedrock properties obfuscate any climate-related information within terrace form itself. In summary, Colorado River terraces were formed in response to glacial-interglacial hydrology changes in the headwaters and also during different periods of increased local sediment loading from the plateau drylands. Terrace form is not simply related to regional climate or tectonics, but instead to variable local valley geometry and neotectonics.

  7. Focal toxicity of oxysterols in vascular smooth muscle cell culture. A model of the atherosclerotic core region.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Black, B. L.; Seidel, C. L.

    1990-01-01

    Cell necrosis and reactive cellular processes in and near the atherosclerotic core region might result from short-range interactions with toxic lipids. To model these interactions in cell culture, focal crystalline deposits of cholestane-3 beta,5 alpha,6 beta-triol, 25-OH cholesterol, and cholesterol were overlaid by a collagen gel, on which canine aortic smooth muscle cells were seeded. Oxysterols, but not cholesterol, caused focally decreased plating efficiency and cell death, leading to the formation of a persistent circular gap in the cell culture. Cholestanetriol was largely removed from the culture dishes over 3 to 4 weeks, whereas cholesterol and 25-OH cholesterol were largely retained. Smooth muscle cells were motile even in proximity to oxysterol crystals, with occasional suicidal migration toward the crystals. Chemoattraction, however, could not be demonstrated. Despite toxicity, cholestanetriol did not appear to alter the fraction of cells exhibiting 3H-thymidine uptake, even in areas close to the crystals. Thus, oxysterols may be toxic to some cells, without causing major impairment of the migration and proliferation of nearby cells. This would allow the simultaneous occurrence of cell death and proliferation evident in atherosclerosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2201200

  8. Florabank1: a grid-based database on vascular plant distribution in the northern part of Belgium (Flanders and the Brussels Capital region)

    PubMed Central

    Landuyt, Wouter Van; Vanhecke, Leo; Brosens, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Florabank1 is a database that contains distributional data on the wild flora (indigenous species, archeophytes and naturalised aliens) of Flanders and the Brussels Capital Region. It holds about 3 million records of vascular plants, dating from 1800 till present. Furthermore, it includes ecological data on vascular plant species, redlist category information, Ellenberg values, legal status, global distribution, seed bank etc. The database is an initiative of “Flo.Wer” (www.plantenwerkgroep.be), the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO: www.inbo.be) and the National Botanic Garden of Belgium (www.br.fgov.be). Florabank aims at centralizing botanical distribution data gathered by both professional and amateur botanists and to make these data available to the benefit of nature conservation, policy and scientific research. The occurrence data contained in Florabank1 are extracted from checklists, literature and herbarium specimen information. Of survey lists, the locality name (verbatimLocality), species name, observation date and IFBL square code, the grid system used for plant mapping in Belgium (Van Rompaey 1943), is recorded. For records dating from the period 1972–2004 all pertinent botanical journals dealing with Belgian flora were systematically screened. Analysis of herbarium specimens in the collection of the National Botanic Garden of Belgium, the University of Ghent and the University of Liège provided interesting distribution knowledge concerning rare species, this information is also included in Florabank1. The data recorded before 1972 is available through the Belgian GBIF node (http://data.gbif.org/datasets/resource/10969/), not through FLORABANK1, to avoid duplication of information. A dedicated portal providing access to all published Belgian IFBL records at this moment is available at: http://projects.biodiversity.be/ifbl All data in Florabank1 is georeferenced. Every record holds the decimal centroid coordinates of the IFBL

  9. Florabank1: a grid-based database on vascular plant distribution in the northern part of Belgium (Flanders and the Brussels Capital region).

    PubMed

    Landuyt, Wouter Van; Vanhecke, Leo; Brosens, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Florabank1 is a database that contains distributional data on the wild flora (indigenous species, archeophytes and naturalised aliens) of Flanders and the Brussels Capital Region. It holds about 3 million records of vascular plants, dating from 1800 till present. Furthermore, it includes ecological data on vascular plant species, redlist category information, Ellenberg values, legal status, global distribution, seed bank etc. The database is an initiative of "Flo.Wer" (www.plantenwerkgroep.be), the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO: www.inbo.be) and the National Botanic Garden of Belgium (www.br.fgov.be). Florabank aims at centralizing botanical distribution data gathered by both professional and amateur botanists and to make these data available to the benefit of nature conservation, policy and scientific research.The occurrence data contained in Florabank1 are extracted from checklists, literature and herbarium specimen information. Of survey lists, the locality name (verbatimLocality), species name, observation date and IFBL square code, the grid system used for plant mapping in Belgium (Van Rompaey 1943), is recorded. For records dating from the period 1972-2004 all pertinent botanical journals dealing with Belgian flora were systematically screened. Analysis of herbarium specimens in the collection of the National Botanic Garden of Belgium, the University of Ghent and the University of Liège provided interesting distribution knowledge concerning rare species, this information is also included in Florabank1. The data recorded before 1972 is available through the Belgian GBIF node (http://data.gbif.org/datasets/resource/10969/), not through FLORABANK1, to avoid duplication of information. A dedicated portal providing access to all published Belgian IFBL records at this moment is available at: http://projects.biodiversity.be/ifblAll data in Florabank1 is georeferenced. Every record holds the decimal centroid coordinates of the IFBL square containing

  10. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  11. Fault strength in Marmara region inferred from the geometry of the principle stress axes and fault orientations: A case study for the Prince's Islands fault segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinar, Ali; Coskun, Zeynep; Mert, Aydin; Kalafat, Dogan

    2015-04-01

    The general consensus based on historical earthquake data point out that the last major moment release on the Prince's islands fault was in 1766 which in turn signals an increased seismic risk for Istanbul Metropolitan area considering the fact that most of the 20 mm/yr GPS derived slip rate for the region is accommodated mostly by that fault segment. The orientation of the Prince's islands fault segment overlaps with the NW-SE direction of the maximum principle stress axis derived from the focal mechanism solutions of the large and moderate sized earthquakes occurred in the Marmara region. As such, the NW-SE trending fault segment translates the motion between the two E-W trending branches of the North Anatolian fault zone; one extending from the Gulf of Izmit towards Çınarcık basin and the other extending between offshore Bakırköy and Silivri. The basic relation between the orientation of the maximum and minimum principal stress axes, the shear and normal stresses, and the orientation of a fault provides clue on the strength of a fault, i.e., its frictional coefficient. Here, the angle between the fault normal and maximum compressive stress axis is a key parameter where fault normal and fault parallel maximum compressive stress might be a necessary and sufficient condition for a creeping event. That relation also implies that when the trend of the sigma-1 axis is close to the strike of the fault the shear stress acting on the fault plane approaches zero. On the other hand, the ratio between the shear and normal stresses acting on a fault plane is proportional to the coefficient of frictional coefficient of the fault. Accordingly, the geometry between the Prince's islands fault segment and a maximum principal stress axis matches a weak fault model. In the frame of the presentation we analyze seismological data acquired in Marmara region and interpret the results in conjuction with the above mentioned weak fault model.

  12. The role of specific Smad linker region phosphorylation in TGF-β mediated expression of glycosaminoglycan synthesizing enzymes in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Rostam, Muhamad A; Kamato, Danielle; Piva, Terence J; Zheng, Wenhua; Little, Peter J; Osman, Narin

    2016-08-01

    Hyperelongation of glycosaminoglycan chains on proteoglycans facilitates increased lipoprotein binding in the blood vessel wall and the development of atherosclerosis. Increased mRNA expression of glycosaminoglycan chain synthesizing enzymes in vivo is associated with the development of atherosclerosis. In human vascular smooth muscle, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) regulates glycosaminoglycan chain hyperelongation via ERK and p38 as well as Smad2 linker region (Smad2L) phosphorylation. In this study, we identified the involvement of TGF-β receptor, intracellular serine/threonine kinases and specific residues on transcription factor Smad2L that regulate glycosaminoglycan synthesizing enzymes. Of six glycosaminoglycan synthesizing enzymes, xylosyltransferase-1, chondroitin sulfate synthase-1, and chondroitin sulfotransferase-1 were regulated by TGF-β. In addition ERK, p38, PI3K and CDK were found to differentially regulate mRNA expression of each enzyme. Four individual residues in the TGF-β receptor mediator Smad2L can be phosphorylated by these kinases and in turn regulate the synthesis and activity of glycosaminoglycan synthesizing enzymes. Smad2L Thr220 was phosphorylated by CDKs and Smad2L Ser250 by ERK. p38 selectively signalled via Smad2L Ser245. Phosphorylation of Smad2L serine residues induced glycosaminoglycan synthesizing enzymes associated with glycosaminoglycan chain elongation. Phosphorylation of Smad2L Thr220 was associated with XT-1 enzyme regulation, a critical enzyme in chain initiation. These findings provide a deeper understanding of the complex signalling pathways that contribute to glycosaminoglycan chain modification that could be targeted using pharmacological agents to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27153775

  13. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  14. Distinct repressing modules on the distal region of the SBP2 promoter contribute to its vascular tissue-specific expression in different vegetative organs.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Rejane L; Carvalho, Claudine M; Fietto, Luciano G; Loureiro, Marcelo E; Almeida, Andrea M; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2007-11-01

    The Glycine max sucrose binding protein (GmSBP2) promoter directs vascular tissue-specific expression of reporter genes in transgenic tobacco. Here we showed that an SBP2-GFP fusion protein under the control of the GmSBP2 promoter accumulates in the vascular tissues of vegetative organs, which is consistent with the proposed involvement of SBP in sucrose transport-dependent physiological processes. Through gain-of-function experiments we confirmed that the tissue-specific determinants of the SBP2 promoter reside in the distal cis-regulatory domain A, CRD-A (position -2000 to -700) that is organized into a modular configuration to suppress promoter activity in tissues other than vascular tissues. The four analyzed CRD-A sub-modules, designates Frag II (-1785/-1508), Frag III (-1507/-1237), Frag IV (-1236/-971) and Frag V (-970/-700), act independently to alter the constitutive pattern of -92pSBP2-mediated GUS expression in different organs. Frag V fused to -92pSBP2-GUS restored the tissue-specific pattern of the full-length promoter in the shoot apex, but not in other organs. Likewise, Frag IV confined GUS expression to the vascular bundle of leaves, whereas Frag II mediated vascular specific expression in roots. Strong stem expression-repressing elements were located at positions -1485 to -1212, as Frag III limited GUS expression to the inner phloem. We have also mapped a procambium silencer to the consensus sequence CAGTTnCaAccACATTcCT which is located in both distal and proximal upstream modules. Fusion of either repressing element-containing module to the constitutive -92pSBP2 promoter suppresses GUS expression in the elongation zone of roots. Together our results demonstrate the unusual aspect of distal sequences negatively controlling tissue-specificity of a plant promoter. PMID:17710554

  15. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  16. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  17. Dynamic Geometry on WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Gilles

    The first section of this paper on World Wide Web applications related to dynamic geometry addresses dynamic geometry and teaching, including the relationship between dynamic geometry and direct manipulation, key features of dynamic geometry environments, the importance of direct engagement of the learner using construction software for…

  18. The analysis of historical earthquakes of the North Anatolian Fault in the Marmara Region, Turkey for the last 15 centuries based on intensity and continuous Coulomb scenarios: Implications for the fault geometry and the interaction of individual earthqua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Şahin, Murat

    2016-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the historical earthquakes of the Marmara Region totally in three-stages. In first stage, historical earthquakes were compiled from the available catalogues and classified according to their spatial distribution, whereas only the ones, related with the active northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) were selected. Then, the next phase of classification was made to relate historical data to the ancient and historical settlements, for which a kind of shake map was produced for each event. In the second stage, three different fault models, suggested for the geometry of the NAF in the Marmara Region, were integrated into a GIS database. Mw magnitudes were calculated for each fault segment by using lengths, seismogenic depths, and slip-rates of fault segments. In the third stage, the revised digital geological map of the Marmara Region were compiled based on 1:500k conventional maps and were used to estimate the Vs30 distribution within a grid of 750x750 m. Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) maps were produced for each earthquake scenario, depending on the geometry of different fault models, calculated model magnitudes and intensity distributions. Moreover, we tested the surface ruptures of each earthquake scenarios by using the Coulomb stress change model for historical data covering a time era between AD 478 and 2016 in assumption with a constant horizontal slip rate of 19 mma-1 for all fault segments. As conclusion, the horsetail-fault geometry (Yaltırak, 2002) among all 3 fault models yielded the best fit to the distribution of intensities and coulomb models.

  19. Learning Geometry through Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates effective teaching and learning of geometrical concepts using dynamic geometry software (DGS). Based from her students' reactions to her project, the author found that her students' understanding of the concepts was better than if they had learned geometry through paper-based tasks. However, mixing computer…

  20. Site- and geometry-specific CH...O interaction in small acetaldehyde clusters studied with core-electron excitation spectroscopy in the carbon K-edge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabayashi, K.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Chohda, M.; Takahashi, O.; Tamenori, Y.; Higuchi, I.; Suzuki, I. H.; Nagaoka, S.; Gejo, T.; Honma, K.

    2011-04-01

    Site-dependent C1s-core excitation spectra of small acetaldehyde (AAL) clusters have been studied under the cluster regime of beam conditions. The excitation spectra of the clusters were generated by monitoring the partial-ion-yields of cluster-origin fragments. Comparison of the cluster bands with the monomer bands revealed that the band intensities of C1s core-to-Rydberg transitions come to be strongly excitation-site dependent upon cluster formation showing significant reduction of C1sHCO→Ryd bands relative to the monomer bands. Computer modeling of X-ray absorption spectra using a density functional theory calculation demonstrated that the intensity reduction is the outcome of the site- and geometry-specific CH...O interaction where hydrogen-bonding association between the aldehyde (HCO) sites of different AAL molecules takes place exclusively within the clusters. As the representatives of small AAL clusters (n>=3), two types of molecular complexes (a planar cyclic trimer and a tetramer with a stack of two dimers) were derived to rationalize the site-dependence of the experimental C1s excitation spectra. Spectral simulation of the above complexes could reproduce the experimental site-dependence of the core-to-Rydberg band-features upon clusterization, indicative of significant contribution of these clusters under the present beam-stagnation condition.

  1. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  2. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... branch of medicine that focuses on the cardiovascular system. ... Circulatory system; Vascular system; Cardiovascular system ... to diagnose, monitor or treat diseases of the circulatory and vascular system include: Cardiac CT for calcium scoring Cardiac MRI ...

  3. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Meeting Events Calendar Vascular Medicine Events Job Bank Professional Practice Position Statements PAD Awareness Vascular Related ... for a new job? Try the SVM Job Bank . Browse the jobs or sign up for job ...

  4. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  5. Heterogeneity of coronary arterial branching geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shu-Yen; Reyes, Denise A.; Higgins, William E.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2000-04-01

    Past measurements of arterial branching geometry have indicated that the branching geometry is somewhat consistent with an optimal trade-off between the work needed to build and maintain the arterial tree and the work needed to operate the tree as a transport system. The branching geometry is also consistent with the mechanism that acutely adjusts the lumen diameter by way of maintaining a constant shear stress by dilating (or constricting) the arteries via the nitric oxide mechanism. However, those observations also indicate that there is considerable variation about the predicted optimization, both within any one individual and between individuals. Possible causes for this variation include: (1) measurement noise -- both due to the imprecision of the method but also the preparation of the specimen for applying the measurement technique, (2) the fact that the measurement task presents a major logistic problem, which increases as the vessel size decreases (but the number of branches correspondingly doubles at each branching) and results in progressive under-sampling as the vessel size decreases, (3) because of the logistic task involved the number of arterial trees analyzed is also greatly limited, and (4) there may indeed be actual heterogeneity in the geometry which is due to slight variation in implementation of the 'rules' used to construct a vascular tree. Indeed, it is this latter possibility that is of considerable physiological interest as it could result in the observed heterogeneity of organ perfusion and also provide some insight into the relative importance of 'initial ' conditions (i.e., how the vascular tree initially develops during embryogenesis) and the adaptive mechanisms operative in the maturing individual. The use of micro-CT imaging to provide 3D images of the intact vascular tree within the intact organ overcomes or minimizes the logistic problems listed above. It is the purpose of this study to examine whether variability in the branching

  6. Regional seismic reflection line, southern Illinois Basin, provides new data on Cambrian rift geometry, Hicks Dome genesis, and the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, C.J.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Taylor, C.D. ); Heigold, P.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Detailed studies of the subsurface structure of the Cambrian Reelfoot rift (RFR) in the Midwestern US provide important insights into continental rifting processes and into the structural fabric of a zone of modern intracratonic seismicity (New Madrid zone). High-quality oil industry seismic reflection data show that in the area of transition between the RFR and the Rough Creek Graben (RCG) the geometry of the Cambrian rift system is that of a half-graben that thickens to the southeast. This contrasts with the northward-thickening half-graben observed to the east in the RCG and with the more symmetric graben to the south in the RFR. An 82.8-km segment of a northwest-southeast seismic reflection profile in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky shows that near Hicks Dome, Illinois, Middle and Lower Cambrian syn-rift sedimentary rocks occupy about 0.35 s (two-way travel time) on the seismic reflection section (corresponding to a thickness of about 970 m). This stratigraphic interval occupies about 0.45 s (1,250 m) near the Ohio river and is thickest against the Tabb Fault System (TFS) in Kentucky, where it occupies 0.7 s (1,940 m). The seismic data show that in this part of the Cambrian rift the master fault was part of the TFS and that normal displacement on the TFS continued through middle Paleozoic time. The seismic data also provide new information on the late Paleozoic development of Hicks-Dome and the surrounding Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC) in southeastern Illinois and western Kentucky. A series of grabens and horsts in the FAFC document a late Paleozoic reactivation of the RFR. Comparison of the reflection data with surface mineralization patterns shows that in most cases mineralized graben-bounding faults clearly cut basement or are splays from faults that cut basement.

  7. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  8. General 2 charge geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marika

    2006-03-01

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  9. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  10. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  11. Development of regional curves of bankfull-channel geometry and discharge for streams in the non-urban, Piedmont Physiographic Province, Pennsylvania and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cinotto, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    Stream-restoration projects utilizing natural stream designs frequently are based on the bankfull-channel characteristics of stream reaches that can accommodate streamflow and sediment transport without excessive erosion or deposition and lie within a watershed that has similar runoff characteristics. The bankfull channel at an ungaged impaired site or reference reach is identified by use of field indicators and is confirmed with tools such as regional curves. Channel dimensions were surveyed at 14 streamflow-measurement stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the Gettysburg-Newark Lowland Section, Piedmont Lowland Section, and the Piedmont Upland Section of the Piedmont Physiographic Province1 in Pennsylvania and Maryland. From the surveyed channel dimensions, regional curves were developed from regression analyses of the relations between drainage area and the cross-sectional area, mean depth, width, and streamflow of the bankfull channel at these sites. Bankfull cross-sectional area and bankfull discharge have the strongest relation to drainage area as evidenced by R2 values of 0.94 and 0.93, respectively. The relation between bankfull crosssectional area and drainage area has a p-value of less than 0.001; no p-value is presented for the relation between bankfull discharge and drainage area because of a non-normal residual distribution. The relation between bankfull width and drainage area has an R2 value of 0.80 and a p-value of less than 0.001 indicating a moderate linear relation between all stations. The relation between bankfull mean depth and drainage area, with an R2 value of 0.72 and a p-value of less than 0.001, also indicates a moderate linear relation between all stations. The concept of regional curves can be a valuable tool to support efforts in stream restoration. Practitioners of stream restoration need to recognize it as such and realize the limitations. The small number of USGS streamflow-measurement stations available for

  12. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  13. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Ciaran J.; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Kennedy, Eimear; Walls, Dermot; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M.; Cahill, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall. PMID:26064136

  14. Geometry, Student's Text, Part II, Unit 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 14 in the SMSG secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in geometry: areas of polygonal regions, similarity, circles and spheres, characterization of sets, constructions, areas of circles and sectors, volumes of solids, and plane coordinate geometry. Appendices cover Eratosthenes' measurement of the…

  15. The ability of AIF-1 to activate human vascular smooth muscle cells is lost by mutations in the EF-hand calcium-binding region

    SciTech Connect

    Autieri, Michael V. . E-mail: mautieri@temple.edu; Chen Xing

    2005-07-01

    Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic calcium-binding protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in response to injury or cytokine stimulation. AIF-1 contains a partially conserved EF-hand calcium-binding domain, and participates in VSMC activation by activation of Rac1 and induction of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression; however, the mechanism whereby AIF-1 mediates these effects is presently uncharacterized. To determine if calcium binding plays a functional role in AIF-1 activity, a single site-specific mutation was made in the EF-hand calcium-binding domain to abrogate binding of calcium (AIF-1{delta}A), which was confirmed by calcium overlay. Functionally, similar to wild-type AIF-1, AIF-1{delta}A was able to polymerize F-actin in vitro. However, in contrast to wild-type AIF-1, over-expression of AIF-1{delta}A was unable to increase migration or proliferation of primary human VSMC. Further, it was unable to activate Rac1, or induce G-CSF expression to the degree as wild-type AIF-1. Taken together, modification of the wild-type EF-hand domain and native calcium-binding activity results in a loss of AIF-1 function. We conclude that appropriate calcium-binding potential is critical in AIF-1-mediated effects on VSMC pathophysiology, and that AIF-1 activity is mediated by Rac1 activation and G-CSF expression.

  16. Covariance of lichen and vascular plant floras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    The geographic relationships among taxonomic groups are important to study to determine patterns of biodiversity and whether or not associations occur between large groups, e.g., birds and vascular plants. This study was undertaken to determine relationships between higher plants and lower plants, specifically vascular plant and lichen floras in nine national parks of the Great Lakes region. No significant relationship was found between vascular plant floras and lichen floras in this area, which spans 1200 km longitudinally, or between an additional 19 areas from North America that were less than 1000 km(2) in area. For areas larger than 1000 km(2), however, a significant positive relationship existed for 33 areas that span one to approximately 150 million km(2). The ratio of numbers of vascular plants to lichens appeared to average just over 6 across the 33 areas. In the Great Lakes parks, between 28-30% of either the vascular plant or lichen species were singletons (occurring in only one park), but the parks that contained the most singletons were not congruent: Isle Royale had the most singleton lichens, while Indiana Dunes had the most vascular plant singletons. Fewer lichen species (2%) than vascular plants (4%) occurred in all nine parks. Latitude appeared to explain some of the variation between the two groups: vascular plants decreased with increasing latitude, while lichens increased.

  17. Atherosclerosis at arterial bifurcations: evidence for the role of haemodynamics and geometry.

    PubMed

    Morbiducci, Umberto; Kok, Annette M; Kwak, Brenda R; Stone, Peter H; Steinman, David A; Wentzel, Jolanda J

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques are found at distinct locations in the arterial system, despite the exposure to systemic risk factors of the entire vascular tree. From the study of arterial bifurcation regions, emerges ample evidence that haemodynamics are involved in the local onset and progression of the atherosclerotic disease. This observed co-localisation of disturbed flow regions and lesion prevalence at geometrically predisposed districts such as arterial bifurcations has led to the formulation of a 'haemodynamic hypothesis', that in this review is grounded to the most current research concerning localising factors of vascular disease. In particular, this review focuses on carotid and coronary bifurcations because of their primary relevance to stroke and heart attack. We highlight reported relationships between atherosclerotic plaque location, progression and composition, and fluid forces at vessel's wall, in particular shear stress and its 'easier-to-measure' surrogates, i.e. vascular geometric attributes (because geometry shapes the flow) and intravascular flow features (because they mediate disturbed shear stress), in order to give more insight in plaque initiation and destabilisation. Analogous to Virchow's triad for thrombosis, atherosclerosis must be thought of as subject to a triad of, and especially interactions among, haemodynamic forces, systemic risk factors, and the biological response of the wall. PMID:26740210

  18. Retroperitoneal vascular malformation mimicking incarcerated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Indu Bhushan; Sharma, Anuj; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old man presented to the Department of Surgery with a painful groin swelling on right side. Exploration revealed a reddish-blue hemangiomatous mass in the scrotum extending through inguinal canal into the retroperitoneum. On further dissection swelling was found to be originating from right external iliac vein. The swelling was excised after ligating all vascular connections. The histopathological examination of excised mass confirmed the diagnosis of venous variety of vascular malformation. This is the first reported case of vascular malformation arising from retroperitoneum and extending into inguinoscrotal region, presenting as incarcerated inguinal hernia. PMID:21633582

  19. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  20. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  1. Extending dark optical trapping geometries.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Aidan S

    2012-07-01

    New counterpropagating geometries are presented for localizing ultracold atoms in the dark regions created by the interference of Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams. In particular dark helices, an "optical revolver," axial lattices of rings, and axial lattices of ring lattices of rings are considered and a realistic scheme for achieving phase stability is explored. The dark nature of these traps will enable their use as versatile tools for low-decoherence atom interferometry with zero differential light shifts. PMID:22743436

  2. The Beauty of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  3. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  4. Want to Play Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  5. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  6. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  7. Infection of Vascular Endothelial Cells with Human Cytomegalovirus under Fluid Shear Stress Reveals Preferential Entry and Spread of Virus in Flow Conditions Simulating Atheroprone Regions of the Artery

    PubMed Central

    DuRose, Jenny B.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major pathogenic factor in cardiovascular diseases, which are the leading cause of mortality in developed countries. While risk factors for atherosclerosis tend to be systemic, the distribution of atherosclerotic plaques within the vasculature is preferentially located at branch points and curves where blood flow is disturbed and shear stress is low. It is now widely accepted that hemodynamic factors can modulate endothelial gene expression and function and influence the pathophysiological changes associated with atherosclerosis. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a ubiquitous pathogen, has long been proposed as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. To date, the role of HCMV in atherogenesis has been explored only in static conditions, and it is not known how HCMV infection is influenced by the physiological context of flow. In this study, we utilized a parallel-plate flow system to simulate the effects of shear stresses in different regions of the vasculature in vitro. We found that endothelial cells cultured under low shear stress, which simulates the flow condition of atheroprone regions in vivo, are more permissive to HCMV infection than cells experiencing high shear stress or static conditions. Cells exposed to low shear stress show increased entry of HCMV compared to cells exposed to high shear stress or static conditions. Viral structural gene expression, viral titers, and viral spread are also enhanced in endothelial cells exposed to low shear stress. These results suggest that hemodynamic factors modulate HCMV infection of endothelial cells, thus providing new insights into the induction/acceleration of atherosclerosis by HCMV. PMID:23055562

  8. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  9. Specific enhancement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in ischemic region by alprostadil--potential therapeutic application in pharmaceutical regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hajime; Aihara, Masaki; Tomioka, Miyuki; Watabe, Yu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Alprostadil (lipo-PGE1) is a drug delivery system preparation. This preparation is applied to treat refractory skin ulcers and arteriosclerosis obliterans. We investigated the effects of alprostadil by using the earflap ischemic model. The following results were obtained: 1) Treatment with alprostadil significantly increased the VEGF contents in an ischemic ear; 2) Treatment with alprostadil resulted in strongly expressed VEGF levels only in the ischemic region; 3) Image analysis revealed a significant increase in the number of vessel bypasses and paths after flap creation with alprostadil administration compared to the vehicle-treated ears. The results suggest that it may be possible to apply alprostadil as one device for regenerative medical technology. PMID:23728380

  10. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  11. Arginase and vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Lakshmi; Christianson, David W.; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular and associated ventricular stiffness is one of the hallmarks of the aging cardiovascular system. Both an increase in reactive oxygen species production and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contribute to the endothelial dysfunction that underlies this vascular stiffness, independent of other age-related vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. The activation/upregulation of arginase appears to be an important contributor to age-related endothelial dysfunction by a mechanism that involves substrate (l-arginine) limitation for NO synthase (NOS) 3 and therefore NO synthesis. Not only does this lead to impaired NO production but also it contributes to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by NOS. Although arginase abundance is increased in vascular aging models, it appears that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation of the enzyme enhances its activity as well. The S-nitrosylation is mediated by the induction of NOS2 in the endothelium. Furthermore, arginase activation contributes to aging-related vascular changes by mechanisms that are not directly related to changes in NO signaling, including polyamine-dependent vascular smooth muscle proliferation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, arginase may represent an as yet elusive target for the modification of age-related vascular and ventricular stiffness contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:18719233

  12. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  13. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  14. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-01

    In this very short essay we shall describe a "spectral" point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a "sum over geometries" on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of "observables" in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  15. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  16. Common Geometry Module

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  17. CMS Geometry Through 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, I.; Brownson, E.; Eulisse, G.; Jones, C. D.; Lange, D. J.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2014-06-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  18. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  19. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  20. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... short-term use. [ Top ] What is an arteriovenous fistula? An AV fistula is a connection, made by a vascular surgeon, ... vessel surgery. The surgeon usually places an AV fistula in the forearm or upper arm. An AV ...

  1. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  2. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  3. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  4. A combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering for noise reduction when using region of interest (ROI) fluoroscopy for patient dose reduction in image guided vascular interventions with significant anatomical motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bioprosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions.

  5. A Combination of Spatial and Recursive Temporal Filtering for Noise Reduction when Using Region of Interest (ROI) Fluoroscopy for Patient Dose Reduction in Image Guided Vascular Interventions with Significant Anatomical Motion

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, S.V. Setlur; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bio-prosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions. PMID:26900203

  6. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  7. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  8. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  9. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  10. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  11. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies. PMID:26585821

  12. Detection of edges using local geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, J. A.; Manohar, M.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers described a new representation, the local geometry, for early visual processing which is motivated by results from biological vision. This representation is richer than is often used in image processing. It extracts more of the local structure available at each pixel in the image by using receptive fields that can be continuously rotated and that go to third order spatial variation. Early visual processing algorithms such as edge detectors and ridge detectors can be written in terms of various local geometries and are computationally tractable. For example, Canny's edge detector has been implemented in terms of a local geometry of order two, and a ridge detector in terms of a local geometry of order three. The edge detector in local geometry was applied to synthetic and real images and it was shown using simple interpolation schemes that sufficient information is available to locate edges with sub-pixel accuracy (to a resolution increase of at least a factor of five). This is reasonable even for noisy images because the local geometry fits a smooth surface - the Taylor series - to the discrete image data. Only local processing was used in the implementation so it can readily be implemented on parallel mesh machines such as the MPP. Researchers expect that other early visual algorithms, such as region growing, inflection point detection, and segmentation can also be implemented in terms of the local geometry and will provide sufficiently rich and robust representations for subsequent visual processing.

  13. Dynamic Adaption of Vascular Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here we present a simple two-dimensional model in which, as an alternative approach, the tissue is modeled as a porous medium with intervening sharply defined flow channels. Based on simple, physiologically realistic assumptions, flow-channel structure adapts so as to reach a configuration in which all parts of the tissue are supplied. A set of model parameters uniquely determine the model dynamics, and we have identified the region of the best-performing model parameters (a global optimum). This region is surrounded in parameter space by less optimal model parameter values, and this separation is characterized by steep gradients in the related fitness landscape. Hence it appears that the optimal set of parameters tends to localize close to critical transition zones. Consequently, while the optimal solution is stable for modest parameter perturbations, larger perturbations may cause a profound and permanent shift in systems characteristics. We suggest that the system is driven toward a critical state as a consequence of the ongoing parameter optimization, mimicking an evolutionary pressure on the system. PMID:23060814

  14. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  15. Pain management in patients with vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seretny, M; Colvin, L A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease covers a wide range of conditions, including arterial, venous, and lymphatic disorders, with many of these being more common in the elderly. As the population ages, the incidence of vascular disease will increase, with a consequent increase in the requirement to manage both acute and chronic pain in this patient population. Pain management can be complex, as there are often multiple co-morbidities to be considered. An understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms is helpful in the logical direction of treatment, particularly in chronic pain states, such as phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome. Acute pain management for vascular surgery presents a number of challenges, including coexisting anticoagulant medication, that may preclude the use of regional techniques. Within the limited evidence base, there is a suggestion that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief and reduced respiratory complications after major vascular surgery. For carotid endarterectomy, there is again some evidence supporting the use of local anaesthetic analgesia, either by infiltration or by superficial cervical plexus block. Chronic pain in vascular disease includes post-amputation pain, for which well-known risk factors include high pain levels before amputation and in the immediate postoperative period, emphasizing the importance of good pain control in the perioperative period. Complex regional pain syndrome is another challenging chronic pain syndrome with a wide variety of treatment options available, with the strongest evidence being for physical therapies. Further research is required to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in pain associated with vascular disease and the best analgesic approaches to manage it. PMID:27566812

  16. Novel Paradigms for Dialysis Vascular Access: Downstream Vascular Biology–Is There a Final Common Pathway?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Vascular access dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The most common cause of vascular access dysfunction is venous stenosis from neointimal hyperplasia within the perianastomotic region of an arteriovenous fistula and at the graft-vein anastomosis of an arteriovenous graft. There have been few, if any, effective treatments for vascular access dysfunction because of the limited understanding of the pathophysiology of venous neointimal hyperplasia formation. This review will (1) describe the histopathologic features of hemodialysis access stenosis; (2) discuss novel concepts in the pathogenesis of neointimal hyperplasia development, focusing on downstream vascular biology; (3) highlight future novel therapies for treating downstream biology; and (4) discuss future research areas to improve our understanding of downstream biology and neointimal hyperplasia development. PMID:23990166

  17. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  18. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  19. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  20. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  1. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  2. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  3. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  4. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  5. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  6. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  7. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  8. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  9. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  10. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  11. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  12. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  13. Honeycomb Geometry: Applied Mathematics in Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William J.

    1984-01-01

    Study and exploration of the hexagonal shapes found in honeycombs is suggested as an interesting topic for geometry classes. Students learn that the hexagonal pattern maximizes the enclosed region and minimizes the wax needed for construction, while satisfying the bees' cell-size constraint. (MNS)

  14. Physics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souriau, Jean-Marie

    1983-01-01

    Differential geometry, the contemporary heir of the infinitesimal calculus of the 17th century, appears today as the most appropriate language for the description of physical reality. This holds at every level: The concept of “connexion,” for instance, is used in the construction of models of the universe as well as in the description of the interior of the proton. Nothing is apparently more contrary to the wisdom of physicists; all the same, “it works.” The pages that follow show the conceptual role played by this geometry in some examples—without entering into technical details. In order to achieve this, we shall often have to abandon the complete mathematical rigor and even full definitions; however, we shall be able to give a precise description of the connection of ideas thanks to some elements of group theory.

  15. Puzzle geometry and rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smania, Daniel

    2007-07-01

    We describe a new and robust method to prove rigidity results in complex dynamics. The new ingredient is the geometry of the critical puzzle pieces: under control of geometry and ``complex bounds'', two generalized polynomial-like maps which admit a topological conjugacy, quasiconformal outside the filled-in Julia set, are indeed quasiconformally conjugate. The proof uses a new abstract removability-type result for quasiconformal maps, following ideas of Heinonen and Koskela and of Kallunki and Koskela, optimized for applications in complex dynamics. We prove, as the first application of this new method, that, for even criticalities distinct from two, the period two cycle of the Fibonacci renormalization operator is hyperbolic with 1 -dimensional unstable manifold.

  16. Failures of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, John

    2015-01-01

    Information H is a unique relationship between probabilities, based on the property of independence which is central to scientific methodology. Information Geometry makes the tempting but fallacious assumption that a local metric (conventionally based on information) can be used to endow the space of probability distributions with a preferred global Riemannian metric. No such global metric can conform to H, which is "from-to" asymmetric whereas geometrical length is by definition symmetric. Accordingly, any Riemannian metric will contradict the required structure of the very distributions which are supposedly being triangulated. It follows that probabilities do not form a metric space. We give counter-examples in which alternative formulations of information, and the use of information geometry, lead to unacceptable results.

  17. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  18. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  19. Sclerotherapy using 1% sodium tetradecyl sulfate to treat a vascular malformation: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the most common congenital and neonatal vascular anomalies in the head and neck region. The demand for simple and esthetic vascular malformation treatments have increased more recently. In this study, two patients that were diagnosed with venous malformations were treated with sodium tetradecyl sulfate as a sclerosing agent. Recurrence was not found one year after the surgery. This article gives a brief case report of sclerotherapy as an effective approach to treat vascular malformations in the oral cavity. PMID:26734559

  20. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  1. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  2. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  3. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  4. Multimodality vascular imaging phantom for calibration purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Guy; Soulez, Gilles; Teppaz, Pierre; Qanadli, Salah D.; Qin, Zhao; Durand, Louis-Gilles

    2003-05-01

    The objective of the project was to design a vascular phantom compatible with X-ray, ultrasound and MRI. Fiducial markers were implanted at precise known locations in the phantom to facilitate identification and orientation of plane views from the 3D reconstructed images. They also allowed optimizing image fusion and calibration. A vascular conduit connected to tubing at the extremities of the phantom ran through an agar-based gel filling it. A vessel wall in latex was included to avoid diffusion of contrast agents. Using a lost-material casting technique based on a low melting point metal, complex realistic geometries of normal and pathological vessels were modeled. The fiducial markers were detectable in all modalities without distortion. No leak of gadolinium through the vascular wall was observed on MRI for 5h of scan. The potential use of the phantom for calibration, rescaling, and fusion of 3D images obtained from the different modalities as well as its use for the evaluation of intra and inter-modality comparative studies of imaging systems were recently demonstrated by our group (results published in SPIE-2003). Endovascular prostheses were also implanted into the lumen of the phantom to evaluate the extent of metallic imaging artifacts (results submitted elsewhere). In conclusion, the phantom can allow accurate calibration of radiological imaging devices and quantitative comparisons of the geometric accuracy of each radiological imaging method tested.

  5. Age-related changes in chest geometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Dean, J M; Koehler, R C; Schleien, C L; Michael, J R; Chantarojanasiri, T; Rogers, M C; Traystman, R J

    1987-06-01

    We studied alterations of chest geometry during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in anesthetized immature swine. Pulsatile force was applied to the sternum in increments to determine the effects of increasing compression on chest geometry and intrathoracic vascular pressures. In 2-wk- and 1-mo-old piglets, permanent changes in chest shape developed due to incomplete recoil of the chest along the anteroposterior axis, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were generated. In 3-mo-old animals, permanent chest deformity did not develop, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were not produced. We propose a theoretical model of the chest as an elliptic cylinder. Pulsatile displacement along the minor axis of an ellipse produces a greater decrease in cross-sectional area than displacement of a circular cross section. As thoracic cross section became less circular due to deformity, greater changes in thoracic volume, and hence pressure, were produced. With extreme deformity at high force, pulsatile displacement became limited, diminishing pressure generation. We conclude that changes in chest geometry are important in producing intrathoracic intravascular pressure during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in piglets. PMID:3610916

  6. Acceleration of Vascular Sprouting from Fabricated Perfusable Vascular-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Tatsuya; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Enomoto, Junko; Nittami, Tadashi; Fukuda, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of vascular networks is essential for engineering three-dimensional thick tissues and organs in the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we describe the fabrication of perfusable vascular-like structures by transferring endothelial cells using an electrochemical reaction as well as acceleration of subsequent endothelial sprouting by two stimuli: phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and fluidic shear stress. The electrochemical transfer of cells was achieved using an oligopeptide that formed a dense molecular layer on a gold surface and was then electrochemically desorbed from the surface. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adhered to gold-coated needles (ϕ600 μm) via the oligopeptide, were transferred to collagen gel along with electrochemical desorption of the molecular layer, resulting in the formation of endothelial cell-lined vascular-like structures. In the following culture, the endothelial cells migrated into the collagen gel and formed branched luminal structures. However, this branching process was strikingly slow (>14 d) and the cell layers on the internal surfaces became disrupted in some regions. To address these issues, we examined the effects of the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, PMA, and shear stress generated by medium flow. Addition of PMA at an optimum concentration significantly accelerated migration, vascular network formation, and its stabilization. Exposure to shear stress reoriented the cells in the direction of the medium flow and further accelerated vascular network formation. Because of the synergistic effects, HUVECs began to sprout as early as 3 d of perfusion culture and neighboring vascular-like structures were bridged within 5 d. Although further investigations of vascular functions need to be performed, this approach may be an effective strategy for rapid fabrication of perfusable microvascular networks when engineering three-dimensional fully vascularized

  7. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  8. Assignment of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placenta growth factor (PIGF) genes to human chromosome 6p12-p21 and 14q24-q31 regions, respectively

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, M.G.; Borg, J.P.; Rosnet, O.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of two growth factor genes: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to human chromosome 6p12-p21 and placenta growth factor (PlGF) to human chromosome 14q24-q31. Such genetic mapping may aid in the identification of genes and mutations responsible for hereditary disorders. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  10. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  11. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  12. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  13. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  14. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  15. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  16. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  17. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, A. S.; Zambon, M.

    2009-02-02

    The main result extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result.

  18. Geometry Career Unit: Junior High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Daniel

    The guide, the product of an exemplary career education program for junior high school students, was developed to show how geometry can be applied to real-life career-oriented areas and to bring a practical approach to the teaching of geometry. It is designed to show how some of the theorems or postulates in geometry are used in different careers.…

  19. Geometry: Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    Behavioral objectives, each accompanied by six sample test items, for secondary school geometry are presented. Objectives were determined by surveying the most widely used secondary school geometry textbooks, and cover 14 major categories of geometry, with sections on set theory and introductory trigonometry. Answers are provided. Categories…

  20. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  1. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2006-05-01

    Quantum information theory is at the frontiers of physics, mathematics and information science, offering a variety of solutions that are impossible using classical theory. This book provides an introduction to the key concepts used in processing quantum information and reveals that quantum mechanics is a generalisation of classical probability theory. After a gentle introduction to the necessary mathematics the authors describe the geometry of quantum state spaces. Focusing on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, they discuss the statistical distance measures and entropies used in quantum theory. The final part of the book is devoted to quantum entanglement - a non-intuitive phenomenon discovered by Schrödinger, which has become a key resource for quantum computation. This richly-illustrated book is useful to a broad audience of graduates and researchers interested in quantum information theory. Exercises follow each chapter, with hints and answers supplied. The first book to focus on the geometry of quantum states Stresses the similarities and differences between classical and quantum theory Uses a non-technical style and numerous figures to make the book accessible to non-specialists

  2. Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis for vascular homeostasis: role in neointimal formation after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal increases in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the intimal region after a vascular injury is a key event in developing neointimal hyperplasia. To maintain vascular function, proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs is tightly controlled during vascular remodeling. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) system, a key component of the oxidative stress response that acts in maintaining homeostasis, plays an important role in neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury; however, the role of Nrf2/Keap1 in VSMC apoptosis has not been clarified. Here we report that 14 days after arterial injury in mice, TUNEL-positive VSMCs are detected in both the neointimal and medial layers. These layers contain cells expressing high levels of Nrf2 but low Keap1 expression. In VSMCs, Keap1 depletion induces features of apoptosis, such as positive TUNEL staining and annexin V binding. These changes are associated with an increased expression of nuclear Nrf2. Simultaneous Nrf2 depletion inhibits Keap1 depletion-induced apoptosis. At 14 days after the vascular injury, Nrf2-deficient mice demonstrated fewer TUNEL-positive cells and increased neointimal formation in the neointimal and medial areas. The results suggest that the Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates VSMC apoptosis during neointimal formation, thereby inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury. PMID:27198574

  3. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  4. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  5. A new approach to blood flow simulation in vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Tamaddon, Houman; Behnia, Mehrdad; Behnia, Masud; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    A proper analysis of blood flow is contingent upon accurate modelling of the branching pattern and vascular geometry of the network of interest. It is challenging to reconstruct the entire vascular network of any organ experimentally, in particular the pulmonary vasculature, because of its very high number of vessels, complexity of the branching pattern and poor accessibility in vivo. The objective of our research is to develop an innovative approach for the reconstruction of the full pulmonary vascular tree from available morphometric data. Our method consists of the use of morphometric data on those parts of the pulmonary vascular tree that are too small to reconstruct by medical imaging methods. This method is a three-step technique that reconstructs the entire pulmonary arterial tree down to the capillary bed. Vessels greater than 2 mm are reconstructed from direct volume and surface analysis using contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Vessels smaller than 2 mm are reconstructed from available morphometric and distensibility data and rearranged by applying Murray's laws. Implementation of morphometric data to reconstruct the branching pattern and applying Murray's laws to every vessel bifurcation simultaneously leads to an accurate vascular tree reconstruction. The reconstruction algorithm generates full arterial tree topography down to the first capillary bifurcation. Geometry of each order of the vascular tree is generated separately to minimize the construction and simulation time. The node-to-node connectivity along with the diameter and length of every vessel segment is established and order numbers, according to the diameter-defined Strahler system, are assigned. In conclusion, the present model provides a morphological foundation for future analysis of blood flow in the pulmonary circulation. PMID:26195135

  6. Optically defined mechanical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.; Müller, Tina; Sankey, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of optomechanics, radiation forces have provided a particularly high level of control over the frequency and dissipation of mechanical elements. Here we propose a class of optomechanical systems in which light exerts a similarly profound influence over two other fundamental parameters: geometry and mass. By applying an optical trap to one lattice site of an extended phononic crystal, we show it is possible to create a tunable, localized mechanical mode. Owing to light's simultaneous and constructive coupling with the structure's continuum of modes, we estimate that a trap power at the level of a single intracavity photon should be capable of producing a significant effect within a realistic, chip-scale device.

  7. Critique of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  8. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain 1/2-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  9. Geometry from Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Diego H.; Silva, Guillermo A.

    2008-07-28

    We discuss how geometrical and topological aspects of certain (1/2)-BPS type IIB geometries are captured by their dual operators in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills theory. The type IIB solutions are characterized by arbitrary droplet pictures in a plane and we consider, in particular, axially symmetric droplets. The 1-loop anomalous dimension of the dual gauge theory operators probed with single traces is described by some bosonic lattice Hamiltonians. These Hamiltonians are shown to encode the topology of the droplets. In appropriate BMN limits, the Hamiltonians spectrum reproduces the spectrum of near-BPS string excitations propagating along each of the individual edges of the droplet. We also study semiclassical regimes for the Hamiltonians. For droplets having disconnected constituents, the Hamiltonian admits different complimentary semiclassical descriptions, each one replicating the semiclassical description for closed strings extending in each of the constituents.

  10. Critique of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-01

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  11. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom

    2008-09-07

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  12. Vascular Anatomy of the Cauda Equina and Its Implication on the Vascular Lesions in the Caudal Spinal Structure.

    PubMed

    Namba, Katsunari

    2016-06-15

    The cauda equina is composed of the lumbosacral and the coccygeal nerve roots and the filum terminale. In the embryonic period, discrepancy in development between the termination of the spinal cord and the spinal column results in elongation of the nerve roots as well as the filum terminale in this region. Although the vascular anatomy of the caudal spinal structure shares many common features with the other metameric levels, this elongation forms the basis of the characteristic vascular anatomy in this region. With the evolution of the high quality imaging techniques, vascular lesions in the cauda equina are being diagnosed more frequently than ever before. Albeit the demand for accurate knowledge of the vascular anatomy in this region, descriptions are often fragmented and not easily accessible. In this review, the author attempted to organize the existing knowledge of the vascular anatomy in the cauda equina and its implication on the vascular lesions in this region. Also reviewed is the clinically relevant embryological development of the cauda equina. PMID:27021641

  13. Vascular Anatomy of the Cauda Equina and Its Implication on the Vascular Lesions in the Caudal Spinal Structure

    PubMed Central

    NAMBA, Katsunari

    2016-01-01

    The cauda equina is composed of the lumbosacral and the coccygeal nerve roots and the filum terminale. In the embryonic period, discrepancy in development between the termination of the spinal cord and the spinal column results in elongation of the nerve roots as well as the filum terminale in this region. Although the vascular anatomy of the caudal spinal structure shares many common features with the other metameric levels, this elongation forms the basis of the characteristic vascular anatomy in this region. With the evolution of the high quality imaging techniques, vascular lesions in the cauda equina are being diagnosed more frequently than ever before. Albeit the demand for accurate knowledge of the vascular anatomy in this region, descriptions are often fragmented and not easily accessible. In this review, the author attempted to organize the existing knowledge of the vascular anatomy in the cauda equina and its implication on the vascular lesions in this region. Also reviewed is the clinically relevant embryological development of the cauda equina. PMID:27021641

  14. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  15. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  16. Vascular corrosion casting: analyzing wall shear stress in the portal vein and vascular abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic rodents.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Casteleyn, Christophe; van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Segers, Patrick; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Vascular corrosion casting is an established method of anatomical preparation that has recently been revived and has proven to be an excellent tool for detailed three-dimensional (3D) morphological examination of normal and pathological microcirculation. In addition, the geometry provided by vascular casts can be further used to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) in a vascular bed using computational techniques. In the first part of this study, the microvascular morphological changes associated with portal hypertension (PHT) and cirrhosis in vascular casts are described. The second part of this study consists of a quantitative analysis of the WSS in the portal vein in casts of different animal models of PHT and cirrhosis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Microvascular changes in the splanchnic, hepatic and pulmonary territory of portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice are described in detail with stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, our results are the first to report the vascular changes in the common bile duct ligation cirrhotic model. Calculating WSS using CFD methods is a feasible technique in PHT and cirrhosis, enabling the differentiation between different animal models. First, a dimensional analysis was performed, followed by a CFD calculation describing the spatial and temporal WSS distributions in the portal vein. WSS was significantly different between sham/cirrhotic/pure PHT animals with the highest values in the latter. Up till now, no techniques have been developed to quantify WSS in the portal vein in laboratory animals. This study showed for the first time that vascular casting has an important role not only in the morphological evaluation of animal models of PHT and cirrhosis, but also in defining the biological response of the portal vein wall to hemodynamic changes. CFD in 3D geometries can be used to describe the spatial and temporal variations in WSS in the portal vein and to better understand

  17. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  18. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bagavathiappan, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R.; Panicker, T. M. R.; Korath, M. Paul; Jagadeesan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1° C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders. PMID:20126565

  19. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  20. [Vascular vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Dieterich, M

    2002-12-01

    Ischemia,hemorrhages, and other vascular disorders can result in various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo, oculomotor/balance disturbances, and nausea. The vascular vertigo syndromes listed in Table 1 can however be brought about by other causes such as demyelitizing focuses in multiple sclerosis or space-occupying lesions, so that not only localization of the damaged structure but also the various etiologies are decisive for the choice of therapy. Occasionally, combined functional disturbances of the peripheral and central vestibular system appear, such as an infarction of the inferior anterior cerebellar artery, which supplies the labyrinth and parts of the brainstem and cerebellum. In rare cases, a central lesion can have the same signs as a peripheral-vertibular disturbance: a lacunar infarct at the root entry zone of the eighth nerve can mimic a unilateral partial loss of labyrinth function as it occurs in vestibular neuritis, thus named "pseudoneuritis". Differential diagnosis between vestibular migraine, vestibular paroxysmia, transient ischemic brainstem attacks, and Meniere's disease is sometimes so difficult that only trial therapies such as prophylaxis with beta blockers, carbamazepine, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, or betahistin can clarify the issue. PMID:12486562

  1. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  2. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  3. Are MPNs vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Guido; De Stefano, Valerio; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-12-01

    A high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis is the hallmark of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis in MPN resemble those of other paradigmatic vascular diseases. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in atypical sites, such as the splanchnic district, and the involvement of plasmatic prothrombotic factors, including an acquired resistance to activated protein C, both link MPN to inherited thrombophilia. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for these complications. The pathogenic role of leukocytes and inflammation, and the high mortality rate from arterial occlusions are common features of MPN and atherosclerosis. The efficacy and safety of aspirin in reducing deaths and major thrombosis in PV have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. Finally, the Virchow's triad of impaired blood cells, endothelium and blood flow is shared both by MPN and thrombosis in solid cancer. Phlebotomy and myelosuppressive agents are the current therapeutic options for correcting these abnormalities and reducing thrombosis in this special vascular disease represented by MPN. PMID:24037420

  4. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  5. Interactive effects of vascular risk burden and advanced age on cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Bangen, Katherine J.; Nation, Daniel A.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Harmell, Alexandrea L.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Dev, Sheena I.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Salmon, David P.; Liu, Thomas T.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular risk factors and cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction have been linked to increased risk of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD); however the possible moderating effects of age and vascular risk burden on CBF in late life remain understudied. We examined the relationships among elevated vascular risk burden, age, CBF, and cognition. Seventy-one non-demented older adults completed an arterial spin labeling MR scan, neuropsychological assessment, and medical history interview. Relationships among vascular risk burden, age, and CBF were examined in a priori regions of interest (ROIs) previously implicated in aging and AD. Interaction effects indicated that, among older adults with elevated vascular risk burden (i.e., multiple vascular risk factors), advancing age was significantly associated with reduced cortical CBF whereas there was no such relationship for those with low vascular risk burden (i.e., no or one vascular risk factor). This pattern was observed in cortical ROIs including medial temporal (hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, uncus), inferior parietal (supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus), and frontal (anterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus) cortices. Furthermore, among those with elevated vascular risk, reduced CBF was associated with poorer cognitive performance. Such findings suggest that older adults with elevated vascular risk burden may be particularly vulnerable to cognitive change as a function of CBF reductions. Findings support the use of CBF as a potential biomarker in preclinical AD and suggest that vascular risk burden and regionally-specific CBF changes may contribute to differential age-related cognitive declines. PMID:25071567

  6. Information geometry of Bayesian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzoe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A survey of geometry of Bayesian statistics is given. From the viewpoint of differential geometry, a prior distribution in Bayesian statistics is regarded as a volume element on a statistical model. In this paper, properties of Bayesian estimators are studied by applying equiaffine structures of statistical manifolds. In addition, geometry of anomalous statistics is also studied. Deformed expectations and deformed independeces are important in anomalous statistics. After summarizing geometry of such deformed structues, a generalization of maximum likelihood method is given. A suitable weight on a parameter space is important in Bayesian statistics, whereas a suitable weight on a sample space is important in anomalous statistics.

  7. Vascular plants of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.; Landeen, D.S. ); Downs, J.L.; Rickard, W.H. ); Baird, G.I. )

    1992-07-01

    An updated listing of the vascular plants of the Hanford Site is provided, along with discussions of how humans may interact with local plants and have influenced the regional flora. Based on examinations of herbarium collections at the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Washington State University, and Brigham Young University, 590 vascular plant species have been identified on or near the Hanford Site. This is more than twice the number of species on previously published lists of Hanford Site vascular plants. A review of the plant species that are currently listed as endangered, threatened, sensitive, or otherwise of concern to the Washington State Natural Heritage Program and the Federal Fish and Wildlife Service is included. Color photographs of selected species are included to aid identification. Lists are provided of the Hanford Site plant species that could be used as food and medicinal sources and of those introduced to the region through human activities. The information provided in this report will be useful to workers charged with performing environmental characterizations in the field, preparing environmental assessments for permitting purposes, performing risk assessments using transport-to-man scenarios, and selecting species for revegetation and environmental reconstruction projects.

  8. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  9. Vascular impedance analysis in human pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinlian; Gao, Jian; Huang, Wei; Yen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vascular impedance is determined by morphometry and mechanical properties of the vascular system, as well as the rheology of the blood. The interactions between all these factors are complicated and difficult to investigate solely by experiments. A mathematical model representing the entire system of human pulmonary circulation was constructed based on experimentally measured morphometric and elasticity data of the vessels. The model consisted of 16 orders of arteries and 15 orders of veins. The pulmonary arteries and veins were considered as elastic tubes and their impedance was calculated based on Womersley's theory. The flow in capillaries was described by the "sheet-flow" theory. The model yielded an impedance modulus spectrum that fell steeply from a high value at 0 Hz to a minimum around 1.5 Hz. At about 4 Hz, it reached a second high and then oscillated around a relatively small value at higher frequencies. Characteristic impedance was 27.9 dyn-sec/cm5. Influence of variations in vessel geometry and elasticity on impedance spectra was analyzed. Simulation results showed good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:16817653

  10. Methods for the correction of vascular artifacts in PET O-15 water brain-mapping studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.M.; Lawson, M.; Yun, L.S.; Bandy, D.

    1996-12-01

    While positron emission tomographic (PET) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can be used to map brain regions that are involved in normal and pathological human behaviors, measurements in the anteromedial temporal lobe can be confounded by the combined effects of radiotracer activity in neighboring arteries and partial-volume averaging. The authors now describe two simple methods to address this vascular artifact. One method utilizes the early frames of a dynamic PET study, while the other method utilizes a coregistered magnetic resonance image (MRI) to characterize the vascular region of interest (VROI). Both methods subsequently assign a common value to each pixel in the VROI for the control scan and the activation scan. To study the vascular artifact and to demonstrate the ability of the proposed methods correcting the vascular artifact, four dynamic PET scans were performed in a single subject during the same behavioral state. For each of the four scans, a vascular scan containing vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 0--60 s after radiotracer administrations, and a control scan containing minimal vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 20--80 s after radiotracer administration. t-score maps calculated from the four pairs of vascular and control scans were used to characterize regional blood flow differences related to vascular activity before and after the applications of each vascular artifact correction method. Both methods eliminated the observed differences in vascular activity, as well as the vascular artifact observed in the anteromedial temporal lobes. Using PET data from a study of normal human emotion, these methods permitted us to identify rCBF increases in the anteromedial temporal lobe free from the potentially confounding, combined effects of vascular activity and partial-volume averaging.

  11. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material. PMID:11552466

  12. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  13. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  14. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world…

  15. Achievement in Writing Geometry Proofs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senk, Sharon L.

    In 1981 a nationwide assessment of achievement in writing geometry proofs was conducted by the Cognitive Development and Achievement in Secondary School Geometry project. Over 1,500 students in 11 schools in 5 states participated. This paper describes the sample, instruments, grading procedures, and selected results. Results include: (1) at the…

  16. Limits of downstream hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2004-10-01

    Adjustments to flow width, depth, and velocity in response to changes in discharge are commonly characterized by using downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. The spatial limits of these relationships within a drainage basin have not been systematically quantified. Where the erosional resistance of the channel substrate is sufficiently large, hydraulic driving forces presumably will be unable to adjust channel form. Data sets from 10 mountain rivers in the United States, Panama, Nepal, and New Zealand are used in this study to explore the limits of downstream hydraulic geometry relationships. Where the ratio of stream power to sediment size (Ω/D84) exceeds 10,000 kg/s3, downstream hydraulic geometry is well developed; where the ratio falls below 10,000 kg/s3, downstream hydraulic geometry relationships are poorly developed. These limitations on downstream hydraulic geometry have important implications for channel engineering and simulations of landscape change.

  17. Lobachevsky's Geometry and Research of Geometry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylevskaya, L. I.

    2008-10-01

    For the first time N. I. Lobachevsky gave a talk on the new geometry in 1826; three years after he had published a work "On the fundamentals of geometry", containing all fundamental theorems and methods of non-Euclidean geometry. A small part of the article was devoted to the study of geometry of the Universe. The interpretation of geometrical concepts in pure empirical way was typical for mathematicians at the beginning of the XIX century; in this connection it was important for scientists to find application of his geometry. Having the purpose to determine experimentally the properties of real physical Space, Lobachevsky decided to calculate the sum of angles in a huge triangle with two vertexes in opposite points of the terrestrial orbit and the third -- on the remote star. Investigating the possibilities of solution of the set task, Lobachevsky faced the difficulties of theoretical, technical and methodological character. More detailed research of different aspects of the problem led Lobachevsky to the comprehension of impossibility to obtain the values required for the goal achievement, and he called his geometry an imaginary geometry.

  18. Neuropathological diagnosis of vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia with implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is recognised as a neurocognitive disorder, which is explained by numerous vascular causes in the general absence of other pathologies. The heterogeneity of cerebrovascular disease makes it challenging to elucidate the neuropathological substrates and mechanisms of VaD as well as vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Consensus and accurate diagnosis of VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychometric and neuroimaging measures with subsequent pathological confirmation. Pathological diagnosis of suspected clinical VaD requires adequate postmortem brain sampling and rigorous assessment methods to identify important substrates. Factors that define the subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases appear the most common substrates of vascular brain injury or infarction. Small vessel disease characterised by arteriolosclerosis and lacunar infarcts also causes cortical and subcortical microinfarcts, which appear to be the most robust substrates of cognitive impairment. Diffuse WM changes with loss of myelin and axonal abnormalities are common to almost all subtypes of VaD. Medial temporal lobe and hippocampal atrophy accompanied by variable hippocampal sclerosis are also features of VaD as they are of Alzheimer's disease. Recent observations suggest that there is a vascular basis for neuronal atrophy in both the temporal and frontal lobes in VaD that is entirely independent of any Alzheimer pathology. Further knowledge on specific neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes in key regions resulting in executive dysfunction and other cognitive deficits, which define VCI and VaD, needs to be gathered. Hereditary arteriopathies such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy or CADASIL have provided insights into the mechanisms of

  19. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  20. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  1. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  2. Instabilities of microstate geometries with antibranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Pasini, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    One can obtain very large classes of horizonless microstate geometries corresponding to near-extremal black holes by placing probe supertubes whose action has metastable minima inside certain supersymmetric bubbling solutions [1]. We show that these minima can lower their energy when the bubbles move in certain directions in the moduli space, which implies that these near-extremal microstates are in fact unstable once one considers the dynamics of all their degrees of freedom. The decay of these solutions corresponds to Hawking radiation, and we compare the emission rate and frequency to those of the corresponding black hole. Our analysis supports the expectation that generic non-extremal black holes microstate geometries should be unstable. It also establishes the existence of a new type of instabilities for antibranes in highly-warped regions with charge dissolved in fluxes.

  3. Bacterial invasion of vascular cell types: vascular infectology and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kozarov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    To portray the chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis, leukocytic cell types involved in the immune response to invading pathogens are often the focus. However, atherogenesis is a complex pathological deterioration of the arterial walls, where vascular cell types are participants with regards to deterioration and disease. Since other recent reviews have detailed the role of both the innate and adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, herein we will summarize the latest developments regarding the association of bacteria with vascular cell types: infections as a risk factor for atherosclerosis; bacterial invasion of vascular cell types; the atherogenic sequelae of bacterial presence such as endothelial activation and blood clotting; and the identification of the species that are able to colonize this niche. The evidence of a polybacterial infectious component of the atheromatous lesions opens the doors for exploration of the new field of vascular infectology and for the study of atherosclerosis microbiome. PMID:22185451

  4. Quantum Consequences of Parameterizing Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    The marriage between geometrization and quantization is not successful, so far. It is well known that quantization of gravity , using known quantization schemes, is not satisfactory. It may be of interest to look for another approach to this problem. Recently, it is shown that geometries with torsion admit quantum paths. Such geometries should be parameterizied in order to preserve the quantum properties appeared in the paths. The present work explores the consequences of parameterizing such geometry. It is shown that quantum properties, appeared in the path equations, are transferred to other geometric entities.

  5. Distance geometry and geometric algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dress, Andreas W. M.; Havel, Timothy F.

    1993-10-01

    As part of his program to unify linear algebra and geometry using the language of Clifford algebra, David Hestenes has constructed a (well-known) isomorphism between the conformal group and the orthogonal group of a space two dimensions higher, thus obtaining homogeneous coordinates for conformal geometry.(1) In this paper we show that this construction is the Clifford algebra analogue of a hyperbolic model of Euclidean geometry that has actually been known since Bolyai, Lobachevsky, and Gauss, and we explore its wider invariant theoretic implications. In particular, we show that the Euclidean distance function has a very simple representation in this model, as demonstrated by J. J. Seidel.(18)

  6. Vascular infections: exceeding the threshold.

    PubMed

    Cox, T R

    1995-12-01

    During fiscal year 1988, our hospital infection control practitioner identified a 400% increase in the incidence of vascular surgery nosocomial infections. The six graft and six amputation infections were validated as nosocomial against hospital definitions adopted from the Centers for Disease Control. Our Infection Control Committee mandated an audit of the infected vascular surgery patients using a case/control design to identify and examine associated variables that may need attention. The significant finding was microbial resistance to prophylactic antibiotics used during surgery (p > 0.0001, Fisher's exact). The use of vancomycin as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent for all major vascular cases was recommended to the surgeons. PMID:8775383

  7. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  8. Autophagy in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Lee, Seon-Jin; Smith, Akaya; Choi, Augustine M K

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy, or "self eating," refers to a regulated cellular process for the lysosomal-dependent turnover of organelles and proteins. During starvation or nutrient deficiency, autophagy promotes survival through the replenishment of metabolic precursors derived from the degradation of endogenous cellular components. Autophagy represents a general homeostatic and inducible adaptive response to environmental stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and exposure to pharmaceuticals and xenobiotics. Whereas elevated autophagy can be observed in dying cells, the functional relationships between autophagy and programmed cell death pathways remain incompletely understood. Preclinical studies have identified autophagy as a process that can be activated during vascular disorders, including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart and other organs, cardiomyopathy, myocardial injury, and atherosclerosis. The functional significance of autophagy in human cardiovascular disease pathogenesis remains incompletely understood, and potentially involves both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes, depending on model system. Although relatively few studies have been performed in the lung, our recent studies also implicate a role for autophagy in chronic lung disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that regulate autophagy could potentially provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the prevention or treatment of human disease. PMID:20160147

  9. Education in vascular access.

    PubMed

    Moist, Louise M; Lee, Timmy C; Lok, Charmaine E; Al-Jaishi, Ahmed; Xi, Wang; Campbell, Vern; Graham, Janet; Wilson, Barb; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    The successful creation and use of an arteriovenous vascular access (VA) requires a coordinated, educated multidisciplinary team to ensure an optimal VA for each patient. Patient education programs on VA are associated with increased arteriovenous VA use at dialysis initiation. Education should be tailored to patient goals and preferences with the understanding that experiential education from patient to patient is far more influential than that provided by the healthcare professional. VA education for the nephrologist should focus on addressing the systematic and patient-level barriers in achieving a functional VA, with specific components relating to VA creation, maturation, and cannulation that consider patient goals and preferences. A deficit in nursing skills in the area of assessment and cannulation can have devastating consequences for hemodialysis patients. Delivery of an integrated education program increases nurses' knowledge of VA and development of simulation programs or constructs to assist in cannulation of the VA will greatly facilitate the much needed skill transfer. Adequate VA surgical training and experience are critical to the creation and outcomes of VA. Simulations can benefit nephrologists, dialysis nurses surgeons, and interventionalists though aiding in surgical creation, understanding of the physiology and anatomy of a dysfunctional VA, and practicing cannulation techniques. All future educational initiatives must emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary care to attain successful VA outcomes. PMID:23432319

  10. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  11. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  12. Vascular status in human primary and permanent teeth in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Helen D; Boissonade, Fiona M

    2005-04-01

    The present study sought to compare the vascular status of human primary teeth with that of human permanent teeth, and to determine whether caries or painful pulpitis was associated with changes in vascularity. Coronal pulps were removed from 62 primary and 62 permanent mandibular molars with a known pain history. Teeth were categorized as intact, moderately carious or grossly carious. Pulp sections were labelled with Ulex europaeus I lectin (UEIL), which is a marker of human vascular endothelium. Image analysis was then used to quantify the percentage area of UEIL-labelled tissue (vascularity) and the number of blood vessels present within three regions: the pulp horn, the subodontoblastic region, and the mid-coronal pulp. Only the mid-coronal region of the primary tooth pulp was found to be significantly more vascular than the corresponding area of the permanent tooth pulp. Both dentitions showed a significant increase in vascularity within the pulp horn region with caries progression, but this was not accompanied by an increase in vessel number. There was no correlation between vascularity and pain symptoms. These findings suggest that the primary tooth pulp is more vascular than its successor within the mid-coronal region. However, the functional and clinical significance of this finding remains speculative. PMID:15819818

  13. Roles of starting geometries in quantum mechanics studies of cellobiose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relaxed HF/6 31G(d) energy surface was constructed for the fraction of phi,psi space that contains most geometries from crystals of molecules similar to cellobiose. Two regions around other minima were examined with unconstrained B3LYP/6 31+G(d) minimizations, as were two sub regions covered by th...

  14. MicroRNA and vascular remodelling in acute vascular injury and pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Hata, Akiko; MacLean, Margaret R.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular remodelling is an integral pathological process central to a number of cardiovascular diseases. The complex interplay between distinct cell populations in the vessel wall following vascular injury leads to inflammation, cellular dysfunction, pro-growth signals in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) compartment, and the acquisition of a synthetic phenotype. Although the signals for vascular remodelling are diverse in different pathological contexts, SMC proliferation and migration are consistently observed. It is therefore critical to elucidate key mechanisms central to these processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding sequences of RNA that have the capacity to regulate many genes, pathways, and complex biological networks within cells, acting either alone or in concert with one another. In diseases such as cancer and cardiac disease, the role of miRNA in disease pathogenesis has been documented in detail. In contrast, despite a great deal of interest in miRNA, relatively few studies have directly assessed the role of miRNA in vascular remodelling. The potential for modulation of miRNA to achieve therapeutic benefits in this setting is attractive. Here, we focus on the role of miRNA in vascular inflammation and remodelling associated with acute vascular injury (vein graft disease, angioplasty restenosis, and in-stent restenosis) as well as in vascular remodelling associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22065733

  15. The Dilemma of Descriptive Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boleslavski, Moshe

    1977-01-01

    Proposes that engineering students undergo a preparatory summer school training program in fundamentals of engineering drawing, descriptive geometry, and mathematics prior to being admitted to regular engineering studies. (SL)

  16. Emergent geometry from quantized spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hyun Seok; Sivakumar, M.

    2010-08-15

    We examine the picture of emergent geometry arising from a mass-deformed matrix model. Because of the mass deformation, a vacuum geometry turns out to be a constant curvature spacetime such as d-dimensional sphere and (anti-)de Sitter spaces. We show that the mass-deformed matrix model giving rise to the constant curvature spacetime can be derived from the d-dimensional Snyder algebra. The emergent geometry beautifully confirms all the rationale inferred from the algebraic point of view that the d-dimensional Snyder algebra is equivalent to the Lorentz algebra in (d+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. For example, a vacuum geometry of the mass-deformed matrix model is completely described by a G-invariant metric of coset manifolds G/H defined by the Snyder algebra. We also discuss a nonlinear deformation of the Snyder algebra.

  17. Interaction of morphogens with geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    2005-09-01

    Morphogen patterns are viewed as being affected by epithelial sheet geometry in early development. As the total area of the (closed) sheet changes, the changing geometry acts back in turn to change the morphogen pattern. A number of constraints are given on the functional form of the Gauss and Mean curvatures, considered as functions of the morphogen concentrations and their derivatives. It is shown that the constraints are sufficient to motivate a convincing dependence of the two curvatures on the morphogen concentrations.

  18. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  19. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  20. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  1. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  2. Social media in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. PMID:23321344

  3. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  4. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  5. Renal vascular perfusion index in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shau, Yio-Wha; Pao, Sun-Hua; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chang, King-Jen; Shyu, Jeou-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Decreased renal perfusion plays an important role in the progression toward renal failure. In this study, a novel measure was proposed to quantify renal perfusion using canine model. Serial renal vascular images at different vascular areas including the whole vascular tree, interlobar, arcuate and interlobular vessels were captured. Image processing software was designed to analyze the changes of power Doppler intensity of colored pixels within regions-of-interest (ROI). For a given ROI, the power Doppler vascular index (PDVI) was found to fluctuate with the cardiac cycle. It was also noted that the power Doppler signals generated by arterial vessels have different fluctuating waveforms and different phase compared with the signal derived from venous vessels. A power Doppler correlation-map was developed to differentiate the arteries and veins in the ROI. Using the serial power Doppler images and the derived flow direction information, the interlobular perfusion can be strongly quantified. The renal vascular perfusion index (RVPI) defined as the ratio of PDVI(max) versus PDVI(min) was significantly higher in the interlobular vessel areas than three other areas for seven healthy dogs. The RVPI resembles the systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio that commonly reflects arterial hemodynamics. RVPI and power Doppler correlation-map reveal more "dynamic" sense of vascular perfusion and provide a novel approach for the examination of renal function in clinical practice. PMID:18805627

  6. Engineering design of artificial vascular junctions for 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Bibb, Richard; Harris, Russell

    2016-06-01

    Vascular vessels, including arteries, veins and capillaries, are being printed using additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing. This paper demonstrates that it is important to follow the vascular design by nature as close as possible when 3D printing artificial vascular branches. In previous work, the authors developed an algorithm of computational geometry for constructing smooth junctions for 3D printing. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) is used to compare the wall shear stress and blood velocity field for the junctions of different designs. The CFD model can reproduce the expected wall shear stress at locations remote from the junction. For large vessels such as veins, it is shown that ensuring the smoothness of the junction and using smaller joining angles as observed in nature is very important to avoid high wall shear stress and recirculation. The issue is however less significant for capillaries. Large joining angles make no difference to the hemodynamic behavior, which is also consistent with the fact that most capillary junctions have large joining angles. The combination of the CFD analysis and the junction construction method form a complete design method for artificial vascular vessels that can be 3D printed using additive manufacturing technologies. PMID:27321286

  7. In situ assessment of tumor vascularity using fluorine NMR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ceckler, T L; Gibson, S L; Hilf, R; Bryant, R G

    1990-03-01

    In situ fluorine NMR imaging has been used to measure vascularity in subcutaneously implanted mammary tumors. Oxyferol, a perfluorinated blood substitute comprised of an emulsion of 25% w/v perfluorotributylamine, was used as a tracer. Following iv administration, this perfluorocarbon emulsion remains primarily in the vasculature during the image acquisition period. The distribution of the PFTA in the 19F NMR image gives a map of tissue regions with intact vascularity. This technique has been used to demonstrate decreased blood flow in necrotic regions of R3230AC mammary tumors in which vasculature had been damaged either as a result of spontaneous necrosis or by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Damage to tumor vascularity following PDT was observed prior to the development of necrosis. PMID:2325542

  8. Vascular smooth muscle in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winquist, R J; Webb, R C; Bohr, D F

    1982-06-01

    The cause of the elevated arterial pressure in most forms of hypertension is an increase in total peripheral resistance. This brief review is directed toward an assessment of recent investigations contributing information about the factors responsible for this increased vascular resistance. Structural abnormalities in the vasculature that characterize the hypertensive process are 1) changes in the vascular media, 2) rarefication of the resistance vessels, and 3) lesions of the intimal vascular surface. These abnormalities are mainly the result of an adaptive process and are secondary to the increase in wall stress and/or to pathological damage to cellular components in the vessel wall. Functional alterations in the vascular smooth muscle are described as changes in agonist-smooth muscle interaction or plasma membrane permeability. These types of changes appear to play a primary, initiating role in the elevation of vascular resistance of hypertension. These alterations are not the result of an increase in wall stress and they often precede the development of high blood pressure. The functional changes are initiated by abnormal function of neurogenic, humoral, and/or myogenic changes that alter vascular smooth muscle activity. PMID:6282652

  9. [Modeling of species distribution using topography and remote sensing data, with vascular plants of the Tukuringra Range low mountain belt (Zeya state Nature Reserve, Amur Region) as a case study].

    PubMed

    Dudov, S V

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of maximum entropy method embedded in MaxEnt software, the cartographic models are designed for spatial distribution of 63 species of vascular plants inhabiting low mountain belt of the Tukuringra Range. Initial data for modeling were actual points of a species occurrence, data on remote sensing (multispectral space snapshots by Landsat), and a digital topographic model. It is found out that the structure of factors contributing to the model is related to species ecological amplitude. The distribution of stenotopic species is determined, mainly, by the topography, which thermal and humidity conditions of habitats are associated with. To the models for eurytopic species, variables formed on the basis of remote sensing contribute significantly, those variables encompassing the parameters of the soil-vegetable cover. In course of the obtained models analyzing, three principal groups of species are revealed that have similar distribution pattern. Species of the first group are restricted in their distribution by the slopes of the. River Zeya and River Giluy gorges. Species of the second group are associated with the southern macroslope of the range and with southern slopes of large rivers' valleys. The third group incorporates those species that are distributed over the whole territory under study. PMID:27266017

  10. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    A planar dissolution front propagating through a homogeneous porous matrix is unstable with respect to small variations in local permeability; regions of high permeability dissolve faster because of enhanced transport of reactants, which leads to increased rippling of the front. This phenomenon, usually referred to known as reactive-infiltration instability is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales, from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. In general, this instability is characterized by two length scales: the diffusive length (D/v) and the reactant penetration length (v/r), where v is the Darcy velocity, D - the diffusion constant and r - the dissolution rate. If the latter scale is much smaller than the former one can adopt the so-called thin front limit, where the interface is treated as a discontinuity in porosity, with a completely dissolved phase on one side and an undissolved phase on the other. Linear stability analysis for this case has been carried out by Chadam et al. [1], and the corresponding dispersion relation shows that long wavelengths are unstable, whereas short wavelengths are stabilized by diffusion. In their derivation, Chadam et al. have considered a linear geometry with a uniform pressure gradient applied along one of the directions. However, in many cases (e.g. in the acidization techniques used in oil industry) the reactive fluids are injected through a well and thus the relevant geometry is radial rather than linear. Motivated by this, we have carried out the linear stability analysis of the reactive-infiltration problem in radial geometry, with the fluid injection at the centre of the system. We stay within the thin-front limit and derive the corresponding dispersion relation, which shows the stable regions for both the long-wavelength and short-wavelength modes, and the unstable region in between. Next, we study how

  11. Factors associated with variability in management of vascular access ports.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Maya, J; Richart-Martínez, M

    2016-09-01

    Guidelines and clinical practice recommendations vary on the management of vascular access ports. Traditionally, patient, health system and healthcare professional's factors have been interrelated in studies of clinical practice variability. Understanding variation in the management of vascular access ports and to identify the influence of these factors in the compliance with the most common recommendations of vascular access guidelines, is an important first step for designing targeted improvement interventions. We analysed data from a survey sent to all Spanish outpatient clinics. Overall, 185 units at Spanish outpatients clinics out of a total of 256 completed the survey. Geographical region and unit size are the most common associated factors in the management of vascular access ports and there is a low level of compliance with many of the recommendations given by guidelines. Large outpatient chemotherapy units have been related to higher monitoring of the recommendations. Clinical practice and provided care to patients with vascular access ports are influenced by region and structural and organisational differences in the outpatient chemotherapy units. It is important to identify additional factors that may explain the variability. PMID:26075498

  12. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  14. Inflammatory Cytokines in Vascular Dysfunction and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Alexander H.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular inflammatory response involves complex interaction between inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages), endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and extracellular matrix (ECM). Vascular injury is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules by ECs and recruitment of inflammatory cells, growth factors, and cytokines, with consequent effects on ECs, VSMCs and ECM. Cytokines include tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and transforming growth factors. Cytokines are produced by macrophages, T cells and monocytes, as well as platelets, ECs and VSMCs. Circulating cytokines interact with specific receptors on various cell types and activate JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and Smad signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response involving cell adhesion, permeability and apoptosis. Cytokines also interact with mitochondria to increasie the production of reactive oxygen species. Cytokine-induced activation of these pathways in ECs modifies the production/activity of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and bradykinin, as well as vasoconstrictive mediators such as endothelin and angiotensin II. Cytokines interact with VSMCs to activate Ca2+, protein kinase C, Rho-Kinase, and MAPK pathways, which promote cell growth and migration, and VSM reactivity. Cytokines also interact with integrins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and modify ECM composition. Persistent increases in cytokines are associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins and hypertension. Genetic and pharmacological tools to decrease the production of cytokines or to diminish their effects using cytokine antagonists could provide new approaches in the management of inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:19413999

  15. Earthquake cycles in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanet, Pierre; Bhat, Harsha; Madariaga, Raul

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of earthquake cycles, from a modelling perspective, comes mainly from theoretical, and numerical, work on a single straight fault. However, natural fault systems are geometrically complex. Modelling complex fault geometry (bends, kinks and multiple faults) is in itself a challenge as it is computationally intensive. To overcome this difficulty, we appeal to the Fast Multipole Method which was developed in the context of modelling N-body problems. This method is then used to model the quasi-dynamic response of multiple faults, with complex geometries, that are governed by rate and state friction laws. Our preliminary findings tell us that when stress interaction between faults, due to complex geometry, is accounted then even strongly rate-weakening faults (a-b)<0 show a complex spectrum of slow slip and dynamic ruptures.

  16. Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald; Simon, Joan

    2007-05-29

    Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.

  17. Hexatic undulations in curved geometries.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter; Nelson, David R

    2003-03-01

    We discuss the influence of two-dimensional hexatic order on capillary waves and undulation modes in spherical and cylindrical geometries. In planar geometries, extended bond-orientational order has only a minor effect on the fluctuations of liquid surfaces or lipid bilayers. However, in curved geometries, the long-wavelength spectrum of these ripples is altered. We calculate this frequency shift and discuss applications to spherical vesicles, liquid metal droplets, bubbles and cylindrical jets coated with surface-active molecules, and to multielectron bubbles in liquid helium at low temperatures. Hexatic order also leads to a shift in the threshold for the fission instability of charged droplets and bubbles, and for the Plateau-Rayleigh instability of liquid jets. PMID:12689068

  18. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  19. Serial analysis of lumen geometry and hemodynamics in human arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Terry, Christi M.; Nguyen, Cuong; Berceli, Scott A.; Shiu, Yan-Ting E.; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2014-01-01

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred form of vascular access for maintenance hemodialysis, but it often fails to mature to become clinically usable, likely due to aberrant hemodynamic forces. A robust pipeline for serial assessment of hemodynamic parameters and subsequent lumen cross-sectional area changes has been developed and applied to a data set from contrast-free MRI of a dialysis patient’s AVF collected over a period of months after AVF creation surgery. Black-blood MRI yielded images of AVF lumen geometry, while cine phase-contrast MRI provided volumetric flow rates at the in-flow and out-flow locations. Lumen geometry and flow rates were used as inputs for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling to provide serial wall shear stress (WSS), WSS gradient, and oscillatory shear index profiles. The serial AVF lumen geometries were co-registered at 1-mm intervals using respective lumen centerlines, with the anastomosis as an anatomical landmark. Lumen enlargement was limited at the vein region near the anastomosis and a downstream vein valve, potentially attributed to a physical inhibition of wall expansion at those sites. This work is the first serial and detail study of lumen and hemodynamic changes in human AVF using MRI and CFD. This novel protocol will be used for a multicenter prospective study to identify critical hemodynamic factors that contribute to AVF maturation failure. PMID:23122945

  20. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. PMID:26964551

  1. Vascular effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Svyatoslav N.; Kopayeva, V. G.; Andreev, J. B.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Suchin, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular effect of PDT has been studied in patients with corneal vascularized leucomas (10 patients) and in patients with corneal neovascularized transplant (3 patients). For vascularized leucomas the method of photodynamic therapy consisted of the local injection of dimegin (deiteroporphyrin derivative) into the space of the newly-formed vessels under operating microscope (opton) with the microneedle (diameter 200 microns) and corneal irradiation by the operating microscope light. For corneal neovascularized transplant the injection of photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) intravenously were made with subsequent irradiation by light of dye laser (5 hours after the injection) with light density of 150 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes. In all the cases at the time of irradiation the aggregated blood flow was appeared, followed by blood flow stasis. In postoperative period the vessels disintegrated into separate fragments which disappeared completely after 10 - 15 days. Taking into account the data of light microscopy, the disappearance of the vessels took place as a result of the vascular endothelium lisis along the vascular walls. Neovascularized cornea and newly-formed vessels in tumor stroms have much in common. The vessel alterations study presented in this paper, may serve to specify the mechanism of photodynamic destruction of neovascularized stroma of tumor.

  2. Inflammation in the Vascular Bed

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Rene; May, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite decreases in atherosclerotic coronary vascular disease over the last several decades, atherosclerosis remains a major cause of mortality in developed nations. One possible contributor to this residual risk is oxidant stress, which is generated by the inflammatory response of atherosclerosis. Although there is a wealth of in vitro, cellular, and animal data supporting a protective role for antioxidant vitamins and nutrients in the atherosclerotic process, the best clinical trials have been negative. This may be due to the fact that antioxidant therapies are applied “too little and too late.” This review considers the role of vitamin C, or ascorbic acid in preventing the earliest inflammatory changes in atherosclerosis. It focuses on the three major vascular cell types involved in atherosclerosis: endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Ascorbate chemistry, recycling, and function are described for these cell types, with emphasis on whether and how the vitamin might affect the inflammatory process. For endothelial cells, ascorbate helps to prevent endothelial dysfunction, stimulates type IV collagen synthesis, and enhances cell proliferation. For vascular smooth muscle cells, ascorbate inhibits dedifferentiation, recruitment, and proliferation in areas of vascular damage. For macrophages, ascorbate decreases oxidant stress related to their activation, decreases uptake and degradation of oxidized LDL in some studies, and enhances several aspects of their function. Although further studies of ascorbate function in these cell types and in novel animal models are needed, available evidence generally supports a salutary role for this vitamin in ameliorating the earliest stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:18582947

  3. Individualized Geometry: A Geometry Unit for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geissler, Dennis; Larson, Richard

    This geometry unit for the intermediate grades is based on the Holt Mathematics Series (levels 3-6), using the concepts of Individually Guided Education (IGE). It is divided into seven levels, one for grade 3 and two each for grades 4-6. Each is designed for both individual and group learning. A vocabulary list is used as a key for activities; a…

  4. PREFACE: Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolin, A.; Abramov, V.; Fuchs, J.; Paal, E.; Shestopalov, Y.; Silvestrov, S.

    2012-02-01

    This proceedings volume presents results obtained by the participants of the 6th Baltic-Nordic workshop 'Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics (AGMP-6)' held at the Sven Lovén Centre for Marine Sciences in Tjärnö, Sweden on October 25-30, 2010. The Baltic-Nordic Network AGMP 'Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics' http://www.agmp.eu was created in 2005 on the initiative of two Estonian universities and two Swedish universities: Tallinn University of Technology represented by Eugen Paal (coordinator of the network), Tartu University represented by Viktor Abramov, Lund University represented by Sergei Silvestrov, and Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg represented by Alexander Stolin. The goal was to promote international and interdisciplinary cooperation between scientists and research groups in the countries of the Baltic-Nordic region in mathematics and mathematical physics, with special emphasis on the important role played by algebra and geometry in modern physics, engineering and technologies. The main activities of the AGMP network consist of a series of regular annual international workshops, conferences and research schools. The AGMP network also constitutes an important educational forum for scientific exchange and dissimilation of research results for PhD students and Postdocs. The network has expanded since its creation, and nowadays its activities extend beyond countries in the Baltic-Nordic region to universities in other European countries and participants from elsewhere in the world. As one of the important research-dissimilation outcomes of its activities, the network has a tradition of producing high-quality research proceedings volumes after network events, publishing them with various international publishers. The PDF also contains the following: List of AGMP workshops and other AGMP activities Main topics discussed at AGMP-6 Review of AGMP-6 proceedings Acknowledgments List of Conference Participants

  5. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  6. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-07-10

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  7. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  8. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  9. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Pitale, Shailesh; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagha

    2011-01-01

    Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ‘Barker's Hypothesis’. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological. PMID:22145131

  10. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  11. [Permanent vascular access for haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Manafov, E N; Batrashov, V A; Sergeev, O G; Yudaev, S S

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a permanent vascular access (PVA) is the pledge of successful treatment of patients being on chronic haemodialysis (CD). Creation and maintenance of a functioning PVA is the priority task of vascular and endovascular surgeons, nephrologists and specialists of haemodialysis departments. According to the KDOQI guidelines, the most preferable type of PVA is a native arteriovenous fistula (AVF). As an alternative it is possible to use a synthetic prosthesis for creating an arteriovenous shunt (AVS) or implantation of a central venous catheter (CVC). Various complications of vascular accesses leading to their loss create the necessity of forming just another PVA, thus negatively influencing the life span and quality of life of this cohort of patients. Improving surgical technique and approaches to treatment, as well as carrying out dynamic monitoring of the condition of the created PVA make it possible to considerably decrease the incidence rate of such complications and to improve the quality of medical care rendered. PMID:26451410

  12. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  13. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  14. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike many neurodegenerative causes of cognitive impairment and dementia, vascular damage is preventable. Despite the heterogeneity of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and the complexity of its clinical presentations, the potential for limiting progression and changing the trajectory of damage makes it all the more important for physicians to be educated about the syndrome and to remain vigilant when taking care of patients. In this review, we outline an approach to patients with possible VCI, summarize current treatment and prevention guidelines, and provide an overview with case examples. PMID:26124978

  15. Genetic basis for vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kirkorian, A Yasmine; Grossberg, Anna L; Püttgen, Katherine B

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental genetics of many isolated vascular anomalies and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies have been elucidated. The rate of discovery continues to increase, expanding our understanding of the underlying interconnected molecular pathways. This review summarizes genetic and clinical information on the following diagnoses: capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, arteriovenous malformation, PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS), Proteus syndrome, SOLAMEN syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, congenital hemangioma, verrucous venous malformation, cutaneomucosal venous malformation, blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, Parkes-Weber syndrome, and Maffucci syndrome. PMID:27607321

  16. The structure-mechanical relationship of palm vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningling; Liu, Wangyu; Huang, Jiale; Ma, Ke

    2014-08-01

    The structure-mechanical relationship of palm sheath is studied with numerical and experimental methods. The cellular structure of the vascular tissue is rebuilt with an image-based reconstruction method and used to create finite element models. The validity of the models is firstly verified with the results from the tensile tests. Then, the cell walls inside each of the specific regions (fiber cap, vessel, xylem, etc.) are randomly removed to obtain virtually imperfect structures. By comparing the magnitudes of performance degradation in the different imperfect structures, the influences of each region on the overall mechanical performances of the vascular tissue are discussed. The longitudinal stiffness and yield strength are sensitive to the defects in the vessel regions. While in the transverse directions (including the radial and tangential directions), the parenchymatous tissue determines the mechanical properties of the vascular tissue. Moreover, the hydraulic, dynamic response and energy absorption behavior of the vascular tissue are numerically explored. The flexibility of natural palm tissue enhances its impact resistance. Under the quasi-static compression, the cell walls connecting the fiber cap and the vessel dissipate more energy. The dominant role of the fiber cap in the plastic energy dissipation under high-speed impact is observed. And the radially-arranged fiber cap also allows the palm tissue to improve its tangential mechanical performances under hydraulic pressure. PMID:24768963

  17. Vascular Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisatsugu; Washida, Kazuo; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated vascular functioning in patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of either Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD) and examined a possible relationship between vascular function and cognitive status. Twenty-seven patients with AD, 23 patients with VaD, and 26 healthy control patients underwent measurements of flow-mediated dilation (FMD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and intima-media thickness (IMT). The FMD was significantly lower in patients with AD or VaD compared to controls. There were no significant differences in ABI, CAVI, or IMT among the 3 groups. A significant correlation was found between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and FMD. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis revealed that FMD was significantly predicted by MMSE scores. These results suggest that endothelial involvement plays a role in AD pathogenesis, and FMD may be more sensitive than other surrogate methods (ABI, CAVI, and IMT) for detecting early-stage atherosclerosis and/or cognitive decline. PMID:27284205

  18. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: Biodegradation, drug delivery and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-05-01

    The metallic stents with durable polymers have been effective in reducing the need for revascularization, but the permanent presence of the metal and polymer have been associated with persistent inflammation, hypersensitivity reactions and incidence of thrombosis. Recent innovations of bioresorbable polymers are in development which could serve as temporary scaffolds that degrade into molecules and eventually resorb overtime, and leave the artery free of any permanent prosthetic constraints. The transient scaffolding has the advantages of restoring blood vessel to natural state, improve vasomotor tone and increase lumen enlargement because of expansive remodeling following completion of polymer resorption. The success of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds will depend on the degradation timeline, such that the elastic recoil of the blood vessel and negative remodeling which could potentially lead to restenosis are prevented. Bioresorbable scaffolds with bulky backbone and thick struts could lead to prolonged biodegradation, alter blood flow dynamics and increase thrombogenicity. The development of bioresorbable scaffolds is challenging because of the complexity of finding an ideal balance of polymer biodegradation and controlled drug release over time, such that the fractional drug released achieves optimal inhibitory concentration until the blood vessel remodels to a stable set point. This review discusses the various types of biodegradable materials, factors affecting biodegradation, drug release kinetics, vascular biocompatibility, adaptive vascular remodeling, and challenges in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds to treat vascular restenosis. PMID:27001225

  19. LOGO Based Instruction in Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mian Muhammad

    The objective of this pretest-posttest Quasi-Experimental Design study was to determine the effects of LOGO Based Instruction (LBI) compared to instruction by teacher lecture and pencil-and-paper activities on: (1) students' understanding of the concepts of point, ray, line, and line segment; (2) students' attitudes toward learning geometry,…

  20. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  1. Computer Environments for Learning Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Battista, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research describing computer functions of construction-oriented computer environments and evaluates their contributions to students' learning of geometry. Topics discussed include constructing geometric concepts; the use of LOGO in elementary school mathematics; software that focuses on geometric construction; and implications for the…

  2. Dislocation dynamics in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, D.; Devincre, B.; Kubin, L.

    1999-05-01

    A simulation of dislocation dynamics has been used to calculate the critical stress for a threading dislocation moving in a confined geometry. The optimum conditions for conducting simulations in systems of various sizes, down to the nanometer range, are defined. The results are critically compared with the available theoretical and numerical estimates for the problem of dislocation motion in capped layers.

  3. Improving Student Reasoning in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Bobson; Bukalov, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    In their years of teaching geometry, Wong and Bukalov realized that the greatest challenge has been getting students to improve their reasoning. Many students have difficulty writing formal proofs--a task that requires a good deal of reasoning. Wong and Bukalov reasoned that the solution was to divide the lessons into parallel tasks, allowing…

  4. Foucault pendulum through basic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Jens; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2007-10-01

    We provide a thorough explanation of the Foucault pendulum that utilizes its underlying geometry on a level suitable for science students not necessarily familiar with calculus. We also explain how the geometrically understood Foucault pendulum can serve as a prototype for more advanced phenomena in physics known as Berry's phase or geometric phases.

  5. A Microcomputer Descriptive Geometry Tutorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zongyi, Zuo

    1990-01-01

    A software package which can aid descriptive geometry instruction is described. Included are the features of the software and the software configuration. This software has been honored as the best and most advanced software of its kind in the People's Republic of China. (KR)

  6. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  7. Logo Activities in Elementary Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libeskind, Shlomo; And Others

    These activities were designed for use at the University of Montana, where they were tested for four quarters in a mathematics for elementary teachers course on informal geometry. They are for use with Apple II-Plus computers with 64K memory or Apple IIe computers and MIT Logo. (Modifications are necessary if the activities are to be used with…

  8. Towards a Navajo Indian Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, Rik; And Others

    This book examines the Navajo system of spatial knowledge and describes a culture-based curriculum for the development of an intuitive geometry based on the child's experience of the physical world. Aspects of the Navajo cosmology relevant to spatial knowledge are discussed: the structure of the world; the dynamic nature of the universe;…

  9. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  10. Spectral geometry of symplectic spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2015-10-01

    Symplectic spinors form an infinite-rank vector bundle. Dirac operators on this bundle were constructed recently by Habermann, K. ["The Dirac operator on symplectic spinors," Ann. Global Anal. Geom. 13, 155-168 (1995)]. Here we study the spectral geometry aspects of these operators. In particular, we define the associated distance function and compute the heat trace asymptotics.

  11. Teaching Geometry According to Euclid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This essay contains some reflections and questions arising from encounters with the text of Euclid's Elements. The reflections arise out of the teaching of a course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry to undergraduates. It is concluded that teachers of such courses should read Euclid and ask questions, then teach a course on Euclid and later…

  12. Noncommutative geometry inspired entropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Akhshabi, Siamak

    2011-06-01

    Recently Verlinde proposed that gravity can be described as an emergent phenomena arising from changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. By using noncommutative geometry as a way to describe the microscopic microstructure of quantum spacetime, we derive modified Friedmann equation in this setup and study the entropic force modifications to the inflationary dynamics of early universe.

  13. Van Hiele Guidelines for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Geoff; Holliday, Jack

    1992-01-01

    Describes five skills underpinning the understanding of geometry for primary and lower secondary mathematics students. Skill categories identified include (1) visual; (2) verbal; (3) drawing; (4) logical; and (5) application. Gives examples of skills appropriate for Van Hiele levels 1-3. (MDH)

  14. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  15. The basics of information geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    To what extent can we distinguish one probability distribution from another? Are there quantitative measures of distinguishability? The goal of this tutorial is to approach such questions by introducing the notion of the "distance" between two probability distributions and exploring some basic ideas of such an "information geometry".

  16. The Idea of Order at Geometry Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Thomas

    The idea of order in geometry is explored using the experience of assignments given to undergraduates in a college geometry course "From Space to Geometry." Discussed are the definition of geometry, and earth measurement using architecture, art, and common experience. This discussion concludes with a consideration of the question of whether…

  17. Teaching Activity-Based Taxicab Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed on the process of teaching taxicab geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry that is easy to understand and similar to Euclidean geometry with its axiomatic structure. In this regard, several teaching activities were designed such as measuring taxicab distance, defining a taxicab circle, finding a geometric locus in taxicab geometry, and…

  18. Mesoscopic Modeling of Thrombus Formation and Growth: Platelet Deposition in Complex Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    Haemodynamics and blood rheology are important contributing factors to thrombus formation at a vulnerable vessel wall, and adhesion of platelets to a vascular surface, particularly in regions of flow stagnation, recirculation and reattachment is significantly important in formation of thrombi. For example, haemodynamic micro-environment can have effects on thrombosis inside the atherosclerotic plaques and aneurysms. To study these effects, we have developed and validated a model for platelet aggregation in blood flow using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. In this model platelets are considered as single DPD particles interacting with each other via Morse potential once activated. We assign an activation delay time to each platelet such that they remain passive during that time. We investigate the effect of different geometries on platelet aggregation by considering arterial stenosis at different levels of occlusion, and aneurysms of different shapes and sizes. The results show a marked increase in platelet aggregation within the boundaries of deceleration zone by increasing the degree of stenosis. Further, we observe enhanced platelet margination and wall deposition in the presence of red blood cells.

  19. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom with fiducial markers visible in DSA, CTA, MRA, and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Guy; Soulez, Gilles; Qanadli, Salah D; Teppaz, Pierre; Allard, Louise; Qin, Zhao; Cloutier, François; Durand, Louis-Gilles

    2004-06-01

    The objective was to design a vascular phantom compatible with digital subtraction angiography, computerized tomography angiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Fiducial markers were implanted at precise known locations in the phantom to facilitate identification and orientation of plane views from three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructed images. A vascular conduit connected to tubing at the extremities of the phantom ran through an agar-based gel filling it. A vessel wall in latex was included around the conduit to avoid diffusion of contrast agents. Using a lost-material casting technique based on a low melting point metal, geometries of pathological vessels were modeled. During the experimental testing, fiducial markers were detectable in all modalities without distortion. No leak of gadolinium through the vascular wall was observed on MRA after 5 hours. Moreover, no significant deformation of the vascular conduit was noted during the fabrication process (confirmed by microtome slicing along the vessel). The potential use of the phantom for calibration, rescaling, and fusion of 3-D images obtained from the different modalities as well as its use for the evaluation of intra- and inter-modality comparative studies of imaging systems are discussed. In conclusion, the vascular phantom can allow accurate calibration of radiological imaging devices based on x-ray, magnetic resonance and ultrasound and quantitative comparisons of the geometric accuracy of the vessel lumen obtained with each of these methods on a given well defined 3-D geometry. PMID:15259645

  20. Geometry in Transition: A Model of Emergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Delgadillo-Blando, Rodrigo; O'Connor, Denjoe; Ydri, Badis

    2008-05-23

    We study a three matrix model with global SO(3) symmetry containing at most quartic powers of the matrices. We find an exotic line of discontinuous transitions with a jump in the entropy, characteristic of a 1st order transition, yet with divergent critical fluctuations and a divergent specific heat with critical exponent {alpha}=1/2. The low temperature phase is a geometrical one with gauge fields fluctuating on a round sphere. As the temperature increased the sphere evaporates in a transition to a pure matrix phase with no background geometrical structure. Both the geometry and gauge fields are determined dynamically. It is not difficult to invent higher dimensional models with essentially similar phenomenology. The model presents an appealing picture of a geometrical phase emerging as the system cools and suggests a scenario for the emergence of geometry in the early Universe.

  1. Monitoring cerebral oxygenation in a pediatric patient undergoing surgery for vascular ring.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Reena K; Motta, Pablo; Horibe, Mayumi; Mossad, Emad

    2006-02-01

    Regional cerebral oxygenation can be monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Inadequacy of collateral cerebral circulation and regional cerebral ischemia during cardiac and vascular surgery may be detected by the use of NIRS monitoring. We report a 2-year-old child who underwent surgical repair of vascular ring and subclavian reimplantation, where use of NIRS helped in early detection and timely intervention to prevent prolonged cerebral ischemia. PMID:16430416

  2. [A new biological vascular prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Erasmi, H; Schmidt, R

    1991-01-01

    In an experimental study on sheeps a new biologic vascular graft was implanted, 30 x in carotidal, 30 x in aortal position. Only one early occlusion of the graft, due to technical reasons, could be observed. Without aneurysmatic degeneration all graft were in function at the time of harvesting the samples. Morphologically a "revitalisation" of the grafts could be proved. PMID:1788779

  3. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  4. Perioperative assessment in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: The use of ultrasound and computerized tomographic scanning in the diagnosis of vascular pathology; Ancillary techniques in diagnostic angiography; Pre-bypass operative arteriography; Perioperative assessment of in situ bypass grafts; and Early and late evaluation of postoperative carotid restenosis and occlusion.

  5. The relationships of vascular plants.

    PubMed Central

    Kenrick, P

    2000-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic research indicates that vascular plants evolved from bryophyte-like ancestors and that this involved extensive modifications to the life cycle. These conclusions are supported by a range of systematic data, including gene sequences, as well as evidence from comparative morphology and the fossil record. Within vascular plants, there is compelling evidence for two major clades, which have been termed lycophytes (clubmosses) and euphyllophytes (seed plants, ferns, horsetails). The implications of recent phylogenetic work are discussed with reference to life cycle evolution and the interpretation of stratigraphic inconsistencies in the early fossil record of land plants. Life cycles are shown to have passed through an isomorphic phase in the early stages of vascular plant evolution. Thus, the gametophyte generation of all living vascular plants is the product of massive morphological reduction. Phylogenetic research corroborates earlier suggestions of a major representational bias in the early fossil record. Mega-fossils document a sequence of appearance of groups that is at odds with that predicted by cladogram topology. It is argued here that the pattern of appearance and diversification of plant megafossils owes more to changing geological conditions than to rapid biological diversification. PMID:10905613

  6. Vascular basis of mucosal color

    PubMed Central

    Kleinheinz, Johannes; Büchter, André; Fillies, Thomas; Joos, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Background Besides the color of the teeth the color of the alveolar gingiva plays a crucial role in esthetic rehabilitation in dento-alveolar treatment. Whereas nowadays the color of the teeth can be determined exactly and individually, the specific influence of the red color of the gingiva on treatment has not been assessed yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vascularization as the basis for gingival esthetics. Methods Standardized photographs of defined areas of the alveolar gingiva in operated and non-operated patients were taken and assigned to groups with same characteristics after color comparisons. In addition, histologic and immunohistologic analyses of gingival specimens were performed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vessels and vascularization. Finally, colors and number of vessels were correlated. Results Our results demonstrated three different constellations of colors of the alveolar gingiva in healthy patients. The operated patients could not be grouped because of disparate depiction. There was a clear correlation between color and vessel number in the alveolar gingiva. Conclusion Our investigations revealed the connections between vascularization and gingival color. Recommendations for specific change or even selection of colors based on the results cannot be given, but the importance of vascularly based incision lines was demonstrated. PMID:16270929

  7. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Solveig L; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-03-01

    This review provides a clinically-oriented summary of the most commonly encountered overgrowth syndromes associated with vascular malformations. This manuscript will outline morphologic features, clinical evaluation and management of this complex group of patients. Recent genetic advances have aided in classification and help to explain overlapping clinical features in many cases. PMID:27607325

  8. Analysis of the fetal placental vascular tree by X-ray micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Langheinrich, A C; Wienhard, J; Vormann, S; Hau, B; Bohle, R M; Zygmunt, M

    2004-01-01

    The current understanding of the placental vascular tree largely derives from time-consuming morphometric analyses performed by conventional histology, electron microscopy of corrosion casts and three-dimensional reconstructions based on physical tissue sections. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) emerges as a new, non-destructive and fast tool for imaging and quantifying fetoplacental vasculature. Term placentae (n=5) were perfused with contrast agent consisting of barium-sulfate, gelatine and thymol shortly after Caesarean-section-delivery. Samples (1 cm(3)) from eight different regions of the placenta were subsequently scanned in a micro-CT. Using tomographic reconstruction algorithms, three dimensional images were obtained by micro-CT allowing total stereoscopic visualization and continuous quantitative analysis of the vascular structure of the investigated samples. These samples were compared regarding vascular surface (VS) and vascular density (vascular volume fraction, TCVF). Quantitative assessment showed an average vascular density of 16 per cent (SD+/-0.4) and a vascular surface of 475 mm(2)(SD+/-8) per total tissue volume (including intervillous space) of 125 mm(3). Micro-CT image-analysis showed no significant differences in the fetal vascularization among term placentae. Micro-CT imaging is feasible for imaging and analysis of the villous vascular tree, allows further morphologic studies and immunohistochemistry of the placental specimens and may emerge as an additional tool in the investigation of the physiology and pathophysiology of the placental vasculature. PMID:15013644

  9. Vascular hemichorea: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Martínez Alfonzo, Bárbara; Blanco, Andrés Enrique; Rojano, Jairo; Calleja, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Chorea rarely complicates ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebral vascular lesions. Clinical symptoms usually involve one side of the body while the injury is situated on the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. Spontaneous remission is the norm, but sometimes symptomatic treatment is required. A 58-year-old male patient who suffers from untreated high blood pressure, type II obesity, smokes 6 packs of cigarettes per year and has a moderate intake of alcohol is presented. The patient’'s recent history began three days before he appeared at the Emergency Department. His symptoms were ceaseless, involuntary movements in his left arm and foot during day and night with no restriction of voluntary movements. Physical examination and laboratory tests revealed no other findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed hyperintensity in the right posterolateral thalamic region consistent with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Symptomatic therapy was indicated and his underlying conditions were addressed. The importance of this case lies on the low prevalence as well as the scarcity of publications regarding vascular causes of hemichorea, including diagnosis, therapy and prognosis. PMID:25473878

  10. Human proximal femur bone adaptation to variations in hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Machado, M M; Fernandes, P R; Zymbal, V; Baptista, F

    2014-10-01

    The study of bone mass distribution at proximal femur may contribute to understand the role of hip geometry on hip fracture risk. We examined how bone mineral density (BMD) of proximal femur adapts to inter individual variations in the femoral neck length (FNL), femoral neck width (FNW) and neck shaft angle (NSA). A parameterized and dimensionally scalable 3-D finite element model of a reference proximal femur geometry was incrementally adjusted to adopt physiological ranges at FNL (3.90-6.90cm), FNW (2.90-3.46cm), and NSA (109-141º), yielding a set of femora with different geometries. The bone mass distribution for each femur was obtained with a suitable bone remodelling model. The BMDs at the integral femoral neck (FN) and at the intertrochanteric (ITR) region, as well as the BMD ratio of inferomedial to superolateral (IM:SL) regions of FN and BMD ratio of FN:ITR were used to represent bone mass distribution. Results revealed that longer FNLs present greater BMD (g/cm(3)) at the FN, mainly at the SL region, and at the ITR region. Wider FNs were associated with reduced BMD at the FN, particularly at the SL region, and at the ITR region. Larger NSAs up to 129° were associated with BMD diminutions at the FN and ITR regions and with increases of the IM:SL BMD ratio while NSAs larger than 129° resulted in decrease of the IM:SL BMD ratio. These findings suggest hip geometry as moderator of the mechanical loading influence on bone mass distribution at proximal femur with higher FNL favoring the BMD of FN and ITR regions and greater FNW and NSA having the opposite effect. Augmented values of FNL and FNW seem also to favor more the BMD at the superolateral than at the inferomedial FN region. PMID:25016094

  11. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth MC; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  12. Increased cerebral vascular reactivity in the tau expressing rTg4510 mouse: evidence against the role of tau pathology to impair vascular health in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jack A; Holmes, Holly E; O'Callaghan, James M; Colgan, Niall; Ismail, Ozama; Fisher, Elizabeth Mc; Siow, Bernard; Murray, Tracey K; Schwarz, Adam J; O'Neill, Michael J; Collins, Emily C; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2015-03-01

    Vascular abnormalities are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Imaging of cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) is a powerful tool to investigate vascular health in clinical populations although the cause of reduced CVR in AD patients is not fully understood. We investigated the specific role of tau pathology in CVR derangement in AD using the rTg4510 mouse model. We observed an increase in CVR in cortical regions with tau pathology. These data suggest that tau pathology alone does not produce the clinically observed decreases in CVR and implicates amyloid pathology as the dominant etiology of impaired CVR in AD patients. PMID:25515210

  13. ROLES OF STARTING GEOMETRIES IN QUANTUM MECHANICS STUDIES OF CELLOBIOSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently we studied the conformations of cellobiose with HF/6-31G(d) energy minimization by constructing an adiabatic energy surface for the region that contains most of the geometries that are observed in crystals. Single point HF/6-311+G(d) calculations were also carried out. We also looked at two...

  14. ROLES OF STARTING GEOMETRIES IN QUANTUM MECHANICS STUDIES OF CELLOBIOSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently we studied the conformations of cellobiose with HF/6-31G(d) energy minimization by constructing an adiabatic energy surface for the region that contains most of the geometries that are observed in crystals. Single point HF/6-311+G(d) calculations were also carried out. We also looked at tw...

  15. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  16. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  17. Geometry of area without length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  18. Information geometry of Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Amari, S; Kurata, K; Nagaoka, H

    1992-01-01

    A Boltzmann machine is a network of stochastic neurons. The set of all the Boltzmann machines with a fixed topology forms a geometric manifold of high dimension, where modifiable synaptic weights of connections play the role of a coordinate system to specify networks. A learning trajectory, for example, is a curve in this manifold. It is important to study the geometry of the neural manifold, rather than the behavior of a single network, in order to know the capabilities and limitations of neural networks of a fixed topology. Using the new theory of information geometry, a natural invariant Riemannian metric and a dual pair of affine connections on the Boltzmann neural network manifold are established. The meaning of geometrical structures is elucidated from the stochastic and the statistical point of view. This leads to a natural modification of the Boltzmann machine learning rule. PMID:18276427

  19. [Vascular reconstruction in visceral transplantation surgery].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, P; Seehofer, D; Öllinger, R; Pratschke, J

    2016-02-01

    Vascular reconstruction is obligatory in transplantation surgery. A differentiation is made between routine vascular reconstructions, which are required for all solid organ transplantations and special cases. Because of the shortage of organs it is often necessary to use organs with complex anatomical vascular prerequisites, which requires high vascular surgical expertise for individualized reconstruction. Non-routine reconstructions are often also necessary on the side of the recipient. This review article presents both the routine and exceptional types of reconstruction. PMID:26541451

  20. [Overview of the vascular interventional surgery robot].

    PubMed

    Li, Shenglin; Shen, Jie; Yan, Yonghua; Chen, Daguo

    2013-03-01

    In vascular invasive surgery procedures, because doctors suffered from a large number of X-ray radiation, and it is difficult to manipulate catheter, so vascular interventional robot has been rapidly developed. On the basis of analysis of vascular surgical intervention process, key technologies of vascular interventional surgical robots are provided. The image navigation system, the mechanical structure, control systems and force feedback are also analyzed. PMID:23777068

  1. Dealing with vascular conundrums with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Angthong, Wirana; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a robust imaging modality for evaluation of vascular diseases. Technological advances have made MR imaging widely available for accurate and time-efficient vascular assessment. In this article the clinical usefulness of MR imaging techniques and their application are reviewed, using examples of vascular abnormalities commonly encountered in clinical practice, including abdominal, pelvic, and thoracic vessels. Common pitfalls and problem solving in interpretation of vascular findings in body MR imaging are also discussed. PMID:24889175

  2. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  3. Orbit propagation in Minkowskian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier; Peláez, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    The geometry of hyperbolic orbits suggests that Minkowskian geometry, and not Euclidean, may provide the most adequate description of the motion. This idea is explored in order to derive a new regularized formulation for propagating arbitrarily perturbed hyperbolic orbits. The mathematical foundations underlying Minkowski space-time are exploited to describe hyperbolic orbits. Hypercomplex numbers are introduced to define the rotations, vectors, and metrics in the problem: the evolution of the eccentricity vector is described on the Minkowski plane in terms of hyperbolic numbers, and the orbital plane is described on the inertial reference using quaternions. A set of eight orbital elements is introduced, namely a time-element, the components of the eccentricity vector in , the semimajor axis, and the components of the quaternion defining the orbital plane. The resulting formulation provides a deep insight into the geometry of hyperbolic orbits. The performance of the formulation in long-term propagations is studied. The orbits of four hyperbolic comets are integrated and the accuracy of the solution is compared to other regularized formulations. The resulting formulation improves the stability of the integration process and it is not affected by the perihelion passage. It provides a level of accuracy that may not be reached by the compared formulations, at the cost of increasing the computational time.

  4. Management of hemangiomas and other vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Greene, Arin K

    2011-01-01

    Vascular tumors of childhood are typically benign. The 4 most common types are infantile hemangioma (IH), congenital hemangioma (CH), kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE), and pyogenic granuloma (PG). Vascular tumors must be differentiated from vascular malformations. Although tumors and malformations may appear as raised, blue, red, or purple lesions, their management differs significantly. PMID:21095471

  5. Critical roles of CD146 in zebrafish vascular development.

    PubMed

    Chan, Barden; Sinha, Sonia; Cho, Dan; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we use zebrafish as a model system to understand the importance of CD146 in vascular development. Endothelial-specific expression of CD146 was verified by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Suppression of CD146 protein expression by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) resulted in poorly developed intersomitic vessels (ISVs). In CD146 morphants, we observed a lack of blood flow through the ISV region, despite that fluorescence microangiography showed that the ISVs were present. This finding suggests that the lumens of the developing ISVs may be too narrow for proper circulation. Additionally, remodeling of the caudal vein plexus into functional vascular tubes appeared to be affected. Suppression of CD146 protein expression resulted in a circulation shunt that caused the circulation to by-pass part of the caudal artery/vein system. The same vascular defects were recapitulated by using a second morpholino oligonucleotide. This morphant expressed a truncated CD146 protein with amino acids V32 to T57 at the N terminus deleted in an in-frame manner. This region, therefore, is likely to contain elements critical for CD146 function. This study provides the first in vivo functional assessment of CD146 in embryonic development by showing that knockdown of CD146 protein expression severely hinders vascular development in zebrafish. PMID:15580611

  6. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates.more » The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.« less

  7. Thermoacoustic engines in alternate geometry resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightfoot, Jay Alan

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to branch out from thermoacoustics in the plane wave geometry to study radial wave thermoacoustic engines. Two possible advantages of radial systems are proposed: a reduction in harmonic generation due to the natural anharmonicity of the resonator, and the possibility of improved engine performance using naturally sloped stacks. The radial wave prime mover is described. Experimental results for the temperature at which oscillations begin are compared with theoretical predictions. Accounting for a pore distribution in the stack and temperature discontinuities between the stack and heat exchangers, theory and experiment are shown to be in agreement. In addition, spectral measurements in the radial prime mover show that the anharmonicity of the resonator significantly reduces non-linear harmonic generation. To gain a better understanding of naturally sloped stacks in the radial engine, the physics of sloped stacks is extended to the plane geometry, where fewer constraints exist. A theoretical treatment of thermoacoustic engines with varying stack pore cross-section and/or varying resonator cross-section in the temperature gradient supporting stack region is presented along with numerical results for plane and radial wave prime movers and refrigerators. Results show significant improvements in refrigerator COP in plane wave systems.

  8. Vascular diseases: aortitis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ladich, Elena; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Romero, Maria E; Virmani, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the aorta broadly include noninfectious and infectious aortitis, periaortitis, atherosclerosis, and inflammatory atherosclerotic aneurysms. Aortitis is uncommon but is increasingly recognized as an important cause of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Abdominal (AAA) and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) have different pathologies and etiologies. AAAs are the most common type of aortic aneurysm, and the vast majority of these are atherosclerotic. The causes of TAA vary depending on the site of involvement, but medial degeneration is a common pathologic substrate, regardless of etiology, and genetic influences play a prominent role in TAA expression. Standardized classification schemes for inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the aorta have only recently been added to the pathology literature. A brief overview of the new histopathologic classifications for aortic inflammatory and degenerative diseases has recently been published by the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology as a consensus document on the surgical pathology of the aorta. Vascular calcification is a highly regulated biologic process, and the mechanisms leading to vascular calcification are under investigation. Calcification may occur in the intima (atherosclerotic) or in the media secondary to metabolic disease. Rarely, vascular calcification may be associated with genetic disorders. PMID:27526100

  9. GI-Associated Hemangiomas and Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Hemangiomas and vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract, rare clinical entities, present as overt or occult bleeding. They can be distributed throughout the intestinal digestive system, or present as a singular cavernous hemangioma or malformation, which is often located in the rectosigmoid region. Misdiagnosis is common despite characteristic radiographic features such as radiolucent phleboliths on plain film imaging and a purplish nodule on endoscopy. Adjunctive imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are suggested as there is potential for local invasion. Endorectal ultrasound with Doppler has also been found to be useful in some instances. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment, with an emphasis on sphincter preservation. Nonsurgical endoscopic treatment with banding and sclerotherapy has been reported with success, especially in instances where an extensive resection is not feasible. PMID:22942801

  10. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  11. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  12. Simulating Irregular Source Geometries for Ionian Plumes

    SciTech Connect

    McDoniel, W. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Buchta, D. A.; Freund, J.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2011-05-20

    Volcanic plumes on Io respresent a complex rarefied flow into a near-vacuum in the presence of gravity. A 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to investigate the gas dynamics of such plumes, with a focus on the effects of source geometry on far-field deposition patterns. A rectangular slit and a semicircular half annulus are simulated to illustrate general principles, especially the effects of vent curvature on deposition ring structure. Then two possible models for the giant plume Pele are presented. One is a curved line source corresponding to an IR image of a particularly hot region in the volcano's caldera and the other is a large area source corresponding to the entire caldera. The former is seen to produce the features seen in observations of Pele's ring, but with an error in orientation. The latter corrects the error in orientation, but loses some structure. A hybrid simulation of 3D slit flow is also discussed.

  13. Topographic patterns of vascular disease: HOX proteins as determining factors?

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Richard P; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Steadily increasing evidence supports the idea that genetic diversities in the vascular bed are, in addition to hemodynamic influences, a major contributing factor in determining region-specific cardiovascular disease susceptibility. Members of the phylogenetically highly conserved Hox gene family of developmental regulators have to be viewed as prime candidates for determining these regional genetic differences in the vasculature. During embryonic patterning, the regionally distinct and precisely choreographed expression patterns of HOX transcription factors are essential for the correct specification of positional identities. Apparently, these topographic patterns are to some degree retained in certain adult tissues, including the circulatory system. While an understanding of the functional significance of these localized Hox activities in adult blood vessels is only beginning to emerge, an argument can be made for a role of Hox genes in the maintenance of vessel wall homeostasis and functional integrity on the one hand, and in regulating the development and progression of regionally restricted vascular pathologies, on the other. Initial functional studies in animal models, as well as data from clinical studies provide some level of support for this view. The data suggest that putative genetic regulatory networks of Hox-dependent cardiovascular disease processes include genes of diverse functional categories (extracellular matrix remodeling, transmembrane signaling, cell cycle control, inflammatory response, transcriptional control, etc.), as potential targets in both vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, as well as cell populations residing in the adventitia. PMID:26322165

  14. Where do we stand on vascular calcification?

    PubMed

    Boström, Kristina I

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease, such as atherosclerosis and diabetic vasculopathy, is frequently complicated by vascular calcification. Previously believed to be an end-stage process of unregulated mineral precipitation, it is now well established to be a multi-faceted disease influenced by the characteristics of its vascular location, the origins of calcifying cells and numerous regulatory pathways. It reflects the fundamental plasticity of the vasculature that is gradually being revealed by progress in vascular and stem cell biology. This review provides a brief overview of where we stand in our understanding of vascular calcification, facing the challenge of translating this knowledge into viable preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27260939

  15. Tetrahydrobiopterin, Superoxide and Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    (6R)-5,6,7,8-Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an endogenously produced pterin that is found widely distributed in mammalian tissues. BH4 works as a cofactor of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. In the vasculature a deficit of BH4 is implicated in the mechanisms of several diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetic vascular disease, and vascular complications from cigarette smoking and environmental pollution. These ill-effects are connected to the ability of BH4 to regulate reactive oxygen species levels in the endothelium. The possibility of using BH4 as a therapeutical agent in cardiovascular medicine is becoming more compelling and many biochemical and physiological aspects involved in this application are currently under investigation. This review summarizes our current understanding of BH4 reactivity and some aspects of cellular production and regulation. PMID:19628033

  16. The Effect of Geometry Instruction with Dynamic Geometry Software; GeoGebra on Van Hiele Geometry Understanding Levels of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutluca, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dynamic geometry software GeoGebra on Van Hiele geometry understanding level of students at 11th grade geometry course. The study was conducted with pre and posttest control group quasi-experimental method. The sample of the study was 42 eleventh grade students studying in the spring term of…

  17. Development and Application of Agglomerated Multigrid Methods for Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    We report progress in the development of agglomerated multigrid techniques for fully un- structured grids in three dimensions, building upon two previous studies focused on efficiently solving a model diffusion equation. We demonstrate a robust fully-coarsened agglomerated multigrid technique for 3D complex geometries, incorporating the following key developments: consistent and stable coarse-grid discretizations, a hierarchical agglomeration scheme, and line-agglomeration/relaxation using prismatic-cell discretizations in the highly-stretched grid regions. A signi cant speed-up in computer time is demonstrated for a model diffusion problem, the Euler equations, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for 3D realistic complex geometries.

  18. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide. PMID:1997046

  19. Lymphatic complications after vascular interventions

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Andrzej; Maruszynski, Marek; Witkowski, Adam; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Chmielak, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lymphorrhea due to classical and mini-invasive surgical interventions on femoral and popliteal arteries is a serious hindrance to patient treatment. Depending on the experience of a particular center, the incidence and frequency of this type of complication may constitute a serious clinical problem. While the level of lymphorrhea intensity and its duration result in certain foreseeable consequences, their treatment can be a time-consuming and multistep procedure. Aim To compare different types of vascular interventions with lymphorrhea occurrence. Material and methods The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of lymphatic complications based on the material collected between 2005 and 2012 at the Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery of the Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw and in the Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology of the Institute of Cardiology in Anin, Warsaw, in 2009–2012. Results Maintaining due thoroughness when dissecting tissues and treating the cutting line in this area with ligatures and tissue puncture are the most reliable methods of minimizing the risk of lymphatic leakage after surgical procedures performed in a classical way. The lymphatic complication under analysis is far less likely to occur when procedures are performed as planned and an endovascular technique is used – statistical significance p < 0.05. Minimally invasive and fully percutaneous procedures performed via needle puncture, including the use of the fascial closure technique to close the femoral artery, eliminate the likelihood of the occurrence of this vascular complication – statistical significance was found with p value less than 0.05. Conclusions We concluded that in every case by minimizing the vascular approach we protected the patient against lymphatic complications. PMID:25337168

  20. Tbx1 regulates brain vascularization.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Sara; Martucciello, Stefania; Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Bilio, Marchesa; Ferrentino, Rosa; Nusco, Edoardo; Illingworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX1 is the major gene involved in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Using mouse models of these diseases, we have previously shown that TBX1 activates VEGFR3 in endothelial cells (EC), and that this interaction is critical for the development of the lymphatic vasculature. In this study, we show that TBX1 regulates brain angiogenesis. Using loss-of-function genetics and molecular approaches, we show that TBX1 regulates the VEGFR3 and DLL4 genes in brain ECs. In mice, loss of TBX1 causes global brain vascular defects, comprising brain vessel hyperplasia, enhanced angiogenic sprouting and vessel network disorganization. This phenotype is recapitulated in EC-specific Tbx1 conditional mutants and in an EC-only 3-dimensional cell culture system (matrigel), indicating that the brain vascular phenotype is cell autonomous. Furthermore, EC-specific conditional Tbx1 mutants have poorly perfused brain vessels and brain hypoxia, indicating that the expanded vascular network is functionally impaired. In EC-matrigel cultures, a Notch1 agonist is able to partially rescue microtubule hyperbranching induced by TBX1 knockdown. Thus, we have identified a novel transcriptional regulator of angiogenesis that exerts its effect in brain by negatively regulating angiogenesis through the DLL4/Notch1-VEGFR3 regulatory axis. Given the similarity of the phenotypic consequences of TBX1 mutation in humans and mice, this unexpected role of TBX1 in murine brain vascularization should stimulate clinicians to search for brain microvascular anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients and to evaluate whether some of the anatomical and functional brain anomalies in patients may have a microvascular origin. PMID:23945394

  1. [Jaboulay, vascular surgeon at Lyon].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Mathieu Jaboulay was an excellent surgeon. He was the first to come up with the principles of vascular surgery as he made a surgical anastomosis between two arteries of a dog by an eversion circular suture. In 1902, he implemented a suture between an artery and a vein in an arteritis by obliteration. Jaboulay also tried the graft of an animal kidney on the crease of a human elbow in 1906. Jaboulay was an initiator for Alexis Carrel. PMID:20527332

  2. Aerodynamic characteristics of scissor-wing geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selberg, Bruce P.; Rokhsaz, Kamran; Housh, Clinton S.

    1991-01-01

    A scissor-wing configuration, consisting of two independently sweeping-wing surfaces, is compared with an equivalent fixed-wing geometry baseline over a wide Mach number range. The scissor-wing configuration is shown to have a higher total lift-to-drag ratio than the baseline in the subsonic region primarily due to the slightly higher aspect ratio of the unswept scissor wing. In the transonic region, the scissor wing is shown to have a higher lift-to-drag ratio than the baseline for values of lift coefficient greater than 0.35. It is also shown that, through the use of wing decalage, the lift of the two independent scissor wings can be equalized. In the supersonic regime, the zero lift wave drag of the scissor-wing at maximum sweep is shown to be 50 and 28 percent less than the zero lift wave drag of the baseline at Mach numbers 1.5 and 3.0, respectively. In addition, a pivot-wing configuration is introduced and compared with the scissor wing. The pivot-wing configuration is shown to have a slightly higher total lift-to-drag ratio than the scissor wing in the supersonic region due to the decreased zero lift wave drag of the pivot-wing configuration.

  3. The European experience with vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Abe; Leppäniemi, Ari K; Androulakis, George A; Archodovassilis, F; Bouillon, Bertil; Cavina, Enrico; Chaloner, Eddie; Chiarugi, Massimo; Davidovic, Lazar; Delgado-Millan, Miguel Angel; Goris, Jan; Gunnlaugsson, Gunnar H; Jover, Jose Maria; Konstandoulakis, Manoussos M; Kurtoglu, Mehmet; Lepäntalo, Mauri; Llort-Pont, Carme; Meneu-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Gonzales, Enrique; Navarro-Soto, Salvador; Panoussis, P; Ryan, James M; Salenius, Juha P; Seccia, Massimo; Takolander, Rabbe; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Torfason, Bjarni; Uranüs, Selman

    2002-02-01

    The rich and diverse heritage of the management of vascular injuries in the 45 independent European countries prevents the authors from revealing a uniform picture of the European experience, but some trends are clearly emerging. In countries with a low incidence of penetrating trauma and increasing use of interventional vascular procedures, the proportion of iatrogenic vascular trauma exceeds 40% of all vascular injuries, whereas on other parts of the continent, armed conflicts are still a major cause of vascular trauma. National vascular registries, mostly in the Scandinavian countries, produce useful, nationwide data about vascular trauma and its management but suffer still from inadequate data collection. Despite a relatively low incidence of vascular trauma in most European countries, the results are satisfactory, probably in most cases because of active and early management by surgeons on call, whether with vascular training or not, treating all kinds of vascular surgical emergencies. In some countries, attempts at developing a trauma and emergency surgical specialty, including expertise in the management of vascular injuries, are on their way. PMID:11905944

  4. Improving Seismic Constraints on Subduction Zone Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Abers, G. A.; Fischer, K. M.; van Keken, P. E.; Kneller, E. A.; Rychert, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    relocations of hypocenters from ISC arrival times reduce this scatter to be more consistent with TUCAN hypocenters, with a center of seismicity less than 5 km deeper and a WBZ thickness 2-3 times greater. Thus, in regions with no local array, relative relocations of teleseismic catalogs can provide slab geometries consistent with regional earthquakes. We extend the slab inferred from TUCAN using relative relocations, to generate an accurate 3D description of the slab suitable for high-resolution geodynamic modeling.

  5. [Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome].

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael

    2009-04-20

    Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited disease with an autosomal dominant trait. The mutation of the COL3A1 gene which encodes type III collagen, is responsible of early vascular (spontaneous arterial rupture or dissection), digestive (perforation) and obstetrical events (uterine and arterial rupture). Diagnosis of the disease is primarily clinical, especially in case of characteristic morphologic features. Diagnostic certainty is obtained by evidencing the mutation of the COL3A1 gene. Some arterial lesions are suggestive of the disease, as dissecting aneurysms of the internal carotid, of the iliac arteries, and of the anterior visceral aortic branches, fusiform aneurisms of the splenic artery, and the occurrence of a non traumatic direct carotid-cavernous fistula. The occurrence of a spontaneous peritonitis or of an extensive perineal tear after delivery should also draw physician's attention. Because of the unpredictability of arterial or organ rupture, any patient diagnosed with vascular type EDS presenting with an acute pain syndrome should be considered as a trauma situation and be investigated straightaway by CT-scan or MRI testing, in order to eliminate a life threatening complication. PMID:19462862

  6. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  7. Mechanotransduction in Embryonic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Beth L.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of biochemical signals provides spatial and temporal cues that carefully orchestrate the complex process of vertebrate embryonic development. The embryonic vasculature develops not only in the context of these biochemical cues, but also in the context of the biomechanical forces imparted by blood flow. In the mature vasculature, different blood flow regimes induce distinct genetic programs, and significant progress has been made toward understanding how these forces are perceived by endothelial cells and transduced into biochemical signals. However, it cannot be assumed that paradigms that govern the mature vasculature are pertinent to the developing embryonic vasculature. The embryonic vasculature can respond to the mechanical forces of blood flow, and these responses are critical in vascular remodeling, certain aspects of sprouting angiogenesis, and maintenance of arterial-venous identity. Here, we review data regarding mechanistic aspects of endothelial cell mechanotransduction, with a focus on the response to shear stress, and elaborate upon the multifarious effects of shear stress on the embryonic vasculature. In addition, we discuss emerging predictive vascular growth models and highlight the prospect of combining signaling pathway information with computational modeling. We assert that correlation of precise measurements of hemodynamic parameters with effects on endothelial cell gene expression and cell behavior is required for fully understanding how blood flow-induced loading governs normal vascular development and shapes congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:22744845

  8. Pregnancy and vascular liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd-Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  9. Pregnancy and Vascular Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd–Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  10. Mechanosensing at the Vascular Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Simon, Scott I.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are endowed with a complex set of mechanisms that sense mechanical forces imparted by blood flow to endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells, and circulating blood cells to elicit biochemical responses through a process referred to as mechanotransduction. These biochemical responses are critical for a host of other responses, including regulation of blood pressure, control of vascular permeability for maintaining adequate perfusion of tissues, and control of leukocyte recruitment during immunosurveillance and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of the endothelial surface proteoglycan/glycoprotein layer—the glycocalyx (GCX)—that lines all blood vessel walls and is an agent in mechanotransduction and the modulation of blood cell interactions with the EC surface. We first discuss the biochemical composition and ultrastructure of the GCX, highlighting recent developments that reveal gaps in our understanding of the relationship between composition and spatial organization. We then consider the roles of the GCX in mechanotransduction and in vascular permeability control and review the prominent interaction of plasma borne sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), which has been shown to regulate both the composition of the GCX and the endothelial junctions. Finally, we consider the association of GCX degradation with inflammation and vascular disease and end with a final section on future research directions. PMID:24905872

  11. Mechanosensing at the vascular interface.

    PubMed

    Tarbell, John M; Simon, Scott I; Curry, Fitz-Roy E

    2014-07-11

    Mammals are endowed with a complex set of mechanisms that sense mechanical forces imparted by blood flow to endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells, and circulating blood cells to elicit biochemical responses through a process referred to as mechanotransduction. These biochemical responses are critical for a host of other responses, including regulation of blood pressure, control of vascular permeability for maintaining adequate perfusion of tissues, and control of leukocyte recruitment during immunosurveillance and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of the endothelial surface proteoglycan/glycoprotein layer-the glycocalyx (GCX)-that lines all blood vessel walls and is an agent in mechanotransduction and the modulation of blood cell interactions with the EC surface. We first discuss the biochemical composition and ultrastructure of the GCX, highlighting recent developments that reveal gaps in our understanding of the relationship between composition and spatial organization. We then consider the roles of the GCX in mechanotransduction and in vascular permeability control and review the prominent interaction of plasma-borne sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), which has been shown to regulate both the composition of the GCX and the endothelial junctions. Finally, we consider the association of GCX degradation with inflammation and vascular disease and end with a final section on future research directions. PMID:24905872

  12. Feasibilty of exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong; Chen, Yanjiao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Huifang; Xia, Xiangnan; Lin, Aizhen

    1998-08-01

    In order to study the exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy for replacing the intravascular laser irradiation therapy, we measure the distribution of radiant fluence rate in exterior vascular laser irradiation in vivo and imitative intravascular laser irradiation. The result shows that the average radiant fluence rate of exterior vascular and intravascular is 1.11 and 10.81 respectively, which is ten times between them. In order to get the radiant fluence rate corresponding to the intravascular laser irradiation, we suggest that about 20 mW HeNe laser could be used in exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy, and the laser must irradiate on the vascular perpendicularly. The suitable patient with exposed vascular must be chosen, and the diameter of the irradiated vascular is about 6 mm. Our experiment result, especially the data measured in vivo, will be useful for the research of light transport in human tissue.

  13. Maintenance of permanent hemodialysis vascular access patency.

    PubMed

    Berkoben, M; Schwab, S J

    1995-02-01

    The morbidity and mortality of maintenance hemodialysis patients are in large part determined by the ability of the nephrologist, dialysis staff, and vascular surgeon to establish and maintain adequate vascular access. Primary arteriovenous fistulae are the preferred form of vascular access because they are the more likely to provide long-term complication-free access. In 1994, however, the majority of patients entering hemodialysis programs have vascular anatomy unsuitable for primary arteriovenous fistula creation. Synthetic fistulae are currently the more common form of vascular access. Unfortunately, this form of vascular access is more prone to thrombosis and infection. Thrombosis is the most common cause of vascular access loss. Venous stenoses account for the majority of thromboses but can be prospectively identified by performing routine measurements of venous dialysis pressure or urea recirculation. Prospective identification of venous stenoses followed by either angioplasty or surgical revision will improve fistula patency and enhance the quality of life of the hemodialysis population. PMID:7598559

  14. Optimizing solar-cell grid geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, A. P.

    1969-01-01

    Trade-off analysis and mathematical expressions calculate optimum grid geometry in terms of various cell parameters. Determination of the grid geometry provides proper balance between grid resistance and cell output to optimize the energy conversion process.

  15. A Whirlwind Tour of Computational Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ron; Yao, Frances

    1990-01-01

    Described is computational geometry which used concepts and results from classical geometry, topology, combinatorics, as well as standard algorithmic techniques such as sorting and searching, graph manipulations, and linear programing. Also included are special techniques and paradigms. (KR)

  16. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  17. Vascular comorbidity is associated with more rapid disability progression in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, R.A.; Rudick, R.; Horwitz, R.; Cutter, G.; Tyry, T.; Campagnolo, D.; Vollmer, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vascular comorbidity adversely influences health outcomes in several chronic conditions. Vascular comorbidities are common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but their impact on disease severity is unknown. Vascular comorbidities may contribute to the poorly understood heterogeneity in MS disease severity. Treatment of vascular comorbidities may represent an avenue for treating MS. Methods: A total of 8,983 patients with MS enrolled in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis Registry participated in this cohort study. Time from symptom onset or diagnosis until ambulatory disability was compared for patients with or without vascular comorbidities to determine their impact on MS severity. Multivariable proportional hazards models were adjusted for sex, race, age at symptom onset, year of symptom onset, socioeconomic status, and region of residence. Results: Participants reporting one or more vascular comorbidities at diagnosis had an increased risk of ambulatory disability, and risk increased with the number of vascular conditions reported (hazard ratio [HR]/condition for early gait disability 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–1.61). Vascular comorbidity at any time during the disease course also increased the risk of ambulatory disability (adjusted HR for unilateral walking assistance 1.54; 95% CI 1.44–1.65). The median time between diagnosis and need for ambulatory assistance was 18.8 years in patients without and 12.8 years in patients with vascular comorbidities. Conclusions: Vascular comorbidity, whether present at symptom onset, diagnosis, or later in the disease course, is associated with a substantially increased risk of disability progression in multiple sclerosis. The impact of treating vascular comorbidities on disease progression deserves investigation. GLOSSARY EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; HR = hazard ratio; MS = multiple sclerosis; NARCOMS = North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis; PDDS

  18. Rotating convection in elliptical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evonuk, M.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal interactions between hot jupiter planets and their host stars are likely to result in non-spherical geometries. These elliptical instabilities may have interesting effects on interior fluid convective patterns, which in turn influence the nature of the magnetic dynamo within these planets. Simulations of thermal convection in the 2D rotating equatorial plane are conducted to determine to first order the effect of ellipticity on convection for varying density contrasts with differing convective vigor and rotation rate. This survey is conducted in two dimensions in order to simulate a broad range of ellipticities and to maximize the parameter space explored.

  19. Worldsheet geometries of ambitwistor string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Kantaro

    2015-06-01

    Mason and Skinner proposed the ambitwistor string theory which directly reproduces the formulas for the amplitudes of massless particles proposed by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In this paper we discuss geometries of the moduli space of worldsheets associated to the bosonic or the RNS ambitwistor string. Further, we investigate the factorization properties of the amplitudes when an internal momentum is near on-shell in the abstract CFT language. Along the way, we propose the existence of the ambitwistor strings with three or four fermionic worldsheet currents.

  20. Emergent Calabi-Yau geometry.

    PubMed

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2009-04-24

    We show how the smooth geometry of Calabi-Yau manifolds emerges from the thermodynamic limit of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting defined in our previous paper. In particular, the thermodynamic partition function of molten crystals is shown to be equal to the classical limit of the partition function of the topological string theory by relating the Ronkin function of the characteristic polynomial of the crystal melting model to the holomorphic 3-form on the corresponding Calabi-Yau manifold. PMID:19518695

  1. Multiple-view, Multiple-selection Visualization of Simulation Geometry in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Eulisse, G.; Jones, C.; Kovalskyi, D.; McCauley, T.; Mrak Tadel, A.; Osborne, I.; Tadel, M.; Yagil, A.

    2012-12-01

    Fireworks, the event-display program of CMS, was extended with an advanced geometry visualization package. ROOT's TGeo geometry is used as internal representation, shared among several geometry views. Each view is represented by a GUI list-tree widget, implemented as a flat vector to allow for fast searching, selection, and filtering by material type, node name, and shape type. Display of logical and physical volumes is supported. Color, transparency, and visibility flags can be modified for each node or for a selection of nodes. Further operations, like opening of a new view or changing of the root node, can be performed via a context menu. Node selection and graphical properties determined by the list-tree view can be visualized in any 3D graphics view of Fireworks. As each 3D view can display any number of geometry views, a user is free to combine different geometry-view selections within the same 3D view. Node-selection by proximity to a given point is possible. A visual clipping box can be set for each geometry view to limit geometry drawing into a specified region. Visualization of geometric overlaps, as detected by TGeo, is also supported. The geometry visualization package is used for detailed inspection and display of simulation geometry with or without the event data. It also serves as a tool for geometry debugging and inspection, facilitating development of geometries for CMS detector upgrades and for SLHC.

  2. Computational study of pulsatile blood flow in prototype vessel geometries of coronary segments.

    PubMed

    Chaniotis, A K; Kaiktsis, L; Katritsis, D; Efstathopoulos, E; Pantos, I; Marmarellis, V

    2010-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) in prototype vessel geometries of coronary segments are investigated via numerical simulation, and the potential association with vascular disease and specifically atherosclerosis and plaque rupture is discussed. In particular, simulation results of WSS spatio-temporal distributions are presented for pulsatile, non-Newtonian blood flow conditions for: (a) curved pipes with different curvatures, and (b) bifurcating pipes with different branching angles and flow division. The effects of non-Newtonian flow on WSS (compared to Newtonian flow) are found to be small at Reynolds numbers representative of blood flow in coronary arteries. Specific preferential sites of average low WSS (and likely atherogenesis) were found at the outer regions of the bifurcating branches just after the bifurcation, and at the outer-entry and inner-exit flow regions of the curved vessel segment. The drop in WSS was more dramatic at the bifurcating vessel sites (less than 5% of the pre-bifurcation value). These sites were also near rapid gradients of WSS changes in space and time - a fact that increases the risk of rupture of plaque likely to develop at these sites. The time variation of the WSS spatial distributions was very rapid around the start and end of the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle, when strong fluctuations of intravascular pressure were also observed. These rapid and strong changes of WSS and pressure coincide temporally with the greatest flexion and mechanical stresses induced in the vessel wall by myocardial motion (ventricular contraction). The combination of these factors may increase the risk of plaque rupture and thrombus formation at these sites. PMID:20400349

  3. Engaging All Students with "Impossible Geometry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lynda R.; Ayebo, Abraham; Dornoo, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Geometry is an area in which Australian students performed particularly poorly on the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). One innovative area of recreational geometry that has rich potential to engage and challenge a wide variety of students is "impossible geometry." An impossible geometric object is a…

  4. Geometry: Career Related Units. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierro, Mike; And Others

    Using six geometry units as resource units, the document explores 22 math-related careers. The authors intend the document to provide senior high school students with career orientation and exploration experiences while they learn geometry skills. The units are to be considered as a part of a geometry course, not a course by themselves. The six…

  5. Preservice Primary School Teachers' Elementary Geometry Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2012-01-01

    Geometrical notions and properties occur in real-world problems, thus Geometry has an important place in school Mathematics curricula. Primary school curricula lays the foundation of Geometry knowledge, pupils learn Geometry notions and properties by exploring their environment. Thus it is very important that primary school teachers have a good…

  6. Teaching Geometry: An Experiential and Artistic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    The view that geometry should be taught at every grade level is promoted. Primary and elementary school children are thought to rarely have any direct experience with geometry, except on an incidental basis. Children are supposed to be able to learn geometry rather easily, so long as the method and content are adapted to their development and…

  7. Fisher information geometry of the barycenter map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Mitsuhiro; Satoh, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report Fisher information geometry of the barycenter map associated with Busemann function Bθ of an Hadamard manifold X and present its application to Riemannian geometry of X from viewpoint of Fisher information geometry. This report is an improvement of [I-Sat'13] together with a fine investigation of the barycenter map.

  8. Geometry in the Early Years: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to provide a commentary on the teaching and learning of geometry in the early years of schooling with the set of papers in this issue as a guiding factor. It is structured around issues about geometry education of young learners, such as: what should we teach in geometry and why; representation of geometrical…

  9. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Yang, Michael T.; Baker, Brendon M.; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A.; Galie, Peter A.; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  10. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry.

    PubMed

    Glebov, Oleg O; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  11. Quanta of Geometry: Noncommutative Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Connes, Alain; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2015-03-01

    In the construction of spectral manifolds in noncommutative geometry, a higher degree Heisenberg commutation relation involving the Dirac operator and the Feynman slash of real scalar fields naturally appears and implies, by equality with the index formula, the quantization of the volume. We first show that this condition implies that the manifold decomposes into disconnected spheres, which will represent quanta of geometry. We then refine the condition by involving the real structure and two types of geometric quanta, and show that connected spin manifolds with large quantized volume are then obtained as solutions. The two algebras M2(H ) and M4(C ) are obtained, which are the exact constituents of the standard model. Using the two maps from M4 to S4 the four-manifold is built out of a very large number of the two kinds of spheres of Planckian volume. We give several physical applications of this scheme such as quantization of the cosmological constant, mimetic dark matter, and area quantization of black holes.

  12. Weyl gravity and Cartan geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, J.; François, J.; Lazzarini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We point out that the Cartan geometry known as the second-order conformal structure provides a natural differential geometric framework underlying gauge theories of conformal gravity. We are concerned with two theories: the first one is the associated Yang-Mills-like Lagrangian, while the second, inspired by [1], is a slightly more general one that relaxes the conformal Cartan geometry. The corresponding gauge symmetry is treated within the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin language. We show that the Weyl gauge potential is a spurious degree of freedom, analogous to a Stueckelberg field, that can be eliminated through the dressing field method. We derive sets of field equations for both the studied Lagrangians. For the second one, they constrain the gauge field to be the "normal conformal Cartan connection.''Finally, we provide in a Lagrangian framework a justification of the identification, in dimension 4, of the Bach tensor with the Yang-Mills current of the normal conformal Cartan connection, as proved in [2].

  13. Turbine engine variable geometry device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, Casimir (Inventor); Lenz, Herman N. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A variable geometry device for use with the turbine nozzle of a turbine engine of the type having a support housing and a combustion chamber contained within the support housing. A pair of spaced walls in the support housing define an annular and radially extending nozzle passageway. The outer end of the nozzle passageway is open to the combustion chamber while the inner end of the nozzle passageway is open to one or more turbine stages. A plurality of circumferentially spaced nozzle vanes are mounted to one of the spaced walls and protrude across the nozzle passageway. An annular opening is formed around the opposite spaced wall and an annular ring is axially slidably mounted within the opening. A motor is operatively connected to this ring and, upon actuation, axially displaces the ring within the nozzle passageway. In addition, the ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots which register with the nozzle vanes so that the vane geometry remains the same despite axial displacement of the ring.

  14. Target Detection Using Fractal Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, J. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The concepts and theory of fractal geometry were applied to the problem of segmenting a 256 x 256 pixel image so that manmade objects could be extracted from natural backgrounds. The two most important measurements necessary to extract these manmade objects were fractal dimension and lacunarity. Provision was made to pass the manmade portion to a lookup table for subsequent identification. A computer program was written to construct cloud backgrounds of fractal dimensions which were allowed to vary between 2.2 and 2.8. Images of three model space targets were combined with these backgrounds to provide a data set for testing the validity of the approach. Once the data set was constructed, computer programs were written to extract estimates of the fractal dimension and lacunarity on 4 x 4 pixel subsets of the image. It was shown that for clouds of fractal dimension 2.7 or less, appropriate thresholding on fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded a 64 x 64 edge-detected image with all or most of the cloud background removed. These images were enhanced by an erosion and dilation to provide the final image passed to the lookup table. While the ultimate goal was to pass the final image to a neural network for identification, this work shows the applicability of fractal geometry to the problems of image segmentation, edge detection and separating a target of interest from a natural background.

  15. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Glebov, Oleg O.; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  16. Quanta of geometry: noncommutative aspects.

    PubMed

    Chamseddine, Ali H; Connes, Alain; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2015-03-01

    In the construction of spectral manifolds in noncommutative geometry, a higher degree Heisenberg commutation relation involving the Dirac operator and the Feynman slash of real scalar fields naturally appears and implies, by equality with the index formula, the quantization of the volume. We first show that this condition implies that the manifold decomposes into disconnected spheres, which will represent quanta of geometry. We then refine the condition by involving the real structure and two types of geometric quanta, and show that connected spin manifolds with large quantized volume are then obtained as solutions. The two algebras M_{2}(H) and M_{4}(C) are obtained, which are the exact constituents of the standard model. Using the two maps from M_{4} to S^{4} the four-manifold is built out of a very large number of the two kinds of spheres of Planckian volume. We give several physical applications of this scheme such as quantization of the cosmological constant, mimetic dark matter, and area quantization of black holes. PMID:25793795

  17. Geometry and the quantum: basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Connes, Alain; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by the construction of spectral manifolds in noncommutative geometry, we introduce a higher degree Heisenberg commutation relation involving the Dirac operator and the Feynman slash of scalar fields. This commutation relation appears in two versions, one sided and two sided. It implies the quantization of the volume. In the one-sided case it implies that the manifold decomposes into a disconnected sum of spheres which will represent quanta of geometry. The two sided version in dimension 4 predicts the two algebras M 2(ℍ) and M 4(ℂ) which are the algebraic constituents of the Standard Model of particle physics. This taken together with the non-commutative algebra of functions allows one to reconstruct, using the spectral action, the Lagrangian of gravity coupled with the Standard Model. We show that any connected Riemannian Spin 4-manifold with quantized volume > 4 (in suitable units) appears as an irreducible representation of the two-sided commutation relations in dimension 4 and that these representations give a seductive model of the "particle picture" for a theory of quantum gravity in which both the Einstein geometric standpoint and the Standard Model emerge from Quantum Mechanics. Physical applications of this quantization scheme will follow in a separate publication.

  18. Alternative cosmology from cusp geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Reinaldo; Herbin Stalder Díaz, Diego

    We study an alternative geometrical approach on the problem of classical cosmological singularity. It is based on a generalized function f(x,y)=x(2+y^2=(1-z)z^n) which consists of a cusped projected coupled isosurface. Such a projected geometry is computed and analized into the context of Friedmann singularity-free cosmology where a pre-big bang scenario is considered. Assuming that the mechanism of cusp formation is described by non-linear oscillations of a pre- big bang extended very high energy density field (>3x10^{94} kg/m^3$), we show that the action under the gravitational field follows a tautochrone of revolution, understood here as the primary projected geometry that alternatively replaces the Friedmann singularity in the standard big bang theory. As shown here this new approach allows us to interpret the nature of both matter and dark energy from first geometric principles [1]. [1] Rosa et al. DOI: 10.1063/1.4756991

  19. Grain-grain contact geometry and the propagation of elastic waves in granular media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the compliance of an orthogonal grain-grain contact is so insensitive to the grain geometry in the contact region that this geometry is not at present an important parameter in theories of the speed of propagation of elastic waves in granular media, such as occur in the earth and in the moon.

  20. Vascular mechanics of the coronary artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veress, A. I.; Vince, D. G.; Anderson, P. M.; Cornhill, J. F.; Herderick, E. E.; Klingensmith, J. D.; Kuban, B. D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes our research into the vascular mechanics of the coronary artery and plaque. The three sections describe the determination of arterial mechanical properties using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a constitutive relation for the arterial wall, and finite element method (FEM) models of the arterial wall and atheroma. METHODS: Inflation testing of porcine left anterior descending coronary arteries was conducted. The changes in the vessel geometry were monitored using IVUS, and intracoronary pressure was recorded using a pressure transducer. The creep and quasistatic stress/strain responses were determined. A Standard Linear Solid (SLS) was modified to reproduce the non-linear elastic behavior of the arterial wall. This Standard Non-linear Solid (SNS) was implemented into an axisymetric thick-walled cylinder numerical model. Finite element analysis models were created for five age groups and four levels of stenosis using the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis Youth (PDAY) database. RESULTS: The arteries exhibited non-linear elastic behavior. The total tissue creep strain was epsilon creep = 0.082 +/- 0.018 mm/mm. The numerical model could reproduce both the non-linearity of the porcine data and time dependent behavior of the arterial wall found in the literature with a correlation coefficient of 0.985. Increasing age had a strong positive correlation with the shoulder stress level, (r = 0.95). The 30% stenosis had the highest shoulder stress due to the combination of a fully formed lipid pool and a thin cap. CONCLUSIONS: Studying the solid mechanics of the arterial wall and the atheroma provide important insights into the mechanisms involved in plaque rupture.

  1. A strategy for vascular services--testing the 600,000 population model.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, S.; Wolfe, J.; Maheswaran, R.; Grossinho, A.; Darke, S.; Colin, J.; Hargreaves, S.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular services' delivery has been criticised, and re-organisation based on a 600,000 population model suggested. We assessed the feasibility of this model in three geographically disparate English regions. METHODS: Surgical arterial activity by Trust was analyzed using 1994/95 data from Hospital Episode Statistics. A postal survey of acute Trusts was used to assess vascular facilities and personnel. Distances between hospitals and enumeration districts were mapped using a Geographical Information System. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number (proportion) of Trusts performing over 100 arterial procedures a year. Number (proportion) of Trusts with a vascular on-call rota. Proportion of population likely to live more than 40 km away (equivalent to 1 h blue-light ambulance travel time) from a vascular unit under the proposed model. RESULTS: Twelve of the 32 Trusts (38%) performed over 100 arterial procedures annually; 23 Trusts completed the survey. Of these, five (22%) had a vascular on-call rota. Under the 600,000 model, in East Anglia a further 16.5% of the population would live > 40 km from a vascular unit. In Wessex, a further 0.4% of the population would live > 40 km from a vascular unit. Impact on access in North West Thames was negligible. CONCLUSIONS: A 600,000 population model could be feasible in urbanized regions, but not in geographically remote ones. PMID:10858679

  2. Cell-based strategies for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tongqiang; Fan, Jiabing; Fartash, Armita; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-05-01

    Vascular regeneration is known to play an essential role in the repair of injured tissues mainly through accelerating the repair of vascular injury caused by vascular diseases, as well as the recovery of ischemic tissues. However, the clinical vascular regeneration is still challenging. Cell-based therapy is thought to be a promising strategy for vascular regeneration, since various cells have been identified to exert important influences on the process of vascular regeneration such as the enhanced endothelium formation on the surface of vascular grafts, and the induction of vessel-like network formation in the ischemic tissues. Here are a vast number of diverse cell-based strategies that have been extensively studied in vascular regeneration. These strategies can be further classified into three main categories, including cell transplantation, construction of tissue-engineered grafts, and surface modification of scaffolds. Cells used in these strategies mainly refer to terminally differentiated vascular cells, pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, and unipotent stem cells. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported research advances on the application of various cells for vascular regeneration, yielding insights into future clinical treatment for injured tissue/organ. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1297-1314, 2016. PMID:26864677

  3. Vascularized Bone Tissue Engineering: Approaches for Potential Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lonnissa H.; Annabi, Nasim; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Bae, Hojae; Binan, Loïc; Park, Sangwon; Kang, Yunqing

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in bone tissue engineering (TE) in the past decade. However, classical bone TE strategies have been hampered mainly due to the lack of vascularization within the engineered bone constructs, resulting in poor implant survival and integration. In an effort toward clinical success of engineered constructs, new TE concepts have arisen to develop bone substitutes that potentially mimic native bone tissue structure and function. Large tissue replacements have failed in the past due to the slow penetration of the host vasculature, leading to necrosis at the central region of the engineered tissues. For this reason, multiple microscale strategies have been developed to induce and incorporate vascular networks within engineered bone constructs before implantation in order to achieve successful integration with the host tissue. Previous attempts to engineer vascularized bone tissue only focused on the effect of a single component among the three main components of TE (scaffold, cells, or signaling cues) and have only achieved limited success. However, with efforts to improve the engineered bone tissue substitutes, bone TE approaches have become more complex by combining multiple strategies simultaneously. The driving force behind combining various TE strategies is to produce bone replacements that more closely recapitulate human physiology. Here, we review and discuss the limitations of current bone TE approaches and possible strategies to improve vascularization in bone tissue substitutes. PMID:22765012

  4. Dynamics of VEGF matrix-retention in vascular network patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn-Luque, A.; de Back, W.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; Herrero, M. A.; Miura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a central regulator of blood vessel morphogenesis, although its role in patterning of endothelial cells into vascular networks is not fully understood. It has been suggested that binding of soluble VEGF to extracellular matrix components causes spatially restricted cues that guide endothelial cells into network patterns. Yet, current evidence for such a mechanism remains indirect. In this study, we quantitatively analyse the dynamics of VEGF retention in a controlled in vitro situation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in Matrigel. We show that fluorescent VEGF accumulates in pericellular areas and colocalizes with VEGF binding molecules. Analysis of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that binding/unbinding to matrix molecules dominates VEGF dynamics in the pericellular region. Computational simulations using our experimental measurements of kinetic parameters show that matrix retention of chemotactic signals can lead to the formation of reticular cellular networks on a realistic timescale. Taken together, these results show that VEGF binds to matrix molecules in proximity of HUVECs in Matrigel, and suggest that bound VEGF drives vascular network patterning.

  5. Fabrication of triple layered vascular scaffolds by combining electrospinning, braiding, and thermally induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Jing, Xin; Yu, Emily; McNulty, Jason; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Triple layered small diameter vascular scaffolds, which consisted of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silk, were fabricated in this study for the first time by combining electrospinning, braiding, and thermally induced phase separation methods. These novel vascular scaffolds, which possess three layers of different structures (nanofibrous inner layer, woven silk filament middle layer, and porous outer layer) have a desired toe region in the tensile test and sufficient suture retention and burst pressure for vascular graft applications. The endothelia cell culture tests showed that a cell layer could form on the inner surface of a scaffold with high cell viability. Furthermore, the cells showed favorable morphology on the scaffold.

  6. Coupled simulation of vascular growth and remodeling, hemodynamics and stress-mediated mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiacheng; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework to couple vascular G&R, blood flow simulation and stress-mediated mechanotransduction is derived for patient specific geometry. A hyperelastic constitutive relation is considered for vascular material and vessel wall is modeled via constrained mixture theory. The coupled simulation is divided into three time scales - G&R (weeks-years), hemodynamics (seconds) and stress-mediated mechanotransduction (much less than 1 second). G&R is simulated and vessel wall deformation (and tension) is computed to obtain the current vessel geometry, which defines the new boundary for blood flow. Hemodynamics are then simulated in the updated domain to calculate WSS field. A system of ODE's is derived based on conservation law and phenomenological models to describe the signaling pathways from mechanical stimuli (WSS, wall tension) to mass production rate of vascular constituents, which, in turn, changes the kinetics of G&R. To reduce computation cost, blood flow is only simulated when G&R causes significant change to geometry, and steady state response of the ODE system for mechanotransduction is used to characterize the influence of WSS and wall tension on G&R, due to separation of three time scales.

  7. Visualizing MCNP Tally Segment Geometry and Coupling Results with ABAQUS

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. Parry; J. A. Galbraith

    2007-11-01

    The Advanced Graphite Creep test, AGC-1, is planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. The experiment requires very detailed neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses to show compliance with programmatic and ATR safety requirements. The MCNP model used for the neutronics analysis required hundreds of tally regions to provide the desired detail. A method for visualizing the hundreds of tally region geometries and the tally region results in 3 dimensions has been created to support the AGC-1 irradiation. Additionally, a method was created which would allow ABAQUS to access the results directly for the thermal analysis of the AGC-1 experiment.

  8. Numerical simulations of cell interactions under shear flows in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gaozhu

    2005-11-01

    The receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion and rolling on endothelium under shear flows are of crucial importance in governing a range of cell functions: inflammatory response, lymphocyte homing, and sickle cell vascular occlusion. In vivo, an endothelium-lined blood vessel lumen has a non-flat irregular complex geometry presented to blood flows, and adherent leukocytes can lead to further geometry complexity. This geometry factor can have a prominent impact on the mechanics and hemodynamics of cell interactions and adhesions in high endothelial venules, non-uniform capillaries and post-capillary expansions to name a few. In this work, a ghost-cell immerse boundary/front tracking method is presented to examine the physiological role of the blood vessel geometry in microcirculation. Motions of deformable blood cells are computed via a multiphase front tracking method. Boundary conditions for arbitrary geometries are enforced through a high-order ghost cell immersed boundary method. The current method is validated and used to explore the potential roles of vessel geometry in modulating hemodynamics and kinetics of 2d/3d cell interactions, in particular leukocyte adhesion and accumulation.

  9. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  10. Clinical pharmacology and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, G; Corea, F; Micheli, S; Lanari, A

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment and several drugs of abuse have been associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). However, there is a paucity of data on the independent risk of vascular disease (VD) associated with pharmacological treatment and no controlled trials demonstrating a reduction in risk with abstinence. Information about IHD and CVD-related drug abuse is mainly limited to epidemiological studies focused on urban populations. The potential link between some pharmacological treatments (estrogen, some oncologic drugs and some atypical antipsychotics) and cerebrovascular adverse events was analyzed, but disagreement about an association persists. Drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamines and heroin, have been associated with an increased vascular risk. These drugs can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure, vasculitic-type changes, lead to embolization caused by infective endocarditis, and hemostatic and hematologic abnormalities that can result in increased blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Long-term treatment strategies based on medication, psychological support, and outreach programs play an important role in treatment of drug dependency. In these last years public interest in risk factors for VD has been constantly increasing and the successful identification and management of pharmacological treatment and drug abuse can be challenging. One of the major public health issues for the future will be to focus more on new vascular risk factor recognition and management. The objective of this chapter is to review the relevance of IHD and CVD associated with various pharmacological treatments and drug abuse with focusing on ischemic disease. This chapter reports the clinical evidence of this association and analyzes the experimental role of new drugs as a growing risk factor of VD with the hypothetical new association. In conclusion, in this chapter great attention is paid to evaluating the scientific and real

  11. Planar geometry inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    In the classic gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion reactor, ion bombardment of the grid leads to heating, thermionic electron emission, significant power loss, and ultimately melting of the grid. Gridless IEC devices have sought to overcome these limitations. Klein reported a gridless device in which ions are circulated as a linear beam in an electrostatic analogue of an optical resonator. To overcome limits of stored ions due to space charge effects at the turning regions, the device employed multiple overlapping traps. The work reported here seeks to further increase the turning region space in a gridless trap by employing a planar geometry. Ion trapping in the planar device was examined by simulating trajectories of 2H+ ions with SIMION 8.1 software. Simulations were carried out using multiple potentials as in Klein's device and for a single potential trap as a planar analogue of the anharmonic ion trap. Scattering by background gas was simulated using a hard sphere collision model, and the results suggested the device will require operation at low pressure with a separate ion source.

  12. Clustering Implies Geometry in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krioukov, Dmitri

    2016-05-01

    Network models with latent geometry have been used successfully in many applications in network science and other disciplines, yet it is usually impossible to tell if a given real network is geometric, meaning if it is a typical element in an ensemble of random geometric graphs. Here we identify structural properties of networks that guarantee that random graphs having these properties are geometric. Specifically we show that random graphs in which expected degree and clustering of every node are fixed to some constants are equivalent to random geometric graphs on the real line, if clustering is sufficiently strong. Large numbers of triangles, homogeneously distributed across all nodes as in real networks, are thus a consequence of network geometricity. The methods we use to prove this are quite general and applicable to other network ensembles, geometric or not, and to certain problems in quantum gravity.

  13. Spinors in Physics and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautman, A.; Furlan, G.

    1988-11-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Killing Spinors According to O. Hijazi and Applications * Self-Duality Conditions Satisfied by the Spin Connections on Spheres * Maslov Index and Half - Forms * Spin - 3/2 Fields on Black Hole Spacetimes * Indecomposable Conformal Spinors and Operator Product Expansions in a Massless QED Model * Nonlinear Spinor Representations * Nonlinear Wave Equations for Intrinsic Spinor Coordinates * Twistors - "Spinors" of SU(2,2), Their Generalizations and Achievements * Spinors, Reflections and Clifford Algebras: A Review * overline {SL}(n, R) Spinors for Particles, Gravity and Superstrings * Spinors on Compact Riemann Surfaces * Simple Spinors as Urfelder * Applications of Cartan Spinors to Differential Geometry in Higher Dimensions * Killing Spinors on Spheres and Projective Spaces * Spinor Structures on Homogeneous Riemannian Spaces * Classical Strings and Minimal Surfaces * Representing Spinors with Differential Forms * Inequalities for Spinors Norms in Clifford Algebras * The Importance of Spin * The Theory of World Spinors * Final List of Participants

  14. Chemical shift driven geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Witter, Raiker; Priess, Wolfram; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2002-01-30

    A new method for refinement of 3D molecular structures by geometry optimization is presented. Prerequisites are a force field and a very fast procedure for the calculation of chemical shifts in every step of optimization. To the energy, provided by the force field (COSMOS force field), a pseudoenergy, depending on the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, is added. In addition to the energy gradients, pseudoforces are computed. This requires the derivatives of the chemical shifts with respect to the coordinates. The pseudoforces are analytically derived from the integral expressions of the bond polarization theory. Single chemical shift values attributed to corresponding atoms are considered for structural correction. As a first example, this method is applied for proton position refinement of the D-mannitol X-ray structure. A crystal structure refinement with 13C chemical shift pseudoforces is carried out. PMID:11924742

  15. Clustering Implies Geometry in Networks.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri

    2016-05-20

    Network models with latent geometry have been used successfully in many applications in network science and other disciplines, yet it is usually impossible to tell if a given real network is geometric, meaning if it is a typical element in an ensemble of random geometric graphs. Here we identify structural properties of networks that guarantee that random graphs having these properties are geometric. Specifically we show that random graphs in which expected degree and clustering of every node are fixed to some constants are equivalent to random geometric graphs on the real line, if clustering is sufficiently strong. Large numbers of triangles, homogeneously distributed across all nodes as in real networks, are thus a consequence of network geometricity. The methods we use to prove this are quite general and applicable to other network ensembles, geometric or not, and to certain problems in quantum gravity. PMID:27258887

  16. Mannose-binding geometry of pradimicin A.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yu; Doi, Takashi; Taketani, Takara; Takegoshi, K; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-08-01

    Pradimicins (PRMs) and benanomicins are the only family of non-peptidic natural products with lectin-like properties, that is, they recognize D-mannopyranoside (Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Coupled with their unique Man binding ability, they exhibit antifungal and anti-HIV activities through binding to Man-containing glycans of pathogens. Notwithstanding the great potential of PRMs as the lectin mimics and therapeutic leads, their molecular basis of Man recognition has yet to be established. Their aggregate-forming propensity has impeded conventional interaction analysis in solution, and the analytical difficulty is exacerbated by the existence of two Man binding sites in PRMs. In this work, we investigated the geometry of the primary Man binding of PRM-A, an original member of PRMs, by the recently developed analytical strategy using the solid aggregate composed of the 1:1 complex of PRM-A and Man. Evaluation of intermolecular distances by solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the C2-C4 region of Man is in close contact with the primary binding site of PRM-A, while the C1 and C6 positions of Man are relatively distant. The binding geometry was further validated by co-precipitation experiments using deoxy-Man derivatives, leading to the proposal that PRM-A binds not only to terminal Man residues at the non-reducing end of glycans, but also to internal 6-substituted Man residues. The present study provides new insights into the molecular basis of Man recognition and glycan specificity of PRM-A. PMID:23832850

  17. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2010-08-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m{sup -2}){sup 1/4}(B/1 G){sup 1/2} MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, {nu}{sub SA}, depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of {nu}{sub SA} range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, {nu}{sub SA} ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  18. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  19. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  20. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  1. Detection of Aortic Wall Inclusion Using Regional Pulse Wave Propagation and Velocity In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of the regional stiffening of the arterial wall may prove important in the diagnosis of various vascular pathologies. The pulse wave velocity (PWV) along the aortic wall has been shown to be dependent on the wall stiffness and has played a fundamental role in a range of diagnostic methods. Conventional clinical methods involve a global examination of the pulse traveling between two remote sites, e.g. femoral and carotid arteries, to provide an average PWV estimate. However, the majority of vascular diseases entail regional vascular changes and therefore may not be detected by a global PWV estimate. In this paper, a fluid-structure interaction study of straight-geometry aortas was carried out to examine the effects of regional stiffness changes on PWV. Five homogeneous aortas with increasing wall stiffness as well as two aortas with soft and hard inclusions were considered. In each case, spatio-temporal maps of the wall motion were used to analyze the regional pulse wave propagation. On the homogeneous aortas, increasing PWVs were found to increase with the wall moduli (R2 = 0.9988), indicating the reliability of the model to accurately represent the wave propagation. On the inhomogeneous aortas, formation of reflected and standing waves was observed at the site of the hard and soft inclusions, respectively. Neither the hard nor the soft inclusion had a significant effect on the velocity of the traveling pulse beyond the inclusion site, which supported the hypothesis that a global measurement of the average PWV could fail to detect regional abnormalities. PMID:24235978

  2. Cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A.; Enzmann, D.

    1983-01-01

    Six patients with angiographically cryptic vascular malformations involving the brainstem were examined with computed tomography (CT). The clinical and CT findings of cryptic vascular malformations of the brainstem are described and distinguished from those of brainstem glioma and multiple sclerosis. Calcification within a brainstem lesion that displays relatively little mass effect and shows little contrast enhancement, particularly when associated with a long history of waxing and waning brainstem symptoms, should suggest a vascular malformation.

  3. Inhibition of Vascularization in Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Sansone, B. Capogrosso

    2002-11-01

    The transition to a vascular phase is a prerequisite for fast tumor growth. During the avascular phase, the neoplasm feeds only from the (relatively few) existing nearby blood vessels. During angiogenesis, the number of capillaries surrounding and infiltrating the tumor increases dramatically. A model which includes physical and biological mechanisms of the interactions between the tumor and vascular growth describes the avascular-vascular transition. Numerical results agree with clinical observations and predict the influence of therapies aiming to inhibit the transition.

  4. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head. PMID:22871542

  5. Vascular Development during Distraction Osteogenesis Proceeds by Sequential Intramuscular Arteriogenesis Followed by Intraosteal Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Elise F.; Hussein, Amira I.; Al-Awadhi, Bader A.; Hogan, Daniel E.; Matsubara, Hidenori; Al-Alq, Zainab; Fitch, Jennifer; Andre, Billy; Hosur, Krutika; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular formation is intimately associated with bone formation during distraction osteogenesis (DO). While prior studies on this association have focused on vascular formation locally within the regenerate, we hypothesized that this vascular formation, as well as the resulting osteogenesis, rely heavily on the response of the vascular network in surrounding muscular compartments. To test this hypothesis, the spatiotemporal sequence of vascular formation was assessed in both muscular and osseous compartments in a murine model of DO and was compared to the progression of osteogenesis. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) scans were performed sequentially, before and after demineralization, on specimens containing contrast-enhanced vascular casts. Image registration and subtraction procedures were developed to examine the co-related, spatiotemporal patterns of vascular and osseous tissue formation. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the contributory roles of arteriogenesis (formation of large vessels) and angiogenesis (formation of small vessels) to overall vessel formation. Mean vessel thickness showed an increasing trend during the period of active distraction (p=0.068), whereas vessel volume showed maximal increases during the consolidation period (p=0.009). The volume of mineralized tissue in the regenerate increased over time (p<0.039), was correlated with vessel volume (r=0.59; p=0.025), and occurred primarily during consolidation. Immunohistological data suggested that: 1) the period of active distraction was characterized primarily by arteriogenesis in the surrounding muscle; 2) during consolidation, angiogenesis predominated in the intraosteal region; 3) vessel formation proceeded from the surrounding muscle into the regenerate. These data show that formation of vascular tissue occurs in both muscular and osseous compartments during DO and that periods of intense osteogenesis are concurrent with those of angiogenesis. The results further suggest the

  6. Tumor vascular disruption using various radiation types

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure with various radiation types and radionuclides is investigated. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for photons and 4He ions suggest that low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides can deposit sufficient absorbed dose to disrupt a tumor’s vascular structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel. Candidate radionuclides uniformly distributed in microspheres are theoretically investigated with respect to their vascular disruption potential and to offer an alternative to 90Y microsphere therapy. Requisite activities of candidate low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides to facilitate vascular disruption are calculated. PMID:24749005

  7. Vascular Disorders of the Cerebellum in Children.

    PubMed

    De Leacy, Reade A; Berenstein, Alejandro; Naidich, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Key differences exist in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of vascular lesions of the cerebellum in children versus adults. An understanding of these differences and an appreciation of the distinct imaging features of these lesions aid in distinguishing normal vascular variations from pathology, in predicting lesion etiology, and in directing effective treatment strategies. This paper reviews the embryogenesis of the normal vascular system of the cerebellum and brainstem and then discusses the clinical and imaging features of the common vascular lesions affecting these structures in the pediatric population. PMID:27423802

  8. Borne identity: CT imaging of vascular infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessica S; Ho, Alexander S; Ahmed, Absar; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Menias, Christine O

    2011-08-01

    Vascular infections present in a multitude of ways with computed tomography (CT) aiding in the diagnosis of many of the uncommon vascular infections, which are equally dangerous and carry severe life-threatening consequences if untreated from a delay in diagnosis. This pictorial review aims to discuss and illustrate the CT findings of the following vascular infections including aortitis, mycotic aneurysms, infective endocarditis, septic thrombophlebitis in the chest and abdomen, and Kawasaki disease. Recognition and prompt diagnosis of these uncommon vascular infections are critical to the initiation of the appropriate management and therapy. PMID:21424803

  9. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  10. Vascular grafting strategies in coronary intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Darryl; Gillies, Elizabeth; Mequanint, Kibret

    2014-06-01

    With the growing need for coronary revascularizations globally, several strategies to restore blood flow to the heart have been explored. Bypassing the atherosclerotic coronary arteries with autologous grafts, synthetic prostheses and tissue-engineered vascular grafts continue to be evaluated in search of a readily available vascular graft with clinically acceptable outcomes. The development of such a vascular graft including tissue engineering approaches both in situ and in vitro is herein reviewed, facilitating a detailed comparison on the role of seeded cells in vascular graft patency.

  11. Vascular endothelium - Gatekeeper of vessel health.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Paul A; Redmond, Eileen M

    2016-05-01

    The vascular endothelium is an interface between the blood stream and the vessel wall. Changes in this single cell layer of the artery wall are believed of primary importance in the pathogenesis of vascular disease/atherosclerosis. The endothelium responds to humoral, neural and especially hemodynamic stimuli and regulates platelet function, inflammatory responses, vascular smooth muscle cell growth and migration, in addition to modulating vascular tone by synthesizing and releasing vasoactive substances. Compromised endothelial function contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; endothelial 'dysfunction' is associated with risk factors, correlates with disease progression, and predicts cardiovascular events. Therapies for atherosclerosis have been developed, therefore, that are directed towards improving endothelial function. PMID:26994427

  12. Vascular tumors and malformations in children, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, I have been amazed at the growth in the field of vascular anomalies. The recognition of vascular birthmarks as a defined area of medicine is a relatively recent event. The International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) was founded by Drs John Mulliken and Anthony Young in the late 1970s. Mulliken and Glowacki's sentinel 1982 paper on the biologic classification of vascular anomalies further established the field, by providing clarity of nomenclature and unifying concepts that had previously been lacking. PMID:27607317

  13. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  14. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  15. Computational modeling of vascular anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele

    2005-06-01

    Recent development of computational technology allows a level of knowledge of biomechanical factors in the healthy or pathological cardiovascular system that was unthinkable a few years ago. In particular, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural (CS) analyses have been used to evaluate specific quantities, such as fluid and wall stresses and strains, which are very difficult to measure in vivo. Indeed, CFD and CS offer much more variability and resolution than in vitro and in vivo methods, yet computations must be validated by careful comparison with experimental and clinical data. The enormous parallel development of clinical imaging such as magnetic resonance or computed tomography opens a new way toward a detailed patient-specific description of the actual hemodynamics and structural behavior of living tissues. Coupling of CFD/CS and clinical images is becoming a standard evaluation that is expected to become part of the clinical practice in the diagnosis and in the surgical planning in advanced medical centers. This review focuses on computational studies of fluid and structural dynamics of a number of vascular anastomoses: the coronary bypass graft anastomoses, the arterial peripheral anastomoses, the arterio-venous graft anastomoses and the vascular anastomoses performed in the correction of congenital heart diseases. PMID:15772842

  16. Orthopedic issues in vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Samantha A; Sorger, Joel

    2014-08-01

    Vascular malformations impact the musculoskeletal system depending on the tissue involved (skin, subcutis, muscle, cartilage, or bone), the extent of involvement, and the type of anomalous vessels (arteries, capillaries, veins, or lymphatics). These malformations can cause a multitude of musculoskeletal problems for the patient and their Orthopedic Surgeon to manage. Leg-length discrepancy, intra-articular involvement, muscular lesions, and primary or secondary scoliosis are just to name a few. All of these problems can cause pain, deformity, and a range of functional limitations. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment plans both have a role in the care of these patients. Patients with vascular malformations may also suffer from life-threatening cardiovascular and hematologic abnormalities. For those patients who undergo surgery, thromboembolic risk is elevated, wound breakdown and infection are much more common, and bleeding risk continues well into the postoperative course. Because of the complex nature of these disorders, the clinician must have a full understanding of the types of lesions, their natural history, appropriate diagnostic studies, associated medical problems, indications for treatment, and all the treatment options. For severe malformations, especially syndromes such as CLOVES and Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, interdisciplinary team management is essential for the best outcomes. PMID:25241103

  17. Regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure: role of chloride transport in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Christian A; Schroeder, Björn C; Ehmke, Heimo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that primary changes in vascular resistance can cause sustained changes in arterial blood pressure. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about Cl(-) homeostasis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Within vascular smooth muscle cells, Cl(-) is accumulated above the electrochemical equilibrium, causing Cl(-) efflux, membrane depolarization, and increased contractile force when Cl(-) channels are opened. At least two different transport mechanisms contribute to raise [Cl(-)] i in vascular smooth muscle cells, anion exchange, and cation-chloride cotransport. Recent work suggests that TMEM16A-associated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents mediate Cl(-) efflux in vascular smooth muscle cells leading to vasoconstriction. Additional proteins associated with Cl(-) flux in vascular smooth muscle are bestrophins, which modulate vasomotion, the volume-activated LRRC8, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Cl(-) transporters and Cl(-) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) significantly contribute to the physiological regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. PMID:25588975

  18. Blood-brain barrier damage in vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Matsumoto, Koichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Fujihara, Ryuji; Kawauchi, Machi; Miyanaka, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Toshitaka

    2016-04-01

    New findings on flow or drainage pathways of brain interstitial fluid and cerebrospinal fluid have been made. The interstitial fluid flow has an effect on the passage of blood-borne substances in the brain parenchyma, especially in areas near blood-brain barrier (BBB)-free regions. Actually, blood-borne substances can be transferred in areas with intact BBB function, such as the hippocampus, the corpus callosum, periventricular areas, and medial portions of the amygdala, presumably through leaky vessels in the subfornical organs or the choroid plexus. Increasing evidence indicates that dysfunction of the BBB function may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia. Accordingly, we have examined which insults seen in patients suffering from vascular dementia have an effect on the BBB using experimental animal models exhibiting some phenotypes of vascular dementia. The BBB in the hippocampus was clearly deteriorated in Mongolian gerbils exposed to acute ischemia followed by reperfusion and also in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) showing hypertension. The BBB in the corpus callosum was clearly deteriorated in Wistar rats with permanent ligation of the bilateral common carotid arteries showing chronic hypoperfusion. The BBB in the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb was mildly deteriorated in aged senescence accelerated prone mice (SAMP8) showing cognitive dysfunction. The BBB in the hippocampus was mildly deteriorated in aged animals with hydrocephalus. Mild endothelial damage was seen in hyperglycemic db/db mice. In addition, mRNA expression of osteopontin, matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), and CD36 was increased in vessels showing BBB damage in hypertensive SHRSP. As osteopontin, MMP-13 and CD36 are known to be related to brain injury and amyloid β accumulation or clearance, BBB damage followed by increased gene expression of these molecules not only contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular dementia, but also bridges

  19. Raising the issue of DNAR orders in vascular surgery patients.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Rachel; Webb, Hannah; Hartley, Matthew; Brooks, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The Tracey Report has recently raised the status of Do Not Attempt Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) orders in the hospital setting.[1] Guidelines are in place both nationally and locally to provide advice to clinicians on when to discuss DNACPR, and the approach to be taken. There was concern that on a busy regional vascular surgery unit, discussion of resuscitation status was not regular practice. Consequently, some patients were at risk of being inappropriately resuscitated, particularly out of hours. The North Bristol Somerset and Gloucester DNAR decision tree[2] was the tool used to decide whether a patient should have a documented discussion and/or a DNACPR form completed. We correlated the outcome of the decision tree with the presence of a DNACPR form or documented resuscitation discussion. Baseline measurements from all vascular inpatients on the vascular surgery unit demonstrated that only 27% had a DNACPR form or documented discussion in concordance with the DNACPR Decision Tree outcome. The aim of this project was to increase the proportion of patients with concordance of the DNACPR decision tree outcome with documented discussion or DNACPR form. The following three simple interventions raised concordance from 27% to 64% of patients on the vascular surgery unit. 1. Including resuscitation status of each patient as a column in the doctors daily handover. 2. Posters in staff only areas to highlight the meaning of DNACPR and raise awareness of the DNACPR decision tree. 3. Educational meeting surrounding DNACPR with the vascular surgery consultants, led by a care of the elderly consultant . This project has highlighted how raising awareness around DNACPR increases discussion amongst the clinical team surrounding resuscitation status of a patient. Consequently, this enables discussion to be had with patient and their family. PMID:26893897

  20. Linearized stability analysis of gravastars in noncommutative geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Garattini, Remo

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we find exact gravastar solutions in the context of noncommutative geometry, and explore their physical properties and characteristics. The energy density of these geometries is a smeared and particle-like gravitational source, where the mass is diffused throughout a region of linear dimension due to the intrinsic uncertainty encoded in the coordinate commutator. These solutions are then matched to an exterior Schwarzschild spacetime. We further explore the dynamical stability of the transition layer of these gravastars, for the specific case of β = M 2/ α < 1.9, where M is the black hole mass, to linearized spherically symmetric radial perturbations about static equilibrium solutions. It is found that large stability regions exist and, in particular, located sufficiently close to where the event horizon is expected to form.

  1. Geometry-induced fluctuations of olfactory searches in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Juan Duque; Gómez-Ullate, David; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    In olfactory search an immobile target emits chemical molecules at constant rate. The molecules are transported by the medium, which is assumed to be turbulent. Considering a searcher able to detect such chemical signals and whose motion follows the infotaxis strategy, we study the statistics of the first-passage time to the target when the searcher moves on a finite two-dimensional lattice of different geometries. Far from the target, where the concentration of chemicals is low, the direction of the searcher's first movement is determined by the geometry of the domain and the topology of the lattice, inducing strong fluctuations on the average search time with respect to the initial position of the searcher. The domain is partitioned in well-defined regions characterized by the direction of the first movement. If the search starts over the interface between two different regions, large fluctuations in the search time are observed.

  2. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  3. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G.; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The “static bioreactor” provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues. PMID:26132527

  4. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The "static bioreactor" provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues. PMID:26132527

  5. Riemannian geometry of fluctuation theory: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Luisberis

    2016-05-01

    Fluctuation geometry was recently proposed as a counterpart approach of Riemannian geometry of inference theory (information geometry), which describes the geometric features of the statistical manifold M of random events that are described by a family of continuous distributions dpξ(x|θ). This theory states a connection among geometry notions and statistical properties: separation distance as a measure of relative probabilities, curvature as a measure about the existence of irreducible statistical correlations, among others. In statistical mechanics, fluctuation geometry arises as the mathematical apparatus of a Riemannian extension of Einstein fluctuation theory, which is also closely related to Ruppeiner geometry of thermodynamics. Moreover, the curvature tensor allows to express some asymptotic formulae that account for the system fluctuating behavior beyond the gaussian approximation, while curvature scalar appears as a second-order correction of Legendre transformation between thermodynamic potentials.

  6. Diabetes and ageing-induced vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Assar, Mariam El; Angulo, Javier; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-04-15

    Diabetes and the ageing process independently increase the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since incidence of diabetes increases as people get older, the diabetic older adults represent the largest population of diabetic subjects. This group of patients would potentially be threatened by the development of CVD related to both ageing and diabetes. The relationship between CVD, ageing and diabetes is explained by the negative impact of these conditions on vascular function. Functional and clinical evidence supports the role of vascular inflammation induced by the ageing process and by diabetes in vascular impairment and CVD. Inflammatory mechanisms in both aged and diabetic vasculature include pro-inflammatory cytokines, vascular hyperactivation of nuclear factor-кB, increased expression of cyclooxygenase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, imbalanced expression of pro/anti-inflammatory microRNAs, and dysfunctional stress-response systems (sirtuins, Nrf2). In contrast, there are scarce data regarding the interaction of these mechanisms when ageing and diabetes co-exist and its impact on vascular function. Older diabetic animals and humans display higher vascular impairment and CVD risk than those either aged or diabetic, suggesting that chronic low-grade inflammation in ageing creates a vascular environment favouring the mechanisms of vascular damage driven by diabetes. Further research is needed to determine the specific inflammatory mechanisms responsible for exacerbated vascular impairment in older diabetic subjects in order to design effective therapeutic interventions to minimize the impact of vascular inflammation. This would help to prevent or delay CVD and the specific clinical manifestations (cognitive decline, frailty and disability) promoted by diabetes-induced vascular impairment in the elderly. PMID:26435167

  7. Use of CAD Geometry in MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) geometry in a Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) environment. Two techniques are presented to facilitate the use of CAD geometry by different disciplines, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM). One method is to transfer the load from a CFD grid to a CSM grid. The second method is to update the CAD geometry for CSM deflection.

  8. Geometry Software Common to All Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    All imaging, remote sensing, and in situ experiments require information about the geometry and location of observations. An alterntive to collecting geometry data with a supplementary experiment data record is proposed. The new method involves identifying the fundamental information, that is, the geometric state upon which geometry calculations are based, and maintaining or delivering these calculations in separate packages which are easily replaced when improved information is available. Implementation of this method in spacecraft navigation is discussed along with software system requirements.

  9. in silico Vascular Modeling for Personalized Nanoparticle Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Shaolie S.; Zhang, Yongjie; Liang, Xinghua; Hussain, Fazle; Ferrari, Mauro; Hughes, Thomas J. R.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Aims To predict the deposition of nanoparticles in a patient-specific arterial tree as a function of the vascular architecture, flow conditions, receptor surface density, and nanoparticle properties. Materials & methods The patient-specific vascular geometry is reconstructed from CT Angiography images. The Isogeometric Analysis framework integrated with a special boundary condition for the firm wall adhesion of nanoparticles is implemented. A parallel plate flow chamber system is used to validate the computational model in vitro. Results Particle adhesion is dramatically affected by changes in patient-specific attributes, such as branching angle and receptor density. The adhesion pattern correlates well with the spatial and temporal distribution of the wall shear rates. For the case considered, the larger (2.0 μm) particles adhere ≈ 2 times more in the lower branches of the arterial tree, whereas the smaller (0.5 μm) particles deposit more in the upper branches. Conclusion Our computational framework in conjunction with patient specific attributes can be used to rationally select nanoparticle properties to personalize, thus optimize, therapeutic interventions. PMID:23199308

  10. Charting the Vasculome: Uncovering the Principles of Vascular Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob; Magnasco, Marcelo

    2014-03-01

    The efficient distribution of resources in any system requires a carefully designed architecture that is both space filling and efficient. While the principles of such networks are beginning to be uncovered in plants, they remain poorly elucidated in the case of higher animals. We have developed a high-throughput, easily implemented method of mapping vascular networks in mammalian tissue. By combining high resolution, rapid fluorescence blockface imaging with serial sectioning, we are able to map the vasculature of the rat liver at a resolution of 10 microns, revealing the structure above the level of the capillaries, constituting the largest vascular dataset yet assembled. We have developed algorithms for the efficient three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional images, allowing skeletonization and investigation of its geometry and topology. We are able to calculate the scaling properties of these networks as well as the frequency of loops at each level. Using sophisticated topological tools, we are beginning to elucidate the principles of their organization. Ultimately, a greater understanding of vasculature is necessary for the success of efforts in synthetic and regenerative biology along with the better understanding of the growth and development of cancers.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Vascular Morphogenesis Using Transgenic Quail Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Huss, David; Filla, Michael B.; Czirok, Andras; Rongish, Brenda J.; Little, Charles D.; Fraser, Scott E.; Lansford, Rusty

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the least understood and most central questions confronting biologists is how initially simple clusters or sheet-like cell collectives can assemble into highly complex three-dimensional functional tissues and organs. Due to the limits of oxygen diffusion, blood vessels are an essential and ubiquitous presence in all amniote tissues and organs. Vasculogenesis, the de novo self-assembly of endothelial cell (EC) precursors into endothelial tubes, is the first step in blood vessel formation [1]. Static imaging and in vitro models are wholly inadequate to capture many aspects of vascular pattern formation in vivo, because vasculogenesis involves dynamic changes of the endothelial cells and of the forming blood vessels, in an embryo that is changing size and shape. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated Tie1 transgenic quail lines Tg(tie1:H2B-eYFP) that express H2B-eYFP in all of their endothelial cells which permit investigations into early embryonic vascular morphogenesis with unprecedented clarity and insight. By combining the power of molecular genetics with the elegance of dynamic imaging, we follow the precise patterning of endothelial cells in space and time. We show that during vasculogenesis within the vascular plexus, ECs move independently to form the rudiments of blood vessels, all while collectively moving with gastrulating tissues that flow toward the embryo midline. The aortae are a composite of somatic derived ECs forming its dorsal regions and the splanchnic derived ECs forming its ventral region. The ECs in the dorsal regions of the forming aortae exhibit variable mediolateral motions as they move rostrally; those in more ventral regions show significant lateral-to-medial movement as they course rostrally. Conclusions/Significance The present results offer a powerful approach to the major challenge of studying the relative role(s) of the mechanical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of vascular development. In past studies

  12. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  13. Linguistic geometry for technologies procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg; Boyd, Ron

    2005-05-01

    In the modern world of rapidly rising prices of new military hardware, the importance of Simulation Based Acquisition (SBA) is hard to overestimate. With SAB, DOD would be able to test, develop CONOPS for, debug, and evaluate new conceptual military equipment before actually building the expensive hardware. However, only recently powerful tools for real SBA have been developed. Linguistic Geometry (LG) permits full-scale modeling and evaluation of new military technologies, combinations of hardware systems and concepts of their application. Using LG tools, the analysts can create a gaming environment populated with the Blue forces armed with the new conceptual hardware as well as with appropriate existing weapons and equipment. This environment will also contain the intelligent enemy with appropriate weaponry and, if desired, with a conceptual counters to the new Blue weapons. Within such LG gaming environment, the analyst can run various what-ifs with the LG tools providing the simulated combatants with strategies and tactics solving their goals with minimal resources spent.

  14. Eye movements and information geometry.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Reiner

    2016-08-01

    The human visual system uses eye movements to gather visual information. They act as visual scanning processes and can roughly be divided into two different types: small movements around fixation points and larger movements between fixation points. The processes are often modeled as random walks, and recent models based on heavy tail distributions, also known as Levý flights, have been used in these investigations. In contrast to these approaches we do not model the stochastic processes, but we will show that the step lengths of the movements between fixation points follow generalized Pareto distributions (GPDs). We will use general arguments from the theory of extreme value statistics to motivate the usage of the GPD and show empirically that the GPDs provide good fits for measured eye tracking data. In the framework of information geometry the GPDs with a common threshold form a two-dimensional Riemann manifold with the Fisher information matrix as a metric. We compute the Fisher information matrix for the GPDs and introduce a feature vector describing a GPD by its parameters and different geometrical properties of its Fisher information matrix. In our statistical analysis we use eye tracker measurements in a database with 15 observers viewing 1003 images under free-viewing conditions. We use Matlab functions with their standard parameter settings and show that a naive Bayes classifier using the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix provides a high classification rate identifying the 15 observers in the database. PMID:27505658

  15. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  16. Diminished Reality Based on Image Inpainting Considering Background Geometry.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Norihiko; Sato, Tomokazu; Yokoya, Naokazu

    2016-03-01

    Diminished reality aims to remove real objects from video images and fill in the missing regions with plausible background textures in real time. Most conventional methods based on image inpainting achieve diminished reality by assuming that the background around a target object is almost planar. This paper proposes a new diminished reality method that considers background geometries with less constraints than the conventional ones. In this study, we approximate the background geometry by combining local planes, and improve the quality of image inpainting by correcting the perspective distortion of texture and limiting the search area for finding similar textures as exemplars. The temporal coherence of texture is preserved using the geometries and camera pose estimated by visual-simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). The mask region that includes a target object is robustly set in each frame by projecting a 3D region, rather than tracking the object in 2D image space. The effectiveness of the proposed method is successfully demonstrated using several experimental environments. PMID:26829239

  17. Non-Destructive Measurement of Vascular Tissue Development in Stems of Miniature Tomato Using Acoustic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kensuke; Watanabe, Eiko; Kato, Hiroshi

    The guided wave effect resembling that of annual rings found in woods and the cortical region of bones is believed to be observable in vascular tissues of herbaceous plants. The properties of acoustic waves traveling through the vascular tissue in the stem of a miniature tomato were measured using a piezoelectric pulser and receiver. The thickness of the vascular tissues and the stem's water content were measured. The detected acoustic waves showed a guided wave effect. The apparent sound velocity, va, was related to the vascular tissue thickness, tv. These results reveal that the detected acoustic waves traveled along the vascular tissues in stems. The maximum peak intensity of the detected acoustic waves, Imax was also related to t. Furthermore, wilting of the examined plants decreased the Imax, although va was not changed. The decrease in Imax might result from cavitations and embolisms with a subsequent increase in air pores in xylem tissues. These results demonstrate that the measurement of acoustic waves traveling through vascular tissue is a useful tool for the non-destructive evaluation of vascular tissue development and embolism density in xylem tissues.

  18. Vascular health and longitudinal changes in brain and cognition in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Acker, James D

    2007-03-01

    The impact of vascular health on the relations between structural brain changes and cognition was assessed in a longitudinal study of 46 adults, 23 of whom remained healthy for 5 years and 23 of whom had hypertension at baseline or acquired vascular problems during follow-up. At both measurement occasions, the volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and regional brain volumes correlated with age. In 5 years, WMH volume more than doubled in the vascular risk group but did not increase in healthy participants. The frontal lobes had the highest WMH load at baseline and follow-up; the parietal WMH showed the greatest rate of expansion. In the vascular risk group, systolic blood pressure at follow-up correlated with posterior WMH volume. The fastest cortical shrinkage was observed in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. Fluid intelligence correlated with WMH burden and declined along with faster WMH progression. In the vascular risk group, WMH progression and shrinkage of the fusiform cortex correlated with decline in working memory. Thus, poor vascular health contributes to age-related declines in brain and cognition, and some of the age-related declines may be limited to persons with elevated vascular risk. PMID:17402815

  19. Imaging Spectrum of Hemangioma and Vascular Malformations of the Head and Neck in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Salins, Paul C; Bhat, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the head and neck region in children constitute an interesting group of lesions that benefit immensely from imaging techniques. Imaging is essential for identification, characterization, and delineation of the extent of lesion and subsequent follow-up. Infantile hemangiomas, which are vascular tumors with a specific evolution pattern, constitute a large majority of these lesions. On the other hand, there are vascular malformations, which are anomalies of the vascular system, consisting of a range of vascular tissues associated with various flow patterns. When diagnosis is clinically evident, imaging should utilize non-radiation techniques and address the issues necessary for management. Timing and interpretation of imaging methods employed in assessing childhood vascular lesion should also take into consideration the natural history so that imaging is performed to address a specific question. This review highlights the typical appearance of a hemangioma and a group of vascular malformations of the head and neck. For descriptive purpose, an attempt has been made to group lesions into specific subsites, with each one having specific clinical significance. Cases included illustrate the spectrum of the disease ranging from classical form in young children to slightly differing manifestations of the disease in adolescents and adults. The illustrations also provide a novel way of presenting image data using volume-rendering techniques of 3D data. Multi-modality team interaction and management strategies of these complex lesions are also emphasized. PMID:25161800

  20. The vascular anatomy of the developing zebrafish: an atlas of embryonic and early larval development.

    PubMed

    Isogai, S; Horiguchi, M; Weinstein, B M

    2001-02-15

    We have used confocal microangiography to examine and describe the vascular anatomy of the developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This method and the profound optical clarity of zebrafish embryos make it possible to view the entire developing vasculature with unprecedented resolution. A staged series of three-dimensional images of the vascular system were collected beginning shortly after the onset of circulation at 1 day postfertilization through early- to midlarval stages at approximately 7 days postfertilization. Blood vessels in every region of the animal were imaged at each stage, and detailed "wiring patterns" were derived describing the interconnections between every major vessel. We present an overview of these data here in this paper and in an accompanying Web site "The interactive atlas of zebrafish vascular anatomy" online at (http://eclipse.nichd.nih.gov/nichd/lmg/redirect.html). We find a highly dynamic but also highly stereotypic pattern of vascular connections, with different sets of primitive embryonic vessels severing connections and rewiring in new configurations according to a reproducible plan. We also find that despite variation in the details of the vascular anatomy, the basic vascular plan of the developing zebrafish shows strong similarity to that of other vertebrates. This atlas will provide an invaluable foundation for future genetic and experimental studies of vascular development in the zebrafish. PMID:11161578

  1. Flow structures at the proximal side-to-end anastomosis. Influence of geometry and flow division.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P E; How, T V

    1995-05-01

    Flow structures were visualized in transparent polyurethane models of proximal side-to-end vascular anastomoses, using planar illumination of suspended tracer particles. Both the effects of geometry and flow division were determined under steady and pulsatile flow conditions, for anastomosis angles of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. The flow patterns were highly three-dimensional and were characterized by a series of vortices in the fully occluded distal artery and two helical vortices aligned with the axis of the graft. In steady flow, above a critical Reynolds number, the flow changed from a laminar regime to one displaying time-dependent behavior. In particular, significant fluctuating velocity components were observed in the distal artery and particles were shed periodically from the occluded artery into the graft. Pairs of asymmetric flow patterns were also observed in the graft, before the onset of the time-dependent flow regime. The critical Reynolds number ranged from 427 to 473 and appeared to be independent of anastomosis angle. The presence of a patent distal artery had a significant effect on the overall flow pattern and led to the formation of a large recirculation region at the toe of the anastomosis. The main structures observed in steady flow, such as vortices in the distal artery and helical flow in the graft, were also seen during the pulsatile cycle. However, the secondary flow components in the graft were more pronounced in pulsatile flow particularly during deceleration of the flow waveform. At higher mean Reynolds numbers, there was also a greater mixing between fluid in the occluded arterial section and that in the graft. PMID:7666660

  2. Brain vascular and hydrodynamic physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the brain in vulnerable infants undergoing surgery is a central aspect of perioperative care. Understanding the link between blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption leads to a more informed approach to bedside care. In some cases, we need to consider how high can we let the partial pressure of carbon dioxide go before we have concerns about risk of increased cerebral blood volume and change in intracranial hydrodynamics? Alternatively, in almost all such cases, we have to address the question of how low can we let the blood pressure drop before we should be concerned about brain perfusion? This review, provides a basic understanding of brain bioenergetics, hemodynamics, hydrodynamics, autoregulation and vascular homeostasis to changes in blood gases that is fundamental to our thinking about bedside care and monitoring. PMID:24331089

  3. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  4. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  5. Functional preservation of vascular smooth muscle tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Hutchins, P. M.; Kimzey, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic and cellular feedback relationships operating to effect the vascular decompensatory modifications were examined to reveal procedures for implementing protective measures guarding against vascular collapse when returning from a weightless environment to that of the earth's gravity. The surgical procedures for preparing the rat cremaster, and the fixation methods are described. Abstracts of publications resulting from this research are included.

  6. Management of Major Vascular Injury: Open.

    PubMed

    Tisherman, Samuel A

    2016-06-01

    Major blood vessels are in proximity to other vital structures in the neck and base of skull. Infections and tumors of the head and neck can invade vascular structures. Vascular injuries can lead to massive hemorrhage, cerebral ischemia, or stroke. Emergency and definitive management can be challenging. PMID:27267027

  7. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  8. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  9. 21 CFR 870.3250 - Vascular clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vascular clip. 870.3250 Section 870.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3250 Vascular clip. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3250 - Vascular clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vascular clip. 870.3250 Section 870.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3250 Vascular clip. (a) Identification. A...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3250 - Vascular clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vascular clip. 870.3250 Section 870.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3250 Vascular clip. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 870.3250 - Vascular clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vascular clip. 870.3250 Section 870.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3250 Vascular clip. (a) Identification. A...

  13. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM. PMID:26756629

  14. Vascular stiffness in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26321962

  15. Engineering clinically relevant volumes of vascularized bone

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Brianna M; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Brey, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Vascularization remains one of the most important challenges that must be overcome for tissue engineering to be consistently implemented for reconstruction of large volume bone defects. An extensive vascular network is needed for transport of nutrients, waste and progenitor cells required for remodelling and repair. A variety of tissue engineering strategies have been investigated in an attempt to vascularize tissues, including those applying cells, soluble factor delivery strategies, novel design and optimization of bio-active materials, vascular assembly pre-implantation and surgical techniques. However, many of these strategies face substantial barriers that must be overcome prior to their ultimate translation into clinical application. In this review recent progress in engineering vascularized bone will be presented with an emphasis on clinical feasibility. PMID:25877690

  16. Accretion shock geometries in the magnetic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    The first self consistent shock models for the AM Herculis-type systems successfully identified the dominant physical processes and their signatures. These homogenous shock models predict unpolarized, Rayleigh-Jeans optical spectra with sharp cutoffs and rising polarizations as the shocks become optically thin in the ultraviolet. However, the observed energy distributions are generally flat with intermediate polarizations over a broad optical band. These and other observational evidence support a non-homogenous accretion profile which may extend over a considerable fraction of the stellar surface. Both the fundamental assumptions underlying the canonical 1-D shock model and the extension of this model to inhomogenous accretion shocks were identified, for both radial and linear structures. The observational evidence was also examined for tall shocks and little evidence was found for relative shock heights in excess of h/R(1) greater than or equal to 0.1. For several systems, upper limits to the shock height can be obtained from either x ray or optical data. These lie in the region h/R(1) is approximately 0.01 and are in general agreement with the current physical picture for these systems. The quasi-periodic optical variations observed in several magnetic variables may eventually prove to be a major aid in further understanding their accretion shock geometries.

  17. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is

  18. Detonation diffraction through different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Rémy; Zitoun, Ratiba; Khasainov, Boris; Desbordes, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We performed the study of the diffraction of a self-sustained detonation from a cylindrical tube (of inner diameter d) through different geometric configurations in order to characterise the transmission processes and to quantify the transmission criteria to the reception chamber. For the diffraction from a tube to the open space the transmission criteria is expressed by d c = k c · λ (with λ the detonation cell size and k c depending on the mixture and on the operture configuration, classically 13 for alkane mixtures with oxygen). The studied geometries are: (a) a sharp increase of diameter ( D/ d > 1) with and without a central obstacle in the diffracting section, (b) a conical divergent with a central obstacle in the diffracting section and (c) an inversed intermediate one end closed tube insuring a double reflection before a final diffraction between the initiator tube and the reception chamber. The results for case A show that the reinitiation process depends on the ratio d/ λ. For ratios below k c the re-ignition takes place at the receptor tube wall and at a fixed distance from the step, i.e. closely after the diffracted shock reflection shows a Mach stem configuration. For ratios below a limit ratio k lim (which depends on D/ d) the re-ignition distance increases with the decrease of d/λ. For both case A and B the introduction of a central obstacle (of blockage ratio BR = 0.5) at the exit of the initiator tube decreases the critical transmission ratio k c by 50%. The results in configuration C show that the re-ignition process depends both on d/ λ and the geometric conditions. Optimal configuration is found that provides the transmission through the two successive reflections (from d = 26 mm to D ch = 200 mm) at as small d/ λ as 2.2 whatever the intermediate diameter D is. This configuration provides a significant improvement in the detonation transmission conditions.

  19. Quantum groups: Geometry and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.S.

    1996-05-13

    The main theme of this thesis is a study of the geometry of quantum groups and quantum spaces, with the hope that they will be useful for the construction of quantum field theory with quantum group symmetry. The main tool used is the Faddeev-Reshetikhin-Takhtajan description of quantum groups. A few content-rich examples of quantum complex spaces with quantum group symmetry are treated in details. In chapter 1, the author reviews some of the basic concepts and notions for Hopf algebras and other background materials. In chapter 2, he studies the vector fields of quantum groups. A compact realization of these vector fields as pseudodifferential operators acting on the linear quantum spaces is given. In chapter 3, he describes the quantum sphere as a complex quantum manifold by means of a quantum stereographic projection. A covariant calculus is introduced. An interesting property of this calculus is the existence of a one-form realization of the exterior differential operator. The concept of a braided comodule is introduced and a braided algebra of quantum spheres is constructed. In chapter 4, the author considers the more general higher dimensional quantum complex projective spaces and the quantum Grassman manifolds. Differential calculus, integration and braiding can be introduced as in the one dimensional case. Finally, in chapter 5, he studies the framework of quantum principal bundle and construct the q-deformed Dirac monopole as a quantum principal bundle with a quantum sphere as the base and a U(1) with non-commutative calculus as the fiber. The first Chern class can be introduced and integrated to give the monopole charge.

  20. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  1. Shape-based 3D vascular tree extraction for perforator flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Quan; Gao, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Perforator flaps have been increasingly used in the past few years for trauma and reconstructive surgical cases. With the thinned perforated flaps, greater survivability and decrease in donor site morbidity have been reported. Knowledge of the 3D vascular tree will provide insight information about the dissection region, vascular territory, and fascia levels. This paper presents a scheme of shape-based 3D vascular tree reconstruction of perforator flaps for plastic surgery planning, which overcomes the deficiencies of current existing shape-based interpolation methods by applying rotation and 3D repairing. The scheme has the ability to restore the broken parts of the perforator vascular tree by using a probability-based adaptive connection point search (PACPS) algorithm with minimum human intervention. The experimental results evaluated by both synthetic and 39 harvested cadaver perforator flaps show the promise and potential of proposed scheme for plastic surgery planning.

  2. Automatic tracking of neuro vascular tree paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayanan, S.; Gopinath, A.; Mallya, Y.; Shriram, K. S.; Joshi, M.

    2006-03-01

    3-D analysis of blood vessels from volumetric CT and MR datasets has many applications ranging from examination of pathologies such as aneurysm and calcification to measurement of cross-sections for therapy planning. Segmentation of the vascular structures followed by tracking is an important processing step towards automating the 3-D vessel analysis workflow. This paper demonstrates a fast and automated algorithm for tracking the major arterial structures that have been previously segmented. Our algorithm uses anatomical knowledge to identify the start and end points in the vessel structure that allows automation. Voxel coding scheme is used to code every voxel in the vessel based on its geodesic distance from the start point. A shortest path based iterative region growing is used to extract the vessel tracks that are subsequently smoothed using an active contour method. The algorithm also has the ability to automatically detect bifurcation points of major arteries. Results are shown for tracking the major arteries such as the common carotid, internal carotid, vertebrals, and arteries coming off the Circle of Willis across multiple cases with various data related and pathological challenges from 7 CTA cases and 2 MR Time of Flight (TOF) cases.

  3. Vascular active contour for vessel tree segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yanfeng; Deklerck, Rudi; Nyssen, Edgard; Markova, Aneta; de Mey, Johan; Yang, Xin; Sun, Kun

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a novel active contour model is proposed for vessel tree segmentation. First, we introduce a region competition-based active contour model exploiting the gaussian mixture model, which mainly segments thick vessels. Second, we define a vascular vector field to evolve the active contour along its center line into the thin and weak vessels. The vector field is derived from the eigenanalysis of the Hessian matrix of the image intensity in a multiscale framework. Finally, a dual curvature strategy, which uses a vesselness measure-dependent function selecting between a minimal principal curvature and a mean curvature criterion, is added to smoothen the surface of the vessel without changing its shape. The developed model is used to extract the liver and lung vessel tree as well as the coronary artery from high-resolution volumetric computed tomography images. Comparisons are made with several classical active contour models and manual extraction. The experiments show that our model is more accurate and robust than these classical models and is, therefore, more suited for automatic vessel tree extraction. PMID:21138795

  4. Intraoperative fluorescence vascular angiography: during tibial bypass.

    PubMed

    Perry, Diana; Bharara, Manish; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Preventing amputations in persons with lower extremity complications of diabetes is a complex endeavor, particularly in those with concomitant ischemia and tissue loss. Fluorescence angiography (Novadaq SPY system) may provide a tool for objective evaluations of tissue viability in the diabetic foot, which is an important indicator of the ability of the diabetic ulcer to heal adequately. The SPY system uses a low-power laser coupled with a charge-coupled device camera and indocyanine green (ICG) to sequence perfusion at the surface of the skin. We present an illustrated example of the potential utility of ICG fluorescence angiography (ICGFA) before and after vascular intervention in a high-risk limb. ICGFA appeared to reveal demarcation between viable and nonviable tissue and real-time perfusion, specifically capillary fill. ICGFA clarified the extent of necessary debridement and provided an immediate indication of improvement in regional perfusion status following revascularization. Future studies involving ICGFA may include pre- and postdebridement and closure perfusion, comparison of tissue perfusion pre- and post-endovascular therapy, and lower extremity flap viability. Future works will also address the consistency of results with ICGFA by analyzing a larger cohort of patients being treated by our unit. PMID:22401340

  5. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Mathews, Scott A; Coburn, James C; Sorg, Brian S; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements—including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth—were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light–tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance. PMID:26662064

  6. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-12-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements-including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth-were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light-tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  7. Stop Teaching and Let Students Learn Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku

    2011-01-01

    For many high school students as well as preservice teachers, geometry can be difficult to learn without experiences that allow them to build their own understanding. The authors' approach to geometry instruction--with its integration of content, multiple representations, real-world examples, reading and writing, communication and collaboration as…

  8. Improving African American Achievement in Geometry Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Adrian B.

    2010-01-01

    This case study evaluated the significance of implementing an enrichment mathematics course during the summer to rising African American ninth graders entitled, "Geometry Honors Preview." In the past, 60 to 70 percent of African American students in this school district had withdrawn from Geometry Honors by the second academic quarter. This study…

  9. Normal faults geometry and morphometry on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, D. A.; Spagnuolo, M. G.; Silvestro, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this report, we show how normal faults scarps geometry and degradation history can be accessed using high resolution imagery and topography. We show how the initial geometry of the faults can be inferred from faulted craters and we demonstrate how a comparative morphometric analysis of faults scarps can be used to study erosion rates through time on Mars.

  10. Teaching Geometry to Visually Impaired Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Christine K.; Lamb, John H.

    2012-01-01

    NCTM (2000) described geometry as "a means of describing, analyzing, and understanding the world and seeing beauty in its structures" (p. 309). Dossey et al. (2002) captured the essence of this aspect of visualization by stating that geometry fosters in students an ability to "visualize and mentally manipulate geometric objects." (p. 200).…

  11. Teaching Geometry through Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schettino, Carmel

    2011-01-01

    About seven years ago, the mathematics teachers at the author's secondary school came to the conclusion that they were not satisfied with their rather traditional geometry textbook. The author had already begun using a problem-based approach to teaching geometry in her classes, a transition for her and her students that inspired her to write about…

  12. Quilt Blocks: Writing in the Geometry Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Michelle; Thomas, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of quilt pattern consisting of many quilt blocks formed by congruent triangles, for writing by the students in the geometry classrooms, is studied. It is found that the students enjoyed this method and writing also helped in understanding the geometric concepts expanding their vocabulary in geometry.

  13. A Multivariate Model of Achievement in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, MarLynn; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that several key variables influence student achievement in geometry, but no research has been conducted to determine how these variables interact. A model of achievement in geometry was tested on a sample of 102 high school students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among…

  14. An approach for management of geometry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, R. P.; Herron, G. J.; Schweitzer, J. E.; Warkentine, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The strategies for managing Integrated Programs for Aerospace Design (IPAD) computer-based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. IPAD's data base system makes this information available to all authorized departments in a company. A discussion of the data structures and algorithms required to support geometry in IPIP (IPAD's data base management system) is presented. Through the use of IPIP's data definition language, the structure of the geometry components is defined. The data manipulation language is the vehicle by which a user defines an instance of the geometry. The manipulation language also allows a user to edit, query, and manage the geometry. The selection of canonical forms is a very important part of the IPAD geometry. IPAD has a canonical form for each entity and provides transformations to alternate forms; in particular, IPAD will provide a transformation to the ANSI standard. The DBMS schemas required to support IPAD geometry are explained.

  15. Teaching Molecular Geometry with the VSEPR Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    The first introduction to molecular geometry should be through the simple and easily understood VSEPR model, as the Valence Bond Theory and MO Theory suffer from limitations as far as understanding molecular geometry is concerned. The VSEPR model gives a perfectly satisfactory description of the bonding that follows directly from the Lewis model…

  16. Historical Digressions in Greek Geometry Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomaidis, Yannis

    1991-01-01

    Presents an attempt to combine the history of mathematics of ancient Greece with the course on theoretical geometry taught in Greek secondary schools. Three sections present the history of ancient Greek geometry, geometrical constructions using straightedges and compasses, and an application of Ptolemy's theorem in solving ancient astronomy…

  17. The Microcomputer and Instruction in Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantowski, Mary Grace

    1981-01-01

    The microcomputer has great potential for making high school geometry more stimulating and more easily understood by the students. The microcomputer can facilitate instruction in both the logico-deductive and spatial-visual aspects of geometry through graphics representations, simulation of motion, and its capability of interacting with the…

  18. Computing Bisectors in a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botana, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In this note, an approach combining dynamic geometry and automated deduction techniques is used to study the bisectors between points and curves. Usual teacher constructions for bisectors are discussed, showing that inherent limitations in dynamic geometry software impede their thorough study. We show that the interactive sketching of bisectors…

  19. Increased Knowledge in Geometry and Instructional Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swafford, Jane O.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effects on instruction of an intervention program designed to enhance teachers' knowledge of geometry and their knowledge of research on student cognition in geometry. Findings indicate significant gains in content knowledge and in van Hiele level, and marked changes in what was taught, how it was taught, and the characteristics…

  20. Linking Theory and Practice in Teaching Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Randall E.

    2005-01-01

    Several examples proved Van Hiele theory to be a useful ingredient in teaching of a summer course for high school students who had failed geometry during the school year are discussed. The theory provided a framework to help organize and reflect upon instruction for some key concepts in geometry.