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Sample records for regional vasoconstriction underlying

  1. Vasoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    Vasoconstriction is the narrowing (constriction) of blood vessels by small muscles in their walls. When blood vessels constrict, blood flow is slowed or blocked. Vasoconstriction may be slight or severe. It may result ...

  2. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: an under-recognized clinical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2010-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by recurrent thunderclap headaches and reversible cerebral vasoconstrictions. RCVS is more common than previously thought and should be differentiated from aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage. RCVS can be spontaneous or evoked by pregnancy or exposure to vasoactive substances. Patients tend to be middle-aged women but pediatric patients have been seen. Up to 80% of sufferers have identifiable triggers. Thunderclap headaches tend to recur daily and last for a period of around 2 weeks, while the vasoconstrictions may last for months. About one-third of patients have blood pressure surges accompanying headache attacks. The potential complications of RCVS include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, ischemic strokes over watershed zones, cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance images including angiography and venography and lumbar punctures are the studies of choice, whereas catheter angiography should not be implemented routinely. Patients with a mean flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery greater than 120 cm/s shown by transcranial color-coded sonography have a greater risk of ischemic complications than those without. The pathophysiology of RCVS remains unknown; sympathetic hyperactivity may play a role. Open-label trials showed calcium channel blockers, such as nimodipine may be an effective treatment in prevention of thunderclap headache attacks. In severe cases, intra-arterial therapy may be considered. Most patients with RCVS recover without sequelae; however, relapse has been reported in a small proportion of patients. PMID:21179608

  3. Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Loubani, Mahmoud; Morice, Alyn H.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is the elegant theory put forward more than six decades ago to explain regional variations in perfusion within the lung in certain animal species in response to localised restrictions in oxygenation. Although considerable progress has been made to describe the phenomenon at the macroscopic level and explain it at the microscopic level, we are far from a universal agreement about the process in humans. This review attempts to highlight some of the important evidence bases of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans and the significant gaps in our knowledge that would need bridging. PMID:24024204

  4. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-03-31

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca(2+) mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca(2+) mobilization. Ca(2+) mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  5. CFTR and sphingolipids mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabeling, Christoph; Yu, Hanpo; Wang, Liming; Ranke, Hannes; Goldenberg, Neil M.; Zabini, Diana; Noe, Elena; Krauszman, Adrienn; Gutbier, Birgitt; Yin, Jun; Schaefer, Michael; Arenz, Christoph; Hocke, Andreas C.; Suttorp, Norbert; Proia, Richard L.; Witzenrath, Martin; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes pulmonary ventilation-perfusion matching in regional hypoxia, but promotes pulmonary hypertension in global hypoxia. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch is a major cause of hypoxemia in cystic fibrosis. We hypothesized that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) may be critical in HPV, potentially by modulating the response to sphingolipids as mediators of HPV. HPV and ventilation-perfusion mismatch were analyzed in isolated mouse lungs or in vivo. Ca2+ mobilization and transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) translocation were studied in human pulmonary (PASMCs) or coronary (CASMCs) artery smooth muscle cells. CFTR inhibition or deficiency diminished HPV and aggravated ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In PASMCs, hypoxia caused CFTR to interact with TRPC6, whereas CFTR inhibition attenuated hypoxia-induced TRPC6 translocation to caveolae and Ca2+ mobilization. Ca2+ mobilization by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was also attenuated by CFTR inhibition in PASMCs, but amplified in CASMCs. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) blocked HPV, whereas exogenous nSMase caused TRPC6 translocation and vasoconstriction that were blocked by CFTR inhibition. nSMase- and hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, yet not TRPC6 translocation, were blocked by inhibition or deficiency of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) or antagonism of S1P receptors 2 and 4 (S1P2/4). S1P and nSMase had synergistic effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction that involved TRPC6, phospholipase C, and rho kinase. Our findings demonstrate a central role of CFTR and sphingolipids in HPV. Upon hypoxia, nSMase triggers TRPC6 translocation, which requires its interaction with CFTR. Concomitant SphK1-dependent formation of S1P and activation of S1P2/4 result in phospholipase C-mediated TRPC6 and rho kinase activation, which conjointly trigger vasoconstriction. PMID:25829545

  6. Pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction: how strong? How fast?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, D. W.; Klocke, R. A.; Farhi, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a minimally invasive technique for studying regional blood flow in conscious sheep, bypassing the complications of open-chest surgery, flow probes and tracer infusion. We quantitate regional perfusion continuously on the basis of regional clearance of methane (methane is produced in the sheep rumen, enters the circulation and is eliminated nearly completely (greater than 95%) in the lung). Tracheal intubation with a dual-lumen catheter isolates the gas exchange of the right apical lobe (RAL; less than 15% of the lung) from that of the remainder of the lung, which serves as a control (CL). We measure RAL and CL methane elimination by entraining expirates in constant flows, sampled continuously for methane. Results obtained with this technique and from regional oxygen uptake are in excellent agreement. We have found that hypoxic vasoconstriction is far more potent and stable during eucapnic hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia. The time course of the vasoconstriction suggests that many of the data in the literature may have been obtained prior to steady state.

  7. Nitric oxide inhibition sustains vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal vasoconstriction increases cytotoxic drug uptake into hepatic metastases by increasing the tumour to liver blood flow ratio. Prolonged infusion of the vasoconstrictor vasopressin does not result in sustained vasoconstriction, and this may limit the benefit of vasopressin in infusional chemotherapy. We have assessed whether loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction is mediated by nitric oxide. Hepatic and tumour blood flow were continuously monitored, in an animal hepatic tumour model, by laser Doppler flowmetry. The response to regionally infused vasopressin and the nitric oxide inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were assessed over a 30 min infusion period. The vasopressin-induced vasoconstrictor effect diminished after 15 min despite continued infusion. Vasoconstriction was significantly prolonged when L-NAME was infused in addition to vasopressin. The increase in tumour to normal blood flow ratio was greater over the infusion period when L-NAME was co-administered with vasopressin. Our results suggest that the loss of vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction seen in liver parenchyma after regional infusion is prevented by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-name and may be mediated by nitric oxide. PMID:7734317

  8. Cocaine attenuates vasoconstriction to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, A.A.; Morley, D.; Vosacek, R.; Zhang, X.Y.; Shah, R. )

    1991-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effects of cocaine and ethanol on vasomotor tone. Using a standard isolated vascular ring preparation, 24 rings from 7 New Zealand White Rabbits were studied. All rings were denuded as verified by methacholine challenge. The dose response to NE for each ring was used as a standard for vasoconstrictors Dose response curves to ETH and C were done in random order. Concentrations of both ETH and C employed were physiologically attainable in man and below thresholds for coma or death. The dose response curve to ETH was repeated after addition of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M C to the arterial bath. After adding 1,500 ug/ml of ETH, the dose response curve to C was repeated. Ethanol, alone caused significant vasoconstriction of arterial rings. After the addition of C to the bath, the dose response to ETH was significantly shifted to the right, peak contraction achieved was 36.6 {plus minus} 3.2% of maximal NE contraction. Cocaine alone did not result in any change in resting tension of the rings. When ETH was added to the bath, C caused vasoconstriction, the peak value equivalent to 12.5 {plus minus} 2.2% of maximal contraction to NE.

  9. Modeling of deep breath vasoconstriction reflex.

    PubMed

    Chalacheva, Patjanaporn; Khoo, Michael C K

    2015-08-01

    Deep breaths akin to sighs have been reported to cause peripheral vasoconstriction. Our previous simulation studies have shown that this phenomenon cannot be reproduced in existing circulatory control models without inclusion of a respiratory-vascular coupling mechanism. To better understand this "sigh-vasoconstriction reflex", we investigated the effect of spontaneous and passively induced sighs as well as spontaneous breathing on peripheral vasoconstriction during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep in human subjects. We found that both spontaneous and induced sighs caused vasoconstriction during wakefulness and sleep. The coupling between respiration and vasoconstriction is also present even in an absence of deep breaths. The coupling mechanism is largely linear with increased nonlinearity during induced sighs. Since peripheral vascular resistance modulation is known to be sympathetically mediated, investigation of this coupling could potentially allow us to assess sympathetic function through non-invasive measurements and simple interventions. PMID:26738099

  10. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  11. Estimation of endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction in acute pulmonary thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, John Y. C.; Lamm, Wayne J. E.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction following acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APTE). Thirteen anesthetized piglets (~25 kg) were ventilated with 0 PEEP. Cardiac output (Qt) and wedge pressure (Pw) were measured by a Swan Ganz catheter, along with arterial and venous blood gases. APTE was induced by autologous blood clots (~0.8 g/kg, 12-16 pieces) via a jugular venous catheter at time = 0 minutes until the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) was about 2.5 times the baseline at 30 minutes. Eight control animals (Group 1) received only normal saline afterward, while the remaining five (Group 2) received at time = 40-minute saline plus Tezosentan, a nonspecific endothelin antagonist. The drug was initially given as an intravenous bolus (10 mg/kg), followed by an infusion (2 mg/min) until the end of the experiment at 2 hours. Hemodynamic data were measured before APTE and then at 30-minute intervals. Pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) was calculated as (Ppa-Pw)/CI, where CI was cardiac index or Qt/W (body weight). Fluorescent microspheres (FMS) were used to mark regional blood flows and ventilation for cluster analysis. PVRI acutely increased within minutes and remained high despite some recovery over time. With Tezosentan treatment, the results showed that endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction persisted significantly up to 2 hours and accounted for about 25% of the increase in PVRI while clot obstruction accounted for the remaining 75%. CI remained relatively constant throughout. Tezosentan also affected PVRI indirectly by mitigating the shift of regional blood flow back to the embolized areas over time, possibly by attenuating vasoconstriction in the nonembolized areas. We conclude that following APTE, although the increased PVRI is mostly due to mechanical embolic obstruction, secondary factors such as vasoconstriction and pattern of regional blood flow over time also play important roles. PMID:22558522

  12. Measurement of model coefficients of skin sympathetic vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Severens, Natascha M W; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D; Frijns, Arjan J H; Kingma, Boris R M; de Mol, Bas A J M; van Steenhoven, Anton A

    2010-01-01

    Many researchers have already attempted to model vasoconstriction responses, commonly using the mathematical representation proposed by Stolwijk (1971 NASA Contractor Report CR-1855 (Washington, DC: NASA)). Model makers based the parameter values in this formulation either on estimations or by attributing the difference between their passive models and measurement data fully to thermoregulation. These methods are very sensitive to errors. This study aims to present a reliable method for determining physiological values in the vasoconstriction formulation. An experimental protocol was developed that enabled us to derive the local proportional amplification coefficients of the toe, leg and arm and the transient vasoconstrictor tone. Ten subjects participated in a cooling experiment. During the experiment, core temperature, skin temperature, skin perfusion, forearm blood flow and heart rate variability were measured. The contributions to the normalized amplification coefficient for vasoconstriction of the toe, leg and arm were 84%, 11% and 5%, respectively. Comparison with relative values in the literature showed that the estimated values of Stolwijk and the values mentioned by Tanabe et al (2002 Energy Build. 34 637-46) were comparable with our measured values, but the values of Gordon (1974 The response of a human temperature regulatory system model in the cold PhD Thesis University of California, Santa Barbara) and Fiala et al (2001 Int. J. Biometeorol. 45 143159) differed significantly. With the help of regression analysis a relation was formulated between the error signal of the standardized core temperature and the vasoconstrictor tone. This relation was formulated in a general applicable way, which means that it can be used for situations where vasoconstriction thresholds are shifted, like under anesthesia or during motion sickness. PMID:19940347

  13. Modulation of the LKB1-AMPK Signalling Pathway Underpins Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Evans, A Mark; Lewis, Sophronia A; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A; Moral-Sanz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the defining characteristic of pulmonary arteries is the process of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which, under physiological conditions, supports ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung by diverting blood flow away from oxygen deprived areas of the lung to oxygen rich regions. However, when alveolar hypoxia is more widespread, either at altitude or with disease (e.g., cystic fibrosis), HPV may lead to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. HPV is driven by the intrinsic response to hypoxia of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, which are acutely sensitive to relatively small changes in pO2 and have evolved to monitor oxygen supply and thus address ventilation-perfusion mismatch. There is now a consensus that the inhibition by hypoxia of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation represents a key step towards the induction of HPV, but the precise nature of the signalling pathway(s) engaged thereafter remains open to debate. We will consider the role of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase through which AMPK is intimately coupled to changes in oxygen supply via mitochondrial metabolism. A growing body of evidence, from our laboratory and others, suggests that modulation of the LKB1-AMPK signalling pathway underpins both hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and the development of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26303471

  14. Endothelium attenuates ethanol induced vasoconstriction of arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, D.; Bove, A.A.; Walter, J. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors have previously demonstrated that clinically relevant doses of ethanol (ETH) caused significant vasoconstriction of rabbit thoracic aorta. This study examined the role of endothelium in ethanol vasoconstriction. Thoracic aorta was harvested from 3 New Zealand White rabbits after anesthetization with sodium pentobarbital. Twelve aortic 3 mm rings were mounted in organ baths attached to force transducers and recording apparatus. Six of the twelve rings were denuded. Denudation was confirmed by challenge with acetylcholine (10-4 M). Resting tension was set at 10 grams and the rings equilibrated in 37 C Krebs-Heinsleit solution for 2 hours. Then, the response to norepinephrine (NE) was established (10-8 to 10-5 M). After reattaining resting tension, the response to ETH (500-2,500 ug/ml) was recorded. ETH produced significant vasoconstriction in both non-denuded (48{plus minus}7% of NE max) and denuded (58{plus minus}2% of NE max) arteries. Vasoconstriction was significantly higher in the denuded condition. The authors conclude that the predominant ETH action on arteries is based in vascular smooth muscle although endothelium acts to attenuate the ETH induced vasoconstrictor response.

  15. Thyroidectomy Under Regional Anaesthesia: An ORL Perspective

    PubMed Central

    K. B, Prashanth; Mohammed, Shamna J.; Pereira, Nivedeeta J.; Gupta, Srijoy; K. R, Sumanth; K. M, Triveni

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of regional anaesthesia as an effective alternative to general anaesthesia in thyroid surgeries is now being accepted in many parts of the world. In this day of computers and technology, there is an increased awareness among the people of the available options of anaesthesia and the adverse effects of general anaesthesia. They thus have an inclination to avoid general anaesthesia wherever feasible. This study dwells on the use of regional anaesthesia as an alternative tool that can be offered to the patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Aims This study aims at analysing the effectiveness, safety, ease and patient acceptability of performing thyroidectomies under regional anaesthesia. Settings and Design This prospective study was performed at a university – affiliated hospital. Materials and Methods Twenty nine patients who underwent thyroidectomy for benign thyroid diseases under regional anaesthesia were included in this study: 20 patients under deep cervical plexus block and 9 patients under cervical epidural anaesthesia. Statistical analysis used Z-test and validity test. Results In our study, all the 29 patients who underwent thyroidectomy under regional anaesthesia found the anaesthesia effective and were comfortable throughout the procedure. The surgeon too was at ease while performing the surgery. No complications were recorded. Conclusion In our present study, regional anaesthesia (Cervical epidural anaesthesia and Cervical plexus block) has been used safely and effectively in 29 thyroid surgeries. We conclude that although regional anaesthesia has been reserved for high risk thyroidectomies it may be offered as effective alternative to general anaesthesia even in routine thyroid surgeries. PMID:26557548

  16. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway. PMID:26524654

  17. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ali; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-09-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral vascular tone is thought to contribute to the disease's pathophysiology. RCVS generally follows a monophasic course. Associated strokes and cerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon. In this review we will attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of RCVS, with emphasis on the controversies in the field and the newest findings in the reported literature. PMID:25138149

  18. Systems Biology of HBOC-Induced Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Chi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Vasoconstriction is a major adverse effect of HBOCs. The use of a single drug for attenuating HBOC-induced vasoconstriction has been tried with limited success. Since HBOC causes disruptions at multiple levels of organization in the vascular system, a systems approach is helpful to explore avenues to counteract the effects of HBOC at multiple levels by targeting multiple sites in the system. A multi-target approach is especially appropriate for HBOC-induced vasoconstriction, because HBOC disrupts the cascade of amplification by NO-cGMP signaling and protein phosphorylation, ultimately resulting in vasoconstriction. Targeting multiple steps in the cascade may alter the overall gain of amplification, thereby limiting the propagation of disruptive effects through the cascade. As a result, targeting multiple sites may accomplish a relatively high overall efficacy at submaximal drug doses. Identifying targets and doses for developing a multi-target combination HBOC regimen for oxygen therapeutics requires a detailed understanding of the systems biology and phenotypic heterogeneity of the vascular system at multiple layers of organization, which can be accomplished by successive iterations between experimental studies and mathematical modeling at multiple levels of vascular systems and organ systems. Towards this goal, this article addresses the following topics: a) NO-scavenging by HBOC, b) HBOC autoxidation-induced reactive oxygen species generation and endothelial barrier dysfunction, c) NO- cGMP signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells, d) NO and cGMP-dependent regulation of contractile filaments in vascular smooth muscle cells, e) phenotypic heterogeneity of vascular systems, f) systems biology as an approach to developing a multi-target HBOC regimen. PMID:21726185

  19. Triptans and chest symptoms: the role of pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Dodick, D W

    2004-04-01

    Triptans are effective and well tolerated in the treatment of acute migraine. Chest symptoms are a common adverse effect unrelated to coronary vasoconstriction in most patients. Although the aetiology of chest symptoms remains to be fully defined, pulmonary vasoconstriction is a possible underlying mechanism. Pre-clinical studies of isolated human blood vessels were used to identify the cerebral selectivity of triptans and ascertain if selectivity vs the pulmonary vasculature predicts a lower rate of chest symptoms. Controlled clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance studies were reviewed to document the incidence of chest symptoms after triptan therapy. In clinical trials, the incidence of chest symptoms at usual therapeutic doses ranged from 1 to 4% depending on the triptan and study design, whereas in post-marketing surveillance studies, up to 41% of patients specifically asked about chest symptoms reported them. A comparative clinical trial showed that almotriptan was associated with lower incidence of chest symptoms than sumatriptan (0.3 vs 2.2%). The intrinsic activity of almotriptan, a second-generation triptan, on human pulmonary arteries and veins was lower than that of sumatriptan. Pre-clinical studies of isolated pulmonary blood vessels may predict the clinical likelihood of chest symptoms; however, additional comparisons are needed. PMID:15030540

  20. Progesterone suppressed vasoconstriction in human umbilical vein via reducing calcium entry.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Gao, Qinqin; Han, Bing; Zhu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Di; Tao, Jianying; Chen, Jie; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the actions of progesterone on human umbilical vein (HUV) from normal pregnancies and the possible underlying mechanisms involved. HUV rings were suspended in organ baths and exposed to progesterone followed by phenylephrine (PE) or serotonin (5-HT). Progesterone suppressed PE- or 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction in HUV rings. The inhibitory effect induced by progesterone was not influenced by nitric oxide syntheses inhibitor, prostaglandins syntheses blocker, the integrity of endothelium, selective progesterone receptor or potassium channel antagonists. Further testing showed that progesterone and nifedipine (a blocker for L-type calcium channels) produced similar inhibitory effects on PE-, 5-HT-, Bay-k8644-, KCl-induced vasoconstriction in Krebs solution as well as CaCl2-induced vasoconstriction in Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. But the inhibitory effect of mibefradil (mibe, a blocker for L-type (CaV1.2) and T-type calcium channels (CaV3.2)) on PE-, 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction was significantly greater than progesterone or nifedipine in Krebs solution. Furthermore, progesterone did not affect the vasoconstriction caused by PE, 5-HT, or caffeine in Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution. In addition, incubation HUV with progesterone did not change CaV1.2 and progesterone receptor (PR) expressions. The results gained demonstrated that progesterone could suppress multiple agonist-induced vasoconstrictions in HUV, mainly due to a reduction of calcium entry through L-type calcium channels, not endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation pathways, potassium channels, or Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, providing new information important to further understanding the contribution of progesterone in the regulation of the placental-fetal circulation. PMID:26875775

  1. Vasoconstriction induced by salivary gland extracts from ixodid ticks.

    PubMed

    Pekáriková, Danica; Rajská, Petra; Kazimírová, Mária; Pecháňová, Olga; Takáč, Peter; Nuttall, Patricia A

    2015-12-01

    In their quest for blood, most haematophagous parasites secrete vasodilators in their saliva to counter the host haemostatic response of vasoconstriction. Surprisingly, salivary gland extracts from adult female Dermacentor reticulatus and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks induced constriction in a rat femoral artery model; males induced vasoconstriction or vasodilation depending on the time of feeding. Based on comparative HPLC fractionation, the active compounds inducing vasoconstriction do not appear to be prostaglandins (which ticks normally use as vasodilators). Vasoconstriction may be unique to ixodid ticks, helping them control blood flow during their prolonged blood-feeding of up to 10 days or more. PMID:26432295

  2. Hemolysate-mediated renal vasoconstriction and hypersensitization.

    PubMed

    Burke, T J; Falk, S; Conger, J D; Voelkel, N F

    1999-01-01

    The present studies measured vessel diameter, before and after addition of hemolysate, in isolated afferent arterioles (AA) and efferent arterioles (EA) obtained from the rat kidney. Human red blood cells (RBC) were hemolyzed in distilled water and membranes were discarded after centrifugation. Hemolysate added to the bath solution caused vigorous AA and EA contraction and, after washout, hypersensitized the AA and EA to doses of angiotensin II (AII) which would normally only elicit 50% contraction (EC50). Neither the contraction nor the hypersensitization were mimicked by pure human hemoglobin. The vasoconstrictive responses in the AA and EA were accompanied by increased cytosolic-free calcium concentration. Further purification (desalting) of the hemolysate to remove substance of < or = 1000 Da (which include ATP) did not eliminate the vasoconstrictive component from the hemolysate. Finally, cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells also demonstrated a rapid increase in (Ca2+i) when exposed to hemolysate. This increase in (Ca2+i) was, in part, dependent on Ca2+ influx since it could be attenuated with diltiazem (10(-5) M). In conclusion, hemolysate contains a factor which induces contractions of the isolated rat kidney AA and EA and rapid elevations in (Ca2+i). This factor, from hemolyzed RBC, is not hemoglobin itself. PMID:10048115

  3. Endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction in postischemic newborn intestine.

    PubMed

    Nankervis, C A; Schauer, G M; Miller, C E

    2000-10-01

    We previously suggested that the profound, sustained vasoconstriction noted in 3-day-old swine intestine after a moderate episode of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) reflects the unmasking of underlying constrictor tone consequent to a loss of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we sought to determine whether endothelin-1 (ET-1) was the unmasked constrictor and whether selective loss of endothelial ET(B) receptors, which mediate NO-based vasodilation, participated in the hemodynamic consequences of I/R in newborn intestine. Studies were performed in innervated, autoperfused intestinal loops in 3- and 35-day-old swine. Selective blockade of ET(A) receptors with BQ-610 had no effect on hemodynamics under control conditions; however, when administered before and during I/R, BQ-610 significantly attenuated the post-I/R vasoconstriction and reduction in arteriovenous O(2) difference in the younger group. In 3-day-old intestine, reduction of intestinal O(2) uptake to a level similar to that noted after I/R by lowering tissue temperature had no effect on the response to BQ-610 or ET-1, indicating that the change in response to BQ-610 noted after I/R was not simply consequent to the reduction in tissue O(2) demand. In studies in mesenteric artery rings suspended in myographs, we observed a leftward shift in the dose-response curve for ET-1 after selective blockade of ET(B) receptors with BQ-788 in 3- but not 35-day-old swine. Rings exposed to I/R in vivo behaved in a manner similar to control rings treated with BQ-788 or endothelium-denuded non-I/R rings. PMID:11005754

  4. The cold effects on circulatory inflammation, thrombosis and vasoconstriction in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Meng, Xia; Wang, Cuicui; Chen, Renjie; Zhou, Ji; Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2016-10-15

    Short-term associations between temperature variation and adverse cardiovascular outcomes have been well documented. However, it remains unclear whether these temperature-related cardiovascular effects are reflected in circulating biomarkers. We aimed to examine the associations between ambient temperature and circulating biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation and vasoconstriction. We collected 207 blood samples from a panel of 35 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Sixteen biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation and vasoconstriction were repeatedly measured over six follow-ups. The short-term associations between air temperature and these biomarkers were assessed by mixed-effect models with controls of demographic characteristics and main air pollutants. We found significant and acute effects of temperature on circulatory biomarkers occurred as early as 3h after exposure, peaked at 25-48h and lasted until 72h after exposure. For example, a 1°C decrease in the 25-48h average of air temperature was associated with 2.2%-15.1% increases in biomarkers of inflammation, 1.4%-24.5% of coagulation and 8.2% of vasoconstriction. Our results provided significant evidence that a temperature decline results in a response in biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation and vasoconstriction biomarkers, suggesting them to be the potential biologic mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular effects of temperature variation, and may have implications for disease prevention. PMID:27295598

  5. Vibration causes acute vascular injury in a two-step process: vasoconstriction and vacuole disruption.

    PubMed

    Govindaraju, Sandya R; Bain, James Lw; Eddinger, Thomas J; Riley, Danny A

    2008-08-01

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome is a vasospastic and neurodegenerative occupational disease. In the current study, the mechanism of vibration-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) injury was examined in a rat-tail vibration model. Tails of male Sprague Dawley rats were vibrated continuously for 4 hr at 60 Hz, 49 m/s(2) with or without general anesthesia. Ventral tail arteries were aldehyde fixed and embedded in epoxy resin to enable morphological analysis. Vibration without anesthesia caused vasoconstriction and vacuoles in the SMC. Anesthetizing rats during vibration prevented vasoconstriction and vacuole formation. Exposing tail arteries in situ to 1 mM norepinephrine (NE) for 15 min induced the greatest vasoconstriction and vacuolation. NE induced vacuoles were twice as large as those formed during vibration. When vibrated 4 hr under anesthesia after pretreatment with NE for 15 min, the SMC lacked vacuoles and exhibited a longitudinal banding pattern of dark and light staining. The extracellular matrix was filled with particulates, which were confirmed by electron microscopy to be cellular debris. The present findings demonstrate that vibration-induced vasoconstriction (SMC contraction) requires functioning central nervous system reflexes, and the physical stress of vibration damages the contracted SMC by dislodging and fragmenting SMC vacuoles. PMID:18493932

  6. Hydrogen sulfide mediates hypoxic vasoconstriction through a production of mitochondrial ROS in trout gills.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Olson, Kenneth R

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive response that diverts pulmonary blood flow from poorly ventilated and hypoxic areas of the lung to more well-ventilated parts. This response is important for the local matching of blood perfusion to ventilation and improves pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. HPV is an ancient and highly conserved response, expressed in the respiratory organs of all vertebrates, including lungs of mammals, birds, and reptiles; amphibian skin; and fish gills. The mechanism underlying HPV and how cells sense low Po(2) remains elusive. In perfused trout gills (Oncorhynchus mykiss), acute hypoxia, as well as H(2)S, caused an initial and transient constriction of the vasculature. Inhibition of the enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase, which blocks H(2)S production, abolished the hypoxic response. Individually blocking the four complexes in the electron transport chain abolished both the hypoxic and the H(2)S-mediated constriction. Glutathione, an antioxidant and scavenger of superoxide, attenuated the vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia and H(2)S. Furthermore, diethyldithiocarbamate, an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase, attenuated the hypoxic and H(2)S constriction. This strongly suggests that H(2)S mediates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in trout gills. H(2)S may stimulate the mitochondrial production of superoxide, which is then converted to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Thus, H(2)O(2) may act as the "downstream" signaling molecule in hypoxic vasoconstriction. PMID:22739350

  7. Inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in exercising human thigh muscles

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D Walter; Fadel, Paul J; Smith, Michael L; Raven, Peter; Sander, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying metabolic inhibition of sympathetic responses within exercising skeletal muscle remain incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to test whether α2-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction was more sensitive to metabolic inhibition than α1-vasoconstriction during dynamic knee-extensor exercise. We studied healthy volunteers using two protocols: (1) wide dose ranges of the α-adrenoreceptor agonists phenylephrine (PE, α1 selective) and BHT-933 (BHT, α2 selective) were administered intra-arterially at rest and during 27 W knee-extensor exercise (n = 13); (2) flow-adjusted doses of PE (0.3 μg kg−1 l−1) and BHT (15 μg kg−1 l−1) were administered at rest and during ramped exercise (7 W to 37 W; n= 10). Ultrasound Doppler and thermodilution techniques provided direct measurements of femoral blood flow (FBF). PE (0.8 μg kg−1) and BHT (40 μg kg−1) produced comparable maximal reductions in FBF at rest (−58 ± 6 versus−64 ± 4%). Despite increasing the doses, PE (1.6 μg kg−1 min−1) and BHT (80 μg kg−1 min−1) caused significantly smaller changes in FBF during 27 W exercise (−13 ± 4 versus−3 ± 5%). During ramped exercise, significant vasoconstriction at lower intensities (7 and 17 W) was seen following PE (−16 ± 5 and −16 ± 4%), but not BHT (−2 ± 4 and −4 ± 5%). At the highest intensity (37 W), FBF was not significantly changed by either drug. Collectively, these data demonstrate metabolic inhibition of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in large postural muscles of healthy humans. Both α1- and α2-adrenoreceptor agonists produce comparable vasoconstriction in the resting leg, and dynamic thigh exercise attenuates α1- and α2-mediated vasoconstriction similarly. However, α2-mediated vasoconstriction appears more sensitive to metabolic inhibition, because α2 is completely inhibited even at low workloads, whereas α1 becomes progressively inhibited with increasing workloads. PMID

  8. Caveolae regulate vasoconstriction of conduit arteries to angiotensin II in hindlimb unweighted rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongchao; Bai, Yungang; Yu, Jinwen; Liu, Huan; Cheng, Yaoping; Liu, Yonghong; Xie, Xiaoping; Ma, Jin; Bao, Junxiang

    2015-10-15

    Weightlessness induces the functional remodelling of arteries, but the changes to angiotensin II (Ang II)-elicited vasoconstriction and the underlying mechanism have never been reported. Caveolae are invaginations of the cell membrane crucial for the contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells, so we investigated the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to simulated weightlessness and the role of caveolae in it. The 4 week hindlimb unweighted (HU) rat was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness. Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was measured by isometric force recording. The morphology of caveolae was examined by transmission electron microscope. The binding of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 ) and caveolin-1 (cav-1) was examined by coimmunoprecipitation and Western blot. We found that the maximal developing force (E(max)) of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction was decreased in abdominal aorta by 30.6%, unchanged in thoracic aorta and increased in carotid artery by 17.9% after HU, while EC50 of the response was increased in all three arteries (P < 0.05). AT1 desensitization upon activation was significantly reduced by HU in all three arteries, as was the number of caveolae (P < 0.05). Furthermore, Ang II promoted the binding of AT1 and cav-1 significantly in control but not HU arteries. Both the number of caveolae and the binding of AT1 and cav-1 in HU arteries were restored by cholesterol pretreatment which also reinstated the change in EC50 as well as the level of AT1 desensitization. These results indicate that modified caveolae in vascular smooth muscle cells could interfere with the binding of AT1 and cav-1 mediating the adaptation of Ang II-elicited vasoconstriction to HU. PMID:26260249

  9. Portuguese wine regions under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, João A.; Fraga, Helder; Malheiro, Aureliano C.; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Jones, Gregory V.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Viticulture and wine production are among the most important sectors of the Portuguese economy. However, as grapevines are strongly affected by weather and climate, climate change may represent an important threat to wine production. The current (1950-2000) and future (2041-2070) bioclimatic conditions in Portugal are discussed by analyzing a number of indices suitable for viticultural zoning, including a categorized bioclimatic index. A two-step method of spatial pattern downscaling is applied in order to achieve a very high spatial resolution (of approximately 1 km) throughout Portugal. Future projections are based on an ensemble of 13 climate model transient experiments, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario. Results for the recent past are in clear agreement with the current distribution of vineyards and of the established Denomination of Origin regions. Furthermore, the typical climatic conditions associated with each grapevine variety that are currently grown in Portugal are assessed. Under future scenarios, nevertheless, the current conditions are projected to change significantly towards a lower bioclimatic diversity. This can be explained by the projected warming and drying in future decades. The resulting changes in varietal suitability and wine characteristics of each region may thereby bring important challenges for the Portuguese winemaking sector. As such, new measures need to be timely implemented to adapt to these climate change projections and to mitigate their likely detrimental impacts on the Portuguese economy. Acknowledgments: this work is supported by European Union Funds (FEDER/COMPETE - Operational Competitiveness Programme) and by national funds (FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) under the project ClimVineSafe (PTDC/AGR-ALI/110877/2009).

  10. Effects of posture on blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, S. M.; Domino, K. B.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    We used differential excretion of sulphur hexafluoride from the left and right lung to measure blood flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) in the prone and supine positions in dogs (n = 9). Gas exchange was assessed using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Blood flow diversion from the hypoxic (3% oxygen) left lung was mean 70.7 (SD 11.2)% in the supine compared with 57.0 (12.1)% in the prone position (P < 0.02). The supine position was associated with increased perfusion to low VA/Q regions (P < 0.05). The increased flow diversion with hypoxia in the supine position was associated with more ventilation to high VA/Q regions (P < 0.05). We conclude that flow diversion by hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is greater in the supine position. This effect could contribute to the variable response in gas exchange with positioning in patients with ARDS.

  11. Cold-induced vasoconstriction may persist long after cooling ends: an evaluation of multiple cryotherapy units

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Localized cooling is widely used in treating soft tissue injuries by modulating swelling, pain, and inflammation. One of the primary outcomes of localized cooling is vasoconstriction within the underlying skin. It is thought that in some instances, cryotherapy may be causative of tissue necrosis and neuropathy via cold-induced ischaemia leading to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI). The purpose of this study is to quantify the magnitude and persistence of vasoconstriction associated with cryotherapy. Methods Data are presented from testing with four different FDA approved cryotherapy devices. Blood perfusion and skin temperature were measured at multiple anatomical sites during baseline, active cooling, and passive rewarming periods. Results Local cutaneous blood perfusion was depressed in response to cooling the skin surface with all devices, including the DonJoy (DJO, p = 2.6 × 10−8), Polar Care 300 (PC300, p = 1.1 × 10−3), Polar Care 500 Lite (PC500L, p = 0.010), and DeRoyal T505 (DR505, p = 0.016). During the rewarming period, parasitic heat gain from the underlying tissues and the environment resulted in increased temperatures of the skin and pad for all devices, but blood perfusion did not change significantly, DJO (n.s.), PC300 (n.s.), PC500L (n.s.), and DR505 (n.s.). Conclusions The results demonstrate that cryotherapy can create a deep state of vasoconstriction in the local area of treatment. In the absence of independent stimulation, the condition of reduced blood flow persists long after cooling is stopped and local temperatures have rewarmed towards the normal range, indicating that the maintenance of vasoconstriction is not directly dependent on the continuing existence of a cold state. The depressed blood flow may dispose tissue to NFCI. PMID:24562697

  12. Transmyocardial Revascularization Ameliorates Ischemia by Attenuating Paradoxical Catecholamine-Induced Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Le, D. Elizabeth; Powers, Eric R.; Bin, Jian-Ping; Leong-Poi, Howard; Goodman, N. Craig; Kaul, Sanjiv

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) offers clinical benefit is controversial. We hypothesized that TMR ameliorates ischemia by reversing paradoxical catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction. Chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy was created in 11 dogs by placing ameroid constrictors on the proximal coronary arteries and their major branches. Six weeks later, 35 channels were created percutaneously in the left circumflex artery (LCx) region with the left anterior descending artery (LAD) region serving as control. At rest, wall thickening (WT) and myocardial blood flow (MBF) did not change in the treated region, while they deteriorated in the control bed. Contractile and MBF reserve increased in the treated region but deteriorated in the control region. There was diminished 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake and significant reduction in noradrenergic nerves in the treated region compared to control region, with corresponding reduction in tissue tyrosine hydroxylase activity. We conclude that the absence of catecholamine-induced reduction in MBF reserve and contractile reserve in the TMR treated region with associated evidence of neuronal injury indicates that the relief of exercise-induced ischemia after TMR is most likely due to reversal of paradoxical catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction. These findings may have implications in selecting patients who would benefit from TMR. PMID:17386383

  13. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, carotid body function and erythropoietin production in adult rats perinatally exposed to hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Ramirez, Maria; Olea, Elena; Moral-Sanz, Javier; Cogolludo, Angel; Castañeda, Javier; Yubero, Sara; Agapito, Teresa; Gomez-Niño, Angela; Rocher, Asuncion; Rigual, Ricardo; Obeso, Ana; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco; González, Constancio

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalians possess three cell systems that are activated by acute bodily hypoxia: pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), carotid body chemoreceptor cells (CBCC) and erythropoietin (EPO)-producing cells. In rats, chronic perinatal hyperoxia causes permanent carotid body (CB) atrophy and functional alterations of surviving CBCC. There are no studies on PASMC or EPO-producing cells. Our aim is to define possible long-lasting functional changes in PASMC or EPO-producing cells (measured as EPO plasma levels) and, further, to analyse CBCC functional alterations. We used 3- to 4-month-old rats born and reared in a normal atmosphere or exposed to perinatal hyperoxia (55–60% O2 for the last 5–6 days of pregnancy and 4 weeks after birth). Perinatal hyperoxia causes an almost complete loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which was correlated with lung oxidative status in early postnatal life and prevented by antioxidant supplementation in the diet. O2-sensitivity of K+ currents in the PASMC of hyperoxic animals is normal, indicating that their inhibition is not sufficient to trigger HPV. Perinatal hyperoxia also abrogated responses elicited by hypoxia on catecholamine and cAMP metabolism in the CB. An increase in EPO plasma levels elicited by hypoxia was identical in hyperoxic and control animals, implying a normal functioning of EPO-producing cells. The loss of HPV observed in adult rats and caused by perinatal hyperoxia, comparable to oxygen therapy in premature infants, might represent a previously unrecognized complication of such a medical intervention capable of aggravating medical conditions such as regional pneumonias, atelectases or general anaesthesia in adult life. Key points Adult animals that have been perinatally exposed to oxygen-rich atmospheres (hyperoxia), recalling those used for oxygen therapy in infants, exhibit a loss of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, whereas vasoconstriction elicited by depolarizing agents is

  14. Effects of endothelin receptor antagonist on cyclosporine-induced vasoconstriction in isolated rat renal arterioles.

    PubMed Central

    Lanese, D M; Conger, J D

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the potent constrictor peptide, endothelin (ET) has a mediating role in cyclosporine A (CsA)-related renal vasoconstriction. However, the nature of the CsA-ET interaction and effect on the renal vasculature is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was twofold: (a) to determine if CsA exposure caused direct local release of ET from the endothelium of the renal microvasculature and (b) to determine if locally generated ET has paracrine effects on the underlying vascular smooth muscle to induce vasoconstriction. Experiments were performed in isolated rat renal arterioles. First it was determined that both afferent arteriole (AA) and efferent arteriole (EA) exhibited concentration-dependent decreases in lumen diameter to increasing molar concentrations of CsA. The AA was more sensitive to the vasoconstrictive effects of CsA than the EA. Next, the blocking effect of a recently synthesized putative ETA receptor antagonist was verified in both the AA and EA, where it was found that the cyclic peptide cyclo D-Asp-L-Pro-D-Val-L-Leu-D-Trp totally inhibited the vasoconstriction observed with ET addition. Finally, the role of locally stimulated ET in CsA-induced vasoconstriction was tested by determining the effect of the ETA receptor antagonist on CsA-induced AA and EA constriction. In the AA the vasoconstrictor effect of 10(-11) M CsA was completely blocked by the ETA receptor antagonist. However, in contrast to AA, 10(-11) M CsA in EA in the presence of the ETA receptor antagonist decreased EA lumen diameter by a mean of 41% from baseline (4.80 +/- 0.75 microns vs 7.80 +/- 0.84 microns, P < 0.05). This change in lumen diameter was similar to that induced by CsA alone. These data suggest that CsA directly constricts renal microvessels. This effect is mediated by ET in the AA but not the EA. PMID:8486781

  15. Effects of mitochondrial inhibitors and uncouplers on hypoxic vasoconstriction in rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Norbert; Ebert, Nadine; Ahrens, Marit; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Hänze, Jörg; Fink, Ludger; Rose, Frank; Conzen, Jörg; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich

    2003-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) matches lung perfusion to ventilation for optimizing pulmonary gas exchange; however, the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully elucidated. Lung nitric oxide (NO) generation appears to be involved in this process. Recently, mitochondria have been proposed as oxygen sensors, with HPV signaling via a hypoxia-induced increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondrial complex III and escaping through an anion channel into the cytoplasm. In addition, complex II has been suggested to be specifically involved in hypoxia-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in the lung. We investigated the effects of several mitochondrial inhibitors and uncouplers on the strength of HPV, and asked for their capacity to mimic HPV during normoxia in isolated buffer-perfused rabbit lungs. Specificity of the agents for HPV was tested by comparison of their effects on non-hypoxia-induced vasoconstriction, elicited by the thromboxane mimetic U46619. Interference with NO metabolism was determined by performing parallel studies with blocked lung NO generation and by measurement of exhaled NO. Rotenone, 3-nitroproprionic acid, and myxothiazol dose-dependently inhibited HPV without being mimics of HPV during normoxia. The inhibitory effect of these agents was only partly specific for HPV by comparison with U46619-induced vasoconstriction. During pre-blocked lung NO synthesis, the selectivity for HPV inhibition was increased for rotenone, but largely lost for myxothiazol. 2-tenoyltrifluoroacetone resulted in an unspecific inhibition of HPV as compared with U46619-induced vasoconstriction. 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide specifically suppressed HPV and increased normoxic vascular tone. Antimycin A suppressed HPV, an effect being specific in lungs with intact NO synthesis and only partly specific while blocking NO. However, this agent did not mimic HPV during normoxia, as

  16. MODULATION OF HYPOXIC PULMONARY VASOCONSTRICTION BY ERYTHROCYTIC NITRIC OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    American Heart Association 2001

    Modulation of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction by Erythrocytic NO
    McMahon TJ1, Gow AJ1, Huang YCT4, Stamler JS1,2,3
    Departments of Medicine1 and Biochemistry2, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute3,
    Duke University Med...

  17. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors oppose hyperoxic vasoconstriction and accelerate seizure development in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Ivan T; Ruehle, Alex; Allen, Barry W; Vann, Richard D; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen is a potent cerebral vasoconstrictor, but excessive exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)) can reverse this vasoconstriction by stimulating brain nitric oxide (NO) production, which increases cerebral blood flow (CBF)-a predictor of O(2) convulsions. We tested the hypothesis that phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 blockers, specifically sildenafil and tadalafil, increase CBF in HBO(2) and accelerate seizure development. To estimate changes in cerebrovascular responses to hyperoxia, CBF was measured by hydrogen clearance in anesthetized rats, either control animals or those pretreated with one of these blockers, with the NO inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), with the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), or with a blocker combined with l-NAME. Animals were exposed to 30% O(2) at 1 atm absolute (ATA) ("air") or to 100% O(2) at 4 or 6 ATA. EEG spikes indicated central nervous system CNS O(2) toxicity. The effects of PDE-5 blockade varied as a positive function of ambient Po(2). In air, CBF did not increase significantly, except after pretreatment with SNAP. However, at 6 ATA O(2), mean values for CBF increased and values for seizure latency decreased, both significantly; pretreatment with l-NAME abolished these effects. Conscious rats treated with sildenafil before HBO(2) were also more susceptible to CNS O(2) toxicity, as demonstrated by significantly shortened convulsive latency. Decreases in regional CBF reflect net vasoconstriction in the brain regions studied, since mean arterial pressures remained constant or increased throughout. Thus PDE-5 blockers oppose the protective vasoconstriction that is the initial response to hyperbaric hyperoxia, decreasing the safety of HBO(2) by hastening onset of CNS O(2) toxicity. PMID:19179645

  18. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Miguel A; Maud, Alberto; Rodriguez, Gustavo J

    2014-01-01

    Background Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome was first described by Call, Fleming, and colleagues. Clinically this entity presents acutely, with severe waxing and waning headaches (“thunderclap”), and occasional fluctuating neurological signs. Case presentation We present four subsequent cases of patients with severe thunderclap headache and brain tomography with evidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. The brain angiogram showed no aneurysm but intracranial vasculopathy consistent with multiple areas of stenosis and dilatation (angiographic beading) in different territories. Conclusion Neurologists should be aware of Call Fleming syndrome presenting with severe headache and associated convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage. After other diagnoses are excluded, patients can be reassured about favorable prognosis with symptomatic management. Abbreviations RCVS Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome CT Computed tomography SAH Subarachnoid hemorrhage MR Magnetic resonance CTA Computed tomography angiography MRA Magnetic resonance angiography PMID:25132905

  19. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Presenting With Visual Field Defects.

    PubMed

    Raven, Meisha L; Ringeisen, Alexander L; McAllister, Angela R; Knoch, Daniel W

    2016-06-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of depression and anxiety, treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), experienced acute, recurrent, and severe bifrontal headaches. Over time, she developed a left homonymous hemianopia and mental status changes. MRA revealed segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in multiple vascular distributions. She was treated with a calcium-channel blocker and magnesium, and there was resolution of her symptoms and cerebrovascular changes. Her clinical course and neuroimaging findings were consistent with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Although rare, this disorder frequently manifests with visual complaints. Although the prognosis is generally favorable, patients with this syndrome require prompt diagnosis and care directed to avoid complications including stroke, seizure, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26807800

  20. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: rare or underrecognized in children?

    PubMed

    Probert, Rebecca; Saunders, Dawn E; Ganesan, Vijeya

    2013-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinicoradiological diagnosis comprising 'thunderclap' headaches and reversible segmental vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, occasionally complicated by ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. We report a case of RCVS in a 13-year-old male with severe thunderclap headaches and no focal neurological signs. Brain imaging showed multiple posterior circulation infarcts; cerebral computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and catheter angiography showed multifocal irregularity and narrowing, but in different arterial segments. Laboratory studies did not support a diagnosis of vasculitis. Symptoms resolved over 3 weeks; magnetic resonance angiography 3 months later was normal and remained so after 2 years. We highlight the typical clinical features of RCVS in this case and suggest that the diagnosis should be considered in children with thunderclap headaches or stroke syndromes where headache is a prominent feature, especially if cerebrovascular imaging studies appear to be evolving or discrepant. PMID:23066702

  1. Inhibition of Cerebral Vasoconstriction by Dantrolene and Nimodipine

    PubMed Central

    Salomone, S; Soydan, G; Moskowitz, MA; Sims

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasoconstriction is associated with increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in vascular smooth muscle, presumably due to Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We tested the hypothesis that dantrolene (a blocker of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from the ryanodine receptor channel on the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum) would potentiate the action of nimodipine (a voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, considered standard therapy for SAH) in inhibiting the vasoconstriction of isolated cerebral arteries. Method Sprague-Dawley rat basilar and femoral arteries were analyzed for ryanodine receptor expression by immunofluorescence and PCR. Vasoconstriction of basilar artery ex vivo was measured in a wire myograph while exposed to serotonin (5-HT) or endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the presence or absence of dantrolene (10–100μM) and/or nimodipine (30nM). Femoral artery was examined for comparison. Results Basilar and femoral arteries express only the ryanodine receptor 3 (RyR3) isoform. In both basilar and femoral arteries dantrolene significantly inhibited the constriction to 5-HT, whereas it poorly affected the constriction to ET-1. The inhibitory effect of dantrolene on 5-HT was substantially increased by nimodipine, inducing a 10-fold increase in the 50% effective concentration of 5-HT and a 46% reduction in maximum basilar constriction. In femoral artery, dantrolene modestly affected constriction to phenylephrine and there was no interaction with nimodipine. Conclusion Dantrolene has synergistic effects with nimodipine against 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction in isolated cerebral arteries. Dantrolene-nimodipine interaction will require testing in a pathophysiological model but might provide treatment for reducing SAH-related vasospasm or other 5-HT-related vasospastic syndromes, such as Call-Fleming syndrome. PMID:18923817

  2. Vasoconstriction Seen in Coronary Bypass Grafts During Handgrip in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Momen, Afsana; Gahremanpour, Amir; Mansoor, Ather; Kunselman, Allen; Blaha, Cheryl; Pae, Walter; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2008-01-01

    In animal studies, sympathetically mediated coronary vasoconstriction has been demonstrated during exercise. Human studies examining coronary artery dynamics during exercise are technically difficult to perform. Recently, noninvasive transthoracic Duplex ultrasound studies demonstrated that: 1) patients with left internal mammary artery (LIMA) grafts to the left anterior descending artery can be imaged; and 2) the LIMA blood flow patterns are similar to those seen in normal coronary arteries. Accordingly, subjects with LIMA to the left anterior descending artery were studied during handgrip protocols as blood flow velocity in the LIMA was determined. Beat-by-beat analysis of changes in diastolic coronary blood flow velocity (CBV) was performed in six male clinically stable volunteers (60 ± 2 yrs) during two handgrip protocols. Arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were also measured and an index of coronary vascular resistance (CVR) was calculated as diastolic BP/CBV). Fatiguing handgrip performed at (40% of maximal voluntary contraction; MVC) followed by circulatory arrest did not evoke an increase in CVR (P = NS). In protocol 2, short bouts of handgrip (15 s) led to increases in CVR (18 ± 3% at 50% MVC and 20 ± 8% at 70% MVC). BP was also increased during handgrip. Our results reveal that in conscious humans, coronary vasoconstriction occurs within 15 s of onset of static handgrip at intensities at or greater than 50% MVC. These responses are likely to be due to sympathetic vasoconstriction of the coronary circulation. PMID:17068218

  3. Classical transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) is essential for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and alveolar gas exchange

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Norbert; Dietrich, Alexander; Fuchs, Beate; Kalwa, Hermann; Ay, Mahmut; Dumitrascu, Rio; Olschewski, Andrea; Storch, Ursula; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Schermuly, Ralph Theo; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Gudermann, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Regional alveolar hypoxia causes local vasoconstriction in the lung, shifting blood flow from hypoxic to normoxic areas, thereby maintaining gas exchange. This mechanism is known as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Disturbances in HPV can cause life-threatening hypoxemia whereas chronic hypoxia triggers lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. The signaling cascade of this vitally important mechanism is still unresolved. Using transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6)-deficient mice, we show that this channel is a key regulator of acute HPV as this regulatory mechanism was absent in TRPC6−/− mice whereas the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to the thromboxane mimetic U46619 was unchanged. Accordingly, induction of regional hypoventilation resulted in severe arterial hypoxemia in TRPC6−/− but not in WT mice. This effect was mirrored by a lack of hypoxia-induced cation influx and currents in smooth-muscle cells from precapillary pulmonary arteries (PASMC) of TRPC6−/− mice. In both WT and TRPC6−/− PASMC hypoxia caused diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation. DAG seems to exert its action via TRPC6, as DAG kinase inhibition provoked a cation influx only in WT but not in TRPC6−/− PASMC. Notably, chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was independent of TRPC6 activity. We conclude that TRPC6 plays a unique and indispensable role in acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Manipulation of TRPC6 function may thus offer a therapeutic strategy for the control of pulmonary hemodynamics and gas exchange. PMID:17142322

  4. Cryotherapy-Induced Persistent Vasoconstriction After Cutaneous Cooling: Hysteresis Between Skin Temperature and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K; Matthew Brothers, R; Diller, Kenneth R

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the persistence of cold-induced vasoconstriction following cessation of active skin-surface cooling. This study demonstrates a hysteresis effect that develops between skin temperature and blood perfusion during the cooling and subsequent rewarming period. An Arctic Ice cryotherapy unit (CTU) was applied to the knee region of six healthy subjects for 60 min of active cooling followed by 120 min of passive rewarming. Multiple laser Doppler flowmetry perfusion probes were used to measure skin blood flow (expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)). Skin surface cooling produced a significant reduction in CVC (P < 0.001) that persisted throughout the duration of the rewarming period. In addition, there was a hysteresis effect between CVC and skin temperature during the cooling and subsequent rewarming cycle (P < 0.01). Mixed model regression (MMR) showed a significant difference in the slopes of the CVC-skin temperature curves during cooling and rewarming (P < 0.001). Piecewise regression was used to investigate the temperature thresholds for acceleration of CVC during the cooling and rewarming periods. The two thresholds were shown to be significantly different (P = 0.003). The results show that localized cooling causes significant vasoconstriction that continues beyond the active cooling period despite skin temperatures returning toward baseline values. The significant and persistent reduction in skin perfusion may contribute to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI) associated with cryotherapy. PMID:26632263

  5. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  6. Astrocyte Contributions to Flow/Pressure-Evoked Parenchymal Arteriole Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Iddings, Jennifer A.; Stern, Javier E.; Blanco, Víctor M.; Croom, Deborah; Kirov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal and activity-dependent cerebral blood flow changes are coordinated by the action of critical processes, including cerebral autoregulation, endothelial-mediated signaling, and neurovascular coupling. The goal of our study was to determine whether astrocytes contribute to the regulation of parenchymal arteriole (PA) tone in response to hemodynamic stimuli (pressure/flow). Cortical PA vascular responses and astrocytic Ca2+ dynamics were measured using an in vitro rat/mouse brain slice model of perfused/pressurized PAs; studies were supplemented with in vivo astrocytic Ca2+ imaging. In vitro, astrocytes responded to PA flow/pressure increases with an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Astrocytic Ca2+ responses were corroborated in vivo, where acute systemic phenylephrine-induced increases in blood pressure evoked a significant increase in astrocytic Ca2+. In vitro, flow/pressure-evoked vasoconstriction was blunted when the astrocytic syncytium was loaded with BAPTA (chelating intracellular Ca2+) and enhanced when high Ca2+ or ATP were introduced to the astrocytic syncytium. Bath application of either the TRPV4 channel blocker HC067047 or purinergic receptor antagonist suramin blunted flow/pressure-evoked vasoconstriction, whereas K+ and 20-HETE signaling blockade showed no effect. Importantly, we found TRPV4 channel expression to be restricted to astrocytes and not the endothelium of PA. We present evidence for a novel role of astrocytes in PA flow/pressure-evoked vasoconstriction. Our data suggest that astrocytic TRPV4 channels are key molecular sensors of hemodynamic stimuli and that a purinergic, glial-derived signal contributes to flow/pressure-induced adjustments in PA tone. Together our results support bidirectional signaling within the neurovascular unit and astrocytes as key modulators of PA tone. PMID:26019339

  7. Neuropeptide Y antagonism reduces reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in humans.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dan P; Saad, Adham R; Bennett, Lee Ann T; Kosiba, Wojciech A; Johnson, John M

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence of a non-noradrenergic contributor to reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in humans but did not identify the transmitter responsible. To test whether neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a role, in two series of experiments we slowly reduced whole body skin temperature (TSK) from 34.5 to 31.7 degrees C. In protocol 1, Ringer solution and the NPY receptor antagonist BIBP-3226 alone were delivered intradermally via microdialysis. In protocol 2, yohimbine plus propranolol (Yoh + Pro), Yoh + Pro in combination with BIBP-3226, and Ringer solution were delivered to antagonize locally the vasomotor effects of NPY and norepinephrine. Blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was monitored at the finger (Finapres). In protocol 1, cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) fell by 45%, to 55.1 +/- 5.6% of baseline at control sites (P < 0.05). At BIBP-3226-treated sites, CVC fell by 34.1% to 65.9 +/- 5.0% (P < 0.05; P < 0.05 between sites). In protocol 2, during body cooling, CVC at control sites fell by 32.6%, to 67.4 +/- 4.3% of baseline; at sites treated with Yoh + Pro, CVC fell by 18.7%, to 81.3 +/- 4.4% of baseline (P < 0.05 vs. baseline; P < 0.05 vs. control) and did not fall significantly at sites treated with BIBP-3226 + Yoh + Pro (P > 0.05; P < 0.05 vs. other sites). After cooling, exogenous norepinephrine induced vasoconstriction at control sites (P < 0.05) but not at sites treated with Yoh + Pro + BIBP-3226 (P > 0.05). These results indicate that NPY participates in sympathetically mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction in humans during whole body cooling. PMID:15165988

  8. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: A Report on Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2016-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a recently recognized syndrome, is defined as an intermittent segmental vasospasm of cerebral arteries accompanied by thunderclap headache. The major complications of RCVS include ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, which may cause morbidity and mortality. It is important to detect RCVS in clinical practice because misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate treatment. In Thailand, there are only two reported cases of RCVS, which may reflect an underdiagnosis of this syndrome. To raise awareness of RCVS, we reported a case series of three RCVS cases. Two of the presented cases had interesting precipitating factors, and two cases had an unusual delayed clinical course. PMID:27455831

  9. Reduced circulating endothelial progenitor cells in reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) remains elusive. Endothelial dysfunction might play a role, but direct evidence is lacking. This study aimed to explore whether patients with RCVS have a reduced level of circulating circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to repair the dysfunctional endothelial vasomotor control. Methods We prospectively recruited 24 patients with RCVS within one month of disease onset and 24 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the numbers of circulating EPCs, defined as KDR+CD133+, CD34+CD133+, and CD34+KDR+ double-positive mononuclear cells. The Lindegaard index, an index of vasoconstriction, was calculated by measuring the mean flow velocity of middle cerebral arteries and distal extracranial internal carotid arteries via color-coded sonography on the same day as blood drawing. A Lindegaard index of 2 was chosen as the cutoff value for significant vasoconstriction of middle cerebral arteries based on our previous study. Results Patients with RCVS had a reduced number of CD34+KDR+ cells (0.009 ± 0.006% vs. 0.014 ± 0.010%, p = 0.031) but not KDR+CD133+ cells or CD34+CD133+ EPCs, in comparison with controls. The number of CD34+KDR+ cells was inversely correlated with the Lindegaard index (rs = -0.418, p = 0.047). Of note, compared to controls, patients with a Lindegaard index > 2 (n = 13) had a reduced number of CD34+KDR+ cells (0.007 ± 0.005% vs. 0.014 ± 0.010%, p = 0.010), but those with a Lindegaard index ≤ 2 did not. Conclusions Patients with RCVS had reduced circulating CD34+KDR+ EPCs, which were correlated with the severity of vasoconstriction. Endothelial dysfunction might contribute to the pathogenesis of RCVS. PMID:25466718

  10. Understanding Hypoxic Drive and the Release of Hypoxic Vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Inkrott, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the hypoxic drive and release of hypoxic vasoconstriction in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population can be somewhat confusing and misunderstood. Furthermore, the hypoxic drive theory is one in which there really is no scientific evidence to support and yet continues to prosper in every aspect of care in regard to the chronic lung patient, from prehospital all the way to intensive care unit and home care therapy. This subject review will hopefully enhance some understanding of what exactly goes on with these patients and the importance of providing oxygen when it is desperately needed. PMID:27393755

  11. The role of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the hypoxic vasoconstriction in isolated rat basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haitao; Liang, Peng; Qiu, Suhua; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yongli; Lv, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction is a key factor in the occurrence and the development of cerebral ischemia. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase affects the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and plays an important role in vascular smooth muscle function. However, the potential role of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in hypoxia-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction is unknown. In this study, we found that the KCl-induced contraction under hypoxia in rat endothelium-intact basilar arteries is similar to that of denuded arteries, suggesting that hypoxia may cause smooth muscle cell (SMC)-dependent vasoconstriction in the basilar artery. The Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity of the isolated basilar artery with or without endothelium significantly reduced with prolonged hypoxia. Blocking the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger with Ni(2+) (10(-3)M) or the L-type Ca(2+) channel with nimodipine (10(-8)M) dramatically attenuated KCl-induced contraction under hypoxia. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia significantly reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and increased [Ca(2+)]i in cultured rat basilar artery SMCs. Hypoxia reduced the protein and mRNA expression of the α2 isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in SMCs in vitro. We used a low concentration of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain, which possesses a high affinity for the α2 isoform. The contractile response in the rat basilar artery under hypoxia was partly inhibited by ouabain pretreatment. The decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in isolated basilar artery and the increased [Ca(2+)]i in SMCs induced by hypoxia were partly inhibited by pretreatment with a low concentration of ouabain. These results suggest that hypoxia may educe Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in SMCs through the α2 isoform contributing to vasoconstriction in the rat basilar artery. PMID:26924456

  12. Functional Segregation of Cortical Regions Underlying Speech Timing and Articulation.

    PubMed

    Long, Michael A; Katlowitz, Kalman A; Svirsky, Mario A; Clary, Rachel C; Byun, Tara McAllister; Majaj, Najib; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2016-03-16

    Spoken language is a central part of our everyday lives, but the precise roles that individual cortical regions play in the production of speech are often poorly understood. To address this issue, we focally lowered the temperature of distinct cortical regions in awake neurosurgical patients, and we relate this perturbation to changes in produced speech sequences. Using this method, we confirm that speech is highly lateralized, with the vast majority of behavioral effects seen on the left hemisphere. We then use this approach to demonstrate a clear functional dissociation between nearby cortical speech sites. Focal cooling of pars triangularis/pars opercularis (Broca's region) and the ventral portion of the precentral gyrus (speech motor cortex) resulted in the manipulation of speech timing and articulation, respectively. Our results support a class of models that have proposed distinct processing centers underlying motor sequencing and execution for speech. PMID:26924439

  13. Vasoconstriction in horses caused by endophyte-infected tall fescue seed is detected with Doppler ultrasonography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypotheses that endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (TF) seed causes vasoconstriction in horses in vivo and that ground seed would cause more pronounced vasoconstriction than whole seed were tested. Ten horses each received 1 of 3 treatments: endophyte-free ground (E–G; n ...

  14. Adrenergic vasoconstriction in peripheral nerves of the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Selander, D.; Mansson, L.G.; Karlsson, L.; Svanvik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The blood flow in the sciatic nerve of the rabbit was estimated from the wash out of intraneurally injected /sup 133/Xe. To avoid diffusion of the tracer into the surrounding muscular tissue, the nerve was covered by a gas-tight plastic film. Using this technique, the basal blood flow in the sciatic nerve was estimated to 35 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. It was found that intraarterial norepinephrine and electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain strongly reduced the wash out of /sup 133/Xe, which only can be explained by a pronounced reduction of the blood flow in the nerve itself. The blood flow again increased within 4 min of stopping the infusion of norepinephrine or the sympathetic stimulation. The prolonged effect and higher neurotoxicity of local anesthetics containing adrenaline may be explained by an alpha receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of the microvessels of peripheral nerves.

  15. Magnesium for Treatment of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mijalski, Christina; Dakay, Katarina; Miller-Patterson, Cameron; Saad, Ali; Silver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) with refractory headache aborted by intravenous magnesium. Case 1 is a 53-year-old woman with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to RCVS presented with refractory headache and persistent vasospasm, despite aggressive treatment with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and systemic corticosteroids. Subsequently, she experienced dramatic relief of symptoms with intravenous magnesium therapy. She continued oral maintenance therapy and remained symptom free. Case 2 is a 71-year-old female with bilateral temporo-occipital infarcts due to RCVS, presented with refractory headache and persistent vasospasm on transcranial Doppler (TCD), despite aggressive treatment with CCBs. She experienced dramatic relief of symptoms with intravenous magnesium and resolution of vasospasm on TCD. Magnesium may be beneficial for the treatment of refractory headaches in patients with RCVS. Future studies are needed to determine whether it should be considered as a first-line agent. PMID:27366294

  16. Obesity and risk of vascular disease: importance of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Baretella, Oliver; Meyer, Matthias R

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious global health issue affecting both adults and children. Recent devolopments in world demographics and declining health status of the world's population indicate that the prevalence of obesity will continue to increase in the next decades. As a disease, obesity has deleterious effects on metabolic homeostasis, and affects numerous organ systems including heart, kidney and the vascular system. Thus, obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction and stroke. In the arterial system, endothelial cells are both the source and target of factors contributing to atherosclerosis. Endothelial vasoactive factors regulate vascular homeostasis under physiological conditions and maintain basal vascular tone. Obesity results in an imbalance between endothelium-derived vasoactive factors favouring vasoconstriction, cell growth and inflammatory activation. Abnormal regulation of these factors due to endothelial cell dysfunction is both a consequence and a cause of vascular disease processes. Finally, because of the similarities of the vascular pathomechanisms activated, obesity can be considered to cause accelerated, ‘premature’ vascular aging. Here, we will review some of the pathomechanisms involved in obesity-related activation of endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction, the clinical relevance of obesity-associated vascular risk, and therapeutic interventions using ‘endothelial therapy’ aiming at maintaining or restoring vascular endothelial health. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21557734

  17. Continuous detection of cerebral vasodilatation and vasoconstriction using intracranial pulse morphological template matching.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Gonzalez, Nestor; Subudhi, Andrew W; Hamilton, Robert; Vespa, Paul; Bergsneider, Marvin; Roach, Robert C; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Although accurate and continuous assessment of cerebral vasculature status is highly desirable for managing cerebral vascular diseases, no such method exists for current clinical practice. The present work introduces a novel method for real-time detection of cerebral vasodilatation and vasoconstriction using pulse morphological template matching. Templates consisting of morphological metrics of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) pulse, measured at middle cerebral artery using Transcranial Doppler, are obtained by applying a morphological clustering and analysis of intracranial pulse algorithm to the data collected during induced vasodilatation and vasoconstriction in a controlled setting. These templates were then employed to define a vasodilatation index (VDI) and a vasoconstriction index (VCI) for any inquiry data segment as the percentage of the metrics demonstrating a trend consistent with those obtained from the training dataset. The validation of the proposed method on a dataset of CBFV signals of 27 healthy subjects, collected with a similar protocol as that of training dataset, during hyperventilation (and CO₂ rebreathing tests) shows a sensitivity of 92% (and 82%) for detection of vasodilatation (and vasoconstriction) and the specificity of 90% (and 92%), respectively. Moreover, the proposed method of detection of vasodilatation (vasoconstriction) is capable of rejecting all the cases associated with vasoconstriction (vasodilatation) and outperforms other two conventional techniques by at least 7% for vasodilatation and 19% for vasoconstriction. PMID:23226385

  18. Continuous Detection of Cerebral Vasodilatation and Vasoconstriction Using Intracranial Pulse Morphological Template Matching

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Gonzalez, Nestor; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Hamilton, Robert; Vespa, Paul; Bergsneider, Marvin; Roach, Robert C.; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Although accurate and continuous assessment of cerebral vasculature status is highly desirable for managing cerebral vascular diseases, no such method exists for current clinical practice. The present work introduces a novel method for real-time detection of cerebral vasodilatation and vasoconstriction using pulse morphological template matching. Templates consisting of morphological metrics of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) pulse, measured at middle cerebral artery using Transcranial Doppler, are obtained by applying a morphological clustering and analysis of intracranial pulse algorithm to the data collected during induced vasodilatation and vasoconstriction in a controlled setting. These templates were then employed to define a vasodilatation index (VDI) and a vasoconstriction index (VCI) for any inquiry data segment as the percentage of the metrics demonstrating a trend consistent with those obtained from the training dataset. The validation of the proposed method on a dataset of CBFV signals of 27 healthy subjects, collected with a similar protocol as that of training dataset, during hyperventilation (and CO2 rebreathing tests) shows a sensitivity of 92% (and 82%) for detection of vasodilatation (and vasoconstriction) and the specificity of 90% (and 92%), respectively. Moreover, the proposed method of detection of vasodilatation (vasoconstriction) is capable of rejecting all the cases associated with vasoconstriction (vasodilatation) and outperforms other two conventional techniques by at least 7% for vasodilatation and 19% for vasoconstriction. PMID:23226385

  19. Topical retinoic acid does not alter the vasoconstrictive properties of topical corticosteroids in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmied, C; Saurat, J H

    1991-01-01

    Dermo-epidermal atrophy is one of the main side effects of long-term treatment with topical corticosteroids. Retinoic acid may prevent and even reverse these effects in animals. Extension of this concept to therapy in humans implies that several studies have been performed; among others, it has to be established that treatment with topical retinoic acid does not interfere with the anti-inflammatory action of topical corticosteroids. The present study on the cutaneous vasoconstriction test comprised two different double-blind approaches: (i) vasoconstriction tests with betamethasone dipropionate (Diprolene) and clobetasone butyrate (Emovate) were carried out on skin that had previously been treated for 10 days with retinoic acid 0.01, 0.025 or 0.05% (or excipient); (ii) vasoconstriction tests with a combination of triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% and retinoic acid 0.025% were compared with triamcinolone acetonide 0.1% alone. Pretreatment for 10 days with retinoic acid did not alter the vasoconstriction induced by corticosteroids: no decrease or increase in the vasoconstriction score was observed, whether the skin had been previously treated with retinoic acid or with excipient. The vasoconstriction scores obtained with a combination of retinoic acid and triamcinolone acetonide were identical with those obtained with the steroid alone. This study indicates that retinoic acid does not inhibit the vasoconstriction induced by topical corticosteroids and suggests that the anti-inflammatory effect of the latter should be maintained in association with retinoic acid. PMID:2050230

  20. No protective role for hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in severe hypergravity-induced arterial hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Lars L; Rohdin, Malin; Nekludov, Michael; Ax, Malin; Petersson, Johan

    2011-09-01

    Supine subjects exposed to hypergravity show a marked arterial desaturation. Previous work from our laboratory has also shown a paradoxical reduction of lung perfusion in dependent lung regions in supine subjects exposed to hypergravity. We reasoned that the increased lung weight during hypergravity caused either direct compression of the blood vessels in the dependent lung tissue or that poor regional ventilation caused reduced perfusion through hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). The objective of this study was to evaluate the importance of HPV through measurements of arterial oxygenation during exposure to hypergravity with normal and attenuated HPV. A further increased arterial desaturation during hypergravity with attenuated HPV would support the hypothesis that HPV contributes to the paradoxical redistribution of regional perfusion. In a two-phased randomized study we first exposed 12 healthy subjects to 5 G while supine during two single-blinded conditions; control and after 50 mg sildenafil p.o.. In a second phase, 12 supine subjects were exposed to 5 G during three single-blinded conditions; control, after 100 mg sildenafil p.o. and after inhalation of 10 μg iloprost. There was a substantial arterial desaturation by 5-30% units in all subjects with no or only minor differences between conditions. The results speak against HPV as a principal mechanism for the hypergravity-induced reduction of lung perfusion in dependent lung regions in supine humans. PMID:21274557

  1. The effect of PCO2 on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Noble, W H; Kay, J C; Fisher, J A

    1981-09-01

    Lung areas with a low V/Q ratio cause hypoxaemia. The low alveolar oxygen concentration may cause local hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) which reduces perfusion, raises the V/Q ratio, and hence reduces the tendency to a low PaO2. By changing PCO2, the HPV response can be altered. We examined this relationship in anaesthetized dogs by using a tracheal divider to separate hypoxic (nitrogen ventilated) from oxygenated (100 per cent oxygen ventilated) lung. Relative perfusion was assessed from total 133Xe exhaled from each lung area after intravenous infusions. When PaCO2 was changed by changing ventilation, we found that an increasing PaCO2 increased HPV and also PaO2. At a PaCO2 of 3.3 kPa, HPV was abolished and PaO2 fell. We also changed PaCO2 by altering PICO2 to one or both lung areas while ventilation remained constant throughout the experiment. Again as PaCO2 increased, HPV and PaCO2 increased. When PaCO2 fell and end tidal carbon dioxide in the hypoxic lung (PETCO2) remained elevated by maintaining PICO2 in the hypoxic lung and removing CO2 from the oxygenated lung) HPV was maintained. Thus it is the alveolar concentration of CO2 in the hypoxic lung which is important in modifying HPV. We conclude that in this model a low PETCO2 (3.3 kPa) in hypoxic lung will reduce HPV, and will result in more severe hypoxaemia. This may have relevance in both anaesthetized and intensive care unit patients when a higher PaO2 may be obtained by increasing hypoxic lung PETCO2. The effect of PETCO2 on PaO2 will be influenced by other variables, but when hypoventilated or hypoxic exist, increasing PETCO2 may reinforce hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and thus may increase PaO2. PMID:6793220

  2. Increased Hepato-Splanchnic Vasoconstriction in Diabetics during Regular Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ribitsch, Werner; Schneditz, Daniel; Franssen, Casper F. M.; Schilcher, Gernot; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Horina, Jörg H.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ultrafiltration (UF) of excess fluid activates numerous compensatory mechanisms during hemodialysis (HD). The increase of both total peripheral and splanchnic vascular resistance is considered essential in maintaining hemodynamic stability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of UF-induced changes in hepato-splanchnic blood flow and resistance in a group of maintenance HD patients during regular dialysis. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements Hepato-splanchnic flow resistance index (RI) and hepato-splanchnic perfusion index (QI) were measured in 12 chronic HD patients using a modified, non-invasive Indocyaningreen (ICG) dilution method. During a midweek dialysis session we determined RI, QI, ICG disappearance rate (kICG), plasma volume (Vp), hematocrit (Hct), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) at four times in hourly intervals (t1 to t4). Dialysis settings were standardized and all patient studies were done in duplicate. Results In the whole study group mean UF volume was 1.86 ± 0.46 L, Vp dropped from 3.65 ± 0.77L at t1 to 3.40 ± 0.78L at t4, and all patients remained hemodynamically stable. In all patients RI significantly increased from 12.40 ± 4.21 mmHg∙s∙m2/mL at t1 to 14.94 ± 6.36 mmHg∙s∙m2/mL at t4 while QI significantly decreased from 0.61 ± 0.22 at t1 to 0.52 ± 0.20 L/min/m2 at t4, indicating active vasoconstriction. In diabetic subjects, however, RI was significantly larger than in non-diabetics at all time points. QI was lower in diabetic subjects. Conclusions In chronic HD-patients hepato-splanchnic blood flow substantially decreases during moderate UF as a result of an active splanchnic vasoconstriction. Our data indicate that diabetic HD-patients are particularly prone to splanchnic ischemia and might therefore have an increased risk for bacterial translocation, endotoxemia and systemic inflammation. PMID:26713734

  3. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome, Part 2: Diagnostic Work-Up, Imaging Evaluation, and Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, T R; Shivashankar, R; Mossa-Basha, M; Gandhi, D

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of a patient with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome integrates clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings. Imaging plays an important role by confirming the presence of cerebral vasoconstriction; monitoring potential complications such as ischemic stroke; and suggesting alternative diagnoses, including CNS vasculitis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Noninvasive vascular imaging, including transcranial Doppler sonography and MR angiography, has played an increasingly important role in this regard, though conventional angiography remains the criterion standard for the evaluation of cerebral artery vasoconstriction. Newer imaging techniques, including high-resolution vessel wall imaging, may help in the future to better discriminate reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome from primary angiitis of the CNS, an important clinical distinction. PMID:25614476

  4. Tall fescue alkaloids cause vasoconstriction in equine medial palmar artery and vein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mares grazing endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) typically exhibit reproductive dysfunction rather than peripheral vasoconstriction as a primary sign of the fescue toxicosis syndrome. Recent work using Doppler ultrasonography demonstrated that consumptio...

  5. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS DEFINITIONS § 500.3 Electric regions—electric region groupings for reliability measurements under...

  6. Ginsenoside Rg1 attenuates hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arterial rings by reducing the expression of p38

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mengxiao; Zhao, Meiping; Tang, Lanlan; Zhang, Congcong; Song, Longsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease characterized by increased pulmonary arteriolar resistance. Pulmonary vasoconstriction has been proved to play a significant role in PAH. We previously reported that Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) might attenuate hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction (HHPV). Methods In the present study, our specific objective was to investigate the role of ginsenoside Rg1, a major component of PNS, in this process and the possible underlying mechanism. The second order pulmonary rings isolated from the Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with different dosage of ginsenoside Rg1 at 8, 40, or 100 mg/L respectively, both before and during the conditions of hypoxia and hypercapnia. Contractile force changes of the rings were detected. Furthermore, SB203580, the selective inhibitor for p38 activation was applied to the rings. Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured under hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions, and ginsenoside Rg1 was administered to detect the changes induced by p38. Results Under the hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions, we observed a biphasic pulmonary artery contractile response to the second pulmonary artery rings. It is hypothesized that the observed attenuation of vasoconstriction and the production of vasodilation could have been induced by ginsenoside Rg1. This effect was significantly reinforced by SB203580 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The expression of p38 in the PASMCs under hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions was significantly activated (P<0.05 or P<0.01) and the observed activation was attenuated by ginsenoside Rg1 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusions Our findings strongly support the significant role of ginsenoside Rg1 in the inhibition of hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced vasoconstriction by the p38 pathway. PMID:27499938

  7. Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with peripheral vasoconstriction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imadojemu, Virginia A.; Gleeson, Kevin; Gray, Kristen S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2002-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with a substantial transient blood pressure elevation. The mechanism of this pressor response is unclear. In this study we measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (Psa), and mean limb blood velocity as an index of blood flow (MBV, Doppler) and calculated changes in limb vascular resistance during and after apneas during both wakefulness and sleep in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Immediately postapnea during sleep Psa increased significantly compared with the earlier stages of apnea and this was preceded by a rise of MSNA (n = 5). In contrast to blood pressure, MBV remained unchanged. Because resistance = blood pressure/blood flow, limb vascular resistance increased by 29 +/- 8% from late apnea to postapnea (n = 7, p < 0.002). Voluntary breathhold maneuvers during room air exposure evoked similar responses (n = 10). Supplemental oxygen administered via nonrebreather face mask attenuated the MSNA and vasoconstrictor responses to obstructive (n = 2) and voluntary apneas (n = 10). Our data suggest that obstructive apneas in patients with the obstructive apnea syndrome are accompanied by transient limb vasoconstriction. This vasoconstrictor response appears to be, at least in part, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and may be linked to hypoxia.

  8. FMLP provokes coronary vasoconstriction and myocardial ischemia in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, M.N.; Booth, D.C.; Friedman, B.J.; Cunningham, M.R.; Jay, M.; De Maria, A.N. )

    1988-03-01

    Recent pathological studies of coronary arteries from humans with suspected coronary spasm have revealed an augmented intramural burden of inflammatory cells. To test the hypothesis than inappropriate activation of inflammatory cells participates in the evolution of coronary vasospasm, the present experiment employed a newly developed coronary arteriographic technique for use in pentobarbital-anesthetized rabbits to evaluate the coronary vasomotor actions of the nonselective inflammatory cell stimulant, N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP). In 10 of 10 animals, selective left intracoronary injection of 200 ng fMLP evoked profound left coronary narrowing accompanied in all cases by ST segment deviation and dysrhythmias. Thallium-201 scintigraphy demonstrated hypoperfusion of the left ventricular free wall and septum supplied by the spastic coronary artery. The fMLP-induced epicardial vasoconstriction, ischemic electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and thallium perfusion defects were reversed by intravenous nitroglycerin. Neither the right coronary artery nor its distribution were influenced by left coronary injection of fMLP. Additional experiments in isolated, salt solution-perfused rabbit hearts demonstrated that fMLP failed to exert direct coronary vasoconstrictor effects. These observations indicate that the nonselective inflammatory cell stimulant, fMLP, provokes arteriographically demonstrable coronary spasm with attendant myocardial hypoperfusion and ischemic ECG changes in anesthetized rabbits. Such a model may be useful in exploring the dynamic role of inflammatory cells in development of coronary spasm.

  9. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Without Typical Thunderclap Headache.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Ducros, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache. Moreover, a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. These patients may be aphasic or in comatose state, explaining their inability to give their own medical history. They may have forgotten the headache they had a few days before more dramatic symptoms, or may have a variant of the classical RCVS. By consequence, an RCVS should be suspected in patients with any unusual headache, whether thunderclap or not, and in patients with cryptogenic stroke or convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, whether the patient also has headache or not. Diagnosis in such cases relies on the demonstration of reversible multifocal intracranial arterial stenosis and the exclusion of other causes. PMID:27016378

  10. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  11. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  12. Splanchnic vasoconstriction in hyperthermic man - Role of falling blood pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, L. B.; Profant, G. R.; Wyss, C.; Detry, J.-M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study in which six supine resting subjects, wearing water-perfused suits, had body skin temperature controlled at 35 C for 30 min (control period), then rapidly increased to 40.5 C for 43 to 50 min (heating period) in a two-part experiment. In the first part of the experiment arterial mean pressure (MP) in three men was increased back to, or above control levels at the 30 to 35th min of heating by total occlusion of both legs for 8 to 10 min. Splanchnic blood flow (SBF), which had fallen from 1.4 to 0.9 L/min at occlusion, rose only 0.05 L/min during occlusion. Splanchnic vascular resistance (SVR) rose throughout heating and occlusion. In the second part of the experiment (three men) SBF fell despite a spontaneous rise in MP and aortic pulse pressure prior to leg occlusion. Cardiac output (CO) was measured just before, during and after occlusion. Occlusion raised MP 10 to 15 mm Hg and reduced CO only slightly. It is concluded that falling MP or aortic pulse pressure are not major causes of the splanchnic vasoconstriction in response to heating man.

  13. Involvement of endothelin-1 in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in the lamb.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Coe, Y; Toyoda, O; Coceani, F

    1995-01-01

    1. Using isolated pulmonary resistance vessels from mature fetal lamb and chronically instrumented lambs (8-17 days old), we have examined whether hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is sustained by activation of a constrictor mechanism or suppression of a dilator mechanism. 2. Hypoxia contracted both arteries and veins in vitro, and the contraction was greater with the former. After removing the endothelium, arteries responded faster to hypoxia, but the magnitude of the response remained unchanged. 3. Hypoxic arteries, unlike normally oxygenated arteries, did not contract with either indomethacin (2.8 microM) or N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM). The same vessels relaxed with sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 0.001-10 microM) but not with bradykinin (0.1-100 nM). 4. Endothelin-1 (ET-1, 0.01-10 nM) contracted isolated arteries and veins under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In both vessels, the contraction was fast in onset and subsidence, and was inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BQ123 (1 microM). The ET-1 precursor, big ET-1 (100 nM), also contracted arteries and veins, but compared with ET-1 its action was slower in development. Big ET-1 contraction, unlike ET-1 contraction, was curtailed by the inhibitor of the ET-1-converting enzyme, phosphoramidon (50 microM). 5. ET-1 (0.1-10 nM) had no effect on isolated arteries precontracted with a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) analogue (ONO-11113) and treated with BQ123 (10 microM). Under the same conditions, ET-1 relaxed the veins. Accordingly, in the absence of BQ123 treatment, the selective ETB receptor agonist IRL-1620 (0.1-100 nM) relaxed the contracted veins but not the arteries. 6. BQ123 (10 microM) inhibited the constriction of isolated arteries and veins to hypoxia. Likewise, in the conscious lamb a bolus of BQ123 (0.4 mg kg-1, injected into the pulmonary artery) curtailed the rise in pulmonary vascular resistance (Rpa) brought about by alveolar hypoxia without changing significantly systemic

  14. Blunted Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Experimental Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Parra, Gloria Juliana; Archer, Stephen L.; Bland, Richard D.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Carlton, David P.; Cho, Soo-Chul; Kirby, Beth; Haromy, Al; Eaton, Farah; Wu, Xichen; Thébaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), caused by prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) with O2-rich gas, is the most common cause of long-term hospitalization and recurrent respiratory illness in extremely premature infants. Recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and associated ventilator adjustments often lead to worsening CLD. The mechanism that causes these hypoxemic episodes is unknown. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which is partially controlled by O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, is an important adaptive response to local hypoxia that helps to match perfusion and ventilation in the lung. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that chronic lung injury (CLI) impairs HPV. Methods: We studied preterm lambs that had MV with O2-rich gas for 3 weeks and newborn rats that breathed 95%-O2 for 2 weeks, both of which resulted in airspace enlargement and pulmonary vascular changes consistent with CLD. Measurements and Main Results: HPV was attenuated in preterm lambs with CLI after 2 weeks of MV and in newborn rats with CLI after 2 weeks of hyperoxia. HPV and constriction to the Kv1.x-specific inhibitor, correolide, were preferentially blunted in excised distal pulmonary arteries (dPAs) from hyperoxic rats, whose dPAs exhibited decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA and K+ current. Intrapulmonary gene transfer of Kv1.5, encoding the ion channel that is thought to trigger HPV, increased O2-sensitive K+ current in cultured smooth muscle cells from rat dPAs, and restored HPV in hyperoxic rats. Conclusions: Reduced expression/activity of O2-sensitive Kv channels in dPAs contributes to blunted HPV observed in neonatal CLD. PMID:18511704

  15. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction as a contributor to response in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Burrowes, K S; Clark, A R; Wilsher, M L; Milne, D G; Tawhai, M H

    2014-08-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive response unique to the lung whereby blood flow is diverted away from areas of low alveolar oxygen to improve ventilation-perfusion matching and resultant gas exchange. Some previous experimental studies have suggested that the HPV response to hypoxia is blunted in acute pulmonary embolism (APE), while others have concluded that HPV contributes to elevated pulmonary blood pressures in APE. To understand these contradictory observations, we have used a structure-based computational model of integrated lung function in 10 subjects to study the impact of HPV on pulmonary hemodynamics and gas exchange in the presence of regional arterial occlusion. The integrated model includes an experimentally-derived model for HPV. Its function is validated against measurements of pulmonary vascular resistance in normal subjects at four levels of inspired oxygen. Our results show that the apparently disparate observations of previous studies can be explained within a single model: the model predicts that HPV increases mean pulmonary artery pressure in APE (by 8.2 ± 7.0% in these subjects), and concurrently shows a reduction in response to hypoxia in the subjects who have high levels of occlusion and therefore maximal HPV in normoxia. PMID:24770844

  16. Vasoconstrictive effects of levobupivacaine on the basilar artery in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Ergil, Julide; Kertmen, Hayri; Sayın, Murat; Yılmaz, Erdal Reşit; Özkan, Derya; Arıkök, Ata Türker; Kanat, Mehmet Ali; Şekerci, Zeki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used technique of the modern practice of anesthesia. Spinal cord ischemia is a rare but catastrophic complication of spinal anesthesia which may be caused by a direct vasoconstrictive effect of the local anesthetic. Although the vasoconstrictive effects of levobupivacaine have been widely studied, the vasoconstrictive effects of this drug on the intradural arteries have never been studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether levobupivacaine has vasoconstrictive effects on the basilar artery in rabbits. Material and methods Thirty male New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly into three groups of ten rabbits each: group 1 (control); group 2 (0.125% levobupivacaine); group 3 (0.25% levobupivacaine). The cisterna magna was punctured as described below, then 1 ml of saline or 0.125% or 0.25% levobupivacaine was injected into the cisterna magna in 10 min by an infusion pump in groups 1, 2 and 3 respectively. All animals were euthanized by perfusion-fixation 30 min after the procedure. The luminal area and the size of the cross-sectional area for each basilar artery were measured. Results Both 0.125% and 0.25% levobupivacaine infusion caused significant vasoconstriction. Vasoconstriction was more significant for the 0.125% concentration. Conclusions The results of this study indicated that both 0.125% and 0.25% concentrations of levobupivacaine caused significant vasoconstriction of the basilar artery when administered into the subarachnoid space. This may constitute proof that subarachnoid administration of levobupivacaine may diminish the spinal cord blood flow, causing ischemia. PMID:26170861

  17. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. (a) The following is a...

  18. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. (a) The following is a...

  19. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. (a) The following is a...

  20. Changes in Soil Temperature Regimes under Regional Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Soil temperatures can provide a smoothed record of regional changes in atmospheric conditions due to soil thermal properties that reduce the annual air and surface temperature amplitude. In areas with seasonal snow cover, however, its insulating effect isolates the soil thermal regime from winter air temperatures. Under changing regional climate patterns, snow cover extent, depth and duration are decreasing. The net effect is thus an expected winter cooling of soil temperature. However, the extent to which this might be mitigated by warmer summer conditions, and changing soil moisture remains to be seen. To examine the relative strength of a cold-season cooling signal versus enhanced summer warming, a network of soil temperature loggers has recorded hourly soil temperatures over the period 2005-2013 within a single watershed experiencing 'lake effect snow'. Elevations range from 168 m to 612 m, on Silurian and Ordovician shale, limestone, and sandstone that have been heavily glaciated. Most of the sites are located on NY Department of Environmental Conservation land in mixed, hardwood and spruce forests. At six sites in varied topographic and land-use setting, two ONSET HOBO Outdoor 4 channel soil temperature loggers are deployed in order to reduce concerns of data reliability and systematic logger drift. Five sites also record air temperature using HOBO Pro Series Temperature loggers at three sites and HOBO Weather Stations at two. Soil temperature data are recorded at hourly intervals at depths of 2-, 5-, 10-, and 25-cm. Several other sites have been operationalized over the 8 year period, but have been tampered with, damaged, stolen, or have failed. These partial records are included to provide greater geographic representation of changing conditions where possible. Data indicate decreasing winter soil temperatures in specific land-use and topographic settings. Only one site, located in a dense spruce plantation, experiences soil freezing within the top 5 cm

  1. Rho kinase-mediated vasoconstriction in rat models of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oka, Masahiko; Homma, Noriyuki; McMurtry, Ivan F

    2008-01-01

    There is current controversy regarding whether vasoconstriction plays a significant role in the elevated pressure of severe, advanced stages of pulmonary hypertension. Results of acute vasodilator testing using conventional vasodilators in such patients suggest there is only a minor contribution of vasoconstriction. However, there is a possibility that these results may underestimate the contribution of vasoconstriction because the most effective vasodilators have not yet been tested. This issue has not been addressed even experimentally, due mainly to a lack of appropriate animal models. A few animal models that mimic the pathology of human severe pulmonary hypertension more closely (i.e., development of occlusive neointimal lesions in small pulmonary arteries/arterioles) have been introduced, including rat models of left lung pneumonectomy plus monocrotaline injection and vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition plus exposure to chronic hypoxia. We have observed that Rho kinase inhibitors, a novel class of potent vasodilators, reduce the high pulmonary artery pressure of these models acutely and markedly, suggesting that vasoconstriction can significantly be involved in pulmonary hypertension with severely remodeled (occluded) pulmonary vessels. This chapter describes methods used for evaluation of the involvement of Rho kinase-mediated vasoconstriction in rat models of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:18374166

  2. Mechanisms of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and their roles in pulmonary hypertension: new findings for an old problem

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jeremy P.T.; McMurtry, Ivan F.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) normally optimises ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung, but leads to pulmonary hypertension under conditions of global hypoxia. The past few years have provided some major advances in our understanding of this complex phenomenon, but significant controversy remains concerning many of the key underlying mechanisms. On balance, recent evidence is most consistent with an elevation in mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species as a key event for initiation of HPV, with consequent Ca2+ release from intracellular ryanodine-sensitive stores, although the activation pathways and molecular identity of the associated Ca2+ entry pathways remain unclear. Recent studies have also raised our perception of the critical role played by Rho kinase in both sustained HPV and the development of pulmonary hypertension, further promoting Rho kinase and the pathways regulating its activity and expression as important therapeutic targets. PMID:19297247

  3. Under siege: Isolated tributaries are threatened by regionally impaired metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Merriam, Eric R; Petty, J Todd

    2016-08-01

    Pristine streams are often targeted as conservation priorities because of their ability to preserve regional biodiversity. However, isolation within heavily degraded regions likely alters important metapopulation and metacommunity processes (e.g., rescue and mass effects), affecting the ability of in-tact communities to boost regional conditions. To test this hypothesis, we sampled invertebrate communities and physicochemical conditions from 168 streams within the mountaintop removal-valley fill mining region of West Virginia. We used redundancy analysis to first test for significant effects of local (observed physicochemical conditions) and neighborhood (streams within a 5km buffer) degradation on assemblage structure across all taxa and stress tolerance (low, moderate, high) and dispersal (low, high) categories. We then used generalized linear and hurdle models to characterize changes in community metrics and individual taxa, respectively. Local condition consistently explained the majority of variation (partial R(2) up to 5× those of neighborhood condition) in community structure and was the only factor affecting sensitive taxa. Neighborhood condition explained significant variation in moderately tolerant taxa with low dispersal capacity and highly tolerant taxa, regardless of dispersal. Decreased occurrence (Baetis) and abundance (Maccaffertium) of key taxa and corresponding metrics (%E, %EPT) suggest decreased dispersal and associated mass and rescue effects within degraded neighborhoods. Decreased neighborhood conditions also resulted in the proliferation of tolerant taxa (Chironomidae, Chimarra, Hemerodromia). Our results suggest communities within even the most pristine streams are at risk when isolated within heavily impacted regions. Consequently, protection of regional species' pools in heavily impacted regions will require more than simply conserving un-impacted streams. PMID:27101452

  4. The South Florida Environment: A Region Under Stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Halley, Robert B.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the environmental setting in South Florida and serves as review and framework for developing U.S. Geological Survey programs in the region. The report describes the predevelopment and the current (present-day) environmental conditions in South Florida with emphasis on the quantity and quality of water. The geographical area covered is the southern one-half of the State and includes the South Florida National Water-Quality Assessment study area and adjacent coastal waters. This study area covers about 19,500 square miles and is the watershed of the larger regional ecosystem. The regional ecosystem includes the coastal waters between Charlotte Harbor on the Gulf of Mexico and the St. Lucie River on the Atlantic Ocean and the lands that drain into these waters.

  5. Isolation of zooxanthellatoxins, novel vasoconstrictive substances from the zooxanthella Symbiodinium sp.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Asari, T; Ohizumi, Y; Kobayashi, J; Yamasu, T; Murai, A

    1993-04-01

    Isolation of zooxanthellatoxins, novel vasoconstrictive substances from the zooxanthella Symbiodinium sp. Toxicon 31, 371-376, 1993. New polyhydroxypolyenes with potent vasoconstrictive activity, zooxanthellatoxin-A and -B, were isolated from a symbiotic marine alga Symbiodinium sp. These compounds caused sustained contractions of isolated rabbit aorta at concentrations above 7 x 10(-7) M; this effect was abolished in Ca(2+)-free solution or in the presence of verapamil. Both compounds were relatively large molecules (mol. wt about 2900), containing a large number of oxygen atoms and olefinic carbons, thus differing from two other vasoconstrictive marine toxins, palytoxin and maitotoxin, in containing more olefins than palytoxin, and fewer ethereal rings than maitotoxin. PMID:8503128

  6. The reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in association with venlafaxine and methenamine.

    PubMed

    Davies, G; Wilson, H; Wilhelm, T; Bowler, J

    2013-01-01

    The reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterised by thunderclap headache and multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries on angiography. It is often drug induced, but it can occur postpartum, and as a result of a number of other precipitants. To make the diagnosis, it is necessary to exclude other causes of severe headache (such as aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, carotid dissection and primary angiitis of the central nervous system). However, it is also important to show that the vasoconstriction has resolved with repeat angiography at the 3-month stage. Here we report two cases of RCVS in association with venlafaxine and the urinary antiseptic, methenamine. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have recently been reported as a possible precipitant, but this is the first report to implicate methenamine. Although RCVS is relatively uncommon, it should be considered in the differential of those presenting with thunderclap headache. PMID:23771970

  7. Hourly and daily evapotranspiration of alfalfa under regional advection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional advection often affects the evapotranspiration rates of irrigated crops in the Southern High Plains. In 1998, during a 10-day period (13-22 June) of unusually strong advection, high evapotranspiration (ET) rates for unstressed, irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were measured with two prec...

  8. Assessment of Vasoconstrictive Capacity of Tall Fescue Alkaloids Using Fescue Naive Lateral Saphenous Veins of Crossbreed Heifer Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vasoconstriction is one response associated with consumption of toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue. Because it is not known if endophyte-produced alkaloids act alone or collectively, the objective of this study was to begin to examine the vasoconstrictive potentials of D-lysergic acid (LSA), ergov...

  9. Effects of Selected Combinations of Tall Fescue Alkaloids on the Vasoconstrictive Capacity of Fescue-Naive Bovine Lateral Saphenous Veins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vasoconstriction is a response associated with consumption of toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue. It is not known if endophyte-produced alkaloids act alone or collectively in mediating the response. Therefore, objective of this study was to examine the vasoconstrictive potentials of selected ergot...

  10. Role of thromboxane A₂-activated nonselective cation channels in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction of rat.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hae Young; Park, Su Jung; Seo, Eun-Young; Park, Kyung Sun; Han, Jung-A; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shin, Dong Hoon; Earm, Yung E; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is critical for matching of ventilation/perfusion in lungs. Although hypoxic inhibition of K(+) channels has been a leading hypothesis for depolarization of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) under hypoxia, pharmacological inhibition of K(+) channels does not induce significant contraction in rat pulmonary arteries. Because a partial contraction by thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) is required for induction of HPV, we hypothesize that TXA(2) receptor (TP) stimulation might activate depolarizing nonselective cation channels (NSCs). Consistently, we found that 5-10 nM U46619, a stable agonist for TP, was indispensible for contraction of rat pulmonary arteries by 4-aminopyridine, a blocker of voltage-gated K(+) channel (K(v)). Whole cell voltage clamp with rat PASMC revealed that U46619 induced a NSC current (I(NSC,TXA2)) with weakly outward rectifying current-voltage relation. I(NSC,TXA2) was blocked by ruthenium red (RR), an antagonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-related channel (TRPV) subfamily. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an agonist for TRPV1-3, consistently activated NSC channels in PASMCs. In contrast, agonists for TRPV1 (capsaicin), TRPV3 (camphor), or TRPV4 (α-PDD) rarely induced an increase in the membrane conductance of PASMCs. RT-PCR analysis showed the expression of transcripts for TRPV2 and -4 in rat PASMCs. Finally, it was confirmed that pretreatment with RR largely inhibited HPV in the presence of U46619. The pretreatment with agonists for TRPV1 (capsaicin) and TRPV4 (α-PDD) was ineffective as pretone agents for HPV. Taken together, it is suggested that the concerted effects of I(NSC,TXA2) activation and K(v) inhibition under hypoxia induce membrane depolarization sufficient for HPV. TRPV2 is carefully suggested as the TXA(2)-activated NSC in rat PASMC. PMID:21998141

  11. Contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction during KIR channel and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Hearon, Christopher M; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting skeletal muscle is blunted relative to that which occurs in resting tissue; however, the mechanisms underlying this ‘functional sympatholysis’ remain unclear in humans. We tested the hypothesis that α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction is augmented during exercise following inhibition of inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels and Na+/K+-ATPase (BaCl2 + ouabain). In young healthy humans, we measured forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and calculated forearm vascular conductance (FVC) at rest, during steady-state stimulus conditions (pre-phenylephrine), and after 2 min of phenylephrine (PE; an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) infusion via brachial artery catheter in response to two different stimuli: moderate (15% maximal voluntary contraction) rhythmic handgrip exercise or adenosine infusion. In Protocol 1 (n = 11 subjects) a total of six trials were performed in three conditions: control (saline), combined enzymatic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis (l-NMMA + ketorolac) and combined inhibition of NO, PGs, KIR channels and Na+/K+-ATPase (l-NMMA + ketorolac + BaCl2 + ouabain). In Protocol 2 (n = 6) a total of four trials were performed in two conditions: control (saline), and combined KIR channel and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition. All trials occurred after local β-adrenoceptor blockade (propranolol). PE-mediated vasoconstriction was calculated (%ΔFVC) in each condition. Contrary to our hypothesis, despite attenuated exercise hyperaemia of ∼30%, inhibition of KIR channels and Na+/K+-ATPase, combined with inhibition of NO and PGs (Protocol 1) or alone (Protocol 2) did not enhance α1-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise (Protocol 1: −27 ± 3%; P = 0.2 vs. control, P = 0.4 vs.l-NMMA + ketorolac; Protocol 2: −21 ± 7%; P = 0.9 vs. control). Thus, contracting human skeletal muscle maintains the ability to blunt α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction during

  12. Effect of cyclosporin A and analogues on cytosolic calcium and vasoconstriction: possible lack of relationship to immunosuppressive activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lo Russo, A.; Passaquin, A. C.; André, P.; Skutella, M.; Rüegg, U. T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The full therapeutic potential of the main immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporin A (CsA), is limited because of its side effects, namely nephrotoxicity and hypertension. Several lines of evidence suggest that the origin of both side effects could be CsA-induced vasoconstriction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. 2. Diameter measurements of rat isolated mesenteric arteries showed an increase in noradrenaline- and [Arg]8vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction when arteries were pretreated with CsA. 3. Measurements in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of either cytosolic calcium concentration or of 45Ca2+ efflux showed that CsA potentiated the calcium influx to several vasoconstrictor hormones: [Arg]8vasopressin, angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine. On the other hand, 45Ca2+ efflux in response to thapsigargin, which depletes calcium from intracellular pools, was not potentiated by CsA. 45Ca2+ uptake was not altered by CsA or by any of the analogues tested. 4. Time-course studies in cultured VSMC showed that maximal CsA-induced Ca2+ potentiation occurred after ca. 20 h and this effect was reversed over approximately the next 20 h. 5. To investigate the possible role played by the known intracellular targets of CsA, namely cyclophilin and calcineurin, CsA derivatives with variable potencies with respect to their immunosuppressive activity, were tested on the calcium influx to [Arg]8vasopressin. Derivatives devoid of immunosuppressive activity (cyclosporin H, PSC-833) potentiated calcium signalling, while the potent immunosuppressant, FK520, a close derivative of FK506, and MeVal4CsA, an antagonist of the immunosuppressive effect of CsA did not. The latter compound was unable to reverse the calcium potentiating effect of CsA. 6. Our results show that CsA increases the calcium influx to vasoconstrictor hormones in smooth muscle cells, which presumably increases vasoconstriction. Loading of the intracellular

  13. Regional feedbacks under changing climate and land-use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle Bayer, L.; van den Hurk, B. J. J. M.; Strengers, B. J.; van Minnen, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Ecosystem responses to a changing climate and human-induced climate forcings (e.g. deforestation) might amplify (positive feedback) or dampen (negative feedback) the initial climate response. Feedbacks may include the biogeochemical (e.g. carbon cycle) and biogeophysical feedbacks (e.g. albedo and hydrological cycle). Here, we first review the most important feedbacks and put them into the context of a conceptual framework, including the major processes and interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and climate. We explore potential regional feedbacks in four hot spots with pronounced potential changes in land-use/management and local climate: sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Europe, the Amazon Basin and South and Southeast Asia. For each region, the relevant human-induced climate forcings and feedbacks were identified based on published literature. When evapotranspiration is limited by a soil water deficit, heat waves in Europe are amplified (positive soil moisture-temperature feedback). Drought events in the Amazon lead to further rainfall reduction when water recycling processes are affected (positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback). In SSA, the adoption of irrigation in the commonly rainfed systems can modulate the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback. In contrast, future water shortage in South and Southeast Asia can turn the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback into a positive one. Further research including advanced modeling strategies is needed to isolate the dominant processes affecting the strength and sign of the feedbacks. In addition, the socio-economic dimension needs to be considered in the ecosystems-climate system to include the essential role of human decisions on land-use and land-cover change (LULCC). In this context, enhanced integration between Earth System (ES) and Integrated Assessment (IA) modeling communities is strongly recommended.

  14. Endovascular Electrodes for Electrical Stimulation of Blood Vessels for Vasoconstriction - a Finite Element Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Kezurer, Noa; Farah, Nairouz; Mandel, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock accounts for 30-40 percent of trauma mortality, as bleeding may sometimes be hard to control. Application of short electrical pulses on blood vessels was recently shown to elicit robust vasoconstriction and reduction of blood loss following vascular injury. In this study we present a novel approach for vasoconstriction based on endovascular application of electrical pulses for situations where access to the vessel is limited. In addition to ease of access, we hypothesize that this novel approach will result in a localized and efficient vasoconstriction. Using computer modeling (COMSOL Multiphysics, Electric Currents Module), we studied the effect of endovascular pulsed electrical treatment on abdominal aorta of pigs, and compared the efficiency of different electrodes configurations on the electric field amplitude, homogeneity and locality when applied on a blood vessel wall. Results reveal that the optimal configuration is the endovascular approach where four electrodes are used, spaced 13 mm apart. Furthermore, computer based temperature investigations (bio-heat model, COMSOL Multiphysics) show that the maximum expected temperature rise is of 1.2 degrees; highlighting the safety of the four endovascular electrodes configuration. These results can aid in planning the application of endovascular pulsed electrical treatment as an efficient and safe vasoconstriction approach. PMID:27534438

  15. Vasoconstrictive responses of lambs grazing endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass paddocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AR6 novel endophyte (Neotyphodium lolii) produces ergovaline that deters against the African black beetle, but also causes vasoconstriction that restricts an animal’s ability to dissipate body heat. An experiment was conducted with 3, 0.10-ha pastures of ‘Extreme’ perennial ryegrass (Lolium per...

  16. Ergovaline-induced vasoconstriction in an isolated bovine lateral saphenous vein bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergovaline has been proposed as a toxic component of endophyte-infected tall fescue. As many of the symptoms of fescue toxicosis are a result of compromised circulation, the objective of this study was to examine the vasoconstrictive potentials of ergovaline and a more documented ergopeptine, ergota...

  17. An Extract of Endophyte Infected Tall Fescue Seed Induces Vasoconstriction of Bovine Foregut Vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ethanol extract of tall fescue seed was produced to further understand the interactions of toxic compounds that cause fescue toxicosis. We hypothesized that the combination of alkaloids present in the extract would have a greater vasoconstrictive response than individual alkaloids. The objective ...

  18. Conditioned Eyelid Response, Peripheral Vasoconstriction, and Attention in Retarded and Nonretarded Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosley, James L.; Bakal, Donald A.

    1974-01-01

    A continuous reinforcement, delayed classical eyelid-conditioning paradigm in combination with the peripheral vasomotor response of digital vasoconstriction was employed to examine the hypothesized attention deficit for 10 15-year-old educable mentally retarded and same-age nonretarded Ss. (Author/MC)

  19. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise vasoconstricts ischemic active skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Machado, Tiago M; Alvarez, Alberto; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Hanna, Hanna W; Altamimi, Yasir H; Senador, Danielle; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite accumulation due to ischemia of active skeletal muscle stimulates group III/IV chemosensitive afferents eliciting reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and sympathetic activity, termed the muscle metaboreflex. We and others have previously demonstrated sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction of coronary, renal, and forelimb vasculatures with muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA). Whether MMA elicits vasoconstriction of the ischemic muscle from which it originates is unknown. We hypothesized that the vasodilation in active skeletal muscle with imposed ischemia becomes progressively restrained by the increasing sympathetic vasoconstriction during MMA. We activated the metaboreflex during mild dynamic exercise in chronically instrumented canines via graded reductions in hindlimb blood flow (HLBF) before and after α1-adrenergic blockade [prazosin (50 μg/kg)], β-adrenergic blockade [propranolol (2 mg/kg)], and α1 + β-blockade. Hindlimb resistance was calculated as femoral arterial pressure/HLBF. During mild exercise, HLBF must be reduced below a threshold level before the reflex is activated. With initial reductions in HLBF, vasodilation occurred with the imposed ischemia. Once the muscle metaboreflex was elicited, hindlimb resistance increased. This increase in hindlimb resistance was abolished by α1-adrenergic blockade and exacerbated after β-adrenergic blockade. We conclude that metaboreflex activation during submaximal dynamic exercise causes sympathetically mediated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in ischemic skeletal muscle. This limits the ability of the reflex to improve blood flow to the muscle. PMID:26475591

  20. Endovascular Electrodes for Electrical Stimulation of Blood Vessels for Vasoconstriction – a Finite Element Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kezurer, Noa; Farah, Nairouz; Mandel, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock accounts for 30–40 percent of trauma mortality, as bleeding may sometimes be hard to control. Application of short electrical pulses on blood vessels was recently shown to elicit robust vasoconstriction and reduction of blood loss following vascular injury. In this study we present a novel approach for vasoconstriction based on endovascular application of electrical pulses for situations where access to the vessel is limited. In addition to ease of access, we hypothesize that this novel approach will result in a localized and efficient vasoconstriction. Using computer modeling (COMSOL Multiphysics, Electric Currents Module), we studied the effect of endovascular pulsed electrical treatment on abdominal aorta of pigs, and compared the efficiency of different electrodes configurations on the electric field amplitude, homogeneity and locality when applied on a blood vessel wall. Results reveal that the optimal configuration is the endovascular approach where four electrodes are used, spaced 13 mm apart. Furthermore, computer based temperature investigations (bio-heat model, COMSOL Multiphysics) show that the maximum expected temperature rise is of 1.2 degrees; highlighting the safety of the four endovascular electrodes configuration. These results can aid in planning the application of endovascular pulsed electrical treatment as an efficient and safe vasoconstriction approach. PMID:27534438

  1. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  2. HIF-2α-mediated induction of pulmonary thrombospondin-1 contributes to hypoxia-driven vascular remodelling and vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Labrousse-Arias, David; Castillo-González, Raquel; Rogers, Natasha M.; Torres-Capelli, Mar; Barreira, Bianca; Aragonés, Julián; Cogolludo, Ángel; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Calzada, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Hypoxic conditions stimulate pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodelling, both pathognomonic changes in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The secreted protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is involved in the maintenance of lung homeostasis. New work identified a role for TSP1 in promoting PAH. Nonetheless, it is largely unknown how hypoxia regulates TSP1 in the lung and whether this contributes to pathological events during PAH. Methods and results In cell and animal experiments, we found that hypoxia induces TSP1 in lungs, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, and pulmonary fibroblasts. Using a murine model of constitutive hypoxia, gene silencing, and luciferase reporter experiments, we found that hypoxia-mediated induction of pulmonary TSP1 is a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α-dependent process. Additionally, hypoxic tsp1−/− pulmonary fibroblasts and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell displayed decreased migration compared with wild-type (WT) cells. Furthermore, hypoxia-mediated induction of TSP1 destabilized endothelial cell–cell interactions. This provides genetic evidence that TSP1 contributes to vascular remodelling during PAH. Expanding cell data to whole tissues, we found that, under hypoxia, pulmonary arteries (PAs) from WT mice had significantly decreased sensitivity to acetylcholine (Ach)-stimulated endothelial-dependent vasodilation. In contrast, hypoxic tsp1−/− PAs retained sensitivity to Ach, mediated in part by TSP1 regulation of pulmonary Kv channels. Translating these preclinical studies, we find in the lungs from individuals with end-stage PAH, both TSP1 and HIF-2α protein expression increased in the pulmonary vasculature compared with non-PAH controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that HIF-2α is clearly implicated in the TSP1 pulmonary regulation and provide new insights on its contribution to PAH-driven vascular remodelling and vasoconstriction. PMID:26503986

  3. An experimental investigation of dyke injection under regional extensional stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, K. A.; Menand, T.

    2015-03-01

    Dyke injection is a fundamental process of magma transport in the crust, occurring in all tectonic settings. The effect of extensional stress regimes on dyke injections is particularly important to understanding a wide spectrum of processes including continental rifting and volcanic activity. Yet dyke injection in extensional regimes has been relatively understudied. In addition, the effect of dyke-dyke interaction modifying the surrounding stress field and leading to dyke rotation about the vertical axis has not been addressed. We present the results from 23 laboratory analogue experiments investigating lateral dyke injections in a remote extensional stress field. This study is unique in that it addresses the effect of both extension and dyke-dyke interaction on the lateral propagation and rotation of dykes. The experiments study the interrelationship between successive lateral dyke injections by examining dyke injection thickness, injection spacing, injection orientation, extension, and structural relationship. A relationship between the rotation angle between two successive intrusions and the distance separating them under given extensional stress conditions is established. The rotation angle depends on two dimensionless numbers: the ratio of fluid overpressure of the first injection and remote tensile stress, and the ratio of the spacing between injections and the height of the first intrusion. The experiments show how the stress field is perturbed by an intrusion and how the remote stress field is locally relieved by this intrusion. The results show furthermore that measuring or estimating the rotation angles between successive intrusions within rift zones allows the spatial distribution of these intrusions to be estimated. In the case of the actively spreading Red Sea rift in Afar, Ethiopia, we find that the vast majority of the dykes are predicted to intrude within 10 km of each other and most frequently between 4 and 5 km, in good agreement with independent

  4. Phenylephrine as an alternative to cocaine for nasal vasoconstriction before nasal surgery: A randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    AlHaddad, Sawsan T; Khanna, Ashish K; Mascha, Edward J; Abdelmalak, Basem B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cocaine is often used topically to provide the profound vasoconstriction required for nasal surgery; however, it has been associated with intraoperative cardiac adverse effects. We compared cocaine with phenylephrine as an alternative to ascertain their relative efficacy as vasoconstrictors in nasal septoplasty. Methods: Adult patients, presenting for elective nasal septoplasty, of American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I-III, were randomised to either 0.5% phenylephrine or 4% cocaine. The primary outcome was quality of vasoconstriction on a 5-point scale (1=unacceptable, 5=excellent), rated by the surgeon at the end of the procedure. Results: Twenty-nine patients received phenylephrine and 26 received cocaine. The median rating for quality of the vasoconstriction was 4.0 (good) in both the phenylephrine and cocaine groups (P=0.84). Median blood loss was 50 ml in the phenylephrine group and 62.5 ml in the cocaine group (P=0.49). In secondary analyses, phenylephrine was shown to be non-inferior to cocaine on both quality of vasoconstriction (non-inferiority delta of 1 point, P=0.009) and estimated blood loss (non-inferiority delta of 25 ml, P=0.028). The frequency of ventricular ectopy, ST segment changes or blood pressure changes after nasal packing was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: Phenylephrine in a concentration of 0.5% is not different from 4% cocaine on the quality of vasoconstriction in septoplasty. Given the abuse potential of cocaine and the added administrative burden associated with its handling, phenylephrine might serve as an alternative. PMID:23825816

  5. Regional Air Quality Under Climate Change Using a Nested Global-Regional Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J.; Racherla, P.; Lynn, B.; Adams, P.; Pandis, S.

    2006-12-01

    Strong links between climate, particulate matter and ozone make it likely that climate change will have impacts on air quality. This study examines the effects that climate change will have on concentrations of PM2.5 and ozone in the Eastern US. The changes examined are between the present day and the 2050s. This is accomplished by developing the Global-Regional Climate Air Pollution Modeling System (GRE-CAPS). GRE-CAPS couples a general circulation model (GCM) / global chemical transport model (CTM), a regional meteorological model, and a regional chemical transport model. Present and future climates are simulated by the GISS-II' GCM with an embedded gas-phase and aerosol chemistry model. Meteorology generated by the GCM is downscaled to the regional modeling domain using the MM5 regional climate model. The downscaled meteorology is passed to the regional chemical transport model PMCAMx. In addition to the downscaled meteorology, chemical boundary conditions for the regional model are derived from the global model. The coupled model system is evaluated for the present day by comparing model-predicted concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 to measured concentrations during the last decade. This comparison between typical present- day measurements and model predictions is made for three modeled present-day Julys (both PM2.5 and O3) and three modeled Januaries (PM2.5). Future concentrations (using the IPCC A2 scenario) are compared to present-day concentrations. Concentrations in specific sites and statistical distributions of concentrations will be examined.

  6. Aspirate from human stented saphenous vein grafts induces epicardial coronary vasoconstriction and impairs perfusion and left ventricular function in rat bioassay hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Helmut R; Baars, Theodor; Kahlert, Philipp; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Stent implantation into aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) releases particulate debris and soluble vasoactive mediators, for example, serotonin. We now analyzed effects of the soluble mediators released into the coronary arterial blood during stent implantation on vasomotion of isolated rat epicardial coronary artery segments and on coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary blood was retrieved during percutaneous SVG intervention using a distal occlusion/aspiration protection device in nine symptomatic patients with stable angina pectoris and a flow-limiting SVG stenosis. The blood was separated into particulate debris and plasma. Responses to coronary plasma were determined in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and in isolated, constant pressure-perfused rat hearts (±nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibition and ±serotonin receptor blockade, respectively). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induced a stronger vasoconstriction of rat epicardial coronary arteries (52 ± 8% of maximal potassium chloride induced vasoconstriction [% KClmax = 100%]) than plasma taken before stent implantation (12 ± 8% of KClmax); NOS inhibition augmented this vasoconstrictor response (to 110 ± 15% and 24 ± 9% of KClmax). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation reduced in isolated perfused rat hearts only under NOS inhibition coronary flow by 17 ± 3% and left ventricular developed pressure by 25 ± 4%. Blockade of serotonin receptors abrogated these effects. Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induces vasoconstriction in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and reduces coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27482071

  7. Concurrent activation of multiple vasoactive signaling pathways in vasoconstriction caused by tubuloglomerular feedback: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Schnermann, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) describes the negative relationship between (a) NaCl concentration at the macula densa and (b) glomerular filtration rate or glomerular capillary pressure. TGF-induced vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole results from the enhanced effect of several vasoconstrictors with an effect size sequence of adenosine = 20-HETE > angiotensin II > thromboxane = superoxide > renal nerves > ATP. TGF-mediated vasoconstriction is limited by the simultaneous release of several vasodilators with an effect size sequence of nitric oxide > carbon monoxide = kinins > adenosine. The sum of the constrictor effects exceeds that of the dilator effects by the magnitude of the TGF response. The validity of the additive model used in this analysis can be tested by determining the effect of combined inhibition of some or all agents contributing to TGF. Multiple independent contributors to TGF are consistent with the variability of TGF and of the factors contributing to TGF resetting. PMID:25668021

  8. Diflucortolone valerate (Nerisona): a comparative vasoconstriction test in artificially induced hyperemia of the skin.

    PubMed

    Reckers, R; Wendt, H

    1980-01-01

    In 20 healthy volunteers of both sexes the vasoconstrictive activity of diflucortolone valerate in two of its commercially available formulations (water-in-oil emulsion and pure fat base) was compared with that of four other substances: fluocinonide; betamethasone-17,21-dipropionate; hydrocortisone-17-butyrate; and clobetasol-17-propionate in corresponding galenical formulations. The visual assessment of vasoconstrictive activity after 10 hours revealed a statistically significant superiority of diflucortolone valerate in its fat base over the corresponding galenical formulations of fluocinonide, clobetasol-17-propionate, and hydrocortisone-17-butyrate. Diflucortolone valerate in a water-in-oil emulsion was statistically better after eight hours than the cream formulations of fluocinonide; clobetasol-17-propionate, and betamethasone-17,21-dipropionate. PMID:7459929

  9. Vasoconstrictive responses by the carotid and auricular arteries in goats to ergot alkaloid exposure1

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Glen E.; Flythe, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    A fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infects most plants of “Kentucky 31” tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) and produces ergot alkaloids that cause persistent constriction of the vascular system in grazing livestock. Consequently, animals undergoing this toxicosis cannot regulate core body temperature and are vulnerable to heat and cold stresses. An experiment was conducted to determine if the caudal and auricular arteries in goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) vasoconstrict in response to ergot alkaloids. Seven, rumen fistulated goats were fed ad libitum orchardgrass (Dactylis glomeratia) hay and ruminally infused with endophtye-free seed (E−) for a 7-day adjustment period. Two periods followed with E− and endophyte-infected (E+) seed being randomly assigned to the 2 goat groups in period 1 and then switching treatments between groups in period 2. Infused E+ and E− seed were in equal proportions to the hay such that concentrations of ergovaline and ergovalanine were 0.80 μg per g dry matter for the E+ treatment. Cross-sections of both arteries were imaged using Doppler ultrasonography on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 in period 1 and on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 9 in period 2. Differences from average baseline areas were used to determine presence or absence of alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction. Carotid arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in both periods, and auricular arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in period 1 and on day 6 in period 2. Luminal areas of the carotid arteries in E+ goats were 46% less than baseline areas in both periods after vasoconstriction occurred, whereas auricular arteries in E+ goats were 52% less than baseline areas in period 1 and 38% in period 2. Both arteries in E+ goats in period 1 relaxed relative to baseline areas by imaging day 2 after they were switched to the E− treatment. Results indicated that goats can vasoconstrict when exposed to ergot alkaloids that could disrupt their

  10. Vasoconstrictive Responses by the Carotid and Auricular Arteries in goats to Ergot Alkaloid Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, Glen; Flythe, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infects most plants of ‘Kentucky 31’ tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) and produces ergot alkaloids that cause persistent constriction of the vascular system in grazing livestock. Consequently, animals undergoing this toxicosis cannot regulate core body temperature and are vulnerable to heat and cold stresses. An experiment was conducted to determine if the caudal and auricular arteries in goats (Capra aegagrus hircus) vasoconstrict in response to ergot alkaloids. Seven, rumen fistulated goats were fed ad libitum orchardgrass (Dactylis glomeratia) hay and ruminally infused with endophtye-free seed (E-) for a 7-day adjustment period. Two periods followed with E- and endophyte-infected (E+) seed being randomly assigned to the 2 goat groups in period 1 and then switching treatments between groups in period 2. Infused E+ and E- seed were in equal proportions to the hay such that concentrations of ergovaline and ergovalanine were 0.80 µg per g dry matter for the E+ treatment. Cross-sections of both arteries were imaged using Doppler ultrasonography on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 in period 1 and on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 9 in period 2. Differences from average baseline areas were used to determine presence or absence of alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction. Carotid arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in both periods, and auricular arteries initiated constriction on imaging day 2 in period 1 and on day 6 in period 2. Luminal areas of the carotid arteries in E+ goats were 46% less than baseline areas in both periods after vasoconstriction occurred, whereas auricular arteries in E+ goats were 52% less than baseline areas in period 1 and 38% in period 2. Both arteries in E+ goats in period 1 relaxed relative to baseline areas by imaging day 2 after they were switched to the E- treatment. Results indicated that goats can vasoconstrict when exposed to ergot alkaloids that could disrupt their thermoregulation.

  11. In vivo imaging reveals an essential role of vasoconstriction in rupture of the ovarian follicle at ovulation.

    PubMed

    Migone, Fernando F; Cowan, Robert G; Williams, Rebecca M; Gorse, Kiersten J; Zipfel, Warren R; Quirk, Susan M

    2016-02-23

    Rupture of the ovarian follicle releases the oocyte at ovulation, a timed event that is critical for fertilization. It is not understood how the protease activity required for rupture is directed with precise timing and localization to the outer surface, or apex, of the follicle. We hypothesized that vasoconstriction at the apex is essential for rupture. The diameter and blood flow of individual vessels and the thickness of the apical follicle wall were examined over time to expected ovulation using intravital multiphoton microscopy. Vasoconstriction of apical vessels occurred within hours preceding follicle rupture in wild-type mice, but vasoconstriction and rupture were absent in Amhr2(cre/+)SmoM2 mice in which follicle vessels lack the normal association with vascular smooth muscle. Vasoconstriction is not simply a response to reduced thickness of the follicle wall; vasoconstriction persisted in wild-type mice when thinning of the follicle wall was prevented by infusion of protease inhibitors into the ovarian bursa. Ovulation was inhibited by preventing the periovulatory rise in the expression of the vasoconstrictor endothelin 2 by follicle cells of wild-type mice. In these mice, infusion of vasoconstrictors (either endothelin 2 or angiotensin 2) into the bursa restored the vasoconstriction of apical vessels and ovulation. Additionally, infusion of endothelin receptor antagonists into the bursa of wild-type mice prevented vasoconstriction and follicle rupture. Processing tissue to allow imaging at increased depth through the follicle and transabdominal ultrasonography in vivo showed that decreased blood flow is restricted to the apex. These results demonstrate that vasoconstriction at the apex of the follicle is essential for ovulation. PMID:26842836

  12. Thromboxane-induced renal vasoconstriction is mediated by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and superoxide anion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Paul A.; Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The present renal hemodynamic study tested the hypothesis that CD38 and superoxide anion (O2·−) participate in the vasoconstriction produced by activation of thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors in the mouse kidney. CD38 is the major mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase contributing to vasomotor tone through the generation of cADP-ribose, a second messenger that activates ryanodine receptors to release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. We evaluated whether the stable thromboxane mimetic U-46619 causes less pronounced renal vasoconstriction in CD38-deficient mice and the involvement of O2·− in U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction. Our results indicate that U-46619 activation of TP receptors causes renal vasoconstriction in part by activating cADP-ribose signaling in renal resistance arterioles. Based on maximal renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance responses to bolus injections of U-46619, CD38 contributes 30–40% of the TP receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We also found that the antioxidant SOD mimetic tempol attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction by U-46619 in both groups of mice, suggesting mediation by O2·−. The degree of tempol blockage of U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction was greater in wild-type mice, attenuating renal vasoconstriction by 40% compared with 30% in CD38-null mice. In other experiments, U-46619 rapidly stimulated O2·− production (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in isolated mouse afferent arterioles, an effect abolished by tempol. These observations provide the first in vivo demonstration of CD38 and O2·− involvement in the vasoconstrictor effects of TP receptor activation in the kidney and in vitro evidence for TP receptor stimulation of O2·− production by the afferent arteriole. PMID:23884143

  13. Stereoselective inhibition of thromboxane-induced coronary vasoconstriction by 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Eltze, M.; Boer, R.; Sanders, K.H.; Boss, H.; Ulrich, W.R.; Flockerzi, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The biological activity of the (+)-S- and (-)-R-enantiomers of niguldipine, of the (-)-S- and (+)-R-enantiomers of felodipine and nitrendipine, and of rac-nisoldipine and rac-nimodipine was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of coronary vasoconstriction due to the thromboxane A2 (TxA2)-mimetic U-46619 in guinea pig Langendorff hearts, displacement of (+)-({sup 3}H)isradipine from calcium channel binding sites of guinea pig skeletal muscle T-tubule membranes, and blood pressure reduction in spontaneously hypertensive rats were determined. The enantiomers were obtained by stereoselective synthesis. Cross-contamination was less than 0.5% for both S- and R-enantiomers of niguldipine and nitrendipine and less than 1% for those of felodipine. From the doses necessary for a 50% inhibition of coronary vasoconstriction, stereoselectivity ratios for (+)-(S)-/(-)-(R)-niguldipine, (-)-(S)-/(+)-(R)-felodipine, and (-)-(S)-/(+)-(R)-nitrendipine of 28, 13, and 7, respectively, were calculated. The potency ratio rac-nisoldipine/rac-nimodipine was 3.5. Ratios obtained from binding experiments and antihypertensive activity were (+)-(S)-/(-)-(R)-niguldipine = 45 and 35, (-)-(S)-/(+)-(R)-felodipine = 12 and 13, (-)-(S)-/(+)-(R)-nitrendipine = 8 and 8, and rac-nisoldipine/rac-nimodipine = 8 and 7, respectively. Highly significant correlations were found between the in vitro potency of the substances to prevent U-46619-induced coronary vasoconstriction and their affinity for calcium channel binding sites as well as their antihypertensive activity.

  14. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides. PMID:26004140

  15. Nitric oxide mediates the inhibitory action of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Handa, R K; Strandhoy, J W

    1996-06-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism(s) involved in the inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on renal vascular reactivity, in vivo. Bolus injections of vasoconstrictor agonists were administered into the renal circulation of pentobarbital anesthetized male Wistar rats at a dose to cause a transient 45 to 50% decrease in renal blood flow. Intrarenal infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 2.5 ng/min/kg attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II by 66%, a significantly smaller reduction of 35% for norepinephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, 22% for vasopressin-mediated vasoconstriction and no alteration of KCl-mediated vasoconstriction. The preferential inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction was mimicked by the intrarenal infusion of either 0.2 to 5 micrograms/min/kg methacholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) or 2 micrograms/min/kg sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). After inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, intrarenal infusion of PAF or methacholine reduced angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction significantly less than that observed in the absence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Therefore, this study provides evidence that the shared ability of platelet-activating factor and methacholine to selectively reduce angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction involves endothelium-derived nitric oxide. PMID:8667214

  16. Mitigation of Ergot Vasoconstriction by Clover Isoflavones in Goats (Capra hircus)

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Glen E.; Flythe, Michael D.; Kagan, Isabelle A.; Ji, Huihua; Bush, Lowell P.

    2016-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids produced by a fungal endophyte (Epichloë coenophiala; formerly Neotyphodium coenophialum) that infects tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) can induce persistent constriction of the vasculature in ruminants, hindering their capability to thermo-regulate core body temperature. There is evidence that isoflavones produced by legumes can relax the vasculature, which suggests that they could relieve ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and mitigate the vulnerability to severe heat stress in ruminants that graze tall fescue. To test if isoflavones can relieve alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction, two pen experiments were conducted with rumen-fistulated goats (Capra hircus) to determine with ultrasonograpy if isoflavones can (1) promote vascular compliance by countering alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and (2) relieve already imposed alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction. Goats were fed ad libitum chopped orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata)–timothy (Phleum pratense) hay prior to conducting the experiments. Measures of carotid and interosseous luminal areas were obtained pre- (baseline) and post-ruminal infusions in both experiments with goats being fed the hay, and for blood flow rate in the carotid artery in Experiment 2. Responses to infusion treatments were evaluated as proportionate differences from baseline measures. Peak systolic velocity, pulsatility index, and heart rate were measured on the last day on treatment (DOT) in Experiment 1, and on all imaging sessions during Experiment 2. For Experiment 1, rumens were infused with ground toxic fescue seed and isoflavones in Phase A and with only the toxic seed in Phase B. The infusion treatments were switched between phases in Experiment 2, which employed a fescue seed extract having an ergot alkaloid composition equivalent to that of the ground seed used in Experiment 1. During Experiment 1, luminal areas of carotid and interosseous arteries in Phase A did not deviate (P > 0.1) from baselines over 1, 2

  17. Mitigation of Ergot Vasoconstriction by Clover Isoflavones in Goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Aiken, Glen E; Flythe, Michael D; Kagan, Isabelle A; Ji, Huihua; Bush, Lowell P

    2016-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids produced by a fungal endophyte (Epichloë coenophiala; formerly Neotyphodium coenophialum) that infects tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) can induce persistent constriction of the vasculature in ruminants, hindering their capability to thermo-regulate core body temperature. There is evidence that isoflavones produced by legumes can relax the vasculature, which suggests that they could relieve ergot alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and mitigate the vulnerability to severe heat stress in ruminants that graze tall fescue. To test if isoflavones can relieve alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction, two pen experiments were conducted with rumen-fistulated goats (Capra hircus) to determine with ultrasonograpy if isoflavones can (1) promote vascular compliance by countering alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction and (2) relieve already imposed alkaloid-induced vasoconstriction. Goats were fed ad libitum chopped orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata)-timothy (Phleum pratense) hay prior to conducting the experiments. Measures of carotid and interosseous luminal areas were obtained pre- (baseline) and post-ruminal infusions in both experiments with goats being fed the hay, and for blood flow rate in the carotid artery in Experiment 2. Responses to infusion treatments were evaluated as proportionate differences from baseline measures. Peak systolic velocity, pulsatility index, and heart rate were measured on the last day on treatment (DOT) in Experiment 1, and on all imaging sessions during Experiment 2. For Experiment 1, rumens were infused with ground toxic fescue seed and isoflavones in Phase A and with only the toxic seed in Phase B. The infusion treatments were switched between phases in Experiment 2, which employed a fescue seed extract having an ergot alkaloid composition equivalent to that of the ground seed used in Experiment 1. During Experiment 1, luminal areas of carotid and interosseous arteries in Phase A did not deviate (P > 0.1) from baselines over 1, 2, 3

  18. Gq-coupled receptors as mechanosensors mediating myogenic vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    y Schnitzler, Michael Mederos; Storch, Ursula; Meibers, Simone; Nurwakagari, Pascal; Breit, Andreas; Essin, Kirill; Gollasch, Maik; Gudermann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Despite the central physiological function of the myogenic response, the underlying signalling pathways and the identity of mechanosensors in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) are still elusive. In contrast to present thinking, we show that membrane stretch does not primarily gate mechanosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, but leads to agonist-independent activation of Gq/11-coupled receptors, which subsequently signal to TRPC channels in a G protein- and phospholipase C-dependent manner. Mechanically activated receptors adopt an active conformation, allowing for productive G protein coupling and recruitment of β-arrestin. Agonist-independent receptor activation by mechanical stimuli is blocked by specific antagonists and inverse agonists. Increasing the AT1 angiotensin II receptor density in mechanically unresponsive rat aortic A7r5 cells resulted in mechanosensitivity. Myogenic tone of cerebral and renal arteries is profoundly diminished by the inverse angiotensin II AT1 receptor agonist losartan independently of angiotensin II (AII) secretion. This inhibitory effect is enhanced in blood vessels of mice deficient in the regulator of G-protein signalling-2. These findings suggest that Gq/11-coupled receptors function as sensors of membrane stretch in VSM cells. PMID:18987636

  19. Postural hypocapnic hyperventilation is associated with enhanced peripheral vasoconstriction in postural tachycardia syndrome with normal supine blood flow.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Medow, Marvin S; Cherniack, Neil S; Natelson, Benjamin H

    2006-08-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated a subset of postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) patients characterized by normal peripheral resistance and blood volume while supine but thoracic hypovolemia and splanchnic blood pooling while upright secondary to splanchnic hyperemia. Such "normal-flow" POTS patients often demonstrate hypocapnia during orthostatic stress. We studied 20 POTS patients (14-23 yr of age) and compared them with 10 comparably aged healthy volunteers. We measured changes in heart rate, blood pressure, heart rate and blood pressure variability, arm and leg strain-gauge occlusion plethysmography, respiratory impedance plethysmography calibrated against pneumotachography, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pet(CO2)), and impedance plethysmographic indexes of blood volume and blood flow within the thoracic, splanchnic, pelvic (upper leg), and lower leg regional circulations while supine and during upright tilt to 70 degrees. Ten POTS patients demonstrated significant hyperventilation and hypocapnia (POTS(HC)) while 10 were normocapnic with minimal increase in postural ventilation, comparable to control. While relative splanchnic hypervolemia and hyperemia occurred in both POTS groups compared with controls, marked enhancement in peripheral vasoconstriction occurred only in POTS(HC) and was related to thoracic blood flow. Variability indexes suggested enhanced sympathetic activation in POTS(HC) compared with other subjects. The data suggest enhanced cardiac and peripheral sympathetic excitation in POTS(HC). PMID:16565300

  20. Exercise training and α1-adrenoreceptor-mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Just, Timothy P; DeLorey, Darren S

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training (ET) increases sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and enhances contraction-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction (i.e., sympatholysis) through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. Changes in α2-adrenoreceptor vasoconstriction mediate a portion of these training adaptations, however the contribution of other postsynaptic receptors remains to be determined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ET on α1-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in resting and contracting muscle. It was hypothesized that α1-adrenoreceptor-mediated sympatholysis would be enhanced following ET. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to sedentary (S; n = 12) or heavy-intensity treadmill ET (n = 11) groups. Subsequently, rats were anesthetized and instrumented for lumbar sympathetic chain stimulation and measurement of femoral vascular conductance (FVC) at rest and during muscle contraction. The percentage change in FVC in response to sympathetic stimulation was measured in control, α1-adrenoreceptor blockade (Prazosin; 20 μg, IV), and combined α1 and NO synthase (NOS) blockade (l-NAME; 5 mg·kg(-1) IV) conditions. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was increased (P < 0.05) in ET compared to S rats at low, but not high (P > 0.05) stimulation frequencies at rest (S: 2 Hz: -25 ± 4%; 5 Hz: -45 ± 5 %; ET: 2 Hz: -35 ± 7%, 5 Hz: -52 ± 7%), whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was not different (P > 0.05) between groups during contraction (S: 2 Hz: -11 ± 8%; 5 Hz: -26 ± 11%; ET: 2 Hz: -10 ± 7%, 5 Hz: -27 ± 12%). Prazosin blunted (P < 0.05) vasoconstrictor responsiveness in S and ET rats at rest and during contraction, and abolished group differences in vasoconstrictor responsiveness. Subsequent NOS blockade increased vasoconstrictor responses (P < 0.05) in S at rest and during contraction, whereas in ET vasoconstriction was increased (P < 0

  1. The role of classical transient receptor potential channels in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, B; Dietrich, A; Gudermann, T; Kalwa, H; Grimminger, F; Weissmann, N

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an essential mechanism of the lung matching blood perfusion to ventilation during local alveolar hypoxia. HPV thus optimizes pulmonary gas exchange. In contrast chronic and generalized hypoxia leads to pulmonary vascular remodeling with subsequent pulmonary hypertension and right heart hypertrophy. Among other non-selective cation channels, the family of classical transient receptor potential channels (TRPC) has been shown to be expressed in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Among this family, TRPC6 is essential for the regulation of acute HPV in mice. Against this background, in this chapter we give an overview about the TRPC family and their role in HPV. PMID:20204731

  2. Sustained cutaneous vasoconstriction during and following cyrotherapy treatment: Role of oxidative stress and Rho kinase.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Kevin M; Patik, Jordan C; Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Diller, Kenneth R; Brothers, R Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Cryotherapy is a therapeutic technique using ice or cold water applied to the skin to reduce bleeding, inflammation, pain, and swelling following soft tissue trauma and injury. While beneficial, there are some side effects such as pronounced vasoconstriction and tissue ischemia that are sustained for hours post-treatment. This study tested the hypothesis that this vasoconstriction is mediated by 1) the Rho-kinase pathway and/or 2) elevated oxidative stress. 9 subjects were fitted with a commercially available cryotherapy unit with a water perfused bladder on the lateral portion of the right calf. Participants were instrumented with three microdialysis probes underneath the bladder. One site received lactated ringers (control site), one received the Rho-Kinase inhibitor Fasudil, and one received Ascorbic Acid. Skin temperature (Tskin) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was measured at each site. Subjects had 1°C water perfused through the bladder for 30min, followed by passive rewarming for 90min. Tskin fell from ~34°C to ~18.0°C during active cooling across all sites and this response was similar for all sites (P>0.05 for all comparisons). During passive rewarming Tskin rose to a similar degree in all sites (P>0.05 relative to the end of cooling). %CVC was reduced during active cooling in all sites; however, the magnitude of this response was blunted in the Fasudil site relative to control (P<0.001 for all comparisons) and min 25 and 30 of cooling in the Ascorbic Acid site (P<0.05). During passive rewarming %CVC at the control and Ascorbic Acid sites did not change such that values were similar to the end of cooling (P>0.05 for each comparison). %CVC at the Fasudil site remained elevated during passive rewarming such that values were higher compared to the control and Ascorbic Acid sites throughout the 90min of passive rewarming (P<0.001 main effect of Fasudil). These findings indicate that the Rho-kinase pathway contributes to pronounced vasoconstriction

  3. TNF potentiates PAF-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in the rat: role of neutrophils and thromboxane A2.

    PubMed

    Chang, S W

    1994-12-01

    Both tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) are released during sepsis and are important mediators of septic lung injury. I investigated the interactions of TNF and PAF on vasoactive responses in the pulmonary circulation. In isolated rat lungs perfused with a cell- and plasma-free physiological salt solution, PAF (0.01- and 0.1-micrograms boluses) caused transient dose-dependent pulmonary arterial and venous constrictions. In vivo pretreatment of the rats with TNF (0.02 or 0.2 mg/kg i.v.) 1 h before lung isolation increased lung myeloperoxidase activity and markedly enhanced PAF-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction without affecting the pressor responses to angiotensin II or hypoxia. In contrast, pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/kg), which increased lung myeloperoxidase to the same extent as TNF, caused only a modest enhancement of PAF-induced vasoconstriction associated with reduced pressor responses to angiotensin II and hypoxia. Ex vivo perfusion of isolated lungs with TNF for 1 h did not affect PAF vasoconstriction. The TNF-induced potentiation of PAF vasoconstriction was not altered by depletion of circulating neutrophils with vinblastine but was blocked by Dazmegrel, a thromboxane synthase inhibitor. Thus, TNF potentiates PAF-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction by an in vivo mechanism that is neutrophil independent but thromboxane dependent. This TNF-PAF interaction likely contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension during sepsis. PMID:7896627

  4. 20 CFR 661.290 - Under what circumstances may States require Local Boards to take part in regional planning...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The State may require Local Boards within a designated region (as defined at 20 CFR 660.300) to: (1) Participate in a regional planning process that results in regional performance measures for workforce investment activities under title I of WIA. Regions that meet or exceed the regional performance measures...

  5. Soil N cycling and phenols accumulation under continuous rice cropping in the Grand Prairie region, Arkansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil C stocks in the Grand Prairie region of eastern Arkansas have declined under the prevalent two-year rotation of rice (Orzya sativa L.) soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Continuous rice cropping could promote soil C sequestration, but in previous work continuous rice averaged 19% less grain yiel...

  6. Glucose metabolism in different regions of the rat brain under hypokinetic stress influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konitzer, K.; Voigt, S.

    1980-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in rats kept under long term hypokinetic stress was studied in 7 brain regions. Determination was made of the regional levels of glucose, lactate, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma-aminobutyrate and the incorporation of C-14 from plasma glucose into these metabolites, in glycogen and protein. From the content and activity data the regional glucose flux was approximated quantitatively. Under normal conditions the activity gradient cortex and frontal pole cerebellum, thalamus and mesencephalon, hypothalamus and pons and medulla is identical with that of the regional blood supply (measured with I131 serum albumin as the blood marker). Within the first days of immobilization a functional hypoxia occurred in all brain regions and the utilization of cycle amino acids for protein synthesis was strongly diminished. After the first week of stress the capillary volumes of all regions increased, aerobic glucose metabolism was enhanced (factors 1.3 - 2.0) and the incorporation of glucose C-14 via cycle amino acids into protein was considerably potentiated. The metabolic parameters normalized between the 7th and 11th week of stress. Blood supply and metabolic rate increased most in the hypothalamus.

  7. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in the absence of pretone: essential role for intracellular Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Michelle J; Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Becker, Silke; Ward, Jeremy P T; Aaronson, Philip I

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) maintains blood oxygenation during acute hypoxia but contributes to pulmonary hypertension during chronic hypoxia. The mechanisms of HPV remain controversial, in part because HPV is usually studied in the presence of agonist-induced preconstriction (‘pretone’). This potentiates HPV but may obscure and distort its underlying mechanisms. We therefore carried out an extensive assessment of proposed mechanisms contributing to HPV in isolated intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs) in the absence of pretone by using a conventional small vessel myograph. Hypoxia elicited a biphasic constriction consisting of a small transient (phase 1) superimposed upon a sustained (phase 2) component. Neither phase was affected by the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists diltiazem (10 and 30 μm) or nifedipine (3 μm). Application of the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) blockers BTP2 (10 μm) or SKF96365 (50 μm) attenuated phase 2 but not phase 1, whereas a lengthy (30 min) incubation in Ca2+-free physiological saline solution similarly reduced phase 2 but abolished phase 1. No further effect of inhibition of HPV was observed if the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (30 μm) was also applied during the 30 min incubation in Ca2+-free physiological saline solution. Pretreatment with 10 μm ryanodine and 15 mm caffeine abolished both phases, whereas treatment with 100 μm ryanodine attenuated both phases. The two-pore channel blocker NED-19 (1 μm) and the nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) antagonist BZ194 (200 μm) had no effect on either phase of HPV. The lysosomal Ca2+-depleting agent concanamycin (1 μm) enhanced HPV if applied during hypoxia, but had no effect on HPV during a subsequent hypoxic challenge. The cyclic ADP ribose antagonist 8-bromo-cyclic ADP ribose (30 μm) had no effect on either phase of HPV. Neither the Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) blocker NPS2390 (0.1 and 10 μm) nor FK506 (10

  8. Bone scintigraphy in acute renal failure with severe loin pain and patchy renal vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Han, J S; Kim, Y G; Kim, S; Lee, M C; Lee, J S; Kim, S H

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of renal images and the diagnostic value as a screening test of the whole-body bone and renal scintigraphy with technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) or -pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP), we performed bone scintigraphy in 6 patients with acute renal failure (ARF) with severe loin pain and patchy renal vasoconstriction on postcontrast renal computed tomography (CT). All 6 patients were young and previously healthy but experienced severe loin pain after track events. Five took analgesics. Postcontrast renal CT showed patchy low-density areas or diffuse enhancement immediately after radiocontrast injection and then patchy wedge-shaped enhancement 24 or 48 h later, which subsequently disappeared 72 h later. On the whole-body bone scintigrams with 99mTc-MDP or 99mTc-PYP before obtaining renal CT, there was no increased uptake of isotope in the soft tissue, and multiple patchy increased accumulations of the isotope in the kidney were observed in 5 patients. In 2 patients, renal scintigraphies with technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinate showed photon-deficient areas in the same areas of patchy isotope accumulation in the whole-body bone scintigraphies. Whole-body image and renal scintigraphy with bone-seeking agents may be useful as a screening test and in the search for the theoretical evidence of ARF with severe loin pain and patchy renal vasoconstriction. PMID:1835520

  9. Mechanisms and modifiers of reflex induced cutaneous vasodilation and vasoconstriction in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow responses to body heating and cooling are essential to the normal processes of physiological thermoregulation. Large increases in skin blood flow provide the necessary augmentation of convective heat loss during environmental heat exposure and/or exercise, just as reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction is key to preventing excessive heat dissipation during cold exposure. In humans, reflex sympathetic innervation of the cutaneous circulation has two branches: a sympathetic noradrenergic vasoconstrictor system, and a non-noradrenergic active vasodilator system. Noradrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves are tonically active in normothermic environments and increase their activity during cold exposure, releasing both norepinephrine and cotransmitters (including neuropeptide Y) to decrease skin blood flow. The active vasodilator system in human skin does not exhibit resting tone and is only activated during increases in body temperature, such as those brought about by heat exposure or exercise. Active cutaneous vasodilation occurs via cholinergic nerve cotransmission and has been shown to include potential roles for nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, prostaglandins, and substance P (and/or neurokinin-1 receptors). It has proven both interesting and challenging that no one substance has been identified as the sole mediator of active cutaneous vasodilation. The processes of reflex cutaneous vasodilation and vasoconstriction are both modified by acute factors, such as exercise and hydration, and more long-term factors, such as aging, reproductive hormones, and disease. This review will highlight some of the recent findings in these areas, as well as interesting areas of ongoing and future work. PMID:20448028

  10. Sympathetic nerve stimulation induces local endothelial Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction of mouse mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Lydia W. M.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the endothelium regulates vascular tone independent of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of sympathetic nerves engages the endothelium to oppose vasoconstriction. Local inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) in or near endothelial projections to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) were measured in an en face mouse mesenteric artery preparation. Electrical field stimulation of sympathetic nerves induced an increase in endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+ pulsars, recruiting new pulsar sites without affecting activity at existing sites. This increase in Ca2+ pulsars was blocked by bath application of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or by TTX but was unaffected by directly picospritzing the α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine onto the vascular endothelium, indicating that nerve-derived norepinephrine acted through α-adrenergic receptors on smooth muscle cells. Moreover, EC Ca2+ signaling was not blocked by inhibitors of purinergic receptors, ryanodine receptors, or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, suggesting a role for IP3, rather than Ca2+, in VSM-to-endothelium communication. Block of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, which have been shown to colocalize with IP3 receptors in endothelial projections to VSM, enhanced nerve-evoked constriction. Collectively, our results support the concept of a transcellular negative feedback module whereby sympathetic nerve stimulation elevates EC Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction. PMID:22140050

  11. Dramatic Intracerebral Hemorrhagic Presentations of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: Three Cases and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Joel M.; Wang, Bonnie H.; Moon, Seong-Jin; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) refers to a number of disorders characterized by severe and sudden-onset (“thunderclap”) headaches and angiographic features of reversible, segmental, multifocal vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. Although RCVS generally resolves without significant sequelae, a rare and possibly underrecognized hemorrhagic presentation has a worse potential course. We report three cases of hemorrhagic RCVS and review the literature. Three females (42, 54, and 33 years old, resp.) presented with severe headache, neurological deficits, and dramatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patient 1 presented comatose with a 9 × 4 × 6.6 cm left deep intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) and 1 cm midline shift. She underwent emergent surgical intervention. Patient 2 had a 3.3 × 1.5 cm left superior frontal IPH that enlarged to 4 × 2.5 cm within 12 hours with worsening headache and neurological deficits. She was successfully managed nonoperatively. Patient 3, after uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery, presented with a 1.5 cm left superior parietal IPH on postpartum day 7. Two days later, she acutely developed right hemiplegia. Repeat CT demonstrated a new 3.3 × 1.7 cm left frontal IPH. She was also successfully managed nonoperatively. Many diverse conditions are grouped within the category of RCVS. Dramatic ICH remains a rare and possibly underrecognized presenting feature. Prompt diagnosis and management are essential for obtaining the best outcome. PMID:24707417

  12. Alcohol lowers the vasoconstriction threshold in humans without affecting core cooling rate during mild cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C E; Bristow, G K; Elias, D A; Giesbrecht, G G

    1996-01-01

    Elevated blood alcohol levels are often seen in hypothermia and hyperthermia related deaths, leading to the belief that alcohol renders humans poikilothermic. We examined the core temperature (Tco) thresholds for sweating, vasoconstriction and shivering as well as core cooling rates of seven subjects immersed in 28 degrees C water. On two separate days, subjects exercised on an underwater cycle ergometer to elevate Tco above the sweating threshold. They then rested and cooled until they shivered vigorously. Subjects drank orange juice (7 ml.kg-1) prior to immersion during the control trial and 1 ml.kg-1 absolute ethanol, added to orange juice in a 1:6 ratio, during the alcohol trial. Mean blood alcohol concentration (breath analysis) was 0.097 +/- 0.010 g% at the start of cooling and 0.077 +/- 0.008 g% at the end of the cooling period. Alcohol lowered the vasoconstriction threshold by 0.32 +/- 0.2 degrees C and elevated finger tip blood flow, but had no effect on thresholds for sweating and shivering or core cooling rate. Considering these minor effects it is unlikely that moderate alcohol consumption predisposes individuals to hypothermia or hyperthermia via impaired thermoregulation, but rather likely due to behavioral factors. PMID:8897037

  13. Successful Corticosteroid Treatment of Refractory Spontaneous Vasoconstriction of Extracranial Internal Carotid and Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kozue; Kajimoto, Katsufumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous vasoconstriction of the extracranial internal carotid artery (SVEICA) is a rare cause of cerebral infarction. Most patients with SVEICA suffer recurrent attacks of vasoconstriction. The standard treatment for this condition has not been established and its long-term prognosis is unclear. Case Report: A 25-year-old man with a history of refractory vasospasm angina presented with transient alternating hemiplegia in both the right and left side. Serial carotid ultrasonography examinations showed severe transient stenosis or occlusion of cervical internal carotid arteries on 1 or both sides, with and without neurological symptoms. This condition resolved completely within 1 day to 1 week. The patient did not present any other risk factors for atherosclerosis and was diagnosed with SVEICA. The treatment with calcium antagonists and nitrates did not prevent the attacks. Administration of a corticosteroid substantially reduced the vasospasm attacks. Conclusions: SVEICA is intractable and difficult to diagnose. It has been reported that SVEICA sometimes complicates coronary artery disease, as observed in this case. The present case demonstrated the effectiveness of corticosteroid treatment against this disease. Serial ultrasonography examinations helped us to diagnose and follow-up the vasospasm attacks. PMID:27348139

  14. [Vasoconstriction is required for edema of contralateral lung after reperfusion injury of one lung].

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Alejandro; Castro, Ignacio; Trejo, Humberto; Urich, Daniela; Caraballo, Juan; Gutiérrez, Jeydith; Cano, Camilo; Sánchez de León, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) lung injury is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in certain clinical scenarios that include transplantation, thromboendarterectomy and reexpansion injury of the lung. Edema of the contralateral lung after IR injury of one lung has been reported and this study was aimed to clarify the pathophysiology of this phenomenon. One-lung ischemia/hypoxia followed by reperfusion with either blood or an acellular plasma substitute was achieved in an isolated rabbit lung model by hilum clamping. After reperfusion, we studied the isolated effects of vasoconstriction and inflammation on contralateral lung injury by using papaverine or hydrocortisone as vasodilator and anti-inflammatory, respectively. We observed that IR of one lung induces edema of the contralateral lung. Absence of leukocytes and platelets in the perfusate or use of hydrocortisone completely inhibits IR injury. Moreover, papaverine suppresses edema of the contralateral, but not that of the reperfused lung. We concluded that IR of one lung produces edema in the contralateral lung that requires vasoconstriction of the latter. PMID:20815156

  15. Unexpected High Incidence of Coronary Vasoconstriction in the Reduction of Microvascular Injury Using Sonolysis (ROMIUS) Trial.

    PubMed

    Roos, Sebastiaan T; Juffermans, Lynda J M; van Royen, Niels; van Rossum, Albert C; Xie, Feng; Appelman, Yolande; Porter, Thomas R; Kamp, Otto

    2016-08-01

    High-mechanical-index ultrasound and intravenous microbubbles might prove beneficial in treating microvascular obstruction caused by microthrombi after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Experiments in animals have revealed that longer-pulse-duration ultrasound is associated with an improvement in microvascular recovery. This trial tested long-pulse-duration, high-mechanical-index ultrasound in STEMI patients. Non-randomly assigned, non-blinded patients were included in this phase 2 trial. The primary endpoint was any side effect possibly related to the ultrasound treatment. The study was aborted after six patients were included; three patients experienced coronary vasoconstriction of the culprit artery, unresponsive to nitroglycerin. Therefore, coronary artery diameter was measured in five pigs. Coronary artery diameters distal to the injury site decreased after application of ultrasound, after balloon injury plus thrombus injection (from 1.89 ± 0.24 mm before to 1.78 ± 0.17 after ultrasound, p = 0.05). Long-pulse-duration ultrasound might cause coronary vasoconstriction distal to the culprit vessel location. PMID:27160847

  16. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome associated with fingolimod treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis three months after childbirth.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Markus; Weber, Ralph; Herold, Michèle; Berlit, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by acute thunderclap headache, evidence of vasoconstriction in conventional angiography or magnetic resonance angiography and reversibility of these phenomena within 12 weeks. Some triggering factors, for example drugs such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, sumatriptan, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide and cocaine, or states such as pregnancy, puerperium or migraine have been described. We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman with RCVS associated with fingolimod three months after childbirth. This case represents the first report of RCVS in fingolimod treatment. PMID:26283695

  17. Rheological regional properties of brain tissue studied under cyclic creep/ recovery shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Lounis, M.; Khelidj, B.; Bessai, N.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of brain tissue were studied by repeated creep-recovery shear tests under static conditions for different regions. Corpus callosum CC, Thalamus Th and Corona radiata CR. Non-linear viscoelastic model was also proposed to characterize the transient/steady states of shear creep results. From the creep-recovery data it was obvious that the brain tissues show high regional anisotropy. However. the both samples exhibit fluid viscoelastic properties in the first shear stress cycle of 100 Pa, while this behaviour evolutes to solid viscoelastic with cyclic effect.

  18. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Streltsova, O. I.; Zuev, M. I.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  19. Thermal Stability Analysis under Embankment with Asphalt Pavement and Cement Pavement in Permafrost Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  20. Regional temperature and precipitation changes under high-end (≥4°C) global warming.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, M G; Hemming, D L; Betts, R A

    2011-01-13

    Climate models vary widely in their projections of both global mean temperature rise and regional climate changes, but are there any systematic differences in regional changes associated with different levels of global climate sensitivity? This paper examines model projections of climate change over the twenty-first century from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report which used the A2 scenario from the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, assessing whether different regional responses can be seen in models categorized as 'high-end' (those projecting 4°C or more by the end of the twenty-first century relative to the preindustrial). It also identifies regions where the largest climate changes are projected under high-end warming. The mean spatial patterns of change, normalized against the global rate of warming, are generally similar in high-end and 'non-high-end' simulations. The exception is the higher latitudes, where land areas warm relatively faster in boreal summer in high-end models, but sea ice areas show varying differences in boreal winter. Many continental interiors warm approximately twice as fast as the global average, with this being particularly accentuated in boreal summer, and the winter-time Arctic Ocean temperatures rise more than three times faster than the global average. Large temperature increases and precipitation decreases are projected in some of the regions that currently experience water resource pressures, including Mediterranean fringe regions, indicating enhanced pressure on water resources in these areas. PMID:21115514

  1. Carotid endarterectomy under regional analgesia:a retrospective study (1988-1999).

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Rajmohan, T; Juneja, R; Mehta, Y; Trehan, N

    2001-01-01

    The procedure of carotid endarterectomy is more or less standardized. Controversies persist on many technical issues, one of which is general versus regional anaesthesia. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of regional analgesia on perioperative complications, the hospital stay and the perioperative mortality after carotid endarterectomy in 53 patients. All the patients in the study received deep cervical block regional anaesthesia (Winne's technique) for carotid endarterectomy. Indications for surgery included transient ischaemic haemodynamically significant stenosis. Shunt was used in 7 cases (13.2%). General anaesthesia was supplemented in 2 patients (3.8%). There was no perioperative mortality. Permanent non-fatal neurologic deficit occurred in 1 patient (1.9%) and temporary neurologic Deficit occurred in 1 patient (1.9%). The mean ICU stay was 1.85 (+/-0.82) days and the hospital stay was 5.2 (+/-1.14) days. On the basis of our data we believe that under regional anaesthesia carotid endarterectomy can be performed with acceptable complications and that regional anaesthetic technique is safe and well tolerated by the patients. PMID:17851155

  2. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries is not inhibited by antagonists of H2 S-synthesizing pathways.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Shaifta, Yasin; Ward, Jeremy P T; Aaronson, Philip I

    2015-01-15

    An increase in the H2 S (hydrogen sulphide, hereafter sulphide) concentration in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) has been proposed to mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). We evaluated this hypothesis in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs) by examining the effects of the sulphide precursor cysteine and sulphide-synthesis blockers on HPV and also on normoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (NPV) stimulated by prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α ) and by the drug LY83583, which causes contraction in IPAs by increasing cellular reactive oxygen species levels. Experiments with several blockers of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the enzyme responsible for sulphide synthesis in the vasculature, demonstrated that propargylglycine (PAG, 1 mm) had little or no effect on the NPV caused by PGF2α or LY83583. Conversely, other CSE antagonists tested, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 100 μm), β-cyanoalanine (BCA, 500 μm) and hydroxylamine (HA, 100 μm), altered the NPV to PGF2α (BCA increased, HA inhibited) and/or LY83583 (BCA increased, AOAA and HA inhibited). Preincubating IPAs in physiological saline solution (PSS) containing 1 mm cysteine increased the amplitude of the NPV to PGF2(α) by ∼50%, and had a similar effect on HPV elicited by hypoxic challenge with 0% O2 . The enhancement of both responses by cysteine was abolished by pretreatment with 1 mm PAG. Measurements carried out with an amperometric electrode demonstrated that incubation with 1 mm cysteine under anoxic conditions (to minimize sulphide oxidation) greatly potentiated the release of sulphide from pieces of rat liver and that this release was strongly antagonized by PAG, indicating that at this concentration PAG could enter cells intact and antagonize CSE. PAG at 1 mm had no effect on HPV recorded in control PSS, or in PSS supplemented with physiological concentrations of cysteine (10 μm), cystine (50 μm) and glutamate (100 μm) in order to prevent the possible depletion of intracellular

  3. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries is not inhibited by antagonists of H2S-synthesizing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Shaifta, Yasin; Ward, Jeremy P T; Aaronson, Philip I

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the H2S (hydrogen sulphide, hereafter sulphide) concentration in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) has been proposed to mediate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). We evaluated this hypothesis in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs) by examining the effects of the sulphide precursor cysteine and sulphide-synthesis blockers on HPV and also on normoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (NPV) stimulated by prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and by the drug LY83583, which causes contraction in IPAs by increasing cellular reactive oxygen species levels. Experiments with several blockers of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), the enzyme responsible for sulphide synthesis in the vasculature, demonstrated that propargylglycine (PAG, 1 mm) had little or no effect on the NPV caused by PGF2α or LY83583. Conversely, other CSE antagonists tested, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 100 μm), β-cyanoalanine (BCA, 500 μm) and hydroxylamine (HA, 100 μm), altered the NPV to PGF2α (BCA increased, HA inhibited) and/or LY83583 (BCA increased, AOAA and HA inhibited). Preincubating IPAs in physiological saline solution (PSS) containing 1 mm cysteine increased the amplitude of the NPV to PGF2α by ∼50%, and had a similar effect on HPV elicited by hypoxic challenge with 0% O2. The enhancement of both responses by cysteine was abolished by pretreatment with 1 mm PAG. Measurements carried out with an amperometric electrode demonstrated that incubation with 1 mm cysteine under anoxic conditions (to minimize sulphide oxidation) greatly potentiated the release of sulphide from pieces of rat liver and that this release was strongly antagonized by PAG, indicating that at this concentration PAG could enter cells intact and antagonize CSE. PAG at 1 mm had no effect on HPV recorded in control PSS, or in PSS supplemented with physiological concentrations of cysteine (10 μm), cystine (50 μm) and glutamate (100 μm) in order to prevent the possible depletion of

  4. Vasoconstrictive responses of the testicular and caudal arteries in bulls exposed to ergot alkaloids from tall fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Color Doppler ultasonography was used to evaluate vasoconstrictive responses of the testicular artery in yearling bulls to ergot alkaloids. Ergot alkaloid-induced constriction of the testicular artery could disrupt thermoregulation of the testes and reduce bull fertility. Luminal areas of the test...

  5. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. PMID:24103665

  6. Effects of task difficulty and invested mental effort on peripheral vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Iani, Cristina; Gopher, Daniel; Lavie, Peretz

    2004-09-01

    We ran two experiments to investigate whether peripheral arterial tone reflects changes in mental effort. Finger pulse wave amplitude, interpulse interval, and pulse variability in the mid- and high-frequency bands were recorded by means of a newly developed finger plethysmograph during both rest and cognitive performance. Using a modified version of the Sternberg memory task, we selectively manipulated either the difficulty of the task (Experiment 1) or the subjects' level of engagement in the task (Experiment 2). We found a significant difference in finger pulse wave amplitude between rest and task periods, suggesting that the measure reflects changes in sympathetic activity due to task engagement. In addition, our results suggest that reduced pulse wave amplitude, signaling vasoconstriction, occurs when subjects are investing effort. PMID:15318885

  7. Changes in capillary filling do not influence inspiratory-induced vasoconstrictive episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Robert; Ochsmann, Elke; Kessler, Manfred; Mueck-Weymann, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Deep inspiration leads to sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction at the fingertip. This so-called inspiratory gasp response (IGR) is usually assessed by laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF) and provides interesting information on the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. In this study we investigated if simple maneuvers which affect microcirculation have an effect on the IGR. For this we detected IGR with LDF in rest, after elevation of the arm to lower capillary filling, after venous congestion to increase capillary filling, and after heating up in warm water to induce vasodilation. Capillary filling was monitored with the Erlangen Microlightguide Spectrophotometer (EMPHO) by determination of the relative hemoglobin concentration. We found that IGR was not affected by microcirculatory starting conditions. Therefore, we conclude that diagnostic results of the IGR are not influenced by different capillary filling levels.

  8. Vasoconstriction by Electrical Stimulation: New Approach to Control of Non-Compressible Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Yossi; Manivanh, Richard; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Phil; Wang, Jenny; Brinton, Mark; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Non-compressible hemorrhage is the most common preventable cause of death on battlefield and in civilian traumatic injuries. We report the use of microsecond pulses of electric current to induce rapid constriction in femoral and mesenteric arteries and veins in rats. Electrically-induced vasoconstriction could be induced in seconds while blood vessels dilated back to their original size within minutes after stimulation. At higher settings, a blood clotting formed, leading to complete and permanent occlusion of the vessels. The latter regime dramatically decreased the bleeding rate in the injured femoral and mesenteric arteries, with a complete hemorrhage arrest achieved within seconds. The average blood loss from the treated femoral artery during the first minute after injury was about 7 times less than that of a non-treated control. This new treatment modality offers a promising approach to non-damaging control of bleeding during surgery, and to efficient hemorrhage arrest in trauma patients. PMID:23828130

  9. Protein kinases in vascular smooth muscle tone--role in the pulmonary vasculature and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeremy P T; Knock, Greg A; Snetkov, Vladimir A; Aaronson, Philip I

    2004-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive mechanism that in the normal animal diverts blood away from poorly ventilated areas of the lung, thereby maintaining optimal ventilation-perfusion matching. In global hypoxia however, such as in respiratory disease or at altitude, it causes detrimental increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery (PA) pressure. The precise intracellular pathways and mechanisms underlying HPV remain unclear, although it is now recognised that both an elevation in smooth muscle intracellular [Ca2+] and a concomitant increase in Ca2+ sensitivity are involved. Several key intracellular protein kinases have been proposed as components of the signal transduction pathways leading to development of HPV, specifically Rho kinase, non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTK), p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC). All of these have been implicated to a greater or lesser extent in pathways leading to Ca2+ sensitisation, and in some cases regulation of intracellular [Ca2+] as well. In this article, we review the role of these key protein kinases in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) constriction, applying what is known in the systemic circulation to the pulmonary circulation and HPV. We conclude that the strongest evidence for direct involvement of protein kinases in the mechanisms of HPV concerns a central role for Rho kinase in Ca2+ sensitisation, and a potential role for Src-family kinases in both modulation of Ca2+ entry via capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) and activation of Rho kinase, though others are likely to have indirect or modulatory influences. In addition, we speculate that Src family kinases may provide a central interface between the proposed hypoxia-induced generation of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and both the elevation in intracellular [Ca2+] and Rho kinase mediated Ca2+ sensitisation. PMID:15556675

  10. Periodic, profound peripheral vasoconstriction--a new marker of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Schnall, R P; Shlitner, A; Sheffy, J; Kedar, R; Lavie, P

    1999-11-01

    We report a novel approach to the determination of sleep apnea based on measuring the peripheral circulatory responses in a primary condition of disordered breathing. The apparatus is a finger plethysmograph coupled to a constant volume, variable pressure, pneumatic system. The plethysmograph's tip (measurement site) is composed of two parallel opposing longitudinal half thimbles, which is attached to a contiguous annular cuff. Each compartment consists of an internal membrane surrounded by an outer rigid wall. These provide a uniform pressure field and impart a two-point locking action preventing axial and longitudinal motion of the finger. Subdiastolic pressure is applied to prevent venous pooling, engorgement, and stasis, to inhibit retrograde venous shock wave propagation and partially unload arterial wall tension. The annular cuff extends the effective boundary of the pressure field beyond the measuring site. In 42 patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) profound, transient vasoconstriction and tachycardia usually of a periodic nature, were clearly seen with each apneic event, possibly related to transient arousal. Good agreement was found between standard total apnea-hypopnea scoring, 129.5+/-22.4 (Mean +/- SEM), and transient vasoconstriction and tachycardia events, 121.2+/-19.4 (R = .92, p<.0001). We conclude that the finger tip exemplifies the scope of peripheral vascular responsiveness due to its high density of alpha sympathetic innervation, and its high degree of blood flow rate lability. Given that elevated peripheral resistance and tightly linked transient heart rate elevation is a consistent part of the hemodynamic response to arousal and OSAS, we believe that pulsatile finger blood flow patterns can be clearly diagnostic of OSAS and other sleep-disordered breathing conditions. PMID:10566912

  11. The clinical and radiological spectrum of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. A prospective series of 67 patients.

    PubMed

    Ducros, Anne; Boukobza, Monique; Porcher, Raphaël; Sarov, Mariana; Valade, Dominique; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    2007-12-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by the association of severe headaches with or without additional neurological symptoms and a 'string and beads' appearance on cerebral arteries, which resolves spontaneously in 1-3 months. We present the clinical, neuroimaging and outcome data of 67 consecutive patients prospectively diagnosed over 3 years in our institution with an angiographically confirmed RCVS. There were 43 females and 24 males with a mean age of 42 years (19-70). RCVS was spontaneous in 37% of patients and secondary in the 63% others, to postpartum in 5 and to exposure to various vasoactive substances in 37, mainly cannabis, selective serotonin-recapture inhibitors and nasal decongestants. The main pattern of presentation (94% of patients) was multiple thunderclap headaches recurring over a mean period of 1 week. In 51 patients (76%), headaches resumed the clinical presentation. Various complications were observed, with different time courses. Cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) (22%), intracerebral haemorrhage (6%), seizures (3%) and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (9%) were early complications, occurring mainly within the first week. Ischaemic events, including TIAs (16%) and cerebral infarction (4%), occurred significantly later than haemorrhagic events, mainly during the second week. Significant sex differences were observed: women were older, had more frequent single-drug exposure and a higher rate of stroke and cSAH. Sixty-one patients were treated by nimodipine: 36% had recurrent headaches, 7% TIAs and one multiple infarcts. The different time courses of thunderclap headaches, vasoconstriction and strokes suggest that the responsible vasospastic disorder starts distally and progresses towards medium sized and large arteries. No relapse was observed during the 16 +/- 12.4 months of follow-up. Our data suggest that RCVS is more frequent than previously thought, is more often secondary particularly to

  12. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  13. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G.; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F.; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  14. Beyond optimality: Multistakeholder robustness tradeoffs for regional water portfolio planning under deep uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jonathan D.; Zeff, Harrison B.; Reed, Patrick M.; Characklis, Gregory W.

    2014-10-01

    While optimality is a foundational mathematical concept in water resources planning and management, "optimal" solutions may be vulnerable to failure if deeply uncertain future conditions deviate from those assumed during optimization. These vulnerabilities may produce severely asymmetric impacts across a region, making it vital to evaluate the robustness of management strategies as well as their impacts for regional stakeholders. In this study, we contribute a multistakeholder many-objective robust decision making (MORDM) framework that blends many-objective search and uncertainty analysis tools to discover key tradeoffs between water supply alternatives and their robustness to deep uncertainties (e.g., population pressures, climate change, and financial risks). The proposed framework is demonstrated for four interconnected water utilities representing major stakeholders in the "Research Triangle" region of North Carolina, U.S. The utilities supply well over one million customers and have the ability to collectively manage drought via transfer agreements and shared infrastructure. We show that water portfolios for this region that compose optimal tradeoffs (i.e., Pareto-approximate solutions) under expected future conditions may suffer significantly degraded performance with only modest changes in deeply uncertain hydrologic and economic factors. We then use the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) to identify which uncertain factors drive the individual and collective vulnerabilities for the four cooperating utilities. Our framework identifies key stakeholder dependencies and robustness tradeoffs associated with cooperative regional planning, which are critical to understanding the tensions between individual versus regional water supply goals. Cooperative demand management was found to be the key factor controlling the robustness of regional water supply planning, dominating other hydroclimatic and economic uncertainties through the 2025 planning horizon. Results

  15. Region-Based Association Test for Familial Data under Functional Linear Models.

    PubMed

    Svishcheva, Gulnara R; Belonogova, Nadezhda M; Axenovich, Tatiana I

    2015-01-01

    Region-based association analysis is a more powerful tool for gene mapping than testing of individual genetic variants, particularly for rare genetic variants. The most powerful methods for regional mapping are based on the functional data analysis approach, which assumes that the regional genome of an individual may be considered as a continuous stochastic function that contains information about both linkage and linkage disequilibrium. Here, we extend this powerful approach, earlier applied only to independent samples, to the samples of related individuals. To this end, we additionally include a random polygene effects in functional linear model used for testing association between quantitative traits and multiple genetic variants in the region. We compare the statistical power of different methods using Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 mini-exome family data and a wide range of simulation scenarios. Our method increases the power of regional association analysis of quantitative traits compared with burden-based and kernel-based methods for the majority of the scenarios. In addition, we estimate the statistical power of our method using regions with small number of genetic variants, and show that our method retains its advantage over burden-based and kernel-based methods in this case as well. The new method is implemented as the R-function 'famFLM' using two types of basis functions: the B-spline and Fourier bases. We compare the properties of the new method using models that differ from each other in the type of their function basis. The models based on the Fourier basis functions have an advantage in terms of speed and power over the models that use the B-spline basis functions and those that combine B-spline and Fourier basis functions. The 'famFLM' function is distributed under GPLv3 license and is freely available at http://mga.bionet.nsc.ru/soft/famFLM/. PMID:26111046

  16. Statistical modelling of grapevine yield in the Port Wine region under present and future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, João A.; Malheiro, Aureliano C.; Karremann, Melanie K.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2011-03-01

    The impact of projected climate change on wine production was analysed for the Demarcated Region of Douro, Portugal. A statistical grapevine yield model (GYM) was developed using climate parameters as predictors. Statistically significant correlations were identified between annual yield and monthly mean temperatures and monthly precipitation totals during the growing cycle. These atmospheric factors control grapevine yield in the region, with the GYM explaining 50.4% of the total variance in the yield time series in recent decades. Anomalously high March rainfall (during budburst, shoot and inflorescence development) favours yield, as well as anomalously high temperatures and low precipitation amounts in May and June (May: flowering and June: berry development). The GYM was applied to a regional climate model output, which was shown to realistically reproduce the GYM predictors. Finally, using ensemble simulations under the A1B emission scenario, projections for GYM-derived yield in the Douro Region, and for the whole of the twenty-first century, were analysed. A slight upward trend in yield is projected to occur until about 2050, followed by a steep and continuous increase until the end of the twenty-first century, when yield is projected to be about 800 kg/ha above current values. While this estimate is based on meteorological parameters alone, changes due to elevated CO2 may further enhance this effect. In spite of the associated uncertainties, it can be stated that projected climate change may significantly benefit wine yield in the Douro Valley.

  17. Early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction under regional analgesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasser, Bassam; Palacios, Jean Luc; Lapasset, Lionel; Hattée, Bernard; Leroy, Frédéric

    2004-02-01

    Patients undergoing major knee surgery may experience postoperative pain, which could be exacerbated by early postoperative continuous passive motion or active mobilization. This pain may result in poor functional recovery. Use of regional analgesia techniques to achieve more consistent pain relief and to facilitate rapid rehabilitation can play an important role in optimizing postoperative outcome after anterior cruciate ligament repair (ACLR). This case study concerns a 20-year-old male soldier, otherwise healthy, who underwent ACLR. We inserted a catheter in the fascia iliaca compartment and performed postoperative analgesia with low-concentration ropivacaine by using an elastomeric pump. The patient started early rehabilitation under fascia iliaca compartment analgesia. We discuss the case and the influence of regional analgesia techniques on postoperative and clinical outcomes. PMID:14966725

  18. Regional crop productivity and greenhouse gas emissions from Swiss soils under organic farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juhwan; Necpalova, Magdalena; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    There is worldwide concern about the increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG) and their impact on climate change and food security. As a sustainable alternative, organic cropping in various forms has been promoted to minimize the environmental impacts of conventional practices. However, relatively little is known about the potential to reduce GHG emissions while maintaining crop productivity through the large-scale adoption of organic practices. Therefore, we simulated and compared regional crop production, soil organic carbon status, and net soil GHG emissions under organic and conventional practices. Grid-level (2.2 km by 2.2 km) simulation was performed using previously validated DailyDayCent by considering typical crop rotations. Regional model estimates are presented and discussed specifically with the focus on Swiss organic and conventional cropping systems, which differ by type and intensity of manuring, tillage, and cover crop.

  19. Application of colour magnification technique for revealing skin microcirculation changes under regional anaesthetic input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubins, Uldis; Spigulis, Janis; Miscuks, Aleksejs

    2013-11-01

    In this work the colour magnification technique was applied for monitoring of palm skin microcirculation changes under peripheral (Plexus Brachialis with axiliary access) Regional Anaesthesia (RA). During the RA procedure 20 minute video of patient's forearm was taken at steady light conditions. Video content was processed offline by custom developed Matlab software with build-in colour magnification algorithm that performs temporal filtering of video sequence near-heartbeat frequency, spatial decomposition of video and amplification of pulsatile signal in every pixel of skin image. Using this method, we are able to visualize the subcutaneous microcirculation changes in high spatial resolution. The results showed different blood pulse amplitude dynamics over the skin regions of palm and forearm during the RA. The colour magnification technique could be used for real-time monitoring of RA effect.

  20. [Stunting and emaciation in children under 5 in distinct regions and strata in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Dommarco, J; González-Cossío, T; Flores, M; Hernández-Avila, M; Lezana, M A; Sepúlveda-Amor, J

    1995-01-01

    Data from a National Nutrition Survey conducted in 1988 in a probability sample of 13,236 households and 17,426 children under five, representative at the national level and for four regions (North, Center, South, and Mexico City), were analyzed. Risks for wasting and stunting and odds ratios were obtained by region, by district according to proportion of indigenous population and by level of urbanization, by level of education of both parents, by gender, and by various combinations of the former strata. A high risk of stunting and a low risk of wasting were found. The risk of stunting is greater in predominantly indigenous and rural districts, in the South and Center, and in families of mothers with low education and poor housing conditions. The results can be used for food and nutrition policy planning and for targeting nutrition intervention programs. PMID:7618120

  1. The Future of Food: Regional Adaptation Strategies for Optimizing Grain Yields Under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, K. A.; Chhetri, N.; Girvetz, E. H.; McCarthy, H. R.; Twine, T. E.; Ummenhofer, C. C.

    2010-12-01

    Current projections of crop yields under climate change generally neglect to account for the potential for farmer adaptation to counteract environmental drivers of yield decreases, but such adaptation will be increasingly important for food security. We used a process-based crop model (Agro-IBIS) and a suite of climate projections based on multiple IPCC AR4 models under three greenhouse gas emission scenarios to project climate change impacts to yield of maize in Free State, South Africa, and Iowa, USA, and of wheat in Victoria, Australia, and Punjab, India. We found, for example in Iowa, that projected substantial increases in temperatures and slight decreases in precipitation result in a compressed growing period, with peak productivity occurring in mid-May rather than mid-July and yield decreasing by up to 40% below current levels by the end of the century. We then used this information to identify regionally-specific adaptation strategies by examining climate-limiting factors on the timing of harvest and quantity of yields in each location, and the current growing practices and resource availability. These adaptation strategies were developed with the intention of replicating current yields at current timing (for example, by selecting longer-ripening cultivars) and also to optimize yields under the new climate regime (for example, by double-cropping a maize/soy rotation in the same growing season). All in all, this research shows that promising adaptation options exist in each region, and highlight the need for sophisticated and regionally-sensitive adaptation strategies to sustain and increase food production in the 21st century.

  2. Critical regions of heat transfer during the nucleate boiling of oxygen under conditions of reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, Iu. A.; Gladchenko, G. M.; Rusanov, K. V.

    1984-11-01

    Heat transfer during the nucleate boiling of liquid oxygen under conditions of simulated microgravity is investigated experimentally over a wide range of pressures (600-70,000 Pa) and relative accelerations (0.01-1). The objective of the study is to verify some of the existing models for the critical region of heat transfer. Formulas are obtained yielding different acceleration dependences of the critical density of the heat flux for high and low pressures, which is consistent with experimental data on oxygen boiling.

  3. A sharp Moho step under the Central and Eastern Betics, Western Mediterranean region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lis Mancilla, Flor; Heit, Benjamin; Morales, Jose; Heit, Xiaohui; Molina-Aguilera, Antonio; Stich, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We map the lithospheric structure under the central and eastern Betics (western Mediterranean region) interpreting P-receiver functions obtained from two dense seismic profiles (HIRE and Transcorbe profiles of ~120 km and 160 km of length, respectively). The goal is to study the lithospheric structure and its variations between the different geological domains, from the Alboran domain in the south (metamorphic rocks), the External zones (sedimentary rocks) and the Variscan terrains of the Iberian Massif in the north. One of the profiles (HIRE), North-South oriented, crosses the Sierra Nevada Mountains, one of the prominent features in the Western Mediterranean tectonic region with the highest topography of the Iberia peninsula (~3400 m). The spacing between stations, around 2km, allows mapping with high accuracy of the variations of the crustal structure. We observe a sharp Moho step of ~15 km under the Internal zones of the Alboran domain coinciding the thinner crust with the highest topography along the profile. This agrees with the prior hypothesis about the lack of crustal root underneath Sierra Nevada Mountains and opens a question about the source of the dynamic compensation of its topography. Previous studies showed that the Iberian crust understrust the Alboran domain under its contact with the External zones observing the presence of slab-type feature of Iberian lithosphere at the western Betics while tearing and delamination of this Iberian slab is proposed at eastern Betics. We observe that the Iberian crust undertrust the Alboran domain and terminate sharply under the contact between the Alpujarride and the Nevado-Filabre complexes (Alboran domain).

  4. Dahl SS rats demonstrate enhanced aortic perivascular adipose tissue-mediated buffering of vasoconstriction through activation of NOS in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Ho, Dao H; Pollock, Jennifer S

    2016-02-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) mediates buffering of vasoconstriction through activation of endothelium-derived factors. We hypothesized that the PVAT of Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl SS) rats has reduced ability to buffer vasoconstriction. Vascular reactivity experiments were performed on aortic rings with PVAT intact (+PVAT) or removed (-PVAT), and endothelium intact (+ENDO) or removed (-ENDO) from Dahl SS rats and control SS.13(BN) rats (Dahl SS rats that have had chromosome 13 completely replaced with that of the Brown Norway rat, rendering this strain insensitive to high-salt or high-fat diet-induced hypertension). Endothelial dysfunction, assessed by ACh-mediated vasorelaxation, was confirmed in aortic rings of Dahl SS rats. The +PVAT+ENDO aortic rings had indistinguishable phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction between genotypes. In both strains, removal of PVAT significantly enhanced vasoconstriction. Dahl SS rat -PVAT+ENDO aortic rings displayed exaggerated vasoconstriction to phenylephrine vs. SS.13(BN) rats, indicating that PVAT-mediated buffering of vasoconstriction was greater in Dahl SS rats. Removal of both the ENDO and PVAT restored vasoconstriction in both strains. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), produced a similar effect as that seen with -ENDO. These data indicate that the function of the PVAT to activate endothelium-derived NOS is enhanced in Dahl SS compared with SS.13(BN) rats and, most likely, occurs through a pathway that is distinct from ACh-mediated activation of NOS. PVAT weight and total PVAT leptin levels were greater in Dahl SS rats. Leptin induced a significantly decreased vasoconstriction in -PVAT+ENDO aortic rings from Dahl SS rats, but not SS.13(BN) rats. In contrast to our initial hypothesis, PVAT in Dahl SS rats buffers vasoconstriction by activating endothelial NOS via mechanisms that may include the involvement of leptin. Thus, the PVAT serves a vasoprotective role in

  5. Regional modelling of nitrate leaching from Swiss organic and conventional cropping systems under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calitri, Francesca; Necpalova, Magdalena; Lee, Juhwan; Zaccone, Claudio; Spiess, Ernst; Herrera, Juan; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Organic cropping systems have been promoted as a sustainable alternative to minimize the environmental impacts of conventional practices. Relatively little is known about the potential to reduce NO3-N leaching through the large-scale adoption of organic practices. Moreover, the potential to mitigate NO3-N leaching and thus the N pollution under future climate change through organic farming remain unknown and highly uncertain. Here, we compared regional NO3-N leaching from organic and conventional cropping systems in Switzerland using a terrestrial biogeochemical process-based model DayCent. The objectives of this study are 1) to calibrate and evaluate the model for NO3-N leaching measured under various management practices from three experiments at two sites in Switzerland; 2) to estimate regional NO3-N leaching patterns and their spatial uncertainty in conventional and organic cropping systems (with and without cover crops) for future climate change scenario A1B; 3) to explore the sensitivity of NO3-N leaching to changes in soil and climate variables; and 4) to assess the nitrogen use efficiency for conventional and organic cropping systems with and without cover crops under climate change. The data for model calibration/evaluation were derived from field experiments conducted in Liebefeld (canton Bern) and Eschikon (canton Zürich). These experiments evaluated effects of various cover crops and N fertilizer inputs on NO3-N leaching. The preliminary results suggest that the model was able to explain 50 to 83% of the inter-annual variability in the measured soil drainage (RMSE from 12.32 to 16.89 cm y-1). The annual NO3-N leaching was also simulated satisfactory (RMSE = 3.94 to 6.38 g N m-2 y-1), although the model had difficulty to reproduce the inter-annual variability in the NO3-N leaching losses correctly (R2 = 0.11 to 0.35). Future climate datasets (2010-2099) from the 10 regional climate models (RCM) were used in the simulations. Regional NO3-N leaching

  6. Global and regional temperature metrics under a two-basket approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Climate and environmental policies and assessments including the Life Cycle Assessments (LCA) commonly employ a single basket approach, in which emissions of non-CO2 components are aggregated into their CO2 equivalents through emission metrics. Such metrics entail various assumptions, which can give rise to a large difference in metric values particularly for near-term climate forcers (NTCFs) (e.g., Tanaka et al., 2013). The difficulties in equating emissions of CO2 and NTCFs led to a proposal of a two-basket approach, which allows emission conversions among species with comparable atmospheric lifetimes (e.g., Cherubini et al., 2014). Here we explore the feasibility of a two-basket approach in the context of LCA. We extract from a LCA database several representative energy-related emissions occurring at four different locations of the world and calculate their effects on the global and regional radiative forcing and temperature change. Such results are also used to derive emission metrics such as the Global Warming Potential (GWP), Global Temperature change Potential (GTP), and Regional Temperature change Potential (RTP) and we test the performance of the metrics under a two-basket framework. Computations are performed by the Aggregated Carbon Cycle, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Climate model (ACC2) (Tanaka et al., 2013) combined with results shown in Collins et al. (2013). References Cherubini, F., T. Gasser, R. M. Bright, P. Ciais and A, H. Stromman. (2014) Linearity between temperature peak and bioenergy CO2 emission rates. Nature Climate Change, 4, 983-987. Collins, W. J., M. M. Fry, H. Yu, J. S. Fuglestvedt, D. T. Shindell and J. J. West. (2013) Global and regional temperature-change potentials for near-term climate forcers. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, 2471-2485. Tanaka, K., D. J. A. Johansson, B. C. O'Neill, and J. S. Fuglestvedt (2013) Emission metrics under the 2°C climate stabilization target. Climatic Change, 117, 933-941.

  7. Assessment of production risks for winter wheat in different German regions under climate change conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersebaum, K. C.; Gandorfer, M.; Wegehenkel, M.

    2012-04-01

    The study shows climate change impacts on wheat production in selected regions across Germany. To estimate yield and economic effects the agro-ecosystem model HERMES was used. The model performed runs using 2 different releases of the model WETTREG providing statistically downscaled climate change scenarios for the weather station network of the German Weather Service. Simulations were done using intersected GIS information on soil types and land use identifying the most relevant sites for wheat production. The production risks for wheat yields at the middle of this century were compared to a reference of the present climate. The irrigation demand was determined by the model using an automatic irrigation mode. Production risks with and without irrigation were assessed and the economic feasibility to reduce production risks by irrigation was evaluated. Costs and benefits were compared. Additionally, environmental effects, e.g. groundwater recharge and nitrogen emissions were assessed for irrigated and rain fed systems. Results show that positive and negative effects of climate change occur within most regions depending on the site conditions. Water holding capacity and groundwater distance were the most important factors which determined the vulnerability of sites. Under climate change condition in the middle of the next century we can expect especially at sites with low water holding capacity decreasing average gross margins, higher production risks and a reduced nitrogen use efficiency under rainfed conditions. Irrigation seems to be profitable and risk reducing at those sites, provided that water for irrigation is available. Additionally, the use of irrigation can also increase nitrogen use efficiency which reduced emissions by leaching. Despite the site conditions results depend strongly on the used regional climate scenario and the model approach to consider the effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere.

  8. Cyclones and extreme windstorm events over Europe under climate change: Global and regional climate model diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckebusch, G. C.; Ulbrich, U.

    2003-04-01

    More than any changes of the climate system mean state conditions, the development of extreme events may influence social, economic and legal aspects of our society. This linkage results from the impact of extreme climate events (natural hazards) on environmental systems which again are directly linked to human activities. Prominent examples from the recent past are the record breaking rainfall amounts of August 2002 in central Europe which produced widespread floodings or the wind storm Lothar of December 1999. Within the MICE (Modelling the Impact of Climate Extremes) project framework an assessment of the impact of changes in extremes will be done. The investigation is carried out for several different impact categories as agriculture, energy use and property damage. Focus is laid on the diagnostics of GCM and RCM simulations under different climate change scenarios. In this study we concentrate on extreme windstorms and their relationship to cyclone activity in the global HADCM3 as well as in the regional HADRM3 model under two climate change scenarios (SRESA2a, B2a). In order to identify cyclones we used an objective algorithm from Murry and Simmonds which was widely tested under several different conditions. A slight increase in the occurrence of systems is identified above northern parts of central Europe for both scenarios. For more severe systems (core pressure < 990 hPa) we find an increase for western Europe. Strong wind events can be defined via different percentile values of the windspeed (e.g. above the 95 percentile). By this means the relationship between strong wind events and cyclones is also investigated. For several regions (e.g. Germany, France, Spain) a shift to more deep cyclones connected with an increasing number of strong wind events is found.

  9. Hindlimb unweighting does not alter vasoconstrictor responsiveness and nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Just, Timothy P; Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis that physical inactivity would increase sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and diminish NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 33) were randomly assigned to sedentary time control (S) or hindlimb unweighted (HU) groups for 21 days. Following the intervention, rats were anaesthetized and instrumented for measurement of arterial blood pressure and femoral artery blood flow and stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain. The percentage change of femoral vascular conductance (%FVC) in response to sympathetic chain stimulation delivered at 2 and 5 Hz was determined at rest and during triceps surae muscle contraction before (control) and after NO synthase blockade with l-NAME (5 mg kg i.v.). Sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was not different (P > 0.05) in S and HU rats at rest (S, 2 Hz, −26 ± 8% and 5 Hz, −46 ± 12%; and HU, 2 Hz, −29 ± 9% and 5 Hz, −51 ± 10%) and during contraction (S, 2 Hz, −10 ± 7% and 5 Hz, −23 ± 11%; and HU, 2 Hz, −9 ± 5% and 5 Hz, −22 ± 7%). Nitric oxide synthase blockade caused a similar increase (P > 0.05) in sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in HU and S rats at rest (S, 2 Hz, −41 ± 7% and 5 Hz, −58 ± 8%; and HU, 2 Hz, −43 ± 6% and 5 Hz, −63 ± 8%) and during muscle contraction (S, 2 Hz, −15 ± 6% and 5 Hz, −31 ± 11%; and HU, 2 Hz, −12 ± 5% and 5 Hz, −29 ± 8%). Skeletal muscle NO synthase expression and ACh-mediated vasodilatation were also not different between HU and S rats. These data suggest that HU does not alter sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Key points Physical inactivity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and may alter sympathetic nervous system control of vascular

  10. A sharp Moho step under Central and Eastern Betics, Western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lis Mancilla, Flor; Aguilera-Molina, Antonio; Heit, Benjamin; Morales, Jose; Yuan, Xiaohui; Stich, Daniel; Martin, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    Previous geophysical studies in the northern limit of the western Mediterranean region have showed that the Iberian crust understrusts the Alboran domain under its contact with the External zones. They observe the presence of slab-type feature of Iberian lithosphere at the western Betics and interpret tearing and delamination of this Iberian slab at central and eastern Betics. To map the variations of the lithospheric structure between the different geological domains under central and eastern Betics, we deploy two dense seismic profiles (~120 and ~160 km length). The spacing between stations, around 2-3 km, allows mapping with high accuracy variations of the crustal structure. By interpreting P-receiver functions, we observe sharp Moho steps of ~15-17 km underneath the Internal zones (Alboran domain) at both profiles. The images suggest that the Iberian crust undertrusts the more deformed Alboran crust and terminates sharply under the contact between the Alpujarride and the Nevado-Filabre complexes (Alboran domain). The thickness of the Iberian crust near the edge, ~17 km, and its position along the contact suggest that the breaking of the Iberian slab occurs in the transitional crust of the Iberian Paleomargin.

  11. Assessing Regional Scale Variability in Extreme Value Statistics Under Altered Climate Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, Nathaniel; Mechem, David; Ma, Chunsheng

    2015-02-20

    validity of an innovative multi–resolution information theory approach, and the ability of the RCM modeling framework to represent the low-frequency modulation of extreme climate events. Once the skill of the modeling and analysis methodology has been established, we will apply the same approach for the AR5 (IPCC Fifth Assessment Report) climate change scenarios in order to assess how climate extremes and the the influence of lowfrequency variability on climate extremes might vary under changing climate. The research specifically addresses the DOE focus area 2. Simulation of climate extremes under a changing climate. Specific results will include (1) a better understanding of the spatial and temporal structure of extreme events, (2) a thorough quantification of how extreme values are impacted by low-frequency climate teleconnections, (3) increased knowledge of current regional climate models ability to ascertain these influences, and (4) a detailed examination of the how the distribution of extreme events are likely to change under different climate change scenarios. In addition, this research will assess the ability of the innovative wavelet information theory approach to characterize extreme events. Any and all of these results will greatly enhance society’s ability to understand and mitigate the regional ramifications of future global climate change.

  12. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Vuksanović, V.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Stefanovska, A.

    2011-06-01

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (≈10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change, are

  13. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, L W; Vuksanović, V; McClintock, P V E; Stefanovska, A

    2011-06-21

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (approximately 10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change

  14. Winter climate changes over East Asian region under RCP scenarios using East Asian winter monsoon indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ja-Young; Ahn, Joong-Bae; Jhun, Jong-Ghap

    2016-03-01

    The changes in the winter climatology and variability of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) for the late 21st century (2070-2099) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios are projected in terms of EAWM indices (EAWMIs). Firstly, the capability of the climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) in simulating the boreal winter climatology and the interannual variability of the EAWM for the late 20th century (1971-2000) is examined. Nine of twenty-three climate models are selected based on the pattern correlations with observation and a multi-model ensemble is applied to the nine model data. Three of twelve EAWMIs that show the most significant temporal correlations between the observation and CMIP5 surface air temperatures are utilized. The ensemble CMIP5 is capable of reproducing the overall features of the EAWM in spite of some biases in the region. The negative correlations between the EAWMIs and boreal winter temperature are well reproduced and 3-5 years of the major interannual variation observed in this region are also well simulated according to power spectral analyses of the simulated indices. The fields regressed onto the indices that resemble the composite strong winter monsoon pattern are simulated more or less weakly in CMIP5 compared to the observation. However, the regressed fields of sea level pressure, surface air temperature, 500-hPa geopotential height, and 300-hPa zonal wind are well established with pattern correlations above 0.83 between CMIP5 and observation data. The differences between RCPs and Historical indicate strong warming, which increases with latitude, ranging from 1 to 5 °C under RCP4.5 and from 3 to 7 °C under RCP8.5 in the East Asian region. The anomalous southerly winds generally become stronger, implying weaker EAWMs in both scenarios. These features are also identified with fields regressed onto the indices in RCPs. The future projections reveal

  15. Coastal erosion impacts under climate change scenarios at the regional scale in the North Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critto, A.; Gallina, V.; Torresan, S.; Rizzi, J.; Zabeo, A.; Carniel, S.; Sclavo, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate change is likely to pose additional pressures on coastal ecosystems by accelerating sea level rise, storms, flooding and erosion. Specifically, coastal erosion is an issue of major concern for estuarine and deltaic coastal areas and ecosystems and it is expected to increase in size and magnitude due to climate change forcing. Accordingly, the use of climate change scenarios in the assessment of coastal erosion risks could improve the development of sustainable adaptation strategies. In order to analyze the potential consequences of climate change on coastal erosion processes and evaluate the related impacts on coastal receptors (i.e. beaches, river mouths, wetlands and protected areas), a Regional Risk Assessment (RRA) methodology was developed and applied to the North Adriatic coast (Italy). Climate induced hazards were analyzed by means of regional hydrodynamic models that provide information about the main coastal erosion stressors (i.e. increases in mean sea-level, changes in wave height and variations in the extent of sediments deposition at the sea bottom) under climate change scenarios (i.e. regional climate projections). Site-specific environmental and socio-economic indicators (e.g. vegetation cover, geomorphology, sediment budget, protection level, population density and wetland extension) and hazard metrics were aggregated in the RRA methodology in order to develop exposure, susceptibility, risk and damage maps that identify and prioritize hot-spot areas and vulnerable targets at the regional scale. Future seasonal exposure maps of coastal erosion at the regional scale depict a worse situation in winter and autumn for the future period 2070-2100 and highlight hot-spot exposure areas surrounding the Po River Delta. Moreover, risk maps highlighted that the receptors (i.e. exposure units) at higher risk to coastal erosion are beaches, wetlands and river mouths with relevant percentages of the territory characterized by higher risk scores

  16. Volume thermal expansivity for lower mantle region of earth under adiabatic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2013-06-01

    A reciprocal equation for the volume dependence of Anderson-Grüneisen parameter has been proposed. This equation has been found to fit the seismic data for the lower mantle region of the Earth. We have developed a new expression for predicting the values of density (volume) dependence of volume thermal expansivity under adiabatic conditions based on the reciprocal equation for the volume dependence of Anderson-Grüneisen parameter. It is found that our relationship fits well the seismic data on volume thermal expansivity for lower mantle corresponding to a wide range of pressures (0-135.75 GPa). These equations thus proposed are found to be consistent with the thermodynamic constraints.

  17. Jael syndrome: removal of a knife blade impacted in the maxillofacial region under local anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Dominguete, Paulo Roberto; Matos, Bruno Figueiredo; Meyer, Tufi Neder; Oliveira, Lucinei Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The presence of retained foreign bodies in the maxillofacial region as a consequence of penetrating injuries from knives is poorly documented in the scientific literature. This manuscript reports the case of a 30-year-old Caucasian with a knife blade lodged in the maxillofacial skeleton. Following clinical and radiographic exams, it was determined that the object had penetrated through the left nostril and nasal septum, in the direction of the right maxillary sinus, and remained impacted without causing injury to important anatomical structures. After systemic assessment and determination of the exact location of the knife blade, the object was removed in an outpatient setting under local anaesthesia. This manuscript aims to report a rare case of a transfacial penetrating injury involving a knife blade that was removed in an outpatient setting while also discussing the proper conduct and treatment options for similar cases in the context of a brief literature review. PMID:23580680

  18. Tetramethylpyrazine, a Chinese drug, blocks coronary vasoconstriction by endothelin-1 and decreases plasma endothelin-1 levels in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Zhu, W; Zhou, X; Jin, Z; Liu, H; Chen, X; Pan, J; Demura, H; Naruse, M; Shi, Y

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a Chinese plant-derived medicine, on coronary vasoconstriction and related electrocardiographic and histologic changes caused by endothelin-1 (ET-1), and on plasma ET-1 levels. ET-1 (75 pmol) was administered into the left coronary artery (LCA) in anesthetized closed-chest dogs with and without prior infusion of TMP (80 mg/kg). Coronary arterial diameter (CAD) was determined by coronary arteriography (CAG). Blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored continuously. Histologic damage in tissues was ascertained microscopically. Plasma ET-1 and 6-keto-PGF1 levels were determined by RIA 90 min after i.v. injection of TMP (25 mg/kg; n = 5) in rabbits. Intracoronary injection of ET-1 resulted in a significant vasoconstriction of the entire vascular bed of the LCA, with a decrease in CAD of 35.9 +/- 5.7% (n = 5; p < 0.01) and ischemic changes on ECG and in tissues of endocardium, myocardium, coronary endothelial cells, and capillary vessels. Pretreatment with TMP produced a significant increase in CAD by 38.5 +/- 7.8% (n = 5; p < 0.01) and greatly suppressed the vasoconstriction produced by ET-1. The myocardial tissue damage estimated from the ratio of ischemic area for the entire area after ET-1 injection (35.6%) was completely abolished by TMP (0.6%). In addition, TMP injection induced a significant decrease in plasma ET-1 levels and an increase in 6-keto-PGF1 levels in rabbits. The Chinese medicine TMP could be a useful therapeutic agent in ischemic heart disease by suppressing coronary vasoconstriction and ischemic changes in the tissues produced by ET-1. PMID:9595468

  19. Folic Acid Improves Acetylcholine-induced Vasoconstriction of Coronary Vessels Isolated from hyperhomocysteinemic mice: An Implication to Coronary Vasospasm*

    PubMed Central

    Qipshidze, Natia; Metreveli, Naira; Lominadze, David; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Human atherosclerotic coronary vessels elicited vasoconstriction to acetylcholine (Ach) and revealed a phenomenon of vasospasm. Homocysteine (Hcy) levels are elevated in the atherosclerotic plaque tissue, suggesting its pathological role in endothelial damage in atherosclerotic diseases. Accordingly, we examined the role hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) in coronary endothelial dysfunction, vessel wall thickness, lumen narrowing, leading to acute/chronic coronary vasospasm. The therapeutic potential and mechanisms of folic acid using hyperhomocysteinemic cystathionine beta synthase heterozygote (CBS-/+) and wild type (CBS+/+) mice were addressed. The CBS-/+ and CBS+/+ mice were treated with or without a Hcy lowering agent folic acid (FA) in drinking water (0.03 g/L) for 4 weeks. The isolated mouse septum coronary artery was cannulated and pressurized at 60 mmHg. The wall thickness and lumen diameters were measured by Ion-Optic. The vessels were treated with Ach (10-8-10-5 M) and, for comparison, with nonendothelial vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (10-5 M).The endothelium-impaired arteries from CBC-/+ mice constricted in response to Ach and this vasoconstriction was mitigated with FA supplementation. The level of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was lower in coronary artery in CBS-/+ than of CBS+/+ mice. Treatment with FA increased the levels of Ach-induced NO generation in the coronary artery of CBS-/+ mice. The results suggest that Ach induced coronary vasoconstriction in CBS-/+ mice and this vasoconstriction was ameliorated by folic acid treatment. The mechanisms for the impairment of vascular function and therapeutic effects of folic acid may be related to the regulation of eNOS expression, NO availability and tissue homocysteine. PMID:21792928

  20. Endothelial dysfunction enhances vasoconstriction due to scavenging of nitric oxide by a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Binglan; Shahid, Mohd; Egorina, Elena M.; Sovershaev, Mikhail A.; Raher, Michael J.; Lei, Chong; Wu, Mei X.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Zapol, Warren M.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no safe and effective hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (HBOC) to substitute for red blood cell transfusion. It is uncertain whether a deficiency of endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability (endothelial dysfunction) prevents or augments the HBOC-induced vasoconstriction. Methods Hemodynamic effects of infusion of PolyHeme (1.08 g hemoglobin/kg, Northfield Laboratories, Evanston, IL) or murine tetrameric hemoglobin (0.48 g hemoglobin/kg) were determined in awake healthy lambs, awake mice and anesthetized mice. In vitro, a cumulative dose-tension response was obtained by sequential addition of PolyHeme or tetrameric hemoglobin to phenylephrine-precontracted murine aortic rings. Results Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in awake lambs, but produced acute systemic and pulmonary vasoconstriction. Infusion of PolyHeme did not cause systemic hypertension in healthy wild-type mice, but induced severe systemic vasoconstriction in mice with endothelial dysfunction (either db/db mice or high-fat fed wild-type mice for 4–6 weeks). The db/db mice were more sensitive to systemic vasoconstriction than wild-type mice after the infusion of either tetrameric hemoglobin or PolyHeme. Murine aortic ring studies confirmed that db/db mice have an impaired response to an endothelial-dependent vasodilator and an enhanced vasoconstrictor response to a HBOC. Conclusions Reduction of low molecular weight hemoglobin concentrations to less than 1% is insufficient to abrogate the vasoconstrictor effects of HBOC infusion in healthy awake sheep or in mice with reduced vascular nitric oxide levels associated with endothelial dysfunction. These findings suggest that testing HBOCs in animals with endothelial dysfunction can provide a more sensitive indication of their potential vasoconstrictor effects. PMID:20179495

  1. Organochlorine pesticides in soils under different land usage in the Taihu Lake region, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Jiang, Xin; Bian, Yong-Rong; Yao, Fen-Xia; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yu, Gui-Fen; Munch, Jean Charles; Schroll, Reiner

    2007-01-01

    A field study was conducted in the Taihu Lake region, China in 2004 to reveal the organochlorine pesticide concentrations in soils after the ban of these substances in the year 1983. Thirteen organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were analyzed in soils from paddy field, tree land and fallow land. Total organochlorine pesticide residues were higher in agricultural soils than in uncultivated fallow land soils. Among all the pesticides, sigmaDDX (DDD, DDE and DDT) had the highest concentration for all the soil samples, ranging from 3.10 ng/g to 166.55 ng/g with a mean value of 57.04 ng/g and followed by sigmaHCH, ranging from 0.73 ng/g to 60.97 ng/g with a mean value of 24.06 ng/g. Dieldrin, endrin, HCB and alpha-endosulfan were also found in soils with less than 15 ng/g. Ratios of p,p'-(DDD+DDE)/DDT in soils under three land usages were: paddy field > tree land > fallow land, indicating that land usage influenced the degradation of DDT in soils. Ratios of p,p'-(DDD+DDE)/DDT > 1, showing aged residues of DDTs in soils of the Taihu Lake region. The results were discussed with data from a former study that showed very low actual concentrations of HCH and DDT in soils in the Taihu Lake region, but according to the chemical half-lives and their concentrations in soils in 1980s, the concentration of DDT in soils seemed to be underestimated. In any case our data show that the ban on the use of HCH and DDT resulted in a tremendous reduction of these pesticide residues in soils, but there are still high amounts of pesticide residues in soils, which need more remediation processes. PMID:17915688

  2. Demographically-Based Evaluation of Genomic Regions under Selection in Domestic Dogs.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Adam H; Schweizer, Rena M; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; Han, Eunjung; Davis, Brian W; Gronau, Ilan; Silva, Pedro M; Galaverni, Marco; Fan, Zhenxin; Marx, Peter; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Ramirez, Oscar; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Vilà, Carles; Squire, Kevin; Geffen, Eli; Kusak, Josip; Boyko, Adam R; Parker, Heidi G; Lee, Clarence; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Siepel, Adam; Bustamante, Carlos D; Harkins, Timothy T; Nelson, Stanley F; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Ostrander, Elaine A; Wayne, Robert K; Novembre, John

    2016-03-01

    Controlling for background demographic effects is important for accurately identifying loci that have recently undergone positive selection. To date, the effects of demography have not yet been explicitly considered when identifying loci under selection during dog domestication. To investigate positive selection on the dog lineage early in the domestication, we examined patterns of polymorphism in six canid genomes that were previously used to infer a demographic model of dog domestication. Using an inferred demographic model, we computed false discovery rates (FDR) and identified 349 outlier regions consistent with positive selection at a low FDR. The signals in the top 100 regions were frequently centered on candidate genes related to brain function and behavior, including LHFPL3, CADM2, GRIK3, SH3GL2, MBP, PDE7B, NTAN1, and GLRA1. These regions contained significant enrichments in behavioral ontology categories. The 3rd top hit, CCRN4L, plays a major role in lipid metabolism, that is supported by additional metabolism related candidates revealed in our scan, including SCP2D1 and PDXC1. Comparing our method to an empirical outlier approach that does not directly account for demography, we found only modest overlaps between the two methods, with 60% of empirical outliers having no overlap with our demography-based outlier detection approach. Demography-aware approaches have lower-rates of false discovery. Our top candidates for selection, in addition to expanding the set of neurobehavioral candidate genes, include genes related to lipid metabolism, suggesting a dietary target of selection that was important during the period when proto-dogs hunted and fed alongside hunter-gatherers. PMID:26943675

  3. Demographically-Based Evaluation of Genomic Regions under Selection in Domestic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Adam H.; Schweizer, Rena M.; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; Han, Eunjung; Davis, Brian W.; Gronau, Ilan; Silva, Pedro M.; Galaverni, Marco; Fan, Zhenxin; Marx, Peter; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Ramirez, Oscar; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Vilà, Carles; Squire, Kevin; Geffen, Eli; Kusak, Josip; Boyko, Adam R.; Parker, Heidi G.; Lee, Clarence; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Siepel, Adam; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Wayne, Robert K.; Novembre, John

    2016-01-01

    Controlling for background demographic effects is important for accurately identifying loci that have recently undergone positive selection. To date, the effects of demography have not yet been explicitly considered when identifying loci under selection during dog domestication. To investigate positive selection on the dog lineage early in the domestication, we examined patterns of polymorphism in six canid genomes that were previously used to infer a demographic model of dog domestication. Using an inferred demographic model, we computed false discovery rates (FDR) and identified 349 outlier regions consistent with positive selection at a low FDR. The signals in the top 100 regions were frequently centered on candidate genes related to brain function and behavior, including LHFPL3, CADM2, GRIK3, SH3GL2, MBP, PDE7B, NTAN1, and GLRA1. These regions contained significant enrichments in behavioral ontology categories. The 3rd top hit, CCRN4L, plays a major role in lipid metabolism, that is supported by additional metabolism related candidates revealed in our scan, including SCP2D1 and PDXC1. Comparing our method to an empirical outlier approach that does not directly account for demography, we found only modest overlaps between the two methods, with 60% of empirical outliers having no overlap with our demography-based outlier detection approach. Demography-aware approaches have lower-rates of false discovery. Our top candidates for selection, in addition to expanding the set of neurobehavioral candidate genes, include genes related to lipid metabolism, suggesting a dietary target of selection that was important during the period when proto-dogs hunted and fed alongside hunter-gatherers. PMID:26943675

  4. Diagnosing RCVS Without the CV: The Evolution of Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Nuri; Kaunzner, Ulrike; Dinkin, Marc; Safdieh, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    This is a case of a 52-year-old man with a past medical history of 2 episodes of coital thunderclap headaches as well as recent cocaine, marijuana, and pseudoephedrine use, who presented with sudden, sharp, posterior headache associated with photophobia and phonophobia. His initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the head, and magnetic resonance venography (MRV) of the head were all normal as well as a normal lumbar puncture. Given the multiple risk factors for reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), the patient was treated for suspected RCVS, despite the normal imaging. Repeat MRI brain 3 days after hospital admission demonstrated confluent white matter T2 hyperintensities most prominent in the occipital lobes, typical of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Repeat MRA of the head 1 day after discharge and 4 days after the abnormal MRI brain showed multisegment narrowing of multiple arteries. This case demonstrates that RCVS may present with PRES on MRI brain and also exemplifies the need to treat suspected RCVS even if imaging is normal, as abnormalities in both the MRI and the MRA may be delayed. PMID:27366300

  5. The effects of oxygen induced pulmonary vasoconstriction on bedside measurement of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Ulla M; Thomsen, Lars P; Rees, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2016-04-01

    In patients with respiratory failure measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are of importance. The bedside automatic lung parameter estimator (ALPE) of pulmonary gas exchange is based on changes in inspired oxygen (FiO2) assuming that these changes do not affect pulmonary circulation. This assumption is investigated in this study. Forty-two out of 65 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had measurements of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), cardiac output and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure thus enabling the calculation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at each FiO2 level. The research version of ALPE was used and FiO2 was step-wise reduced a median of 0.20 and ultimately returned towards baseline values, allowing 6-8 min' steady state period at each of 4-6 levels before recording the oxygen saturation (SpO2). FiO2 reduction led to median decrease in SpO2 from 99 to 92 %, an increase in MPAP of 4 mmHg and an increase in PVR of 36 dyn s cm(-5). Changes were immediately reversed on returning FiO2 towards baseline. In this study changes in MPAP and PVR are small and immediately reversible consistent with small changes in pulmonary gas exchange. This indicates that mild deoxygenation induced pulmonary vasoconstriction does not have significant influences on the ALPE parameters in patients after CABG. PMID:25962614

  6. Experimental Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Induces Blunted Vasoconstriction and Functional Changes in the Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Tufiño, Cecilia; Villanueva-López, Cleva; Ibarra-Barajas, Maximiliano; Bracho-Valdés, Ismael; Bobadilla-Lugo, Rosa Amalia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic conditions increase vascular reactivity to angiotensin II in several studies but there are scarce reports on cardiovascular effects of hypercaloric diet (HD) induced gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), so the objective of this work was to determine the effects of HD induced GDM on vascular responses. Angiotensin II as well as phenylephrine induced vascular contraction was tested in isolated aorta rings with and without endothelium from rats fed for 7 weeks (4 before and 3 weeks during pregnancy) with standard (SD) or hypercaloric (HD) diet. Also, protein expression of AT1R, AT2R, COX-1, COX-2, NOS-1, and NOS-3 and plasma glucose, insulin, and angiotensin II levels were measured. GDM impaired vasoconstrictor response (P < 0.05 versus SD) in intact (e+) but not in endothelium-free (e−) vessels. Losartan reduced GDM but not SD e− vasoconstriction (P < 0.01 versus SD). AT1R, AT2R, and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression were significantly increased in GDM vessels (P < 0.05 versus SD). Results suggest an increased participation of endothelium vasodilator mediators, probably prostaglandins, as well as of AT2 vasodilator receptors as a compensatory mechanism for vasoconstrictor changes generated by experimental GDM. Considering the short term of rat pregnancy findings can reflect early stage GDM adaptations. PMID:25610861

  7. Cyclooxygenase blockade (COB) attenuates ethanol-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in perfused rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, W.H.; Lyles, D. )

    1990-02-26

    Ethanol causes pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular leak by obscure mechanisms. In lambs, COB with indomethacin (Indo) or meclofenamate (Meclo) block ethanol's circulatory effects. To test for these effects in rats, in-situ, ventilated, Krebs-Henselheit perfused (constant flow) lungs were studied in 6 groups: ethanol (ETOH) and perfusate controls; ETOH/Meclo, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, IV; ETOH/Indo, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, IV, given 30 minutes before study. They measured mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and edema, indexed by reservoir weight change (RW), then by tracheal froth ( death'). ETOH doses (0.5, 1.3 and 2.2gm) were infused into the perfusate (60 ml). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and X{sup 2}; n = 9 in each group. PAP differed by treatment, by drug/dose, and by dose/treatment interactions; PIP, RW change, and death' were attenuated. Data show that COB lessens the vascular and edema effects of moderate dose ETOH, which larger ETOH doses override.

  8. Molecular mapping of genomic regions underlying barley yellow dwarf tolerance in cultivated oat (Avena sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Kolb, F L; Kaeppler, H F

    2003-05-01

    Barley yellow dwarf (BYD) is one of the most important viral diseases in small grains, including oat (Avena sativa L.). Breeding for BYD tolerance is an effective and efficient means to control the disease. Characterization of major sources of tolerance, and identification of marker and the trait associations, will directly benefit breeding for BYD tolerance. Genomic regions underlying BYD tolerance were mapped and characterized in an oat population consisting of 152 recombinant inbred lines from the cross of 'Ogle' (tolerant)/MAM17-5 (sensitive). Tolerance was evaluated in replicated field trials across 2 years under artificial inoculation with viruliferous aphids harboring BYD virus isolate PAV-IL. Composite interval mapping was used for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis with a framework map consisting of 272 molecular markers. Four QTLs, BYDq1, BYDq2, BYDq3 and BYDq4, for BYD tolerance were identified on linkage groups OM1, 5, 7 and 24, respectively. All but BYDq2 were consistently detected across both years. Significant epistasis was found between some QTLs. The final model including the epistatic effect explained 50.3 to 58.2% of the total phenotypic variation for BYD tolerance. Some QTLs for BYD tolerance were closely linked to QTLs for plant height and days to heading. Potential problems with QTL mapping for BYD tolerance have been discussed. The identified association of markers and tolerance should be useful to pyramid favorable alleles for BYD tolerance into individual oat lines. PMID:12748782

  9. Study of aerosol radiative properties under different relative humidity conditions in the thermal infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Nasiri, S. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    In the aerosol transport process, the optical properties of aerosol particles can vary due to humidification or mixing with other kinds of aerosols. Previous studies have shown mixing dust with other types of aerosol tends to make the aerosol more spectrally absorptive, but the degree of impact of relative humidity (RH) along the transport path is not clear. To investigate this effect, we conduct a numerical study to estimate the radiative sensitivity of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Specifically, the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database is used, which provides the optical properties (i.e., the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and phase function) of ten types of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Lookup tables (LUTs) of the bidirectional reflectivity, transmissivity and effective emissivity will be computed for the ten aerosol types for input to the high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model (HRTM). Using these LUTs, the HTRM can calculate top-of-atmospheric brightness temperatures, which we can use to determine the degree of radiative sensitivity in the infrared spectral region. Furthermore, comparisons between simulations and MODIS observations will be presented.

  10. 5'-Untranslated region of heat shock protein 70 mRNA drives translation under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In mammalian cells, adaptation to hypertonic conditions leads to the activation of an array of early (cell shrinkage, regulatory volume increase) and late (accumulation of compatible osmolytes) responses and increased level of HSPs (heat shock proteins). Protein synthesis is strongly inhibited few minutes after the hypertonic challenge as demonstrated in whole cells and as reproduced under controlled conditions in cell-free systems. Different mechanisms known to mediate the accumulation of HSP70, such as mRNA transcription and stabilization, require fully active protein synthesis. We show that the 5'-untranslated region of HSP70 messenger drives a hypertonicity-resistant translation (up to 0.425 osmol/kg of water), whereas cap-dependent protein synthesis is almost totally blocked under the same conditions. The results, obtained in cell-free systems and in whole cells, might help to explain why HSP70 is accumulated in cells when total protein synthesis is impaired. We also observed that translation initiated by viral IRES (from Cricket paralysis virus) is highly efficient in cells exposed to hyperosmolarity, suggesting that the resistance to hypertonic conditions is a more general feature of cap-independent translation. The described mechanism may also play a role in the control of translation of other messengers encoding for proteins involved in the adaptation to hypertonicity. PMID:23291172

  11. Modelling Sub-canopy Shortwave Under Needle-Leaf Forests in Mountain Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, C.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Snowmelt is one of the most important hydrological events in mountain regions, responsible for soil moisture recharge, vegetation growth, and ecosystem productivity. Mountain snowmelt is also of tremendous importance to the downstream water resource of many North American regions, from where over 80% of river- flows may originate. As mountain regions are covered largely by needle-leaf forests, turbulent energy exchanges are suppressed and snowmelt is driven primarily by shortwave irradiance energy transmitted to the sub-canopy Thus, effective prediction of the timing and magnitude of mountain snowmelt runoff for the purposes reservoir operation, land-use planning, and flood forecasting require accurate estimation of shortwave irradiance transmission through sloping forest-cover. This paper outlines and evaluates a physically-based model requiring minimal calibration designed to estimate shortwave irradiance transmission through needle-leaf forest cover with respect to surface orientation. Transmission was estimated using forest-survey data to calculate the fractions of forest occupied by non-transmitting trunks, partially-transmitting crowns and fully-transmitting gaps with respect to both above-canopy diffuse and beam irradiance. Simulations were conducted for continuous and uniform lodgepole pine forests on level and north-facing slopes and a discontinuous, non-uniform forest on a southeast-facing slope during snowmelt at the Marmot Creek Research Basin, Alberta, Canada. Mean observed daily transmissivity values were 0.09 at the north-facing forest, 0.21 at the level forest and 0.36 at the southeast-facing forest. Modelled and observed results indicate that sub-canopy shortwave irradiance snowmelt energy exhibited greatest variation with change in sky condition and forest-cover density under south-facing forests and the least variation under north-facing forests. This suggests the timing and rate of snowmelt may vary more for south-facing forests than for forests

  12. Regional Flood Frequency Analysis using Support Vector Regression under historical and future climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizaw, Mesgana Seyoum; Gan, Thian Yew

    2016-07-01

    Regional Flood Frequency Analysis (RFFA) is a statistical method widely used to estimate flood quantiles of catchments with limited streamflow data. In addition, to estimate the flood quantile of ungauged sites, there could be only a limited number of stations with complete dataset are available from hydrologically similar, surrounding catchments. Besides traditional regression based RFFA methods, recent applications of machine learning algorithms such as the artificial neural network (ANN) have shown encouraging results in regional flood quantile estimations. Another novel machine learning technique that is becoming widely applicable in the hydrologic community is the Support Vector Regression (SVR). In this study, an RFFA model based on SVR was developed to estimate regional flood quantiles for two study areas, one with 26 catchments located in southeastern British Columbia (BC) and another with 23 catchments located in southern Ontario (ON), Canada. The SVR-RFFA model for both study sites was developed from 13 sets of physiographic and climatic predictors for the historical period. The Ef (Nash Sutcliffe coefficient) and R2 of the SVR-RFFA model was about 0.7 when estimating flood quantiles of 10, 25, 50 and 100 year return periods which indicate satisfactory model performance in both study areas. In addition, the SVR-RFFA model also performed well based on other goodness-of-fit statistics such as BIAS (mean bias) and BIASr (relative BIAS). If the amount of data available for training RFFA models is limited, the SVR-RFFA model was found to perform better than an ANN based RFFA model, and with significantly lower median CV (coefficient of variation) of the estimated flood quantiles. The SVR-RFFA model was then used to project changes in flood quantiles over the two study areas under the impact of climate change using the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 climate projections of five Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) GCMs (Global Climate Models) for the 2041

  13. 20 CFR 661.290 - Under what circumstances may States require Local Boards to take part in regional planning...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... activities? (a) The State may require Local Boards within a designated region (as defined at 20 CFR 660.300... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Under what circumstances may States require Local Boards to take part in regional planning activities? 661.290 Section 661.290 Employees'...

  14. Role of neuronal nitric oxide in the inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle of healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2013-07-01

    Isoform-specific nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) contributions to NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle are incompletely understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in the inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle of healthy rats. We hypothesized that acute pharmacological inhibition of nNOS would augment sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle, demonstrating that nNOS is primarily responsible for NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 13) were anesthetized and instrumented with an indwelling brachial artery catheter, femoral artery flow probe, and lumbar sympathetic chain stimulating electrodes. Triceps surae muscles were stimulated to contract rhythmically at 60% of maximal contractile force. In series 1 (n = 9), the percent change in femoral vascular conductance (%FVC) in response to sympathetic stimulations delivered at 2 and 5 Hz was determined at rest and during muscle contraction before and after selective nNOS blockade with S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC, 0.6 mg/kg iv) and subsequent nonselective NOS blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 5 mg/kg iv). In series 2 (n = 4), l-NAME was injected first, and then SMTC was injected to determine if the effect of l-NAME on constrictor responses was influenced by selective nNOS inhibition. Sympathetic stimulation decreased FVC at rest (-25 ± 7 and -44 ± 8%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively) and during contraction (-7 ± 3 and -19 ± 5%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively). The decrease in FVC in response to sympathetic stimulation was greater in the presence of SMTC at rest (-32 ± 6 and -49 ± 8%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively) and during contraction (-21 ± 4 and -28 ± 4%FVC at 2 and 5 Hz, respectively). l-NAME further increased (P < 0.05) the sympathetic vasoconstrictor

  15. Quantifying the economic competitiveness of cellulosic biofuel pathways under uncertainty and regional sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tristan R.

    cellulosic biofuel pathways being commercialized in eight different U.S. states under price uncertainty, utilization of pathway-specific costs of capital, and region-specific economic factors. 10-year probabilities of default in excess of 60% are calculated for all eight location scenarios considered, with default probabilities in excess of 98% calculated for seven of the eight. Negative mean 20-year NPVs are calculated for seven of the eight location scenarios.

  16. New mechanism under International Flood Initiative toward robustness for flood management in the Asia Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, M.; Yoshitani, J.; Takeuchi, K.; Koike, T.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is likely to result in increases in the frequency or intensity of extreme weather events. It is imperative that a good understanding is developed of how climate change affects the events that are reflected in hydrological extremes such as floods and how practitioners in water resources management deal with them. Since there is still major uncertainty as to how the impact of climate change affect actual water resources management, it is important to build robustness into management schemes and communities. Flood management under such variety of uncertainty favors the flexible and adaptive implementation both in top-down and bottom-up approaches. The former uses projections of global or spatially downscaled models to drive resource models and project resource impacts. The latter utilizes policy or planning tools to identify what changes in climate would be most threatening to their long-range operations. Especially for the bottom-up approaches, it is essential to identify the gap between what should be done and what has not been achieved for disaster risks. Indicators or index are appropriate tools to measure such gaps, but they are still in progress to cover the whole world. The International Flood Initiative (IFI), initiated in January 2005 by UNESCO and WMO in close cooperation with UNU and ISDR, IAHS and IAHR, has promoted an integrated approach to flood management to take advantage of floods and use of flood plains while reducing the social, environmental and economic risks. Its secretariat is located in ICHARM. The initiative objective is to support national platforms to practice evidence-based disaster risk reduction through mobilizing scientific and research networks at national, regional and international levels. The initiative is now preparing for a new mechanism to facilitate the integrated approach for flood management on the ground regionally in the Asia Pacific (IFI-AP) through monitoring, assessment and capacity building.

  17. Influence of ecohydrologic feedbacks from simulated crop growth on integrated regional hydrologic simulations under climate scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Walsum, P. E. V.; Supit, I.

    2012-06-01

    Hydrologic climate change modelling is hampered by climate-dependent model parameterizations. To reduce this dependency, we extended the regional hydrologic modelling framework SIMGRO to host a two-way coupling between the soil moisture model MetaSWAP and the crop growth simulation model WOFOST, accounting for ecohydrologic feedbacks in terms of radiation fraction that reaches the soil, crop coefficient, interception fraction of rainfall, interception storage capacity, and root zone depth. Except for the last, these feedbacks are dependent on the leaf area index (LAI). The influence of regional groundwater on crop growth is included via a coupling to MODFLOW. Two versions of the MetaSWAP-WOFOST coupling were set up: one with exogenous vegetation parameters, the "static" model, and one with endogenous crop growth simulation, the "dynamic" model. Parameterization of the static and dynamic models ensured that for the current climate the simulated long-term averages of actual evapotranspiration are the same for both models. Simulations were made for two climate scenarios and two crops: grass and potato. In the dynamic model, higher temperatures in a warm year under the current climate resulted in accelerated crop development, and in the case of potato a shorter growing season, thus partly avoiding the late summer heat. The static model has a higher potential transpiration; depending on the available soil moisture, this translates to a higher actual transpiration. This difference between static and dynamic models is enlarged by climate change in combination with higher CO2 concentrations. Including the dynamic crop simulation gives for potato (and other annual arable land crops) systematically higher effects on the predicted recharge change due to climate change. Crop yields from soils with poor water retention capacities strongly depend on capillary rise if moisture supply from other sources is limited. Thus, including a crop simulation model in an integrated

  18. Groundwater Modeling in Coastal Arid Regions Under the Influence of Marine Saltwater Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Marc; Kolditz, Olaf; Grundmann, Jens; Liedl, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The optimization of an aquifer's "safe yield", especially within agriculturally used regions, is one of the fundamental tasks for nowaday's groundwater management. Due to the limited water ressources in arid regions, conflict of interests arise that need to be evaluated using scenario analysis and multicriterial optimization approaches. In the context of the government-financed research project "International Water Research Alliance Saxony" (IWAS), the groundwater quality for near-coastal, agriculturally used areas is investigated under the influence of marine saltwater intrusion. Within the near-coastal areas of the study region, i.e. the Batinah plains of Northern Oman, an increasing agricultural development could be observed during the recent decades. Simultaneously, a constant lowering of the groundwater table was registered, which is primarily due to the uncontrolled and unsupervised mining of the aquifers for the local agricultural irrigation. Intensively decreased groundwater levels, however, cause an inversion of the hydraulic gradient which is naturally aligned towards the coast. This, in turn,leads to an intrusion of marine saltwater flowing inland, endangering the productivity of farms near the coast. Utilizing the modeling software package OpenGeoSys, which has been developed and constantly enhanced by the Department of Environmental Informatics at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig (UFZ; Kolditz et al., 2008), a three-dimensional, density-dependent model including groundwater flow and mass transport is currently being built up. The model, comprehending three selected coastal wadis of interest, shall be used to investigate different management scenarios. The main focus of the groundwater modelling are the optimization of well positions and pumping schemes as well as the coupling with a surface runoff model, which is also used for the determination of the groundwater recharge due to wadi runoff downstream of retention dams. Based on

  19. Long tails in regional surface temperature probability distributions with implications for extremes under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Tyler W.; Neelin, J. David

    2012-02-01

    Prior work has shown that probability distributions of column water vapor and several passive tropospheric chemical tracers exhibit longer-than-Gaussian (approximately exponential) tails. The tracer-advection prototypes explaining the formation of these long-tailed distributions motivate exploration of observed surface temperature distributions for non-Gaussian tails. Stations with long records in various climate regimes in National Climatic Data Center Global Surface Summary of Day observations are used to examine tail characteristics for daily average, maximum and minimum surface temperature probability distributions. Each is examined for departures from a Gaussian fit to the core (here approximated as the portion of the distribution exceeding 30% of the maximum). While the core conforms to Gaussian for most distributions, roughly half the cases exhibit non-Gaussian tails in both winter and summer seasons. Most of these are asymmetric, with a long, roughly exponential, tail on only one side. The shape of the tail has substantial implications for potential changes in extreme event occurrences under global warming. Here the change in the probability of exceeding a given threshold temperature is quantified in the simplest case of a shift in the present-day observed distribution. Surface temperature distributions with long tails have a much smaller change in threshold exceedances (smaller increases for high-side and smaller decreases for low-side exceedances relative to exceedances in current climate) under a given warming than do near-Gaussian distributions. This implies that models used to estimate changes in extreme event occurrences due to global warming should be verified regionally for accuracy of simulations of probability distribution tails.

  20. The tripeptide ZAMI-420 inhibits thromboxane-induced gastric vasoconstriction and ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Moroni, D; Gervasi, G B; Patella, P; Visentin, L; Maselli, M A; Bergamaschi, M

    1983-01-01

    The tripeptide ZAMI-420 has been shown by Gervasi et al. (4) to be able to prevent experimentally-induced gastric damage, possibly by interfering with the synthesis and the action of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator. Further studies on a canine stomach wedge preparation, supplied with a fixed flow of 10 ml/min-1 of arterial blood from the same dog have been designed to investigate this hypothesis. Bolus injection of arachidonic acid (AA) through a 30-sec incubation coil that allows the production of TXA2 resulted in a dose-related increase in resistance to flow in the stomach wedge vasculature and blanching of the gastric mucosa. This was progressively inhibited by ZAMI-420 perfused through the delay coil. Similar results were obtained with 1-benzylimidazole (BI). ZAMI-420, but not BI, produced a partial inhibition of TXA2-induced vasoconstriction when infused close to the stomach. Investigations of the antagonistic action of ZAMI-420 on the pharmacological effect of the formed TXA2 were carried out using strips of celiac and mesenteric artery from rabbits and gastric artery from dogs. Preincubation of these vascular preparations with ZAMI-420 led to progressive inhibition of the contraction induced either by the stable endoperoxide U-46619 or by CaCl2. Whittle et al. (3) reported that TXA2 may be involved in the pathogenesis of ulcerative disorders of the stomach; if so, both the inhibition of the synthesis and the antagonism of TXA2-induced effects could be of value in the prevention of experimentally-induced gastric disorders. PMID:6654624

  1. Angiotensin II type I receptor blockade attenuates reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in aged but not young skin.

    PubMed

    Lang, James A; Kolb, Kelsey E

    2015-05-15

    Stimulation of angiotensin II type I receptors (AT1R) elicits vasoconstriction (VC) that may be occurring through the activation of a pathogenic vascular pathway such as Rho kinase (ROCK). We hypothesize that reflex cutaneous VC to whole body cooling (mean skin temperature = 30.5°C) in older humans relies in part on AT1R activation, which may explain greater ROCK activity attendant with aging. Two microdialysis (MD) fibers were placed in the forearm skin of 10 young (Y; 24 ± 1 yr) and 10 older (O; 70 ± 2 yr) individuals for infusion of 1) lactated Ringer's solution (switched to fasudil, a ROCK antagonist, after cooling); and 2) AT1R blockade with losartan. Laser Doppler flux (LDF) was measured over each MD site and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated (CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure) and expressed as percent change from baseline (%ΔCVCBASELINE). In older individuals the VC response to whole body cooling was blunted (Y = -34 ± 2, O = -17 ± 3%ΔCVC) and was further attenuated at the losartan site (Y = -34 ± 3, O = -9 ± 3%ΔCVC; P < 0.05). The VC response to an exogenous 10-μM dose of angiotensin II (Y = -27 ± 3, O = -42 ± 5%ΔCVC) was completely blocked in sites pretreated with losartan or with fasudil. These data suggest that AT1R activation contributes to the reflex VC response in aged but not young skin. Furthermore, the angiotensin II component of the VC response appears to occur primarily through a ROCK-mediated mechanism. PMID:25770238

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 induction modulates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction through upregulation of ecSOD.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansoor; Zhao, Xiangmin; Kelly, Melissa R; Kandhi, Sharath; Perez, Oscar; Abraham, Nader G; Wolin, Michael S

    2009-10-01

    Endothelium-denuded bovine pulmonary arteries (BPA) contract to hypoxia through a mechanism potentially involving removing a superoxide-derived hydrogen peroxide-mediated relaxation. BPA organ cultured for 24 h with 0.1 mM cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) to increase the expression and activity of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is accompanied by a decrease in 5 microM lucigenin-detectable superoxide and an increase in horseradish peroxidase-luminol detectable peroxide levels. Force development to KCl in BPA was not affected by increases in HO-1, but the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) response was decreased. Organ culture with a HO-1 inhibitor (10 microM chromium mesoporphyrin) reversed the effects of HO-1 on HPV and peroxide. Treatment of HO-1-induced BPA with extracellular catalase resulted in reversal of the attenuation of HPV without affecting the force development to KCl. Increasing intracellular peroxide scavenging with 0.1 mM ebselen increased force development to KCl and partially reversed the decrease in HPV seen on induction of HO-1. HO-1 induction increases extracellular (ec) superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression without changing Cu,Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD levels. HO-1-induced BPA rings treated with the copper chelator 10 mM diethyldithiocarbamate to inactivate ecSOD and Cu,Zn-SOD showed increased superoxide and decreased peroxide to levels equal to non-HO-1-induced rings, whereas the addition of SOD to freshly isolated BPA rings attenuated HPV similar to HO-1 induction with CoCl(2). Therefore, HO-1 induction in BPA increases ecSOD expression associated with enhanced generation of peroxide in amounts that may not be adequately removed during hypoxia, leading to an attenuation of HPV. PMID:19666846

  3. Notch Activation of Ca(2+) Signaling in the Development of Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kimberly A; Voiriot, Guillaume; Tang, Haiyang; Fraidenburg, Dustin R; Song, Shanshan; Yamamura, Hisao; Yamamura, Aya; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Jun; Pohl, Nicole M; Tauseef, Mohammad; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A; Haddad, Gabriel G; Powell, Frank L; Makino, Ayako; Mehta, Dolly; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an important physiological response that optimizes the ventilation/perfusion ratio. Chronic hypoxia causes vascular remodeling, which is central to the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We have previously shown that Notch3 is up-regulated in HPH and that activation of Notch signaling enhances store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), an important mechanism that contributes to pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and contraction. Here, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in HPV and hypoxia-induced enhancement of SOCE. We examined SOCE in human PASMCs exposed to hypoxia and pulmonary arterial pressure in mice using the isolated perfused/ventilated lung method. Wild-type and canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 6(-/-) mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia to induce HPH. Inhibition of Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor attenuates hypoxia-enhanced SOCE in PASMCs and hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. Our results demonstrate that hypoxia activates Notch signaling and up-regulates TRPC6 channels. Additionally, treatment with a Notch ligand can mimic hypoxic responses. Finally, inhibition of TRPC6, either pharmacologically or genetically, attenuates HPV, hypoxia-enhanced SOCE, and the development of HPH. These results demonstrate that hypoxia-induced activation of Notch signaling mediates HPV and the development of HPH via functional activation and up-regulation of TRPC6 channels. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration and PASMC proliferation is critical to elucidation of the pathogenesis of HPH. Targeting Notch regulation of TRPC6 will be beneficial in the development of novel therapies for pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:25569851

  4. The production of vasoconstriction-induced residual NO modulates perfusion pressure in rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Seçilmiş, M A; Özü, Ö Y; Kıroğlu, O E; Şingirik, E; Büyükafşar, K

    2014-11-01

    In the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors, the contribution of residual NO to endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by chemical agonists acetylcholine and bradykinin has been documented in resistance vessels. However, the contribution of residual NO to the vasodilatation in response to pressure and fluid shear stress is not well understood. In this study, to demonstrate the activity of residual NO, we applied a NO scavenger, hydroxocobalamin (HCX), on the phenylephrine-induced increase in perfusion pressure in the presence of NOS inhibitors, Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in the rat perfused mesenteric bed. The perfusion pressure was increased by phenylephrine (1-2 µM), an α1-adrenoceptor agonist. This increase was augmented by the addition of L-NA or L-NAME. In the presence of any NOS inhibitors, the application of hydroxocobalamin (100 µM) further increased the perfusion pressure. The removal of endothelium by saponin (50 mg/L) and the use of a non-selective protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine (5 nM), and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erbstatin A (30 µM), but not a calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium (0.5 µM), inhibited the additional pressor responses induced by L-NA or L-NAME and a combination of either of them with hydroxocobalamine. These findings show that there could be a NOS inhibitor-resistant residual NO production in response to pressure in the rat mesenteric vascular bed. This residual NO production may be associated with the activation of tyrosine kinase and protein kinases, but not calmodulin. Finally, this pressure-induced residual NO exerts a modulatory role against vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine. PMID:24534887

  5. Leptin augments coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation via a Rho-kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Jillian N; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2016-05-01

    Leptin has been implicated as a key upstream mediator of pathways associated with coronary vascular dysfunction and disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that leptin modifies the coronary artery proteome and promotes increases in coronary smooth muscle contraction and proliferation via influences on Rho kinase signaling. Global proteomic assessment of coronary arteries from lean swine cultured with obese concentrations of leptin (30 ng/mL) for 3 days revealed significant alterations in the coronary artery proteome (68 proteins) and identified an association between leptin treatment and calcium signaling/contraction (four proteins) and cellular growth and proliferation (35 proteins). Isometric tension studies demonstrated that both acute (30 min) and chronic (3 days, serum-free media) exposure to obese concentrations of leptin potentiated depolarization-induced contraction of coronary arteries. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced leptin-mediated increases in coronary artery contractions. The effects of leptin on the functional expression of Rho kinase were time-dependent, as acute treatment increased Rho kinase activity while chronic (3 day) exposure was associated with increases in Rho kinase protein abundance. Proliferation assays following chronic leptin administration (8 day, serum-containing media) demonstrated that leptin augmented coronary vascular smooth muscle proliferation and increased Rho kinase activity. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced these effects of leptin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes increases in coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation and indicate that these phenotypic effects are associated with alterations in the coronary artery proteome and dynamic effects on the Rho kinase pathway. PMID:26975316

  6. Optimization of isolated perfused/ventilated mouse lung to study hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hae Young; Zeifman, Amy; Ko, Eun A.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Chen, Jiwang; Machado, Roberto F.; Zhao, You-Yang; Minshall, Richard D.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a compensatory physiological mechanism in the lung that optimizes the matching of ventilation to perfusion and thereby maximizes gas exchange. Historically, HPV has been primarily studied in isolated perfused/ventilated lungs; however, the results of these studies have varied greatly due to different experimental conditions and species. Therefore, in the present study, we utilized the mouse isolated perfused/ventilated lung model for investigation of the role of extracellular Ca2+ and caveolin-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression on HPV. We also compared HPV using different perfusate solutions: Physiological salt solution (PSS) with albumin, Ficoll, rat blood, fetal bovine serum (FBS), or Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). After stabilization of the pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), hypoxic (1% O2) and normoxic (21% O2) gases were applied via a ventilator in five-minute intervals to measure HPV. The addition of albumin or Ficoll with PSS did not induce persistent and strong HPV with or without a pretone agent. DMEM with the inclusion of FBS in the perfusate induced strong HPV in the first hypoxic challenge, but the HPV was neither persistent nor repetitive. PSS with rat blood only induced a small increase in HPV amplitude. Persistent and repetitive HPV occurred with PSS with 20% FBS as perfusate. HPV was significantly decreased by the removal of extracellular Ca2+ along with addition of 1 mM EGTA to chelate residual Ca2+ and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker (nifedipine 1 μM). PAP was also reactive to contractile stimulation by high K+ depolarization and U46619 (a stable analogue of thromboxane A2). In summary, optimal conditions for measuring HPV were established in the isolated perfused/ventilated mouse lung. Using this method, we further confirmed that HPV is dependent on Ca2+ influx. PMID:24015341

  7. Infrared imaging to quantify the effects of nicotine-induced vasoconstriction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Siegfried; Kargel, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Smoking is the most significant source of preventable morbidity and premature mortality worldwide (WHO-2008). One of the many effects of nicotine is vasoconstriction which is triggered by the autonomic nervous system. The constriction of blood vessels e.g. of the skin's vascular bed is responsible for a decrease of the supply with oxygen and nutrients and a lowering of the skin temperature. We used infrared imaging to quantify temperature decreases caused by cigarette smoking in the extremities of smokers and also monitored heart rate as well as blood pressure. The results - including thermograms showing "temporary amputations" of the fingertips due to a significant temperature drop - can help increase the awareness of the dangers of smoking and the success of withdrawal programs. Surprisingly, in our control persons (3 brave non-smoking volunteers who smoked a cigarette) we also found temperature increases suggesting that vasodilation (widening of blood vessels) was provoked by cigarettes. To verify this unexpected finding and eliminate effects from the 4000 chemical compounds in the smoke, we repeated the experiment following a stringent protocol ruling out physiological and psychological influences with 9 habitual smokers and 17 nonsmokers who all chew gums with 2 mg of nicotine. Task-optimized digital image processing techniques (target detection, image-registration and -segmentation) were applied to the acquired infrared image sequences to automatically yield temperature plots of the fingers and palm. In this paper we present the results of our study in detail and show that smokers and non-smokers respond differently to the administration of nicotine.

  8. Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: An Avian Model for Plexogenic Arteriopathy and Serotonergic Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, Robert F.; Hamal, Krishna R.

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a disease of unknown cause that is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance attributable to vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling of small pulmonary arteries. Vascular remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle (medial hypertrophy) accompanied in up to 80% of the cases by the formation of occlusive plexiform lesions (plexogenic arteriopathy). Patients tend to be unresponsive to vasodilator therapy and have a poor prognosis for survival when plexogenic arteriopathy progressively obstructs their pulmonary arteries. Research is needed to understand and treat plexogenic arteriopathy, but advances have been hindered by the absence of spontaneously developing lesions in existing laboratory animal models. Young domestic fowl bred for meat production (broiler chickens, broilers) spontaneously develop IPAH accompanied by semi-occlusive endothelial proliferation that progresses into fully developed plexiform lesions. Plexiform lesions develop in both females and male broilers, and lesion incidences (lung sections with lesions/lung sections examined) averaged approximately 40% in 8 to 52 week old birds. Plexiform lesions formed distal to branch points in muscular interparabronchial pulmonary arteries, and were associated with perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a potent vasoconstrictor and mitogen known to stimulate vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation. Serotonin has been directly linked to the pathogenesis of IPAH in humans, including IPAH linked to serotonergic anorexigens that trigger the formation of plexiform lesions indistinguishable from those observed in primary IPAH triggered by other causes. Serotonin also plays a major role in the susceptibility of broilers to IPAH. This avian model of spontaneous IPAH constitutes a new animal model for biomedical research focused on the

  9. Macro-to-micro cortical vascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain.

    PubMed

    Dziennis, Suzan; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify hemodynamic responses down to the capillary level is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of neurovascular disorders, including stroke. We developed an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLS) was used as a guiding tool for optical microangiography (OMAG) to test whether detailed vascular responses to experimental stroke in male mice can be evaluated with wide range sensitivity from arteries and veins down to the capillary level. DWLS enabled rapid identification of cerebral blood flow (CBF), prediction of infarct area and hemoglobin oxygenation over the whole mouse brain and was used to guide the OMAG system to hone in on depth information regarding blood volume, blood flow velocity and direction, vascular architecture, vessel diameter and capillary density pertaining to defined regions of CBF in response to ischemia. OMAG-DWLS is a novel imaging platform technology to simultaneously evaluate multiple vascular responses to ischemic injury, which can be useful in improving our understanding of vascular responses under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitating clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases. PMID:25941797

  10. [Decomposition of herbaceous species in reservoir riparian region of Three Gorges Reservoir under flooding condition].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Ye; Xie, Zong-Qiang; Yang, Lin-Sen; Xiong, Gao-Ming; Li, Zhao-Jia; Fan, Da-Yong

    2014-08-01

    A total of 10 annuals and perennials of herbaceous species were investigated in reservoir riparian region of Three Gorges Reservoir. The correlations between the plants' nutrient release rate and the substrate composition and structural matter were studied under flooding condition. The decomposition rates of different species differed substantially, with the maximum of Alternanthera philoxeroides (decomposition rate constant k = 0.0228 d(-1)) and the minimum of Microstegium vimineum (k = 0.0029 d(-1)). There was no significant difference in k between annuals and perennials. There was no significant difference in nitrogen and phosphorus contents between annuals and perennials. Paspalum paspaloides and Bidens pilosa released more nutrients into the water than the other species. A. philoxeroides had a higher potential to release nitrogen while it had little effect on water phosphorus compared with the other species. Total N, P contents in the water were negatively correlated with the plants' decomposition rate, initial C content, C:N ratio, lignin:N ratio, and positively correlated with initial contents of K, Ca and N in plants. PMID:25509072

  11. Macro-to-micro cortical vascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziennis, Suzan; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-05-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify hemodynamic responses down to the capillary level is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of neurovascular disorders, including stroke. We developed an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLS) was used as a guiding tool for optical microangiography (OMAG) to test whether detailed vascular responses to experimental stroke in male mice can be evaluated with wide range sensitivity from arteries and veins down to the capillary level. DWLS enabled rapid identification of cerebral blood flow (CBF), prediction of infarct area and hemoglobin oxygenation over the whole mouse brain and was used to guide the OMAG system to hone in on depth information regarding blood volume, blood flow velocity and direction, vascular architecture, vessel diameter and capillary density pertaining to defined regions of CBF in response to ischemia. OMAG-DWLS is a novel imaging platform technology to simultaneously evaluate multiple vascular responses to ischemic injury, which can be useful in improving our understanding of vascular responses under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitating clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases.

  12. Large-scale climate patterns and precipitation in an arid endorheic region: linkage and underlying mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Pengfei; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Ke; Tang, Qiuhong; Yu, Zhongbo; Zhou, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between a range of large-scale climate oscillations and their quantitative links with precipitation are basic prerequisites to understand the hydrologic cycle. Restricted by the current limited knowledge on underlying mechanisms, statistical methods (e.g. correlation methods) are often used rather than a physical-based model. However, available correlation methods generally fail to explain the interactions among a wide range of climate oscillations and associated effects on the water cycle. This study presents a new probabilistic analysis approach by means of a state-of-the-art Copula-based joint probability distribution to characterize the aggregated behaviors for large-scale climate patterns and their connections to precipitation. We applied this method to identify the complex connections between climate patterns (westerly circulation (WEC), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)) and seasonal precipitation over a typical endorheic region, the Tarim River Basin in central Asia. Results show that the interactions among multiple climate oscillations are non-uniform in most seasons and phases. Certain joint extreme phases can significantly trigger extremes (flood and drought) owing to the amplification effect among climate oscillations. We further find that the connection is mainly due to the complex effects of climatic and topographical factors.

  13. Horse impoundments under Control of Horses legislation in the Munster region of Ireland: factors affecting euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Cullinane, M; O'Sullivan, E; Collins, D M; Byrne, A W; More, S J

    2015-01-24

    Recently, considerable international attention has been paid to the problem of unwanted horses. In Ireland, stray horses, particularly in urban areas, are a further problem. The Control of Horses Act 1996 was enacted in response to an ongoing problem of uncontrolled horses in public places. As yet, no research work has been conducted focusing on stray horses in Ireland. This paper describes horses impounded under the Act in the Munster region of Ireland during 2005-2012 and the factors influencing decisions regarding their disposal. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate factors influencing the probability that a horse was euthanised during impoundment. In total, 3625 seizure events were recorded, most towards the end of the study period. Predictors for euthanasia during 2010-2012 included seizure location, sex, age, colour, body condition score and year. This study highlights the problem of stray horses in Ireland, particularly in urban areas. There is a need for rigorous enforcement of newly enacted horse identification legislation, allowing a fully integrated traceability system. More is required to manage the long-established societal problems of stray horses in urban settings, with a uniform approach by all Local Authorities being long overdue. PMID:25376504

  14. Macro-to-micro cortical vascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    PubMed Central

    Dziennis, Suzan; Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify hemodynamic responses down to the capillary level is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of neurovascular disorders, including stroke. We developed an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging (DWLS) was used as a guiding tool for optical microangiography (OMAG) to test whether detailed vascular responses to experimental stroke in male mice can be evaluated with wide range sensitivity from arteries and veins down to the capillary level. DWLS enabled rapid identification of cerebral blood flow (CBF), prediction of infarct area and hemoglobin oxygenation over the whole mouse brain and was used to guide the OMAG system to hone in on depth information regarding blood volume, blood flow velocity and direction, vascular architecture, vessel diameter and capillary density pertaining to defined regions of CBF in response to ischemia. OMAG-DWLS is a novel imaging platform technology to simultaneously evaluate multiple vascular responses to ischemic injury, which can be useful in improving our understanding of vascular responses under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitating clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases. PMID:25941797

  15. 7 CFR 1486.103 - Are regional projects possible under the program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consideration provided such projects target qualifying emerging markets in the specified region. CCC may consider activities which target qualified emerging markets in a specific region, but are conducted in a non-emerging market because of its importance as a central location and ease of access to that region....

  16. [Concentration distribution of metal elements in atmospheric aerosol under different weather conditions in Qingdao Coastal Region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jian-Hua; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Shen, Heng-Qing; Liu, Ming-Xu

    2014-10-01

    To know the influence of different weather conditions on the concentration of metal elements in aerosols in the coastal region, total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected from April to May 2012, and August 2012 to March 2013 in the Qingdao coastal region, and common trace metals were analyzed by using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results showed that Al, Ca, Fe, Na, K and Mg were the dominant metal elements in TSP, and the sum of the six elements accounted for 94.2% of the sum of all metals. TSP and metal elements had significant monthly variations, Fe, Al, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ba, Mn, Ti, Sr and Li had the highest concentration in November and January, while Be, Sc, Co, Ni and Cr showed the highest value in January. Na had the highest concentration in August, November and February, and the lowest in December. Pb had the highest concentration in January and February, and the lowest in August and December. Enrichment factors indicated that Be, Co, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Sr and Ti were mainly affected by natural sources; Li, Cr, Ni, Zn, Ba and Na were affected by natural sources and part of anthropogenic sources; Pb was mainly from anthropogenic sources. Different weather conditions had great impact on TSP and metal elements concentrations, all the measured metals had the highest concentrations in smog except Ti. Compared with the sunny day, the concentration of atmospheric particulate Ti decreased, while the other elements increased by 1 to 4 times in smog. Li, Be, Cr, Ni, Al, Fe, Mg and Mn had little variation in concentration in foggy day, and the concentration of Pb and Na increased considerably. The concentration of Co, Ca and Ti reduced obviously in fog. Except for Cr, Co and Ti, the other elements increased by 1 to 3 times in haze. Most of the elements had the minimal enrichment factors in sunny day, while the other had the maximal enrichment factor in

  17. A Fast Radiative Transfer Parameterization Under Cloudy Condition in Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Liu, X.; Yang, P.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) system, which is proposed and developed by NASA, will directly measure the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (IR), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (RS), and radio occultation (RO). IR, RS, and RO measurements provide information on the most critical but least understood climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks associated with the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor, broadband reflected and emitted radiative fluxes, cloud properties, surface albedo, and surface skin temperature. To perform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for long term climate observations, accurate and fast radiative transfer models are needed. The principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) is one of the efforts devoted to the development of fast radiative transfer models for simulating radiances and reflecatance observed by various hyperspectral instruments. Retrieval algorithm based on PCRTM forward model has been developed for AIRS, NAST, IASI, and CrIS. It is very fast and very accurate relative to the training radiative transfer model. In this work, we are extending PCRTM to UV-VIS-near IR spectral region. To implement faster cloudy radiative transfer calculations, we carefully investigated the radiative transfer process under cloud condition. The cloud bidirectional reflectance was parameterized based on off-line 36-stream multiple scattering calculations while few other lookup tables were generated to describe the effective transmittance and reflectance of the cloud-clear-sky coupling system in solar spectral region. The bidirectional reflectance or the irradiance measured by satellite may be calculated using a simple fast radiative transfer model providing the type of cloud (ice or water), optical depth of the cloud, optical depth of both atmospheric trace gases above and below clouds, particle size of the cloud, as well

  18. Assimilation of hyperspectral infrared sounder radiances under cloudy skies in a regional NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. Since most of the data assimilation models are used for the clear radiances assimilation, an important step for satellite radiances assimilation is the clear location detection. Good clear detection could effectively remove the cloud contamination and keep the clear observations for assimilation. In this dissertation, a new detection method uses collocated high spatial resolution imager data onboard the same platform as the satellite sounders to help IR sounders subpixel cloud detection, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The MODIS cloud mask provides a level of confidence for the observed skies to help AIRS Field-of-View (FOVs) cloud detection. By reducing the cloud contamination, a cold bias in the temperature field and a wet bias in the moisture field are corrected for the atmospheric analysis fields. These less cloud affected analysis fields further improve hurricane track and intensity forecast. The availability of satellite observations that can be assimilated in the model is limited if only the clear radiances are assimilation. An effective way to use the thermodynamic information under partially cloudy regions is to assimilate the "cloud-cleared" radiances (CCRs); CCRs are also called clear equivalent radiances. Because the CCRs are the equivalent clear radiances from the partially cloudy FOVs, they can be directly assimilated into the current data assimilation models without modifications. The AIRS CCRs are assimilated and compared with the AIRS using stand-alone cloud detection and collocated cloud detection. The assimilation of AIRS cloud-cleared radiances directly affects

  19. Seismic images under the Beijing region inferred from P and PmP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jianshe; Xie, Furen; Lan, Congxin; Xing, Chengqi; Ma, Shizhen

    2008-07-01

    In this study a new tomographic method is applied to over 1500 high-quality PmP (Moho reflected wave) travel-time data as well as over 38,500 high-quality first P-wave arrivals to determine a detailed 3D crustal velocity structure under Beijing and adjacent areas. Results of detailed resolution analyses show that the PmP data can significantly improve the resolution of the model in the middle and lower crust. After the PmP data are included in the tomographic inversion, our new model not only displays the tectonic feature appeared in the previous studies, but also reveals some new features. The Zhangjiakou-Bohai Sea fault zone (Zhang-Bo zone) is imaged as prominent and continuous low-velocity (low-V) anomalies in the shallower crust, while in the middle and lower crust it shows intermittent low-V anomalies extending down to the uppermost mantle. Furthermore, the pattern of low-V anomalies is different along the Zhang-Bo zone from the southeast to the northwest, indicating that there exist large differences in the dynamic evolution of Taihangshan and Yanshan uplifts and North China depression basin. Prominent low-V anomalies are visible under the source area of the 4 July 2006 Wen-An earthquake (M 5.1), suggesting that the occurrence of the Wen-An earthquake is possibly related to the effect of the crustal fluids probably caused by the upwelling of the hot and wet asthenospheric materials due to the deep dehydration of the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone. The fluids in the lower crust may cause the weakening of the seismogenic layer in the upper and middle crust and thus contribute to the initiation of the Wen-An earthquake. This is somewhat similar to the cause of the 1695 Sanhe-Pinggu earthquake and the 1976 Tangshan earthquake in the region, as well as the 1995 Kobe earthquake in Japan and the 2001 Bhuj earthquake in India.

  20. Evidences of Attenuation Zones Under Vesuvius Volcano By Local and Regional Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubellis, E.; Marturano, A.

    corresponding to the vesuvian area testifying the presence of a probable shallow large structure characterized by ductile beahaviour . The quality factor, obtained from local seismicity, and the extension of the circular attenuation zone, observed by regional earthquake, caracterise the attenu- ation source under Vesuvius volcano.

  1. Investigation of Regional Drivers for Discharge Variability in the Blue Nile Basin under Climate Change Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecklenburg, J.; Hattermann, F. F.; Liersch, S.

    2012-04-01

    A discharge time series is the result of complex and interacting processes. Important for the runoff variability are catchment characteristics like the basin size and shape, gradient of altitude and exposition as well as micro- and macroclimatic conditions. The discharge dynamic of the Blue Nile is predominantly controlled by the monsoon variability. Due to the steep gradients in the Ethiopian highlands, the surface flow component represents the main fraction of the total discharge. The composition of discharge and the resulting time response of river runoff is further a function of subsurface retention and surface roughness. Thus, the soil surface characteristics and thereby the land use are main factors controlling formation of local water availability in the Upper Blue Nile basin. During the last 30 years the continual transformation of forest and grassland to cropland reduced the total forest area of Ethiopia to 2.5 % with respect to the total area. Regarding the discharge formation process, land cover change supports generation of surface flow because of degradation of the surface roughness with two mainly negative effects: more surface runoff and less vegetation cover leads to erosion and degradation of soils. On the other hand, the water available for plants (soil moisture) may be reduced by a decreasing infiltration rate. Both effects have consequences for agricultural production and lead to an increasing demand for irrigation. Thus, the combination of the processes may accelerate the negative environmental response which makes the system highly vulnerable and sensitive to changes in driving forces. This study aims at analyzing the correlation of possible regional drivers with the inter-seasonal and inter-annual variability of subcatchment discharge generation. The study will be carried out applying the eco-hydrological model SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model) driven by observed and scenario climate data. Based on satellite image information the effect

  2. Pollen flow of wheat under natural conditions in the Huanghuai River Wheat Region, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ai-Qing; Zhang, Chun-Qing; Wu, Cheng-Lai; Gao, Qing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The transgenic pollen spread is the main pathway of transgenic plant gene flow. The maximum distance of pollen dispersal (horizontal), the spatial dynamics of pollen movement (vertical), and the patterns of pollen dispersal are important considerations in biosafety assessments of genetically modified crops. To evaluate wheat (Triticum aestivum) pollen dispersal, we measured the pollen suspension velocity and analyzed pollen dispersal patterns under natural conditions in the Huanghuai River wheat-growing region in 2009. The pollen suspension velocity was 0.3-0.4 m/s. The highest pollen densities were detected in the north, northwest, and south of the pollen source. Pollen was dispersed over distances greater than 245 m in the northwest and northeast directions. At the pollen source center, pollen density decreased with increasing vertical height. In the north of the pollen source, the pollen density from 65 m to 225 m showed a wave-mode decrease with increasing height. The horizontal transport of pollen over longer distances fitted polynomial equations. In the north, the pollen density was highest at 45 m from the pollen source, and decreased with increasing distance. In the northwest, the pollen density showed a double-peak trend. In the northeast, pollen density was highest from 45 m to 125 m from the source. Wind speeds greater than the pollen suspension velocity and the duration of continuous gusts were the main factors affecting pollen dispersal. This information will be useful for determining the spatial isolation distances for hybrid seed production and for the commercial production of transgenic wheat. PMID:25658025

  3. Bias correction methods for regional climate model simulations considering the distributional parametric uncertainty underlying the observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kue Bum; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Han, Dawei

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study of bias correction methods for regional climate model simulations considering the distributional parametric uncertainty underlying the observations/models. In traditional bias correction schemes, the statistics of the simulated model outputs are adjusted to those of the observation data. However, the model output and the observation data are only one case (i.e., realization) out of many possibilities, rather than being sampled from the entire population of a certain distribution due to internal climate variability. This issue has not been considered in the bias correction schemes of the existing climate change studies. Here, three approaches are employed to explore this issue, with the intention of providing a practical tool for bias correction of daily rainfall for use in hydrologic models ((1) conventional method, (2) non-informative Bayesian method, and (3) informative Bayesian method using a Weather Generator (WG) data). The results show some plausible uncertainty ranges of precipitation after correcting for the bias of RCM precipitation. The informative Bayesian approach shows a narrower uncertainty range by approximately 25-45% than the non-informative Bayesian method after bias correction for the baseline period. This indicates that the prior distribution derived from WG may assist in reducing the uncertainty associated with parameters. The implications of our results are of great importance in hydrological impact assessments of climate change because they are related to actions for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Since this is a proof of concept study that mainly illustrates the logic of the analysis for uncertainty-based bias correction, future research exploring the impacts of uncertainty on climate impact assessments and how to utilize uncertainty while planning mitigation and adaptation strategies is still needed.

  4. NCX 4016, a nitric oxide-releasing aspirin, modulates adrenergic vasoconstriction in the perfused rat tail artery

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Giuseppe; Manfredi, Barbara; Soldato, Piero Del; Berti, Ferruccio

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the nitric oxide (NO)-releasing aspirin, NCX 4016, to control vasoconstrictor responses induced by electrical field stimulation (TNS) or by exogenous norepinephrine (NE) was investigated in perfused rat tail artery with intact endothelium. NCX 4016 (25, 50 and 100 μM) dose-dependently antagonized the vasoconstriction caused by TNS (from 0.5 to 64 Hz) and by NE (from 0.01 to 10 μM). The vasorelaxant activity of NCX 4016 (100 μM) in NE-precontracted arteries was concomitant with a marked increase of tissue cyclic GMP (4.9 fold, P<0.001) and was significantly antagonized by the inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase, methylene blue and 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. The effect of NCX 4016 was endothelium NO-independent since, in preparations perfused with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (10 μM), this compound prevented the rise in basal perfusion pressure and reversed the accentuation of vasoconstrictor responses caused by NO synthase inhibition. Aspirin-moiety released by NCX 4016 inhibited the 6-keto-PGF1α formation without interfering with the vasorelaxant activity of NCX 4016, while aspirin (100 μM) was devoid of any activity against vasoconstriction induced by both TNS and NE in perfused rat tail artery. NCX 4016 moderated adrenergic vasoconstriction in perfused rat tail arteries by a direct donation of NO without involving the relaxant factors such as PGI2 and NO from endothelial cells. The results obtained with NCX 4016 in perfused rat tail artery bears some therapeutical potential in conditions associated with vascular smooth muscle hyperreactivity to adrenergic stimulation. PMID:12208780

  5. Effect of renal sympathetic nerve on adrenergically and angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction in normal Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the effect of renal sympathetic innervation on adrenergically and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced renal vasoconstriction in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Methods Forty-eight WKY rats were treated with either losartan (10 mg/kg/day p.o.) or carvedilol (5 mg/kg/day p.o.) or a combination of them (10 mg/kg/day + 5 mg/kg/day p.o.) for 7 days. On day 8, the rats were anaesthetized, and renal vasoconstrictor experiments were carried out. A group of rats was subjected to acute unilateral renal denervation during the acute study. Changes in the renal vasoconstrictor responses were determined in terms of reductions in renal blood flow caused by Ang II, noradrenaline (NA), and methoxamine (ME). Results In normal animals, losartan decreased (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but not to NA or ME. Carvedilol treatment, however, blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Combination of losartan and carvedilol blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but augmented the responses to NA and ME (all P < 0.05). Interestingly, when denervated rats were treated with the same combination, there was a reduction (P < 0.05) in the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Conclusions Data suggest that the renal sympathetic nerve contributes to adrenergic agonist-mediated renal vasoconstrictions in normal rats. The data further indicate an interactive relationship between renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems in modulating adrenergically and Ang II-induced renal vasoconstriction in WKY rats. PMID:21047287

  6. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes and primary angiitis of the central nervous system: clinical, imaging, and angiographic comparison.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Aneesh B; Topcuoglu, Mehmet A; Fok, Joshua W; Kursun, Oguzhan; Nogueira, Raul G; Frosch, Matthew P; Caviness, Verne S

    2016-06-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) are invariably considered in the differential diagnosis of new cerebral arteriopathies. However, prompt and accurate diagnosis remains challenging. Here we compared the features of 159 RCVS to 47 PACNS patients and developed criteria for prompt bedside diagnosis. Recurrent thunderclap headache (TCH), and single TCH combined with either normal neuroimaging, border zone infarcts, or vasogenic edema, have 100% positive predictive value for diagnosing RCVS or RCVS-spectrum disorders. In patients without TCH and positive angiography, neuroimaging can discriminate RCVS (no lesion) from PACNS (deep/brainstem infarcts). Ann Neurol 2016;79:882-894. PMID:27043703

  7. Direct vasoconstriction as a possible cause for amphotericin B-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, B P; Weihprecht, H; Campbell, W R; Lorenz, J N; Webb, R C; Briggs, J P; Schnermann, J

    1991-01-01

    In anesthetized rats we tested the hypothesis that amphotericin B (AmB) reduces glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by activating the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. Infusion of 1 mg/kg AmB over 50 min was followed by a reduction in kidney GFR (from 0.47 +/- 0.03 to 0.39 +/- 0.02 ml/min per 100 g body wt during the second hour after infusion; P less than 0.05) and by an increase in urine flow and urinary chloride excretion. Single-nephron GFR (SNGFR) measured in proximal (TGF interrupted) or distal tubules (TGF intact) decreased to a similar degree from 33.4 +/- 1.8 and 30.6 +/- 1.2 nl/min in the control period to 19.7 +/- 1.9 and 21.2 +/- 1.6 nl/min during the second hour after AmB infusion (P less than 0.05). Distal chloride concentrations and TGF responses to changes in loop of Henle flow rate were not significantly altered by AmB. AmB at 10(-5) M reduced the diameter of isolated perfused afferent arterioles from rabbit kidneys. In isometrically contracting rings of rabbit aorta and renal artery in vitro AmB produced endothelium-independent constriction, with half-maximal contraction (EC50) being achieved by 1.8 x 10(-6) and 2.6 x 10(-6) M in intact vessels and 1.3 x 10(-6) and 1.7 x 10(-6) M in endothelium-denuded vessels respectively. Tension development did not occur in Ca-free media or in the presence of Ca channel blockers. Pretreatment with ouabain or Bay K 8644 potentiated the effect of AmB. The vasoconstrictive effect of AmB was counteracted by aminophylline and atrial natriuretic peptide. We conclude that the AmB-induced reduction in GFR is not caused by TGF activation and that AmB has a direct vasoconstrictor effect that is probably initiated by depolarization-induced opening of Ca channels. This effect may be an important component of the nephrotoxic actions of AmB. Images PMID:1710234

  8. 6-Gingerol alleviates exaggerated vasoconstriction in diabetic rat aorta through direct vasodilation and nitric oxide generation.

    PubMed

    Ghareib, Salah A; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Elberry, Ahmed A; Azhar, Ahmad; Watson, Malcolm L; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect and potential mechanism of action of 6-gingerol on alterations of vascular reactivity in the isolated aorta from diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into two experimental groups, control and diabetics. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg kg(-1)), and the rats were left for 10 weeks to develop vascular complications. The effect of in vitro incubation with 6-gingerol (0.3-3 μM) on the vasoconstrictor response of the isolated diabetic aortae to phenylephrine and the vasodilator response to acetylcholine was examined. Effect of 6-gingerol was also examined on aortae incubated with methylglyoxal as an advanced glycation end product (AGE). To investigate the mechanism of action of 6-gingerol, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (100 μM), guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue (5 μM), calcium-activated potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium chloride (10 mM), and cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 μM) were added 30 minutes before assessing the direct vasorelaxant effect of 6-gingerol. Moreover, in vitro effects of 6-gingerol on NO release and the effect of 6-gingerol on AGE production were examined. Results showed that incubation of aortae with 6-gingerol (0.3-10 μM) alleviated the exaggerated vasoconstriction of diabetic aortae to phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent manner with no significant effect on the impaired relaxatory response to acetylcholine. Similar results were seen in the aortae exposed to methylglyoxal. In addition, 6-gingerol induced a direct vasodilation effect that was significantly inhibited by Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride and methylene blue. Furthermore, 6-gingerol stimulated aortic NO generation but had no effect on AGE formation. In conclusion, 6-gingerol ameliorates enhanced vascular contraction in diabetic aortae, which may be partially

  9. Under-Ice Science in the Polar Regions with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Singh, H.; Das, S. B.; Jackson, R. H.; Kukulya, A.; Littlefield, R.; Maksym, T. L.; Plueddemann, A. J.; Sohn, R. A.; Straneo, F.; Wilkinson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Developments in autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology over the last decade have enabled scientists to study areas of the ocean at high latitude that were previously unapproachable. In particular, advances in acoustic communications, robotic autonomy and navigation, and compact sensor technology allow AUVs to work in close proximity to sea ice, glacial fronts, and the sea floor under multi-year pack ice. We describe the technology that enabled several expeditions to both polar regions that have used Seabed-class AUVs as the primary platform for making scientific measurements. We also describe current and upcoming missions using the smaller Seabed-100 and REMUS-100 AUVs for shallow-water work near glacial fronts. Several problems must be solved in order to successfully use robots under ice. Acoustic communications must be robust enough for operators on the surface to inform the AUV of changing conditions so that the vehicle can safely return to open water on the surface - during the AGAVE and IceBell expeditions, we experienced sea ice drift rates of tens of centimeters per second, and moving ice floes that constrained the availability of open water. AUV navigation must be flexible enough for the robot to switch reference frames during a mission depending on the conditions and on the scientific objective. During a single deployment during the IceBell expedition, it was typical for the robot to switch from ship-relative (using acoustic transponders), to ice-relative (using a doppler velocity log), to ice-relative (using a distinct set of acoustic transponders), and back again; an AUV may also need to navigate relative to the sea floor (as during the AGAVE expedition). Making ice-relative measurements also requires taking ice floe rotation into account, and on-board navigation relative to a rotating frame may be necessary. Finally, specialized scenarios such as when navigating near a glacial front require navigation relative to vertical, rather than horizontal

  10. Modeling for regional ecosystem sustainable development under uncertainty--A case study of Dongying, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Li, Y P; Huang, G H; You, L; Jin, S W

    2015-11-15

    In this study, a superiority-inferiority two-stage stochastic programming (STSP) method is developed for planning regional ecosystem sustainable development. STSP can tackle uncertainties expressed as fuzzy sets and probability distributions; it can be used to analyze various policy scenarios that are associated with different levels of economic penalties when the promised targets are violated. STSP is applied to a real case of planning regional ecosystem sustainable development in the City of Dongying, where ecosystem services valuation approaches are incorporated within the optimization process. Regional ecosystem can provide direct and indirect services and intangible benefits to local economy. Land trading mechanism is introduced for planning the regional ecosystem's sustainable development, where wetlands are buyers who would protect regional ecosystem components and self-organization and maintain its integrity. Results of regional ecosystem activities, land use patterns, and land trading schemes have been obtained. Results reveal that, although large-scale reclamation projects can bring benefits to the local economy development, they can also bring with negative effects to the coastal ecosystem; among all industry activities oil field is the major contributor with a large number of pollutant discharges into local ecosystem. Results also show that uncertainty has an important role in successfully launching such a land trading program and trading scheme can provide more effective manner to sustain the regional ecosystem. The findings can help decision makers to realize the sustainable development of ecological resources in the process of rapid industrialization, as well as the integration of economic and ecological benefits. PMID:26179784

  11. Constraints to Hamari sheep farming under range conditions in Darfur and Kordofan Regions of Western Sudan.

    PubMed

    Tirab, Ahmed Berima; Chimonyo, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The study was conducted to identify the major production constraints of Hamari sheep in Darfur and Kordofan Regions of Western Sudan. A structured questionnaire was administered to 128 farmers in Darfur and Kordofan. Feed shortages, prevalence of diseases and parasites, and predation were more severe in Darfur than Kordofan (P < 0.05). Thefts were ranked higher by farmers using the sedentary system compared to those using semi-nomadic system (P < 0.05). Water shortage was ranked higher by farmers with small flocks, large flocks, semi-nomadic and sedentary husbandry system in Kordofan than their counterparts in Darfur Region (P < 0.05). Farmers practising semi-nomadic husbandry system and sedentary system in Darfur region ranked diseases, parasites and predation higher than those practising semi-nomadic and sedentary system in Kordofan region (P < 0.05). Feed shortage was ranked higher as a challenge by farmers practising semi-nomadic system in Darfur Region than those practising semi-nomadic system in Kordofan Region (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that the severity of challenges facing Hamari sheep producers vary with flock size, region and production system used. PMID:27126220

  12. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for an Ozone... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In...

  13. Land Claims and Native Manpower. Staffing Regional and Village Corporations under Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinfeld, Judith; And Others

    An exploratory examination of the professional, technical, and clerical manpower needs of Alaskan regional and village corporations established under the Native Land Claims Settlement Act, this report recognized that critical staffing needs can only be met by carefully designed educational and training programs. The staffing demand analyses were,…

  14. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  15. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  16. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  17. 40 CFR 51.916 - What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.916 What are the requirements for an Ozone Transport Region under the 8-hour NAAQS? (a) In General... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for an...

  18. Regional seismic variations in the inner core under the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J. C. E.; Deuss, A.

    2015-12-01

    An asymmetry between a nearly isotropic, faster `eastern' hemisphere and an anisotropic, slower `western' hemisphere in Earth's inner core has been revealed by previous seismic studies. However, it remains unclear if division of the inner core into just two hemispheres is too simplistic. Here, we carry out regional-scale tomography using a new body wave data set to study the hemisphere boundary region beneath the northern and central Pacific Ocean and North America. If anisotropy is not considered, then a hemispherical pattern seems to be present in the study region, though the hemisphere boundary appears to be irregular. However, once the presence of anisotropy is permitted we find that this region cannot be simply separated into an anisotropic western hemisphere and an isotropic eastern hemisphere; instead the strength of the anisotropy varies regionally. The global hemispherical pattern is not observed here, instead the strongest anisotropy is observed in the centre and south west of the study region. Some of the strongest anisotropy appears to be in the `eastern' inner core, while part of the inner core assumed to be in the western hemisphere shows weaker anisotropy. Thus, this part of the inner core displays complex variations in anisotropy which differ from a simple hemispherical division. We suggest that a long-lived global heterogeneity, such as uneven heat flow through the core-mantle boundary over a period of hundreds of millions of years, may be responsible for the observed pattern of inner core anisotropy.

  19. Enhanced Endothelin-1 Mediated Vasoconstriction of the Ophthalmic Artery May Exacerbate Retinal Damage after Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Blixt, Frank W.; Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Johnson, Leif; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculature is often the target of stroke studies. However, the vasculature supplying the eye might also be affected by ischemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the transient global cerebral ischemia (GCI) enhances vascular effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and 5-hydroxytryptamine/serotonin (5-HT) on the ophthalmic artery in rats, leading to delayed retinal damage. This was preformed using myography on the ophthalmic artery, coupled with immunohistochemistry and electroretinogram (ERG) to assess the ischemic consequences on the retina. Results showed a significant increase of ET-1 mediated vasoconstriction at 48 hours post ischemia. The retina did not exhibit any morphological changes throughout the study. However, we found an increase of GFAP and vimentin expression at 72 hours and 7 days after ischemia, indicating Müller cell mediated gliosis. ERG revealed significantly decreased function at 72 hours, but recovered almost completely after 7 days. In conclusion, we propose that the increased contractile response via ET-1 receptors in the ophthalmic artery after 48 hours may elicit negative retinal consequences due to a second ischemic period. This may exacerbate retinal damage after ischemia as illustrated by the decreased retinal function and Müller cell activation. The ophthalmic artery and ET-1 mediated vasoconstriction may be a valid and novel therapeutic target after longer periods of ischemic insults. PMID:27322388

  20. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits antigen-stimulated increases in vasoconstriction and glycogenolysis in perfused livers derived from sensitized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, K.L.; Bates, J.N.; Fisher, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Recent studies in the authors laboratory demonstrated that infusion of antigen into perfused livers from sensitized rats produces increases in hepatic portal pressure, increases in hepatic glucose output and decreases in hepatic oxygen consumption. In the present study, effects of NO on these hepatic responses to antigen challenge were investigated. Infusion of NO into perfused livers from sensitized rats attenuated ovalbumin induced increases in hepatic portal pressure and glucose output approximately 85% and 90%, respectively, and abolished ovalbumin-induced decreases in hepatic oxygen consumption. The duration of ovalbumin-stimulated increases in hepatic portal pressure was reduced nearly 90% by NO. Similarly, infusion of NO into perfused livers from sensitized rats inhibited increases in hepatic portal pressure and glucose output in response to platelet-activating factor (PAF) nearly 80 and 90%, respectively. In contrast, NO inhibited completely hepatic vasoconstriction in response to phenylephrine without altering glycogenolytic responses to this {alpha}-adrenergic agonist. These results provide evidence for regulatory effects of NO on hemodynamic and glycogenolytic responses to antigen in perfused livers from sensitized rats. These observations support previous findings which suggest that hepatic responses to sensitizing antigen may be mediated by PAF or other autacoid mediators which stimulate glycogenolysis in liver by indirect mechanisms involving hepatic vasoconstriction.

  1. Modulation of pain in pediatric sickle cell disease: understanding the balance between endothelin mediated vasoconstriction and apelin mediated vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terika P.; Schlenz, Alyssa M.; Schatz, Jeffrey C.; Maitra, Rangan; Sweitzer, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) have painful vaso-occlusive episodes (VOE), which often reoccur across the individual's lifespan. Vaso-constrictive and vaso-dilatory molecules have been hypothesized to play a role in VOEs. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor that is released during VOEs and is correlated with pain history. Apelin is a vaso-dilatory peptide that also has a modulatory role in pain processing. We hypothesize that the ratio between vaso-dilatory and vaso-constrictive tone in children with SCD may be a marker of pain sensitization and vaso-occlusion. Plasma endothelin and apelin levels were measured in 47 children with SCD. Procedural and baseline pain were assessed via child- and caregiver-reports and observational distress. Pain history was assessed using retrospective chart review. Plasma apelin was related to age, with decreased levels in older children. The ratio between apelin and ET-1 was negatively correlated to observational baseline pain. The ratio between apelin and Big ET was negatively correlated to caregiver ratings of baseline pain and positively correlated to history of VOEs, which is possibly due to hydroxyurea treatment. These results suggest that an imbalance in the apelin and endothelin systems may contribute to an increasing number of VOEs and baseline pain in children with SCD. PMID:25486928

  2. Regional and cardiac haemodynamic effects of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in conscious, Long Evans rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, S. M.; Compton, A. M.; Kemp, P. A.; Bennett, T.

    1990-01-01

    1. Regional haemodynamic responses to i.v. bolus doses (0.1-10.0 mg kg-1) of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were measured in conscious, Long Evans rats (n = 8) chronically instrumented with renal, mesenteric and hindquarters pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters. 2. L-NAME caused dose-dependent pressor effects associated with renal, mesenteric and hindquarters vasoconstrictions. The mesenteric vascular bed showed earlier onset with more rapid, and greater, maximum vasoconstrictions than the renal or hindquarters vascular beds; however, the hindquarters vasoconstriction was more persistent. D-NAME was without significant effects (n = 2). 3. Primed infusion of L-arginine (100 mg kg-1 bolus followed by 100 mg kg-1 h-1 infusion), starting 10 min after an i.v. bolus injection of L-NAME (10 mg kg-1), caused significant reversal of the pressor responses, and renal and mesenteric vasoconstrictions, but not of the hindquarters vasoconstriction. Primed infusions of L-arginine (100 mg kg-1, 100 mg kg-1 h-1) starting 5 min after L-NAME (1 mg kg-1) additionally caused some reversal of the hindquarters vasoconstriction, but this effect was transient. 4. Primed infusion of L-arginine (100 mg kg-1, 100 mg kg-1 h-1) starting 30 min before i.v. bolus injection of L-NAME (10 mg kg-1) caused significant attenuation of the pressor effects and the renal and mesenteric vasoconstrictions but not of the hindquarters vasoconstriction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2076481

  3. Region-confined restoration method for motion-blurred star image of the star sensor under dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liheng; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco; Jiang, Guangwen; Wang, Xingshu; Huang, Zongsheng; Qin, Shiqiao

    2016-06-10

    Under dynamic conditions, the centroiding accuracy of the motion-blurred star image decreases and the number of identified stars reduces, which leads to the degradation of the attitude accuracy of the star sensor. To improve the attitude accuracy, a region-confined restoration method, which concentrates on the noise removal and signal to noise ratio (SNR) improvement of the motion-blurred star images, is proposed for the star sensor under dynamic conditions. A multi-seed-region growing technique with the kinematic recursive model for star image motion is given to find the star image regions and to remove the noise. Subsequently, a restoration strategy is employed in the extracted regions, taking the time consumption and SNR improvement into consideration simultaneously. Simulation results indicate that the region-confined restoration method is effective in removing noise and improving the centroiding accuracy. The identification rate and the average number of identified stars in the experiments verify the advantages of the region-confined restoration method. PMID:27409019

  4. Sensitivity of soil moisture initialization for decadal predictions under different regional climatic conditions in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, S.; Sehlinger, A.; Feldmann, H.; Kottmeier, C.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of soil initialization is investigated through perturbation simulations with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The focus of the investigation is to assess the sensitivity of simulated extreme periods, dry and wet, to soil moisture initialization in different climatic regions over Europe and to establish the necessary spin up time within the framework of decadal predictions for these regions. Sensitivity experiments consisted of a reference simulation from 1968 to 1999 and 5 simulations from 1972 to 1983. The Effective Drought Index (EDI) is used to select and quantify drought status in the reference run to establish the simulation time period for the sensitivity experiments. Different soil initialization procedures are investigated. The sensitivity of the decadal predictions to soil moisture initial conditions is investigated through the analysis of water cycle components' (WCC) variability. In an episodic time scale the local effects of soil moisture on the boundary-layer and the propagated effects on the large-scale dynamics are analysed. The results show: (a) COSMO-CLM reproduces the observed features of the drought index. (b) Soil moisture initialization exerts a relevant impact on WCC, e.g., precipitation distribution and intensity. (c) Regional characteristics strongly impact the response of the WCC. Precipitation and evapotranspiration deviations are larger for humid regions. (d) The initial soil conditions (wet/dry), the regional characteristics (humid/dry) and the annual period (wet/dry) play a key role in the time that soil needs to restore quasi-equilibrium and the impact on the atmospheric conditions. Humid areas, and for all regions, a humid initialization, exhibit shorter spin up times, also soil reacts more sensitive when initialised during dry periods. (e) The initial soil perturbation may markedly modify atmospheric pressure field, wind circulation systems and atmospheric water vapour distribution affecting atmospheric stability

  5. Enhanced soil moisture drying in transitional regions under a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shanjun; Huang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed global trends of soil moisture for the period 1948-2010 using the Global Land Data Assimilation System data set. Soil moisture was dominated by negative trends, with pronounced drying over East Asia and the Sahel. Spatial analysis according to climatic region revealed that the most obvious drying occurred over transitional regions between dry and wet climates. The noticeable drying first took place in the humid transitional regions and extended to the dry transitional regions, beginning in the 1980s. The variability of soil moisture was notably related to the changes in precipitation and temperature, but with different roles. For the global average, precipitation had a dominant effect on the variability of soil moisture at interannual to decadal time scales, but temperature was the main cause of the long-term trend of soil moisture on the whole. The enhanced soil drying in the transitional regions was primarily caused by global warming, which is illustrated by regression analysis and the land surface model.

  6. Regional dynamics of forest canopy change and underlying causal processes in the contiguous U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleeweis, Karen; Goward, Samuel N.; Huang, Chengquan; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Moisen, Gretchen; Kennedy, Robert E.; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2013-07-01

    history of forest change processes is written into forest age and distribution and affects earth systems at many scales. No one data set has been able to capture the full forest disturbance and land use record through time, so in this study, we combined multiple lines of evidence to examine trends, for six US regions, in forest area affected by harvest, fire, wind, insects, and forest conversion to urban/surburban use. We built an integrated geodatabase for the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) with data spanning the nation and decades, from remote sensing observations of forest canopy dynamics, geospatial data sets on disturbance and conversion, and statistical inventories, to evaluate relationships between canopy change observations and casual processes at multiple scales. Results show the variability of major change processes through regions across decades. Harvest affected more forest area than any other major change processes in the North East, North Central, Southeast, and South central regions. In the Pacific Coast and Intermountain West, more forest area was affected by harvest than forest fires. Canopy change rates at regional scales confounded the trends of individual forest change processes, showing the importance of landscape scale data. Local spikes in observed canopy change rates were attributed to wind and fire events, as well as volatile harvest regimes. This study improves the geographic model of forest change processes by updating regional trends for major disturbance and conversion processes and combining data on the dynamics of fire, wind, insects, harvest, and conversion into one integrated geodatabase for the CONUS.

  7. Kinematic mapping reveals different spatial distributions of center of pressure high-speed regions under somatosensory loss.

    PubMed

    Portela, Fellipe M; Ferreira, Arthur S

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of center-of-pressure speed during postural tasks and its changes due to somatosensory constraint (temporary ischemic hypoxia on ankle/feet) were investigated in young, healthy subjects (n = 13). A single high-speed region in the central region of the statokinesigram was observed during postural tasks with full sensory information. A significant increase in the quantity of high-speed regions was observed during ischemia and somatosensory constraint, whereas a significant increase in the quantity of high-speed regions localized more distant to the center of center-of-pressure area occurred under somatosensory constraints, suggesting a redirection of center-of-pressure trajectory to adjust the position of the center of mass with respect to the egocentric reference of balance. PMID:24945569

  8. Progeny of Osmia lignaria from distinct regions differ in developmental phenology and survival under a common thermal regime.

    PubMed

    Pitts-Singer, Theresa L; Cane, James H; Trostle, Glen

    2014-08-01

    Many insects, including some bees, have extensive subcontinental distributions that can differ in climatic conditions. Within and beyond these distributions, humans intentionally transport beneficial insects, including bees, to non-natal geographic locations. Insects also are experiencing unprecedented climatic change in their resident localities. For solitary bees, we know very little about the adaptive plasticity and geographic variation in developmental physiology that accommodates the different climates experienced within distributional ranges. Osmia lignaria Say (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) is a widely distributed North American spring-emerging bee being developed as a managed pollinator for tree fruit crops, including almonds. We examined the development and survival of O. lignaria progeny that were descended from populations sourced from southern California, western Washington, and northern Utah, and then were reared together under an hourly and weekly temperature regime simulating those of a California almond-growing region. We found that developmental physiologies of Washington and Utah progeny were generally similar. However, California progeny developed slower, were more metabolically active, and survived better under California conditions than did populations native to regions at higher latitudes. Regardless of geographic origin, cocooned adults managed under prescribed thermal regimes emerged faster and lived longer after wintering. Progeny of parents from different regions exhibited some acclimatory plasticity in developmental phenologies to a novel climatic regime, but overall their responses reflected their geographic origins. This outcome is consistent with their developmental phenologies being largely heritable adaptations to regional climates. PMID:24879969

  9. Response to selection under controlled environment versus natural selection in diverse regions across Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover is a widely adaptable and productive forage legume species found in most temperate regions of the world. To date, specific selection techniques for identifying genotypes with superior persistence have not been successful in improving the general adaptation and the long-term persistence o...

  10. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Alexander, Caroline E.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Hi-C: first observational evidence of field line braiding in the AR corona; NLFFF extrapolations support. Flux emergence and/or cancellation in the coronal braided region generate large stresses and tension in the coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. The field in these sub-regions are highly sheared and have apparent high speed plasma flows, therefore, the contribution from shearing flows to power the coronal and transition region heating can not be ruled out! The spatial resolution of Hi-­C is five times better than AIA. The cadence of Hi-C is 2.5 - 6 times better than AIA. The 193 Å was selected because of the strong emission line of Fe XII (peak formation temperature of 1.5 MK). Hi-­C collected data for 345 s @ 5.4 s cadence. The Hi-C target region was NOAA AR 11520; 11 July 2012, 18:51-18:57 UT. NLFFF extrapolation confirms the braided structure, and free magnetic energy estimates in the given volume.