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Sample records for regulate amyloid fibril

  1. Amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Rambaran, Roma N

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid refers to the abnormal fibrous, extracellular, proteinaceous deposits found in organs and tissues. Amyloid is insoluble and is structurally dominated by β-sheet structure. Unlike other fibrous proteins it does not commonly have a structural, supportive or motility role but is associated with the pathology seen in a range of diseases known as the amyloidoses. These diseases include Alzheimer's, the spongiform encephalopathies and type II diabetes, all of which are progressive disorders with associated high morbidity and mortality. Not surprisingly, research into the physicochemical properties of amyloid and its formation is currently intensely pursued. In this chapter we will highlight the key scientific findings and discuss how the stability of amyloid fibrils impacts on bionanotechnology. PMID:19158505

  2. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general. PMID:26496385

  3. Amyloid fibrils formed by the programmed cell death regulator Bcl-xL.

    PubMed

    Chenal, Alexandre; Vendrely, Charlotte; Vitrac, Heidi; Karst, Johanna C; Gonneaud, Alexis; Blanchet, Clément E; Pichard, Sylvain; Garcia, Elisabeth; Salin, Bénédicte; Catty, Patrice; Gillet, Daniel; Hussy, Nicolas; Marquette, Christel; Almunia, Christine; Forge, Vincent

    2012-01-20

    The accumulation of amyloid fibers due to protein misfolding is associated with numerous human diseases. For example, the formation of amyloid deposits in neurodegenerative pathologies is correlated with abnormal apoptosis. We report here the in vitro formation of various types of aggregates by Bcl-xL, a protein of the Bcl-2 family involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Bcl-xL forms aggregates in three states, micelles, native-like fibrils, and amyloid fibers, and their biophysical characterization has been performed in detail. Bcl-xL remains in its native state within micelles and native-like fibrils, and our results suggest that native-like fibrils are formed by the association of micelles. Formation of amyloid structures, that is, nonnative intermolecular β-sheets, is favored by the proximity of proteins within fibrils at the expense of the Bcl-xL native structure. Finally, we provide evidence of a direct relationship between the amyloid character of the fibers and the tertiary-structure stability of the native Bcl-xL. The potential causality between the accumulation of Bcl-xL into amyloid deposits and abnormal apoptosis during neurodegenerative diseases is discussed. PMID:22119486

  4. Nucleation of amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchiev, Dimo; Auer, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    We consider nucleation of amyloid fibrils in the case when the process occurs by the mechanism of direct polymerization of practically fully extended protein segments, i.e., β-strands, into β-sheets. Applying the classical nucleation theory, we derive a general expression for the work to form a nanosized amyloid fibril (protofilament) constituted of successively layered β-sheets. Analysis of this expression reveals that with increasing its size, the fibril transforms from one-dimensional to two-dimensional aggregate in order to preserve the equilibrium shape corresponding to minimal formation work. We determine the size of the fibril nucleus, the fibril nucleation work, and the fibril nucleation rate as explicit functions of the concentration and temperature of the protein solution. The results obtained are applicable to homogeneous nucleation, which occurs when the solution is sufficiently pure and/or strongly supersaturated.

  5. Are amyloid fibrils molecular spandrels?

    PubMed

    Hane, Francis

    2013-11-15

    Amyloid-β, the protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, along with a number of other proteins, has been shown to form amyloid fibrils. Fibril forming proteins share no common primary structure and have little known function. Furthermore, all proteins have the ability to form amyloid fibrils under certain conditions as the fibrillar structure lies at the global free energy minimum of proteins. This raises the question of the mechanism of the evolution of the amyloid fibril structure. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that the fibril structure is a by-product of the forces of protein folding and lies outside the bounds of evolutionary pressures. PMID:24140343

  6. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Nucleation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Auer, Stefan

    2015-03-10

    One and the same protein can self-assemble into amyloid fibrils with different morphologies. The phenomenon of fibril polymorphism is relevant biologically because different fibril polymorphs can have different toxicity, but there is no tool for predicting which polymorph forms and under what conditions. Here, we consider the nucleation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils occurring by direct polymerization of monomeric proteins into fibrils. We treat this process within the framework of our newly developed nonstandard nucleation theory, which allows prediction of the concentration dependence of the nucleation rate for different fibril polymorphs. The results highlight that the concentration dependence of the nucleation rate is closely linked with the protein solubility and a threshold monomer concentration below which fibril formation becomes biologically irrelevant. The relation between the nucleation rate, the fibril solubility, the threshold concentration, and the binding energies of the fibril building blocks within fibrils might prove a valuable tool for designing new experiments to control the formation of particular fibril polymorphs. PMID:25762329

  8. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  9. PMEL Amyloid Fibril Formation: The Bright Steps of Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Christin; Rochin, Leila; van Niel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In pigment cells, melanin synthesis takes place in specialized organelles, called melanosomes. The biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes is initiated by an unpigmented step that takes place prior to the initiation of melanin synthesis and leads to the formation of luminal fibrils deriving from the pigment cell-specific pre-melanosomal protein (PMEL). In the lumen of melanosomes, PMEL fibrils optimize sequestration and condensation of the pigment melanin. Interestingly, PMEL fibrils have been described to adopt a typical amyloid-like structure. In contrast to pathological amyloids often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, PMEL fibrils represent an emergent category of physiological amyloids due to their beneficial cellular functions. The formation of PMEL fibrils within melanosomes is tightly regulated by diverse mechanisms, such as PMEL traffic, cleavage and sorting. These mechanisms revealed increasing analogies between the formation of physiological PMEL fibrils and pathological amyloid fibrils. In this review we summarize the known mechanisms of PMEL fibrillation and discuss how the recent understanding of physiological PMEL amyloid formation may help to shed light on processes involved in pathological amyloid formation. PMID:27589732

  10. Amyloid Fibrils: Formation, Polymorphism, and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Härd, Torleif

    2014-02-01

    Amyloid fibrils with cross-β spine basic architectures are prevalent and stable forms of peptides and proteins. Recent research has provided significant contributions to our understanding of the mechanisms of fibril formation and to the surprising diversity and persistence of structural polymorphism in amyloid fibrils. There have also been successful demonstrations of how molecules can be engineered to inhibit unwanted amyloid formation by different mechanisms. Future research in these areas will include investigations of mechanisms for primary nucleation and the structure of oligomeric intermediates, the general role of secondary nucleation events (autocatalysis), elucidation of the mechanisms and implications of preservation of structural morphology in amyloid propagation, and research into the largely unexplored phenomenon of cross-seeding, by which amyloid fibrils of one species induce the formation of amyloid by another species. PMID:26276617

  11. Polymorphism of Amyloid Fibrils In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Karthikeyan; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Koehler, Rolf; Schmidt, Matthias; Michel, Henri; Loos, Cornelia; Gaffney, Patricia M; Sigurdson, Christina J; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism is a wide-spread feature of amyloid-like fibrils formed in vitro, but it has so far remained unclear whether the fibrils formed within a patient are also affected by this phenomenon. In this study we show that the amyloid fibrils within a diseased individual can vary considerably in their three-dimensional architecture. We demonstrate this heterogeneity with amyloid fibrils deposited within different organs, formed from sequentially non-homologous polypeptide chains and affecting human or animals. Irrespective of amyloid type or source, we found in vivo fibrils to be polymorphic. These data imply that the chemical principles of fibril assembly that lead to such polymorphism are fundamentally conserved in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26954430

  12. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils. PMID:26453215

  13. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  14. Shear flow promotes amyloid-{beta} fibrilization.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Dave E; Hamilton-Brown, Paul; Asimakis, Peter; Ducker, William; Bertolini, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    The rate of formation of amyloid fibrils in an aqueous solution of amyloid-beta (Abeta) is greatly increased when the solution is sheared. When Abeta solution is stirred with a magnetic stirrer bar at 37 degrees C, a rapid increase in thioflavin T fluorescence is observed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images show the formation of aggregates, the growth of fibrils and the intertwining of the fibrils with time. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples taken after stirring shows a transition from random coil to alpha-helix to beta-sheet secondary structure over 20 h at 37 degrees C. The fluorescence, AFM and CD measurements are all consistent with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Quiescent, non-stirred solutions incubated at 37 degrees C showed no evidence of amyloid formation over a period of 3 days. Couette flow was found to accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils demonstrating that the primary effect of stirring is not mixing but shearing. Only very small shear forces are applied to individual molecules in our experiments. Simple calculation suggests that the force is too small to support a hypothesis that shearing promotes partial unfolding of the protein as is observed. PMID:19850675

  15. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  16. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-14

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27585675

  17. Atomistic theory of amyloid fibril nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabriolu, Raffaela; Kashchiev, Dimo; Auer, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    We consider the nucleation of amyloid fibrils at the molecular level when the process takes place by a direct polymerization of peptides or protein segments into β-sheets. Employing the atomistic nucleation theory (ANT), we derive a general expression for the work to form a nanosized amyloid fibril (protofilament) composed of successively layered β-sheets. The application of this expression to a recently studied peptide system allows us to determine the size of the fibril nucleus, the fibril nucleation work, and the fibril nucleation rate as functions of the supersaturation of the protein solution. Our analysis illustrates the unique feature of ANT that the size of the fibril nucleus is a constant integer in a given supersaturation range. We obtain the ANT nucleation rate and compare it with the rates determined previously in the scope of the classical nucleation theory (CNT) and the corrected classical nucleation theory (CCNT). We find that while the CNT nucleation rate is orders of magnitude greater than the ANT one, the CCNT and ANT nucleation rates are in very good quantitative agreement. The results obtained are applicable to homogeneous nucleation, which occurs when the protein solution is sufficiently pure and/or strongly supersaturated.

  18. Kinetic theory of amyloid fibril templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Jeremy D.

    2013-05-01

    The growth of amyloid fibrils requires a disordered or partially unfolded protein to bind to the fibril and adapt the same conformation and alignment established by the fibril template. Since the H-bonds stabilizing the fibril are interchangeable, it is inevitable that H-bonds form between incorrect pairs of amino acids which are either incorporated into the fibril as defects or must be broken before the correct alignment can be found. This process is modeled by mapping the formation and breakage of H-bonds to a one-dimensional random walk. The resulting microscopic model of fibril growth is governed by two timescales: the diffusion time of the monomeric proteins, and the time required for incorrectly bound proteins to unbind from the fibril. The theory predicts that the Arrhenius behavior observed in experiments is due to off-pathway states rather than an on-pathway transition state. The predicted growth rates are in qualitative agreement with experiments on insulin fibril growth rates as a function of protein concentration, denaturant concentration, and temperature. These results suggest a templating mechanism where steric clashes due to a single mis-aligned molecule prevent the binding of additional molecules.

  19. Fibril structure of human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Bedrood, Sahar; Li, Yiyu; Isas, J Mario; Hegde, Balachandra G; Baxa, Ulrich; Haworth, Ian S; Langen, Ralf

    2012-02-17

    Misfolding and amyloid fibril formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, but the structures of the misfolded forms remain poorly understood. Here we developed an approach that combines site-directed spin labeling with continuous wave and pulsed EPR to investigate local secondary structure and to determine the relative orientation of the secondary structure elements with respect to each other. These data indicated that individual hIAPP molecules take up a hairpin fold within the fibril. This fold contains two β-strands that are much farther apart than expected from previous models. Atomistic structural models were obtained using computational refinement with EPR data as constraints. The resulting family of structures exhibited a left-handed helical twist, in agreement with the twisted morphology observed by electron microscopy. The fibril protofilaments contain stacked hIAPP monomers that form opposing β-sheets that twist around each other. The two β-strands of the monomer adopt out-of-plane positions and are staggered by about three peptide layers (∼15 Å). These results provide a mechanism for hIAPP fibril formation and could explain the remarkable stability of the fibrils. Thus, the structural model serves as a starting point for understanding and preventing hIAPP misfolding. PMID:22187437

  20. Metastable Amyloid Phases and their Conversion to Mature Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschol, Martin; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in both functional biological responses and pathogenic disorders which include Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Amyloid fibril assembly frequently generates compact oligomeric and curvilinear polymeric intermediates which are implicated to be toxic to cells. Yet, the relation between these early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. Our measurements indicate that lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after crossing a salt and protein concentration dependent threshold. These oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. Our experimental transition boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions accounting for salt-modulated charge repulsion. We also report our preliminary findings on the mechanism by which these metastable oligomeric phases are converted into stable amyloid fibrils.

  1. [Cytotoxicity of amyloid fibrils of X-protein].

    PubMed

    Marsagishvili, L G; Shpagina, M D; Shatalin, Iu V; Shubina, V S; Naumov, A A; Potselueva, M M; Podlubnaia, Z A

    2006-01-01

    It is known that amyloid oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils induce cell death, and antibiotic tetracycline inhibits the fibrillization of beta amyloid peptides and other amyloidogenic proteins and disassembles their pre-formed fibrils. Earlier we have demonstrated that sarcomeric cytoskeletal proteins of the titin family (X-, C-, and H-proteins) are capable to form in vitro amyloid fibrils, and tetracycline effectively destroys these fibrils. Here we show that the viability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the presence of X-protein amyloids depends on the concentration of amyloid fibrils of X-protein and the time of incubation. In addition to the disaggregation of X-protein fibrils, tetracycline eliminated the cytotoxic effect of the protein. The antibiotic itself did not show a toxic effect, and the cell viability in its presence even increased. Our results evidence the potential of this approach for evaluating the effectiveness of drugs preventing or treating amyloidoses. PMID:17131815

  2. Physical and structural basis for polymorphism in amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils has matured over the past 15 years, it has become clear that, while amyloid fibrils do have well-defined molecular structures, their molecular structures are not uniquely determined by the amino acid sequences of their constituent peptides and proteins. Self-propagating molecular-level polymorphism is a common phenomenon. This article reviews current information about amyloid fibril structures, variations in molecular structures that underlie amyloid polymorphism, and physical considerations that explain the development and persistence of amyloid polymorphism. Much of this information has been obtained through solid state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The biological significance of amyloid polymorphism is also discussed briefly. Although this article focuses primarily on studies of fibrils formed by amyloid-β peptides, the same principles apply to many amyloid-forming peptides and proteins. PMID:25179159

  3. Universal Behavior in the Mesoscale Properties of Amyloid Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assenza, Salvatore; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ubiquitous proteinaceous aggregates occurring in vivo and in vitro, with an invariant structural fingerprint at the molecular length scale. However, interpretation of their mesoscopic architectures is complicated by diverse observable polymorphic states. We here present a constitutive model for amyloid fibrils based on the minimization of the total energy per fibril. The model is benchmarked on real amyloid fibrils studied by atomic force microscopy. We use multistranded β -lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils as a model system exhibiting a rich polymorphism. The constitutive model quantitatively recapitulates the main mesoscopic topological features of amyloid fibrils, that is, the evolution of fibril periodicity as a function of the ionic strength of the solution and of the fibril width. A universal mesoscopic structural signature of the fibrils emerges from this picture, predicting a general, parameter-free law for the periodicity of the fibrils, that depends solely on the number of protofilaments per fibril. These predictions are validated experimentally and conclusively highlight the role of competing electrostatic and elastic contributions as the main players in the establishment of amyloid fibrils structure.

  4. Amyloid fibril formation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuel, Hilal A. . E-mail: hilal.lashuel@epfl.ch; Aljabari, Bayan; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Metz, Christine N.; Leng Lin; Callaway, David J.E.; Bucala, Richard

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in the brain and not previously considered to be amyloidogenic, forms amyloid fibrils similar to those derived from the disease associated amyloidogenic proteins {beta}-amyloid and {alpha}-synuclein. Acid denaturing conditions were found to readily induce MIF to undergo amyloid fibril formation. MIF aggregates to form amyloid-like structures with a morphology that is highly dependent on pH. The mechanism of MIF amyloid formation was probed by electron microscopy, turbidity, Thioflavin T binding, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The fibrillar structures formed by MIF bind Congo red and exhibit the characteristic green birefringence under polarized light. These results are consistent with the notion that amyloid fibril formation is not an exclusive property of a select group of amyloidogenic proteins, and contribute to a better understanding of the factors which govern protein conformational changes and amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  5. Amyloid fibrils as functionalizable components of nanocomposite materials.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shiva P; Meade, Susie J; Healy, Jackie P; Sutton, Kevin H; Larsen, Nigel G; Staiger, Mark P; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a form of protein nanofiber that show promise as components of multifunctional bionanomaterials. In this work, native bovine insulin and bovine insulin that had been previously converted into amyloid fibrils were combined with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) via solution casting to determine the effect of fibrillization on the thermomechanical properties of the resulting composite. The synthesis method was found to preserve the amyloid fibril structure and properties of the resulting fibril-PVOH composite were investigated. At a filling level of 0.6 wt %, the fibril-reinforced PVOH was 15% stiffer than the PVOH control. Various properties of the films, including the glass transition temperature, degradation temperature, microstructure, and film morphology were characterized. Although more work is required to optimize the properties of the composites, this study provides proof of principle that incorporation of amyloid fibrils into a polymeric material can impart useful changes to the mechanical and morphological properties of the films. PMID:22002950

  6. Correlation between nanomechanics and polymorphic conformations in amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-11-25

    Amyloid fibrils occur in diverse morphologies, but how polymorphism affects the resulting mechanical properties is still not fully appreciated. Using formalisms from the theory of elasticity, we propose an original way of averaging the second area moment of inertia for non-axisymmetric fibrils, which constitutes the great majority of amyloid fibrils. By following this approach, we derive theoretical expressions for the bending properties of the most common polymorphic forms of amyloid fibrils (twisted ribbons, helical ribbons, and nanotubes), and we benchmark the predictions to experimental cases. These results not only allow an accurate estimation of the amyloid fibrils' elastic moduli but also bring insight into the structure-property relationships in the nanomechanics of amyloid systems, such as in the closure of helical ribbons into nanotubes. PMID:25275956

  7. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina; Melnikova, Lucia; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Garamus, Vasil M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Gazova, Zuzana

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  8. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Meenakshi; Vats, Abhishek; Taneja, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization) disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils) in amyloid cascade are also described. PMID:26019408

  9. Computational Assembly of Polymorphic Amyloid Fibrils Reveals Stable Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Smaoui, Mohamed Raef; Poitevin, Frédéric; Delarue, Marc; Koehl, Patrice; Orland, Henri; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid proteins aggregate into polymorphic fibrils that damage tissues of the brain, nerves, and heart. Experimental and computational studies have examined the structural basis and the nucleation of short fibrils, but the ability to predict and precisely quantify the stability of larger aggregates has remained elusive. We established a complete classification of fibril shapes and developed a tool called CreateFibril to build such complex, polymorphic, modular structures automatically. We applied stability landscapes, a technique we developed to reveal reliable fibril structural parameters, to assess fibril stability. CreateFibril constructed HET-s, Aβ, and amylin fibrils up to 17 nm in length, and utilized a novel dipolar solvent model that captured the effect of dipole-dipole interactions between water and very large molecular systems to assess their aqueous stability. Our results validate experimental data for HET-s and Aβ, and suggest novel (to our knowledge) findings for amylin. In particular, we predicted the correct structural parameters (rotation angles, packing distances, hydrogen bond lengths, and helical pitches) for the one and three predominant HET-s protofilaments. We reveal and structurally characterize all known Aβ polymorphic fibrils, including structures recently classified as wrapped fibrils. Finally, we elucidate the predominant amylin fibrils and assert that native amylin is more stable than its amyloid form. CreateFibril and a database of all stable polymorphic fibril models we tested, along with their structural energy landscapes, are available at http://amyloid.cs.mcgill.ca. PMID:23442919

  10. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K

    2016-03-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  11. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled. PMID:26592772

  12. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled.

  13. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled. PMID:26592772

  14. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  15. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; et al

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presencemore » of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.« less

  16. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils. PMID:26393799

  17. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  18. Elongation dynamics of amyloid fibrils: A rugged energy landscape picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiu Fan; Loken, James; Jean, Létitia; Vaux, David J.

    2009-10-01

    Protein amyloid fibrils are a form of linear protein aggregates that are implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we study the dynamics of amyloid fibril elongation by performing Langevin dynamic simulations on a coarse-grained model of peptides. Our simulation results suggest that the elongation process is dominated by a series of local minimum due to frustration in monomer-fibril interactions. This rugged energy landscape picture indicates that the amount of recycling of monomers at the fibrils’ ends before being fibrilized is substantially reduced in comparison to the conventional two-step elongation model. This picture, along with other predictions discussed, can be tested with current experimental techniques.

  19. Solid State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid state NMR methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer’s disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid state NMR techniques and technology. PMID:21219138

  20. Raft lipids as common components of human extracellular amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Gellermann, Gerald P.; Appel, Thomas R.; Tannert, Astrid; Radestock, Anja; Hortschansky, Peter; Schroeckh, Volker; Leisner, Christian; Lütkepohl, Tim; Shtrasburg, Shmuel; Röcken, Christoph; Pras, Mordechai; Linke, Reinhold P.; Diekmann, Stephan; Fändrich, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are fibrillar polypeptide aggregates from several degenerative human conditions, including Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases. Analysis of amyloid fibrils derived from various human diseases (AA, ATTR, Aβ2M, ALλ, and ALκ amyloidosis) shows that these are associated with a common lipid component that has a conserved chemical composition and that is specifically rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, the major components of cellular lipid rafts. This pattern is not notably affected by the purification procedure, and no tight lipid interactions can be detected when preformed fibrils are mixed with lipids. By contrast, the early and prefibrillar aggregates formed in an AA amyloid-producing cell system interact with the raft marker ganglioside-1, and amyloid formation is impaired by addition of cholesterol-reducing agents. These data suggest the existence of common cellular mechanisms in the generation of different types of clinical amyloid deposits. PMID:15851687

  1. Molecular Mechanism of Thioflavin-T Binding to Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Biancalana, Matthew; Koide, Shohei

    2010-01-01

    Intense efforts to detect, diagnose, and analyze the kinetic and structural properties of amyloid fibrils have generated a powerful toolkit of amyloid-specific molecular probes. Since its first description in 1959, the fluorescent dye Thioflavin-T (ThT) has become among the most widely used “gold standards” for selectively staining and identifying amyloid fibrils both in vivo and in vitro. The large enhancement of its fluorescence emission upon binding to fibrils makes ThT a particularly powerful and convenient tool. Despite its widespread use in clinical and basic science applications, the molecular mechanism for the ability of ThT to recognize diverse types of amyloid fibrils and for the dye’s characteristic fluorescence has only begun to be elucidated. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of ThT-fibril interactions at an atomic resolution. These studies have yielded important insights into amyloid structures and the processes of fibril formation, and they also offer guidance for designing the next generation of amyloid assembly diagnostics, inhibitors, and therapeutics. PMID:20399286

  2. Molecular basis for amyloid fibril formation and stability

    PubMed Central

    Makin, O. Sumner; Atkins, Edward; Sikorski, Pawel; Johansson, Jan; Serpell, Louise C.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular structure of the amyloid fibril has remained elusive because of the difficulty of growing well diffracting crystals. By using a sequence-designed polypeptide, we have produced crystals of an amyloid fiber. These crystals diffract to high resolution (1 Å) by electron and x-ray diffraction, enabling us to determine a detailed structure for amyloid. The structure reveals that the polypeptides form fibrous crystals composed of antiparallel β-sheets in a cross-β arrangement, characteristic of all amyloid fibers, and allows us to determine the side-chain packing within an amyloid fiber. The antiparallel β-sheets are zipped together by means of π-bonding between adjacent phenylalanine rings and salt-bridges between charge pairs (glutamic acid–lysine), thus controlling and stabilizing the structure. These interactions are likely to be important in the formation and stability of other amyloid fibrils. PMID:15630094

  3. Superresolution Imaging of Amyloid Fibrils with Binding-Activated Probes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding into amyloid-like aggregates underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, insights into the structure and function of these amyloids will provide valuable information on the pathological mechanisms involved and aid in the design of improved drugs for treating amyloid-based disorders. However, determining the structure of endogenous amyloids at high resolution has been difficult. Here we employ binding-activated localization microscopy (BALM) to acquire superresolution images of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils with unprecedented optical resolution. We propose that BALM imaging can be extended to study the structure of other amyloids, for differential diagnosis of amyloid-related diseases and for discovery of drugs that perturb amyloid structure for therapy. PMID:23594172

  4. Isotropic-nematic phase transition in amyloid fibrilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiu Fan

    2009-09-01

    We carry out a theoretical study on the isotropic-nematic phase transition and phase separation in amyloid fibril solutions. Borrowing the thermodynamic model employed in the study of cylindrical micelles, we investigate the variations in the fibril length distribution and phase behavior with respect to changes in the protein concentration, fibril’s rigidity, and binding energy. We then relate our theoretical findings to the nematic ordering experimentally observed in Hen Lysozyme fibril solution.

  5. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:23552370

  6. Amyloid Fibrils Composed of Hexameric Peptides Attenuate Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Adams, Chris M.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid forming proteins Tau, alpha B crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein, alpha B crystallin(HspB5), and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P (SAP), and insulin B chain were shown to be anti-inflammatory, capable of reducing serological levels of IL-6, and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of Tau 623–628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:23552370

  7. Molecular structures of amyloid and prion fibrils: consensus versus controversy.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-07-16

    Many peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Examples include mammalian and fungal prion proteins, polypeptides associated with human amyloid diseases, and proteins that may have biologically functional amyloid states. To understand the propensity for polypeptides to form amyloid fibrils and to facilitate rational design of amyloid inhibitors and imaging agents, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular structures of these fibrils. Although fibril structures were largely mysterious 15 years ago, a considerable body of reliable structural information about amyloid fibril structures now exists, with essential contributions from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. This Account reviews results from our laboratories and discusses several structural issues that have been controversial. In many cases, the amino acid sequences of amyloid fibrils do not uniquely determine their molecular structures. Self-propagating, molecular-level polymorphism complicates the structure determination problem and can lead to apparent disagreements between results from different laboratories, particularly when different laboratories study different polymorphs. For 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ₁₋₄₀) fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, we have developed detailed structural models from solid state NMR and electron microscopy data for two polymorphs. These polymorphs have similar peptide conformations, identical in-register parallel β-sheet organizations, but different overall symmetry. Other polymorphs have also been partially characterized by solid state NMR and appear to have similar structures. In contrast, cryo-electron microscopy studies that use significantly different fibril growth conditions have identified structures that appear (at low resolution) to be different from those examined by solid state NMR. Based on solid state NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, the in-register parallel β-sheet organization

  8. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid β fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, M.; Morgado, I.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ► Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ► Aβ(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ► We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of Aβ(1–40) fibril formation. ► At high Aβ(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ► Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid β (Aβ) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. Aβ(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  9. Amyloid fibril disruption by ultrasonic cavitation: nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G

    2014-07-30

    We describe the disruption of amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptides by ultrasonic cavitation. For this purpose, we performed nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with sinusoidal pressure and visualized the process with movies. When the pressure is negative, a bubble is formed, usually at hydrophobic residues in the transmembrane region. Most β-strands maintain their secondary structures in the bubble. When the pressure becomes positive, the bubble collapses, and water molecules crash against the hydrophilic residues in the nontransmembrane region to disrupt the amyloid. Shorter amyloids require longer sonication times for disruption because they do not have enough hydrophobic residues to serve as a nucleus to form a bubble. These results agree with experiments in which monodispersed amyloid fibrils were obtained by ultrasonication. PMID:24987794

  10. Ultrafast propagation of β-amyloid fibrils in oligomeric cloud

    PubMed Central

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Fukukshima, Masahiko; Hamada, Hiroki; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between monomer peptides and seeds is essential for clarifying the fibrillation mechanism of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. We monitored the deposition reaction of Aβ1–40 peptides on immobilized seeds grown from Aβ1–42, which caused formation of oligomers in the early stage. The deposition reaction and fibrillation procedure were monitored throughout by novel total-internal-reflection-fluorescence microscopy with a quartz-crystal microbalance (TIRFM-QCM) system. This system allows simultaneous evaluation of the amount of deposited peptides on the surface seeds by QCM and fibril nucleation and elongation by TIRFM. Most fibrils reached other nuclei, forming the fibril network across the nucleus hubs in a short time. We found a fibril-elongation rate two-orders-of-magnitude higher in an oligomeric cloud than reported values, indicating ultrafast transition of oligomers into fibrils. PMID:25376301

  11. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields. PMID:27451367

  12. Structural requirements of glycosaminoglycans for facilitating amyloid fibril formation of human serum amyloid A.

    PubMed

    Takase, Hiroka; Tanaka, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Aki; Watanabe, Shiori; Takahashi, Sanae; Nadanaka, Satomi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Mukai, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a precursor protein of amyloid fibrils. Given that heparan sulfate (HS), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), is detected in amyloid deposits, it has been suggested that GAG is a key component of amyloid fibril formation. We previously reported that heparin (an analog of HS) facilitates the fibril formation of SAA, but the structural requirements remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the structural requirements of GAGs for facilitating the amyloid fibril formation of SAA. Spectroscopic analyses using structurally diverse GAG analogs suggested that the fibril formation of SAA was facilitated irrespective of the backbone structure of GAGs; however, the facilitating effect was strongly correlated with the degree of sulfation. Microscopic analyses revealed that the morphologies of SAA aggregates were modulated by the GAGs. The HS molecule, which is less sulfated than heparin but contains highly sulfated domains, exhibited a relatively high potential to facilitate fibril formation compared to other GAGs. The length dependence of fragmented heparins on the facilitating effect suggested that a high density of sulfate groups is also required. These results indicate that not only the degree of sulfation but also the lengths of sulfated domains in GAG play important roles in fibril formation of SAA. PMID:27097047

  13. Amyloid Fibrillation of Insulin under Water-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Su; Lee, Jong Wha; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Hugh I.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrillation in water-organic mixtures has been widely studied to understand the effect of protein-solvent interactions on the fibrillation process. In this study, we monitored insulin fibrillation in formamide and its methyl derivatives (formamide, N-methyl formamide, N,N-dimethyl formamide) in the presence and absence of water. These model solvent systems mimic the cellular environment by providing denaturing conditions and a hydrophobic environment with limited water content. Thioflavin T (ThT) assay revealed that binary mixtures of water with formamide and its methyl derivatives enhanced fibrillation rates and β-sheet abundance, whereas organic solvents suppressed insulin fibrillation. We utilized solution small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the correlation between protein-solvent interactions and insulin fibrillation. SAXS experiments combined with simulated annealing of the protein indicated that the degree of denaturation of the hydrophobic core region at residues B11–B17 determines the fibrillation rate. In addition, DSC experiments suggested a crucial role of hydrophobic interactions in the fibrillation process. These results imply that an environment with limited water, which imitates a lipid membrane system, accelerates protein denaturation and the formation of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions during amyloid fibrillation. PMID:25418175

  14. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 ± 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25613018

  15. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Generalization of Filament Braiding Model for Amyloid Fibril Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Maighdlin; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian; Khurana, Ritu; Carter, Sue

    2001-03-01

    Research into the formation of amyloid fibrils is motivated by their association with several prominent diseases, among these Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and amyloidosis. Previous work in monitering the aggregation of immunoglobulin light chains to form amyloid fibrils suggests a braided structure where filaments and protofibrils wind together to form Type I and Type II fibrils. Non-contact atomic force microscopy is used to image and explore the kinetics of several other amyloid fibril forming proteins in an effort to generalize the filament braiding model. Included in this study are insulin and the B1 domain of G. Both of these have been shown to form fibrils in vitro. Alpha-synuclein is also included in this study. It is involved in the formation of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's Disease. The fourth protein used in this comparitive study is human amylin that is the cause of a systemic amyloidosis. Results from these four proteins and their associated fibrils are compared to the Ig light chain fibril structure in an effort to show the universality of the filament braiding model.

  17. Amyloid-like Fibril Formation by Trypsin in Aqueous Ethanol. Inhibition of Fibrillation by PEG.

    PubMed

    Kotormán, Márta; Simon, Mária L; Borics, Attila; Szabó, Márton Richárd; Szabó, Kitti; Szögi, Titanilla; Fülöp, Lívia

    2015-01-01

    The formation of amyloid-like fibrils was studied by using the well-known serine protease trypsin as a model protein in the presence of ethanol as organic solvent. Trypsin forms amyloid-like fibrils in aqueous ethanol at pH = 7.0. The dye Congo red (CR) was used to detect the presence of amyloid-like fibrils in the samples. The binding of CR to fibrils led to an increase in absorption intensity and a red shift in the absorption band of CR. Thioflavin T (ThT) and 8-anilino-1- naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) binding assays were employed to characterize amyloid-like fibril formation. The ThT binding assay revealed that the protein exhibited maximum aggregation in 60% (v/v) ethanol after incubation for 24 h at 24 (o)C. The ANS binding results indicated that the hydrophobic residues were more exposed to the solvent in the aggregated form of the protein. The effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the formation of amyloid-like fibrils was studied in vitro. The aggregation of trypsin was followed via the kinetics of aggregation, the far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the presence and absence of PEG. The CD measurements indicated that the protein aggregates have a cross-beta structure in 60% ethanol. TEM revealed that trypsin forms fibrils with a thread-like structure. The inhibitory effect of PEG on the aggregation of trypsin increased with rising PEG concentration. PEG therefore inhibits the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of trypsin in aqueous ethanol. PMID:26428300

  18. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation. PMID:27355699

  19. Amyloid fibrils as a nanoscaffold for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Sarah M; Roberts, Sarah J; Meade, Susie J; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a misfolded state, formed by many proteins when subjected to denaturing conditions. Their constituent amino acids make them ideally suited as a readily functionalized nanoscaffold for enzyme immobilization and their strength, stability, and nanometer size are attractive features for exploitation in the creation of new bionanomaterials. We report successful functionalization of amyloid fibrils by conjugation to glucose oxidase (GOD) using glutaraldehyde. GOD retained activity upon attachment and successful cross-linking was determined using electrophoresis, centrifugation, sucrose gradient centrifugation, and TEM. The resulting functionalized enzyme scaffold was then incorporated into a model poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) film, to create a new bionanomaterial. The antibacterial effect of the functionalized film was then tested on E. coli, the growth of which was inhibited, demonstrating the incorporation of GOD antibacterial activity into the PVOH film. The incorporation of the GOD-functionalized amyloid fibrils into PVOH provides an excellent 'proof of concept' model for the creation of a new bionanomaterial using a functionalized amyloid fibril scaffold. PMID:19918761

  20. Imaging and quantification of amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, Florian; Scharf, Andrea; von Mikecz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotics, as well as intrinsic processes such as cellular aging, contribute to an environment that constantly challenges nuclear organization and function. While it becomes increasingly clear that proteasome-dependent proteolysis is a major player, the topology and molecular mechanisms of nuclear protein homeostasis remain largely unknown. We have shown previously that (1) proteasome-dependent protein degradation is organized in focal microenvironments throughout the nucleoplasm and (2) heavy metals as well as nanoparticles induce nuclear protein fibrillation with amyloid characteristics. Here, we describe methods to characterize the landscape of intranuclear amyloid on the global and local level in different systems such as cultures of mammalian cells and the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Application of discrete mathematics to imaging data is introduced as a tool to develop pattern recognition of intracellular protein fibrillation. Since stepwise fibrillation of otherwise soluble proteins to insoluble amyloid-like protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative protein-misfolding disorders including Alzheimer's disease, CAG repeat diseases, and the prion encephalopathies, investigation of intracellular amyloid may likewise aid to a better understanding of the pathomechanisms involved. We consider aggregate profiling as an important experimental approach to determine if nuclear amyloid has toxic or protective roles in various disease processes. PMID:25311131

  1. Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Hereditary Transthyretin V30M Amyloidosis - Impact of Sex and Amyloid Fibril Composition

    PubMed Central

    Arvidsson, Sandra; Pilebro, Björn; Westermark, Per; Lindqvist, Per; Suhr, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transthyretin V30M (ATTR V30M) amyloidosis is a phenotypically diverse disease with symptoms ranging from predominant neuropathy to exclusive cardiac manifestations. The aims of this study were to determine the dispersion of the two types of fibrils found in Swedish ATTR V30M patients -Type A consisting of a mixture of truncated and full length ATTR fibrils and type B fibrils consisting of full length fibrils, and to estimate the severity of cardiac dysfunction in relation to fibril composition and sex. Material and Methods Echocardiographic data were analysed in 107 Swedish ATTR V30M patients with their fibril composition determined as either type A or type B. Measurements of left ventricular (LV) dimensions and evaluation of systolic and diastolic function including speckle tracking derived strain were performed. Patients were grouped according to fibril type and sex. Multivariate linear regression was utilised to determine factors of significant impact on LV thickness. Results There was no significant difference in proportions of the two types of fibrils between men and women. In patients with type A fibrils, women had significantly lower median septal (p = 0.007) and posterior wall thicknesses (p = 0.010), lower median LV mass indexed to height (p = 0.008), and higher septal strain (p = 0.037), as compared to males. These differences were not apparent in patients with type B fibrils. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that fibril type, sex and age all had significant impact on LV septal thickness. Conclusion This study demonstrates a clear difference between sexes in the severity of amyloid heart disease in ATTR V30M amyloidosis patients. Even though type A fibrils were associated with more advanced amyloid heart disease compared to type B, women with type A fibrils generally developed less cardiac infiltration than men. The differences may explain the better outcome for liver transplanted late-onset female patients compared to males. PMID

  2. Simulations of nucleation and elongation of amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianing; Muthukumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for the growth kinetics of amyloid fibrils from solutions of peptides and address the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and elongation by using a lattice Monte Carlo procedure. We reproduce the three main characteristics of nucleation of amyloid fibrils: (1) existence of lag time, (2) occurrence of a critical concentration, and (3) seeding. We find the nucleation of amyloid fibrils to require a quasi-two-dimensional configuration, where a second layer of β sheet must be formed adjunct to a first layer, which in turn leads to a highly cooperative nucleation barrier. The elongation stage is found to involve the Ostwald ripening (evaporation-condensation) mechanism, whereby bigger fibrils grow at the expense of smaller ones. This new mechanism reconciles the debate as to whether protofibrils are precursors or monomer reservoirs. We have systematically investigated the roles of time, peptide concentration, temperature, and seed size. In general, we find that there are two kinds of lag time arising from two different mechanisms. For higher temperatures or low enough concentrations close to the disassembly boundary, the fibrillization follows the nucleation mechanism. However, for low temperatures, where the nucleation time is sufficiently short, there still exists an apparent lag time due to slow Ostwald ripening mechanism. Consequently, the lag time is nonmonotonic with temperature, with the shortest lag time occurring at intermediate temperatures, which in turn depend on the peptide concentration. While the nucleation dominated regime can be controlled by seeding, the Ostwald ripening regime is insensitive to seeding. Simulation results from our coarse-grained model on the fibril size, lag time, elongation rate, and solubility are consistent with available experimental observations on many specific amyloid systems. PMID:19173542

  3. Hierarchical ordering of amyloid fibrils on the mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xingfei; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Feng; Pillai, Saju; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Rong; Dai, Bin; Li, Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2013-05-01

    The aggregation of amyloid peptides into ordered fibrils is closely associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The surfaces of cell membranes and biomolecules are believed to play important roles in modulation of peptide aggregation under physiological conditions. Experimental studies of fibrillogenesis at the molecular level in vivo, however, are inherently challenging, and the molecular mechanisms of how surface affects the structure and ordering of amyloid fibrils still remain elusive. Herein we have investigated the aggregation behavior of insulin peptides within water films adsorbed on the mica surface. AFM measurements revealed that the structure and orientation of fibrils were significantly affected by the mica lattice and the peptide concentration. At low peptide concentration (~0.05 mg mL-1), there appeared a single layer of short and well oriented fibrils with a mean height of 1.6 nm. With an increase of concentration to a range of 0.2-2.0 mg mL-1, a different type of fibrils with a mean height of 3.8 nm was present. Interestingly, when the concentration was above 2.0 mg mL-1, the thicker fibrils exhibited two-dimensional liquid-crystal-like ordering probably caused by the combination of entropic and electrostatic forces. These results could help us gain better insight into the effects of the substrate on amyloid fibrillation.The aggregation of amyloid peptides into ordered fibrils is closely associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The surfaces of cell membranes and biomolecules are believed to play important roles in modulation of peptide aggregation under physiological conditions. Experimental studies of fibrillogenesis at the molecular level in vivo, however, are inherently challenging, and the molecular mechanisms of how surface affects the structure and ordering of amyloid fibrils still remain elusive. Herein we have investigated the aggregation behavior of insulin peptides within water films adsorbed on the mica surface. AFM

  4. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  5. Aggregate Geometry in Amyloid Fibril Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbäck, Anders; Jónsson, Sigurður Æ.; Linnemann, Niels; Linse, Björn; Wallin, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    We present and study a minimal structure-based model for the self-assembly of peptides into ordered β-sheet-rich fibrils. The peptides are represented by unit-length sticks on a cubic lattice and interact by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity forces. Using Monte Carlo simulations with >105 peptides, we show that fibril formation occurs with sigmoidal kinetics in the model. To determine the mechanism of fibril nucleation, we compute the joint distribution in length and width of the aggregates at equilibrium, using an efficient cluster move and flat-histogram techniques. This analysis, based on simulations with 256 peptides in which aggregates form and dissolve reversibly, shows that the main free-energy barriers that a nascent fibril has to overcome are associated with changes in width.

  6. Scanning ion conductance microscopy studies of amyloid fibrils at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Cho, Sang-Joon; Busuttil, Katerina; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2012-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has developed to become a very versatile nano-scale technique to reveal the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of amyloid aggregates under physiological conditions. However, the imaging principle of AFM is based on measuring the `force' between a sharp tip and a given nanostructure, which may cause mechanical deformation of relatively soft objects. To avoid the deformation, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an alternative scanning probe microscopy technique, operating with alternating current mode. Here we can indeed reveal the 3D morphology of amyloid fibrils and it is capable of exploring proteins with nanoscale resolution. Compared with conventional AFM, we show that SICM can provide precise height measurements of amyloid protein aggregates, a feature that enables us to obtain unique insight into the detailed nucleation and growth mechanisms behind amyloid self-assembly.

  7. Nanopore analysis of amyloid fibrils formed by lysozyme aggregation.

    PubMed

    Martyushenko, Nikolay; Bell, Nicholas A W; Lamboll, Robin D; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-07-21

    The measurement of single particle size distributions of amyloid fibrils is crucial for determining mechanisms of growth and toxicity. Nanopore sensing is an attractive solution for this problem since it gives information on aggregates' shapes with relatively high throughput for a single particle technology. In this paper we study the translocation of lysozyme fibrils through quartz glass nanopores. We demonstrate that, under appropriate salt and pH conditions, lysozyme fibrils translocate through bare quartz nanopores without causing significant clogging. This enables us to measure statistics on tens of thousands of translocations of lysozyme fibrils with the same nanopore and track their development over a time course of aggregation spanning 24 h. Analysis of our events shows that the statistics are consistent with a simple bulk conductivity model for the passage of rods with a fixed cross sectional area through a conical glass nanopore. PMID:25994201

  8. Decoding vibrational states of Concanavalin A amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Piccirilli, Federica; Schirò, Giorgio; Vetri, Valeria; Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea; Militello, Valeria

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils are a general class of protein aggregates and represent a central topic in life sciences for their involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders and their unique mechanical and supramolecular morphological properties. Both their biological role and their physical properties, including their high mechanical stability and thermodynamic inertia, are related to the structural arrangement of proteins in the aggregates at molecular level. Significant variations may exist in the supramolecular organization of the commonly termed cross-β structure that constitutes the amyloid core. In this context, a fine knowledge of the structural details in fibrils may give significant information on the assembly process and on possible ways of tuning or inhibiting it. Here we propose a simple method based on the combined use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy to accurately reveal structural details in the fibrillar aggregates, side-chain exposure and intermolecular interactions. Interestingly, coupled analysis of mid-infrared spectra reveals antiparallel β-sheet orientation in ConA fibrils. We also report the comparison between THz absorption spectra of Concanavalin A in its native and fibrillar state at different hydration levels, allowing obtaining corroboration of peaks assignation in this range and information on the effect of amyloid supramolecular arrangement on the network dynamics of hydration water. PMID:25776525

  9. Amyloid fibril protein nomenclature: 2012 recommendations from the Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Sipe, Jean D; Benson, Merrill D; Buxbaum, Joel N; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Merlini, Giampaolo; Saraiva, Maria J M; Westermark, Per

    2012-12-01

    The Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA) met during the XIIIth International Symposium, May 6-10, 2012, Groningen, The Netherlands, to formulate recommendations on amyloid fibril protein nomenclature and to consider newly identified candidate amyloid fibril proteins for inclusion in the ISA Amyloid Fibril Protein Nomenclature List. The need to promote utilization of consistent and up to date terminology for both fibril chemistry and clinical classification of the resultant disease syndrome was emphasized. Amyloid fibril nomenclature is based on the chemical identity of the amyloid fibril forming protein; clinical classification of the amyloidosis should be as well. Although the importance of fibril chemistry to the disease process has been recognized for more than 40 years, to this day the literature contains clinical and histochemical designations that were used when the chemical diversity of amyloid diseases was poorly understood. Thus, the continued use of disease classifications such as familial amyloid neuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy generates confusion. An amyloid fibril protein is defined as follows: the protein must occur in body tissue deposits and exhibit both affinity for Congo red and green birefringence when Congo red stained deposits are viewed by polarization microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical identity of the protein must have been unambiguously characterized by protein sequence analysis when so is practically possible. Thus, in nearly all cases, it is insufficient to demonstrate mutation in the gene of a candidate amyloid protein; the protein itself must be identified as an amyloid fibril protein. Current ISA Amyloid Fibril Protein Nomenclature Lists of 30 human and 10 animal fibril proteins are provided together with a list of inclusion bodies that, although intracellular, exhibit some or all of the properties of the mainly extracellular amyloid fibrils. PMID:23113696

  10. Walnut extract inhibits the fibrillization of amyloid beta-protein, and also defibrillizes its preformed fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neha; Wang, K C; Wegiel, Jerzy; Malik, Mazhar N

    2004-08-01

    Fibrillar amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) is the principal component of amyloid plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. We have studied the effect of walnut extract on Abeta fibrillization by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The walnut extract not only inhibited Abeta fibril formation in a concentration and time- dependent manner but it was also able to defibrillize Abeta preformed fibrils. Over 90% inhibition of Abeta fibrillization was observed with 5 microl of methanolic extract of walnut (MEOW) both after 2 and 3 days of incubation. The maximum defibrillization (91.6%) was observed when preformed Abeta fibrils were incubated with 10 microl of MEOW for 2 days. These results suggest that walnuts may reduce the risk or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease by maintaining Abeta in the soluble form. Further studies showed that anti-amyloidogenic compound in walnut is an organic compound of molecular weight less than 10 kDa, which is neither a lipid nor a protein. Chloroform extract of walnut had no effect on Abeta fibrillization while MEOW and its 10 kDa filtrate inhibited Abeta fibrillization equally. It is proposed that polyphenolic compounds (such as flavonoids) present in walnuts may be responsible for its anti-amyloidogenic activity. PMID:15975066

  11. Aggregation of fibrils and plaques in amyloid molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, Mario; de Candia, Antonio; Coniglio, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    Amyloidlike proteins form highly organized aggregates, such as fibrils and plaques, preceded by the assembly of a wide range of unstructured oligomers and protofibrils. Despite their importance in a number of human neurodegenerative diseases, a comprehensive understanding of their kinetics and thermodynamics is still missing. We investigate, by computer simulations, a realistic model of amyloid molecules interacting via the experimentally determined Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential and derive its phase diagram. We show that fibrils and plaques, along with their precursors, correspond to different equilibrium and metastable thermodynamics phases and discuss the dynamical mechanisms leading to the nucleation and self-assembly of large scale structures.

  12. Designed amyloid beta peptide fibril - a tool for high-throughput screening of fibril inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Gunnar T; Ouberai, Myriam; Dumy, Pascal; Garcia, Julian

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) fibril formation is widely believed to be the causative event of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Therapeutic approaches are therefore in development that target various sites in the production and aggregation of Abeta. Herein we present a high-throughput screening tool to generate novel hit compounds that block Abeta fibril formation. This tool is an application for our fibril model (Abeta(16-37)Y(20)K(22)K(24))(4), which is a covalent assembly of four Abeta fragments. With this tool, screening studies are complete within one hour, as opposed to days with native Abeta(1-40). A Z' factor of 0.84+/-0.03 was determined for fibril formation and inhibition, followed by the reporter molecule thioflavin T. Herein we also describe the analysis of a broad range of reported inhibitors and non-inhibitors of Abeta fibril formation to test the validity of the system. PMID:17876751

  13. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  14. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  15. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy to study amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahou, Pierre; Curry, Nathan; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele; Kaminski, Clemens

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation of misfolded proteins is a characteristic hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. The ability to observe these aggregation processes and the corresponding structures formed in vitro or in situ is therefore a key requirement to understand the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. We report here on the implementation and application of Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy to visualize the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro.

  16. Surfaces Self-Assembly and Rapid Growth of Amyloid Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yichih; Petersson, E. James; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of surface-mediated fibrillization has been considered as a key issue in understanding the origins of the neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. In vitro, amyloid proteins fold through nucleation-elongation process. There is a critical concentration for early nucleating stage. However, some studies indicate that surfaces can modulate the fibril's formation under physiological conditions, even when the concentration is much lower than the critical concentration. Here, we use a label-free procedure to monitor the growth of fibrils across many length scales. We show that near a surface, the fibrillization process appears to bypass the nucleation step and fibrils grow through a self-assembly mechanism instead. We control and measure the pre-fibrillar morphology at different stages of this process on various surfaces. The interplay between the surface concentration and diffusion constant can help identify the detailed mechanisms of surface-mediated fibril growth, which remains largely unexplored. Our works provide a new insight in designing new probes and therapies. Supported by the National Institute On Aging of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P30AG010124.

  17. Self-Assembly of Amyloid Fibrils That Display Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Entwistle, Aiman; Zhang, Hong; Jackson, Antony P; Mason, Thomas O; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Smith, Andrew T; Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Perrett, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization is an important strategy to enhance the stability and recoverability of enzymes and to facilitate the separation of enzymes from reaction products. However, enzyme purification followed by separate chemical steps to allow immobilization on a solid support reduces the efficiency and yield of the active enzyme. Here we describe polypeptide constructs that self-assemble spontaneously into nanofibrils with fused active enzyme subunits displayed on the amyloid fibril surface. We measured the steady-state kinetic parameters for the appended enzymes in situ within fibrils and compare these with the identical protein constructs in solution. Finally, we demonstrated that the fibrils can be recycled and reused in functional assays both in conventional batch processes and in a continuous-flow microreactor. PMID:25937845

  18. Glycosaminoglycans in extracts of cardiac amyloid fibrils from familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin related to variant transthyretin Met 111.

    PubMed

    Magnus, J H; Stenstad, T; Kolset, S O; Husby, G

    1991-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated an association between secondary AA type amyloid fibrils and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in human liver. The present study was aimed at investigating whether a similar association could be demonstrated in isolated cardiac amyloid fibrils from a unique Danish family with amyloid cardiomyopathy related to variant transthyretin (TTR) with a single amino acid substitution of a methionin for leucine at position 111 (TTR Met 111). Using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography, significant amounts of GAGs were detected in close association with purified myocardial amyloid fibrils, whereas only trace amounts of polysaccharides were present in the corresponding normal preparation. The GAGs were identified as 50% chondroitin sulfate, 33% heparin/heparan sulfate, and 17% hyaluronan. With the methods used the amyloid associated GAGs appeared as high molecular weight free polysaccharide chains, and not as part of intact proteoglycans (PGs) in the fibril extracts. We conclude that the association between purified amyloid fibrils and GAGs may be a general feature of amyloid deposits. Also, we suggest that the proportion of different GAGs in the amyloid deposits may depend both on the organ or tissues affected and the type of proteins making up the fibrils. PMID:2068532

  19. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-\\beta protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining \\beta -sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  20. Electron tomography reveals the fibril structure and lipid interactions in amyloid deposits.

    PubMed

    Kollmer, Marius; Meinhardt, Katrin; Haupt, Christian; Liberta, Falk; Wulff, Melanie; Linder, Julia; Handl, Lisa; Heinrich, Liesa; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Matthias; Syrovets, Tatiana; Simmet, Thomas; Westermark, Per; Westermark, Gunilla T; Horn, Uwe; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-05-17

    Electron tomography is an increasingly powerful method to study the detailed architecture of macromolecular complexes or cellular structures. Applied to amyloid deposits formed in a cell culture model of systemic amyloid A amyloidosis, we could determine the structural morphology of the fibrils directly in the deposit. The deposited fibrils are arranged in different networks, and depending on the relative fibril orientation, we can distinguish between fibril meshworks, fibril bundles, and amyloid stars. These networks are frequently infiltrated by vesicular lipid inclusions that may originate from the death of the amyloid-forming cells. Our data support the role of nonfibril components for constructing fibril deposits and provide structural views of different types of lipid-fibril interactions. PMID:27140609

  1. Effect of acid predissolution on fibril size and fibril flexibility of synthetic beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Fitzgerald, M C; Murphy, R M

    1994-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the major protein component of senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's patients. Several researchers have demonstrated that A beta is neurotoxic in in vitro and in vivo systems. Peptide aggregation state and/or conformation might play a significant role in determining the toxicity of the peptide. The size and flexibility of fibrils formed from the synthetic peptide beta (1-39), corresponding to the first 39 residues of A beta, were determined. Samples were prepared either directly from lyophilized peptide or diluted from a 10 mg/ml stock solution in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). All samples had a final peptide concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, a final pH of 7.4, and a final NaCl concentration of 0.14 M. The molecular weight and linear density of the fibrils increased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA, based on static light scattering measurements. Analysis of the angular dependence of the intensity of scattered light indicated that the fibrils were semi-flexible chains and that the fibril flexibility decreased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA. There was a concomitant change in phase behavior from precipitation to gelation with the decrease in fibril flexibility. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7811938

  2. Fibpredictor: a computational method for rapid prediction of amyloid fibril structures.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Topp, Elizabeth M; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and are also a common instability in peptide and protein drug products. Despite their importance, experimental structures of amyloid fibrils in atomistic detail are rare. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel, rapid computational method to predict amyloid fibril structures (Fibpredictor). The method combines β-sheet model building, β-sheet replication, and symmetry operations with side-chain prediction and statistical scoring functions. When applied to nine amyloid fibrils with experimentally determined structures, the method predicted the correct structures of amyloid fibrils and enriched those among the top-ranked structures. These models can be used as the initial heuristic structures for more complicated computational studies. Fibpredictor is available at http://nanohub.org/resources/fibpredictor . PMID:27502172

  3. Elucidating the Role of Disulfide Bond on Amyloid Formation and Fibril Reversibility of Somatostatin-14

    PubMed Central

    Anoop, Arunagiri; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Dhaked, Bhagwan Das; Jha, Narendra Nath; Pratihar, Supriya; Ghosh, Saikat; Sahay, Shruti; Kumar, Santosh; Das, Subhadeep; Kombrabail, Mamata; Agarwal, Kumud; Jacob, Reeba S.; Singru, Praful; Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2014-01-01

    The storage of protein/peptide hormones within subcellular compartments and subsequent release are crucial for their native function, and hence these processes are intricately regulated in mammalian systems. Several peptide hormones were recently suggested to be stored as amyloids within endocrine secretory granules. This leads to an apparent paradox where storage requires formation of aggregates, and their function requires a supply of non-aggregated peptides on demand. The precise mechanism behind amyloid formation by these hormones and their subsequent release remain an open question. To address this, we examined aggregation and fibril reversibility of a cyclic peptide hormone somatostatin (SST)-14 using various techniques. After proving that SST gets stored as amyloid in vivo, we investigated the role of native structure in modulating its conformational dynamics and self-association by disrupting the disulfide bridge (Cys3–Cys14) in SST. Using two-dimensional NMR, we resolved the initial structure of somatostatin-14 leading to aggregation and further probed its conformational dynamics in silico. The perturbation in native structure (S-S cleavage) led to a significant increase in conformational flexibility and resulted in rapid amyloid formation. The fibrils formed by disulfide-reduced noncyclic SST possess greater resistance to denaturing conditions with decreased monomer releasing potency. MD simulations reveal marked differences in the intermolecular interactions in SST and noncyclic SST providing plausible explanation for differential aggregation and fibril reversibility observed experimentally in these structural variants. Our findings thus emphasize that subtle changes in the native structure of peptide hormone(s) could alter its conformational dynamics and amyloid formation, which might have significant implications on their reversible storage and secretion. PMID:24782311

  4. On the lag phase in amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of nanoscale amyloid fibrils from normally soluble peptides and proteins is a common form of self-assembly phenomenon that has fundamental connections with biological functions and human diseases. The kinetics of this process has been widely studied and exhibits on a macroscopic level three characteristic stages: a lag phase, a growth phase and a final plateau regime. The question of which molecular events take place during each one of these phases has been a central element in the quest for a mechanism of amyloid formation. In this review, we discuss the nature and molecular origin of the lag-phase in amyloid formation by making use of tools and concepts from physical chemistry, in particular from chemical reaction kinetics. We discuss how, in macroscopic samples, it has become apparent that the lag-phase is not a waiting time for nuclei to form. Rather, multiple parallel processes exist and typically millions of primary nuclei form during the lag phase from monomers in solution. Thus, the lag-time represents a time that is required for the nuclei that are formed early on in the reaction to grow and proliferate in order to reach an aggregate concentration that is readily detected in bulk assays. In many cases, this proliferation takes place through secondary nucleation, where fibrils may present a catalytic surface for the formation of new aggregates. Fibrils may also break (fragmentation) and thereby provide new ends for elongation. Thus, at least two – primary nucleation and elongation – and in many systems at least four – primary nucleation, elongation, secondary nucleation and fragmentation – microscopic processes occur during the lag phase. Moreover, these same processes occur during all three phases of the macroscopic aggregation process, albeit at different rates as governed by rate constants and by the concentration of reacting species at each point in time. PMID:25719972

  5. Localization microscopy for the study of amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Rees, Eric; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2013-09-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has emerged as a powerful and non-invasive tool for the study of molecular processes both in vitro, but also as they occur in live cells. Here we present the application of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution technique based on single molecule localization, to determine the morphology of protein aggregates and of small extra- and intracellular structures. The technique reveals details down to 20 nm providing information on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the probing light. We use dSTORM in the study of amyloid fibril self-assembly processes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We show that the aggregation process can be followed kinetically and observe the emergence of amyloid structures in time as they occur in vitro. As an all optical technique, there is translation potential from studies in vitro to in vivo applications.

  6. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Metal-organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11‧-bidppz)(phen)4Ru2]4+ (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen)4Ru2]4+ (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  7. Quantification of amyloid fibrils using size exclusion chromatography coupled with online fluorescence and ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Randrianjatovo-Gbalou, Irina; Marcato-Romain, Claire-Emmanuelle; Girbal-Neuhauser, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    An amyloid fibrils investigation within biofilm samples requires distinguishing the amyloid β-sheet structure of these proteins and quantifying them. In this study, the property of amyloids to incorporate the fluorescent dye Thioflavin T has been exploited to propose a method of quantification. The experimental protocol includes the preparation of amyloids from commercial κ-casein (κCN) and their fractionation through size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to provide calibration curves from fluorescence and absorbance signals. Finally, a bacterial biofilm extract was injected into SEC, and the amyloid fibrils could be expressed as equivalent κCN, representing approximately 21% of the total proteins. PMID:26239215

  8. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  9. Looking for a generic inhibitor of amyloid-like fibril formation among flavone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Šneideris, Tomas; Baranauskienė, Lina; Cannon, Jonathan G.; Rutkienė, Rasa; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    A range of diseases is associated with amyloid fibril formation. Despite different proteins being responsible for each disease, all of them share similar features including beta-sheet-rich secondary structure and fibril-like protein aggregates. A number of proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, resembling structural features of disease-related amyloids. Given these generic structural properties of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, generic inhibitors of fibril formation would be of interest for treatment of amyloid diseases. Recently, we identified five outstanding inhibitors of insulin amyloid-like fibril formation among the pool of 265 commercially available flavone derivatives. Here we report testing of these five compounds and of epi-gallocatechine-3-gallate (EGCG) on aggregation of alpha-synuclein and beta-amyloid. We used a Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, relying on halftimes of aggregation as the measure of inhibition. This method avoids large numbers of false positive results. Our data indicate that four of the five flavones and EGCG inhibit alpha-synuclein aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. However none of these derivatives were able to increase halftimes of aggregation of beta-amyloid. PMID:26421240

  10. Potassium-dependent oriented growth of amyloid β25 35 fibrils on mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsai, Árpád; Grama, László; Murvai, Ünige; Soós, Katalin; Penke, Botond; Kellermayer, Miklós S. Z.

    2007-08-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important components of tissue deposits in neurodegenerative and protein misfolding diseases. Because modified amyloid peptide subunits can be generated by synthetic methods and the nanometer-scale fibrils are stable under diverse conditions, amyloid fibrils have been suggested for use in nanotechnology applications. However, well-controlled and oriented growth of amyloid fibrils has not yet been accomplished. Here we show that amyloid β 25-35 (Aβ 25-35), a toxic fragment of Alzheimer's beta peptide, forms trigonally oriented fibrils on mica. Oriented binding depends on an apparently cooperative interaction of a positively charged moiety on the Aβ 25-35 peptide with the K+-binding pocket of the mica lattice. Time-lapse in situ AFM revealed that the formation of oriented fibrils is the result of epitaxial polymerization rather than binding of already assembled fibrils from solution. By varying the K+ concentration the growth rate and the mesh size of the oriented amyloid fibril network may be tuned. The K+-controlled oriented assembly of Aβ 25-35 fibrils could be utilized in nanotechnology applications such as formation of oriented tracks for molecular devices and generation of nanoelectronic circuits.

  11. Amyloid fibrils containing fragmented ATTR may be the standard fibril composition in ATTR amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ihse, Elisabet; Rapezzi, Claudio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Benson, Merrill D; Ando, Yukio; Suhr, Ole B; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Lavatelli, Francesca; Obici, Laura; Quarta, Candida C; Leone, Ornella; Jono, Hirofumi; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Liepnieks, Juris; Ohshima, Toshinori; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Taro; Westermark, Per

    2013-09-01

    Abstract The clinical phenotype of familial ATTR amyloidosis depends to some extent on the particular mutation, but differences exist also within mutations. We have previously described that two types of amyloid fibril compositions exist among Swedish ATTRV30M amyloidosis patients, one consisting of a mixture of intact and fragmented ATTR (type A) and one consisting of mainly intact ATTR (type B). The fibril types are correlated to phenotypic differences. Patients with ATTR fragments have a late onset and develop cardiomyopathy, while patients without fragments have an early onset and less myocardial involvement. The present study aimed to determine whether this correlation between fibril type and phenotype is valid for familial ATTR amyloidosis in general. Cardiac or adipose tissues from 63 patients carrying 29 different TTR non-V30M mutations as well as 13 Japanese ATTRV30M patients were examined. Fibril type was determined by western blotting and compared to the patients' age of onset and degree of cardiomyopathy. All ATTR non-V30M patients had a fibril composition with ATTR fragments, except two ATTRY114C patients. No clear conclusions could be drawn about a phenotype to fibril type correlation among ATTR non-V30M patients. In contrast, Japanese ATTRV30M patients showed a similar correlation as previously described for Swedish ATTRV30M patients. This study shows that a fibril composition with fragmented ATTR is very common in ATTR amyloidosis, and suggests that fibrils composed of only full-length ATTR is an exception found only in a subset of patients. PMID:23713495

  12. Role of sequence and structural polymorphism on the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Myeongsang; Kim, Jae In; Na, Sungsoo; Eom, Kilho

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils playing a critical role in disease expression, have recently been found to exhibit the excellent mechanical properties such as elastic modulus in the order of 10 GPa, which is comparable to that of other mechanical proteins such as microtubule, actin filament, and spider silk. These remarkable mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are correlated with their functional role in disease expression. This suggests the importance in understanding how these excellent mechanical properties are originated through self-assembly process that may depend on the amino acid sequence. However, the sequence-structure-property relationship of amyloid fibrils has not been fully understood yet. In this work, we characterize the mechanical properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) fibrils with respect to their molecular structures as well as their amino acid sequence by using all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation result suggests that the remarkable bending rigidity of amyloid fibrils can be achieved through a specific self-aggregation pattern such as antiparallel stacking of β strands (peptide chain). Moreover, we have shown that a single point mutation of hIAPP chain constituting a hIAPP fibril significantly affects the thermodynamic stability of hIAPP fibril formed by parallel stacking of peptide chain, and that a single point mutation results in a significant change in the bending rigidity of hIAPP fibrils formed by antiparallel stacking of β strands. This clearly elucidates the role of amino acid sequence on not only the equilibrium conformations of amyloid fibrils but also their mechanical properties. Our study sheds light on sequence-structure-property relationships of amyloid fibrils, which suggests that the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are encoded in their sequence-dependent molecular architecture. PMID:24551113

  13. Morphology and mechanical properties of multi-stranded amyloid fibrils probed by atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Myeongsang; Kim, Kyungwoo; In Kim, Jae; Chang, Hyun Joon; Baek, Inchul; Eom, Kilho; Na, Sungsoo

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are responsible for pathogenesis of various diseases and exhibit the structural feature of an ordered, hierarchical structure such as multi-stranded helical structure. As the multi-strandedness of amyloid fibrils has recently been found to be highly correlated with their toxicity and infectivity, it is necessary to study how the hierarchical (i.e. multi-stranded) structure of amyloid fibril is formed. Moreover, although it has recently been reported that the nanomechanics of amyloid proteins plays a key role on the amyloid-induced pathogenesis, a critical role that the multi-stranded helical structure of the fibrils plays in their nanomechanical properties has not fully characterized. In this work, we characterize the morphology and mechanical properties of multi-stranded amyloid fibrils by using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and elastic network model. It is shown that the helical pitch of multi-stranded amyloid fibril is linearly proportional to the number of filaments comprising the amyloid fibril, and that multi-strandedness gives rise to improving the bending rigidity of the fibril. Moreover, we have also studied the morphology and mechanical properties of a single protofilament (filament) in order to understand the effect of cross-β structure and mutation on the structures and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils. Our study sheds light on the underlying design principles showing how the multi-stranded amyloid fibril is formed and how the structure of amyloid fibrils governs their nanomechanical properties.

  14. Toward the Molecular Mechanism(s) by which EGCG Treatment Remodels Mature Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Palhano, Fernando L.; Lee, Jiyong; Grimster, Neil P.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding and/or aggregation has been implicated in several human diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and familial amyloid polyneuropathy. These maladies are referred to as amyloid diseases, because they are named after the cross-β-sheet amyloid fibril aggregates or deposits common to these diseases. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal polyphenol present in green tea, has been shown to be effective at preventing aggregation and is able to remodel amyloid fibrils comprising different amyloidogenic proteins, although the mechanistic underpinnings are unclear. Herein, we work towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) by which EGCG remodels mature amyloid fibrils made up of Aβ1–40, IAPP8–24, or Sup35NM7–16. We show that EGCG amyloid remodeling activity in vitro is dependent on auto-oxidation of the EGCG. Oxidized and unoxidized EGCG binds to amyloid fibrils, preventing the binding of thioflavin T. This engagement of the hydrophobic binding sites in Aβ1–40, IAPP8–24, or Sup35NM7–16 amyloid fibrils seems to be sufficient to explain the majority of the amyloid remodeling observed by EGCG treatment, although how EGCG oxidation drives remodeling remains unclear. Oxidized EGCG molecules react with free amines within the amyloid fibril through the formation of Schiff bases, cross-linking the fibrils, which may prevent dissociation and toxicity, but these aberrant post-translational modifications do not appear to be the major driving force for amyloid remodeling by EGCG treatment. These insights into the molecular mechanism of action of EGCG provide boundary conditions for exploring amyloid remodeling in more detail. PMID:23611538

  15. Intrinsic Structural Heterogeneity and Long-Term Maturation of Amyloid β Peptide Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptides form fibrils that are commonly assumed to have a dry, homogeneous, and static internal structure. To examine these assumptions, fibrils under various conditions and different ages have been examined with multidimensional infrared spectroscopy. Each peptide in the fibril had a 13C=18O label in the backbone of one residue to disinguish the amide I′ absorption due to that residue from the amide I′ absorption of other residues. Fibrils examined soon after they formed, and reexamined after 1 year in the dry state, exhibited spectral changes confirming that structurally significant water molecules were present in the freshly formed fibrils. Results from fibrils incubated in solution for 4 years indicate that water molecules remained trapped within fibrils and mobile over the 4 year time span. These water molecules are structurally significant because they perturb the parallel β-sheet hydrogen bonding pattern at frequent intervals and at multiple points within individual fibrils, creating structural heterogeneity along the length of a fibril. These results show that the interface between β-sheets in an amyloid fibril is not a “dry zipper”, and that the internal structure of a fibril evolves while it remains in a fibrillar state. These features, water trapping, structural heterogeneity, and structural evolution within a fibril over time, must be accommodated in models of amyloid fibril structure and formation. PMID:23701594

  16. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingdong; Bruun Hovgaard, Mads; Mamdouh, Wael; Xu, Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2008-09-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the β-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders. In addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications.

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  18. Human Hsp70 Disaggregase Reverses Parkinson's-Linked α-Synuclein Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuechao; Carroni, Marta; Nussbaum-Krammer, Carmen; Mogk, Axel; Nillegoda, Nadinath B; Szlachcic, Anna; Guilbride, D Lys; Saibil, Helen R; Mayer, Matthias P; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular amyloid fibrils linked to neurodegenerative disease typically accumulate in an age-related manner, suggesting inherent cellular capacity for counteracting amyloid formation in early life. Metazoan molecular chaperones assist native folding and block polymerization of amyloidogenic proteins, preempting amyloid fibril formation. Chaperone capacity for amyloid disassembly, however, is unclear. Here, we show that a specific combination of human Hsp70 disaggregase-associated chaperone components efficiently disassembles α-synuclein amyloid fibrils characteristic of Parkinson's disease in vitro. Specifically, the Hsc70 chaperone, the class B J-protein DNAJB1, and an Hsp110 family nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) provide ATP-dependent activity that disassembles amyloids within minutes via combined fibril fragmentation and depolymerization. This ultimately generates non-toxic α-synuclein monomers. Concerted, rapid interaction cycles of all three chaperone components with fibrils generate the power stroke required for disassembly. This identifies a powerful human Hsp70 disaggregase activity that efficiently disassembles amyloid fibrils and points to crucial yet undefined biology underlying amyloid-based diseases. PMID:26300264

  19. Particle tracking microrheology of gel-forming amyloid fibril networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, A. M.; Donald, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Microrheology is a technique that is increasingly used to investigate the local viscoelastic properties of complex fluids non-invasively, by tracking the motion of micron-sized probe spheres. In this work, passive Particle Tracking Microrheology (PTM) is used to study network formation in the milk protein β -lactoglobulin at 80 ° C and p H 2. In these conditions the protein aggregates to form thread-like structures known as amyloid fibrils, which can further aggregate into elastic networks. Using PTM, gels were observed to form at significantly lower concentrations than determined by bulk rheometry, where the oscillatory shear forces may disrupt either fibril or network formation. During incubation, the Mean Square Displacement (MSD) of the probe particles exhibited time-cure superposition, allowing the critical relaxation exponent to be calculated as ˜ 0.63 , consistent with other biopolymer gels. Combined with the gel-like appearance of the complex modulus at long incubation times, this confirms that a true gel is forming, with physical or chemical crosslinks forming between the fibrils, refining the conclusions of other workers in the field.

  20. Inhibition of amyloid fibrillation and cytotoxicity of lysozyme fibrillation products by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Shariatizi, Sajad; Meratan, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2015-09-01

    An increasing number of studies conducted under in vitro and in vivo conditions, have concluded that polyphenols, compounds frequently occurring in many herbs with antioxidant properties, prevent and reverse amyloid fibril formation. However, the mechanisms by which these natural products modulate the protein aggregation process are poorly understood. Herein, a range of techniques including thioflavin T (ThT) and ANS fluorescence assays, electron microscopy and circular dichroism have been employed to determine the efficacy of rosmarinic acid (RA) and resveratrol (Res) on the inhibition/reversion of fibrillogenesis and hindering cytotoxicity induced by protofibrils and amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). Results demonstrated that both polyphenols effectively inhibit fibrillogenesis and destabilize preformed fibrils of HEWL in a concentration-dependent manner. Cytotoxicity protection on PC12 cells was also observed using the MTT assay, ROS production assay, and phase-contrast microscopy. It is suggested that the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of RA and Res is to prevent hydrophobic interactions between HEWL amyloidogenic prefibrillar species, although additional studies is needed to elucidate the detailed mechanisms involved. A combination of antioxidative and anti-amyloidogenic properties of these molecules may provide them with the described neuroprotective capacities. PMID:26102331

  1. Microscale structural model of Alzheimer Aβ(1-40) amyloid fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J.

    2009-06-01

    Amyloid fibril formation and characterization are crucial due to their association with severe degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's disease. Here we present an atomistic-based multiscale analysis, utilized to predict the structure of Alzheimer Aβ(1-40) fibrils. Our study provides a structural model of amyloid fibers with lengths of hundreds of nanometers at atomistic resolution. We report a systematic analysis of the energies, structural changes and H-bonding for varying fibril lengths, elucidating their size dependent properties. Our model predicts the formation of twisted amyloid microfibers with a periodicity of ≈82 nm, in close agreement with experimental results.

  2. Nucleic acid-containing amyloid fibrils potently induce type I interferon and stimulate systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Di Domizio, Jeremy; Dorta-Estremera, Stephanie; Gagea, Mihai; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Meller, Stephan; Li, Ping; Zhao, Bihong; Tan, Filemon K.; Bi, Liqi; Gilliet, Michel; Cao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The immunopathophysiologic development of systemic autoimmunity involves numerous factors through complex mechanisms that are not fully understood. In systemic lupus erythematosus, type I IFN (IFN-I) produced by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) critically promotes the autoimmunity through its pleiotropic effects on immune cells. However, the host-derived factors that enable abnormal IFN-I production and initial immune tolerance breakdown are largely unknown. Previously, we found that amyloid precursor proteins form amyloid fibrils in the presence of nucleic acids. Here we report that nucleic acid-containing amyloid fibrils can potently activate pDCs and enable IFN-I production in response to self-DNA, self-RNA, and dead cell debris. pDCs can take up DNA-containing amyloid fibrils, which are retained in the early endosomes to activate TLR9, leading to high IFNα/β production. In mice treated with DNA-containing amyloid fibrils, a rapid IFN response correlated with pDC infiltration and activation. Immunization of nonautoimmune mice with DNA-containing amyloid fibrils induced antinuclear serology against a panel of self-antigens. The mice exhibited positive proteinuria and deposited antibodies in their kidneys. Intriguingly, pDC depletion obstructed IFN-I response and selectively abolished autoantibody generation. Our study reveals an innate immune function of nucleic acid-containing amyloid fibrils and provides a potential link between compromised protein homeostasis and autoimmunity via a pDC-IFN axis. PMID:22904191

  3. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding.

    PubMed

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed's spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow. PMID:27558445

  4. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding

    PubMed Central

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed’s spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow. PMID:27558445

  5. Ultrasonication-dependent formation and degradation of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Mizuno, Aiko; So, Masatomo; Hirano, Miki; Adachi, Masayuki; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Ikenoue, Tatsuya; Lee, Young-Ho; Kawata, Yasushi; Goto, Yuji

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonication can be used to break the supersaturation of α-synuclein, a protein associated with Parkinson's disease, at pH7.4 above the critical concentration of fibrillation, thereby inducing the formation of amyloid fibrils. We speculated that ultrasonication could also be used to depolymerize preformed fibrils below the critical concentration. However, extensive ultrasonic irradiation transformed preformed fibrils into amorphous aggregates even above the critical concentration. Exposing preformed fibrils to the hydrophobic air-water interface of cavitation bubbles may have destabilized the fibrils and stabilized amorphous aggregates. Upon extensive ultrasonic irradiation, the accompanying decomposition of chemical structures was suggested when monitored by analytical ultracentrifugation. Amorphous aggregates produced by extensive ultrasonication showed higher cytotoxicity, suggesting that, although ultrasonication might be a useful approach for inactivating amyloid fibrils, potential cytotoxicity of amorphous aggregates should be considered. PMID:25528988

  6. Carnosine's Effect on Amyloid Fibril Formation and Induced Cytotoxicity of Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Josephine W.; Liu, Kuan-Nan; How, Su-Chun; Chen, Wei-An; Lai, Chia-Min; Liu, Hwai-Shen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Wang, Steven S. -S.

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24349167

  7. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  8. Stretching and ordering of amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gado, Emanuela; Schwenke, Konrad; Jordens, Sophia; Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Georgetown University Team; ETH Zurich Team

    We investigate the formation of nematic domains, which might be precursor of plaque formation, in the adsorption of amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces. Combining experiments and computer simulations we analyse spatial correlations in the nematic order and in apparent persistence length. Non-equilibrium numerical simulations provide new insight into the coupling between those quantities. The emerging scenario is that the out-of-equilibrium adsorption favors the formation of spatial heterogeneities due to the presence of local nematic order that tend to persist upon increasing the surface coverage. Such structural heterogeneities are directly coupled to the apparent straightening of the brils and might affect the density and the mechanical properties of the final self-assembled material.

  9. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  10. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  11. Isolation and characterization of the integral glycosaminoglycan constituents of human amyloid A and monoclonal light-chain amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S R; Lyon, M; Gallagher, J T; Johnson, E A; Pepys, M B

    1991-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils were isolated by extraction in water from the livers and spleens of four patients who had died of monoclonal, light-chain (AL)-type, systemic amyloidosis and one with reactive systemic, amyloid A protein (AA)-type amyloidosis. Each fibril preparation contained 1-2% by weight of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which was tightly associated with the fibrils and not just co-isolated from the tissues with them. After exhaustive digestion of the fibrils with papain and Pronase, the GAGs were specifically precipitated with cetylpyridinium chloride and were identified by cellulose acetate electrophoresis and selective susceptibility to specific glycosidases. All the preparations contained approximately equal amounts of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate. There was no evidence for the presence of chondroitin sulphate or other GAGs. Fine structural analysis by oligosaccharide mapping in gradient polyacrylamide gels, following partial digestion with specific glycosidases, showed very similar structures among the heparan sulphates and the dermatan sulphates, respectively. GAGs were also extracted by solubilizing amyloid fibrils in 4 M-guanidinium chloride followed by CsCl density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Although a minor proportion of the GAG material obtained in this way was apparently in the form of proteoglycan molecules, most of it was free GAG chains. The presence in amyloid fibrils of different types, in different organs and from different patients of particular GAG classes with similar structures supports the view that these molecules may be of pathogenic significance. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1902087

  12. Is supramolecular filament chirality the underlying cause of major morphology differences in amyloid fibrils?

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Lu, Xuefang; Popova, Ludmila; Wan, William; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Stubbs, Gerald; Dukor, Rina K; Lednev, Igor K; Nafie, Laurence A

    2014-02-12

    The unique enhanced sensitivity of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) to the formation and development of amyloid fibrils in solution is extended to four additional fibril-forming proteins or peptides where it is shown that the sign of the fibril VCD pattern correlates with the sense of supramolecular filament chirality and, without exception, to the dominant fibril morphology as observed in AFM or SEM images. Previously for insulin, it has been demonstrated that the sign of the VCD band pattern from filament chirality can be controlled by adjusting the pH of the incubating solution, above pH 2 for "normal" left-hand-helical filaments and below pH 2 for "reversed" right-hand-helical filaments. From AFM or SEM images, left-helical filaments form multifilament braids of left-twisted fibrils while the right-helical filaments form parallel filament rows of fibrils with a flat tape-like morphology, the two major classes of fibril morphology that from deep UV resonance Raman scattering exhibit the same cross-β-core secondary structure. Here we investigate whether fibril supramolecular chirality is the underlying cause of the major morphology differences in all amyloid fibrils by showing that the morphology (twisted versus flat) of fibrils of lysozyme, apo-α-lactalbumin, HET-s (218-289) prion, and a short polypeptide fragment of transthyretin, TTR (105-115), directly correlates to their supramolecular chirality as revealed by VCD. The result is strong evidence that the chiral supramolecular organization of filaments is the principal underlying cause of the morphological heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils. Because fibril morphology is linked to cell toxicity, the chirality of amyloid aggregates should be explored in the widely used in vitro models of amyloid-associated diseases. PMID:24484302

  13. Ferulic acid destabilizes preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that curcumin (Cur) inhibits fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilizes preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of FA with Cur, rifampicin, and tetracycline. Ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide, as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The overall activity of the molecules examined was in the order of: Cur > FA > rifampicin = tetracycline. FA could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  14. Energy interactions in amyloid-like fibrils from NNQQNY.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Inmaculada García; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M J

    2014-03-01

    We use large-scale MP2 calculations to analyze the interactions appearing in amyloid fibers, which are difficult to determine experimentally. To this end, dimers and trimers of the hexapeptide NNQQNY from the yeast prion-like protein Sup35 were considered as model systems. We studied the energy interactions present in the three levels of organization in which the formation of amyloid fibrils is structured. The structural changes in the hydrogen bonds were studied too. It was found that the most energetic process is the formation of the β-sheet, which is equally due to both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The aromatic rings help stabilize these aggregates through stacking of the aromatic rings of tyrosine, the stability produced by the aromatics residues increasing with their aromaticity. The formation of the basic unit of the assembled proto-fiber, the steric zipper, is less energetic and is associated to both dispersion forces and hydrogen bonds. The interactions between pair of β-sheets across the peptide-to-peptide contact through the tyrosine rings are cooperative and due to dispersion effects. Moreover, the strength of this interaction can rationalize the variation of mobility of the aromatic ring in the tyrosine units found in solid NMR experiments. PMID:24458317

  15. The E46K mutation in alpha-synuclein increases amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Eric A; Graves, Charles L; Mishizen-Eberz, Amanda J; Lupoli, Michael A; Lynch, David R; Englander, S Walter; Axelsen, Paul H; Giasson, Benoit I

    2005-03-01

    The identification of a novel mutation (E46K) in one of the KTKEGV-type repeats in the amino-terminal region of alpha-synuclein suggests that this region and, more specifically, Glu residues in the repeats may be important in regulating the ability of alpha-synuclein to polymerize into amyloid fibrils. It was demonstrated that the E46K mutation increased the propensity of alpha-synuclein to fibrillize, but this effect was less than that of the A53T mutation. The substitution of Glu(46) for an Ala also increased the assembly of alpha-synuclein, but the polymers formed can have different ultrastructures, further indicating that this amino acid position has a significant effect on the assembly process. The effect of residue Glu(83) in the sixth repeat of alpha-synuclein, which lies closest to the amino acid stretch critical for filament assembly, was also studied. Mutation of Glu(83) to a Lys or Ala increased polymerization but perturbed some of the properties of mature amyloid. These results demonstrated that some of the Glu residues within the repeats can have significant effects on modulating the assembly of alpha-synuclein to form amyloid fibrils. The greater effect of the A53T mutation, even when compared with what may be predicted to be a more dramatic mutation such as E46K, underscores the importance of protein microenvironment in affecting protein structure. Moreover, the relative effects of the A53T and E46K mutations are consistent with the age of onset of disease. These findings support the notion that aberrant alpha-synuclein polymerization resulting in the formation of pathological inclusions can lead to disease. PMID:15632170

  16. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Wang, C; Besenbacher, F; Dong, M

    2015-05-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils. PMID:25839069

  17. Thioflavin T-Silent Denaturation Intermediates Support the Main-Chain-Dominated Architecture of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Noda, Sayaka; So, Masatomo; Adachi, Masayuki; Kardos, József; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yuji

    2016-07-19

    Ultrasonication is considered one of the most effective agitations for inducing the spontaneous formation of amyloid fibrils. When we induced the ultrasonication-dependent fibrillation of β2-microglobulin and insulin monitored by amyloid-specific thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, both proteins showed a significant decrease in ThT fluorescence after the burst-phase increase. The decrease in ThT fluorescence was accelerated when the ultrasonic power was stronger, suggesting that this decrease was caused by the partial denaturation of preformed fibrils. The possible intermediates of denaturation retained amyloid-like morphologies, secondary structures, and seeding potentials. Similar denaturation intermediates were also observed when fibrils were denatured by guanidine hydrochloride or sodium dodecyl sulfate. The presence of these denaturation intermediates is consistent with the main-chain-dominated architecture of amyloid fibrils. Moreover, in the three types of denaturation experiments conducted, insulin fibrils were more stable than β2-microglobulin fibrils, suggesting that the relative stability of various fibrils is independent of the method of denaturation. PMID:27345358

  18. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  19. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  20. An equilibrium model for linear and closed-loop amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Griffin, Michael D. W.; Binger, Katrina J.; Schuck, Peter; Howlett, Geoffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils and their soluble oligomeric intermediates are implicated in several age-related diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The distribution of oligomers and fibrils is related to toxicity and is dependent on the pathways for fibril assembly, generally considered to occur via a slow nucleation step that precedes fibril elongation. Human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II forms amyloid fibrils via a reversible self-assembly process accompanied by closed-loop formation and fibril breaking and joining. Our fluorescence quenching and sedimentation velocity experiments with Alexa488-labelled apoC-II indicated a time-dependent sub-unit interchange for both linear and closed-loop fibrils, while dilution experiments using mature fibrils indicated a shift to smaller size distributions consistent with a reversible assembly pathway. To account for this behaviour we developed an equilibrium self-association model that describes the final size distributions of apoC-II fibrils formed at different starting concentrations. The model proposes a reversible isomerisation of apoC-II monomer to form an active conformer that self-assembles into fibrils via an isodesmic self-association pathway coupled to fibril length-dependent closed-loop formation. The model adequately described fibril size distributions and the proportion of closed-loops as a function of total apoC-II concentration over the concentration range 0.1–0.5 mg/ml. Extension of the model to include the rates of isomerisation, self-association and fibril breaking and joining provided satisfactory global fits to kinetic data on fibril formation and changes in average fibril size at different apoC-II starting concentrations. The model provides a simple thermodynamic description of the processes governing the size distribution of apoC-II fibrils at equilibrium and the formation of discrete oligomeric intermediates. PMID:22370559

  1. An equilibrium model for linear and closed-loop amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Griffin, Michael D W; Binger, Katrina J; Schuck, Peter; Howlett, Geoffrey J

    2012-08-10

    Amyloid fibrils and their soluble oligomeric intermediates are implicated in several age-related diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The distribution of oligomers and fibrils is related to toxicity and is dependent on the pathways for fibril assembly, generally considered to occur via a slow nucleation step that precedes fibril elongation. Human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II forms amyloid fibrils via a reversible self-assembly process accompanied by closed-loop formation and fibril breaking and joining. Our fluorescence quenching and sedimentation velocity experiments with Alexa488-labeled apoC-II indicated a time-dependent subunit interchange for both linear and closed-loop fibrils, while dilution experiments using mature fibrils indicated a shift to smaller size distributions consistent with a reversible assembly pathway. To account for this behavior, we developed an equilibrium self-association model that describes the final size distributions of apoC-II fibrils formed at different starting concentrations. The model proposes a reversible isomerization of apoC-II monomer to form an active conformer that self-assembles into fibrils via an isodesmic self-association pathway coupled to fibril length-dependent closed-loop formation. The model adequately described fibril size distributions and the proportion of closed loops as a function of total apoC-II concentration over the concentration range 0.1-0.5 mg/ml. Extension of the model to include the rates of isomerization, self-association and fibril breaking and joining provided satisfactory global fits to kinetic data on fibril formation and changes in average fibril size at different apoC-II starting concentrations. The model provides a simple thermodynamic description of the processes governing the size distribution of apoC-II fibrils at equilibrium and the formation of discrete oligomeric intermediates. PMID:22370559

  2. Measurement of intrinsic properties of amyloid fibrils by the peak force QNM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamcik, Jozef; Lara, Cecile; Usov, Ivan; Jeong, Jae Sun; Ruggeri, Francesco S.; Dietler, Giovanni; Lashuel, Hilal A.; Hamley, Ian W.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    We report the investigation of the mechanical properties of different types of amyloid fibrils by the peak force quantitative nanomechanical (PF-QNM) technique. We demonstrate that this technique correctly measures the Young's modulus independent of the polymorphic state and the cross-sectional structural details of the fibrils, and we show that values for amyloid fibrils assembled from heptapeptides, α-synuclein, Aβ(1-42), insulin, β-lactoglobulin, lysozyme, ovalbumin, Tau protein and bovine serum albumin all fall in the range of 2-4 GPa.

  3. Influence of dendrimer's structure on its activity against amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klajnert, B. . E-mail: aklajn@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Cortijo-Arellano, M.; Cladera, J.; Bryszewska, M.

    2006-06-23

    Inhibition of fibril assembly is a potential therapeutic strategy in neurodegenerative disorders such as prion and Alzheimer's diseases. Highly branched, globular polymers-dendrimers-are novel promising inhibitors of fibril formation. In this study, the effect of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (generations 3rd, 4th, and 5th) on amyloid aggregation of the prion peptide PrP 185-208 and the Alzheimer's peptide A{beta} 1-28 was examined. Amyloid fibrils were produced in vitro and their formation was monitored using the dye thioflavin T (ThT). Fluorescence studies were complemented with electron microscopy. The results show that the higher the dendrimer generation, the larger the degree of inhibition of the amyloid aggregation process and the more effective are dendrimers in disrupting the already existing fibrils. A hypothesis on dendrimer-peptide interaction mechanism is presented based on the dendrimers' molecular structure.

  4. Comparisons with Amyloid-β Reveal an Aspartate Residue That Stabilizes Fibrils of the Aortic Amyloid Peptide Medin*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Hannah A.; Madine, Jillian; Middleton, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic medial amyloid (AMA) is the most common localized human amyloid, occurring in virtually all of the Caucasian population over the age of 50. The main protein component of AMA, medin, readily assembles into amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. Despite the prevalence of AMA, little is known about the self-assembly mechanism of medin or the molecular architecture of the fibrils. The amino acid sequence of medin is strikingly similar to the sequence of the Alzheimer disease (AD) amyloid-β (Aβ) polypeptides around the structural turn region of Aβ, where mutations associated with familial, early onset AD, have been identified. Asp25 and Lys30 of medin align with residues Asp23 and Lys28 of Aβ, which are known to form a stabilizing salt bridge in some fibril morphologies. Here we show that substituting Asp25 of medin with asparagine (D25N) impedes assembly into fibrils and stabilizes non-cytotoxic oligomers. Wild-type medin, by contrast, aggregates into β-sheet-rich amyloid-like fibrils within 50 h. A structural analysis of wild-type fibrils by solid-state NMR suggests a molecular repeat unit comprising at least two extended β-strands, separated by a turn stabilized by a Asp25-Lys30 salt bridge. We propose that Asp25 drives the assembly of medin by stabilizing the fibrillar conformation of the peptide and is thus reminiscent of the influence of Asp23 on the aggregation of Aβ. Pharmacological comparisons of wild-type medin and D25N will help to ascertain the pathological significance of this poorly understood protein. PMID:25614623

  5. Comparisons with amyloid-β reveal an aspartate residue that stabilizes fibrils of the aortic amyloid peptide medin.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hannah A; Madine, Jillian; Middleton, David A

    2015-03-20

    Aortic medial amyloid (AMA) is the most common localized human amyloid, occurring in virtually all of the Caucasian population over the age of 50. The main protein component of AMA, medin, readily assembles into amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. Despite the prevalence of AMA, little is known about the self-assembly mechanism of medin or the molecular architecture of the fibrils. The amino acid sequence of medin is strikingly similar to the sequence of the Alzheimer disease (AD) amyloid-β (Aβ) polypeptides around the structural turn region of Aβ, where mutations associated with familial, early onset AD, have been identified. Asp(25) and Lys(30) of medin align with residues Asp(23) and Lys(28) of Aβ, which are known to form a stabilizing salt bridge in some fibril morphologies. Here we show that substituting Asp(25) of medin with asparagine (D25N) impedes assembly into fibrils and stabilizes non-cytotoxic oligomers. Wild-type medin, by contrast, aggregates into β-sheet-rich amyloid-like fibrils within 50 h. A structural analysis of wild-type fibrils by solid-state NMR suggests a molecular repeat unit comprising at least two extended β-strands, separated by a turn stabilized by a Asp(25)-Lys(30) salt bridge. We propose that Asp(25) drives the assembly of medin by stabilizing the fibrillar conformation of the peptide and is thus reminiscent of the influence of Asp(23) on the aggregation of Aβ. Pharmacological comparisons of wild-type medin and D25N will help to ascertain the pathological significance of this poorly understood protein. PMID:25614623

  6. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  7. 99mTc-DPD uptake reflects amyloid fibril composition in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pilebro, Björn; Suhr, Ole B.; Näslund, Ulf; Westermark, Per; Lindqvist, Per; Sundström, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Aims In transthyretin amyloid (ATTR) amyloidosis various principal phenotypes have been described: cardiac, neuropathic, or a mixed cardiac and neuropathic. In addition, two different types of amyloid fibrils have been identified (type A and type B). Type B fibrils have thus far only been found in predominantly early-onset V30M and in patients carrying the Y114C mutation, whereas type A is noted in all other mutations currently examined as well as in wild-type ATTR amyloidosis. The fibril type is a determinant of the ATTR V30M disease phenotype. 99mTc-DPD scintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for diagnosing heart involvement in ATTR amyloidosis. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between ATTR fibril composition and 99mTc-DPD scintigraphy outcome in patients with biopsy-proven ATTR amyloidosis. Methods Altogether 55 patients with biopsy-proven diagnosis of ATTR amyloidosis and amyloid fibril composition determined were examined by 99mTc-DPD scintigraphy. The patients were grouped and compared according to their type of amyloid fibrils. Cardiovascular evaluation included ECG, echocardiography, and cardiac biomarkers. The medical records were scrutinized to identify subjects with hypertension or other diseases that have an impact on cardiac dimensions. Results A total of 97% with type A and none of the patients with type B fibrils displayed 99mTc-DPD uptake at scintigraphy (p < 0.001). Findings from analyses of cardiac biomarkers, ECG, and echocardiography, though significantly different, could not differentiate between type A and B fibrils in individual patients. Conclusion In ATTR amyloidosis, the outcome of 99mTc-DPD scintigraphy is strongly related to the patients’ transthyretin amyloid fibril composition. PMID:26849806

  8. (99m)Tc-DPD uptake reflects amyloid fibril composition in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Pilebro, Björn; Suhr, Ole B; Näslund, Ulf; Westermark, Per; Lindqvist, Per; Sundström, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Aims In transthyretin amyloid (ATTR) amyloidosis various principal phenotypes have been described: cardiac, neuropathic, or a mixed cardiac and neuropathic. In addition, two different types of amyloid fibrils have been identified (type A and type B). Type B fibrils have thus far only been found in predominantly early-onset V30M and in patients carrying the Y114C mutation, whereas type A is noted in all other mutations currently examined as well as in wild-type ATTR amyloidosis. The fibril type is a determinant of the ATTR V30M disease phenotype. (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for diagnosing heart involvement in ATTR amyloidosis. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between ATTR fibril composition and (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy outcome in patients with biopsy-proven ATTR amyloidosis. Methods Altogether 55 patients with biopsy-proven diagnosis of ATTR amyloidosis and amyloid fibril composition determined were examined by (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy. The patients were grouped and compared according to their type of amyloid fibrils. Cardiovascular evaluation included ECG, echocardiography, and cardiac biomarkers. The medical records were scrutinized to identify subjects with hypertension or other diseases that have an impact on cardiac dimensions. Results A total of 97% with type A and none of the patients with type B fibrils displayed (99m)Tc-DPD uptake at scintigraphy (p < 0.001). Findings from analyses of cardiac biomarkers, ECG, and echocardiography, though significantly different, could not differentiate between type A and B fibrils in individual patients. Conclusion In ATTR amyloidosis, the outcome of (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy is strongly related to the patients' transthyretin amyloid fibril composition. PMID:26849806

  9. The Effect of Milk Constituents and Crowding Agents on Amyloid Fibril Formation by κ-Casein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jihua; Dehle, Francis C; Liu, Yanqin; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Ecroyd, Heath; Thorn, David C; Carver, John A

    2016-02-17

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, κ-casein, a major milk protein, rapidly forms amyloid fibrils at physiological pH and temperature. In this study, the effects of milk components (calcium, lactose, lipids, and heparan sulfate) and crowding agents on reduced and carboxymethylated (RCM) κ-casein fibril formation was investigated using far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavin T binding assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Longer-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids, which form the lining of milk ducts and milk fat globules, enhanced RCM κ-casein fibril formation irrespective of whether the lipids were in a monomeric or micellar state, whereas shorter-chain phospholipids and triglycerides had little effect. Heparan sulfate, a component of the milk fat globule membrane and catalyst of amyloid deposition in extracellular tissue, had little effect on the kinetics of RCM κ-casein fibril formation. Major nutritional components such as calcium and lactose also had no significant effect. Macromolecular crowding enhances protein-protein interactions, but in contrast to other fibril-forming species, the extent of RCM κ-casein fibril formation was reduced by the presence of a variety of crowding agents. These data are consistent with a mechanism of κ-casein fibril formation in which the rate-determining step is dissociation from the oligomer to give the highly amyloidogenic monomer. We conclude that the interaction of κ-casein with membrane-associated phospholipids along its secretory pathway may contribute to the development of amyloid deposits in mammary tissue. However, the formation of spherical oligomers such as casein micelles is favored over amyloid fibrils in the crowded environment of milk, within which the occurrence of amyloid fibrils is low. PMID:26807595

  10. Effect of initial stagger selection on the handedness of Amyloid beta helical fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Cheng, Xiaolin; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Various structural models for Amyloid $\\beta$ fibrils derived from a variety of experimental techniques are currently available. However, this data cannot differentiate between the relative position of the two arms of the $\\beta$ hairpin called the stagger. Amyloid fibrils of various heirarchical levels form left--handed helices composed of $\\beta$ sheets. However it is unclear if positive, negative and neutral staggers all form the macroscopic left--handed helices. Studying this is important since the success of computational approaches to develop drugs for amyloidic diseases will depend on selecting the physiologically relevant structure of the sheets. To address this issue we have conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations of Amyloid$\\beta$ sheets of various staggers and show that only negative staggers generate the experimentally observed left--handed helices while positive staggers generate the incorrect right--handed helices. The implications of this result extend in to all amyloidic--aggregation type diseases.

  11. Generating local amyloidosis in mice by the subcutaneous injection of human insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chinisaz, Maryam; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Parivar, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2014-08-01

    Localized deposits of amyloid structures are observed in various pathological conditions. One example of when local amyloidosis occurs is following repeated insulin injections in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to simulate the same condition in mice. To obtain the amyloid structures, regular insulin was incubated at 57°C for 24 h. The subsequently formed amyloid fibrils were analyzed using the Congo red absorbance test, as well as transmission electron microscopy images, and then injected into mice once per day for 21 consecutive days. Firm waxy masses were developed following this period, which were excised, prepared as thin sections and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Congo red and Sudan black. Histological examination revealed that these masses contained adipose cells and connective tissue, in which amyloid deposition was visible. Thus, localized amyloidosis was obtained by the subcutaneous injection of insulin fibrils. The present results may be of further use in the development of models of amyloid tumors. PMID:25009591

  12. Generating local amyloidosis in mice by the subcutaneous injection of human insulin amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    CHINISAZ, MARYAM; EBRAHIM-HABIBI, AZADEH; YAGHMAEI, PARICHEHREH; PARIVAR, KAZEM; DEHPOUR, AHMAD-REZA

    2014-01-01

    Localized deposits of amyloid structures are observed in various pathological conditions. One example of when local amyloidosis occurs is following repeated insulin injections in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to simulate the same condition in mice. To obtain the amyloid structures, regular insulin was incubated at 57°C for 24 h. The subsequently formed amyloid fibrils were analyzed using the Congo red absorbance test, as well as transmission electron microscopy images, and then injected into mice once per day for 21 consecutive days. Firm waxy masses were developed following this period, which were excised, prepared as thin sections and stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Congo red and Sudan black. Histological examination revealed that these masses contained adipose cells and connective tissue, in which amyloid deposition was visible. Thus, localized amyloidosis was obtained by the subcutaneous injection of insulin fibrils. The present results may be of further use in the development of models of amyloid tumors. PMID:25009591

  13. Experimentally Derived Structural Constraints for Amyloid Fibrils of Wild-Type Transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, David A.; Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B.

    2011-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a largely β-sheet serum protein responsible for transporting thyroxine and vitamin A. TTR is found in amyloid deposits of patients with senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR mutants lead to familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, with an earlier age of onset. Studies of amyloid fibrils of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy mutant TTR suggest a structure similar to the native state with only a simple opening of a β-strand-loop-strand region exposing the two main β-sheets of the protein for fibril elongation. However, we find that the wild-type TTR sequence forms amyloid fibrils that are considerably different from the previously suggested amyloid structure. Using protease digestion with mass spectrometry, we observe the amyloid core to be primarily composed of the C-terminal region, starting around residue 50. Solid-state NMR measurements prove that TTR differs from other pathological amyloids in not having an in-register parallel β-sheet architecture. We also find that the TTR amyloid is incapable of binding thyroxine as monitored by either isothermal calorimetry or 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate competition. Taken together, our experiments are consistent with a significantly different configuration of the β-sheets compared to the previously suggested structure. PMID:22098747

  14. Experimentally derived structural constraints for amyloid fibrils of wild-type transthyretin.

    PubMed

    Bateman, David A; Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2011-11-16

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a largely β-sheet serum protein responsible for transporting thyroxine and vitamin A. TTR is found in amyloid deposits of patients with senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR mutants lead to familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, with an earlier age of onset. Studies of amyloid fibrils of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy mutant TTR suggest a structure similar to the native state with only a simple opening of a β-strand-loop-strand region exposing the two main β-sheets of the protein for fibril elongation. However, we find that the wild-type TTR sequence forms amyloid fibrils that are considerably different from the previously suggested amyloid structure. Using protease digestion with mass spectrometry, we observe the amyloid core to be primarily composed of the C-terminal region, starting around residue 50. Solid-state NMR measurements prove that TTR differs from other pathological amyloids in not having an in-register parallel β-sheet architecture. We also find that the TTR amyloid is incapable of binding thyroxine as monitored by either isothermal calorimetry or 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate competition. Taken together, our experiments are consistent with a significantly different configuration of the β-sheets compared to the previously suggested structure. PMID:22098747

  15. The effects of ginsenosides to amyloid fibril formation by RCMκ-casein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jihua; Chen, Fanbo; Yin, Jianyuan; Bu, Fengquan; Zheng, Baohua; Yang, Miao; Wang, Yunhua; Sun, Dandan; Meng, Qin

    2015-08-01

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, isolated κ-casein spontaneously forms amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions, and is a convenient model for researching generic aspects of fibril formation. Ginsenosides have recently attracted much research interest because of the effects on aging diseases, which are always associated with amyloid fibril formation, for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. In addition, the mechanism remains unclear that ginsenosides exert the effects against aging diseases. To address these aspects, we have investigated the ability of ginsenoside Rb1, Rc, Rg1, and Re influencing fibril formation by RCMκ-casein (reduced and carboxymethylated κ-casein), with the methods of Thioflavin T fluorescence assay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that ginsenoside Rb1 and Rg1 inhibited obviously RCMκ-CN fibrillation in both the initial rate and final level of ThT fluorescence. On the contrary, ginsenoside Re had a few effect on promoting RCMκ-CN fibril formation, proved by thick and larger fibrils observed frequently in TEM. While Rc did not influence RCMκ-CN fibrillation. It is demonstrated that Rg1 prevent RCMκ-CN fibril formation by stabilising RCMκ-CN in its native like state. Additional chemical structure difference of ginsenosides and the effects on fibril formation are also implicated. PMID:25934110

  16. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher Sagui, Celeste; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  17. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  18. Fibrillation of β amyloid peptides in the presence of phospholipid bilayers and the consequent membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schulte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillation of β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and the accumulation of amyloid plaques are considered as an important clinical hallmark to identify Alzheimer's disease (AD). The physiological connection between Aβ plaques and the disruption of neuronal cells has not been clearly understood. One hypothesis to explain the Aβ neurotoxicity is that the fibrillation process induces disruption to the cellular membrane. We studied the Aβ fibrillation process in two biologically relevant conditions with the peptide either pre-incorporated into or externally added to the synthetic phospholipid bilayers. These two sample preparation conditions mimic the physiological membrane proximities of Aβ peptides before and after the enzymatic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we were able to monitor the kinetics and morphological evolution of fibril formation, which was highly sensitive to the two sample preparation protocols. While the external addition protocol generates long and mature fibrils through normal fibrillation process, the pre-incubation protocol was found to stabilize the immature protofibrils. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies with doubly-labeled phospholipids indicated that there may be a lipid uptake process associated with the fibril formation. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provided evidence for high resolution structural variations in fibrils formed with different protocols, and in particular the stabilization of long-range contact between N- and C-terminal β strands. In addition, disruption of phospholipid bilayers was supported by measurements with ³¹P chemical shifts and relaxation time constants. PMID:24769158

  19. Supersaturation-limited and Unlimited Phase Transitions Compete to Produce the Pathway Complexity in Amyloid Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masayuki; So, Masatomo; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kardos, József; Goto, Yuji

    2015-07-17

    Although amyloid fibrils and amorphous aggregates are two types of aggregates formed by denatured proteins, their relationship currently remains unclear. We used β2-microglobulin (β2m), a protein responsible for dialysis-related amyloidosis, to clarify the mechanism by which proteins form either amyloid fibrils or amorphous aggregates. When ultrasonication was used to accelerate the spontaneous fibrillation of β2m at pH 2.0, the effects observed depended on ultrasonic power; although stronger ultrasonic power effectively accelerated fibrillation, excessively strong ultrasonic power decreased the amount of fibrils formed, as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence. An analysis of the products formed indicated that excessively strong ultrasonic power generated fibrillar aggregates that retained β-structures but without high efficiency as seeds. On the other hand, when the spontaneous fibrillation of β2m was induced at higher concentrations of NaCl at pH 2.0 with stirring, amorphous aggregates became more dominant than amyloid fibrils. These apparent complexities in fibrillation were explained comprehensively by a competitive mechanism in which supersaturation-limited reactions competed with supersaturation-unlimited reactions. We link the kinetics of protein aggregation and a conformational phase diagram, in which supersaturation played important roles. PMID:26063798

  20. Cryo-EM reveals the steric zipper structure of a light chain-derived amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andreas; Annamalai, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Matthias; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-05-31

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous aggregates associated with diseases in humans and animals. The fibrils are defined by intermolecular interactions between the fibril-forming polypeptide chains, but it has so far remained difficult to reveal the assembly of the peptide subunits in a full-scale fibril. Using electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM), we present a reconstruction of a fibril formed from the pathogenic core of an amyloidogenic immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain. The fibril density shows a lattice-like assembly of face-to-face packed peptide dimers that corresponds to the structure of steric zippers in peptide crystals. Interpretation of the density map with a molecular model enabled us to identify the intermolecular interactions between the peptides and rationalize the hierarchical structure of the fibril based on simple chemical principles. PMID:27185936

  1. Insulin amyloid fibrillation studied by terahertz spectroscopy and other biophysical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; He, Mingxia; Su, Rongxin; Yu, Yanjun; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2010-01-01

    Assembly and fibrillation of amyloid proteins are believed to play a key role in the etiology of various human diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and type II diabetes. Insights into conformational changes and formation processes during amyloid fibrillation are essential for the clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. To study the changes in secondary, tertiary, quaternary structures, and the alteration in the collective vibrational mode density of states during the amyloid fibrillation, bovine insulin in 20% acetic acid was incubated at 60 {sup o}C, and its multi-level structures were followed by various biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), thioflavin T fluorescence (ThT), dynamic light scattering (DLS), electron microscopy, and terahertz (THz) absorption spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrated a transformation of {alpha}-helix into {beta}-sheet starting at 26 h. This was followed by the aggregation of insulin, as shown by ThT binding, with a transition midpoint at 41 h, and by the bulk formation of mature aggregates after about 71 h. THz is a quick and non-invasive technique, which has the advantage of allowing the study of the conformational state of biomolecules and tissues. We first applied THz spectroscopy to study the amyloid fibrillation. At the terahertz frequency range of 0.2-2.0 THz, there was an apparent increase in both the absorbance and refractive index in THz spectra. Thus, THz is expected to provide a new way of looking into amyloid fibrillation.

  2. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A. S.; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J. F.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity. PMID:26172440

  3. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent. PMID:11730002

  4. The Aβ peptide forms non-amyloid fibrils in the presence of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.; Yu, Chien-Hung; Muhammad, Kamran; Gräslund, Astrid; Pieter Abrahams, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils.Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00291a

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein 2 is Unstructured and Forms Amyloid-Like Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Adda, Christopher G.; Murphy, Vince J.; Sunde, Margaret; Waddington, Lynne J.; Jesse, Schloegel; Talbo, Gert H.; Vingas, Kleo; Kienzle, Vivian; Masciantonio, Rosella; Howlett, Geoffrey J.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Foley, Michael; Anders, Robin F.

    2009-01-01

    Several merozoite surface proteins are being assessed as potential components of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the cause of the most serious form of human malaria. One of these proteins, merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), is unusually hydrophilic and contains tandem sequence repeats, characteristics of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A range of physicochemical studies have confirmed that recombinant forms of MSP2 are largely unstructured. Both dimorphic types of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) are equivalently extended in solution and form amyloid-like fibrils although with different kinetics and structural characteristics. These fibrils have a regular underlying β-sheet structure and both fibril types stain with Congo Red, but only the FC27 fibrils stain with Thioflavin T. 3D7 MSP2 fibrils seeded the growth of fibrils from 3D7 or FC27 MSP2 monomer indicating the involvement of a conserved region of MSP2 in fibril formation. Consistent with this, digestion of fibrils with proteinase K generated resistant peptides, which included the N-terminal conserved region of MSP2. A monoclonal antibody that reacted preferentially with monomeric recombinant MSP2 did not react with the antigen in situ on the merozoite surface. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of infected erythrocytes generated MSP2 oligomers similar to those formed by polymeric recombinant MSP2. We conclude that MSP2 oligomers containing intermolecular β-strand interactions similar to those in amyloid fibrils may be a component of the fibrillar surface coat on P. falciparum merozoites. PMID:19450733

  6. Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 2 is unstructured and forms amyloid-like fibrils.

    PubMed

    Adda, Christopher G; Murphy, Vince J; Sunde, Margaret; Waddington, Lynne J; Schloegel, Jesse; Talbo, Gert H; Vingas, Kleo; Kienzle, Vivian; Masciantonio, Rosella; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Hodder, Anthony N; Foley, Michael; Anders, Robin F

    2009-08-01

    Several merozoite surface proteins are being assessed as potential components of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the cause of the most serious form of human malaria. One of these proteins, merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2), is unusually hydrophilic and contains tandem sequence repeats, characteristics of intrinsically unstructured proteins. A range of physicochemical studies has confirmed that recombinant forms of MSP2 are largely unstructured. Both dimorphic types of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) are equivalently extended in solution and form amyloid-like fibrils although with different kinetics and structural characteristics. These fibrils have a regular underlying beta-sheet structure and both fibril types stain with Congo Red, but only the FC27 fibrils stain with Thioflavin T. 3D7 MSP2 fibrils seeded the growth of fibrils from 3D7 or FC27 MSP2 monomer indicating the involvement of a conserved region of MSP2 in fibril formation. Consistent with this, digestion of fibrils with proteinase K generated resistant peptides, which included the N-terminal conserved region of MSP2. A monoclonal antibody that reacted preferentially with monomeric recombinant MSP2 did not react with the antigen in situ on the merozoite surface. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of infected erythrocytes generated MSP2 oligomers similar to those formed by polymeric recombinant MSP2. We conclude that MSP2 oligomers containing intermolecular beta-strand interactions similar to those in amyloid fibrils may be a component of the fibrillar surface coat on P. falciparum merozoites. PMID:19450733

  7. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  8. Atomic Details of the Interactions of Glycosaminoglycans with AmyloidFibrils.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Katie L; Hughes, Eleri; Yates, Edwin A; Akien, Geoffrey R; Huang, Teng-Yi; Lima, Marcelo A; Rudd, Timothy R; Guerrini, Marco; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Radford, Sheena E; Middleton, David A

    2016-07-13

    The amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) comprise fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides as well as non-protein factors including glycosaminoglycan (GAG) polysaccharides. GAGs affect the kinetics and pathway of Aβ self-assembly and can impede fibril clearance; thus, they may be accessory molecules in AD. Here we report the first high-resolution details of GAG-Aβ fibril interactions from the perspective of the saccharide. Binding analysis indicated that the GAG proxy heparin has a remarkably high affinity for Aβ fibrils with 3-fold cross-sectional symmetry (3Q). Chemical synthesis of a uniformly (13)C-labeled octasaccharide heparin analogue enabled magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR of the GAG bound to 3Q fibrils, and measurements of dynamics revealed a tight complex in which all saccharide residues are restrained without undergoing substantial conformational changes. Intramolecular (13)C-(15)N dipolar dephasing is consistent with close (<5 Å) contact between GAG anomeric position(s) and one or more histidine residues in the fibrils. These data provide a detailed model for the interaction between 3Q-seeded Aβ40 fibrils and a major non-protein component of AD plaques, and they reveal that GAG-amyloid interactions display a range of affinities that critically depend on the precise details of the fibril architecture. PMID:27281497

  9. Antimicrobial Protegrin-1 Forms Amyloid-Like Fibrils with Rapid Kinetics Suggesting a Functional Link

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Arce, Fernando Teran; Mustata, Mirela; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Capone, Ricardo; Nussinov, Ruth; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Protegrin-1 (PG-1) is an 18 residues long, cysteine-rich β-sheet antimicrobial peptide (AMP). PG-1 induces strong cytotoxic activities on cell membrane and acts as a potent antibiotic agent. Earlier we reported that its cytotoxicity is mediated by its channel-forming ability. In this study, we have examined the amyloidogenic fibril formation properties of PG-1 in comparison with a well-defined amyloid, the amyloid-β (Aβ1–42) peptide. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thioflavin-T staining to investigate the kinetics of PG-1 fibrils growth and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the underlying mechanism. AFM images of PG-1 on a highly hydrophilic surface (mica) show fibrils with morphological similarities to Aβ1–42 fibrils. Real-time AFM imaging of fibril growth suggests that PG-1 fibril growth follows a relatively fast kinetics compared to the Aβ1–42 fibrils. The AFM results are in close agreement with results from thioflavin-T staining data. Furthermore, the results indicate that PG-1 forms fibrils in solution. Significantly, in contrast, we do not detect fibrillar structures of PG-1 on an anionic lipid bilayer 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine; only small PG-1 oligomers can be observed. Molecular dynamics simulations are able to identify the presence of these small oligomers on the membrane bilayer. Thus, our current results show that cytotoxic AMP PG-1 is amyloidogenic and capable of forming fibrils. Overall, comparing β-rich AMPs and amyloids such as Aβ, in addition to cytotoxicity and amyloidogenicity, they share a common structural motif, and are channel forming. These combined properties support a functional relationship between amyloidogenic peptides and β-sheet-rich cytolytic AMPs, suggesting that amyloids channels may have an antimicrobial function. PMID:21463591

  10. Small Liposomes Accelerate the Fibrillation of Amyloid β (1–40)*

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Mayu S.; Yagi, Hisashi; Adachi, Masayuki; Lee, Young-Ho; Goto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Aβ peptides were previously considered to interact specifically with ganglioside-containing membranes. Several studies have suggested that Aβ peptides also bind to phosphatidylcholine membranes, which lead to deformation of membranes and fibrillation of Aβ. Moreover, the role of membrane curvature, one type of deformation produced by binding of proteins to a membrane, in the binding and fibrillation of Aβ remains unclear. To clearly understand the relationship between the binding, consequent membrane deformation, and fibrillation of Aβ, we examined the amyloid fibrillation of Aβ-(1–40) in the presence of liposomes of various sizes. Membrane curvature increased with a decrease in the size of the liposomes. We used liposomes made of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine to eliminate electrostatic effects. The results obtained showed that liposomes of smaller sizes (≤50 nm) significantly accelerated the nucleation step, thereby shortening the lag time of fibrillation. On the other hand, liposomes of larger sizes decreased the amount of fibrils but did not notably affect the lag time. The morphologies of fibrils, which were monitored by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, revealed that the length of Aβ-(1–40) fibrils became shorter and the amount of amorphous aggregates became larger as liposomes increased in size. These results suggest that the curvature of membranes coupled with an increase in water-accessible hydrophobic regions is important for binding and concentrating Aβ monomers, leading to amyloid nucleation. Furthermore, amyloid fibrillation on membranes may compete with non-productive binding to produce amorphous aggregates. PMID:25406316

  11. Curcumin Reduces Amyloid Fibrillation of Prion Protein and Decreases Reactive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Fen; Yu, Kun-Hua; Jheng, Cheng-Ping; Chung, Raymond; Lee, Cheng-I

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation into amyloids of the prion protein (PrP) is responsible for the development of fatal transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. Various studies on curcumin demonstrate promise for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and inhibition of PrPres accumulation. To evaluate the effect of curcumin on amyloid fibrillation of prion protein, we first investigated the effect of curcumin on mouse prion protein (mPrP) in a cell-free system. Curcumin reduced the prion fibril formation significantly. Furthermore, we monitored the change in apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level upon curcumin treatment in mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2a). Curcumin effectively rescues the cells from apoptosis and decreases the ROS level caused by subsequent co-incubation with prion amyloid fibrils. The assays in cell-free mPrP and in N2a cells of this work verified the promising effect of curcumin on the prevention of transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25437204

  12. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  13. Gold-Induced Fibril Growth: The Mechanism of Surface-Facilitated Amyloid Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, Anika; Abel, Bernd; Risselada, Herre Jelger

    2016-09-01

    The question of how amyloid fibril formation is influenced by surfaces is crucial for a detailed understanding of the process in vivo. We applied a combination of kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate how (model) surfaces influence fibril formation of the amyloid-forming sequences of prion protein SUP35 and human islet amyloid polypeptide. The kinetic data suggest that structural reorganization of the initial peptide corona around colloidal gold nanoparticles is the rate-limiting step. The molecular dynamics simulations reveal that partial physisorption to the surface results in the formation of aligned monolayers, which stimulate the formation of parallel, critical oligomers. The general mechanism implies that the competition between the underlying peptide-peptide and peptide-surface interactions must strike a balance to accelerate fibril formation. PMID:27513605

  14. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Annika; Soederberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Sletten, Knut; Engstroem, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Naeslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-10-05

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation.

  15. The effects of chondroitin sulfate and serum albumin on the fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide at phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Tong; Wei, Ying; Li, Fei

    2016-04-28

    Glycosaminoglycans and serum albumin are important cellular components that regulate the fibril formation of proteins. Whereas the effects of cellular components on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins in bulk solution are widely studied, less attention has been paid to the effects of cellular components on amyloidogenesis occurring at cellular membranes. In this study, we focus on the impacts of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the amyloidogenic behaviors of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) at phospholipid membranes consisting of neutral POPC and anionic POPG. Using the thioflavin T fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we demonstrate that CSA has an intensive promotion effect on the fibrillation of hIAPP at the POPC membrane, which is larger than the total effect of CSA alone and POPC alone. The further enhanced promotion of the fibrillation of hIAPP by CSA at the neutral membrane is associated with a specific interaction of CSA with POPC. In contrast, the activity of BSA as an inhibitor of hIAPP fibrillation observed in bulk solution decreases dramatically in the presence of POPG vesicles. The dramatic loss of the inhibition efficiency of BSA arises essentially from a specific interaction with the POPG component, but not simply from suppression by an opposite effect of the anionic membrane. The findings in this study suggest that the interactions between membranes and cellular components may have a significant effect on the activity of the cellular components in regulating the fibrillation of hIAPP. PMID:27067251

  16. Conversion of non-fibrillar {beta}-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Cocera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    A{beta}(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular {beta}-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the A{beta}(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90 {mu}M peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar {beta}-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar {beta}-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar {beta}-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) {beta}-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  17. Surface adsorption considerations when working with amyloid fibrils in multiwell plates and Eppendorf tubes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amber N; Palhano, Fernando L; Bieschke, Jan; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of amyloid diseases. Recently, we reported the discovery of amyloid disaggregase activities in extracts from mammalian cells and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, we have discovered a problem with the interpretation of our previous results as Aβ disaggregation in vitro. Here, we show that Aβ fibrils adsorb to the plastic surface of multiwell plates and Eppendorf tubes. This adsorption is markedly increased in the presence of complex biological mixtures subjected to a denaturing air-water interface. The time-dependent loss of thioflavin T fluorescence that we interpreted previously as disaggregation is due to increased adsorption of Aβ amyloid to the surfaces of multiwell plates and Eppendorf tubes in the presence of biological extracts. As the proteins in biological extracts denature over time at the air-water interface due to agitation/shaking, their adsorption increases, in turn promoting adsorption of amyloid fibrils. We delineate important control experiments that quantify the extent of amyloid adsorption to the surface of plastic and quartz containers. Based on the results described in this article, we conclude that our interpretation of the kinetic fibril disaggregation assay data previously reported in Bieschke et al., Protein Sci 2009;18:2231-2241 and Murray et al., Protein Sci 2010;19:836-846 is invalid when used as evidence for a disaggregase activity. Thus, we correct the two prior publications reporting that worm or mammalian cell extracts disaggregate Aβ amyloid fibrils in vitro at 37°C (see Corrigenda in this issue of Protein Science). We apologize for misinterpreting our previous data and for any confounding experimental efforts this may have caused. PMID:23963844

  18. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  19. Photo-induced inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation on online laser measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} We compare the structures of insulin upon heating with or without laser irradiation. {yields} Laser irradiation inhibits insulin fibrillation and may be of insert for mechanistic disease studies. {yields} Online laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins. -- Abstract: Protein aggregation and amyloid fibrillation can lead to several serious diseases and protein drugs ineffectiveness; thus, the detection and inhibition of these processes have been of great interest. In the present study, the inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation by laser irradiation was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), far-UV circular dichroism (far-UV CD), and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. During heat-induced aggregation, the size distribution of two insulin solutions obtained by online and offline dynamic light scattering were different. The laser-on insulin in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl exhibited fewer fibrils than the laser-off insulin, whereas no insulin fibril under laser irradiation was observed in the absence of 0.1 M NaCl for 45 h incubation. Moreover, our CD results showed that the laser-irradiated insulin solution maintained mainly an {alpha}-helical conformation, but the laser-off insulin solution formed bulk fibrils followed by a significant increase in {beta}-sheet content for 106 h incubation. These findings provide an inhibition method for insulin amyloid fibrillation using the laser irradiation and demonstrate that the online long-time laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins because they may change the original results.

  20. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  1. Destruction of {alpha}-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley

    2010-10-04

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the 'plasma pencil', a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  2. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siposova, Katarina; Kubovcikova, Martina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Koneracka, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Antosova, Andrea; Kopcansky, Peter; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Gazova, Zuzana

    2012-02-01

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical-chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis.

  3. A Generic Crystallization-like Model That Describes the Kinetics of Amyloid Fibril Formation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Rosa; Rocha, Fernando A.; Damas, Ana M.; Martins, Pedro M.

    2012-01-01

    Associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, or prion diseases, the conversion of soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils remains poorly understood. Extensive “in vitro” measurements of protein aggregation kinetics have been reported, but no consensus mechanism has emerged until now. This contribution aims at overcoming this gap by proposing a theoretically consistent crystallization-like model (CLM) that is able to describe the classic types of amyloid fibrillization kinetics identified in our literature survey. Amyloid conversion represented as a function of time is shown to follow different curve shapes, ranging from sigmoidal to hyperbolic, according to the relative importance of the nucleation and growth steps. Using the CLM, apparently unrelated data are deconvoluted into generic mechanistic information integrating the combined influence of seeding, nucleation, growth, and fibril breakage events. It is notable that this complex assembly of interdependent events is ultimately reduced to a mathematically simple model, whose two parameters can be determined by little more than visual inspection. The good fitting results obtained for all cases confirm the CLM as a good approximation to the generalized underlying principle governing amyloid fibrillization. A perspective is presented on possible applications of the CLM during the development of new targets for amyloid disease therapeutics. PMID:22767606

  4. A generic crystallization-like model that describes the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rosa; Rocha, Fernando A; Damas, Ana M; Martins, Pedro M

    2012-08-31

    Associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, or prion diseases, the conversion of soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils remains poorly understood. Extensive "in vitro" measurements of protein aggregation kinetics have been reported, but no consensus mechanism has emerged until now. This contribution aims at overcoming this gap by proposing a theoretically consistent crystallization-like model (CLM) that is able to describe the classic types of amyloid fibrillization kinetics identified in our literature survey. Amyloid conversion represented as a function of time is shown to follow different curve shapes, ranging from sigmoidal to hyperbolic, according to the relative importance of the nucleation and growth steps. Using the CLM, apparently unrelated data are deconvoluted into generic mechanistic information integrating the combined influence of seeding, nucleation, growth, and fibril breakage events. It is notable that this complex assembly of interdependent events is ultimately reduced to a mathematically simple model, whose two parameters can be determined by little more than visual inspection. The good fitting results obtained for all cases confirm the CLM as a good approximation to the generalized underlying principle governing amyloid fibrillization. A perspective is presented on possible applications of the CLM during the development of new targets for amyloid disease therapeutics. PMID:22767606

  5. The interplay between carbon nanomaterials and amyloid fibrils in bio-nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in bio-nanotechnology have not only rapidly broadened the applications and scope of hybrid nanomaterials in biological fields, but also greatly enriched the examples of ordered materials based on supramolecular self-assembly. Among eminent examples of functional nanostructured materials of undisputed impact in nanotechnology and biological environments, carbon nanomaterials (such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene) and amyloid fibrils have attracted great attention because of their unique architectures and exceptional physical properties. Nonetheless, combination of these two classes of nanomaterials into functional hybrids is far from trivial. For example, the presence of carbon nanomaterials can offer either an inhibitory effect or promotion of amyloid fibrillation, depending on the structural architectures of carbon nanomaterials and the starting amyloid proteins/peptides considered. To date, numerous studies have been devoted to evaluating both the biological toxicity of carbon nanomaterials and their use in developing therapies for amyloidosis. At the same time, hybridization of these two classes of nanomaterials offers new possibilities for combining some of their desirable properties into nanocomposites of possible use in electronics, actuators, sensing, biomedicine and structural materials. This review describes recent developments in the hybridization of carbon nanomaterials and amyloid fibrils and discusses the current state of the art on the application of carbon nanomaterial-amyloid fibril hybrids in bio-nanotechnology.

  6. Gallic acid, one of the components in many plant tissues, is a potential inhibitor for insulin amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Jayamani, Jayaraman; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2014-10-01

    Proteins under stressful conditions can lead to the formation of an ordered self-assembled structure, referred to as amyloid fibrils, to which many neurodegenerative diseases such as Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, etc., are attributed. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation using natural products is one of the main therapeutic strategies to prevent the progression of these diseases. Polyphenols are the mostly consumed as antioxidants in a human nutrition. Herein, we have studied the effect of a simple polyphenol, gallic acid (GA), one of the main components in plant tissues, especially in tea leaves, on the insulin amyloid fibril formation. Different biophysical characterizations such as turbidity, atomic force microscopy (AFM), Thioflavin T (ThT) assays, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy have been used to analyze the inhibition of amyloid fibril formation. The occurrence of fibrils in an AFM image and ThT fluorescence enhancement confirms the formation of insulin amyloid fibrils when incubated under acidic pH 2 at 65 °C. In the presence of GA, absence of fibrils in AFM image and no change in the intensity of ThT fluorescence confirms the inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrils by GA. Spectroscopic results reveal that GA inhibits the conformational transition of α-helix → β-sheet, which is generally induced during the insulin fibril formation. It was found that the inhibitory effect of GA is concentration dependent and non-linear. Based on the observed results, we propose that GA interacts with native insulin, preventing nuclei formation, which is essential for fibril growth, thereby inhibiting the amyloid fibril formation. The present results thus demonstrate that GA can effectively inhibit insulin amyloid fibril formation in vitro. PMID:25105923

  7. Aqueous, Unfolded OmpA Forms Amyloid-Like Fibrils upon Self-Association

    PubMed Central

    Danoff, Emily J.; Fleming, Karen G.

    2015-01-01

    Unfolded outer membrane beta-barrel proteins have been shown to self-associate in the absence of lipid bilayers. We previously investigated the formation of high molecular weight species by OmpA, with both the transmembrane domain alone and the full-length protein, and discovered that the oligomeric form contains non-native β-sheet structure. We have further probed the conformation of self-associated OmpA by monitoring binding to Thioflavin T, a dye that is known to bind the cross-β a structure inherent in amyloid fibrils, and by observing the species by electron microscopy. The significant increase in fluorescence indicative of Thioflavin T binding and the appearance of fibrillar species by electron microscopy verify that the protein forms amyloid-like fibril structures upon oligomerization. These results are also consistent with our previous kinetic analysis of OmpA self-association that revealed a nucleated growth polymerization mechanism, which is frequently observed in amyloid formation. The discovery of OmpA’s ability to form amyloid-like fibrils provides a new model protein with which to study fibrillization, and implicates periplasmic chaperone proteins as capable of inhibiting fibril formation. PMID:26196893

  8. High resolution structural characterization of Aβ42 amyloid fibrils by magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Frohm, Birgitta; Su, Yongchao; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-06-17

    The presence of amyloid plaques composed of amyloid beta (Aβ) fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Aβ peptide is present as several length variants with two common alloforms consisting of 40 and 42 amino acids, denoted Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, respectively. While there have been numerous reports that structurally characterize fibrils of Aβ1-40, very little is known about the structure of amyloid fibrils of Aβ1-42, which are considered the more toxic alloform involved in AD. We have prepared isotopically (13)C/(15)N labeled AβM01-42 fibrils in vitro from recombinant protein and examined their (13)C-(13)C and (13)C-(15)N magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra. In contrast to several other studies of Aβ fibrils, we observe spectra with excellent resolution and a single set of chemical shifts, suggesting the presence of a single fibril morphology. We report the initial structural characterization of AβM01-42 fibrils utilizing (13)C and (15)N shift assignments of 38 of the 43 residues, including the backbone and side chains, obtained through a series of cross-polarization based 2D and 3D (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N MAS NMR experiments for rigid residues along with J-based 2D TOBSY experiments for dynamic residues. We find that the first ∼5 residues are dynamic and most efficiently detected in a J-based TOBSY spectrum. In contrast, residues 16-42 are easily observed in cross-polarization experiments and most likely form the amyloid core. Calculation of ψ and φ dihedral angles from the chemical shift assignments indicate that 4 β-strands are present in the fibril's secondary structure. PMID:26001057

  9. Inhibition by small-molecule ligands of formation of amyloid fibrils of an immunoglobulin light chain variable domain

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Salwinski, Lukasz; Phillips, Martin L; Ly, Alan T; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2015-01-01

    Overproduction of immunoglobulin light chains leads to systemic amyloidosis, a lethal disease characterized by the formation of amyloid fibrils in patients' tissues. Excess light chains are in equilibrium between dimers and less stable monomers which can undergo irreversible aggregation to the amyloid state. The dimers therefore must disassociate into monomers prior to forming amyloid fibrils. Here we identify ligands that inhibit amyloid formation by stabilizing the Mcg light chain variable domain dimer and shifting the equilibrium away from the amyloid-prone monomer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10935.001 PMID:26576950

  10. Nanoscale Heterogeneity of the Molecular Structure of Individual hIAPP Amyloid Fibrils Revealed with Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    vandenAkker, Corianne C; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Schleeger, Michael; Velikov, Krassimir P; Deckert, Volker; Bonn, Mischa; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the pathological deposition of fibrillized protein, known as amyloids. It is thought that oligomers and/or amyloid fibrils formed from human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) cause cell death by membrane damage. The molecular structure of hIAPP amyloid fibrils is dominated by β-sheet structure, as probed with conventional infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy. However, with these techniques it is not possible to distinguish between the core and the surface structure of the fibrils. Since the fibril surface crucially affects amyloid toxicity, it is essential to know its structure. Here the surface molecular structure and amino acid residue composition of hIAPP fibrils are specifically probed with nanoscale resolution using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The fibril surface mainly contains unordered or α-helical structures, in contrast to the β-sheet-rich core. This experimentally validates recent models of hIAPP amyloids based on NMR measurements. Spatial mapping of the surface structure reveals a highly heterogeneous surface structure. Finally, TERS can probe fibrils formed on a lipid interface, which is more representative of amyloids in vivo. PMID:25952953

  11. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils Are Nanoparticles That Disrupt Lysosomal Membrane Protein Trafficking and Inhibit Protein Degradation by Lysosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Jakhria, Toral; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Porter, Morwenna Y.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Radford, Sheena E.; Hewitt, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Fragmentation of amyloid fibrils produces fibrils that are reduced in length but have an otherwise unchanged molecular architecture. The resultant nanoscale fibril particles inhibit the cellular reduction of the tetrazolium dye 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), a substrate commonly used to measure cell viability, to a greater extent than unfragmented fibrils. Here we show that the internalization of β2-microglobulin (β2m) amyloid fibrils is dependent on fibril length, with fragmented fibrils being more efficiently internalized by cells. Correspondingly, inhibiting the internalization of fragmented β2m fibrils rescued cellular MTT reduction. Incubation of cells with fragmented β2m fibrils did not, however, cause cell death. Instead, fragmented β2m fibrils accumulate in lysosomes, alter the trafficking of lysosomal membrane proteins, and inhibit the degradation of a model protein substrate by lysosomes. These findings suggest that nanoscale fibrils formed early during amyloid assembly reactions or by the fragmentation of longer fibrils could play a role in amyloid disease by disrupting protein degradation by lysosomes and trafficking in the endolysosomal pathway. PMID:25378395

  12. What Can the Kinetics of Amyloid Fibril Formation Tell about Off-pathway Aggregation?

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rosa; Villar-Alvarez, Eva; Taboada, Pablo; Rocha, Fernando A; Damas, Ana M; Martins, Pedro M

    2016-01-22

    Some of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of amyloid fibrils in organs and tissues. Although the pathogenic role of these fibrils has not been completely established, increasing evidence suggests off-pathway aggregation as a source of toxic/detoxicating deposits that still remains to be targeted. The present work is a step toward the development of off-pathway modulators using the same amyloid-specific dyes as those conventionally employed to screen amyloid inhibitors. We identified a series of kinetic signatures revealing the quantitative importance of off-pathway aggregation relative to amyloid fibrillization; these include non-linear semilog plots of amyloid progress curves, highly variable end point signals, and half-life coordinates weakly influenced by concentration. Molecules that attenuate/intensify the magnitude of these signals are considered promising off-pathway inhibitors/promoters. An illustrative example shows that amyloid deposits of lysozyme are only the tip of an iceberg hiding a crowd of insoluble aggregates. Thoroughly validated using advanced microscopy techniques and complementary measurements of dynamic light scattering, CD, and soluble protein depletion, the new analytical tools are compatible with the high-throughput methods currently employed in drug discovery. PMID:26601940

  13. Analysis of the length distribution of amyloid fibrils by centrifugal sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Cedervall, Tommy; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara

    2016-07-01

    The aggregation of normally soluble peptides and proteins into amyloid fibrils is a process associated with a wide range of pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. It has become apparent that aggregates of different sizes possess markedly different biological effects, with aggregates of lower relative molecular weight being associated with stronger neurotoxicity. Yet, although many approaches exist to measure the total mass concentration of aggregates, the ability to probe the length distribution of growing aggregates in solution has remained more elusive. In this work, we applied a differential centrifugation technique to measure the sedimentation coefficients of amyloid fibrils produced during the aggregation process of the amyloid β (M1-42) peptide (Aβ42). The centrifugal method has the advantage of providing structural information on the fibril distribution directly in solution and affording a short analysis time with respect to alternative imaging and analytical centrifugation approaches. We show that under quiescent conditions interactions between Aβ42 fibrils lead to lateral association and to the formation of entangled clusters. By contrast, aggregation under shaking generates a population of filaments characterized by shorter lengths. The results, which have been validated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) analysis, highlight the important role that fibril-fibril assembly can play in the deposition of aggregation-prone peptides. PMID:27033008

  14. Simulation of Two Dimensional Ultraviolet (2DUV) Spectroscopy of Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Abramavicius, Darius; Falvo, Cyril; Bulheller, Benjamin M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-01-01

    Revealing the structure and aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibrils is essential for the treatment of over 20 diseases related to protein misfolding. Coherent two dimensional (2D) infrared spectroscopy is a novel tool that provides a wealth of new insight into the structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems. Recently developed ultrafast laser sources are extending multidimensional spectroscopy into the ultraviolet (UV) region, and this opens up new opportunities for probing fibrils. In a simulation study, we show that 2DUV spectra of the backbone of a 32-residue β-amyloid (Aβ9–40) fibril associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and two intermediate prefibrillar structures carry characteristic signatures of fibril size and geometry that could be used to monitor its formation kinetics. The dependence of these signals on the fibril size and geometry is explored. We demonstrate that the dominant features of the β-amyloid fibril spectra are determined by intramolecular interactions within a single Aβ9–40, while intermolecular interactions at the “external interface” have clear signatures in the fine details of these signals. PMID:20795695

  15. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  16. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  17. Seeding-dependent maturation of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Miho; Chatani, Eri; Sakai, Miyo; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-03-25

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2-m) is a major component of amyloid fibrils deposited in patients with dialysis-related amyloidosis. Recent studies have focused on the mechanism by which amyloid fibrils are formed under physiological conditions, which had been difficult to reproduce quantitatively. Yamamoto et al. (Yamamoto, S., Hasegawa, K., Yamaguchi, I., Tsutsumi, S., Kardos, J., Goto, Y., Gejyo, F. & Naiki, H. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 11075-11082) showed that a combination of seed fibrils prepared under acidic conditions and a low concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate below its critical micelle concentration enabled extensive fibril formation at pH 7.0. Here, we found that repeated self-seeding at pH 7.0 with fibrils formed at the same pH causes a marked acceleration of growth, indicating the maturation of fibrils. The observed maturation can be simulated by assuming the existence of two types of fibrils with different growth rates. Importantly, some mutations of beta2-m or the addition of a low concentration of urea, both destabilizing the native conformation, were not enough to extend the fibrils at pH 7.0, and a low concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (i.e. 0.5 mM) was essential. Thus, even though the first stage fibrils in patients are unstable and require stabilizing factors to remain at neutral pH, they can adapt to a neutral pH with repeated self-seeding, implying a mechanism of development of amyloid deposition after a long latent period in patients. PMID:15659393

  18. Molecular Structure of Amyloid Fibrils Controls the Relationship between Fibrillar Size and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jin; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the prevailing view, soluble oligomers or small fibrillar fragments are considered to be the most toxic species in prion diseases. To test this hypothesis, two conformationally different amyloid states were produced from the same highly pure recombinant full-length prion protein (rPrP). The cytotoxic potential of intact fibrils and fibrillar fragments generated by sonication from these two states was tested using cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings For one amyloid state, fibril fragmentation was found to enhance its cytotoxic potential, whereas for another amyloid state formed within the same amino acid sequence, the fragmented fibrils were found to be substantially less toxic than the intact fibrils. Consistent with the previous studies, the toxic effects were more pronounced for cell cultures expressing normal isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) at high levels confirming that cytotoxicity was in part PrPC-dependent. Silencing of PrPC expression by small hairpin RNAs designed to silence expression of human PrPC (shRNA-PrPC) deminished the deleterious effects of the two amyloid states to a different extent, suggesting that the role of PrPC-mediated and PrPC-independent mechanisms depends on the structure of the aggregates. Conclusions/Significance This work provides a direct illustration that the relationship between an amyloid's physical dimension and its toxic potential is not unidirectional but is controlled by the molecular structure of prion protein (PrP) molecules within aggregated states. Depending on the structure, a decrease in size of amyloid fibrils can either enhance or abolish their cytotoxic effect. Regardless of the molecular structure or size of PrP aggregates, silencing of PrPC expression can be exploited to reduce their deleterious effects. PMID:21625461

  19. Protein corona composition of gold nanoparticles/nanorods affects amyloid beta fibrillation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Zohreh; Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ghavami, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades, nanoparticles (NPs) were recognized as one of the most promising tools for inhibiting the progress of the disease by controlling the fibrillation kinetic process; for instance, gold NPs have a strong capability to inhibit Aβ fibrillations. It is now well understood that a layer of biomolecules would cover the surface of NPs (so called ``protein corona'') upon the interaction of NPs with protein sources. Due to the fact that the biological species (e.g., cells and amyloidal proteins) ``see'' the protein corona coated NPs rather than the pristine coated particles, one should monitor the fibrillation process of amyloidal proteins in the presence of corona coated NPs (and not pristine coated ones). Therefore, the previously obtained data on NPs effects on the fibrillation process should be modified to achieve a more reliable and predictable in vivo results. Herein, we probed the effects of various gold NPs (with different sizes and shapes) on the fibrillation process of Aβ in the presence and absence of protein sources (i.e., serum and plasma). We found that the protein corona formed a shell at the surface of gold NPs, regardless of their size and shape, reducing the access of Aβ to the gold inhibitory surface and, therefore, affecting the rate of Aβ fibril formation. More specifically, the anti-fibrillation potencies of various corona coated gold NPs were strongly dependent on the protein source and their concentrations (10% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vitro milieu) and 100% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vivo milieu)).Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades

  20. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  1. High Resolution Structural Characterization of Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils by Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The presence of amyloid plaques composed of amyloid beta (Aβ) fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The Aβ peptide is present as several length variants with two common alloforms consisting of 40 and 42 amino acids, denoted Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42, respectively. While there have been numerous reports that structurally characterize fibrils of Aβ1–40, very little is known about the structure of amyloid fibrils of Aβ1–42, which are considered the more toxic alloform involved in AD. We have prepared isotopically 13C/15N labeled AβM01–42 fibrils in vitro from recombinant protein and examined their 13C–13C and 13C–15N magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra. In contrast to several other studies of Aβ fibrils, we observe spectra with excellent resolution and a single set of chemical shifts, suggesting the presence of a single fibril morphology. We report the initial structural characterization of AβM01–42 fibrils utilizing 13C and 15N shift assignments of 38 of the 43 residues, including the backbone and side chains, obtained through a series of cross-polarization based 2D and 3D 13C–13C, 13C–15N MAS NMR experiments for rigid residues along with J-based 2D TOBSY experiments for dynamic residues. We find that the first ∼5 residues are dynamic and most efficiently detected in a J-based TOBSY spectrum. In contrast, residues 16–42 are easily observed in cross-polarization experiments and most likely form the amyloid core. Calculation of ψ and φ dihedral angles from the chemical shift assignments indicate that 4 β-strands are present in the fibril’s secondary structure. PMID:26001057

  2. In vitro fibrillization of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide (1-42)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiiman, Ann; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2015-09-01

    The amyloid deposition in the form of extracellular fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillization in vitro. The effects of Aβ42 peptide concentration, temperature, pH, added solvents and the ratio of Aβ40 and Aβ42 on the peptide fibrillization under agitated conditions was studied. The analysis show that the rate of fibril growth by monomer addition is not limited by diffusion but by rearrangement in the monomer structure, which is enhanced by low concentrations of fluorinated alcohols and characterized by the activation energy of 12 kcal/mol. Fibrillization rate decreases at pH values below 7.0 where simultaneous protonation of His 13 and 14 inhibits fibril formation. The lag period for Aβ42 was only twofold shorter and the fibril growth rate twofold faster than those of Aβ40. Lag period was shortened and the fibrillization rate was increased only at 90% content of Aβ42.

  3. Large Proteins Have a Great Tendency to Aggregate but a Low Propensity to Form Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Hassan; Parrini, Claudia; Relini, Annalisa; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Mannini, Benedetta; Pesce, Alessandra; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of soluble proteins into ordered fibrillar aggregates with cross-β structure is an essential event of many human diseases. The polypeptides undergoing aggregation are generally small in size. To explore if the small size is a primary determinant for the formation of amyloids under pathological conditions we have created two databases of proteins, forming amyloid-related and non-amyloid deposits in human diseases, respectively. The size distributions of the two protein populations are well separated, with the systems forming non-amyloid deposits appearing significantly larger. We have then investigated the propensity of the 486-residue hexokinase-B from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YHKB) to form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. This size is intermediate between the size distributions of amyloid and non-amyloid forming proteins. Aggregation was induced under conditions known to be most effective for amyloid formation by normally globular proteins: (i) low pH with salts, (ii) pH 5.5 with trifluoroethanol. In both situations YHKB aggregated very rapidly into species with significant β-sheet structure, as detected using circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction, but a weak Thioflavin T and Congo red binding. Moreover, atomic force microscopy indicated a morphology distinct from typical amyloid fibrils. Both types of aggregates were cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma cells, as indicated by the MTT assay. This analysis indicates that large proteins have a high tendency to form toxic aggregates, but low propensity to form regular amyloid in vivo and that such a behavior is intrinsically determined by the size of the protein, as suggested by the in vitro analysis of our sample protein. PMID:21249193

  4. Mechanisms of transthyretin amyloidogenesis. Antigenic mapping of transthyretin purified from plasma and amyloid fibrils and within in situ tissue localizations.

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, A.; Engström, U.; Westermark, P.

    1994-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is the major amyloid fibril protein in senile systemic amyloidosis and in several forms of familial amyloidoses. However, the internal organization of the fibrils is virtually unknown. It is not known whether the structure of the TTR molecules is substantially altered within the fibrils. In this study we used various antigenic mapping procedures to determine whether major antigenic sites differ between normal TTR, ATTR (TTR from amyloid fibrils), and in situ amyloid fibrils. Antigenic mapping was achieved using standard immunological procedures (ie, ELISA, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry), synthetic peptides of the TTR molecule, antisera against these synthetic peptides and against normal TTR, ATTR, and alkali-degraded amyloid fibrils. Our results show that the antigenic sites on normal plasma TTR include the AB loop and the CD loop. The amino acid sequences associated with these loops are present on the outside of the TTR molecule. Antiserum against beta-strand H reacted only with TTR in amyloid fibrils and ATTR but not with normal plasma TTR or TTR in the islets of Langerhans. Our results suggest that there is an altered configuration of TTR within amyloid fibrils when compared with plasma TTR. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8203468

  5. Inhibitory effects of β-ionone on amyloid fibril formation of β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoliang; You, Xiong; Lu, Fujiao

    2014-03-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) is the major constituent of whey food, which has been shown to interact with a wide range of aroma compounds. In the present work, a model aroma compound, β-ionone, is used to investigate the influence of aroma compounds on the urea-induced unfolding of β-LG at pH 7.0. β-Ionone is observed to enhance the stability of β-LG at pH 7.0. Moreover, the amyloid fibrils are observed when β-LG at pH 7.0 is incubated for 12-20 days at 37 °C in the presence of 3-5M urea. However, the formation of amyloid fibrils is inhibited when β-ionone is added into the samples and the inhibitory effects follow a concentration-dependent fashion. There is a clear correlation between Cm and lag time. The correlation demonstrates that protein stability affects the amyloid fibril formation of β-LG. The results highlight the critical role of protein stability and provide an approach to prevent the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. PMID:24325860

  6. Self-assembly of Amyloid Fibrils in One, Two and Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are protein aggregates, which occur in-vivo in the case of neurodegenerative diseases and in-vitro in the design of advanced functional materials of relevance in nanotechnology and nanosciences. At length scales above the well-established atomistic fingerprint of amyloid fibrils, these colloidal aggregates exhibit mesoscopic properties comparable to those of natural polyelectrolytes, yet with persistence lengths several orders of magnitude beyond the Debye length. This intrinsic rigidity, together with their chiral, polar and charged nature, provides these systems with some unique physical behavior in one, two and three dimensions. In this talk I will discuss our current understanding on the mesoscopic properties of amyloid fibrils at the single molecule level, the implication of their semiflexible nature on their liquid crystalline properties, and I will illustrate how this information proves useful in understanding their collective behavior in bulk and when adsorbed at liquid interfaces. By the careful exploitation of the physical properties of amyloid fibrils, the design of advanced materials with unprecedented physical properties becomes possible, and I will give a few examples on how these systems can ideally suit the design of biosensors and biomaterials.

  7. Evaluating Nuclei Concentration in Amyloid Fibrillation Reactions Using Back-Calculation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Mirco; Silkworth, Whitney; Gehan, Timothy; Belfort, Georges

    2011-01-01

    Background In spite of our extensive knowledge of the more than 20 proteins associated with different amyloid diseases, we do not know how amyloid toxicity occurs or how to block its action. Recent contradictory reports suggest that the fibrils and/or the oligomer precursors cause toxicity. An estimate of their temporal concentration may broaden understanding of the amyloid aggregation process. Methodology/Principal Findings Assuming that conversion of folded protein to fibril is initiated by a nucleation event, we back-calculate the distribution of nuclei concentration. The temporal in vitro concentration of nuclei for the model hormone, recombinant human insulin, is estimated to be in the picomolar range. This is a conservative estimate since the back-calculation method is likely to overestimate the nuclei concentration because it does not take into consideration fibril fragmentation, which would lower the amount of nuclei Conclusions Because of their propensity to form aggregates (non-ordered) and fibrils (ordered), this very low concentration could explain the difficulty in isolating and blocking oligomers or nuclei toxicity and the long onset time for amyloid diseases. PMID:21625464

  8. Quantum dots induce charge-specific amyloid-like fibrillation of insulin at physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Poly, Simon; Shemetov, Anton; Nabiev, Igor R.

    2012-10-01

    Agglomeration of some proteins may give rise to aggregates that have been identified as the main cause of amyloid diseases. For example, fibrillation of insulin is related to diabetes mellitus. Quantum dots (QDs) are of special interest as tagging agents for diagnostic and therapeutic studies due to their broad absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra, and high photostability. In this study, PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of human insulin under physiological conditions, this process being dependent on the variation of the surface charge of the nanoparticles (NPs) used. Circular dichroism (CD), protein secondary structure analysis, thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique have been used for comparative analysis of different stages of the fibrillation process. In particular, insulin secondary structure remodelling accompanied by a considerable increase in the rate of amyloid fiber formation have been observed after insulin was mixed with PEGylated QDs. Nanoparticles may significantly influence the rate of protein fibrillation and induce new mechanisms of amyloid diseases, as well as offer opportunities for their treatment.

  9. Fibrillar Oligomers Nucleate the Oligomerization of Monomeric Amyloid β but Do Not Seed Fibril Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jessica W.; Breydo, Leonid; Isas, J. Mario; Lee, Jerome; Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Langen, Ralf; Glabe, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Soluble amyloid oligomers are potent neurotoxins that are involved in a wide range of human degenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. In Alzheimer disease, amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers bind to neuronal synapses, inhibit long term potentiation, and induce cell death. Recent evidence indicates that several immunologically distinct structural variants exist as follows: prefibrillar oligomers (PFOs), fibrillar oligomers (FOs), and annular protofibrils. Despite widespread interest, amyloid oligomers are poorly characterized in terms of structural differences and pathological significance. FOs are immunologically related to fibrils because they react with OC, a conformation-dependent, fibril-specific antibody and do not react with antibodies specific for other types of oligomers. However, fibrillar oligomers are much smaller than fibrils. FOs are soluble at 100,000 × g, rich in β-sheet structures, but yet bind weakly to thioflavin T. EPR spectroscopy indicates that FOs display significantly more spin-spin interaction at multiple labeled sites than PFOs and are more structurally similar to fibrils. Atomic force microscopy indicates that FOs are approximately one-half to one-third the height of mature fibrils. We found that Aβ FOs do not seed the formation of thioflavin T-positive fibrils from Aβ monomers but instead seed the formation of FOs from Aβ monomers that are positive for the OC anti-fibril antibody. These results indicate that the lattice of FOs is distinct from the fibril lattice even though the polypeptide chains are organized in an immunologically identical conformation. The FOs resulting from seeded reactions have the same dimensions and morphology as the initial seeds, suggesting that the seeds replicate by growing to a limiting size and then splitting, indicating that their lattice is less stable than fibrils. We suggest that FOs may represent small pieces of single fibril protofilament and that the addition of monomers to the ends of FOs is

  10. Membrane damage by human islet amyloid polypeptide through fibril growth at the membrane.

    PubMed

    Engel, Maarten F M; Khemtémourian, Lucie; Kleijer, Cécile C; Meeldijk, Hans J D; Jacobs, Jet; Verkleij, Arie J; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette; Höppener, Jo W M

    2008-04-22

    Fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid) in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be involved in death of the insulin-producing islet beta cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that the mechanism of this beta cell death involves membrane disruption by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid. However, the molecular mechanism of hIAPP-induced membrane disruption is not known. Here, we propose a hypothesis that growth of hIAPP fibrils at the membrane causes membrane damage. We studied the kinetics of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to hIAPP fibril growth and found that the kinetic profile of hIAPP-induced membrane damage is characterized by a lag phase and a sigmoidal transition, which matches the kinetic profile of hIAPP fibril growth. The observation that seeding accelerates membrane damage supports the hypothesis. In addition, variables that are well known to affect hIAPP fibril formation, i.e., the presence of a fibril formation inhibitor, hIAPP concentration, and lipid composition, were found to have the same effect on hIAPP-induced membrane damage. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis showed that hIAPP fibrils line the surface of distorted phospholipid vesicles, in agreement with the notion that hIAPP fibril growth at the membrane and membrane damage are physically connected. Together, these observations point toward a mechanism in which growth of hIAPP fibrils, rather than a particular hIAPP species, is responsible for the observed membrane damage. This hypothesis provides an additional mechanism next to the previously proposed role of oligomers as the main cytotoxic species of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:18408164

  11. Membrane damage by human islet amyloid polypeptide through fibril growth at the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Maarten F. M.; Khemtémourian, Lucie; Kleijer, Cécile C.; Meeldijk, Hans J. D.; Jacobs, Jet; Verkleij, Arie J.; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J. Antoinette; Höppener, Jo W. M.

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid) in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be involved in death of the insulin-producing islet β cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that the mechanism of this β cell death involves membrane disruption by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid. However, the molecular mechanism of hIAPP-induced membrane disruption is not known. Here, we propose a hypothesis that growth of hIAPP fibrils at the membrane causes membrane damage. We studied the kinetics of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to hIAPP fibril growth and found that the kinetic profile of hIAPP-induced membrane damage is characterized by a lag phase and a sigmoidal transition, which matches the kinetic profile of hIAPP fibril growth. The observation that seeding accelerates membrane damage supports the hypothesis. In addition, variables that are well known to affect hIAPP fibril formation, i.e., the presence of a fibril formation inhibitor, hIAPP concentration, and lipid composition, were found to have the same effect on hIAPP-induced membrane damage. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis showed that hIAPP fibrils line the surface of distorted phospholipid vesicles, in agreement with the notion that hIAPP fibril growth at the membrane and membrane damage are physically connected. Together, these observations point toward a mechanism in which growth of hIAPP fibrils, rather than a particular hIAPP species, is responsible for the observed membrane damage. This hypothesis provides an additional mechanism next to the previously proposed role of oligomers as the main cytotoxic species of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:18408164

  12. Population of non-native states of lysozyme variants drives amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Mossuto, Maria F.; Cremades, Nunilo; Kumita, Janet R.; Dumoulin, Mireille; Welland, Mark E.; Knowles, Tuomas P.J.; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The propensity of protein molecules to self-assemble into highly ordered, fibrillar aggregates lies at the heart of the understanding of many disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease or lysozyme systemic amyloidosis. In this article we use highly accurate kinetic measurements of amyloid fibril growth in combination with spectroscopic tools to quantify the effect of modifications in the solution conditions and the amino acid sequence of human lysozyme on its propensity to form amyloid fibrils under acidic conditions. We elucidate and quantify the correlation between the rate of amyloid growth and the population of non-native states, and show that changes in amyloidogenicity are almost entirely due to alterations in the stability of the native state, while other regions of the global free energy surface remain largely unmodified. These results provide insight into the complex dynamics of a macromolecule on a multidimensional energy landscape, and point the way for a better understanding of misfolding diseases. PMID:21528861

  13. Islet amyloid polypeptide and high hydrostatic pressure: towards an understanding of the fibrillization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, D. H. J.; Smirnovas, V.; Winter, R.

    2008-07-01

    Type II Diabetes Mellitus is a disease which is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance coupled with a progressive loss of insulin secretion that is associated with a decrease in pancreatic islet β-cell mass and the deposition of amyloid in the extracellular matrix of β-cells, which lead to islet cell death. The principal component of the islet amyloid is a pancreatic hormone called islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). High-pressure coupled with FT-IR, CD, ThT fluorescence spectroscopic and AFM studies were carried out to reveal information on the aggregation pathway as well as the aggregate structure of IAPP. Our data indicate that IAPP pre-formed fibrils exhibit a strong polymorphism with heterogeneous structures very sensitive to high hydrostatic pressure, indicating a high percentage of ionic and hydrophobic interactions being responsible for the stability the IAPP fibrils.

  14. Measurements of 13C multiple-quantum coherences in amyloid fibrils under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tsai, Tim W T; Cheng, Hsin-Mei; Chan, Jerry C C

    2012-06-21

    The excitation and detection of high-order multiple quantum coherences among (13)C nuclear spins are demonstrated in the samples of [1-(13)C]-L-alanine and (13)C labeled amyloid fibrils at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz. The technique is based on the double-quantum average Hamiltonian prepared by the DRAMA-XY4 pulse sequence. Empirically, we find that multiple supercycles are required to suppress the higher-order effects for real applications. Measurements for the fibril samples formed by the polypeptides of PrP(113-127) provide the first solid-state NMR evidence for the stacking of multiple β-sheet layers at the structural core of amyloid fibrils. PMID:22632418

  15. Conformational stability of PrP amyloid fibrils controls their smallest possible fragment size.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Makarava, Natallia; Lee, Cheng-I; Laksanalamai, Pongpan; Robb, Frank T; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2008-02-29

    Fibril fragmentation is considered to be an essential step in prion replication. Recent studies have revealed a strong correlation between the incubation period to prion disease and conformational stability of synthetic prions. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism that accounts for this correlation, we proposed that the conformational stability of prion fibrils controls their intrinsic fragility or the size of the smallest possible fibrillar fragments. Using amyloid fibrils produced from full-length mammalian prion protein under three growth conditions, we found a correlation between conformational stability and the smallest possible fragment sizes. Specifically, the fibrils that were conformationally less stable were found to produce shorter pieces upon fragmentation. Site-specific denaturation experiments revealed that the fibril conformational stability was controlled by the region that acquires a cross-beta-sheet structure. Using atomic force microscopy imaging, we found that fibril fragmentation occurred in both directions--perpendicular to and along the fibrillar axis. Two mechanisms of fibril fragmentation were identified: (i) fragmentation caused by small heat shock proteins, including alpha B-crystallin, and (ii) fragmentation due to mechanical stress arising from adhesion of the fibril to a surface. This study provides new mechanistic insight into the prion replication mechanism and offers a plausible explanation for the correlation between conformational stability of synthetic prions and incubation time to prion disease. PMID:18206163

  16. A folded and functional protein domain in an amyloid-like fibril

    PubMed Central

    Sackewitz, Mirko; von Einem, Sabrina; Hause, Gerd; Wunderlich, Michael; Schmid, Franz-Xaver; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the polypeptide environment on polyalanine-induced fibril formation was investigated with amyloidogenic fragments from PAPBN1, a nuclear protein controlling polyadenylation. Mutation-caused extensions of the natural 10 alanine sequence up to maximally 17 alanines result in fibril formation of PABPN1 and the development of the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). We explored the influence of fibril formation on the structure and function of a one-domain protein linked to the fibril-forming part of PABPN1. The well-characterized, stably folded, one-domain protein, cold-shock protein CspB from Bacillus subtilis, was fused either to the C terminus of the entire N-terminal domain of PABPN1 or directly to peptides consisting of 10 or 17 alanine residues. The fusion protein between the N-terminal domain of PABPN1 and CspB formed fibrils in which the structure and activity of CspB were retained. In the fibrils formed by fusions in which the polyalanine sequence was directly linked to CspB, CspB was unfolded. These results indicate that the folded conformation and the function of a protein domain can be maintained in amyloid-like fibrils, and that the distance between this domain and the fibril plays an important role. PMID:18424511

  17. Guanidine hydrochloride can induce amyloid fibril formation from hen egg-white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Vernaglia, Brian A; Huang, Jia; Clark, Eliana D

    2004-01-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils is an intractable problem in which normally soluble protein polymerizes and forms insoluble ordered aggregates. Such aggregates can range from being a nuisance in vitro to being toxic in vivo. The latter is true for lysozyme, which has been shown to form toxic deposits in humans. In the present study, the effects of partial denaturation of hen egg-white lysozyme via incubation in a concentrated solution of the denaturant guanidine hydrochloride are investigated. Results show that when lysozyme is incubated under moderate guanidine hydrochloride concentrations (i.e., 2-5 M), where lysozyme is partially unfolded, fibrils form rapidly. Thioflavin T, Congo red, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy are all used to verify the production of fibrils under these conditions. Incubation at very low or very high guanidine hydrochloride concentrations fails to produce fibrils. At very low denaturant concentrations, the structure of lysozyme is fully native and very stable. On the other hand, at very high denaturant concentrations, guanidine hydrochloride is capable of dissolving and dis-aggregating fibrils that are formed. Raising the temperature and/or concentration of lysozyme accelerates fibril formation by further adding to the concentration of partially unfolded species. The addition of preformed fibrils also accelerates fibril formation but only under partially unfolding conditions. The results presented here provide further evidence that partial unfolding is a prerequisite to fibril formation. Partial denaturation can accelerate fibril formation in much the same way that mutations have been shown to accelerate fibril formation. PMID:15244452

  18. Rapid amyloid fibril formation by a winter flounder antifreeze protein requires specific interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Dubé, André; Leggiadro, Cindy; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya

    2016-05-01

    A typically α-helical antifreeze protein (wflAFP-6) from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, forms amyloid fibrils during freezing. In this study, the effects of distinct components of the freezing process were examined. Freezing of wflAFP-6 in the presence of template ice was shown to be necessary for rapid conversion to an amyloid conformation. Neither subfreezing temperature nor phase change was sufficient. Thus, specific interaction with the ice surface was essential. The ice-induced formation of amyloid appeared to be unique to this helical antifreeze, it required high concentrations of protein and it occurred over a range of pH values. These results define a method for rapid formation of amyloid by wflAFP-6 on demand under physiological conditions. PMID:27086686

  19. Elucidating the Locking Mechanism of Peptides onto Growing Amyloid Fibrils through Transition Path Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Schor, Marieke; Vreede, Jocelyne; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the molecular mechanism of monomer addition to a growing amyloid fibril composed of the main amyloidogenic region from the insulin peptide hormone, the LVEALYLLVEALYL heptapeptide. Applying transition path sampling in combination with reaction coordinate analysis reveals that the transition from a docked peptide to a locked, fully incorporated peptide can occur in two ways. Both routes involve the formation of backbone hydrogen bonds between the three central amino acids of the attaching peptide and the fibril, as well as a reorientation of the central Glu side chain of the locking peptide toward the interface between two β-sheets forming the fibril. The mechanisms differ in the sequence of events. We also conclude that proper docking is important for correct alignment of the peptide with the fibril, as alternative pathways result in misfolding. PMID:22995502

  20. Engineering amyloid fibrils from β-solenoid proteins for biomaterials applications.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Maria D R; Karsai, Arpad; Ngo, Alice; Sierra, Catherine; Fong, Kai T; Hayre, Natha Robert; Mirzaee, Nima; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar Mayuram; Kluber, Alexander J; Chen, Xi; Liu, Gang-yu; Toney, Michael D; Singh, Rajiv R; Cox, Daniel Lee

    2015-01-27

    Nature provides numerous examples of self-assembly that can potentially be implemented for materials applications. Considerable attention has been given to one-dimensional cross-β or amyloid structures that can serve as templates for wire growth or strengthen materials such as glue or cement. Here, we demonstrate controlled amyloid self-assembly based on modifications of β-solenoid proteins. They occur naturally in several contexts (e.g., antifreeze proteins, drug resistance proteins) but do not aggregate in vivo due to capping structures or distortions at their ends. Removal of these capping structures and regularization of the ends of the spruce budworm and rye grass antifreeze proteins yield micron length amyloid fibrils with predictable heights, which can be a platform for biomaterial-based self-assembly. The design process, including all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, purification, and self-assembly procedures are described. Fibril formation with the predicted characteristics is supported by evidence from thioflavin-T fluorescence, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Additionally, we find evidence for lateral assembly of the modified spruce budworm antifreeze fibrils with sufficient incubation time. The kinetics of polymerization are consistent with those for other amyloid formation reactions and are relatively fast due to the preformed nature of the polymerization nucleus. PMID:25562726

  1. pH-Driven Polymorphism of Insulin Amyloid-Like Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sneideris, Tomas; Darguzis, Domantas; Botyriute, Akvile; Grigaliunas, Martynas; Winter, Roland; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    Prions are infective proteins, which can self-assemble into different strain conformations, leading to different disease phenotypes. An increasing number of studies suggest that prion-like self-propagation may be a common feature of amyloid-like structures. Thus it is important to unravel every possible factor leading to the formation of different amyloid strains. Here we report on the formation of two types of insulin amyloid-like fibrils with distinct infrared spectroscopic features grown under slightly different pH conditions. Similar to prion strains, both insulin fibril types are able to self-propagate their conformational template under conditions, favoring spontaneous formation of different type fibrils. The low-pH-induced insulin amyloid strain is structurally very similar to previously reported strains formed either in the presence of 20% ethanol, or by modification of the amino acid sequence of insulin. A deeper analysis of literature data in the context of our current findings suggests a shift of the monomer-dimer equilibrium of insulin as a possible factor controlling the formation of different strains. PMID:26313643

  2. Does Thioflavin-T Detect Oligomers Formed During Amyloid Fibril Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichilli, Christopher; Hill, Shannon E.; Mast, Jason; Muschol, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Recent results have shown that oligomeric intermediates of amyloid fibril assembly represent the main toxic species in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Thioflavin-T (ThT) is among the most commonly used indicator dyes for mature amyloid fibrils in vitro. We used ThT to monitor amyloid fibril formation of lysozyme (HEWL), and correlated ThT fluorescence to concurrent dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. Specifically, we tested the ability of ThT to discern among oligomer-free vs. oligomeric fibril assembly pathways. We found that ThT fluorescence did not detect oligomer growth; however, fluorescence increases did coincide with the formation of monomeric filaments in the oligomer-free assembly pathway. This implies that ThT fluorescence is not generally suitable for the detection of oligomeric intermediates. The results further suggest different internal structures for oligomeric vs. monomeric filaments. This research was supported, in part, by funding through the Byrd Alzheimer's Institute (ARG-2007-22) and the BITT-Florida Center of Excellence for M.M., an NSF-REU grant (DMR-1004873) for C. P. and an NSF-IGERT fellowship for S.H.

  3. On the Heat Stability of Amyloid-Based Biological Activity: Insights from Thermal Degradation of Insulin Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Malka, Iwona; Bożycki, Łukasz; Nieznańska, Hanna; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Formation of amyloid fibrils in vivo has been linked to disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and prion-associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. One of the characteristic features of amyloid fibrils is the high thermodynamic stability relative both to native and disordered states which is also thought to underlie the perplexingly remarkable heat resistance of prion infectivity. Here, we are comparing high-temperature degradation of native and fibrillar forms of human insulin. Decomposition of insulin amyloid has been studied under helium atmosphere and in the temperature range from ambient conditions to 750°C using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry coupled to mass spectrometry. While converting native insulin into amyloid does upshift onset of thermal decomposition by ca. 75°C, fibrils remain vulnerable to covalent degradation at temperatures below 300°C, as reflected by mass spectra of gases released upon heating of amyloid samples, as well as morphology and infrared spectra of fibrils subjected to incubation at 250°C. Mass spectra profiles of released gases indicate that degradation of fibrils is much more cooperative than degradation of native insulin. The data show no evidence of water of crystallization trapped within insulin fibrils. We have also compared untreated and heated amyloid samples in terms of capacity to seed daughter fibrils. Kinetic traces of seed-induced insulin fibrillation have shown that the seeding potency of amyloid samples decreases significantly already after exposure to 200°C, even though corresponding electron micrographs indicated persisting fibrillar morphology. Our results suggest that amyloid-based biological activity may not survive extremely high temperature treatments, at least in the absence of other stabilizing factors. PMID:24466022

  4. Structure-Based Design of Non-Natural Amino Acid Inhibitors of Amyloid Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibers. These fibers are associated with numerous pathologies1 as well as with normal cellular functions2,3, and frequently form during protein denaturation4,5. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibers could serve as leads for therapeutics, provided the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibers as templates, we have designed and characterized an all D-amino acid inhibitor of fibrillation of the tau protein found in Alzheimer’s disease, and a non-natural L-amino acid inhibitor of an amyloid fiber that enhances sexual transmission of HIV. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibrillation of full-length proteins, including those like tau that lack fully ordered native structures. PMID:21677644

  5. Evaluating the binding selectivity of transthyretin amyloid fibril inhibitors in blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Purkey, Hans E.; Dorrell, Michael I.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2001-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) tetramer dissociation and misfolding facilitate assembly into amyloid fibrils that putatively cause senile systemic amyloidosis and familial amyloid polyneuropathy. We have previously discovered more than 50 small molecules that bind to and stabilize tetrameric TTR, inhibiting amyloid fibril formation in vitro. A method is presented here to evaluate the binding selectivity of these inhibitors to TTR in human plasma, a complex biological fluid composed of more than 60 proteins and numerous small molecules. Our immunoprecipitation approach isolates TTR and bound small molecules from a biological fluid such as plasma, and quantifies the amount of small molecules bound to the protein by HPLC analysis. This approach demonstrates that only a small subset of the inhibitors that saturate the TTR binding sites in vitro do so in plasma. These selective inhibitors can now be tested in animal models of TTR amyloid disease to probe the validity of the amyloid hypothesis. This method could be easily extended to evaluate small molecule binding selectivity to any protein in a given biological fluid without the necessity of determining or guessing which other protein components may be competitors. This is a central issue to understanding the distribution, metabolism, activity, and toxicity of potential drugs. PMID:11344299

  6. Gallic Acid Is an Antagonist of Semen Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    LoRicco, Josephine G; Xu, Changmingzi Sherry; Neidleman, Jason; Bergkvist, Magnus; Greene, Warner C; Roan, Nadia R; Makhatadze, George I

    2016-07-01

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that amyloid fibrils found in semen from healthy and HIV-infected men, as well as semen itself, can markedly enhance HIV infection rates. Semen fibrils are made up of multiple naturally occurring peptide fragments derived from semen. The best characterized of these fibrils are SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), made up of residues 248-286 of prostatic acidic phosphatase, and the SEM1 fibrils, made up of residues 86-107 of semenogelin 1. A small molecule screen for antagonists of semen fibrils identified four compounds that lowered semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity. One of the four, gallic acid, was previously reported to antagonize other amyloids and to exert anti-inflammatory effects. To better understand the mechanism by which gallic acid modifies the properties of semen amyloids, we performed biophysical measurements (atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, thioflavin T and Congo Red fluorescence assays, zeta potential measurements) and quantitative assays on the effects of gallic acid on semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and inflammation. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid binds to both SEVI and SEM1 fibrils and modifies their surface electrostatics to render them less cationic. In addition, gallic acid decreased semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection but did not decrease the inflammatory response induced by semen. Together, these observations identify gallic acid as a non-polyanionic compound that inhibits semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and suggest the potential utility of incorporating gallic acid into a multicomponent microbicide targeting both the HIV virus and host components that promote viral infection. PMID:27226574

  7. Engineered polymer nanoparticles containing hydrophobic dipeptide for inhibition of amyloidfibrillation.

    PubMed

    Skaat, Hadas; Chen, Ravit; Grinberg, Igor; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-09-10

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. Engineered nanoparticles have emerged as a potential approach to alter the kinetics of protein fibrillation process. Yet, there are only a few reports describing the use of nanoparticles for inhibition of amyloid-β 40 (Aβ(40)) peptide aggregation, involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we designed new uniform biocompatible amino-acid-based polymer nanoparticles containing hydrophobic dipeptides in the polymer side chains. The dipeptide residues were designed similarly to the hydrophobic core sequence of Aβ. Poly(N-acryloyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) (polyA-FF-ME) nanoparticles of 57 ± 6 nm were synthesized by dispersion polymerization of the monomer A-FF-ME in 2-methoxy ethanol, followed by precipitation of the obtained polymer in aqueous solution. Cell viability assay confirmed that no significant cytotoxic effect of the polyA-FF-ME nanoparticles on different human cell lines, e.g., PC-12 and SH-SY5Y, was observed. A significantly slow secondary structure transition from random coil to β-sheets during Aβ(40) fibril formation was observed in the presence of these nanoparticles, resulting in significant inhibition of Aβ(40) fibrillation kinetics. However, the polyA-FF-ME analogous nanoparticles containing the L-alanyl-L-alanine (AA) dipeptide in the polymer side groups, polyA-AA-ME nanoparticles, accelerate the Aβ(40) fibrillation kinetics. The polyA-FF-ME nanoparticles and the polyA-AA-ME nanoparticles may therefore contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fibrillation process, leading to the development of therapeutic strategies against amyloid-related diseases. PMID:22897679

  8. Binding Modes of Thioflavin T on the Surface of Amyloid Fibrils Studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Valerie A; Ekanayake, Oshini; Lazo, Noel D

    2016-08-18

    The mechanism for the interaction of thioflavin T (ThT) with amyloid fibrils at the molecular level is not known. Here, we used (1) H NMR spectroscopy to determine the binding mode of ThT on the surface of fibrils from lysozyme and insulin. Relayed rotating-frame Overhauser enhancements in ThT were observed, indicating that the orientation of ThT is orthogonal to the fibril surface. Importantly, the assembly state of ThT on both surfaces is different. On the surface of insulin fibrils, ThT is oligomeric, as indicated by rapid (1) H spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (R1ρ ), presumably due to intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions between ThT molecules. In contrast, ThT on the surface of lysozyme fibrils is a monomer, as indicated by slower (1) H R1ρ . These results shed new light into the mechanism for the enhancement of ThT fluorescence and may lead to more efficient detectors of amyloid assemblies, which have escaped detection by ThT in monomer form. PMID:27165642

  9. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Amyloid Beta Fibrils: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Approach.

    PubMed

    Paul, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Zachary; Wang, Congzhou; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; DeJoannis, Jason; Shekhtman, Alexander; Lednev, Igor K; Yadavalli, Vamsi K; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2016-07-21

    In this combined experimental (deep ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM)) and theoretical (molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and stress-strain (SS)) study, the structural and mechanical properties of amyloid beta (Aβ40) fibrils have been investigated. The DUVRR spectroscopy and AFM experiments confirmed the formation of linear, unbranched and β-sheet rich fibrils. The fibrils (Aβ40)n, formed using n monomers, were equilibrated using all-atom MD simulations. The structural properties such as β-sheet character, twist, interstrand distance, and periodicity of these fibrils were found to be in agreement with experimental measurements. Furthermore, Young's modulus (Y) = 4.2 GPa computed using SS calculations was supported by measured values of 1.79 ± 0.41 and 3.2 ± 0.8 GPa provided by two separate AFM experiments. These results revealed size dependence of structural and material properties of amyloid fibrils and show the utility of such combined experimental and theoretical studies in the design of precisely engineered biomaterials. PMID:27387853

  10. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  11. Effect of PEGylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) under magnetic field on amyloid beta fibrillation process.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-02-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with specific surface coatings have been shown appropriate potential in the diagnosis and treatment of various brain diseases such as Alzheimer's. Comprehensive understanding of SPIONs interactions with amyloid beta (Aβ) and other amyloidogenic proteins is essential for their clinical application. SPIONs could be delivered to the target tissue under the magnetic field, while they might be influenced by the applied field. In this work, we exhibit the effect of different SPIONs (magnetized or non-magnetized with different surface charges) on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillation in aqueous solution by the aid of ThT assay. The results showed that applying of magnetic field to the SPIONs influences on the Aβ fibrillation because of its effect on the size due to surface charge. It was found that under magnetic field and high concentrations of nanoparticles (SPIONs-PEG-NH2), the Aβ fibrillation process accelerates, while at lower concentrations the fibrillation is inhibited. Furthermore, the coating charge has a considerable role in fibrillation process and the positively charged SPIONs/magnetized, at lower particle concentrations, accelerate the fibrillation compared with the negatively charged or uncharged SPIONs. This hints that SPIONs with a positive charge have dual effects on the Aβ fibrillation process. They influence on the concentration of monomeric protein in solution and thereby the nucleation time. Also, SPIONs have an effect on binding during the protein conformation. PMID:26652388

  12. Dynamics of water in the amphiphilic pore of amyloid β fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GhattyVenkataKrishna, Pavan K.; Mostofian, Barmak

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimers disease related amyloid peptide, Aβ, forms a fibrillar structure through aggregation. The aggregate is stabilized by a salt bridge that is responsible for the formation of an amphiphilic pore that can accommodate water molecules. None of the reported structures of Aβ, however, contain water. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations on dimeric Aβ fibrils solvated in water. Water penetrates and fills the amphiphilic pore increasing its volume. We observe a thick wire of water that is translationally and rotationally stiff in comparison to bulk water and may be essential for the stabilization of the amyloid Aβ protein.

  13. Atomic-resolution 3D structure of amyloid β fibrils: The Osaka mutation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schutz, Anne K.; Wall, Joseph; Vagt, Toni; Huber, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Oxana Y.; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Guntert, Peter; Bockmann, Anja; Glockshuber, Rudi; Meier, Beat H.

    2014-11-13

    Despite its central importance for understanding the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-resolution structural information on amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils, which are intimately linked with AD, is scarce. We report an atomic-resolution fibril structure of the Aβ 1-40 peptide with the Osaka mutation (E22Δ), associated with early-onset AD. The structure, which differs substantially from all previously proposed models, is based on a large number of unambiguous intra- and intermolecular solid-state NMR distance restraints

  14. Universality in the morphology and mechanics of coarsening amyloid fibril networks.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Head, D A; Auer, S

    2015-02-20

    Peptide hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but utilization often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of percolating amyloid fibril networks and couple these to the elastic network theory to determine their mechanical properties. We find that the time variation of network length scales can be collapsed onto master curves by using a time scaling function that depends on the peptide interaction anisotropy. The same scaling applies to network mechanics, revealing a nonmonotonic dependence of the shear modulus with time. Our structure-function relationship between the peptide building blocks, network morphology, and network mechanical properties can aid in the design of amyloid fibril networks with tailored mechanical properties. PMID:25763974

  15. Re-entrant isotropic-nematic phase behavior in polymer-depleted amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-11-19

    Amyloid fibrils dispersed in water exhibit both isotropic (I) and nematic (N) phases, depending on concentration, but their coexistence, expected from the first order nature of the I - N thermodynamic transition is seldom observed. By adding a non-absorbing polymer to an amyloid fibrils suspension, we report, for the first time, an unusual closed-loop phase behavior. The phase diagrams reveal that the I + N coexistence does emerge, but only when the depleting polymer is present at intermediate concentrations. We combine depletion potentials in the dilute and semi-dilute polymer regime with the DLVO theory and the principle of equivalent law of corresponding states to calculate variations of the second virial coefficient with increasing polymer concentrations. We conclude that the decrease of the depletion potential range in the semi-dilute regime plays a pivotal role in the observed re-stabilization, leading to a closure of the I + N coexistence region. PMID:25347270

  16. Re-entrant isotropic-nematic phase behavior in polymer-depleted amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianguo; Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils dispersed in water exhibit both isotropic (I) and nematic (N) phases, depending on concentration, but their coexistence, expected from the first order nature of the I - N thermodynamic transition is seldom observed. By adding a non-absorbing polymer to an amyloid fibrils suspension, we report, for the first time, an unusual closed-loop phase behavior. The phase diagrams reveal that the I + N coexistence does emerge, but only when the depleting polymer is present at intermediate concentrations. We combine depletion potentials in the dilute and semi-dilute polymer regime with the DLVO theory and the principle of equivalent law of corresponding states to calculate variations of the second virial coefficient with increasing polymer concentrations. We conclude that the decrease of the depletion potential range in the semi-dilute regime plays a pivotal role in the observed re-stabilization, leading to a closure of the I + N coexistence region.

  17. Universality in the Morphology and Mechanics of Coarsening Amyloid Fibril Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, L. G.; Head, D. A.; Auer, S.

    2015-02-01

    Peptide hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but utilization often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of percolating amyloid fibril networks and couple these to the elastic network theory to determine their mechanical properties. We find that the time variation of network length scales can be collapsed onto master curves by using a time scaling function that depends on the peptide interaction anisotropy. The same scaling applies to network mechanics, revealing a nonmonotonic dependence of the shear modulus with time. Our structure-function relationship between the peptide building blocks, network morphology, and network mechanical properties can aid in the design of amyloid fibril networks with tailored mechanical properties.

  18. Anastellin, an FN3 Fragment with Fibronectin Polymerization Activity, Resembles Amyloid Fibril Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Briknarova, Klara; Akermann, Maria; Hoyt, David W. ); Ruoslahti, Erkki; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2003-08-01

    Anastellin is a carboxy-terminal fragment of the 1st FN3 domain from human fibronectin. It is capable of polymerizing fibronectin in vitro, and it displays anti-tumor, antimetastatic and anti-angiogenic properties in vivo. We have determined the structure of anastellin using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and identified residues critical for its activity. Anastellin exhibits dynamic fluctuations and conformational exchange in solution. Its overall topology is very similar to the corresponding region of full-length FN3 domains. However, its hydrophobic core becomes solvent accessible and some of its -strands lose their protection against hydrogen bonding to -strands from other molecules. These features seem to be relevant for the fibronectin polymerization activity of anastellin and resemble the characteristics of amyloid fibril precursors. We suggest that this analogy is not random and may reflect similarities between fibronectin and amyloid fibril formation.

  19. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  20. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1–42) amyloid fibril

    PubMed Central

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G.; Wall, Joseph S.; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H.; Riek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1–42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1–42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15–42 forming a double-horseshoe–like cross–β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1–14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure. PMID:27469165

  1. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G; Wall, Joseph S; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-08-23

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1-42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15-42 forming a double-horseshoe-like cross-β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1-14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure. PMID:27469165

  2. Annealing prion protein amyloid fibrils at high temperature results in extension of a proteinase K-resistant core.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Makarava, Natallia; Breydo, Leonid; Anderson, Maighdlin; Salnikov, Vadim V; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2006-01-27

    Amyloids are highly ordered, rigid beta-sheet-rich structures that appear to have minimal dynamic flexibility in individual polypeptide chains. Here, we demonstrate that substantial conformational rearrangements occur within mature amyloid fibrils produced from full-length mammalian prion protein. The rearrangement results in a substantial extension of a proteinase K-resistant core and is accompanied by an increase in the beta-sheet-rich conformation. The conformational rearrangement was induced in the presence of low concentrations of Triton X-100 either by brief exposure to 80 degrees C or, with less efficacy, by prolonged incubation at 37 degrees C at pH 7.5 and is referred to here as "annealing." Upon annealing, amyloid fibrils acquired a proteinase K-resistant core identical to that found in bovine spongiform encephalopathy-specific scrapie-associated prion protein. Annealing was also observed when amyloid fibrils were exposed to high temperatures in the absence of detergent but in the presence of brain homogenate. These findings suggest that the amyloid fibrils exist in two conformationally distinct states that are separated by a high energy barrier and that yet unknown cellular cofactors may facilitate transition of the fibrils into thermodynamically more stable state. Our studies provide new insight into the complex behavior of prion polymerization and highlight the annealing process, a previously unknown step in the evolution of amyloid structures. PMID:16314415

  3. Self Assembly of Short Aromatic Peptides into Amyloid Fibrils and Related Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of more than twenty human disorders of unrelated etiology. In all these cases, ordered fibrillar protein assemblies with a diameter of 7–10 nm are being observed. In spite of the great clinical important of amyloidassociated diseases, the molecular recognition and self-assembly processes that lead to the formation of the fibrils are not fully understood. One direction to decipher the mechanism of amyloid formation is the use of short peptides fragments as model systems. Short peptide fragments, as short as pentapeptides, were shown to form typical amyloid assemblies in vitro that have ultrastructural, biophysical, and cytotoxic properties, as those of assemblies that are being formed by full length polypeptides. When we analyzed such short fragments, we identified the central role of aromatic moieties in the ability to aggregate into ordered nano-fibrillar structures. This notion allowed us to discover additional very short amyloidogenic peptides as well as other aromatic peptide motifs, which can form various assemblies at the nano-scale (including nanotubes, nanospheres, and macroscopic hydrogels with nano-scale order). Other practical utilization of this concept, together with novel β breakage methods, is their use for the development of novel classes of amyloid formation inhibitors. PMID:19164892

  4. Structural motif of polyglutamine amyloid fibrils discerned with mixed-isotope infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Lauren E; Carr, Joshua K; Fluitt, Aaron M; Hoganson, Andrew J; Moran, Sean D; de Pablo, Juan J; Skinner, James L; Zanni, Martin T

    2014-04-22

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences are found in a variety of proteins, and mutational expansion of the polyQ tract is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. We study the amyloid fibril structure and aggregation kinetics of K2Q24K2W, a model polyQ sequence. Two structures have been proposed for amyloid fibrils formed by polyQ peptides. By forming fibrils composed of both (12)C and (13)C monomers, made possible by protein expression in Escherichia coli, we can restrict vibrational delocalization to measure 2D IR spectra of individual monomers within the fibrils. The spectra are consistent with a β-turn structure in which each monomer forms an antiparallel hairpin and donates two strands to a single β-sheet. Calculated spectra from atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations of the two proposed structures confirm the assignment. No spectroscopically distinct intermediates are observed in rapid-scan 2D IR kinetics measurements, suggesting that aggregation is highly cooperative. Although 2D IR spectroscopy has advantages over linear techniques, the isotope-mixing strategy will also be useful with standard Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. PMID:24550484

  5. Toward a Molecular Theory of Early and Late Events in Monomer to Amyloid Fibril Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, John E.; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative understanding of the kinetics of fibril formation and the molecular mechanism of transition from monomers to fibrils is needed to obtain insights into the growth of amyloid fibrils and more generally self-assembly multisubunit protein complexes. Significant advances using computations of protein aggregation in a number of systems have established generic and sequence-specific aspects of the early steps in oligomer formation. Theoretical considerations, which view oligomer and fibril growth as diffusion in a complex energy landscape, and computational studies, involving minimal lattice and coarse-grained models, have revealed general principles governing the transition from monomeric protein to ordered fibrillar aggregates. Detailed atomistic calculations have explored the early stages of the protein aggregation pathway for a number of amyloidogenic proteins, most notably amyloid β- (Aβ-) protein and fragments from proteins linked to various diseases. These computational studies have provided insights into the role of sequence, role of water, and specific interatomic interactions underlying the thermodynamics and dynamics of elementary kinetic steps in the aggregation pathway. Novel methods are beginning to illustrate the structural basis for the production of Aβ-peptides through interactions with secretases in the presence of membranes. We show that a variety of theoretical approaches, ranging from scaling arguments to minimal models to atomistic simulations, are needed as a complement to experimental studies probing the principles governing protein aggregation.

  6. Structural stability of amyloid fibrils depends on the existence of the peripheral sequence near the core cross-β region.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Masatoshi; Shiba, Kohei; Okumura, Masaki

    2015-11-30

    Amyloid fibrils are fibrous protein assemblies with distinctive cross-β structures. For amyloidosis, there are disease-associated mutations outside of the cross-β structures. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the role of peripheral sequences outside the cross-β structure. Amyloid fibrils are generally 10nm in width; however, the amyloid fibrils of truncated barnase M1 peptides missing the C-terminal sequence outside the cross-β structure are 20 nm in width. In this study, we performed comparative analysis of the structural stability of amyloids formed by the respective peptides. We found that the C-terminal amino acids dramatically affect the conformational instability in the presence of a denaturing reagent. PMID:26497084

  7. Is the serum amyloid A protein in acute phase plasma high density lipoprotein the precursor of AA amyloid fibrils?

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, M L; Rowe, I F; Caspi, D; Turnell, W G; Pepys, M B

    1986-01-01

    Serum amyloid A protein (SAA), an apolipoprotein of high density lipoprotein (HDL), is generally considered to be the precursor of AA protein, which forms the fibrils in reactive systemic amyloidosis in man and animals. This view is based on amino acid sequence identity between AA and the amino-terminal portion of SAA. However, in extensive and well-controlled studies of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis, we were unable to demonstrate a direct precursor-product relationship between SAA, in SAA-rich HDL preparations from acute phase or amyloidotic mouse or human serum, and AA protein in the amyloid deposits. This raises the possibility that SAA in its usual form, as an apolipoprotein of HDL synthesized during the acute phase response, may not be the major precursor of AA fibrils. The amyloidogenic forms of circulating SAA molecules may not be isolated during the preparation of HDL. Alternatively, particularly in the light of recent evidence that SAA mRNA is expressed in many different tissues throughout the body of appropriately stimulated animals, amyloidogenic SAA may be derived from sources other than the liver cells in which SAA-rich HDL is synthesized. PMID:3105937

  8. Polymorph-specific kinetics and thermodynamics of β-amyloid fibril growth

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Wei; Kelley, Kevin; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide (Aβ1–40) are highly polymorphic, with molecular structures that depend on the details of growth conditions. Underlying differences in physical properties are not well understood. Here, we investigate differences in growth kinetics and thermodynamic stabilities of two Aβ1–40 fibril polymorphs for which detailed structural models are available from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Rates of seeded fibril elongation in the presence of excess soluble Aβ1–40 and shrinkage in the absence of soluble Aβ1–40 are determined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). From these rates, we derive polymorph-specific values for the soluble Aβ1–40 concentration at quasi-equilibrium, from which relative stabilities can be derived. The AFM results are supported by direct measurements by ultraviolet absorbance, using a novel dialysis system to establish quasi-equilibrium. At 24° C, the two polymorphs have significantly different elongation and shrinkage kinetics but similar thermodynamic stabilities. At 37° C, differences in kinetics are reduced, and thermodynamic stabilities are increased significantly. Fibril length distributions in AFM images provide support for an intermittent growth model, in which fibrils switch randomly between an "on" state (capable of elongation) and an "off" state (incapable of elongation). We also monitor interconversion between polymorphs at 24° C by solid state NMR, showing that the two-fold symmetric "agitated" () polymorph is more stable than the three-fold symmetric "quiescent" polymorph. Finally, we show that the two polymorphs have significantly different rates of fragmentation in the presence of shear forces, a difference that helps explain the observed predominance of the structure when fibrils are grown in agitated solutions. PMID:23627695

  9. Understanding amyloid fibril nucleation and aβ oligomer/drug interactions from computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-02-18

    Evolution has fine-tuned proteins to accomplish a variety of tasks. Yet, with aging, some proteins assemble into harmful amyloid aggregates associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), which presents a complex and costly challenge to our society. Thus, far, drug after drug has failed to slow the progression of AD, characterized by the self-assembly of the 39-43 amino acid β-amyloid (Aβ) protein into extracellular senile plaques that form a cross-β structure. While there is experimental evidence that the Aβ small oligomers are the primary toxic species, standard tools of biology have failed to provide structures of these transient, inhomogeneous assemblies. Despite extensive experimental studies, researchers have not successfully characterized the nucleus ensemble, the starting point for rapid fibril formation. Similarly scientists do not have atomic data to show how the compounds that reduce both fibril formation and toxicity in cells bind to Aβ42 oligomers. In this context, computer simulations are important tools for gaining insights into the self-assembly of amyloid peptides and the molecular mechanism of inhibitors. This Account reviews what analytical models and simulations at different time and length scales tell us about the dynamics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of amyloid fibril formation and, notably, the nucleation process. Though coarse-grained and mesoscopic protein models approximate atomistic details by averaging out unimportant degrees of freedom, they provide generic features of amyloid formation and insights into mechanistic details of the self-assembly process. The thermodynamics and kinetics vary from linear peptides adopting straight β-strands in fibrils to longer peptides adopting in parallel U shaped conformations in fibrils. In addition, these properties change with the balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and the intrinsic disorder of the system. However, simulations suggest that

  10. A carboxylated Zn-phthalocyanine inhibits fibril formation of Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Shatera; Sheikh, Abdullah M; Yano, Shozo; Ikeue, Takafumi; Handa, Makoto; Nagai, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ), a 39-42 amino acid peptide derived from amyloid precursor protein, is deposited as fibrils in Alzheimer's disease brains, and is considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of the disease. We have investigated the effects of a water-soluble Zn-phthalocyanine, ZnPc(COONa)₈, a macrocyclic compound with near-infrared optical properties, on Aβ fibril formation in vitro. A thioflavin T fluorescence assay showed that ZnPc(COONa)₈ significantly inhibited Aβ fibril formation, increasing the lag time and dose-dependently decreasing the plateau level of fibril formation. Moreover, it destabilized pre-formed Aβ fibrils, resulting in an increase in low-molecular-weight species. After fibril formation in the presence of ZnPc(COONa)₈, immunoprecipitation of Aβ₁₋₄₂ using Aβ-specific antibody followed by near-infrared scanning demonstrated binding of ZnPc(COONa)₈ to Aβ₁₋₄₂. A study using the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid showed that ZnPc(COONa)8 decreased the hydrophobicity during Aβ₁₋₄₂ fibril formation. CD spectroscopy showed an increase in the α helix structure and a decrease in the β sheet structure of Aβ₁₋₄₀ in fibril-forming buffer containing ZnPc(COONa)₈. SDS/PAGE and a dot-blot immunoassay showed that ZnPc(COONa)₈ delayed the disappearance of low-molecular-weight species and the appearance of higher-molecular-weight oligomeric species of Aβ₁₋₄₂. A cell viability assay showed that ZnPc(COONa)₈ was not toxic to a neuronal cell line (A1), but instead protected A1 cells against Aβ₁₋₄₂-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that ZnPc(COONa)₈ binds to Aβ and decreases the hydrophobicity, and this change is unfavorable for Aβ oligomerization and fibril formation. PMID:25404240

  11. Early aggregation preceding the nucleation of insulin amyloid fibrils as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Chatani, Eri; Inoue, Rintaro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kato, Minoru; Yamamoto, Masahide; Nishida, Koji; Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation event of amyloid fibrils is one of the most crucial processes that dictate the timing and rate of the pathology of diseases; however, information regarding how protein molecules associate to produce fibril nuclei is currently limited. In order to explore this issue in more detail, we performed time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on insulin fibrillation, in combination with additional multidirectional analyses of thioflavin T fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, light scattering, and light transmittance, during the fibrillation process of bovine insulin. SAXS monitoring revealed that insulin molecules associated into rod-like prefibrillar aggregates in the very early stage of the reaction. After the formation of these early aggregates, they appeared to further coalesce mutually to form larger clusters, and the SAXS profiles subsequently showed the further time evolution of conformational development towards mature amyloid fibrils. Distinct types of structural units in terms of shape in a nano-scale order, cross-β content, and thioflavin T fluorescence intensity were observed in a manner that was dependent on the fibrillation pathways. These results suggest the presence of diverse substructures that characterize various fibrillation pathways, and eventually, manifest polymorphisms in mature amyloid fibrils. PMID:26503463

  12. Early aggregation preceding the nucleation of insulin amyloid fibrils as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Chatani, Eri; Inoue, Rintaro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kato, Minoru; Yamamoto, Masahide; Nishida, Koji; Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation event of amyloid fibrils is one of the most crucial processes that dictate the timing and rate of the pathology of diseases; however, information regarding how protein molecules associate to produce fibril nuclei is currently limited. In order to explore this issue in more detail, we performed time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on insulin fibrillation, in combination with additional multidirectional analyses of thioflavin T fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, light scattering, and light transmittance, during the fibrillation process of bovine insulin. SAXS monitoring revealed that insulin molecules associated into rod-like prefibrillar aggregates in the very early stage of the reaction. After the formation of these early aggregates, they appeared to further coalesce mutually to form larger clusters, and the SAXS profiles subsequently showed the further time evolution of conformational development towards mature amyloid fibrils. Distinct types of structural units in terms of shape in a nano-scale order, cross-β content, and thioflavin T fluorescence intensity were observed in a manner that was dependent on the fibrillation pathways. These results suggest the presence of diverse substructures that characterize various fibrillation pathways, and eventually, manifest polymorphisms in mature amyloid fibrils. PMID:26503463

  13. Evaluation of protease resistance and toxicity of amyloid-like food fibrils from whey, soy, kidney bean, and egg white.

    PubMed

    Lassé, Moritz; Ulluwishewa, Dulantha; Healy, Jackie; Thompson, Dion; Miller, Antonia; Roy, Nicole; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2016-02-01

    The structural properties of amyloid fibrils combined with their highly functional surface chemistry make them an attractive new food ingredient, for example as highly effective gelling agents. However, the toxic role of amyloid fibrils in disease may cause some concern about their food safety because it has not been established unequivocally if consumption of food fibrils poses a health risk to consumers. Here we present a study of amyloid-like fibrils from whey, kidney bean, soy bean, and egg white to partially address this concern. Fibrils showed varied resistance to proteolytic digestion in vitro by either Proteinase K, pepsin or pancreatin. The toxicity of mature fibrils was measured in vitro and compared to native protein, early-stage-fibrillar protein, and sonicated fibrils in two immortalised human cancer cell lines, Caco-2 and Hec-1a. There was no reduction in the viability of either Caco-2 or Hec-1a cells after treatment with a fibril concentration of up to 0.25 mg/mL. PMID:26304377

  14. Methionine oxidation induces amyloid fibril formation by full-length apolipoprotein A-I

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yuan Qi; Binger, Katrina J.; Howlett, Geoffrey J.; Griffin, Michael D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is the major protein component of HDL, where it plays an important role in cholesterol transport. The deposition of apoA-I derived amyloid is associated with various hereditary systemic amyloidoses and atherosclerosis; however, very little is known about the mechanism of apoA-I amyloid formation. Methionine residues in apoA-I are oxidized via several mechanisms in vivo to form methionine sulfoxide (MetO), and significant levels of methionine oxidized apoA-I (MetO-apoA-I) are present in normal human serum. We investigated the effect of methionine oxidation on the structure, stability, and aggregation of full-length, lipid-free apoA-I. Circular dichrosim spectroscopy showed that oxidation of all three methionine residues in apoA-I caused partial unfolding of the protein and decreased its thermal stability, reducing the melting temperature (Tm) from 58.7 °C for native apoA-I to 48.2 °C for MetO-apoA-I. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that methionine oxidation inhibited the native self association of apoA-I to form dimers and tetramers. Incubation of MetO-apoA-I for extended periods resulted in aggregation of the protein, and these aggregates bound Thioflavin T and Congo Red. Inspection of the aggregates by electron microscopy revealed fibrillar structures with a ribbon-like morphology, widths of approximately 11 nm, and lengths of up to several microns. X-ray fibre diffraction studies of the fibrils revealed a diffraction pattern with orthogonal peaks at spacings of 4.64 Å and 9.92 Å, indicating a cross-β amyloid structure. This systematic study of fibril formation by full-length apoA-I represents the first demonstration that methionine oxidation can induce amyloid fibril formation. PMID:20133843

  15. Flavone Derivatives as Inhibitors of Insulin Amyloid-Like Fibril Formation

    PubMed Central

    Malisauskas, Ricardas; Botyriute, Akvile; Cannon, Jonathan G.; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    Several natural and synthetic flavone derivatives have been reported to inhibit formation of amyloid fibrils or to remodel existing fibrils. These studies suggest that the numbers and positions of hydroxyl groups on the flavone rings determine their effectiveness as amyloid inhibitors. In many studies the primary method for determining the effectiveness of inhibition is measuring Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. This method demonstrably results in a number of false positives for inhibition. We studied the effects of 265 commercially available flavone derivatives on insulin fibril formation. We enhanced the effectiveness of ThT fluorescence measurements by fitting kinetic curves to obtain halftime of aggregation (t50). Maximal values of ThT fluorescence varied two fold or more in one third of all cases, but this did not correlate with changes in t50. Changes in t50 values were more accurate measures of inhibition of amyloid formation. We showed that without a change in an assay, but just by observing complete kinetic curves it is possible to eliminate numbers of false positive and sometimes even false negative results. Examining the data from all 265 flavones we confirmed previous observations that identified the importance of hydroxyl groups for inhibition. Our evidence suggests the importance of hydroxyl groups at locations 5, 6, 7, and 4’, and the absence of a hydroxyl group at location 3, for inhibiting amyloid formation. However, the main conclusion is that the positions are not additive. The structures and their effects must be thought of in the context of the whole molecule. PMID:25799281

  16. Freeze-Thaw Cycling Induced Isotropic-Nematic Coexistence of Amyloid Fibrils Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Adamcik, Jozef; Han, Jun; Fernández-Ronco, María P; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-03-15

    Amyloid fibrils are charged semiflexible assemblies with very large aspect ratio (length to diameter, L/D). Because of this large aspect ratio, the isotropic (I) and nematic (N) phase coexistence expected from the first-order thermodynamic nature of the I-N phase transition, as predicted from the Onsager's theory, is vanishingly small and, in practice, challenging to experimentally observe. In this study we present a remarkable widening of the I + N biphasic region in β-lactoglobulin fibrils suspension via freeze-thaw (F-T) cycling. The demixing behavior can be induced and controlled by a slow growth of propagation front of the ice crystals, which grow by excluding the amyloid fibrils from the crystal phase and thus concentrating them in the liquid phase. The growth of the ice crystals is accompanied by the formation of concentrated and elongated tactoid-like structure in the liquid phase. During the subsequent thawing cycling, at large tactoid domains, the mismatch in density caused by the presence of amyloid fibrils is sufficient to generate a sedimentation of the N phase at the bottom of the vial, coexisting with an I phase on the top. We reason why, despite the remarkable stability of the coexisting I and N phases observed over several weeks after F-T cycling, the biphasic region is understood to be a nonequilibrium, metastable state. Yet, the results in this study suggest that the F-T treatment is an effective approach to stabilize multiphase coexistence of liquid crystalline phases in colloidal suspensions of anisotropic particles without the need of additives, such as depleting agents, needed to modify interaction potentials. PMID:26907697

  17. Zinc as chaperone-mimicking agent for retardation of amyloid β peptide fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Abelein, Axel; Gräslund, Astrid; Danielsson, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Metal ions have emerged to play a key role in the aggregation process of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide that is closely related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanistic process of peptide–metal interactions, however, has been challenging to obtain. By applying a combination of NMR relaxation dispersion and fluorescence kinetics methods we have investigated quantitatively the thermodynamic Aβ–Zn2+ binding features as well as how Zn2+ modulates the nucleation mechanism of the aggregation process. Our results show that, under near-physiological conditions, substoichiometric amounts of Zn2+ effectively retard the generation of amyloid fibrils. A global kinetic profile analysis reveals that in the absence of zinc Aβ40 aggregation is driven by a monomer-dependent secondary nucleation process in addition to fibril-end elongation. In the presence of Zn2+, the elongation rate is reduced, resulting in reduction of the aggregation rate, but not a complete inhibition of amyloid formation. We show that Zn2+ transiently binds to residues in the N terminus of the monomeric peptide. A thermodynamic analysis supports a model where the N terminus is folded around the Zn2+ ion, forming a marginally stable, short-lived folded Aβ40 species. This conformation is highly dynamic and only a few percent of the peptide molecules adopt this structure at any given time point. Our findings suggest that the folded Aβ40–Zn2+ complex modulates the fibril ends, where elongation takes place, which efficiently retards fibril formation. In this conceptual framework we propose that zinc adopts the role of a minimal antiaggregation chaperone for Aβ40. PMID:25825723

  18. Intermolecular structure determination of amyloid fibrils with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bayro, Marvin J.; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Eddy, Matthew T.; Birkett, Neil R.; MacPhee, Catherine E.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe magic-angle spinning NMR experiments designed to elucidate the interstrand architecture of amyloid fibrils. Three methods are introduced for this purpose, two being based on the analysis of long-range 13C-13C correlation spectra and a third based on the identification of intermolecular interactions in 13C-15N spectra. We show, in studies of fibrils formed by the 86-residue SH3 domain of PI3 kinase (PI3-SH3), that efficient 13C-13C correlation spectra display a resonance degeneracy that establishes a parallel, in-register alignment of the proteins in the amyloid fibrils. In addition, this degeneracy can be circumvented to yield direct intermolecular constraints. The 13C-13C experiments are corroborated by 15N-13C correlation spectrum obtained from a mixed [15N,12C]/[14N,13C] sample which directly quantifies interstrand distances. Furthermore, when the spectra are recorded with signal enhancement provided by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 100 K, we demonstrate a dramatic increase (from 23 to 52) in the number of intermolecular 15N-13C constraints present in the spectra. The increase in the information content is due to the enhanced signal intensities and to the fact that dynamic processes, leading to spectral intensity losses, are quenched at low temperatures. Thus, acquisition of low temperature spectra addresses a problem that is frequently encountered in MAS spectra of proteins. In total the experiments provide 111 intermolecular 13C-13C and 15N-13C constraints that establish that the PI3-SH3 protein strands are aligned in a parallel, in-register arrangement within the amyloid fibril. PMID:21774549

  19. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the complex behaviour of an amyloid fibril inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Chris T.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Singh, Sadanand; Woys, Ann Marie; de Pablo, Juan J.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-05-01

    Amyloid formation has been implicated in the pathology of over 20 human diseases, but the rational design of amyloid inhibitors is hampered by a lack of structural information about amyloid-inhibitor complexes. We use isotope labelling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to obtain a residue-specific structure for the complex of human amylin (the peptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes) with a known inhibitor (rat amylin). Based on its sequence, rat amylin should block formation of the C-terminal β-sheet, but at 8 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks the N-terminal β-sheet instead. At 24 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks neither β-sheet and forms its own β-sheet, most probably on the outside of the human fibrils. This is striking, because rat amylin is natively disordered and not previously known to form amyloid β-sheets. The results show that even seemingly intuitive inhibitors may function by unforeseen and complex structural processes.

  20. Folding into a beta-hairpin can prevent amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Hosia, Waltteri; Bark, Niklas; Liepinsh, Edvards; Tjernberg, Agneta; Persson, Bengt; Hallén, Dan; Thyberg, Johan; Johansson, Jan; Tjernberg, Lars

    2004-04-27

    The tetrapeptide KFFE is one of the shortest amyloid fibril-forming peptides described. Herein, we have investigated how the structural environment of this motif affects polymerization. Using a turn motif (YNGK) or a less rigid sequence (AAAK) to fuse two KFFE tetrapeptides, we show by several biophysical methods that the amyloidogenic properties are strongly dependent on the structural environment. The dodecapeptide KFFEAAAKKFFE forms abundant thick fibril bundles. Freshly dissolved KFFEAAAKKFFE is monomeric and shows mainly disordered secondary structure, as evidenced by circular dichroism, NMR spectroscopy, hydrogen/deuterium exchange measurements, and molecular modeling studies. In sharp contrast, the dodecapeptide KFFEYNGKKFFE does not form fibrils but folds into a stable beta-hairpin. This structure can oligomerize into a stable 12-mer and multiples thereof, as shown by size exclusion chromatography, sedimentation analysis, and electrospray mass spectrometry. These data indicate that the structural context in which a potential fibril forming sequence is present can prevent fibril formation by favoring self-limiting oligomerization over polymerization. PMID:15096033

  1. Chitosan Oligosaccharides Inhibit/Disaggregate Fibrils and Attenuate Amyloid β-Mediated Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xueling; Hou, Wanqi; Sun, Yaxuan; Gao, Zhaolan; Zhu, Shigong; Jiang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a large number of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in the brain. Therefore, inhibiting Aβ aggregation or destabilizing preformed aggregates could be a promising therapeutic target for halting/slowing the progression of AD. Chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) have previously been reported to exhibit antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. Recent study shows that COS could markedly decrease oligomeric Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat hippocampal neurons. However, the potential mechanism that COS reduce Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity remains unclear. In the present study, our findings from circular dichroism spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope and thioflavin T fluorescence assay suggested that COS act as an inhibitor of Aβ aggregation and this effect shows dose-dependency. Moreover, data from thioflavin T assay indicated that COS could significantly inhibit fibrils formation and disrupt preformed fibrils in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of COS attenuated Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in rat cortical neurons. Taken together, our results demonstrated for the first time that COS could inhibit Aβ1-42 fibrils formation and disaggregate preformed fibrils, suggesting that COS may have anti-Aβ fibrillogenesis and fibril-destabilizing properties. These findings highlight the potential role of COS as novel therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:26006224

  2. Preparation of amyloid-like fibrils containing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Effect of protein aggregation on proton relaxivity

    SciTech Connect

    Viktor Andersson, B.; Skoglund, Caroline; Uvdal, Kajsa; Solin, Niclas

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of amyloid materials labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of amyloid materials by electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of protein aggregation on the magnetic nanoparticle properties. -- Abstract: A method to prepare amyloid-like fibrils functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles has been developed. The amyloid-like fibrils are prepared in a two step procedure, where insulin and magnetic nanoparticles are mixed simply by grinding in the solid state, resulting in a water soluble hybrid material. When the hybrid material is heated in aqueous acid, the insulin/nanoparticle hybrid material self assembles to form amyloid-like fibrils incorporating the magnetic nanoparticles. This results in magnetically labeled amyloid-like fibrils which has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography. The influence of the aggregation process on proton relaxivity is investigated. The prepared materials have potential uses in a range of bio-imaging applications.

  3. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sulatskaya, Anna I.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Belousov, Mikhail V.; Bondarev, Stanislav A.; Zhouravleva, Galina A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  4. Heme stabilization of α-Synuclein oligomers during amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Eric Y.; Kaur, Prerna; Williams, Thomas L.; Matsui, Hiroshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (αSyn), which forms amyloid fibrils, is linked to the neuronal pathology of Parkinson’s disease, as it is the major fibrillar component of Lewy bodies, the inclusions that are characteristic of the disease. Oligomeric structures, common to many neurodegenerative disease-related proteins, may in fact be the primary toxic species, while the amyloid fibrils exist as either a less toxic dead-end species, or even as a beneficial mechanism to clear damaged proteins. In order to alter the progression of the aggregation and gain insights into the pre-fibrillar structures, the effect of heme on αSyn oligomerization was determined by several different techniques including native (non-denaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, thioflavin T fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and membrane permeation using a calcein release assay. During aggregation, heme is able to bind the αSyn in a specific fashion, stabilizing distinct oligomeric conformations and promoting the formation of αSyn into annular structures, thereby delaying and/or inhibiting the fibrillation process. These results indicate that heme may play a regulatory role in the progression of Parkinson’s disease; in addition, they provide insights of how the aggregation process may be altered, which may be applicable to the understanding of many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26161848

  5. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Gu, Zonglin; Li, Haotian; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP{sub 22-28}) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp{sup 2} hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  6. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Li, Haotian; Gu, Zonglin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-12-01

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP22-28) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp2 hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π-π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  7. MpUL-multi: Software for Calculation of Amyloid Fibril Mass per Unit Length from TB-TEM Images

    PubMed Central

    Iadanza, Matthew G.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Radford, Sheena E.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination for amyloid fibrils presents many challenges due to the high variability exhibited by fibrils and heterogeneous morphologies present, even in single samples. Mass per unit length (MPL) estimates can be used to differentiate amyloid fibril morphologies and provide orthogonal evidence for helical symmetry parameters determined by other methods. In addition, MPL data can provide insight on the arrangement of subunits in a fibril, especially for more complex fibrils assembled with multiple parallel copies of the asymmetric unit or multiple twisted protofilaments. By detecting only scattered electrons, which serve as a relative measure of total scattering, and therefore protein mass, dark field imaging gives an approximation of the total mass of protein present in any given length of fibril. When compared with a standard of known MPL, such as Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV), MPL of the fibrils in question can be determined. The program suite MpUL-multi was written for rapid semi-automated processing of TB-TEM dark field data acquired using this method. A graphical user interface allows for simple designation of fibrils and standards. A second program averages intensities from multiple TMV molecules for accurate standard determination, makes multiple measurements along a given fibril, and calculates the MPL. PMID:26867957

  8. Intrinsic Linear Heterogeneity of Amyloid β Protein Fibrils Revealed by Higher Resolution Mass-per-length Determinations*

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Hiroaki; Feingold-Link, Elana; Sharp, Kim A.; Rastogi, Tanvi; Axelsen, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid β proteins spontaneously form fibrils in vitro that vary in their thermodynamic stability and in morphological characteristics such as length, width, shape, longitudinal twist, and the number of component filaments. It is vitally important to determine which variant best represents the type of fibril that accumulates in Alzheimer disease. In the present study, the nature of morphological variation was examined by dark-field and transmission electron microscopy in a preparation of seeded amyloid β protein fibrils that formed at relatively low protein concentrations and exhibited remarkably high thermodynamic stability. The number of filaments comprising these fibrils changed frequently from two to six along their length, and these changes only became apparent when mass-per-length (MPL) determinations are made with sufficient resolution. The MPL results could be reproduced by a simple stochastic model with a single adjustable parameter. The presence of more than two primary filaments could not be discerned by transmission electron microscopy, and they had no apparent relationship to the longitudinal twist of the fibrils. However, the pitch of the twist was strongly affected by the pH of the negative stain. We conclude that highly stable amyloid fibrils may form in which a surprising amount of intrinsic linear heterogeneity may be obscured by MPL measurements of insufficient resolution, and by the negative stains used for imaging fibrils by electron microscopy. PMID:20940298

  9. Evidence for Inhibition of Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrillization by Peptide Fragments from Human Lysozyme: A Combined Spectroscopy, Microscopy, and Docking Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Gazova, Zuzana; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Mroue, Kamal H; Ghosh, Anirban; Zhang, Ruiyan; Ulicna, Katarina; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-06-13

    Degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases, as well as type II diabetes, have a pathogenesis associated with protein misfolding, which routes with amyloid formation. Recent strategies for designing small-molecule and polypeptide antiamyloid inhibitors are mainly based on mature fibril structures containing cross β-sheet structures. In the present study, we have tackled the hypothesis that the rational design of antiamyloid agents that can target native proteins might offer advantageous prospect to design effective therapeutics. Lysozyme amyloid fibrillization was treated with three different peptide fragments derived from lysozyme protein sequence R(107)-R(115). Using low-resolution spectroscopic, high-resolution NMR, and STD NMR-restrained docking methods such as HADDOCK, we have found that these peptide fragments have the capability to affect lysozyme fibril formation. The present study implicates the prospect that these peptides can also be tested against other amyloid-prone proteins to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27116396

  10. Alpha-lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for beta-amyloid fibrils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito

    2006-03-24

    Inhibition of the formation of beta-amyloid fibrils (fAbeta), as well as the destabilization of preformed fAbeta in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fAbeta at pH 7.5 at 37 degrees C in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fAbeta formation from amyloid beta-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fAbetas. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD. PMID:16460684

  11. {alpha}-Lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-24

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of {alpha}-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  12. Double-Layer Mediated Electromechanical Response of Amyloid Fibrils in Liquid Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Maxim; Thompson, G. L.; Reukov, Vladimir V; Jesse, Stephen; Guo, Senli; Rodriguez, Brian; Seal, Katyayani; Vertegel, Alexey; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing electrical bias-induced mechanical motion on the nanometer and molecular scale is a critical step toward understanding the fundamental mechanisms of redox processes and implementation of molecular electromechanical machines. Probing these phenomena in biomolecular systems requires electromechanical measurements be performed in liquid environments. Here we demonstrate the use of band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for probing electromechanical coupling in amyloid fibrils. The approaches for separating the elastic and electromechanical contributions based on functional fits and multivariate statistical analysis are presented. We demonstrate that in the bulk of the fibril the electromechanical response is dominated by double-layer effects (consistent with shear piezoelectricity of biomolecules), while a number of electromechanically active hot spots possibly related to structural defects are observed.

  13. Electric birefringence study of an amyloid fibril system: The short end of the length distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, S. S.; Venema, P.; van der Ploeg, J. P. M.; Sagis, L. M. C.; Donald, A. M.; van der Linden, E.

    2005-10-01

    In this article, a system of amyloid fibrils, based on the protein β-lactoglobulin, is studied by transient electric birefringence. Single pulses of an electric field were applied to the solution, and the initial rise and subsequent decay of birefringence analysed. The decay takes place on a range of relaxation times, and therefore contains information about the length distribution of fibrils in the system. The information can be extracted using theories of the electric polarisability of polyelectrolyte rods, since the fibrils are an example of these. Despite the long-standing complications of such theories, useful quantitative information about the system can still be obtained. Using the Fixman model of polyelectrolyte polarisability, we obtain a measurement of the short end of the length distribution which shows the fibril concentration as a function of length rising linearly from 0.02-2 μm. The short end of the length distribution was unobtainable in our previous study using rheo-optics (S.S. Rogers et al., Macromolecules 38, 2948 (2005)), but reasonable agreement between the two techniques shows they are complementary.

  14. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloidfibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  15. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  16. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Langkilde, Annette E.; Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  17. Degeneration of amyloidfibrils caused by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Yoshida, Tomonori; Margareta Sörgjerd, Karin; Zako, Tamotsu; Maeda, Mizuo; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma was applied to degenerate amyloid-ß (Aß) fibrils, which are a major component of neuritic plaque associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We showed that an Aß fibril exposed to a low-frequency (LF) plasma jet in aqueous solution retained its morphology, molecular weight, and cytotoxicity, but, intriguingly, decreased in protease resistance and ß-sheet content. These results suggested that an LF plasma jet could be utilized for the treatment of AD to eliminate neuritic plaque by accelerating the proteolysis of Aß fibrils.

  18. Hydrophobic tail length plays a pivotal role in amyloid beta (25-35) fibril-surfactant interactions.

    PubMed

    Bag, Sudipta; Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Pramanik, Dibyendu; DasGupta, Sunando; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-09-01

    The amyloid β-peptide fragment comprising residues 25-35 (Aβ25-35 ) is known to be the most toxic fragment of the full length Aβ peptide which undergoes fibrillation very rapidly. In the present work, we have investigated the effects of the micellar environment (cationic, anionic, and nonionic) on preformed Aβ25-35 fibrils. The amyloid fibrils have been prepared and characterized by several biophysical and microscopic techniques. Effects of cationic dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and nonionic polyoxyethyleneoctyl phenyl ether (Triton X-100 or TX) on fibrils have been studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence, UV-vis spectroscopy based turbidity assay and microscopic analyses. Interestingly, DTAB and SDS micelles were observed to disintegrate prepared fibrils to some extent irrespective of their charges. CTAB micelles were found to break down the fibrillar assembly to a greater extent. On the other hand, the nonionic surfactant TX was found to trigger the fibrillation process. The presence of a longer hydrophobic tail in case of CTAB is assumed to be a reason for its higher fibril disaggregating efficacy, the premise of their formation being largely attributed to hydrophobic interactions. Proteins 2016; 84:1213-1223. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27192507

  19. Bridging the gap between the nanostructural organization and macroscopic interfacial rheology of amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Sophia; Rühs, Patrick A; Sieber, Christine; Isa, Lucio; Fischer, Peter; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-08-26

    The interfacial behavior of proteins and protein aggregates such as fibrils influences the bulk behavior of multiphase systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, and other technological applications. Additionally, it is an important factor in some biological processes such as the accumulation of amyloid fibrils at biological membranes in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, using β-lactoglobulin fibrils as a model system, we cover a large range of characteristic measuring length scales by combining atomic force microscopy, passive probe particle tracking, tensiometry, interfacial shear, and dilatational rheology in order to correlate the intricate structure of fibril-laden interfaces with their macroscopic adsorption kinetics and viscoelasticity. A subtle change in solution pH provokes pronounced changes in interfacial properties such as alignment, entanglement, multilayer formation, and fibril fracture, which can be resolved and linked across the various length scales involved. PMID:25100189

  20. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinquan; Ren, Ruxia; Tan, Suiyi; Zhang, Wanyue; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Yu, Fei; Xun, Tianrong; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2), can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT) and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells. Conclusions and Significance Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection. PMID:26656730

  1. An Efficient Kinetic Model for Assemblies of Amyloid Fibrils and Its Application to Polyglutamine Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Stéphanie; Ballesta, Annabelle; Charles, Frédérique; Lenuzza, Natacha; Gabriel, Pierre; Tine, Léon Matar; Rezaei, Human; Doumic, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Protein polymerization consists in the aggregation of single monomers into polymers that may fragment. Fibrils assembly is a key process in amyloid diseases. Up to now, protein aggregation was commonly mathematically simulated by a polymer size-structured ordinary differential equations (ODE) system, which is infinite by definition and therefore leads to high computational costs. Moreover, this Ordinary Differential Equation-based modeling approach implies biological assumptions that may be difficult to justify in the general case. For example, whereas several ordinary differential equation models use the assumption that polymerization would occur at a constant rate independently of polymer size, it cannot be applied to certain protein aggregation mechanisms. Here, we propose a novel and efficient analytical method, capable of modelling and simulating amyloid aggregation processes. This alternative approach consists of an integro-Partial Differential Equation (PDE) model of coalescence-fragmentation type that was mathematically derived from the infinite differential system by asymptotic analysis. To illustrate the efficiency of our approach, we applied it to aggregation experiments on polyglutamine polymers that are involved in Huntington’s disease. Our model demonstrates the existence of a monomeric structural intermediate acting as a nucleus and deriving from a non polymerizing monomer (). Furthermore, we compared our model to previously published works carried out in different contexts and proved its accuracy to describe other amyloid aggregation processes. PMID:23152746

  2. Class I Hydrophobin Vmh2 Adopts Atypical Mechanisms to Self-Assemble into Functional Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gravagnuolo, Alfredo Maria; Longobardi, Sara; Luchini, Alessandra; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; De Stefano, Luca; Notomista, Eugenio; Paduano, Luigi; Giardina, Paola

    2016-03-14

    Hydrophobins are fungal proteins whose functions are mainly based on their capability to self-assemble into amphiphilic films at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (HHI). It is widely accepted that class I hydrophobins form amyloid-like structures, named rodlets, which are hundreds of nanometers long, packed into ordered lateral assemblies and do not exhibit an overall helical structure. We studied the self-assembly of the Class I hydrophobin Vmh2 from Pleurotus ostreatus in aqueous solutions by dynamic light scattering (DLS), thioflavin T (ThT), fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), cryogenic trasmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and TEM. Vmh2 does not form fibrillar aggregates at HHI. It exhibits spherical and fibrillar assemblies whose ratio depends on the protein concentration when freshly solubilized at pH ≥ 7. Moreover, it spontaneously self-assembles into isolated, micrometer long, and twisted amyloid fibrils, observed for the first time in fungal hydrophobins. This process is promoted by acidic pH, temperature, and Ca(2+) ions. A model of self-assembly into amyloid-like structures has been proposed. PMID:26828412

  3. A β-solenoid model of the Pmel17 repeat domain: insights to the formation of functional amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Louros, Nikolaos N; Baltoumas, Fotis A; Hamodrakas, Stavros J; Iconomidou, Vassiliki A

    2016-02-01

    Pmel17 is a multidomain protein involved in biosynthesis of melanin. This process is facilitated by the formation of Pmel17 amyloid fibrils that serve as a scaffold, important for pigment deposition in melanosomes. A specific luminal domain of human Pmel17, containing 10 tandem imperfect repeats, designated as repeat domain (RPT), forms amyloid fibrils in a pH-controlled mechanism in vitro and has been proposed to be essential for the formation of the fibrillar matrix. Currently, no three-dimensional structure has been resolved for the RPT domain of Pmel17. Here, we examine the structure of the RPT domain by performing sequence threading. The resulting model was subjected to energy minimization and validated through extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Structural analysis indicated that the RPT model exhibits several distinct properties of β-solenoid structures, which have been proposed to be polymerizing components of amyloid fibrils. The derived model is stabilized by an extensive network of hydrogen bonds generated by stacking of highly conserved polar residues of the RPT domain. Furthermore, the key role of invariant glutamate residues is proposed, supporting a pH-dependent mechanism for RPT domain assembly. Conclusively, our work attempts to provide structural insights into the RPT domain structure and to elucidate its contribution to Pmel17 amyloid fibril formation. PMID:26754844

  4. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  5. Insights on the binding of thioflavin derivative markers to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40} fibrils from computational approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Alí-Torres, Jorge; Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Rodriguez-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-10-06

    The present contribution analyzes the binding of ThT and neutral ThT derivatives to a β-sheet model by means of quantum chemical calculations. In addition, we study the properties of four molecules: (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBX), 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) and their respective iodinated compounds, HBXI and HBTI, in binding to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40}fibrils by using a combination of docking, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations.

  6. Structural Characterization of the Partially Folded Intermediates of An Immunoglobulin Light Chain Leading to Amyloid Fibrillation And Amorphous Aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Z.; Hu, D.; Zhu, M.; Fink, A.L.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Immunoglobulin light chain deposition diseases involve various types of extracellular deposition of light chain variable domains, including amyloid fibrils and amorphous deposits. The decreased thermodynamic stability of the light chain is believed to be the major factor leading to fibrillation. However, the differences in the nature of the deposits among the light chain deposition diseases raise the question of whether the mechanisms leading to fibrillar or amorphous aggregation is different. In this study, we generated two partially folded intermediates of the light chain variable domain SMA in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and characterized their conformations. The more unfolded intermediate formed fibrils most rapidly, while the more native-like intermediate predominantly led to amorphous deposits. The results also show that the monomeric, rather than the dimeric state, was critical for fibrillation. The data also indicate that fibril elongation involves addition of a partially unfolded intermediate, rather than the native state. We postulate that a more highly unfolded intermediate is more suited to undergo the topological rearrangements necessary to form amyloid fibrils than a more structured one and that this also correlates with increased destabilization. In the case of light chain aggregation, it appears that more native-like intermediate conformations are more prone to form amorphous deposits.

  7. Capturing a reactive state of amyloid aggregates: NMR-based characterization of copper-bound Alzheimer disease amyloid β-fibrils in a redox cycle.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Yoo, Brian; McElheny, Dan; Tay, William; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of redox-active copper ions with misfolded amyloid β (Aβ) is linked to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which has been associated with oxidative stress and neuronal damages in Alzheimer disease. Despite intensive studies, it is still not conclusive how the interaction of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) with Aβ aggregates leads to ROS production even at the in vitro level. In this study, we examined the interaction between Cu(+)/Cu(2+) and Aβ fibrils by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and other spectroscopic methods. Our photometric studies confirmed the production of ~60 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from a solution of 20 μM Cu(2+) ions in complex with Aβ(1-40) in fibrils ([Cu(2+)]/[Aβ] = 0.4) within 2 h of incubation after addition of biological reducing agent ascorbate at the physiological concentration (~1 mM). Furthermore, SSNMR (1)H T1 measurements demonstrated that during ROS production the conversion of paramagnetic Cu(2+) into diamagnetic Cu(+) occurs while the reactive Cu(+) ions remain bound to the amyloid fibrils. The results also suggest that O2 is required for rapid recycling of Cu(+) bound to Aβ back to Cu(2+), which allows for continuous production of H2O2. Both (13)C and (15)N SSNMR results show that Cu(+) coordinates to Aβ(1-40) fibrils primarily through the side chain Nδ of both His-13 and His-14, suggesting major rearrangements from the Cu(2+) coordination via Nε in the redox cycle. (13)C SSNMR chemical shift analysis suggests that the overall Aβ conformations are largely unaffected by Cu(+) binding. These results present crucial site-specific evidence of how the full-length Aβ in amyloid fibrils offers catalytic Cu(+) centers. PMID:24523414

  8. Probing amyloid fibril formation of the NFGAIL peptide by computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melquiond, Adrien; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2007-02-01

    Amyloid fibril formation, as observed in Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes, is currently described by a nucleation-condensation mechanism, but the details of the process preceding the formation of the nucleus are still lacking. In this study, using an activation-relaxation technique coupled to a generic energy model, we explore the aggregation pathways of 12 chains of the hexapeptide NFGAIL. The simulations show, starting from a preformed parallel dimer and ten disordered chains, that the peptides form essentially amorphous oligomers or more rarely ordered β-sheet structures where the peptides adopt a parallel orientation within the sheets. Comparison between the simulations indicates that a dimer is not a sufficient seed for avoiding amorphous aggregates and that there is a critical threshold in the number of connections between the chains above which exploration of amorphous aggregates is preferred.

  9. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  10. Novel Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Formation Inhibitors: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and X-Ray Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orlandini, Elisabetta; Ortore, Gabriella; Nencetti, Susanna; Lapucci, Annalina; Rossello, Armando; Freundlich, Joel S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is one of thirty non-homologous proteins whose misfolding, dissociation, aggregation, and deposition is linked to human amyloid diseases. Previous studies have identified that TTR amyloidogenesis can be inhibited through stabilization of the native tetramer state by small molecule binding to the thyroid hormone sites of TTR. We have evaluated a new series of β-aminoxypropionic acids (compounds 5–21), with a single aromatic moiety (aryl or fluorenyl) linked through a flexible oxime tether to a carboxylic acid. These compounds are structurally distinct from the native ligand thyroxine and typical halogenated biaryl NSAID-like inhibitors to avoid off-target hormonal or anti-inflammatory activity. Based on an in vitro fibril formation assay, five of these compounds showed significant inhibition of TTR amyloidogenesis, with two fluorenyl compounds displaying inhibitor efficacy comparable to the well-known TTR inhibitor diflunisal. Fluorenyl 15 is the most potent compound in this series and importantly does not show off-target anti-inflammatory activity. Crystal structures of the TTR∶inhibitor complexes, in agreement with molecular docking studies, revealed that the aromatic moiety, linked to the sp2-hybridized oxime carbon, specifically directed the ligand in either a forward or reverse binding mode. Compared to the aryl family members, the bulkier fluorenyl analogs achieved more extensive interactions with the binding pockets of TTR and demonstrated better inhibitory activity in the fibril formation assay. Preliminary optimization efforts are described that focused on replacement of the C-terminal acid in both the aryl and fluorenyl series (compounds 22–32). The compounds presented here constitute a new class of TTR inhibitors that may hold promise in treating amyloid diseases associated with TTR misfolding. PMID:19621084

  11. Aβ(1–40) forms five distinct amyloid structures whose β-sheet contents and fibril stabilities are correlated

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Ravindra; Williams, Angela D.; Chemuru, Saketh; Wetzel, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The ability of a single polypeptide sequence to grow into multiple stable amyloid fibrils sets these aggregates apart from most native globular proteins. The existence of multiple amyloid forms is the basis for strain effects in yeast prion biology, and may also contribute to variations in Alzheimer’s disease pathology. However, the structural basis for amyloid polymorphism is poorly understood. We report here five structurally distinct fibrillar aggregates of the Alzheimer’s plaque peptide Aβ(1–40), as well as a non-fibrillar aggregate induced by Zn+2. Each of these conformational forms exhibits a unique profile of physical properties, and all the fibrillar forms “breed true” in elongation reactions at a common set of growth conditions. Consistent with their defining cross-β structure, we find that in this series the amyloid fibrils containing more extensive β-sheet exhibit greater stability. At the same time, side chain packing outside of the β-sheet regions also contributes to stability, and to stability differences between polymorphic forms. Stability comparison is facilitated by the unique feature that the free energy of the monomer (equivalent to the unfolded state in a protein folding reaction) does not vary, and hence can be ignored, in the comparison of ΔG° of elongation values for each polymorphic fibril obtained at a single set of conditions. PMID:20600131

  12. Aβ(1–42) Fibril Structure Illuminates Self-recognition and Replication of Amyloid in Alzheimer’s

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiling; Ma, Buyong; McElheny, Dan; Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Long, Fei; Hoshi, Minako; Nussinov, Ruth; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that formation and propagation of misfolded aggregates of 42-residue human amyloid β (Aβ(1–42)), rather than the more abundant Aβ(1–40), provokes the Alzheimer’s cascade. To date, structural details of misfolded Aβ(1–42) have remained elusive. Here we present the atomic model of Aβ(1–42) amyloid fibril based on solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. It displays triple parallel-β-sheet segments that are different from reported structures of Aβ(1–40) fibrils. Remarkably, Aβ(1–40) is not compatible with the triple-β motif, as seeding with Aβ(1–42) fibrils does not promote conversion of monomeric Aβ(1–40) into fibrils via cross-replication. SSNMR experiments suggest that the Ala42 carboxyl terminus, absent in Aβ(1–40), forms a salt-bridge with Lys28 as a self-recognition molecular switch that excludes Aβ(1–40). The results provide insight into Aβ(1–42)-selective self-replicating amyloid propagation machinery in early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25938662

  13. Time-lapse atomic force microscopy in the characterization of amyloid-like fibril assembly and oligomeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Green, Janelle

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) images the topography of biological structures adsorbed to surfaces with nanometer to angstrom scale resolution. Amyloid-like fibrils and oligomers can be imaged in buffer solutions, allowing the samples to retain physiological-like properties while temporal changes in structure are monitored, e.g., the elongation of fibrils or the growth of single oligomers. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, i.e., electron microscopy (EM). However, AFM is limited in that the specimen must be firmly attached to a solid support for measurement and that time-lapse imaging of individual assemblies can thus only be achieved for fibrils and oligomers growing on this support. Nevertheless, AFM has provided several insights into the in vitro assembly mechanism and structures of amyloid-like fibrils. The first section of this chapter provides a methodological introduction to AFM, whilst the second details the application of this technique to the investigation of amyloidogenic proteins, specifically amylin and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. PMID:15980598

  14. Estrogen has anti-amyloidogenic effects on Alzheimer's {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morinaga, Akiyoshi; Hirohata, Mie; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    Inhibition of the assembly of amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) as well as the destabilization of preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}) in the central nervous system could be valuable therapeutics of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have indicated that estrogen therapy reduced the risk of developing AD in women. Here, we examined the effects of estrogen (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3)) and related sexual steroids (androstenedione (AND) and testosterone (TES)) on the polymerization, extension and destabilization of fA{beta}(1-42) and fA{beta}(1-40) at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro, using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies. E1, E2, and E3 dose-dependently inhibited the formation, as well as destabilization of fA{beta}s. The overall anti-amyloidogenic activity of these molecules was in the order of: E3 > E2 = E1 >>AND = TES. Estrogen could be a potential therapeutic agent to prevent or delay AD progression.

  15. Preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils are destabilized by coenzyme Q{sub 10} in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-04-29

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and wine-related polyphenol, myricetin (Myr), inhibit fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilize preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of CoQ{sub 10} with NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}), as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The anti-amyloidogenic effects of CoQ{sub 10} were slightly weaker than those of NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  16. Urea modulation of β-amyloid fibril growth: Experimental studies and kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Ryoun; Muresan, Adrian; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Murphy, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) into fibrillar deposits is widely believed to initiate a cascade of adverse biological responses associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Although it was once assumed that the mature fibril was the toxic form of Aβ, recent evidence supports the hypothesis that Aβ oligomers, intermediates in the fibrillogenic pathway, are the dominant toxic species. In this work we used urea to reduce the driving force for Aβ aggregation, in an effort to isolate stable intermediate species. The effect of urea on secondary structure, size distribution, aggregation kinetics, and aggregate morphology was examined. With increasing urea concentration, β-sheet content and the fraction of aggregated peptide decreased, the average size of aggregates was reduced, and the morphology of aggregates changed from linear to a globular/linear mixture and then to globular. The data were analyzed using a previously published model of Aβ aggregation kinetics. The model and data were consistent with the hypothesis that the globular aggregates were intermediates in the amyloidogenesis pathway rather than alternatively aggregated species. Increasing the urea concentration from 0.4 M to 2 M decreased the rate of filament initiation the most; between 2 M and 4 M urea the largest change was in partitioning between the nonamyloid and amyloid pathways, and between 4 M and 6 M urea, the most significant change was a reduction in the rate of filament elongation. PMID:15459334

  17. Prevention of amyloid fibril formation of amyloidogenic chicken cystatin by site-specific glycosylation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianwei; Song, Youtao; Ueyama, Nobuhiro; Saito, Akira; Azakami, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akio

    2006-01-01

    To address the role of glycosylation on fibrillogenicity of amyloidogenic chicken cystatin, the consensus sequence for N-linked glycosylation (Asn106-Ile108 → Asn106-Thr108) was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis into the wild-type and amyloidogenic chicken cystatins to construct the glycosylated form of chicken cystatins. Both the glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of wild-type and amyloidogenic mutant I66Q cystatin were expressed and secreted in a culture medium of yeast Pichia pastoris transformants. Comparison of the amount of insoluble aggregate, the secondary structure, and fibrillogenicity has shown that the N-linked glycosylation could prevent amyloid fibril formation of amyloidogenic chicken cystatin secreted in yeast cells without affecting its inhibitory activities. Further study showed this glycosylation could inhibit the formation of cystatin dimers. Therefore, our data strongly suggested that the mechanism causing the prevention of amyloidogenic cystation fibril formation may be realized through suppression of the formation of three-dimensional domain-swapped dimers and oligomers of amyloidogenic cystatin by the glycosylated chains at position 106. PMID:16434741

  18. Investigation of the growth mechanisms of diglyme plasma polymers on amyloid fibril networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yali; Reynolds, Nicholas P.; Styan, Katie E.; Muir, Benjamin W.; Forsythe, John S.; Easton, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Within the area of biomaterials research, the ability to tailor a materials surface chemistry while presenting a biomimetic topography is a useful tool for studying cell-surface and cell-cell interactions. For the study reported here we investigated the deposition of diglyme plasma polymer films (DGpp) onto amyloid fibril networks (AFNs), which have morphologies that mimic the extracellular matrix. We extend our previous work to observe that the nanoscale contours of the AFNs are well preserved even under thick layers of DGpp. The width of the surface features is positively correlated to the DGpp thickness. DGpp film growth conformed to the underlying fibril features, with a gradual smoothing out of the resultant surface topography. Further, to understand how the films grow on top of AFNs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling was employed to determine the elemental composition within the coating, perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. It was found that AFNs partially fragment during the initial stage of plasma polymerisation, and these fragments then mix with the growing DGpp to form an intermixed interface region above the AFN. The findings in this study are likely applicable to situations where plasma polymerisation is used to apply an overcoat to adsorbed organic and/or biological molecules.

  19. Conformational Stability of Mammalian Prion Protein Amyloid Fibrils Is Dictated by a Packing Polymorphism within the Core Region*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Nathan J.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrPSc. One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrPSc as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrPSc, especially because large strain-specific differences in PrPSc stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrPSc core region. PMID:24338015

  20. Denaturation and Amyloid Fibril Formation of Insulin at Model Lipid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, J. S.; Forrest, J. A.; Jones, R. A. L.

    2003-03-01

    The role played by surfaces in the denaturation and subsequent amyloid fibril formation of certain proteins is unclear. In this study we consider the effects of confining the model protein, bovine insulin, at different charged lipid surfaces. The aim is to determine the effects that localisation at an interface, has upon the rate of unfolding and the changes in the β-sheet content of the protein when it is placed under denaturing conditions (low pH and elevated temperature). Adsorption, unfolding and changes in the β-sheet content of the protein are monitored using FTIR ATR spectroscopy and are compared to the behaviour of the bulk protein solution. We show that localisation of the proteins at these surfaces results in a more rapid unfolding than is observed in the bulk solution and that the β-sheet content of the insulin molecules is also reduced at the surfaces. The resulting external aggregate/fibril morphologies are then compared using a series of atomic force microscopy experiments (AFM) performed on samples taken from both of the surfaces and the bulk protein solution. The AFM images show that the increased level of disorder in the protein molecules at the surface, (arising from a greater extent of the unfolding and reduction in β-sheet content) affects the morphology of high β-sheet content structures like fibrils. An attempt is made to explain the observed differences in the behaviour of the adsorbed protein molecules, in terms of the balance of enthalpic and entropic mechanisms involved in protein adsorption.

  1. Revealing molecular-level surface structure of amyloid fibrils in liquid by means of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Mostaert, Anika S.; Serpell, Louise C.; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the surface structure of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) fibrils and α-synuclein protofibrils in liquid by means of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). Ångström-resolution FM-AFM imaging of isolated macromolecules in liquid is demonstrated for the first time. Individual β-strands aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis with a spacing of 0.5 nm are resolved in FM-AFM images, which confirms cross-β structure of IAPP fibrils in real space. FM-AFM images also reveal the existence of 4 nm periodic domains along the axis of IAPP fibrils. Stripe features with 0.5 nm spacing are also found in images of α-synuclein protofibrils. However, in contrast to the case for IAPP fibrils, the stripes are oriented 30° from the axis, suggesting the possibility of β-strand alignment in protofibrils different from that in mature fibrils or the regular arrangement of thioflavin T molecules present during the fibril preparation aligned at the surface of the protofibrils.

  2. Suppression of IAPP fibrillation at anionic lipid membranes via IAPP-derived amyloid inhibitors and insulin.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Daniel; Yan, Li-Mei; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Winter, Roland

    2010-08-01

    Aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) into cytotoxic beta-sheet oligomers and amyloid plaques is considered a key event in pancreatic beta-cell degeneration in type 2 diabetes (T2D). hIAPP is synthesized in the pancreatic beta-cells and it is stored, co-processed in the secretory granules, and co-secreted to the extracellular matrix together with insulin. In vivo, hIAPP aggregation may start and proceed at the water-cell membrane interface and anionic lipid membranes strongly enhance the process of hIAPP fibrillization which is causally linked to membrane disintegration and cell degeneration. In this study we explored the amyloidogenic propensity and conformational properties of hIAPP in the presence of negatively charged membrane (DOPC/DOPG phospholipid bilayers) surfaces upon addition of two recently designed potent hIAPP-derived inhibitors of hIAPP amyloidogenesis, the hexapeptide NF(N-Me)GA(N-Me)IL (NFGAIL-GI) and the 37-residue non-amyloidogenic hIAPP analog [(N-Me)G24, (N-Me)I26]-IAPP (IAPP-GI). For comparison, the effects of insulin, which is a natively occurring hIAPP aggregation inhibitor, rat IAPP (rIAPP), which is a natively non-amyloidogenic hIAPP analog, and the hIAPP amyloid core peptide hIAPP(22-27) or NFGAIL were also studied. The aim of our study was to test whether and how the above peptides which have been shown to completely block or suppress hIAPP amyloidogenesis in bulk solution in vitro would also affect these processes in the presence of lipid membranes. To this end, attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was applied. We find that IAPP-GI, NFGAIL-GI, insulin, and rIAPP are potent inhibitors of hIAPP fibrillization. Importantly, our data also suggest that the hetero-complexes of IAPP-GI, rIAPP, and insulin with hIAPP although non-amyloidogenic per se are still able to adsorb at the lipid membrane. By contrast, in the presence of NFGAIL-GI, interaction of hIAPP with the lipid membrane is

  3. Amyloid fibril formation in vitro from halophilic metal binding protein: Its high solubility and reversibility minimized formation of amorphous protein aggregations

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Yuhei; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Tokunaga, Masao; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic proteins are characterized by high net negative charges and relatively small fraction of hydrophobic amino acids, rendering them aggregation resistant. These properties are also shared by histidine-rich metal binding protein (HP) from moderate halophile, Chromohalobacter salexigens, used in this study. Here, we examined how halophilic proteins form amyloid fibrils in vitro. His-tagged HP, incubated at pH 2.0 and 58°C, readily formed amyloid fibrils, as observed by thioflavin fluorescence, CD spectra, and transmission or atomic force microscopies. Under these low-pH harsh conditions, however, His-HP was promptly hydrolyzed to smaller peptides most likely responsible for rapid formation of amyloid fibril. Three major acid-hydrolyzed peptides were isolated from fibrils and turned out to readily form fibrils. The synthetic peptides predicted to form fibrils in these peptide sequences by Waltz software also formed fibrils. Amyloid fibril was also readily formed from full-length His-HP when incubated with 10–20% 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol at pH 7.8 and 25°C without peptide bond cleavage. PMID:24038709

  4. In Silico and in Vitro Study of Binding Affinity of Tripeptides to Amyloid β Fibrils: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Viet, Man Hoang; Siposova, Katarina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Nguyen, Truc Trang; Gazova, Zuzana; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-23

    Self-assembly of Aβ peptides into amyloid aggregates has been suggested as the major cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nowadays, there is no medication for AD, but experimental data indicate that reversion of the process of amyloid aggregation reduces the symptoms of disease. In this paper, all 8000 tripeptides were studied for their ability to destroy Aβ fibrils. The docking method and the more sophisticated MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area) method were employed to calculate the binding affinity and mode of tripeptides to Aβ fibrils. The ability of these peptides to depolymerize Aβ fibrils was also investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (Thioflavin T assay). It was shown that tripeptides prefer to bind to hydrophobic regions of 6Aβ9-40 fibrils. Tripeptides WWW, WWP, WPW and PWW were found to be the most potent binders. In vitro experiments showed that tight-binding tripeptides have significant depolymerizing activities and their DC50 values determined from dose-response curves were in micromolar range. The ability of nonbinding (GAM, AAM) and weak-binding (IVL and VLA) tripeptides to destroy Aβ fibrils was negligible. In vitro data of tripeptide depolymerizing activities support the predictions obtained by molecular docking and all-atom simulation methods. Our results suggest that presence of multiple complexes of heterocycles forming by tryptophan and proline residues in tripeptides is crucial for their tight binding to Aβ fibrils as well as for extensive fibril depolymerization. We recommend PWW for further studies as it has the lowest experimental binding constant. PMID:25815792

  5. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloidfibrillation of Humanin containing a d-isomerized serine residue.

    PubMed

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-01

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from l to d form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin d-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin d-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin d-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure-function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloidfibrillation activity of Humanin caused by d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. PMID:27349871

  6. Effect of Sequence Variation on the Mechanical Response of Amyloid Fibrils Probed by Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Hlengisizwe; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Radford, Sheena E.; Harris, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical failure of mature amyloid fibers produces fragments that act as seeds for the growth of new fibrils. Fragmentation may also be correlated with cytotoxicity. We have used steered atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanical failure of fibrils formed by the amyloidogenic fragment of human amylin hIAPP20-29 subjected to force applied in a variety of directions. By introducing systematic variations to this peptide sequence in silico, we have also investigated the role of the amino-acid sequence in determining the mechanical stability of amyloid fibrils. Our calculations show that the force required to induce mechanical failure depends on the direction of the applied stress and upon the degree of structural order present in the β-sheet assemblies, which in turn depends on the peptide sequence. The results have implications for the importance of sequence-dependent mechanical properties on seeding the growth of new fibrils and the role of breakage events in cytotoxicity. PMID:22325282

  7. Continuous Paranematic Ordering of Rigid and Semiflexible Amyloid-Fe3O4 Hybrid Fibrils in an External Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Isabettini, Stéphane; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Adamcik, Jozef; Fischer, Peter; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    External magnetic field is a powerful approach to induce orientational order in originally disordered suspensions of magneto-responsive anisotropic particles. By small angle neutron scattering and optical birefringence measurement technology, we investigated the effect of magnetic field on the spatial ordering of hybrid amyloid fibrils with different aspect ratios (length-to-diameter) and flexibilities decorated by spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A continuous paranematic ordering from an initially isotropic suspension was observed upon increasing magnetic field strength, with spatial orientation increasing with colloidal volume fraction. At constant dimensionless concentration, stiff hybrid fibrils with varying aspect ratios and volume fractions, fall on the same master curve, with equivalent degrees of ordering at identical magnetic fields. However, the semiflexible hybrid fibrils with contour length close to persistence length exhibit a lower degree of alignment. This is consistent with Khokhlov-Semenov theoretical predictions. These findings sharpen the experimental toolbox to design colloidal systems with controllable degree of orientational ordering. PMID:27304090

  8. Characterization of intermolecular structure of β(2)-microglobulin core fragments in amyloid fibrils by vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy and circular dichroism theory.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koichi; Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Gekko, Kunihiko; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Woody, Robert W

    2014-03-20

    Intermolecular structures are important factors for understanding the conformational properties of amyloid fibrils. In this study, vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) theory were used for characterizing the intermolecular structures of β2-microglobulin (β2m) core fragments in the amyloid fibrils. The VUVCD spectra of β2m20-41, β2m21-31, and β2m21-29 fragments in the amyloid fibrils exhibited characteristic features, but they were affected not only by the backbone conformations but also by the aromatic side-chain conformations. To estimate the contributions of aromatic side-chains to the spectra, the theoretical spectra were calculated from the simulated structures of β2m21-29 amyloid fibrils with various types of β-sheet stacking (parallel or antiparallel) using CD theory. We found that the experimental spectrum of β2m21-29 fibrils is largely affected by aromatic-backbone couplings, which are induced by the interaction between transitions within the aromatic and backbone chromophores, and these couplings are sensitive to the type of stacking among the β-sheets of the fibrils. Further theoretical analyses of simulated structures incorporating mutated aromatic residues suggested that the β2m21-29 fibrils are composed of amyloid accumulations in which the parallel β-sheets stack in an antiparallel manner and that the characteristic Phe-Tyr interactions among the β-sheet stacks affect the aromatic-backbone coupling. These findings indicate that the coupling components, which depend on the characteristic intermolecular structures, induce the spectral differences among three fragments in the amyloid fibrils. These advanced spectral analyses using CD theory provide a useful method for characterizing the intermolecular structures of protein and peptide fragment complexes. PMID:24512563

  9. A Computational Approach for Identifying the Chemical Factors Involved in the Glycosaminoglycans-Mediated Acceleration of Amyloid Fibril Formation

    PubMed Central

    Monsellier, Elodie; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Taddei, Niccolò; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Background Amyloid fibril formation is the hallmark of many human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils deposit in the extracellular space and generally co-localize with the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) of the basement membrane. GAGs have been shown to accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro for a number of protein systems. The high number of data accumulated so far has created the grounds for the construction of a database on the effects of a number of GAGs on different proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have constructed such a database and have used a computational approach that uses a combination of single parameter and multivariate analyses to identify the main chemical factors that determine the GAG-induced acceleration of amyloid formation. We show that the GAG accelerating effect is mainly governed by three parameters that account for three-fourths of the observed experimental variability: the GAG sulfation state, the solute molarity, and the ratio of protein and GAG molar concentrations. We then combined these three parameters into a single equation that predicts, with reasonable accuracy, the acceleration provided by a given GAG in a given condition. Conclusions/Significance In addition to shedding light on the chemical determinants of the protein∶GAG interaction and to providing a novel mathematical predictive tool, our findings highlight the possibility that GAGs may not have such an accelerating effect on protein aggregation under the conditions existing in the basement membrane, given the values of salt molarity and protein∶GAG molar ratio existing under such conditions. PMID:20613870

  10. RuvbL1 and RuvbL2 enhance aggresome formation and disaggregate amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zaarur, Nava; Xu, Xiaobin; Lestienne, Patrick; Meriin, Anatoli B; McComb, Mark; Costello, Catherine E; Newnam, Gary P; Ganti, Rakhee; Romanova, Nina V; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Silva, Sara TN; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Matias, Pedro M; Lobachev, Kirill S; Lednev, Igor K; Chernoff, Yury O; Sherman, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    The aggresome is an organelle that recruits aggregated proteins for storage and degradation. We performed an siRNA screen for proteins involved in aggresome formation and identified novel mammalian AAA+ protein disaggregases RuvbL1 and RuvbL2. Depletion of RuvbL1 or RuvbL2 suppressed aggresome formation and caused buildup of multiple cytoplasmic aggregates. Similarly, downregulation of RuvbL orthologs in yeast suppressed the formation of an aggresome-like body and enhanced the aggregate toxicity. In contrast, their overproduction enhanced the resistance to proteotoxic stress independently of chaperone Hsp104. Mammalian RuvbL associated with the aggresome, and the aggresome substrate synphilin-1 interacted directly with the RuvbL1 barrel-like structure near the opening of the central channel. Importantly, polypeptides with unfolded structures and amyloid fibrils stimulated the ATPase activity of RuvbL. Finally, disassembly of protein aggregates was promoted by RuvbL. These data indicate that RuvbL complexes serve as chaperones in protein disaggregation. PMID:26303906

  11. Mechanisms of Ultrasonically Induced Fibrillation of Amyloid β1-40 Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Kentaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Masahiko; So, Masatomo; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji; Hirao, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    We systematically study the relationship between the ultrasonically induced aggregation behavior of amyloid β1-40 peptide and acoustic pressures to clarify the dominant mechanism of the aggregation. With ultrasonic irradiation, the thioflavin-T (ThT) level of the Aβ solution rises after a lag time, takes a maximum at ˜5 h, and remains unchanged or decreases. Thus, we monitor the ThT level at 5 h to evaluate the progress of the β-sheet structure and investigate its correlation with the acoustic pressures of fundamental and harmonics waves. The second-harmonics-wave amplitude shows the highest correlation with the ThT level, indicating the dominant contribution of cavitation bubbles to the fibrillation phenomenon. The influence of solution pH and Ar gas are investigated to identify the aggregation mechanism. As a result, local condensation of the peptide due to the high affinity of hydrophobic residues to the bubble-solution interface causes a highly supersaturated solution, leading to precipitation of β-sheet-rich nuclei.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of GNNQQNY nanocrystals and amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Caporini, Marc A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) utilizes the inherently larger polarization of electrons to enhance the sensitivity of conventional solid-state NMR experiments at low temperature. Recent advances in instrumentation development and sample preparation have transformed this field and have opened up new opportunities for its application to biological systems. Here, we present DNP-enhanced 13C–13C and 15N–13C correlation experiments on GNNQQNY nanocrystals and amyloid fibrils acquired at 9.4 T and 100 K and demonstrate that DNP can be used to obtain assignments and site-specific structural information very efficiently. We investigate the influence of temperature on the resolution, molecular conformation, structural integrity and dynamics in these two systems. In addition, we assess the low-temperature performance of two commonly used solid-state NMR experiments, proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) and transferred echo double resonance (TEDOR), and discuss their potential as tools for measurement of structurally relevant distances at low temperature in combination with DNP. PMID:20454733

  13. Nanomechanical properties of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils: a comparative study by nanoindentation, harmonic force microscopy, and Peakforce QNM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweers, Kim; van der Werf, Kees; Bennink, Martin; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2011-12-01

    We report on the use of three different atomic force spectroscopy modalities to determine the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils of the human α-synuclein protein. α-Synuclein forms fibrillar nanostructures of approximately 10 nm diameter and lengths ranging from 100 nm to several microns, which have been associated with Parkinson's disease. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image the morphology of these protein fibrils deposited on a flat surface. For nanomechanical measurements, we used single-point nanoindentation, in which the AFM tip as the indenter is moved vertically to the fibril surface and back while the force is being recorded. We also used two recently developed AFM surface property mapping techniques: Harmonic force microscopy (HarmoniX) and Peakforce QNM. These modalities allow extraction of mechanical parameters of the surface with a lateral resolution and speed comparable to tapping-mode AFM imaging. Based on this phenomenological study, the elastic moduli of the α-synuclein fibrils determined using these three different modalities are within the range 1.3-2.1 GPa. We discuss the relative merits of these three methods for the determination of the elastic properties of protein fibrils, particularly considering the differences and difficulties of each method.

  14. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Alexandra L.; Kiselar, Janna; Ilchenko, Serguei; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Chance, Mark R.; Axelsen, Paul H.

    2014-11-09

    The structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. When we combined mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, we determined that the results of our study were consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. Our results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide.

  15. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. Combined with mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, the results of this study are consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. The results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide. PMID:25382225

  16. One of the possible mechanisms of amyloid fibrils formation based on the sizes of primary and secondary folding nuclei of Aβ40 and Aβ42.

    PubMed

    Dovidchenko, Nikita V; Glyakina, Anna V; Selivanova, Olga M; Grigorashvili, Elizaveta I; Suvorina, Mariya Yu; Dzhus, Ulyana F; Mikhailina, Alisa O; Shiliaev, Nikita G; Marchenkov, Victor V; Surin, Alexey K; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2016-06-01

    In the presented paper, theoretical as well as electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction experimental approaches were employed for studding the process of Aβ amyloid formation. Using quantitative estimates of a number of monomers which form the nuclei of amyloid fibrils the sizes of folding nuclei of amyloid fibrils for Aβ40 and 42 have been determined for the first time. We have shown that the size of the primary nucleus of Aβ42 peptide fibrils corresponds to 3 monomers, the size of the secondary nucleus for this peptide is 2 monomers. Applying the same analysis to Aβ40 we conclude that the size of the primary nucleus is 2 monomers, and the size of the secondary nucleus is one monomer. Summation of our theoretical and experimental results has allowed us to propose a new model of the structural organization of amyloid fibrils. Our model suggests that the generation of fibrils takes place along the following simplified pathway: a monomer→a ring oligomer→a mature fibril consisting of ring oligomers. These data shed more light upon our understanding of what sizes of the oligomers could represent main targets for future therapies (tetramers for Aβ42 and trimers for Aβ40), and aid in the development of inhibitors of Aβ40 and 42 oligomer formation. PMID:27016282

  17. Secondary structure in the core of amyloid fibrils formed from human β₂m and its truncated variant ΔN6.

    PubMed

    Su, Yongchao; Sarell, Claire J; Eddy, Matthew T; Debelouchina, Galia T; Andreas, Loren B; Pashley, Clare L; Radford, Sheena E; Griffin, Robert G

    2014-04-30

    Amyloid fibrils formed from initially soluble proteins with diverse sequences are associated with an array of human diseases. In the human disorder, dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), fibrils contain two major constituents, full-length human β2-microglobulin (hβ2m) and a truncation variant, ΔN6 which lacks the N-terminal six amino acids. These fibrils are assembled from initially natively folded proteins with an all antiparallel β-stranded structure. Here, backbone conformations of wild-type hβ2m and ΔN6 in their amyloid forms have been determined using a combination of dilute isotopic labeling strategies and multidimensional magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques at high magnetic fields, providing valuable structural information at the atomic-level about the fibril architecture. The secondary structures of both fibril types, determined by the assignment of ~80% of the backbone resonances of these 100- and 94-residue proteins, respectively, reveal substantial backbone rearrangement compared with the location of β-strands in their native immunoglobulin folds. The identification of seven β-strands in hβ2m fibrils indicates that approximately 70 residues are in a β-strand conformation in the fibril core. By contrast, nine β-strands comprise the fibrils formed from ΔN6, indicating a more extensive core. The precise location and length of β-strands in the two fibril forms also differ. The results indicate fibrils of ΔN6 and hβ2m have an extensive core architecture involving the majority of residues in the polypeptide sequence. The common elements of the backbone structure of the two proteins likely facilitates their ability to copolymerize during amyloid fibril assembly. PMID:24679070

  18. Secondary Structure in the Core of Amyloid Fibrils Formed from Human β2m and its Truncated Variant ΔN6

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils formed from initially soluble proteins with diverse sequences are associated with an array of human diseases. In the human disorder, dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), fibrils contain two major constituents, full-length human β2-microglobulin (hβ2m) and a truncation variant, ΔN6 which lacks the N-terminal six amino acids. These fibrils are assembled from initially natively folded proteins with an all antiparallel β-stranded structure. Here, backbone conformations of wild-type hβ2m and ΔN6 in their amyloid forms have been determined using a combination of dilute isotopic labeling strategies and multidimensional magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques at high magnetic fields, providing valuable structural information at the atomic-level about the fibril architecture. The secondary structures of both fibril types, determined by the assignment of ∼80% of the backbone resonances of these 100- and 94-residue proteins, respectively, reveal substantial backbone rearrangement compared with the location of β-strands in their native immunoglobulin folds. The identification of seven β-strands in hβ2m fibrils indicates that approximately 70 residues are in a β-strand conformation in the fibril core. By contrast, nine β-strands comprise the fibrils formed from ΔN6, indicating a more extensive core. The precise location and length of β-strands in the two fibril forms also differ. The results indicate fibrils of ΔN6 and hβ2m have an extensive core architecture involving the majority of residues in the polypeptide sequence. The common elements of the backbone structure of the two proteins likely facilitates their ability to copolymerize during amyloid fibril assembly. PMID:24679070

  19. Polyglutamine Amyloid Core Boundaries and Flanking Domain Dynamics in Huntingtin Fragment Fibrils Determined by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In Huntington’s disease, expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in the huntingtin (htt) protein leads to misfolding and aggregation. There is much interest in the molecular features that distinguish monomeric, oligomeric, and fibrillar species that populate the aggregation pathway and likely differ in cytotoxicity. The mechanism and rate of aggregation are greatly affected by the domains flanking the polyQ segment within exon 1 of htt. A “protective” C-terminal proline-rich flanking domain inhibits aggregation by inducing polyproline II structure (PPII) within an extended portion of polyQ. The N-terminal flanking segment (httNT) adopts an α-helical structure as it drives aggregation, helps stabilize oligomers and fibrils, and is seemingly integral to their supramolecular assembly. Via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), we probe how, in the mature fibrils, the htt flanking domains impact the polyQ domain and in particular the localization of the β-structured amyloid core. Using residue-specific and uniformly labeled samples, we find that the amyloid core occupies most of the polyQ domain but ends just prior to the prolines. We probe the structural and dynamical features of the remarkably abrupt β-sheet to PPII transition and discuss the potential connections to certain htt-binding proteins. We also examine the httNT α-helix outside the polyQ amyloid core. Despite its presumed structural and demonstrated stabilizing roles in the fibrils, quantitative ssNMR measurements of residue-specific dynamics show that it undergoes distinct solvent-coupled motion. This dynamical feature seems reminiscent of molten-globule-like α-helix-rich features attributed to the nonfibrillar oligomeric species of various amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:25280367

  20. Amyloid fibrillation in native and chemically-modified forms of carbonic anhydrase II: role of surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Es-Haghi, Ali; Shariatizi, Sajad; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2012-03-01

    Chemical modification or mutation of proteins may bring about significant changes in the net charge or surface hydrophobicity of a protein structure. Such events may be of major physiological significance and may provide important insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases. In the present study, fibrillation potential of native and chemically-modified forms of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCA II) were investigated. Initially, various denaturing conditions including low pH and high temperatures were tested to induce fibrillation. At a low pH of around 2.4, where the protein is totally dissociated, the apo form was found to take up a pre-molten globular (PMG) conformation with the capacity for fibril formation. Upon increasing the pH to around 3.6, a molten globular (MG) form became abundant, forming amorphous aggregates. Charge neutralization and enhancement of hydrophobicity by methylation, acetylation and propionylation of lysine residues appeared very effective in promoting fibrillation of both the apo and holo forms under native conditions, the rates and extents of which were directly proportional to surface hydrophobicity, and influenced by salt concentration and temperature. These modified structures underwent more pronounced fibrillation under native conditions, than the PMG intermediate form, observed under denaturing conditions. The nature of the fibrillation products obtained from intermediate and modified structures were characterized and compared and their possible cytotoxicity determined. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of surface net charge and hydrophobicity in controlling protein aggregation. A discussion on the physiological significance of the observations is also presented. PMID:22251892

  1. Solution Conditions Affect the Ability of the K30D Mutation To Prevent Amyloid Fibril Formation by Apolipoprotein C-II: Insights from Experiments and Theoretical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Todorova, Nevena; Zlatic, Courtney O; Gooley, Paul R; Griffin, Michael D W; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Yarovsky, Irene

    2016-07-12

    Apolipoproteins form amphipathic helical structures that bind lipid surfaces. Paradoxically, lipid-free apolipoproteins display a strong propensity to form cross-β structure and self-associate into disease-related amyloid fibrils. Studies of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) amyloid fibrils suggest that a K30-D69 ion pair accounts for the dual abilities to form helix and cross-β structure. Consistent with this is the observation that a K30D mutation prevents fibril formation under standard fibril forming conditions. However, we found that fibril formation by K30D apoC-II proceeded readily at low pH and a higher salt or protein concentration. Structural analysis demonstrated that K30D apoC-II fibrils at pH 7 have a structure similar to that of the wild-type fibrils but are less stable. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type apoC-II fibril model at pH 7 and 3 showed that the loss of charge on D69 at pH 3 leads to greater separation between residues K30 and D69 within the fibril with a corresponding reduction in β-strand content around residue 30. In contrast, in simulations of the K30D mutant model at pH 7 and 3, residues D30 and D69 moved closer at pH 3, accompanied by an increase in β-strand content around residue 30. The simulations also demonstrated a strong dominance of inter- over intramolecular contacts between ionic residues of apoC-II and suggested a cooperative mechanism for forming favorable interactions between the individual strands under different conditions. These observations demonstrate the important role of the buried K30-D69 ion pair in the stability and solution properties of apoC-II amyloid fibrils. PMID:27311794

  2. Bioactive polyphenol interactions with β amyloid: a comparison of binding modelling, effects on fibril and aggregate formation and neuroprotective capacity.

    PubMed

    Das, Sukanya; Stark, Lina; Musgrave, Ian F; Pukala, Tara; Smid, Scott D

    2016-02-01

    In this study we compared the effects of a diverse set of natural polyphenolics ligands on in silico interactive modelling, in vitro anti-aggregative properties and neuronal toxicity of β amyloid. The β amyloid-binding characteristics of optimised structural conformations of polyphenols with ascribed neuroprotective actions including punicalagin, myricetin, luteolin and honokiol were determined in silico. Thioflavin T and transmission electron microscopy were used to assess in vitro inhibitory effects of these polyphenols on Aβ1-42 fibril and aggregation formation. Phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells were exposed to Aβ1-42, alone and in combination with test concentrations of each polyphenol (100 μM) and viability measured using MTT assay. Aβ1-42 evoked a concentration-dependent loss of cell viability in PC12 cells, in which all four polyphenols demonstrated significant inhibition of neurotoxicity. While all compounds variably altered the morphology of Aβ aggregation, the flavonoids luteolin and myricetin and the lignan honokiol all bound in a similar hydrophobic region of the amyloid pentamer and exerted the most pronounced inhibition of Aβ1-42 aggregation. Each of the polyphenols demonstrated neuroprotective effects in PC12 cells exposed to Aβ1-42, including punicalagin. These findings highlight some structure-activity insights that can be gleaned into the anti-aggregatory properties of bioactive polyphenols based on modelling of their binding to β-amyloid, but also serve to highlight the more general cellular neuroprotective nature of such compounds. PMID:26815043

  3. Bacoside-A, an anti-amyloid natural substance, inhibits membrane disruption by the amyloidogenic determinant of prion protein through accelerating fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Malishev, Ravit; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shaham-Niv, Shira; Gazit, Ehud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-09-01

    Bacosides, class of compounds extracted from the Bacopa monniera plant, exhibit interesting therapeutic properties, particularly enhancing cognitive functions and putative anti-amyloid activity. We show that bacoside-A exerted significant effects upon fibrillation and membrane interactions of the amyloidogenic fragment of the prion protein [PrP(106-126)]. Specifically, when co-incubated with PrP(106-126), bacoside-A accelerated fibril formation in the presence of lipid bilayers and in parallel inhibited bilayer interactions of the peptide aggregates formed in solution. These interesting phenomena were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which suggest that bacoside A-promoted fibrillation reduced the concentration of membrane-active pre-fibrillar species of the prion fragment. This study suggests that induction of fibril formation and corresponding inhibition of membrane interactions are likely the underlying factors for ameliorating amyloid protein toxicity by bacoside-A. PMID:27365272

  4. Polyanionic Candidate Microbicides Accelerate the Formation of Semen-Derived Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Suiyi; Lu, Lu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jixiang; Oksov, Yelena; Lu, Hong; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen

    2013-01-01

    Polyanionic candidate microbicides, including cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, PRO 2000, were proven ineffective in preventing HIV-1 transmission and even cellulose sulfate showed increased risk of HIV acquisition in the Phase III efficacy trials. Semen plays critical roles in HIV-1 sexual transmission. Specifically, amyloid fibrils formed by fragments of prostatic acidic phosphatase (PAP) in semen termed semen-derived enhancer of virus infection (SEVI) could drastically enhance HIV-1 infection. Here we investigated the interaction between polyanions and PAP248-286, a prototype peptide of SEVI, to understand the possible cause of polyanionic candidate microbicides to fail in clinical trials. We found anionic polymers could efficiently promote SEVI fibril formation, most likely mediated by the natural electrostatic interaction between polyanions and PAP248-286, as revealed by acid native PAGE and Western blot. The overall anti-HIV-1 activity of polyanions in the presence or absence of PAP248-286 or semen was evaluated. In the viral infection assay, the supernatants of polyanions/PAP248-286 or polyanions/semen mixtures containing the free, unbound polyanionic molecules showed a general reduction in antiviral efficacy, while the pellets containing amyloid fibrils formed by the polyanion-bound PAP248-286 showed aggravated enhancement of viral infection. Collectively, from the point of drug-host protein interaction, our study revealed that polyanions facilitate SEVI fibril formation to promote HIV-1 infection, thus highlighting a molecular mechanism underlying the failure of polyanions in clinical trials and the importance of drug-semen interaction in evaluating the anti-HIV-1 efficacy of candidate microbicides. PMID:23544097

  5. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils formed by a peptide from the yeast prion protein Sup35: AFM and Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Zhang, Yuliang; Deckert, Volker; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation of prion proteins is the cause of various prion related diseases. The infectious form of prions, amyloid aggregates, exist as multiple strains. The strains are thought to represent structurally different prion protein molecules packed into amyloid aggregates, but the knowledge on the structure of different types of aggregates is limited. Here we report on the use of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and TERS (Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering) to study morphological heterogeneity and access underlying conformational features of individual amyloid aggregates. Using AFM we identified the morphology of amyloid fibrils formed by the peptide (CGNNQQNY) from the yeast prion protein Sup35 that is critically involved in the aggregation of the full protein. TERS results demonstrate that morphologically different amyloid fibrils are composed of a distinct set of conformations. Fibrils formed at pH 5.6 are composed of a mixture of peptide conformations (β-sheets, random coil and α-helix) while fibrils formed in pH~2 solution primarily have β-sheets. Additionally, peak positions in the amide III region of the TERS spectra suggested that peptides have parallel arrangement of β-sheets for pH~2 fibrils and antiparallel arrangement for fibrils formed at pH 5.6. We also developed a methodology for detailed analysis of the peptide secondary structure by correlating intensity changes of Raman bands in different regions of TERS spectra. Such correlation established that structural composition of peptides is highly localized with large contribution of unordered secondary structures on a fibrillar surface. PMID:27060278

  6. Fullerenol C60(OH)16 prevents amyloid fibrillization of Aβ40-in vitro and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Bednarikova, Zuzana; Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Mocanu, Maria-Magdalena; Fedunova, Diana; Li, Mai Suan; Gazova, Zuzana

    2016-07-28

    The generation of Aβ amyloid aggregates in the form of senile plaques in the brain is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is no cure for AD and one of the recent treatment strategies is focused on the inhibition of amyloid fibrillization of Aβ peptide. Fullerene C60 has been proposed as a candidate for destroying Aβ aggregates but it is not soluble in water and its toxicity to cells remains largely ambiguous. To overcome these drawbacks, we synthesized and studied the effect of water-soluble fullerenol C60(OH)16 (fullerene C60 carrying 16 hydroxyl groups) on the amyloid fibrillization of Aβ40 peptide in vitro. Using a Thioflavin T fluorescent assay and atomic force microscopy it was found that C60(OH)16 effectively reduces the formation of amyloid fibrils. The IC50 value is in the low range (μg ml(-1)) suggesting that fullerenol interferes with Aβ40 aggregation at stoichiometric concentrations. The in silico calculations supported the experimental data. It was revealed that fullerenol tightly binds to monomer Aβ40 and polar, negatively charged amino acids play a key role. Electrostatic interactions dominantly contribute to the binding propensity via interaction of the oxygen atoms from the COO(-) groups of side chains of polar, negatively charged amino acids with the OH groups of fullerenol. This stabilizes contact with either the D23 or K28 of the salt bridge. Due to the lack of a well-defined binding pocket fullerenol is also inclined to locate near the central hydrophobic region of Aβ40 and can bind to the hydrophobic C-terminal of the peptide. Upon fullerenol binding the salt bridge becomes flexible, inhibiting Aβ aggregation. In order to assess the toxicity of fullerenol, we found that exposure of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to fullerenol caused no significant changes in viability after 24 h of treatment. These results suggest that fullerenol C60(OH)16 represents a promising candidate as a therapeutic for Alzheimer

  7. Investigation of the Binding Profiles of AZD2184 and Thioflavin T with Amyloid-β(1-42) Fibril by Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Methods.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Guanglin; Murugan, N Arul; Tu, Yaoquan; Nordberg, Agneta; Ågren, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Detecting deposits of amyloid β fibrils in the brain is of paramount importance for an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. A number of PET tracers have been developed for amyloid imaging, but many suffer from poor specificity and large signal to background ratio. Design of tracers with specificity and improved binding affinity requires knowledge about various potential binding sites in the amyloid β fibril available for the tracers and the nature of the local microenvironment of these sites. In this study we investigate the local structure of fibrils using two important probes, namely, thioflavin T (a fluorescent probe) and AZD2184 (a PET tracer). The target structures for amyloid-β(1-42) fibril are based on reported NMR solution models. By explicitly considering the effect of fibril flexibility on the available binding sites for all these models, the binding affinity of these probes has been investigated. The binding profiles of AZD2184 and thioflavin T were studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The two compounds were found to bind at the same sites of the fibril: three of which are within the fibril, and one is on the two sides of the Met35 residue on the surface. The binding affinity of AZD2184 and thioflavin T is found to be higher at the core sites than on the surface due to more contact residues. The binding affinity of AZD2184 is much higher than that of thioflavin T at every site due to electrostatic interaction and spatial restriction, which is in good agreement with experimental observation. However, the structural change of thioflavin T is much more significant than that of AZD2184, which is the chemical basis for its usage as a fluorescent probe. The ramifications of these results for the design and optimization of PET radioligands and fluorescent probes are briefly discussed. PMID:26266837

  8. Glucose regulates amyloid β production via AMPK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting-Ting; Shih, Yao-Shan; Chen, Yun-Wen; Kuo, Yu-Min; Lee, Chu-Wan

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Accumulation of Aβ peptides in the brain has been suggested as the cause of AD (amyloid cascade hypothesis); however, the mechanism for the abnormal accumulation of Aβ in the brains of AD patients remains unclear. A plethora of evidence has emerged to support a link between metabolic disorders and AD. This study was designed to examine the relationship between energy status and Aβ production. Neuro 2a neuroblastoma cells overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP cells) were cultured in media containing different concentrations of glucose and agonist or antagonist of AMP-activated-protein-kinase (AMPK), a metabolic master sensor. The results showed that concentrations of glucose in the culture media were negatively associated with the activation statuses of AMPK in APP cells, but positively correlated with the levels of secreted Aβ. Modulating AMPK activities affected the production of Aβ. If APP cells were cultured in high glucose medium (i.e., AMPK was inactive), stimulation of AMPK activity decreased the production levels of Aβ. On the contrary, if APP cells were incubated in medium containing no glucose (i.e., AMPK was activated), inhibition of AMPK activity largely increased Aβ production. As AMPK activation is a common defect in metabolic abnormalities, our study supports the premise that metabolic disorders may aggravate AD pathogenesis. PMID:26071020

  9. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  10. Amyloid fibril formation requires a chemically discriminating nucleation event: studies of an amyloidogenic sequence from the bacterial protein OsmB.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, J T; Lansbury, P T

    1992-12-15

    The sequence of the Escherichia coli OsmB protein was found to resemble that of the C-terminal region of the beta amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease, which seems to be the major determinant of its unusual structural and solubility properties. A peptide corresponding to residues 28-44 of the OsmB protein was synthesized, and its conformational properties and aggregation behavior were analyzed. The peptide OsmB(28-44) was shown to form amyloid fibrils, as did two sequence analogs designed to test the sequence specificity of fibril formation. These fibrils bound Congo red, and two of the peptides showed birefringence. The peptide fibrils were analyzed by electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Subtle differences were observed which were not interpretable at the molecular level. The rate of fibril formation by each peptide was followed by monitoring the turbidity of supersaturated aqueous solutions. The kinetics of aggregation were characterized by a delay period during which the solution remained clear, followed by a nucleation event which led to a growth phase, during which the solution became viscous and turbid due to the presence of insoluble fibrils. The observation of a kinetic barrier to aggregation is typical of a crystallization event. The delay period could be eliminated by seeding the supersaturated solution with previously formed fibrils. Each peptide could be nucleated by fibrils formed from that same peptide, but not by fibrils from closely related sequences, suggesting that fibril growth requires specific hydrophobic interactions. It appears likely that this repeated sequence motif, which comprises most of the OsmB protein sequence, dictates the structure and possibly the function of that protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1463722

  11. Formation of Amyloid-Like Fibrils by Y-Box Binding Protein 1 (YB-1) Is Mediated by Its Cold Shock Domain and Modulated by Disordered Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Guryanov, Sergey G.; Selivanova, Olga M.; Nikulin, Alexey D.; Enin, Gennady A.; Melnik, Bogdan S.; Kretov, Dmitry A.; Serdyuk, Igor N.; Ovchinnikov, Lev P.

    2012-01-01

    YB-1, a multifunctional DNA- and RNA-binding nucleocytoplasmic protein, is involved in the majority of DNA- and mRNA-dependent events in the cell. It consists of three structurally different domains: its central cold shock domain has the structure of a β-barrel, while the flanking domains are predicted to be intrinsically disordered. Recently, we showed that YB-1 is capable of forming elongated fibrils under high ionic strength conditions. Here we report that it is the cold shock domain that is responsible for formation of YB-1 fibrils, while the terminal domains differentially modulate this process depending on salt conditions. We demonstrate that YB-1 fibrils have amyloid-like features, including affinity for specific dyes and a typical X-ray diffraction pattern, and that in contrast to most of amyloids, they disassemble under nearly physiological conditions. PMID:22590640

  12. Amyloid at the nanoscale: AFM and single-molecule investigations of early steps of aggregation and mature fibril growth, structure, and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vinod

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into nanometer-scale fibrillar assemblies is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We have investigated the self-assembly of the human intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, into amyloid fibrils. A particularly relevant question is the role of early oligomeric aggregates in modulating the dynamics of protein nucleation and aggregation. We have used single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize conformational transitions of alpha-synuclein, and to gain insights into the structure and composition of oligomeric aggregates of alpha-synuclein. Quantitative atomic force microscopy and nanomechanical investigations provide information on amyloid fibril polymorphism and on nanoscale mechanical properties of mature fibrillar species, while conventional optical and super-resolution imaging have yielded insights into the growth of fibrils and into the assembly of suprafibrillar structures. We thank the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology for support.

  13. The crowded environment of a reverse micelle induces the formation of β-strand seed structures for nucleating amyloid fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Priscilla S-W; Axelsen, Paul H

    2012-04-11

    A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of insoluble fibrils in the brain composed of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins with parallel in-register cross-β-sheet structure. It has been suggested that the aggregation of monomeric Aβ proteins into fibrils is promoted by "seeds" that form within compartments of the brain that have limited solvent due to macromolecular crowding. To characterize these seeds, a crowded macromolecular environment was mimicked by encapsulating Aβ40 monomers into reverse micelles. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that monomeric Aβ proteins form extended β-strands in reverse micelles, while an analogue with a scrambled sequence does not. This is a remarkable finding, because the formation of extended β-strands by monomeric Aβ proteins suggests a plausible mechanism whereby the formation of amyloid fibrils may be nucleated in the human brain. PMID:22448820

  14. Structural Transitions and Interactions in the Early Stages of Human Glucagon Amyloid Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S.; Ghomi, Hamed Tabatabaei; Lill, Markus A.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the intermolecular interactions and structural changes during fibrillation is crucial for the design of safe and efficacious glucagon formulations. Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis was used to identify the interactions and amino acids involved in the initial stages of glucagon fibril formation at acidic pH. Kinetic measurements from intrinsic and thioflavin T fluorescence showed sigmoidal behavior. Secondary structural measurement of fibrillating glucagon using far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy showed changes in structure from random coil → α-helix → β-sheet, with increase in α-helix content during the lag phase followed by increase in β-sheet content during the growth phase. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis of fibrillating glucagon suggested that C-terminal residues 22–29 are involved in interactions during the lag phase, during which N-terminal residues 1–6 showed no changes. Molecular dynamics simulations of glucagon fragments showed C-terminal to C-terminal interactions with greater α-helix content for the 20–29 fragment, with hydrophobic and aromatic residues (Phe-22, Trp-25, Val-23, and Met-27) predominantly involved. Overall, the study shows that glucagon interactions during the early phase of fibrillation are mediated through C-terminal residues, which facilitate the formation of α-helix-rich oligomers, which further undergo structural rearrangement and elongation to form β-sheet-rich mature fibrils. PMID:25692598

  15. Non-equilibrium nature of two-dimensional isotropic and nematic coexistence in amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Sophia; Isa, Lucio; Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional alignment of shape-anisotropic colloids is ubiquitous in nature, ranging from interfacial virus assembly to amyloid plaque formation. The principles governing two-dimensional self-assembly have therefore long been studied, both theoretically and experimentally, leading, however, to diverging fundamental interpretations on the nature of the two-dimensional isotropic-nematic phase transition. Here we employ single-molecule atomic force microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and passive probe particle tracking to study the adsorption and liquid crystalline ordering of semiflexible β-lactoglobulin fibrils at liquid interfaces. Fibrillar rigidity changes on increasing interfacial density, with a maximum caused by alignment and a subsequent decrease stemming from crowding and domain bending. Coexistence of nematic and isotropic regions is resolved and quantified by a length scale-dependent order parameter S(2D)(d). The nematic surface fraction increases with interfacial fibril density, but depends, for a fixed interfacial density, on the initial bulk concentration, ascribing the observed two-dimensional isotropic-nematic coexistence to non-equilibrium phenomena. PMID:23715276

  16. Non-equilibrium nature of two-dimensional isotropic and nematic coexistence in amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Sophia; Isa, Lucio; Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional alignment of shape-anisotropic colloids is ubiquitous in nature, ranging from interfacial virus assembly to amyloid plaque formation. The principles governing two-dimensional self-assembly have therefore long been studied, both theoretically and experimentally, leading, however, to diverging fundamental interpretations on the nature of the two-dimensional isotropic-nematic phase transition. Here we employ single-molecule atomic force microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and passive probe particle tracking to study the adsorption and liquid crystalline ordering of semiflexible β-lactoglobulin fibrils at liquid interfaces. Fibrillar rigidity changes on increasing interfacial density, with a maximum caused by alignment and a subsequent decrease stemming from crowding and domain bending. Coexistence of nematic and isotropic regions is resolved and quantified by a length scale-dependent order parameter S2D(d). The nematic surface fraction increases with interfacial fibril density, but depends, for a fixed interfacial density, on the initial bulk concentration, ascribing the observed two-dimensional isotropic-nematic coexistence to non-equilibrium phenomena.

  17. Few-layer bismuth selenides exfoliated by hemin inhibit amyloid-β1–42 fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jian; Xiong, Yunjing; Lin, Zhiqin; Sun, Liping; Weng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Inhibiting amyloid-β (Aβ) fibril formation is the primary therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. Several small molecules and nanomaterials have been used to inhibit Aβ fibril formation. However, insufficient inhibition efficiency or poor metabolization limits their further applications. Here, we used hemin to exfoliate few-layer Bi2Se3 in aqueous solution. Then we separated few-layer Bi2Se3 with different sizes and thicknesses by fractional centrifugation, and used them to attempt to inhibit Aβ1-42 aggregation. The results show that smaller and thinner few-layer Bi2Se3 had the highest inhibition efficiency. We further investigated the interaction between few-layer Bi2Se3 and Aβ1-42 monomers. The results indicate that the inhibition effect may be due to the high adsorption capacity of few-layer Bi2Se3 for Aβ1−42 monomers. Few-layer Bi2Se3 also decreased Aβ-mediated peroxidase-like activity and cytotoxicity according to in vitro neurotoxicity studies under physiological conditions. Therefore, our work shows the potential for applications of few-layer Bi2Se3 in the biomedical field. PMID:26018135

  18. Few-layer bismuth selenides exfoliated by hemin inhibit amyloid-β1-42 fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jian; Xiong, Yunjing; Lin, Zhiqin; Sun, Liping; Weng, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Inhibiting amyloid-β (Aβ) fibril formation is the primary therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. Several small molecules and nanomaterials have been used to inhibit Aβ fibril formation. However, insufficient inhibition efficiency or poor metabolization limits their further applications. Here, we used hemin to exfoliate few-layer Bi2Se3 in aqueous solution. Then we separated few-layer Bi2Se3 with different sizes and thicknesses by fractional centrifugation, and used them to attempt to inhibit Aβ1-42 aggregation. The results show that smaller and thinner few-layer Bi2Se3 had the highest inhibition efficiency. We further investigated the interaction between few-layer Bi2Se3 and Aβ1-42 monomers. The results indicate that the inhibition effect may be due to the high adsorption capacity of few-layer Bi2Se3 for Aβ1-42 monomers. Few-layer Bi2Se3 also decreased Aβ-mediated peroxidase-like activity and cytotoxicity according to in vitro neurotoxicity studies under physiological conditions. Therefore, our work shows the potential for applications of few-layer Bi2Se3 in the biomedical field.

  19. Structural Characterization of Fibrils from Recombinant Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide by Solid-State NMR: The Central FGAILS Segment Is Part of the β-Sheet Core.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Franziska; Gremer, Lothar; Mirecka, Ewa A; Schiefer, Stephanie; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Heise, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid deposits formed from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) are a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and are known to be cytotoxic to pancreatic β-cells. The molecular structure of the fibrillar form of IAPP is subject of intense research, and to date, different models exist. We present results of solid-state NMR experiments on fibrils of recombinantly expressed and uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled human IAPP in the non-amidated, free acid form. Complete sequential resonance assignments and resulting constraints on secondary structure are shown. A single set of chemical shifts is found for most residues, which is indicative of a high degree of homogeneity. The core region comprises three to four β-sheets. We find that the central 23-FGAILS-28 segment, which is of critical importance for amyloid formation, is part of the core region and forms a β-strand in our sample preparation. The eight N-terminal amino acid residues of IAPP, forming a ring-like structure due to a disulfide bridge between residues C2 and C7, appear to be well defined but with an increased degree of flexibility. This study supports the elucidation of the structural basis of IAPP amyloid formation and highlights the extent of amyloid fibril polymorphism. PMID:27607147

  20. Assembly of the fungal SC3 hydrophobin into functional amyloid fibrils depends on its concentration and is promoted by cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Scholtmeijer, Karin; de Vocht, Marcel L; Rink, Rick; Robillard, George T; Wösten, Han A B

    2009-09-25

    Class I hydrophobins function in fungal growth and development by self-assembling at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces into amyloid-like fibrils. SC3 of the mushroom-forming fungus Schizophyllum commune is the best studied class I hydrophobin. This protein spontaneously adopts the amyloid state at the water-air interface. In contrast, SC3 is arrested in an intermediate conformation at the interface between water and a hydrophobic solid such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; Teflon). This finding prompted us to study conditions that promote assembly of SC3 into amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that SC3 adopts the amyloid state at the water-PTFE interface at high concentration (300 microg ml(-1)) and prolonged incubation (16 h). Moreover, we show that amyloid formation at both the water-air and water-PTFE interfaces is promoted by the cell wall components schizophyllan (beta(1-3),beta(1-6)-glucan) and beta(1-3)-glucan. Hydrophobin concentration and cell wall polysaccharides thus contribute to the role of SC3 in formation of aerial hyphae and in hyphal attachment. PMID:19654326

  1. Differential effects of amyloid-beta 1-40 and 1-42 fibrils on 5-HT1A serotonin receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Verdurand, Mathieu; Chauveau, Fabien; Daoust, Alexia; Morel, Anne-Laure; Bonnefoi, Frédéric; Liger, François; Bérod, Anne; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Evidence accumulates suggesting a complex interplay between neurodegenerative processes and serotonergic neurotransmission. We have previously reported an overexpression of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT(1A)R) after intrahippocampal injections of amyloid-beta 1-40 (Aβ40) fibrils in rats. This serotonergic reactivity paralleled results from clinical positron emission tomography studies with [(18)F]MPPF revealing an overexpression of 5-HT(1A)R in the hippocampus of patients with mild cognitive impairment. Because Aβ40 and Aβ42 isoforms are found in amyloid plaques, we tested in this study the hypothesis of a peptide- and region-specific 5-HT(1A)R reactivity by injecting them, separately, into the hippocampus or striatum of rats. [(18)F]MPPF in vitro autoradiography revealed that Aβ40 fibrils, but not Aβ42, were triggering an overexpression of 5-HT(1A)R in the hippocampus and striatum of rat brains after 7 days. Immunohistochemical approaches targeting neuronal precursor cells, mature neurons, and astrocytes showed that Aβ42 fibrils caused more pathophysiological damages than Aβ40 fibrils. The mechanisms of Aβ40 fibrils-induced 5-HT(1A)R expression remains unknown, but hypotheses including neurogenesis, glial expression, and axonal sprouting are discussed. PMID:26973100

  2. Dissecting ion-specific from electrostatic salt effects on amyloid fibrillation: A case study of insulin.

    PubMed

    Kutsch, Miriam; Hortmann, Pascal; Herrmann, Christian; Weibels, Sebastian; Weingärtner, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    Diseases like Alzheimer, type II diabetes mellitus, and others go back to fibril formation of partially unfolded proteins. The impact of sodium, potassium, choline, guanidinium, and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride on the fibrillation kinetics of insulin in an acid-denaturing solvent environment is studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using thioflavin T as a fibril-specific stain. The fibrillation kinetics reveal a sigmoidal behavior, characterized by the lag time τlag and the maximum elongation rate k of the fibrils. Up to ionic strengths of about 70 mM, the elongation rate increases with salt concentration. This increase is nonspecific with regard to the salts. Below ionic strengths of ∼50 mM, it can be explained by a Debye-Hückel type model, indicating a dominant role of Coulomb interactions between the charged reactants and products screened by the ionic environment. At higher ionic strength, the elongation rates pass maxima, followed by a Hofmeister type ion-specific decrease. There is a correlation between the lag time τlag and the inverse elongation rate k, which can be described by a power law of the form τlag ∝  aτ(α) with a sublinear exponent α ≅ 1/2. PMID:26843409

  3. Structural Polymorphism of Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Fibrils as Controlled by an E22 Switch: A Solid-State NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Matthew R; Wang, Tuo; Nick, Mimi; Jo, Hyunil; Lemmin, Thomas; Prusiner, Stanley B; DeGrado, William F; Stöhr, Jan; Hong, Mei

    2016-08-10

    The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide of Alzheimer's disease (AD) forms polymorphic fibrils on the micrometer and molecular scales. Various fibril growth conditions have been identified to cause polymorphism, but the intrinsic amino acid sequence basis for this polymorphism has been unclear. Several single-site mutations in the center of the Aβ sequence cause different disease phenotypes and fibrillization properties. The E22G (Arctic) mutant is found in familial AD and forms protofibrils more rapidly than wild-type Aβ. Here, we use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the structure, dynamics, hydration and morphology of Arctic E22G Aβ40 fibrils. (13)C, (15)N-labeled synthetic E22G Aβ40 peptides are studied and compared with wild-type and Osaka E22Δ Aβ40 fibrils. Under the same fibrillization conditions, Arctic Aβ40 exhibits a high degree of polymorphism, showing at least four sets of NMR chemical shifts for various residues, while the Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils show a single or a predominant set of chemical shifts. Thus, structural polymorphism is intrinsic to the Arctic E22G Aβ40 sequence. Chemical shifts and inter-residue contacts obtained from 2D correlation spectra indicate that one of the major Arctic conformers has surprisingly high structural similarity with wild-type Aβ42. (13)C-(1)H dipolar order parameters, (1)H rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and water-to-protein spin diffusion experiments reveal substantial differences in the dynamics and hydration of Arctic, Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils. Together, these results strongly suggest that electrostatic interactions in the center of the Aβ peptide sequence play a crucial role in the three-dimensional fold of the fibrils, and by inference, fibril-induced neuronal toxicity and AD pathogenesis. PMID:27414264

  4. The formation, function and regulation of amyloids: insights from structural biology.

    PubMed

    Landreh, M; Sawaya, M R; Hipp, M S; Eisenberg, D S; Wüthrich, K; Hartl, F U

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the accumulation of insoluble, β-strand-rich aggregates. The underlying structural conversions are closely associated with cellular toxicity, but can also drive the formation of functional protein assemblies. In recent years, studies in the field of structural studies have revealed astonishing insights into the origins, mechanisms and implications of amyloid formation. Notably, high-resolution crystal structures of peptides in amyloid-like fibrils and prefibrillar oligomers have become available despite their challenging chemical nature. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has revealed that dynamic local polymorphisms in the benign form of the prion protein affect the transformation into amyloid fibrils and the transmissibility of prion diseases. Studies of the structures and interactions of chaperone proteins help us to understand how the cellular proteostasis network is able to recognize different stages of aberrant protein folding and prevent aggregation. In this review, we will focus on recent developments that connect the different aspects of amyloid biology and discuss how understanding the process of amyloid formation and the associated defence mechanisms can reveal targets for pharmacological intervention that may become the first steps towards clinically viable treatment strategies. PMID:27237473

  5. Wildlife sequences of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) identify critical species variants for fibrillization.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jessica S; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid can be detected in the islets of Langerhans in a majority of type 2 diabetic patients. These deposits have been associated with β-cell death, thereby furthering diabetes progression. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) amyloidogenicity is quite variable among animal species, and studying this variability could further our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the aggregation process. Thus, the general aim of this study was to identify IAPP isoforms in different animal species and characterize their propensity to form fibrillar aggregates. A library of 23 peptides (fragment 8-32) was designed to study the amyloid formation using in silico analysis and in vitro assays. Amyloid formation was impeded when the NFLVH motif found in segment 8-20 was substituted by DFLGR or KFLIR segments. A 29P, 14K and 18R substitution were often present in non-amyloidogenic sequences. Non-amyloidogenic sequences were obtained from Leontopithecus rosalia, Tursiops truncatus and Vicugna pacos. Fragment peptides from 34 species were amyloidogenic. To conclude, this project advances our knowledge on the comparative pathogenesis of amyloidosis in type II diabetes. It is conceivable that the additional information gained may help point towards new therapeutic strategies for diabetes patients. PMID:26300107

  6. Suppression of amyloid fibrils using the GroEL apical domain

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Bimlesh; Fukui, Naoya; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In E. coli cells, rescue of non-native proteins and promotion of native state structure is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL. An important key to this activity lies in the structure of the apical domain of GroEL (GroEL-AD) (residue 191–376), which recognizes and binds non-native protein molecules through hydrophobic interactions. In this study, we investigated the effects of GroEL-AD on the aggregation of various client proteins (α-Synuclein, Aβ42, and GroES) that lead to the formation of distinct protein fibrils in vitro. We found that GroEL-AD effectively inhibited the fibril formation of these three proteins when added at concentrations above a critical threshold; the specific ratio differed for each client protein, reflecting the relative affinities. The effect of GroEL-AD in all three cases was to decrease the concentration of aggregate-forming unfolded client protein or its early intermediates in solution, thereby preventing aggregation and fibrillation. Binding affinity assays revealed some differences in the binding mechanisms of GroEL-AD toward each client. Our findings suggest a possible applicability of this minimal functioning derivative of the chaperonins (the “minichaperones”) as protein fibrillation modulators and detectors. PMID:27488469

  7. Structural and Material Properties of Amyloid Aβ40/42 Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Dong, Mingyan; Paul, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Zachary; Chan, Kwaichow; Hu, Dingkun; Ai, Hongqi; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2016-08-18

    In this study, structural and mechanical properties of a series of models of Aβ42 (one- and two-fold) and Aβ40 (two- and three-fold) fibrils have been computed by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Based on calculations of the twist angle (θ) and periodicity (v=360d/θ), oligomers formed by 20, 11, and 13 monomers were found to be the smallest realistic models of three-fold Aβ40 , one-fold Aβ42 , and two-fold Aβ42 fibrils, respectively. Our results predict that the Aβ40 fibrils initially exist in two staggered conformations [STAG(+2) and STAG(+1)] and then undergo a [STAG(+2)→STAG(+1)] transformation in a size-dependent manner. The length of the loop region consisting of the residues 23-29 shrinks with the elongation of both Aβ40 and Aβ42 fibrils. A comparison of the computed potential energy suggests that a two-fold Aβ40 aggregate is more stable than its three-fold counterpart, and that Aβ42 oligomers can exist only in one-fold conformation for aggregates of more than 11 monomers in length. The computed Young's modulus and yield strengths of 50 GPa and 0.95 GPa, respectively, show that these aggregates possess excellent material properties. PMID:27146076

  8. Suppression of amyloid fibrils using the GroEL apical domain.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Bimlesh; Fukui, Naoya; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In E. coli cells, rescue of non-native proteins and promotion of native state structure is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL. An important key to this activity lies in the structure of the apical domain of GroEL (GroEL-AD) (residue 191-376), which recognizes and binds non-native protein molecules through hydrophobic interactions. In this study, we investigated the effects of GroEL-AD on the aggregation of various client proteins (α-Synuclein, Aβ42, and GroES) that lead to the formation of distinct protein fibrils in vitro. We found that GroEL-AD effectively inhibited the fibril formation of these three proteins when added at concentrations above a critical threshold; the specific ratio differed for each client protein, reflecting the relative affinities. The effect of GroEL-AD in all three cases was to decrease the concentration of aggregate-forming unfolded client protein or its early intermediates in solution, thereby preventing aggregation and fibrillation. Binding affinity assays revealed some differences in the binding mechanisms of GroEL-AD toward each client. Our findings suggest a possible applicability of this minimal functioning derivative of the chaperonins (the "minichaperones") as protein fibrillation modulators and detectors. PMID:27488469

  9. Impaired processing of human pro-islet amyloid polypeptide is not a causative factor for fibril formation or membrane damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Khemtémourian, Lucie; Lahoz Casarramona, Gemma; Suylen, Dennis P L; Hackeng, Tilman M; Meeldijk, Johannes D; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2009-11-24

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) forms amyloid fibrils in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). hIAPP is synthesized by islet beta-cells initially as a preprohormone, processing of which occurs in several steps. It has been suggested that in DM2 this processing is defective and that aggregation of the processing intermediates prohIAPP and prohIAPP(1-48) may represent the initial step in formation of islet amyloid. Here we investigate this possibility by analyzing the aggregation, the structure, and the membrane interaction of mature hIAPP and its precursors, prohIAPP and prohIAPP(1-48), in vitro. Our data reveal that both precursors form amyloid fibrils in solution but not in the presence of membranes. This inhibition is in contrast to the catalyzing effect of membranes on fibril formation of mature hIAPP. Importantly, in the presence of membranes, both precursors are able to inhibit fibrillogenesis of mature hIAPP. These differences in behavior between mature hIAPP and its precursors are most likely related to differences in their mode of membrane insertion. Both precursors insert efficiently and adopt an alpha-helical structure even with a high lipid/peptide ratio, while mature hIAPP rapidly adopts a beta-sheet conformation. Furthermore, while mature hIAPP affects the barrier properties of lipid vesicles, neither of the precursors is able to induce membrane leakage. Our study suggests that the hIAPP precursors prohIAPP and prohIAPP(1-48) do not serve as amyloid initiators but rather prevent aggregation and membrane damage of mature hIAPP in early stages of its biosynthesis and intracellular transport. PMID:19817482

  10. Residue-specific, real-time characterization of lag-phase species and fibril growth during amyloid formation: a combined fluorescence and IR study of p-cyanophenylalanine analogs of islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Marek, Peter; Mukherjee, Sudipta; Zanni, Martin T; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2010-07-23

    Amyloid formation normally exhibits a lag phase followed by a growth phase, which leads to amyloid fibrils. Characterization of the species populated during the lag phase is experimentally challenging, but is critical since the most toxic entities may be pre-fibrillar species. p-Cyanophenylalanine (F(C[triple bond]N)) fluorescence is used to probe the nature of lag-phase species populated during the formation of amyloid by human islet amyloid polypeptide. The polypeptide contains two phenylalanines at positions 15 and 23 and a single tyrosine located at the C-terminus. Each aromatic residue was separately replaced by F(C[triple bond]N). The substitutions do not perturb amyloid formation relative to wild-type islet amyloid polypeptide as detected using thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy. F(C[triple bond]N) fluorescence is high when the cyano group is hydrogen bonded and low when it is not. It can also be quenched via Förster resonance energy transfer to tyrosine. Fluorescence intensity was monitored in real time and revealed that all three positions remained exposed to solvent during the lag phase but less exposed than unstructured model peptides. The time course of amyloid formation as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence and F(C[triple bond]N) fluorescence is virtually identical. Fluorescence quenching experiments confirmed that each residue remains exposed during the lag phase. These results place significant constraints on the nature of intermediates that are populated during the lag phase and indicate that significant sequestering of the aromatic side chains does not occur until beta-structure sufficient to bind thioflavin T has developed. Seeding studies and analysis of maximum rates confirm that sequestering of the cyano groups occurs concomitantly with the development of thioflavin T binding capability. Overall, the process of amyloid formation and growth appears to be remarkably homogenous in terms of side-chain ordering. F(C[triple bond

  11. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. PMID:25452000

  12. Capsaicin-Coated Silver Nanoparticles Inhibit Amyloid Fibril Formation of Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Anand, Bibin G; Dubey, Kriti; Shekhawat, Dolat Singh; Kar, Karunakar

    2016-06-21

    We have synthesized capsaicin-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs(Cap)) and have tested their anti-amyloid activity, considering serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. We found that amyloid formation of BSA was strongly suppressed in the presence of AgNPs(Cap). However, isolated capsaicin and uncapped control nanoparticles did not show such an inhibition effect. Bioinformatics analysis reveals CH-π and H-bonding interactions between capsaicin and BSA in the formation of the protein-ligand complex. These results suggest the significance of surface functionalization of nanoparticles with capsaicin, which probably allows capsaicin to effectively interact with the key residues of the amyloidogenic core of BSA. PMID:27243335

  13. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  14. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  15. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  16. Radiating Amyloid Fibril Formation on the Surface of Lipid Membranes through Unit-Assembly of Oligomeric Species of α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Hong, Chul-Suk; Lee, Soonkoo; Yang, Jee-Eun; Park, Yong Il; Lee, Daekyun; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Jung, Seunho; Paik, Seung R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lewy body in the substantia nigra is a cardinal pathological feature of Parkinson's disease. Despite enormous efforts, the cause-and-effect relationship between Lewy body formation and the disorder is yet to be explicitly unveiled. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we showed that radiating amyloid fibrils (RAFs) were instantly developed on the surface of synthetic lipid membranes from the β-sheet free oligomeric species of α-synuclein through a unit-assembly process. The burgeoning RAFs were successfully matured by feeding them with additional oligomers, which led to concomitant dramatic shrinkage and disintegration of the membranes by pulling off lipid molecules to the extending fibrils. Mitochondria and lysosomes were demonstrated to be disrupted by the oligomeric α-synuclein via membrane-dependent fibril formation. Conclusion The physical structure formation of amyloid fibrils, therefore, could be considered as detrimental to the cells by affecting membrane integrity of the intracellular organelles, which might be a molecular cause for the neuronal degeneration observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23077644

  17. A-type dimeric epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a more potent inhibitor against the formation of insulin amyloid fibril than EGCG monomer.

    PubMed

    Nie, Rong-Zu; Zhu, Wei; Peng, Jin-Ming; Ge, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Chun-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Because fibrillary protein aggregates is regarded to be closely associated with many diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease, growing interest and researches have been focused on finding potential fibrillation inhibitors. In the present study, the inhibitory effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and A-type dimeric epigallocatechin-3-gallate (A-type EGCG dimer) on the formation of insulin fibrillation were compared by multi-dimensional approaches including thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic (ANS) fluorescence assay, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Our results confirmed that A-type EGCG dimer is a more potent inhibitor against the formation of bovine insulin amyloid fibril than EGCG. In addition, A-type EGCG dimer could not only inhibit insulin amyloid fibril formation, but also change the aggregation pathway and induce bovine insulin into amorphous aggregates. The results of the present study may provide a new guide on finding novel anti-amyloidogenic agents. PMID:27079519

  18. A sequential assignment procedure for proteins that have intermediate line widths in MAS NMR spectra: amyloid fibrils of human CA150.WW2.

    PubMed

    Becker, Johanna; Ferguson, Neil; Flinders, Jeremy; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Fersht, Alan R; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2008-08-11

    The second WW domain (WW2) of CA150, a human transcriptional activator, forms amyloid fibrils in vitro under physiological conditions. Based on experimental constraints from MAS NMR spectroscopy experiments, alanine scanning and electron microscopy, a structural model of CA150.WW2 amyloid fibrils was calculated earlier. Here, the assignment strategy is presented and suggested as a general approach for proteins that show intermediate line width. The (13)C,(13)C correlation experiments were recorded on fully or partially (13)C-labelled fibrils. The earlier (13)C assignment (26 residues) was extended to 34 of the 40 residues by direct (13)C-excitation experiments by using a deuterated sample that showed strongly improved line width. A 3D HNC-TEDOR (transferred-echo double-resonance) experiment with deuterated CA150.WW2 fibrils yielded 14 amide nitrogen and proton resonance assignments. The obtained chemical shifts were compared with the chemical shifts determined with the natively folded WW domain. TALOS (Torsion angle likelihood obtained from shift and sequence similarity) predictions confirmed that, under physiological conditions, the fibrillar form of CA150.WW2 adopts a significantly different beta structure than the native WW-domain fold. PMID:18642254

  19. Solid-state NMR sequential assignment of Osaka-mutant amyloid-beta (Aβ1-40 E22Δ) fibrils.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Oxana Yu; Schütz, Anne K; Glockshuber, Rudi; Meier, Beat H; Böckmann, Anja

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ), a peptide of 39-43 residues length, into insoluble fibrils is considered to initiate the disease. Determination of the molecular structure of Aβ fibrils is technically challenging and is a significant goal in AD research that may lead to design of effective therapeutical inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. Here, we present chemical-shift assignments for fibrils formed by highly pure recombinant Aβ1-40 with the Osaka E22Δ mutation that is found in familial AD. We show that that all regions of the peptide are rigid, including the N-terminal part often believed to be flexible in Aβ wt. PMID:24395155

  20. Deacylated Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-C Transforms From α-Helical to Amyloid Fibril Structure via a pH-Dependent Mechanism: An Infrared Structural Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Dluhy, Richard A.; Shanmukh, Saratchandra; Leapard, J. Brian; Krüger, Peter; Baatz, John E.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a hydrophobic, α-helical membrane-associated lipoprotein in which cysteines C4 and C5 are acylated with palmitoyl chains. Recently, it has been found that the α-helix form of SP-C is metastable, and under certain circumstances may transform from an α-helix to a β-strand conformation that resembles amyloid fibrils. This transformation is accelerated when the protein is in its deacylated form (dSP-C). We have used infrared spectroscopy to study the structure of dSP-C in solution and at membrane interfaces. Our results show that dSP-C transforms from an α-helical to a β-type amyloid fibril structure via a pH-dependent mechanism. In solution at low pH, dSP-C is α-helical in nature, but converts to an amyloid fibril structure composed of short β-strands or β-hairpins at neutral pH. The α-helix structure of dSP-C is fully recoverable from the amyloid β-structure when the pH is once again lowered. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy of lipid-protein monomolecular films showed that the fibril β-form of dSP-C is not surface-associated at the air-water interface. In addition, the lipid-associated α-helix form of dSP-C is only retained at the surface at low surface pressures and dissociates from the membrane at higher surface pressures. In situ polarization modulation infrared spectroscopy of protein and lipid-protein monolayers at the air-water interface confirmed that the residual dSP-C helix conformation observed in the attenuated total reflectance infrared spectra of transferred films is randomly or isotropically oriented before exclusion from the membrane interface. This work identifies pH as one of the mechanistic causes of amyloid fibril formation for dSP-C, and a possible contributor to the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:14507705

  1. Size Effect of Graphene Oxide on Modulating Amyloid Peptide Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cao, Yunpeng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-06-26

    Protein misfolding and abnormal assembly could lead to aggregates such as oligomer, proto-fibril, mature fibril, and senior amyloid plaques, which are associated with the pathogenesis of many amyloid diseases. These irreversible amyloid aggregates typically form in vivo and researchers have been endeavoring to find new modulators to invert the aggregation propensity in vitro, which could increase understanding in the mechanism of the aggregation of amyloid protein and pave the way to potential clinical treatment. Graphene oxide (GO) was shown to be a good modulator, which could strongly control the amyloidosis of Aβ (33-42). In particular, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements revealed the size-dependent manner of GO on modulating the assembly of amyloid peptides, which could be a possible way to regulate the self-assembled nanostructure of amyloid peptide in a predictable manner. PMID:26031933

  2. Fluorescence molecular probes for sensitive point detection of amyloid fibrils and protofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Mikael; Jonsson, Per; Sörgjerd, Karin; Hammarström, Per

    2005-10-01

    Protein based infections such as prion diseases have lately attracted a large amount of interest, primarily due to the Mad Cow Epidemic in Great Britain, and the increase of Alzheimer's disease and related diseases in the ageing Western society. Infective proteins are very stable and almost untraceable prior to infection making them ideal as biological weapons. Particularly if the used agent is of human origin, the immunoresponse can be avoided, leaving no trace of the infectious agent. The transient nature of infectious oligomeric intermediates of misfolded proteins or peptide fragments that later matures into fibrillar aggregates makes them hard to study, and methods to detect and study these species are sparse. There exist a number of fluorescent probes that bind specifically to protein amyloidic structures. Thioflavins (ThT, ThS), Congo and Nile red, 4-(dicyanovinyl)-julolidine (DCVJ), as well as derivatives amino-8-naphtalene sulphonate (ANS, Bis-ANS) which are known to bind to the fibrillar or pre-fibrillar states with dissociation constants of typically 1 - 20 μM. Here, transthyretin (TTR), insulin and lysozyme were used as model proteins to detect different amyloid precursor states for diseases such as senile systemic amyloidosis, familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) and iatrogenic amyloidosis. Specifically, the probes were employed in static assays to characterize protofibrillar and mature amyloid fibrillar states using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. Particularly, we investigate and report on the possibility to detect protofibrillar states at low concentration levels using modern fluorescence array detector systems in conjunction with lasers operating in the blue or ultraviolett wavelengths as excitation source. Results of ANS, ThT and a ThT analogue (abbreviated ThC) are discussed.

  3. High Membrane Curvature Enhances Binding, Conformational Changes, and Fibrillation of Amyloid-β on Lipid Bilayer Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yuuki; Ikeda, Keisuke; Nakano, Minoru

    2015-10-27

    Aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein and the formation of toxic aggregates are the possible pathogenic pathways in Alzheimer's disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that lipid membranes play key roles in protein aggregation, although the intermolecular forces that drive the interactions between Aβ-(1-40) and the membranes vary in different membrane systems. Here, we observed that a high positive curvature of lipid vesicles with diameters of ∼30 nm enhanced the association of Aβ with anionic phosphatidylglycerol membranes in the liquid-crystalline phase and with zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine membranes in the gel phase. The binding modes of Aβ to these membranes differ in terms of the location of the protein on the membrane and of the protein secondary structure. The fibrillation of Aβ was accelerated in the presence of the vesicles and at high protein-to-lipid ratios. Under these conditions, the protein accumulated on the surfaces, as demonstrated by a high (10(7) M(-1)) binding constant. Our findings suggest that packing defects on membranes with high curvatures, such as the intraluminal vesicles in multivesicular bodies and the exosomes, might result in the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates. PMID:26474149

  4. α-Synuclein and huntingtin exon 1 amyloid fibrils bind laterally to the cellular membrane

    PubMed Central

    Monsellier, Elodie; Bousset, Luc; Melki, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Fibrillar aggregates involved in neurodegenerative diseases have the ability to spread from one cell to another in a prion-like manner. The underlying molecular mechanisms, in particular the binding mode of the fibrils to cell membranes, are poorly understood. In this work we decipher the modality by which aggregates bind to the cellular membrane, one of the obligatory steps of the propagation cycle. By characterizing the binding properties of aggregates made of α-synuclein or huntingtin exon 1 protein displaying similar composition and structure but different lengths to mammalian cells we demonstrate that in both cases aggregates bind laterally to the cellular membrane, with aggregates extremities displaying little or no role in membrane binding. Lateral binding to artificial liposomes was also observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition we show that although α-synuclein and huntingtin exon 1 fibrils bind both laterally to the cellular membrane, their mechanisms of interaction differ. Our findings have important implications for the development of future therapeutic tools that aim to block protein aggregates propagation in the brain. PMID:26757959

  5. Atomic force fluorescence microscopy in the characterization of amyloid fibril assembly and oligomeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogeneity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  6. Atomic Force Fluorescence Microscopy in the Characterization of Amyloid Fibril Assembly and Oligomeric Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogencity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  7. Synthesis of fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents for amyloid-beta fibrils detection and removal by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-09-01

    Early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before the onset of marked clinical symptoms, is critical in preventing the irreversible neuronal damage that eventually leads to dementia and ultimately death. Therefore, there is an urgent need for in vivo imaging agents, which are valuable as specific biomarkers to demonstrate the location and density of amyloid plaques in the living human brain. The present manuscript describes a novel method for selective marking of Abeta(40) fibrils by non-fluorescent gamma-Fe(2)O(3) and fluorescent-magnetic gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-rhodamine or gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-Congo red nanoparticles, and the complete removal of the magnetized fibrils from the aqueous continuous phase by a magnetic field. These fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents have a great advantage due to the combination of the magnetic and fluorescence imaging into one nanostructured system. This hybrid system, which selectively marks Abeta(40) fibrils, might enable the early detection of plaques using both MRI and fluorescence microscopy, and therefore may be applied in in vivo AD diagnosis studies. These fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles may also be useful as selective biomarkers to detect the location and the removal of other amyloid plaques derived from different amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow, and prion diseases. PMID:19559008

  8. Multifunctional cholinesterase and amyloid Beta fibrillization modulators. Synthesis and biological investigation.

    PubMed

    Butini, Stefania; Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Maramai, Samuele; Guarino, Egeria; Panico, Alessandro; Saxena, Ashima; Chauhan, Ved; Colombo, Raffaella; Verga, Laura; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    In order to identify novel Alzheimer's modifying pharmacological tools, we developed bis-tacrines bearing a peptide moiety for specific interference with surface sites of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) binding amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accordingly, compounds 2a-c proved to be inhibitors of hAChE catalytic and noncatalytic functions, binding the catalytic and peripheral sites, interfering with Aβ aggregation and with the Aβ self-oligomerization process (2a). Compounds 2a-c in complex with TcAChE span the gorge with the bis-tacrine system, and the peptide moieties bulge outside the gorge in proximity of the peripheral site. These moieties are likely responsible for the observed reduction of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation since they physically hamper Aβ binding to the enzyme surface. Moreover, 2a was able to significantly interfere with Aβ self-oligomerization, while 2b,c showed improved inhibition of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation. PMID:24900626

  9. Steady-state and time-resolved Thioflavin-T fluorescence can report on morphological differences in amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, David J.; Wranne, Moa S.; Gilbert Gatty, Mélina; Westerlund, Fredrik; Esbjörner, Elin K.

    2015-03-06

    Thioflavin-T (ThT) is one of the most commonly used dyes for amyloid detection, but the origin of its fluorescence enhancement is not fully understood. Herein we have characterised the ThT fluorescence response upon binding to the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) variants of the Alzheimer's-related peptide amyloid-β, in order to explore how the photophysical properties of this dye relates to structural and morphological properties of two amyloid fibril types formed by peptides with a high degree of sequence homology. We show that the steady-state ThT fluorescence is 1.7 times more intense with Aβ(1-40) compared to Aβ(1-42) fibrils in concentration matched samples prepared under quiescent conditions. By measuring the excited state lifetime of bound ThT, we also demonstrate a distinct difference between the two fibril isoforms, with Aβ(1-42) fibrils producing a longer ThT fluorescence lifetime compared to Aβ(1-40). The substantial steady-state intensity difference is therefore not explained by differences in fluorescence quantum yield. Further, we find that the ThT fluorescence intensity, but not the fluorescence lifetime, is dependent on the fibril preparation method (quiescent versus agitated conditions). We therefore propose that the fluorescence lifetime is inherent to each isoform and sensitively reports on fibril microstructure in the protofilament whereas the total fluorescence intensity relates to the amount of exposed β-sheet in the mature Aβ fibrils and hence to differences in their morphology. Our results highlight the complexity of ThT fluorescence, and demonstrate its extended use in amyloid fibril characterisation. - Highlights: • ThT emission is more intense with Aβ(1-40) fibrils than with Aβ(1-42) fibrils. • Aβ(1-42) fibrils induce longer ThT fluorescence lifetimes and higher quantum yield. • ThT emission intensity in Aβ fibril samples reports on fibril morphology. • The ThT fluorescence lifetime is a characteristic feature of each A

  10. Hsp40 interacts directly with the native state of the yeast prion protein Ure2 and inhibits formation of amyloid-like fibrils.

    PubMed

    Lian, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Zai-Rong; Loovers, Harriët M; Jones, Gary W; Rowling, Pamela J E; Itzhaki, Laura S; Zhou, Jun-Mei; Perrett, Sarah

    2007-04-20

    Ure2 is the protein determinant of the [URE3] prion phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and consists of a flexible N-terminal prion-determining domain and a globular C-terminal glutathione transferase-like domain. Overexpression of the type I Hsp40 member Ydj1 in yeast cells has been found to result in the loss of [URE3]. However, the mechanism of prion curing by Ydj1 remains unclear. Here we tested the effect of overexpression of Hsp40 members Ydj1, Sis1, and Apj1 and also Hsp70 co-chaperones Cpr7, Cns1, Sti1, and Fes1 in vivo and found that only Ydj1 showed a strong curing effect on [URE3]. We also investigated the interaction of Ydj1 with Ure2 in vitro. We found that Ydj1 was able to suppress formation of amyloid-like fibrils of Ure2 by delaying the process of fibril formation, as monitored by thioflavin T binding and atomic force microscopy imaging. Controls using bovine serum albumin, Sis1, or the human Hsp40 homologues Hdj1 or Hdj2 showed no significant inhibitory effect. Ydj1 was only effective when added during the lag phase of fibril formation, suggesting that it interacts with Ure2 at an early stage in fibril formation and delays the nucleation process. Using surface plasmon resonance and size exclusion chromatography, we demonstrated a direct interaction between Ydj1 and both wild type and N-terminally truncated Ure2. In contrast, Hdj2, which did not suppress fibril formation, did not show this interaction. The results suggest that Ydj1 inhibits Ure2 fibril formation by binding to the native state of Ure2, thus delaying the onset of oligomerization. PMID:17324933

  11. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation of human amylin by N-alkylated amino acid and alpha-hydroxy acid residue containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Rijkers, Dirk T S; Höppener, Jo W M; Posthuma, George; Lips, Cornelis J M; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-09-16

    Amyloid deposits are formed as a result of uncontrolled aggregation of (poly)peptides or proteins. Today several diseases are known, for example Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease, in which amyloid formation is involved. Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of beta-pleated sheets and here a general method is described to introduce molecular mutations in order to achieve disruption of beta-sheet formation. Eight backbone-modified amylin derivatives, an amyloidogenic peptide involved in maturity onset diabetes, were synthesized. Their beta-sheet forming properties were studied by IR spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Modification of a crucial amide NH by an alkyl chain led to a complete loss of the beta-sheet forming capacity of amylin. The resulting molecular mutated amylin derivative could be used to break the beta-sheet thus retarding beta-sheet formation of unmodified amylin. Moreover, it was found that the replacement of this amide bond by an ester moiety suppressed fibrillogenesis significantly. Introduction of N-alkylated amino acids and/or ester functionalities-leading to depsipeptides-into amyloidogenic peptides opens new avenues towards novel peptidic beta-sheet breakers for inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation. PMID:12298020

  12. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  13. Polymorphic C-terminal β-Sheet Interactions Determine the Formation of Fibril or Amyloid β-derived Diffusible Ligand-like Globulomer for the Alzheimer Aβ42 Dodecamer*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between amyloid deposition and cellular toxicity is still controversial. In addition to fibril-forming oligomers, other soluble Aβ forms (amyloid β-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs)) were also suggested to form and to present different morphologies and mechanisms of toxicity. One ADDL type, the “globulomer,” apparently forms independently of the fibril aggregation pathway. Even though many studies argue that such soluble Aβ oligomers are off fibril formation pathways, they may nonetheless share some structural similarity with protofibrils. NMR data of globulomer intermediates, “preglobulomers,” suggested parallel in-register C-terminal β-sheets, with different N-terminal conformations. Based on experimental data, we computationally investigate four classes of Aβ dodecamers: fibril, fibril oligomer, prefibril/preglobulomer cluster, and globulomer models. Our simulations of the solvent protection of double-layered fibril and globulomer models reproduce experimental observations. Using a single layer Aβ fibril oligomer β-sheet model, we found that the C-terminal β-sheet in the fibril oligomer is mostly curved, preventing it from quickly forming a fibril and leading to its breaking into shorter pieces. The simulations also indicate that β-sheets packed orthogonally could be the most stable species for Aβ dodecamers. The major difference between fibril-forming oligomers and ADDL-like oligomers (globulomers) could be the exposure of Met-35 patches. Although the Met-35 patches are necessarily exposed in fibril-forming oligomers to allow their maturation into fibrils, the Met-35 patches in the globulomer are covered by other residues in the orthogonally packed Aβ peptides. Our results call attention to the possible existence of certain “critical intermediates” that can lead to both seeds and other soluble ADDL-like oligomers. PMID:20847046

  14. Interaction of the ginsenosides with κ-casein and their effects on amyloid fibril formation by the protein: Multi-spectroscopic approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fanbo; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Miao; Yin, Jianyuan; Meng, Qin; Bu, Fengquan; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Jihua

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of the ginsenosides (GS) including ginsenoside Rg1, Rb1 and Re with κ-casein and the effects of GS inhibiting amyloid fibril formation by κ-casein have been investigated in vitro by fluorescence and ultraviolet spectra. Results showed that Rg1 and Rb1 had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on reduced and carboxymethylated κ-casein (RCMκ-CN) fibril formation, while Re resulted in an increase in the rate of fibril formation. The enhancement in RLS intensity was attributed to the formation of new complex between GS and RCMκ-CN, and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were assayed. The steady-state ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra had also been tested to observe if the ground-state complex formed, and it showed the same result as RLS spectra. The binding constants and the number of binding sites between GS and RCMκ-CN at different temperatures had been evaluated from relevant fluorescence data. According to the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the binding distance between RCMκ-CN and GS was calculated. The fluorescence lifetime of RCMκ-CN was longer in the presence of GS than in absence of GS, which was evident that the hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the binding of GS to RCMκ-CN. From the results of synchronous fluorescence, it could be deduced that the polarity around RCMκ-CN Trp97 residue decreased and the hydrophobicity increased after addition of Rg1 or Rb1. Based on all the above results, it is explained that Rg1 and Rb1 inhibited amyloid fibril formation by κ-casein because the molecular spatial conformation and physical property of κ-casein changed causing by the complex formation between GS and κ-casein. PMID:27163725

  15. Specific chaperones and regulatory domains in control of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-10-30

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  16. Expression of recombinant human serum amyloid A in mammalian cells and demonstration of the region necessary for high-density lipoprotein binding and amyloid fibril formation by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, H; Bramall, J; Waters, H; De Beer, M C; Woo, P

    1996-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of the acute-phase human serum amyloid A (SAA1 alpha) protein was used to evaluate the importance of the N-terminal amino acid residues, namely RSFFSFLGEAF The full-length cDNA clone of SAA1 alpha (pA1.mod.) was used to create two mutations, namely Gly-8 to Asp-8 and an 11 amino acid truncation between Arg-1 and Phe-11 respectively. Wild-type and mutant cDNAs were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells under the control of the human cytomegalovirus promoter, which resulted in the secretion of the processed proteins into the culture media. Wild-type recombinant human SAA (rSAA) protein was shown to have pI values of 6.0 and 6.4, similar to the human SAA isoform SAA1 alpha and SAA1 alpha desArg found in acute-phase plasma. N-terminal sequencing of 56 residues confirmed its identity with human SAA1 alpha. The total yield of wild-type rSAA measured by ELISA was between 3.5 and 30 mg/l. The two mutations resulted in reduced expression levels of the mutant SAA proteins (3-10 mg/l). Further measurements of rSAA concentration in lipid fractions of culture medium collected at a density of 1.21 g/ml (high-density liporotein; HDL) and 1.063-1.18 g/ml (very-low-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein; VLDL/LDL) showed that 76% of the wild-type protein was found in the HDL fraction and the remaining 24% in the infranatant non-lipid fraction. In contrast the relative concentration of mutant rSAA in HDL and infranatant fractions was reversed. This is consistent with the previously proposed involvement of the 11 amino acid peptide in anchoring. SAA protein on to HDL3 [Turnell, Sarra, Glover, Baum, Caspi, Baltz and Pepys (1986) Mol. Biol. Med. 3, 387-407]. Wild-type rSAA protein was shown to from amyloid fibrils in vitro under acidic conditions as shown by electron microscopy, and stained positive with Congo Red and exhibited apple-green birefringence when viewed under polarized light. Under the same conditions mutSAA(G8D) and mutSAA delta 1

  17. Plasticity of amyloid fibrils†

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Ronald; Shivaprasad, Shankaramma; Williams, Angela D.

    2008-01-01

    In experiments designed to characterize the basis of amyloid fibril stability through mutational analysis of the Aβ(1-40) molecule, fibrils exhibit consistent, significant structural malleability. In these results, and in other properties, amyloid fibrils appear to more resemble plastic materials generated from synthetic polymers than they do globular proteins. Thus, like synthetic polymers and plastics, amyloid fibrils exhibit both polymorphism, the ability of one polypeptide to form aggregates of different morphologies, and isomorphism, the ability of different polypeptides to grow into a fibrillar amyloid morphology. This view links amyloid with the prehistorical and 20th Century use of proteins as starting materials to make films, fibers, and plastics, and with the classic protein fiber stretching experiments of the Astbury group. Viewing amyloid from the point of view of the polymer chemist may shed new light on issues such as the role of protofibrils in the mechanism of amyloid formation, the biological potency of fibrils, and the prospects for discovering inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:17198370

  18. Essential role of Pro 74 in stefin B amyloid-fibril formation: dual action of cyclophilin A on the process.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Aida; Berbić, Selma; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia; Tusek-Znidaric, Magda; Taler, Ajda; Jenko-Kokalj, Sasa; Turk, Dusan; Zerovnik, Eva

    2009-04-01

    We report that Pro74 in human stefin B is critical for fibril formation and that proline isomerization plays an important role. The stefin B P74S mutant did not fibrillate over the time of observation at 25 degrees C, and it exhibited a prolonged lag phase at 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. The peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase cyclophilin A, when added to the wild-type protein, exerted two effects: it prolonged the lag phase and increased the yield and length of the fibrils. Addition of the inactive cyclophilin A R55A variant still resulted in a prolonged lag phase but did not mediate the increase of the final fibril yield. These results demonstrate that peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerism is rate-limiting in stefin B fibril formation. PMID:19265692

  19. Two Distinct Amyloid β-Protein (Aβ) Assembly Pathways Leading to Oligomers and Fibrils Identified by Combined Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Morphology, and Toxicity Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Satoko; Shinoda, Keiko; Yamada, Mayumi; Yokojima, Satoshi; Inoue, Masafumi; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Shimada, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Masui, Dai; Hashimoto, Shigeki; Sato, Michio; Ito, Akane; Akioka, Manami; Takagi, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kiyokazu; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Haruo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Teplow, David B.; Kinjo, Masataka; Hoshi, Minako

    2011-01-01

    Nonfibrillar assemblies of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are considered to play primary roles in Alzheimer disease (AD). Elucidating the assembly pathways of these specific aggregates is essential for understanding disease pathogenesis and developing knowledge-based therapies. However, these assemblies cannot be monitored in vivo, and there has been no reliable in vitro monitoring method at low protein concentration. We have developed a highly sensitive in vitro monitoring method using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and toxicity assays. Using Aβ labeled at the N terminus or Lys16, we uncovered two distinct assembly pathways. One leads to highly toxic 10–15-nm spherical Aβ assemblies, termed amylospheroids (ASPDs). The other leads to fibrils. The first step in ASPD formation is trimerization. ASPDs of ∼330 kDa in mass form from these trimers after 5 h of slow rotation. Up to at least 24 h, ASPDs remain the dominant structures in assembly reactions. Neurotoxicity studies reveal that the most toxic ASPDs are ∼128 kDa (∼32-mers). In contrast, fibrillogenesis begins with dimer formation and then proceeds to formation of 15–40-nm spherical intermediates, from which fibrils originate after 15 h. Unlike ASPD formation, the Lys16-labeled peptide disturbed fibril formation because the Aβ16–20 region is critical for this final step. These differences in the assembly pathways clearly indicated that ASPDs are not fibril precursors. The method we have developed should facilitate identifying Aβ assembly steps at which inhibition may be beneficial. PMID:21292768

  20. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloidfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Skaat, Hadas; Corem-Slakmon, Enav; Grinberg, Igor; Last, David; Goez, David; Mardor, Yael; Margel, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is the main fibrillar component of plaque deposits found in brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is related to the pathogenesis of AD. Passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for the therapy of AD, based on the administration of specific anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (aAβmAbs) to delay Aβ aggregation in the brain. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is the required readministration of the aAβmAbs at frequent intervals. There are only a few reports describing in vitro study for the immobilization of aAβmAbs to nanoparticles as potential targeting agents of Aβ aggregates. In this article, we report the immobilization of the aAβmAb clone BAM10 to near-infrared fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles for the inhibition of Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics and the specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils. The BAM10-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were well-characterized, including their immunogold labeling and cytotoxic effect on PC-12 (pheochromocytoma cell line). Indeed, these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly inhibit the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics compared with the same concentration, or even five times higher, of the free BAM10. This inhibitory effect was confirmed by different assays such as the photo-induced crosslinking of unmodified proteins combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate– polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A cell viability assay also confirmed that these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly reduced the Aβ40-induced cytotoxicity to PC-12 cells. Furthermore, the selective labeling of the Aβ40 fibrils with the BAM10-conjugated near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles enabled specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils ex vivo by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging. This study highlights the immobilization of the aAβmAb to dual-modal nanoparticles as a potential approach for aAβmAb delivery, eliminating the issue of readministration

  1. Interaction of L-arginine with κ-casein and its effect on amyloid fibril formation by the protein: multi-spectroscopic approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fanbo; Yin, Jianyuan; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Miao; Meng, Qin; Zeng, Baohua; Sun, Dandan; Liu, Jihua

    2015-02-01

    Herein, the interaction of l-arginine (ARG) with κ-casein, and its effect on amyloid fibril formation of the protein, have been investigated in vitro by resonance light scattering (RLS), fluorescence, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under simulated physiological conditions. The results indicated that ARG inhibited fibril formation by reduced and carboxymethylated κ-casein (RCMκ-CN), and there was interaction between ARG and RCMκ-CN, proved by the observation of enhancement in RLS intensity attributed to the formation of RCMκ-CN-ARG complex. It was also demonstrated that ARG strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of RCMκ-CN through a static quenching mechanism. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) were tested to show that the binding process was spontaneous and mainly enthalpy driven with an unfavorable entropy, and both hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces played a key role in the binding of ARG and RCMκ-CN. The determined value of the distance r between ARG and RCMκ-CN Trp97 residue evaluated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was 2.94nm. Furthermore, the conformational investigation from synchronous fluorescence showed that the RCMκ-CN Trp97 residue was placed in a less polar environment and more difficultly exposed to the solvent after addition of ARG. PMID:25622152

  2. Structural and mechanistic basis behind the inhibitory interaction of PcTS on α-synuclein amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Lamberto, Gonzalo R.; Binolfi, Andrés; Orcellet, María L.; Bertoncini, Carlos W.; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Fernández, Claudio O.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of aggregation inhibitors and the investigation of their mechanism of action are fundamental in the quest to mitigate the pathological consequences of amyloid formation. Here, characterization of the structural and mechanistic basis for the antiamyloidogenic effect of phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (PcTS) on α-synuclein (AS) allowed us to demonstrate that specific aromatic interactions are central for ligand-mediated inhibition of amyloid formation. We provide evidence indicating that the mechanism behind the antiamyloidogenic effect of PcTS is correlated with the trapping of prefibrillar AS species during the early stages of the assembly process. By using NMR spectroscopy, we have located the primary binding region for PcTS to a specific site in the N terminus of AS, involving the amino acid Tyr-39 as the anchoring residue. Moreover, the residue-specific structural characterization of the AS-PcTS complex provided the basis for the rational design of nonamyloidogenic species of AS, highlighting the role of aromatic interactions in driving AS amyloid assembly. A comparative analysis with other proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders reveals that aromatic recognition interfaces might constitute a key structural element to target their aggregation pathways. These findings emphasize the use of aggregation inhibitors as molecular probes to assess structural and toxic mechanisms related to amyloid formation and the potential of small molecules as therapeutics for amyloid-related pathologies. PMID:19948969

  3. Coupling of the non-amyloid-component (NAC) domain and the KTK(E/Q)GV repeats stabilize the α-synuclein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-10-01

    The aggregates of α-synuclein (αS) are a major pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) making their structure-function relationship important for rational drug design. Yet, the atomic structure of the αS aggregates is unavailable, making it difficult to understand the underlying aggregation mechanism. In this work, based on available experimental data, we examined plausible molecular structures of αS(20/30-110) fibrils for the first time by employing computational approaches. The optimized structure was used to investigate possible interactions with aggregation inhibitors. Our structural models characterize the essential properties of the five-layered fold of the αS fibril. The distribution of the β-strands and the topology of the five β-strands in the relatively stable models are in good agreement with experimental values. In particular, we find that the KTK(E/Q)GV repeat motifs significantly stabilize the αS fibrils. The charged residues within each repeat prefer exposure to the solvent in order to further stabilize the inter-layered interactions by salt-bridges. The organization of the repeat K(58)T(59)K(60)E(61)Q(62)V(63) between the β2 and β3 layers significantly affects the stability of the non-amyloid-component (NAC) domain. The coupling between the NAC domain and the KTKEGV repeats indicates that both regions can be potential binding sites for inhibitor design. The distinct binding modes of chemical agents that alter αS aggregation highlight the potential of our models in inhibitor design. PMID:26873872

  4. Influence of the Physiochemical Properties of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Amyloid β Protein Fibrillation in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are recognized as promising nanodiagnostic materials due to their biocompatibility, unique magnetic properties, and their application as multimodal contrast agents. As coated SPIONs have potential use in the diagnosis and treatment of various brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, a comprehensive understanding of their interactions with Aβ and other amyloidogenic proteins is essential prior to their clinical application. Here we demonstrate the effect of thickness and surface charge of the coating layer of SPIONs on the kinetics of fibrillation of Aβ in aqueous solution. A size and surface area dependent “dual” effect on Aβ fibrillation was observed. While lower concentrations of SPIONs inhibited fibrillation, higher concentrations increased the rate of Aβ fibrillation. With respect to coating charge, it is evident that the positively charged SPIONs are capable of promoting fibrillation at significantly lower particle concentrations compared with negatively charged or uncharged SPIONs. This suggests that in addition to the presence of particles, which affect the concentration of monomeric protein in solution (and thereby the nucleation time), there are also effects of binding on the protein conformation. PMID:23509983

  5. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by serotonin signaling.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anna A; Thathiah, Amantha; De Strooper, Bart; Tesseur, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the β- and γ-secretases releases the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which deposits in senile plaques and contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The α-secretase cleaves APP in the Aβ peptide sequence to generate soluble APPα (sAPPα). Upregulation of α-secretase activity through the 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT4) receptor has been shown to reduce Aβ production, amyloid plaque load and to improve cognitive impairment in transgenic mouse models of AD. Consequently, activation of 5-HT4 receptors following agonist stimulation is considered to be a therapeutic strategy for AD treatment; however, the signaling cascade involved in 5-HT4 receptor-stimulated proteolysis of APP remains to be determined. Here we used chemical and siRNA inhibition to identify the proteins which mediate 5-HT4d receptor-stimulated α-secretase activity in the SH-SY5Y human neuronal cell line. We show that G protein and Src dependent activation of phospholipase C are required for α-secretase activity, while, unexpectedly, adenylyl cyclase and cAMP are not involved. Further elucidation of the signaling pathway indicates that inositol triphosphate phosphorylation and casein kinase 2 activation is also a prerequisite for α-secretase activity. Our findings provide a novel route to explore the treatment of AD through 5-HT4 receptor-induced α-secretase activation. PMID:24466315

  6. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Cusumano, Zachary T; Pinkner, Jerome S; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J; Frieden, Carl

    2016-06-28

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG-CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  7. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaat, Hadas; Belfort, Georges; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-06-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 ± 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic γ-Fe2O3/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) (γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from α-helix to β-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the γ-Fe2O3 core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  8. CX3CR1 in microglia regulates brain amyloid deposition through selective protofibrillar Aβ phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqiang; Condello, Carlo; Schain, Aaron; Harb, Roa; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are frequently surrounded by activated microglia but the precise role of these cells in disease progression remains unclear. The chemokine receptor CX3CR1 is selectively expressed in microglia and is thought to modulate their activity. To study the specific effects of microglia activation on amyloid pathology in vivo, we crossbred mice lacking CX3CR1 with the Alzheimer’s mouse model CRND8. Surprisingly, we found that CX3CR1 deficient mice had lower brain levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42 and reduced amyloid deposits. Quantification of Aβ within microglia and time-lapse two photon microscopy in live mice revealed that these cells were highly effective at the uptake of protofibrillar amyloid but were incapable of phagocytosis of fibrillar congophilic Aβ. CX3CR1 deletion was associated with increased phagocytic ability which led to greater amyloid content within microglial phagolysosomes. Furthermore, CX3CR1 deficient mice had an increased number of microglia around individual plaques due to higher proliferative rates, which likely contributed to an overall greater phagocytic capacity. CX3CR1 deletion did not affect the degree of neuronal or synaptic damage around plaques despite increased microglia density. Our results demonstrate that microglia can regulate brain Aβ levels and plaque deposition via selective protofibrillar Aβ phagocytosis. Modulation of microglia activity and proliferation by CX3CR1 signaling may represent a therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:21159979

  9. A brief overview of amyloids and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ow, Sian-Yang; Dunstan, Dave E

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled fibrous protein aggregates that are associated with a number of presently incurable diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Millions of people worldwide suffer from amyloid diseases. This review summarizes the unique cross-β structure of amyloid fibrils, morphological variations, the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation, and the cytotoxic effects of these fibrils and oligomers. Alzheimer’s disease is also explored as an example of an amyloid disease to show the various approaches to treat these amyloid diseases. Finally, this review investigates the nanotechnological and biological applications of amyloid fibrils; as well as a summary of the typical biological pathways involved in the disposal of amyloid fibrils and their precursors. PMID:25042050

  10. Cytotoxic Aggregation and Amyloid Formation by the Myostatin Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Starck, Carlene S.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth, has been implicated in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). sIBM is the most common age-related muscle-wastage disease with a pathogenesis similar to that of amyloid disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Myostatin precursor protein (MstnPP) has been shown to associate with large molecular weight filamentous inclusions containing the Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide in sIBM tissue, and MstnPP is upregulated following ER stress. The mechanism for how MstnPP contributes to disease pathogenesis is unknown. Here, we show for the first time that MstnPP is capable of forming amyloid fibrils in vitro. When MstnPP-containing Escherichia coli inclusion bodies are refolded and purified, a proportion of MstnPP spontaneously misfolds into amyloid-like aggregates as characterised by electron microscopy and binding of the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T. When subjected to a slightly acidic pH and elevated temperature, the aggregates form straight and unbranched amyloid fibrils 15 nm in diameter and also exhibit higher order amyloid structures. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that the amyloid fibrils are dominated by β-sheet and that their formation occurs via a conformational change that occurs at a physiologically relevant temperature. Importantly, MstnPP aggregates and protofibrils have a negative effect on the viability of myoblasts. These novel results show that the myostatin precursor protein is capable of forming amyloid structures in vitro with implications for a role in sIBM pathogenesis. PMID:20161792

  11. Luteinizing hormone, a reproductive regulator that modulates the processing of amyloid-beta precursor protein and amyloid-beta deposition.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard L; Verdile, Giuseppe; Liu, Tianbing; Parlow, Albert F; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Martins, Ralph N; Atwood, Craig S

    2004-05-01

    Hormonal changes associated with the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis following menopause/andropause have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental support for this has come from studies demonstrating an increase in amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition following ovariectomy/castration. Because sex steroids and gonadotropins are both part of the HPG feedback loop, any loss in sex steroids results in a proportionate increase in gonadotropins. To assess whether Abeta generation was due to the loss of serum 17beta-estradiol or to the up-regulation of serum gonadotropins, we treated C57Bl/6J mice with the anti-gonadotropin leuprolide acetate, which suppresses both sex steroids and gonadotropins. Leuprolide acetate treatment resulted in a 3.5-fold (p < 0.0001) and a 1.5-fold (p < 0.024) reduction in total brain Abeta1-42 and Abeta1-40 concentrations, respectively, after 8 weeks of treatment. To further explore the role of gonadotropins in promoting amyloidogenesis, M17 neuroblastoma cells were treated with the gonadotropin luteinizing hormone (LH) at concentrations equivalent to early adulthood (10 mIU/ml) or post-menopause/andropause (30 mIU/ml). LH did not alter amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) expression but did alter AbetaPP processing toward the amyloidogenic pathway as evidenced by increased secretion and insolubility of Abeta, decreased alphaAbetaPP secretion, and increased AbetaPP-C99 levels. These results suggest the marked increases in serum LH following menopause/andropause as a physiologically relevant signal that could promote Abeta secretion and deposition in the aging brain. Suppression of the age-related increase in serum gonadotropins using anti-gonadotropin agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:14871891

  12. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Estefania P; Rochael, Natalia C; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M; Palhano, Fernando L; Foguel, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation. PMID:26198639

  13. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Estefania P.; Rochael, Natalia C.; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B.; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S.; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Palhano, Fernando L.; Foguel, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation. PMID:26198639

  14. Nomenclature of amyloid and amyloidosis. WHO-IUIS Nomenclature Sub-Committee.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    This classification of amyloid and amyloidosis is based on the amyloid fibril proteins, followed by a designation of the fibril protein precursor. Additional information includes the protein type or variant (where applicable) and the clinical diagnosis. PMID:8440029

  15. The Components of Flemingia macrophylla Attenuate Amyloid β-Protein Accumulation by Regulating Amyloid β-Protein Metabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yun-Lian; Tsay, Huey-Jen; Liao, Yung-Feng; Wu, Mine-Fong; Wang, Chuen-Neu; Shiao, Young-Ji

    2012-01-01

    Flemingia macrophylla (Leguminosae) is a popular traditional remedy used in Taiwan as anti-inflammatory, promoting blood circulation and antidiabetes agent. Recent study also suggested its neuroprotective activity against Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the effects of F. macrophylla on Aβ production and degradation were studied. The effect of F. macrophylla on Aβ metabolism was detected using the cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells N2a transfected with human Swedish mutant APP (swAPP-N2a cells). The effects on Aβ degradation were evaluated on a cell-free system. An ELISA assay was applied to detect the level of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. Western blots assay was employed to measure the levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE). Three fractions of F. macrophylla modified Aβ accumulation by both inhibiting β-secretase and activating IDE. Three flavonoids modified Aβ accumulation by activating IDE. The activated IDE pool by the flavonoids was distinctly regulated by bacitracin (an IDE inhibitor). Furthermore, flavonoid 94-18-13 also modulates Aβ accumulation by enhancing IDE expression. In conclusion, the components of F. macrophylla possess the potential for developing new therapeutic drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22719789

  16. The Components of Flemingia macrophylla Attenuate Amyloid β-Protein Accumulation by Regulating Amyloid β-Protein Metabolic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Lian; Tsay, Huey-Jen; Liao, Yung-Feng; Wu, Mine-Fong; Wang, Chuen-Neu; Shiao, Young-Ji

    2012-01-01

    Flemingia macrophylla (Leguminosae) is a popular traditional remedy used in Taiwan as anti-inflammatory, promoting blood circulation and antidiabetes agent. Recent study also suggested its neuroprotective activity against Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the effects of F. macrophylla on Aβ production and degradation were studied. The effect of F. macrophylla on Aβ metabolism was detected using the cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells N2a transfected with human Swedish mutant APP (swAPP-N2a cells). The effects on Aβ degradation were evaluated on a cell-free system. An ELISA assay was applied to detect the level of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. Western blots assay was employed to measure the levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE). Three fractions of F. macrophylla modified Aβ accumulation by both inhibiting β-secretase and activating IDE. Three flavonoids modified Aβ accumulation by activating IDE. The activated IDE pool by the flavonoids was distinctly regulated by bacitracin (an IDE inhibitor). Furthermore, flavonoid 94-18-13 also modulates Aβ accumulation by enhancing IDE expression. In conclusion, the components of F. macrophylla possess the potential for developing new therapeutic drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22719789

  17. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Herling, Therese W.; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers. PMID:26195762

  18. Amyloid Polymorphism: Structural Basis and Neurobiological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, of mechanisms by which disease-associated peptides and proteins aggregate into fibrils, and of structural properties of aggregation intermediates has advanced considerably in recent years. Detailed molecular structural models for certain fibrils and aggregation intermediates are now available. It is now well established that amyloid fibrils are generally polymorphic at the molecular level, with a given peptide or protein being capable of forming a variety of distinct, self-propagating fibril structures. Recent results from structural studies and from studies involving cell cultures, transgenic animals, and human tissue provide initial evidence that molecular structural variations in amyloid fibrils and related aggregates may correlate with or even produce variations in disease development. This article reviews our current knowledge of the structural and mechanistic aspects of amyloid formation, as well as current evidence for the biological relevance of structural variations. PMID:25950632

  19. Graphene oxide inhibits hIAPP amyloid fibrillation and toxicity in insulin-producing NIT-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Gurzov, Esteban N; Chen, Pengyu; Pilkington, Emily H; Stanley, William J; Litwak, Sara A; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) aggregation is directly associated with pancreatic β-cell death and subsequent insulin deficiency in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Since no cure is currently available for T2D, it is of great benefit to devise new anti-aggregation molecules, which protect β-cells against hIAPP aggregation-induced toxicity. Engineered nanoparticles have been recently exploited as anti-aggregation nanomedicines. In this work, we studied graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets for their potential for hIAPP aggregation inhibition by combining computational modeling, biophysical characterization and cell toxicity measurements. Using discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations and in vitro studies, we showed that GO exhibited an inhibitory effect on hIAPP aggregation. DMD simulations indicated that the strong binding of hIAPP to GO nanosheets was driven by hydrogen bonding and aromatic stacking and that the strong peptide-GO binding efficiently inhibited hIAPP self-association and aggregation on the nanosheet surface. Secondary structural changes of hIAPP upon GO binding derived from DMD simulations were consistent with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the reduction of hIAPP aggregation in the presence of GO. Furthermore, we carried out a cell toxicity assay and found that these nanosheets protected insulin-secreting NIT-1 pancreatic β-cells against hIAPP-induced toxicity. Our multidisciplinary study suggests that GO nanosheets have the potential to be utilized as an anti-aggregation nanomedicine itself in addition to a biosensor or delivery vehicle for the mitigation of T2D progression. PMID:26625841

  20. Nanomaterials: amyloids reflect their brighter side

    PubMed Central

    Mankar, Shruti; Anoop, A.; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils belong to the group of ordered nanostructures that are self-assembled from a wide range of polypeptides/proteins. Amyloids are highly rigid structures possessing a high mechanical strength. Although amyloids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, growing evidence indicates that amyloids may also perform native functions in host organisms. Discovery of such amyloids, referred to as functional amyloids, highlight their possible use in designing novel nanostructure materials. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of amyloids for the development of nanomaterials and prospective applications of such materials in nanotechnology and biomedicine. PMID:22110868

  1. Differential regulation of amyloid-. beta. -protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-..beta..-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease.

  2. AFM study of glucagon fibrillation via oligomeric structures resulting in interwoven fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingdong; Bruun Hovgaard, Mads; Xu, Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2006-08-01

    Glucagon is a 29-residue amphiphatic hormone involved in the regulation of blood glucose levels in conjunction with insulin. In concentrated aqueous solutions, glucagon spontaneously aggregates to form amyloid fibrils, destroying its biological activity. In this study we utilize the atomic force microscope (AFM) to elucidate the fibrillation mechanism of glucagon at the nanoscale under acidic conditions (pH 2.0) by visualizing the nanostructures of fibrils formed at different stages of the incubation. Hollow disc-shaped oligomers form at an early stage in the process and subsequently rearrange to more solid oligomers. These oligomers co-exist with, and most likely act as precursors for, protofibrils, which subsequently associate to form at least three different classes of higher-order fibrils of different heights. A repeat unit of around 50 nm along the main fibril axis suggests a helical arrangement of interwoven protofibrils. The diversity of oligomeric and fibrillar arrangements formed at pH 2.0 complements previous spectroscopic analyses that revealed that fibrils formed under different conditions can differ substantially in stability and secondary structure.

  3. Amyloid Precursor Protein Translation Is Regulated by a 3’UTR Guanine Quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Sharoni, Michal; Olson, Kalee; Sebastian, Neeraj P.; Ansaloni, Sara; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Akins, Michael R.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Saunders, Aleister J.

    2015-01-01

    A central event in Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP overexpression leads to increased Aβ generation and Alzheimer’s disease in humans and altered neuronal migration and increased long term depression in mice. Conversely, reduction of APP expression results in decreased Aβ levels in mice as well as impaired learning and memory and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Together these findings indicate that therapeutic interventions that aim to restore APP and Aβ levels must do so within an ideal range. To better understand the effects of modulating APP levels, we explored the mechanisms regulating APP expression focusing on post-transcriptional regulation. Such regulation can be mediated by RNA regulatory elements such as guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes), non-canonical structured RNA motifs that affect RNA stability and translation. Via a bioinformatics approach, we identified a candidate G-quadruplex within the APP mRNA in its 3’UTR (untranslated region) at residues 3008–3027 (NM_201414.2). This sequence exhibited characteristics of a parallel G-quadruplex structure as revealed by circular dichroism spectrophotometry. Further, as with other G-quadruplexes, the formation of this structure was dependent on the presence of potassium ions. This G-quadruplex has no apparent role in regulating transcription or mRNA stability as wild type and mutant constructs exhibited equivalent mRNA levels as determined by real time PCR. Instead, we demonstrate that this G-quadruplex negatively regulates APP protein expression using dual luciferase reporter and Western blot analysis. Taken together, our studies reveal post-transcriptional regulation by a 3’UTR G-quadruplex as a novel mechanism regulating APP expression. PMID:26618502

  4. Early Events in the Amyloid Formation of the A546T Mutant of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Induced Protein (TGFBIp) in Corneal Dystrophies Compared to the Non-Fibrillating R555W and R555Q Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Koldsø, Heidi; Andersen, Ole Juul; Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Scavenius, Carsten; Sørensen, Charlotte S.; Underhaug, Jarl; Runager, Kasper; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Enghild, Jan J.; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    The human transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp) is involved in several types of corneal dystrophies where protein aggregation and amyloid fibril formation severely impairs vision. Most disease-causing mutations are located in the last of four homologous fasciclin-1 (FAS1) domains of the protein, and it has been shown that when isolated, the fourth FAS1 domain (FAS1–4) mimics the behavior of full-length TGFBIp. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and principal component analysis to study the wild type FAS1–4 domain along with three disease-causing mutations (R555W, R555Q, and A546T) to decipher any internal difference in dynamical properties of the domains that may explain their varied stabilities and aggregation properties. In addition, we use a protein-protein docking method in combination with chemical cross-linking experiments and mass spectrometry of the cross-linked species to obtain information about interaction faces between identical FAS1–4 domains. The results show that the pathogenic mutations A546T and R555W affect the packing in the hydrophobic core of FAS1–4 in different directions. We further show that the FAS1–4 monomers associate using their β-rich regions consistent with peptides observed to be part of the amyloid fibril core in lattice corneal dystrophy patients. PMID:26305369

  5. Tetraspanin12 regulates ADAM10-dependent cleavage of amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daosong; Sharma, Chandan; Hemler, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Using mass spectrometry, we identified ADAM10 (a membrane-associated metalloproteinase) as a partner for TSPAN12, a tetraspanin protein. TSPAN12-ADAM10 interaction was confirmed by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation in multiple tumor cell lines. TSPAN12, to a greater extent than other tetraspanins (CD81, CD151, CD9, and CD82), associated with ADAM10 but not with ADAM17. Overexpression of TSPAN12 enhanced ADAM10-dependent shedding of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in MCF7 (breast cancer) and SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cell lines. Conversely, siRNA ablation of endogenous TSPAN12 markedly diminished APP proteolysis in both cell lines. Furthermore, TSPAN12 overexpression enhanced ADAM10 prodomain maturation, whereas TSPAN12 ablation diminished ADAM10 maturation. A palmitoylation-deficient TSPAN12 mutant failed to associate with ADAM10, inhibited ADAM10-dependent proteolysis of APP, and inhibited ADAM10 maturation, most likely by interfering with endogenous wild-type TSPAN12. In conclusion, TSPAN12 serves as a novel and robust partner for ADAM10 and promotes ADAM10 maturation, thereby facilitating ADAM10-dependent proteolysis of APP. This novel mode of regulating APP cleavage is of relevance to Alzheimer’s disease therapy.—Xu, D., Sharma, C., Hemler, M. E. Tetraspanin12 regulates ADAM10-dependent cleavage of amyloid precursor protein. PMID:19587294

  6. Regulation of the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain shedding by the 5-HT4 receptor and Epac.

    PubMed

    Robert, Sylvain; Maillet, Marjorie; Morel, Eric; Launay, Jean-Marie; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Mercken, Luc; Lezoualc'h, Frank

    2005-02-14

    The serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT4) receptor is of potential interest for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease because it increases memory and learning. In this study, we investigated the effect of zinc metalloprotease inhibitors on the amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing induced by the serotonin 5-HT4 receptor in vitro. We show that secretion of the non-amyloidogenic form of APP, sAPPalpha induced by the 5-HT4(e) receptor isoform was not due to a general boost of the constitutive secretory pathway but rather to its specific effect on alpha-secretase activity. Although the h5-HT4(e) receptor increased IP3 production, inhibition of PKC did not modify its effect on sAPPalpha secretion. In addition, we found that alpha secretase activity is regulated by the cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Epac and the small GTPase Rac. PMID:15710402

  7. Iron transport across the blood-brain barrier; Development, neurovascular regulation and cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    There are two barriers for iron entry into the brain: 1) the brain-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and 2) the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the literature on developmental iron accumulation by the brain, focusing on the transport of iron through the brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) of the BBB. We review the iron trafficking proteins which may be involved in the iron flux across BMVEC and discuss the plausible mechanisms of BMVEC iron uptake and efflux. We suggest a model for how BMVEC iron uptake and efflux are regulated and a mechanism by which the majority of iron is trafficked across the developing BBB under the direct guidance of neighboring astrocytes. Thus, we place brain iron uptake in the context of the neurovascular unit of the adult brain. Last, we propose that BMVEC iron is involved in the aggregation of amyloid-β peptides leading to the progression of cerebral amyloid angiopathy which often occurs prior to dementia and the onset of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25355056

  8. Amyloid precursor protein expression and processing are differentially regulated during cortical neuron differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Petra; Agholme, Lotta; Nazir, Faisal Hayat; Satir, Tugce Munise; Toombs, Jamie; Wellington, Henrietta; Strandberg, Joakim; Bontell, Thomas Olsson; Kvartsberg, Hlin; Holmström, Maria; Boreström, Cecilia; Simonsson, Stina; Kunath, Tilo; Lindahl, Anders; Blennow, Kaj; Hanse, Eric; Portelius, Erik; Wray, Selina; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage product amyloid β (Aβ) have been thoroughly studied in Alzheimer’s disease. However, APP also appears to be important for neuronal development. Differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) towards cortical neurons enables in vitro mechanistic studies on human neuronal development. Here, we investigated expression and proteolytic processing of APP during differentiation of human iPSCs towards cortical neurons over a 100-day period. APP expression remained stable during neuronal differentiation, whereas APP processing changed. α-Cleaved soluble APP (sAPPα) was secreted early during differentiation, from neuronal progenitors, while β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPPβ) was first secreted after deep-layer neurons had formed. Short Aβ peptides, including Aβ1-15/16, peaked during the progenitor stage, while processing shifted towards longer peptides, such as Aβ1-40/42, when post-mitotic neurons appeared. This indicates that APP processing is regulated throughout differentiation of cortical neurons and that amyloidogenic APP processing, as reflected by Aβ1-40/42, is associated with mature neuronal phenotypes. PMID:27383650

  9. Calcium regulates the interaction of amyloid precursor protein with Homer3 protein.

    PubMed

    Kyratzi, Elli; Efthimiopoulos, Spiros

    2014-09-01

    Ca(2+) dysregulation is an important factor implicated in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms mediating the reciprocal regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis and amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism, function, and protein interactions are not well known. We have previously shown that APP interacts with Homer proteins, which inhibit APP processing toward amyloid-β. In this study, we investigated the effect of Ca(2+) homeostasis alterations on APP/Homer3 interaction. Influx of extracellular Ca(2+) upon treatment of HEK293 cells with the ionophore A23187 or addition of extracellular Ca(2+) in cells starved of calcium specifically reduced APP/Homer3 but not APP/X11a interaction. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) store depletion by thapsigargin followed by store-operated calcium entry also decreased the interaction. Interestingly, application of a phospholipase C stimulator, which causes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release, caused dissociation of APP/Homer3 complex. In human neuroblastoma cells, membrane depolarization also disrupted the interaction. This is the first study showing that changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis affect APP protein interactions. Our results suggest that Ca(2+) and Homers play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease pathology. PMID:24792907

  10. Amyloid-clearing proteins and their epigenetic regulation as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Belyaev, Nikolai D.; Kerridge, Caroline; Turner, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal elevation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) levels in the brain is the primary trigger for neuronal cell death specific to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It is now evident that Aβ levels in the brain are manipulable due to a dynamic equilibrium between its production from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and removal by amyloid clearance proteins. Clearance can be either enzymic or non-enzymic (binding/transport proteins). Intriguingly several of the main amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs) are members of the M13 peptidase family (neprilysin (NEP), NEP2 and the endothelin converting enzymes (ECE-1 and -2)). A distinct metallopeptidase, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), also contributes to Aβ degradation in the brain. The ADE family currently embraces more than 20 members, both membrane-bound and soluble, and of differing cellular locations. NEP plays an important role in brain function terminating neuropeptide signals. Its decrease in specific brain areas with age or after hypoxia, ischaemia or stroke contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP (and other genes) by the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and its dependence on the cell type and APP isoform expression suggest possibilities for selective manipulation of NEP gene expression in neuronal cells. We have also observed that another amyloid-clearing protein, namely transthyretin (TTR), is also regulated in the neuronal cell by a mechanism similar to NEP. Dependence of amyloid clearance proteins on histone deacetylases and the ability of HDAC inhibitors to up-regulate their expression in the brain opens new avenues for developing preventive strategies in AD. PMID:25278875

  11. Arf6 controls beta-amyloid production by regulating macropinocytosis of the Amyloid Precursor Protein to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihao; Tam, Joshua H K; Seah, Claudia; Chiu, Justin; Tyrer, Andrea; Cregan, Sean P; Meakin, Susan O; Pasternak, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of Beta-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Aβ peptides are generated by cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by the β - and γ - secretase enzymes. Although this process is tightly linked to the internalization of cell surface APP, the compartments responsible are not well defined. We have found that APP can be rapidly internalized from the cell surface to lysosomes, bypassing early and late endosomes. Here we show by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy that this pathway is mediated by macropinocytosis. APP internalization is enhanced by antibody binding/crosslinking of APP suggesting that APP may function as a receptor. Furthermore, a dominant negative mutant of Arf6 blocks direct transport of APP to lysosomes, but does not affect classical endocytosis to endosomes. Arf6 expression increases through the hippocampus with the development of Alzheimer's disease, being expressed mostly in the CA1 and CA2 regions in normal individuals but spreading through the CA3 and CA4 regions in individuals with pathologically diagnosed AD. Disruption of lysosomal transport of APP reduces both Aβ40 and Aβ42 production by more than 30 %. Our findings suggest that the lysosome is an important site for Aβ production and that altering APP trafficking represents a viable strategy to reduce Aβ production. PMID:26170135

  12. Amyloid formation of growth hormone in presence of zinc: Relevance to its storage in secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Saikat; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Khan, Tuhin; Singru, Praful; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are cross-β-sheet fibrillar aggregates, associated with various human diseases and native functions such as protein/peptide hormone storage inside secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In the current study, using amyloid detecting agents, we show that growth hormone (GH) could be stored as amyloid in the pituitary of rat. Moreover, to demonstrate the formation of GH amyloid in vitro, we studied various conditions (solvents, glycosaminoglycans, salts and metal ions) and found that in presence of zinc metal ions (Zn(II)), GH formed short curvy fibrils. The amyloidogenic nature of these fibrils was examined by Thioflavin T binding, Congo Red binding, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our biophysical studies also suggest that Zn(II) initiates the early oligomerization of GH that eventually facilitates the fibrillation process. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence study of pituitary tissue, we show that GH in pituitary significantly co-localizes with Zn(II), suggesting the probable role of zinc in GH aggregation within secretory granules. We also found that GH amyloid formed in vitro is capable of releasing monomers. The study will help to understand the possible mechanism of GH storage, its regulation and monomer release from the somatotrophs of anterior pituitary. PMID:27004850

  13. Amyloid formation of growth hormone in presence of zinc: Relevance to its storage in secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Saikat; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Khan, Tuhin; Singru, Praful; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are cross-β-sheet fibrillar aggregates, associated with various human diseases and native functions such as protein/peptide hormone storage inside secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In the current study, using amyloid detecting agents, we show that growth hormone (GH) could be stored as amyloid in the pituitary of rat. Moreover, to demonstrate the formation of GH amyloid in vitro, we studied various conditions (solvents, glycosaminoglycans, salts and metal ions) and found that in presence of zinc metal ions (Zn(II)), GH formed short curvy fibrils. The amyloidogenic nature of these fibrils was examined by Thioflavin T binding, Congo Red binding, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our biophysical studies also suggest that Zn(II) initiates the early oligomerization of GH that eventually facilitates the fibrillation process. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence study of pituitary tissue, we show that GH in pituitary significantly co-localizes with Zn(II), suggesting the probable role of zinc in GH aggregation within secretory granules. We also found that GH amyloid formed in vitro is capable of releasing monomers. The study will help to understand the possible mechanism of GH storage, its regulation and monomer release from the somatotrophs of anterior pituitary. PMID:27004850

  14. Presenilin/γ-secretase-dependent processing of β-amyloid precursor protein regulates EGF receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-wu; Wang, Ruishan; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Han; Liao, Francesca-Fang; Xu, Huaxi

    2007-01-01

    Presenilins (PS, PS1/PS2) are necessary for the proteolytic activity of γ-secretase, which cleaves multiple type I transmembrane proteins including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), Notch, ErbB4, etc. Cleavage by PS/γ-secretase releases the intracellular domain (ICD) of its substrates. Notch ICD translocates into the nucleus to regulate expression of genes important for development. However, the patho/physiological role of other ICDs, especially APP ICD (AICD), in regulating gene expression remains controversial because evidence supporting this functionality stems mainly from studies performed under supraphysiological conditions. EGF receptor (EGFR) is up-regulated in a wide variety of tumors and hence is a target for cancer therapeutics. Abnormal expression/activation of EGFR contributes to keratinocytic carcinomas, and mice with reduced PS dosages have been shown to develop skin tumors. Here we demonstrate that the levels of PS and EGFR in the skin tumors of PS1+/−/ PS2−/− mice and the brains of PS1/2 conditional double knockout mice are inversely correlated. Deficiency in PS/γ-secretase activity or APP expression results in a significant increase of EGFR in fibroblasts. Importantly, we show that AICD mediates transcriptional regulation of EGFR. Furthermore, we provide in vivo evidence demonstrating direct binding of endogenous AICD to the EGFR promoter. Our results indicate an important role of PS/γ-secretase-generated APP metabolite AICD in gene transcription and in EGFR-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:17556541

  15. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions. PMID:23747840

  16. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Landreh, Michael; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Willander, Hanna; Soeder, Olle; Johansson, Jan; Joernvall, Hans

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  17. Alzheimer amyloid peptide aβ42 regulates gene expression of transcription and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Barucker, Christian; Sommer, Anette; Beckmann, Georg; Eravci, Murat; Harmeier, Anja; Schipke, Carola G; Brockschnieder, Damian; Dyrks, Thomas; Althoff, Veit; Fraser, Paul E; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Breitner, John C S; Peters, Oliver; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides leading to deposition of senile plaques and a progressive decline of cognitive functions, which currently remains the main criterion for its diagnosis. Robust biomarkers for AD do not yet exist, although changes in the cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau and Aβ represent promising candidates in addition to brain imaging and genetic risk profiling. Although concentrations of soluble Aβ42 correlate with symptoms of AD, less is known about the biological activities of Aβ peptides which are generated from the amyloid-β protein precursor. An unbiased DNA microarray study showed that Aβ42, at sub-lethal concentrations, specifically increases expression of several genes in neuroblastoma cells, notably the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5 (IGFBP3/5), the transcription regulator inhibitor of DNA binding, and the transcription factor Lim only domain protein 4. Using qRT-PCR, we confirmed that mRNA levels of the identified candidate genes were exclusively increased by the potentially neurotoxic Aβ42 wild-type peptide, as both the less toxic Aβ40 and a non-toxic substitution peptide Aβ42 G33A did not affect mRNA levels. In vivo immunohistochemistry revealed a corresponding increase in both hippocampal and cortical IGFBP5 expression in an AD mouse model. Proteomic analyses of human AD cerebrospinal fluid displayed increased in vivo concentrations of IGFBPs. IGFBPs and transcription factors, as identified here, are modulated by soluble Aβ42 and may represent useful early biomarkers. PMID:25318543

  18. Amyloid domains in the cell nucleus controlled by nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 reveal a new pathway of mercury neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Arnhold, Florian; Gührs, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a bioaccumulating trace metal that globally circulates the atmosphere and waters in its elemental, inorganic and organic chemical forms. While Hg represents a notorious neurotoxicant, the underlying cellular pathways are insufficiently understood. We identify amyloid protein aggregation in the cell nucleus as a novel pathway of Hg-bio-interactions. By mass spectrometry of purified protein aggregates, a subset of spliceosomal components and nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 were detected as constituent parts of an Hg-induced nuclear aggregome network. The aggregome network was located by confocal imaging of amyloid-specific antibodies and dyes to amyloid cores within splicing-speckles that additionally recruit components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hg significantly enhances global proteasomal activity in the nucleus, suggesting that formation of amyloid speckles plays a role in maintenance of protein homeostasis. RNAi knock down showed that lamin B1 for its part regulates amyloid speckle formation and thus likewise participates in nuclear protein homeostasis. As the Hg-induced cascade of interactions between the nucleoskeleton and protein homeostasis reduces neuronal signalling, amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus is introduced as a feature of Hg-neurotoxicity that opens new avenues of future research. Similar to protein aggregation events in the cytoplasm that are controlled by the cytoskeleton, amyloid fibrillation of nuclear proteins may be driven by the nucleoskeleton. PMID:25699204

  19. Amyloid formation: functional friend or fearful foe?

    PubMed

    Bergman, P; Roan, N R; Römling, U; Bevins, C L; Münch, J

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid formation has been most studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, as well as in amyloidosis. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that amyloid is also present in the healthy setting; for example nontoxic amyloid formation is important for melanin synthesis and in innate immunity. Furthermore, bacteria have mechanisms to produce functional amyloid structures with important roles in bacterial physiology and interaction with host cells. Here, we will discuss some novel aspects of fibril-forming proteins in humans and bacteria. First, the amyloid-forming properties of the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 6 (HD6) will be considered. Intriguingly, unlike other antimicrobial peptides, HD6 does not kill bacteria. However, recent data show that HD6 can form amyloid structures at the gut mucosa with strong affinity for bacterial surfaces. These so-called nanonets block bacterial invasion by entangling the bacteria in net-like structures. Next, the role of functional amyloid fibrils in human semen will be discussed. These fibrils were discovered through their property to enhance HIV infection but they may also have other yet unknown functions. Finally, the role of amyloid formation in bacteria will be reviewed. The recent finding that bacteria can make amyloid in a controlled fashion without toxic effects is of particular interest and may have implications for human disease. The role of amyloid in health and disease is beginning to be unravelled, and here, we will review some of the most recent findings in this exciting area. PMID:27151743

  20. Apolipoprotein E and beta-amyloid (1-42) regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta.

    PubMed

    Cedazo-Mínguez, A; Popescu, B O; Blanco-Millán, J M; Akterin, S; Pei, J-J; Winblad, B; Cowburn, R F

    2003-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) is implicated in regulating apoptosis and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the effects of two key AD molecules, namely apoE (E3 and E4 isoforms) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 on GSK-3beta and its major upstream regulators, intracellular calcium and protein kinases C and B (PKC and PKB) in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. ApoE3 induced a mild, transient, Ca2+-independent and early activation of GSK-3beta. ApoE4 effects were biphasic, with an early strong GSK-3beta activation that was partially dependent on extracellular Ca2+, followed by a GSK-3beta inactivation. ApoE4 also activated PKC-alpha and PKB possibly giving the subsequent GSK-3beta inhibition. Abeta(1-42) effects were also biphasic with a strong activation dependent partially on extracellular Ca2+ followed by an inactivation. Abeta(1-42) induced an early and potent activation of PKC-alpha and a late decrease of PKB activity. ApoE4 and Abeta(1-42) were more toxic than apoE3 as shown by MTT reduction assays and generation of activated caspase-3. ApoE4 and Abeta(1-42)-induced early activation of GSK-3beta could lead to apoptosis and tau hyperphosphorylation. A late inhibition of GSK-3beta through activation of upstream kinases likely compensates the effects of apoE4 and Abeta(1-42) on GSK-3beta, the unbalanced regulation of which may contribute to AD pathology. PMID:14622095

  1. Ventricular fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fibrillation is an uncontrolled twitching or quivering of muscle fibers (fibrils). When it occurs in the lower chambers of the heart, it is called ventricular fibrillation. During ... the heart muscle does not get enough oxygen for any reason. ...

  2. Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding in Amyloid Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Eisenberg, Dvaid; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases, are each associated with unbranched protein fibrils. Each fibril is made of a particular protein, yet they share common properties. One such property is nucleation-dependent fibril growth. Monomers of amyloid-forming proteins can remain in dissolved form for long periods, before rapidly assembly into fibrils. The lag before growth has been attributed to slow kinetics of formation of a nucleus, on which other molecules can deposit to form the fibril. We have explored the energetics of fibril formation, based on the known molecular structure of a fibril-forming peptide from the yeast prion, Sup35, using both classical and quantum (density functional theory) methods. We find that the energetics of fibril formation for the first three layers are cooperative using both methods. This cooperativity is consistent with the observation that formation of amyloid fibrils involves slow nucleation and faster growth.

  3. All-atom Simulation of Amyloid Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Alred, Erik J.; Bernhardt, Nathan A.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    Molecular simulations are now commonly used to complement experiments in the investigation of amyloid formation and their role in human diseases. While various simulations based on enhanced sampling techniques are used in amyloid formation simulations, this article will focus on those using standard atomistic simulations to evaluate the stability of fibril models. Such studies explore the limitations that arise from the choice of force field or polymorphism; and explore the stability of in vivo and in vitro forms of Aβ fibril aggregates, and the role of heterologous seeding as a link between different amyloid diseases.

  4. Resveratrol Inhibits β-Amyloid-Induced Neuronal Apoptosis through Regulation of SIRT1-ROCK1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaowen; Liang, Nan; Zhu, Dexiao; Gao, Qing; Peng, Lei; Dong, Haiman; Yue, Qingwei; Liu, Haili; Bao, Lihua; Zhang, Jing; Hao, Jing; Gao, Yingmao; Yu, Xuejie; Sun, Jinhao

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and loss of neurons. Recently, a growing body of evidences have indicated that as a herbal compound naturally derived from grapes, resveratrol modulates the pathophysiology of AD, however, with a largely unclear mechanism. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the protection of resveratrol against the neurotoxicity of β-amyloid peptide 25–35 (Aβ25–35) and further explore its underlying mechanism in the present study. PC12 cells were injuried by Aβ25–35, and resveratrol at different concentrations was added into the culture medium. We observed that resveratrol increased cell viability through the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) colorimetric assays. Flow cytometry indicated the reduction of cell apoptosis by resveratrol. Moreover, resveratrol also stabilized the intercellular Ca2+ homeostasis and attenuated Aβ25–35 neurotoxicity. Additionally, Aβ25–35-suppressed silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) activity was significantly reversed by resveratrol, resulting in the downregulation of Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1). Our results clearly revealed that resveratrol significantly protected PC12 cells and inhibited the β-amyloid-induced cell apoptosis through the upregulation of SIRT1. Moreover, as a downstream signal molecule, ROCK1 was negatively regulated by SIRT1. Taken together, our study demonstrated that SIRT1-ROCK1 pathway played a critical role in the pathomechanism of AD. PMID:23555824

  5. Regulation of serum amyloid A protein expression during the acute-phase response.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, L E; Whitehead, A S

    1998-01-01

    The acute-phase (AP) serum amyloid A proteins (A-SAA) are multifunctional apolipoproteins which are involved in cholesterol transport and metabolism, and in modulating numerous immunological responses during inflammation and the AP response to infection, trauma or stress. During the AP response the hepatic biosynthesis of A-SAA is up-regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and circulating concentrations can increase by up to 1000-fold. Chronically elevated A-SAA concentrations are a prerequisite for the pathogenesis of secondary amyloidosis, a progressive and fatal disease characterized by the deposition in major organs of insoluble plaques composed principally of proteolytically cleaved A-SAA, and may also contribute to physiological processes that lead to atherosclerosis. There is therefore a requirement for both positive and negative control mechanisms that permit the rapid induction of A-SAA expression until it has fulfilled its host-protective function(s) and subsequently ensure that its expression can be rapidly returned to baseline. These mechanisms include modulation of promoter activity involving, for example, the inducer nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and its inhibitor IkappaB, up-regulatory transcription factors of the nuclear factor for interleukin-6 (NF-IL6) family and transcriptional repressors such as yin and yang 1 (YY1). Post-transcriptional modulation involving changes in mRNA stability and translation efficiency permit further up- and down-regulatory control of A-SAA protein synthesis to be achieved. In the later stages of the AP response, A-SAA expression is effectively down-regulated via the increased production of cytokine antagonists such as the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and of soluble cytokine receptors, resulting in less signal transduction driven by pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:9729453

  6. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane. PMID:26673736

  7. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin. PMID:19117402

  8. Rapid Generation of Amyloid from Native Proteins In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dorta-Estremera, Stephanie M; Li, Jingjing; Cao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Proteins carry out crucial tasks in organisms by exerting functions elicited from their specific three dimensional folds. Although the native structures of polypeptides fulfill many purposes, it is now recognized that most proteins can adopt an alternative assembly of beta-sheet rich amyloid. Insoluble amyloid fibrils are initially associated with multiple human ailments, but they are increasingly shown as functional players participating in various important cellular processes. In addition, amyloid deposited in patient tissues contains nonproteinaceous components, such as nucleic acids and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). These cofactors can facilitate the formation of amyloid, resulting in the generation of different types of insoluble precipitates. By taking advantage of our understanding how proteins misfold via an intermediate stage of soluble amyloid precursor, we have devised a method to convert native proteins to amyloid fibrils in vitro. This approach allows one to prepare amyloid in large quantities, examine the properties of amyloid generated from specific proteins, and evaluate the structural changes accompanying the conversion. PMID:24335677

  9. Differential Effects of Structural Modifications on the Competition of Chalcones for the PIB Amyloid Imaging Ligand-Binding Site in Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Synthetic Aβ Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Fosso, Marina Y; McCarty, Katie; Head, Elizabeth; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; LeVine, Harry

    2016-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex brain disorder that still remains ill defined. In order to understand the significance of binding of different clinical in vivo imaging ligands to the polymorphic pathological features of AD brain, the molecular characteristics of the ligand interacting with its specific binding site need to be defined. Herein, we observed that tritiated Pittsburgh Compound B ((3)H-PIB) can be displaced from synthetic Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) fibrils and from the PIB binding complex purified from human AD brain (ADPBC) by molecules containing a chalcone structural scaffold. We evaluated how substitution on the chalcone scaffold alters its ability to displace (3)H-PIB from the synthetic fibrils and ADPBC. By comparing unsubstituted core chalcone scaffolds along with the effects of bromine and methyl substitution at various positions, we found that attaching a hydroxyl group on the ring adjacent to the carbonyl group (ring I) of the parent member of the chalcone family generally improved the binding affinity of chalcones toward ADPBC and synthetic fibrils F40 and F42. Furthermore, any substitution on ring I at the ortho-position of the carbonyl group greatly decreases the binding affinity of the chalcones, potentially as a result of steric hindrance. Together with the finding that neither our chalcones nor PIB interact with the Congo Red/X-34 binding site, these molecules provide new tools to selectively probe the PIB binding site that is found in human AD brain, but not in brains of AD pathology animal models. Our chalcone derivatives also provide important information on the effects of fibril polymorphism on ligand binding. PMID:26682772

  10. The Aβ-clearance protein transthyretin, like neprilysin, is epigenetically regulated by the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Caroline; Belyaev, Nikolai D; Nalivaeva, Natalia N; Turner, Anthony J

    2014-08-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the successive actions of β- and γ-secretases generates several biologically active metabolites including the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and the APP intracellular domain (AICD). By analogy with the Notch signalling pathway, AICD has been proposed to play a role in transcriptional regulation. Among the cohort of genes regulated by AICD is the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP). AICD binds to the NEP promoter causing transcriptional activation by competitive replacement with histone deacetylases (HDACs) leading to increased levels of NEP activity and hence increased Aβ clearance. We now show that the Aβ-clearance protein transthyretin (TTR) is also epigenetically up-regulated by AICD. Like NEP regulation, AICD derived specifically from the neuronal APP isoform, APP695 , binds directly to the TTR promoter displacing HDAC1 and HDAC3. Cell treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Gleevec (imatinib) or with the alkalizing agent NH4 Cl causes an accumulation of 'functional' AICD capable of up-regulating both TTR and NEP, leading to a reduction in total cellular Aβ levels. Pharmacological regulation of both NEP and TTR might represent a viable therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24528201

  11. Antimicrobial Properties of Amyloid Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Jang, Hyunbum; Capone, Ricardo; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    More than two dozen clinical syndromes known as amyloid diseases are characterized by the buildup of extended insoluble fibrillar deposits in tissues. These amorphous Congo red staining deposits known as amyloids exhibit a characteristic green birefringence and cross-β structure. Substantial evidence implicates oligomeric intermediates of amyloids as toxic species in the pathogenesis of these chronic disease states. A growing body of data has suggested that these toxic species form ion channels in cellular membranes causing disruption of calcium homeostasis, membrane depolarization, energy drainage, and in some cases apoptosis. Amyloid peptide channels exhibit a number of common biological properties including the universal U-shape β-strand-turn-β-strand structure, irreversible and spontaneous insertion into membranes, production of large heterogeneous single-channel conductances, relatively poor ion selectivity, inhibition by Congo red, and channel blockade by zinc. Recent evidence has suggested that increased amounts of amyloids are not only toxic to its host target cells but also possess antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, at least one human antimicrobial peptide, protegrin-1, which kills microbes by a channel-forming mechanism, has been shown to possess the ability to form extended amyloid fibrils very similar to those of classic disease-forming amyloids. In this paper, we will review the reported antimicrobial properties of amyloids and the implications of these discoveries for our understanding of amyloid structure and function. PMID:22081976

  12. Interactions driving the collapse of islet amyloid polypeptide: Implications for amyloid aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, Stephanie M.

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also known as amylin, is a 37-residue intrinsically disordered hormone involved in glucose regulation and gastric emptying. The aggregation of hIAPP into amyloid fibrils is believed to play a causal role in type 2 diabetes. To date, not much is known about the monomeric state of hIAPP or how it undergoes an irreversible transformation from disordered peptide to insoluble aggregate. IAPP contains a highly conserved disulfide bond that restricts hIAPP(1-8) into a short ring-like structure: N_loop. Removal or chemical reduction of N_loop not only prevents cell response upon binding to the CGRP receptor, but also alters the mass per length distribution of hIAPP fibers and the kinetics of fibril formation. The mechanism by which N_loop affects hIAPP aggregation is not yet understood, but is important for rationalizing kinetics and developing potential inhibitors. By measuring end-to-end contact formation rates, Vaiana et al. showed that N_loop induces collapsed states in IAPP monomers, implying attractive interactions between N_loop and other regions of the disordered polypeptide chain . We show that in addition to being involved in intra-protein interactions, the N_loop is involved in inter-protein interactions, which lead to the formation of extremely long and stable beta-turn fibers. These non-amyloid fibers are present in the 10 muM concentration range, under the same solution conditions in which hIAPP forms amyloid fibers. We discuss the effect of peptide cyclization on both intra- and inter-protein interactions, and its possible implications for aggregation. Our findings indicate a potential role of N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not previously been explored. Though our findings suggest that N_loop plays an important role in the pathway of amyloid formation, other naturally occurring IAPP variants that contain this structural feature are incapable of forming amyloids. For example, hIAPP readily

  13. Deformation behavior and mechanical properties of amyloid protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are most often associated with their pathological role in diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but they are now increasingly being considered for uses in functional engineering materials. They are among the stiffest protein fibers known but they are also rather brittle, and it is unclear how this combination of properties affects the behavior of amyloid structures at larger length scales, such as in films, wires or plaques. Using a coarse-grained model for amyloid fibrils, we study the mechanical response of amyloid nanowires and examine fundamental mechanical properties, including mechanisms of deformation and failure under tensile loading. We also explore the effect of varying the breaking strain and adhesion strength of the constituent amyloid fibrils on the properties of the larger structure. We find that deformation in the nanowires is controlled by a combination of fibril sliding and fibril failure and that there exists a transition from brittle to ductile behavior by either increasing the fibril failure strain or decreasing the strength of adhesion between fibrils. Furthermore, our results reveal that the mechanical properties of the nanowires are quite sensitive to changes in the properties of the individual fibrils, and the larger scale structures are found to be more mechanically robust than the constituent fibrils, for all cases considered. More broadly, this work demonstrates the promise of utilizing self-assembled biological building blocks in the development of hierarchical nanomaterials. PMID:23290516

  14. Osthole decreases beta amyloid levels through up-regulation of miR-107 in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yanan; Kong, Liang; Yao, Yingjia; Li, Shaoheng; Tao, Zhenyu; Yan, Yuhui; Yang, Jingxian

    2016-09-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although osthole has been shown to neuroprotective activity in AD, the exact molecular mechanism of its neuroprotective effects has not yet been fully elucidated. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to regulate multiple aspects of AD development and progression, indicating that targeting miRNAs could be a novel strategy to treat AD. In the current study, we investigated whether a natural coumarin derivative osthole could up-regulate miR-107, resulting in facilitating the cells survival, reducing LDH leakage, inhibiting apoptosis and reducing beta amyloid (Aβ) production in AD. We found that osthole treatment significantly up-regulate miR-107 expression and inhibited BACE1, one of the targets of miR-107. Administration of osthole to APP/PS1 transgenic mice resulted in a significant improvement in learning and memory function, which was associated with a significant a decrease in Aβ in the hippocampal and cortex region of the brain. Our findings demonstrated that osthole plays a neuroprotective activity role in part through up-regulate miR-107 in AD. PMID:27143098

  15. Pharmacological removal of serum amyloid P component from intracerebral plaques and cerebrovascular Aβ amyloid deposits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Millar, David J.; Richard-Londt, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Human amyloid deposits always contain the normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP), owing to its avid but reversible binding to all amyloid fibrils, including the amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils in the cerebral parenchyma plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). SAP promotes amyloid fibril formation in vitro, contributes to persistence of amyloid in vivo and is also itself directly toxic to cerebral neurons. We therefore developed (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC), a drug that removes SAP from the blood, and thereby also from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in patients with AD. Here we report that, after introduction of transgenic human SAP expression in the TASTPM double transgenic mouse model of AD, all the amyloid deposits contained human SAP. Depletion of circulating human SAP by CPHPC administration in these mice removed all detectable human SAP from both the intracerebral and cerebrovascular amyloid. The demonstration that removal of SAP from the blood and CSF also removes it from these amyloid deposits crucially validates the strategy of the forthcoming ‘Depletion of serum amyloid P component in Alzheimer's disease (DESPIAD)’ clinical trial of CPHPC. The results also strongly support clinical testing of CPHPC in patients with CAA. PMID:26842068

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  17. Combining Classical MD and QM calculations to elucidate complex system nucleation: a twisted, three-stranded, parallel β-sheet seeds amyloid fibril conception.

    PubMed

    Mompeán, Miguel; González, Carlos; Lomba, Enrique; Laurents, Douglas V

    2014-07-01

    The crystal structure of the Sup35 prion segment, GNNQQNY, revealed precise side chain packing and an extensive H-bond network. However, the conformers and stabilizing interactions involved at nascent amyloid formation are still unclear. Here, long molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations have been utilized to study the conformation and energetics of the initial structure that acts to nucleate further growth. Considering all the plausible intermediates that may act as stepping stones, we find that the initial nucleus is a twisted single-layer, three-stranded parallel β-sheet. H-bonds between β-strands in this twisted sheet, some of which differ from those of the crystal structure's nontwisted β-strands, are key for the nucleus' formation and stability. High level theoretical calculations of these H-bonds' energetics can account for this amyloid-like trimer's remarkable stability. The intermeshing of facing sheets to form the dry interface provides less stability and would occur between two three-stranded β-sheets without metastable water nanowires. PMID:24918329

  18. Production and regulation of functional amyloid curli fimbriae by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional amyloid, in the form of adhesive fimbrial proteins termed curli, was first described in Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Curli fibers adhere to various host cells and structural proteins, interact with components of the host immune system, and participate in biofilm formation. Shiga toxin...

  19. Multifaceted anti-amyloidogenic and pro-amyloidogenic effects of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Daisaku; Nomura, Ryo; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Okoshi, Tadakazu; Porcari, Riccardo; Bellotti, Vittorio; Naiki, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP), two major classical pentraxins in humans, are soluble pattern recognition molecules that regulate the innate immune system, but their chaperone activities remain poorly understood. Here, we examined their effects on the amyloid fibril formation from Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) (1-40) and on that from D76N β2-microglobulin (β2-m) which is related to hereditary systemic amyloidosis. CRP and SAP dose-dependently and substoichiometrically inhibited both Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m fibril formation in a Ca2+-independent manner. CRP and SAP interacted with fresh and aggregated Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m on the fibril-forming pathway. Interestingly, in the presence of Ca2+, SAP first inhibited, then significantly accelerated D76N β2-m fibril formation. Electron microscopically, the surface of the D76N β2-m fibril was coated with pentameric SAP. These data suggest that SAP first exhibits anti-amyloidogenic activity possibly via A face, followed by pro-amyloidogenic activity via B face, proposing a model that the pro- and anti-amyloidogenic activities of SAP are not mutually exclusive, but reflect two sides of the same coin, i.e., the B and A faces, respectively. Finally, SAP inhibits the heat-induced amorphous aggregation of human glutathione S-transferase. A possible role of pentraxins to maintain extracellular proteostasis is discussed. PMID:27380955

  20. Multifaceted anti-amyloidogenic and pro-amyloidogenic effects of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Daisaku; Nomura, Ryo; Mangione, P Patrizia; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Okoshi, Tadakazu; Porcari, Riccardo; Bellotti, Vittorio; Naiki, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP), two major classical pentraxins in humans, are soluble pattern recognition molecules that regulate the innate immune system, but their chaperone activities remain poorly understood. Here, we examined their effects on the amyloid fibril formation from Alzheimer's amyloid β (Aβ) (1-40) and on that from D76N β2-microglobulin (β2-m) which is related to hereditary systemic amyloidosis. CRP and SAP dose-dependently and substoichiometrically inhibited both Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m fibril formation in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. CRP and SAP interacted with fresh and aggregated Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m on the fibril-forming pathway. Interestingly, in the presence of Ca(2+), SAP first inhibited, then significantly accelerated D76N β2-m fibril formation. Electron microscopically, the surface of the D76N β2-m fibril was coated with pentameric SAP. These data suggest that SAP first exhibits anti-amyloidogenic activity possibly via A face, followed by pro-amyloidogenic activity via B face, proposing a model that the pro- and anti-amyloidogenic activities of SAP are not mutually exclusive, but reflect two sides of the same coin, i.e., the B and A faces, respectively. Finally, SAP inhibits the heat-induced amorphous aggregation of human glutathione S-transferase. A possible role of pentraxins to maintain extracellular proteostasis is discussed. PMID:27380955

  1. Magnetic fluid - a novel approach to treat amyloid-related diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosova, Andrea; Siposova, Katarina; Koneracka, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Vavra, Ivo; Fedunova, Diana; Bagelova, Jaroslava; Kopcansky, Peter; Gazova, Zuzana

    Protein amyloid aggregates are associated with several human pathologies termed amyloid-related diseases. We have investigated effect of two magnetic fluids (MFs) - electrostatically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MF1) and sterically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles by sodium oleate with adsorbed BSA (MF2) on amyloid aggregation of two proteins - human insulin and hen egg lysozyme. We have found that both MF1 and MF2 are able to interact with amyloid fibrils in vitro resulting into decreasing of amyloid aggregates. The extent of fibril disruption depends on MF concentration with extensive reduction of amyloid aggregates, 90% for lysozyme and 70% for insulin (ratio protein: MF=1:5). The obtained results suggest that magnetite component of MF play significant role in the process of amyloid fibril depolymerisation. Our findings indicate that MF1 and MF2 have potential to be used for treatment of amyloid diseases.

  2. Structure of amyloid oligomers and their mechanisms of toxicities: Targeting amyloid oligomers using novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Parveen; Fatima, Munazza Tamkeen; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Nusrat, Saima; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-05-23

    Protein misfolding is one of the leading causes of amyloidoses. Protein misfolding occurs from changes in environmental conditions and host of other factors, including errors in post-translational modifications, increase in the rate of degradation, error in trafficking, loss of binding partners and oxidative damage. Misfolding gives rise to the formation of partially unfolded or misfolded intermediates, which have exposed hydrophobic residues and interact with complementary intermediates to form oligomers and consequently protofibrils and fibrils. The amyloid fibrils accumulate as amyloid deposits in the brain and central nervous system in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Prion disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Initial studies have shown that amyloid fibrils were the main culprit behind toxicity that cause neurodegenerative diseases. However, attention shifted to the cytotoxicity of amyloid fibril precursors, notably amyloid oligomers, which are the major cause of toxicity. The mechanism of toxicity triggered by amyloid oligomers remains elusive. In this review, we have focused on the current knowledge of the structures of different aggregated states, including amyloid fibril, protofibrils, annular aggregates and oligomers. Based on the studies on the mechanism of toxicities, we hypothesize two major possible mechanisms of toxicities instigated by oligomers of Aβ (amyloid beta), PrP (prion protein) (106-126), and α-Syn (alpha-synuclein) including direct formation of ion channels and neuron membrane disruption by the increase in membrane conductance or leakage in the presence of small globulomers to large prefibrillar assemblies. Finally, we have discussed various novel innovative approaches that target amyloid oligomers in Alzheimer's diseases, Prion disease and Parkinson's disease. PMID:26974374

  3. The amyloid in familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin is related to pre-albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Husby, G; Ranløv, P J; Sletten, K; Marhaug, G

    1985-01-01

    Amyloid obtained from the myocardium of a patient (Han) with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin was studied. Gel filtration and electrophoresis of purified and denatured amyloid fibrils Han revealed various fractions ranging in mol. wt from 40,000 to 8,000 daltons. Amyloid Han and fractions reacted with an antiserum against amyloid Han showing a reaction of identity with each other; partial identity between Han and human pre-albumin was observed, while no reaction was seen with AA or AL proteins. Cardiac tissue sections from Han showed reactivity with antisera to amyloid Han, pre-albumin and protein AP, but not with anti-AA or anti-AL in indirect immunofluorescence. Amino acid composition and sequence studies of a protein fraction of amyloid Han with mol. wt 15,000 daltons confirmed the structural relationship with pre-albumin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3924450

  4. The amyloid in familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin is related to pre-albumin.

    PubMed

    Husby, G; Ranløv, P J; Sletten, K; Marhaug, G

    1985-04-01

    Amyloid obtained from the myocardium of a patient (Han) with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin was studied. Gel filtration and electrophoresis of purified and denatured amyloid fibrils Han revealed various fractions ranging in mol. wt from 40,000 to 8,000 daltons. Amyloid Han and fractions reacted with an antiserum against amyloid Han showing a reaction of identity with each other; partial identity between Han and human pre-albumin was observed, while no reaction was seen with AA or AL proteins. Cardiac tissue sections from Han showed reactivity with antisera to amyloid Han, pre-albumin and protein AP, but not with anti-AA or anti-AL in indirect immunofluorescence. Amino acid composition and sequence studies of a protein fraction of amyloid Han with mol. wt 15,000 daltons confirmed the structural relationship with pre-albumin. PMID:3924450

  5. Islet amyloid polypeptide-induced membrane leakage involves uptake of lipids by forming amyloid fibers.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Emma; Engel, Maarten F M; Sakharov, Dmitri V; Sprong, Mariette; Jacobs, Jet; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-11-01

    Fibril formation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is associated with cell death of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A likely cause for the cytotoxicity of human IAPP is that it destroys the barrier properties of the cell membrane. Here, we show by fluorescence confocal microscopy on lipid vesicles that the process of hIAPP amyloid formation is accompanied by a loss of barrier function, whereby lipids are extracted from the membrane and taken up in the forming amyloid deposits. No membrane interaction was observed when preformed fibrils were used. It is proposed that lipid uptake from the cell membrane is responsible for amyloid-induced membrane damage and that this represents a general mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of amyloid forming proteins. PMID:15527771

  6. Rational design of potent human transthyretin amyloid disease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, T; Petrassi, H M; Oza, V B; Raman, P; Kelly, J W; Sacchettini, J C

    2000-04-01

    The human amyloid disorders, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, familial amyloid cardiomyopathy and senile systemic amyloidosis, are caused by insoluble transthyretin (TTR) fibrils, which deposit in the peripheral nerves and heart tissue. Several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and structurally similar compounds have been found to strongly inhibit the formation of TTR amyloid fibrils in vitro. These include flufenamic acid, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, and resveratrol. Crystal structures of the protein-drug complexes have been determined to allow detailed analyses of the protein-drug interactions that stabilize the native tetrameric conformation of TTR and inhibit the formation of amyloidogenic TTR. Using a structure-based drug design approach ortho-trifluormethylphenyl anthranilic acid and N-(meta-trifluoromethylphenyl) phenoxazine 4, 6-dicarboxylic acid have been discovered to be very potent and specific TTR fibril formation inhibitors. This research provides a rationale for a chemotherapeutic approach for the treatment of TTR-associated amyloid diseases. PMID:10742177

  7. Mechanistic Contributions of Biological Cofactors in Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Andraka, Nagore; De Carufel, Carole Anne; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is associated with the deposition of fibrillar aggregates in pancreatic islets. The major protein component of islet amyloids is the glucomodulatory hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). Islet amyloid fibrils are virtually always associated with several biomolecules, including apolipoprotein E, metals, glycosaminoglycans, and various lipids. IAPP amyloidogenesis has been originally perceived as a self-assembly homogeneous process in which the inherent aggregation propensity of the peptide and its local concentration constitute the major driving forces to fibrillization. However, over the last two decades, numerous studies have shown a prominent role of amyloid cofactors in IAPP fibrillogenesis associated with the etiology of type II diabetes. It is increasingly evident that the biochemical microenvironment in which IAPP amyloid formation occurs and the interactions of the polypeptide with various biomolecules not only modulate the rate and extent of aggregation, but could also remodel the amyloidogenesis process as well as the structure, toxicity, and stability of the resulting fibrils. PMID:26576436

  8. Apolipoprotein C-II Adopts Distinct Structures in Complex with Micellar and Submicellar Forms of the Amyloid-Inhibiting Lipid-Mimetic Dodecylphosphocholine.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy M; Griffin, Michael D W; McGillivray, Duncan J; Knott, Robert B; Wood, Kathleen; Masters, Colin L; Kirby, Nigel; Curtain, Cyril C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of amyloid deposits is a common feature of a broad range of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The basis and role of amyloid deposition in the pathogenesis of these diseases is still being defined, however an interesting feature of amyloidogenic proteins is that the majority of the pathologically associated proteins are involved in lipid homeostasis, be it in lipid transport, incorporation into membranes, or the regulation of lipid pathways. Thus, amyloid-forming proteins commonly bind lipids, and lipids are generally involved in the proper folding of these proteins. However, understanding of the basis for these lipid-related aspects of amyloidogenesis is lacking. Thus, we have used the apolipoprotein C-II amyloid model system in conjunction with x-ray and neutron scattering analyses to address this problem. Apolipoprotein C-II is a well-studied model system of systemic amyloid fibril formation, with a clear and well-defined pathway for fibril formation, where the effects of lipid interaction are characterized, particularly for the lipid mimetic dodecylphosphocholine. We show that the micellar state of an inhibitory lipid can have a very significant effect on protein conformation, with micelles stabilizing a particular α-helical structure, whereas submicellar lipids stabilize a very different dimeric, α-helical structure. These results indicate that lipids may have an important role in the development and progression of amyloid-related diseases. PMID:26745412

  9. Charge regulation phenomenon predicted from the modeling of polypeptide electrophoretic mobilities as a relevant mechanism of amyloid-beta peptide oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides and their aggregates are modeled to study the amyloidogenic pathway associated with Alzheimer´s Disease. The near molecule pH generated by the intraparticle charge regulation phenomenon during the oligomerization of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides is evaluated and discussed as a relevant mechanism supporting the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" proposed in the literature. A theoretical framework associated with the oligomerization of amyloid-beta peptides including simple scaling laws and the consideration of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of oligomers is presented. The central finding is the explanation of the near molecule pH change toward the pI when the oligomerization number increases. These results allow one to rationalize consecutive physical stages that validate the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Concluding remarks involving mainly the effects of pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena on the amyloidogenic pathway with some suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:26718015

  10. Quaternary structure defines a large class of amyloid-β oligomers neutralized by sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Reed, Miranda N.; Kotilinek, Linda A.; Grant, Marianne K.O.; Forster, Colleen L.; Qiang, Wei; Shapiro, Samantha L.; Reichl, John H.; Chiang, Angie C.A.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Cleary, James P.; Zahs, Kathleen R.; Ashe, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) as amyloid fibrils and toxic oligomers is an important step in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are numerous potentially toxic oligomers and little is known about their neurological effects when generated in the living brain. Here, we show that Aβ oligomers can be assigned to one of at least two classes (Type 1 and Type 2) based on their temporal, spatial and structural relationships to amyloid fibrils. The Type 2 oligomers are related to amyloid fibrils and represent the majority of oligomers generated in vivo, but remain confined to the vicinity of amyloid plaques and do not impair cognition at levels relevant to AD. Type 1 oligomers are unrelated to amyloid fibrils and may have greater potential to cause global neural dysfunction in AD because they are dispersed. These results refine our understanding of the pathogenicity of Aβ oligomers in vivo. PMID:26051935

  11. SorLA/LR11 regulates processing of amyloid precursor protein via interaction with adaptors GGA and PACS-1.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Sporbert, Anje; Rohe, Michael; Reimer, Tatjana; Rehm, Armin; Andersen, Olav M; Willnow, Thomas E

    2007-11-01

    SorLA has been recognized as a novel sorting receptor that regulates trafficking and processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and that represents a significant risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms that control intracellular trafficking of sorLA and their relevance for APP processing. We demonstrate that sorLA acts as a retention factor for APP in trans-Golgi compartments/trans-Golgi network, preventing release of the precursor into regular processing pathways. Proper localization and activity of sorLA are dependent on functional interaction with GGA and PACS-1, adaptor proteins involved in protein transport to and from the trans-Golgi network. Aberrant targeting of sorLA to the recycling compartment or the plasma membrane causes faulty APP trafficking and imbalance in non-amyloidogenic and amyloidogenic processing fates. Thus, our findings identified altered routing of sorLA as a major cellular mechanism contributing to abnormal APP processing and enhanced amyloid beta-peptide formation. PMID:17855360

  12. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  13. Stable, Metastable, and Kinetically Trapped Amyloid Aggregate Phases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in a multitude of human disorders that range from Alzheimer’s disease to type II diabetes. Compact oligomeric species, observed early during amyloid formation, are reported as the molecular entities responsible for the toxic effects of amyloid self-assembly. However, the relation between early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. We show that these different structures occupy well-defined regions in a peculiar phase diagram. Lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after they cross a salt and protein concentration-dependent threshold. We also determine a boundary for the onset of amyloid oligomer precipitation. The oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. These experimentally determined boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions that account for salt-modulated charge repulsion. The model also incorporates the metastable and kinetic character of oligomer phases. Similarities and differences of amyloid oligomer assembly to metastable liquid–liquid phase separation of proteins and to surfactant aggregation are discussed. PMID:25469942

  14. Direct interaction of beta-amyloid with Na,K-ATPase as a putative regulator of the enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Anashkina, Anastasia A; Adzhubei, Alexei A; Burnysheva, Ksenia M; Lakunina, Valentina A; Kamanina, Yulia V; Dergousova, Elena A; Lopina, Olga D; Ogunshola, Omolara O; Bogdanova, Anna Yu; Makarov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    By maintaining the Na(+) and K(+) transmembrane gradient mammalian Na,K-ATPase acts as a key regulator of neuronal electrotonic properties. Na,K-ATPase has an important role in synaptic transmission and memory formation. Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) at the early stages of Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by reduction of Na,K-ATPase functional activity. The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not known. Here we show that the monomeric Aβ(1-42) forms a tight (Kd of 3 μM), enthalpy-driven equimolar complex with α1β1 Na,K-ATPase. The complex formation results in dose-dependent inhibition of the enzyme hydrolytic activity. The binding site of Aβ(1-42) is localized in the "gap" between the alpha- and beta-subunits of Na,K-ATPase, disrupting the enzyme functionality by preventing the subunits from shifting towards each other. Interaction of Na,K-ATPase with exogenous Aβ(1-42) leads to a pronounced decrease of the enzyme transport and hydrolytic activity and Src-kinase activation in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. This interaction allows regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by short-term increase of the Aβ(1-42) level. However prolonged increase of Aβ(1-42) level under pathological conditions could lead to chronical inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and disruption of neuronal function. Taken together, our data suggest the role of beta-amyloid as a novel physiological regulator of Na,K-ATPase. PMID:27296892

  15. Direct interaction of beta-amyloid with Na,K-ATPase as a putative regulator of the enzyme function

    PubMed Central

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Burnysheva, Ksenia M.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Kamanina, Yulia V.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Ogunshola, Omolara O.; Bogdanova, Anna Yu.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    By maintaining the Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradient mammalian Na,K-ATPase acts as a key regulator of neuronal electrotonic properties. Na,K-ATPase has an important role in synaptic transmission and memory formation. Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease is accompanied by reduction of Na,K-ATPase functional activity. The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not known. Here we show that the monomeric Aβ(1-42) forms a tight (Kd of 3 μM), enthalpy-driven equimolar complex with α1β1 Na,K-ATPase. The complex formation results in dose-dependent inhibition of the enzyme hydrolytic activity. The binding site of Aβ(1-42) is localized in the “gap” between the alpha- and beta-subunits of Na,K-ATPase, disrupting the enzyme functionality by preventing the subunits from shifting towards each other. Interaction of Na,K-ATPase with exogenous Aβ(1-42) leads to a pronounced decrease of the enzyme transport and hydrolytic activity and Src-kinase activation in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. This interaction allows regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by short-term increase of the Aβ(1-42) level. However prolonged increase of Aβ(1-42) level under pathological conditions could lead to chronical inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and disruption of neuronal function. Taken together, our data suggest the role of beta-amyloid as a novel physiological regulator of Na,K-ATPase. PMID:27296892

  16. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  17. Individual antigenic specificity and cross-reactions among amyloid preparations from different individuals

    PubMed Central

    Husby, G.; Natvig, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils were isolated from eleven amyloid-laden organs of six patients. By alkaline degradation, soluble units were obtained which gave antibody formation in rabbits. Gel precipitation and haemagglutination inhibition were used to characterize antigens of the amyloid. Evidence was obtained that amyloids from different organs of the same individual were identical in the antigenicity. In contrast, amyloids from different individuals each showed unique individual specificity. Besides this, antigenic cross-reactions were noted between the amyloid preparations. Finally, evidence for antigenic cross-reactivity between certain amyloid preparations and immunoglobulin light chains was obtained. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4624554

  18. Acute ER stress regulates amyloid precursor protein processing through ubiquitin-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Sun; Hong, HyunSeok; Kim, Chaeyoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2015-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavage by β-secretase and γ-secretase enzymes. APP is an integral membrane protein, and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD; however, the biological function of APP is still unclear. The present study shows that APP is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the CHO cell line in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, such as calcium ionophore, A23187, induced calcium influx. Increased levels of intracellular calcium by A23187 induces polyubiquitination of APP, causing its degradation. A23187-induced reduction of APP is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, an increase in levels of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) marker, E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, proteasome activity, and decreased levels of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP25 were observed during ER stress. In addition, we found that APP interacts with USP25. These findings suggest that acute ER stress induces degradation of full-length APP via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:25740315

  19. Delta-secretase cleaves amyloid precursor protein and regulates the pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Su Kang, Seong; Duong, Duc M.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Cao, Xuebing; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Ping Yu, Shan; Jia, Jianping; Levey, Allan I.; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent deposition of amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite age being the greatest risk factor for AD, the molecular mechanisms linking ageing to APP processing are unknown. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a pH-controlled cysteine proteinase, is activated during ageing and mediates APP proteolytic processing. AEP cleaves APP at N373 and N585 residues, selectively influencing the amyloidogenic fragmentation of APP. AEP is activated in normal mice in an age-dependent manner, and is strongly activated in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model and human AD brains. Deletion of AEP from 5XFAD or APP/PS1 mice decreases senile plaque formation, ameliorates synapse loss, elevates long-term potentiation and protects memory. Blockade of APP cleavage by AEP in mice alleviates pathological and behavioural deficits. Thus, AEP acts as a δ-secretase, contributing to the age-dependent pathogenic mechanisms in AD. PMID:26549211

  20. Delta-secretase cleaves amyloid precursor protein and regulates the pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Su Kang, Seong; Duong, Duc M; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Cao, Xuebing; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E; Ping Yu, Shan; Jia, Jianping; Levey, Allan I; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent deposition of amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite age being the greatest risk factor for AD, the molecular mechanisms linking ageing to APP processing are unknown. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a pH-controlled cysteine proteinase, is activated during ageing and mediates APP proteolytic processing. AEP cleaves APP at N373 and N585 residues, selectively influencing the amyloidogenic fragmentation of APP. AEP is activated in normal mice in an age-dependent manner, and is strongly activated in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model and human AD brains. Deletion of AEP from 5XFAD or APP/PS1 mice decreases senile plaque formation, ameliorates synapse loss, elevates long-term potentiation and protects memory. Blockade of APP cleavage by AEP in mice alleviates pathological and behavioural deficits. Thus, AEP acts as a δ-secretase, contributing to the age-dependent pathogenic mechanisms in AD. PMID:26549211

  1. Template-directed deposition of amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Chanki

    The formation of amyloid plaques in tissue is a pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Amyloid deposition, the process of amyloid plaque growth by the association of individual soluble amyloid molecules with a pre-existing amyloid template (i.e. plaque), is known to be critical for amyloid formation in vivo. In order to characterize amyloid deposition, we developed novel, synthetic amyloid templates like amyloid plaques in the human Alzheimer's brain by attaching amyloid seeds covalently onto an N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated surface. Amyloid plaques with a characteristic beta-sheet structure formed through a conformational rearrangement of soluble insulin or Abeta monomers upon interaction with the template. The amyloid deposition rate followed saturation kinetics with respect to insulin concentration in the solution. According to visualization of temporal evolution of Abeta plaque deposition on a template, it was found that mature amyloid plaques serve as a sink of soluble Abeta in a solution as well as a reservoir of small aggregates such as oligomers and protofibrils. Quantitative analysis of seeding efficiencies of three different Abeta species revealed that oligomeric forms of Abeta act more efficiently as seeds than monomers or fibrils do. Furthermore, studies on the interaction between Abeta40 and 42 showed an important role of Abeta42 in amyloid deposition. A slightly acidic condition was found to be unfavorable for amyloid plaque formation. Effects of metal ions on amyloid deposition indicated that Fe3+, but not Cu3 and Zn2+, is important for the deposition of amyloid plaques. The binding of Fe3+ to Abeta42 peptide was confirmed by using SIMS analysis. Zn2+ induced nonfibrillar amorphous aggregates, but the release of Zn2+ from Abeta42 deposits by Fe3+ triggered the formation of amyloid fibers. Effects or metal ion chelators such as ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, deferoxamine, and clioquinol on amyloid deposition were tested to

  2. Fueling the Fire with Fibers: Bacterial Amyloids Promote Inflammatory Disorders.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Caitlin N; Dodson, Karen W; Chapman, Matthew R; Hultgren, Scott J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial infection is associated with increased morbidity in patients with systematic lupus erythematosus. In a recent Immunity paper, Gallo et al. (2015) report that extracellular DNA is bound tightly by bacterial amyloid fibrils during biofilm formation and that amyloid/DNA composites are immune stimulators when injected into mice, leading to autoimmunity. PMID:26159711

  3. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  5. Molecular basis for insulin fibril assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Sievers, Stuart A.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Wall, Joseph S.; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In the rare medical condition termed injection amyloidosis, extracellular fibrils of insulin are observed. We found that the segment of the insulin B-chain with sequence LVEALYL is the smallest segment that both nucleates and inhibits the fibrillation of full-length insulin in a molar ratio-dependent manner, suggesting that this segment is central to the cross-{beta} spine of the insulin fibril. In isolation from the rest of the protein, LVEALYL forms microcrystalline aggregates with fibrillar morphology, the structure of which we determined to 1 {angstrom} resolution. The LVEALYL segments are stacked into pairs of tightly interdigitated {beta}-sheets, each pair displaying the dry steric zipper interface typical of amyloid-like fibrils. This structure leads to a model for fibrils of human insulin consistent with electron microscopic, x-ray fiber diffraction, and biochemical studies.

  6. Molecular basis for insulin fibril assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Sievers, Stuart A.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Wall, Joseph S.; Eisenberg, David

    2009-01-01

    In the rare medical condition termed injection amyloidosis, extracellular fibrils of insulin are observed. We found that the segment of the insulin B-chain with sequence LVEALYL is the smallest segment that both nucleates and inhibits the fibrillation of full-length insulin in a molar ratio–dependent manner, suggesting that this segment is central to the cross-β spine of the insulin fibril. In isolation from the rest of the protein, LVEALYL forms microcrystalline aggregates with fibrillar morphology, the structure of which we determined to 1 Å resolution. The LVEALYL segments are stacked into pairs of tightly interdigitated β-sheets, each pair displaying the dry steric zipper interface typical of amyloid-like fibrils. This structure leads to a model for fibrils of human insulin consistent with electron microscopic, x-ray fiber diffraction, and biochemical studies. PMID:19864624

  7. Amyloid-β peptide aggregation and the influence of carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Hui, Xi; Guang-Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Soluble peptides or proteins can self-aggregate into insoluble, ordered amyloid fibrils under appropriate conditions. These amyloid aggregates are the hallmarks of several human diseases ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. In this review, we first introduce the common structural features of amyloid fibrils and the amyloid fibrillation kinetics determined from experimental studies. Then, we discuss the structural models of Alzheimer’s amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils derived from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. On the computational side, molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomic details of structures and the underlying oligomerization mechanisms. We finally summarize recent progress in atomistic simulation studies on the oligomerization of Aβ (including full-length Aβ and its fragments) and the influence of carbon nanoparticles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274075 and 91227102).

  8. The Ubiquitin Ligase Synoviolin Up-regulates Amyloid β Production by Targeting a Negative Regulator of γ-Secretase, Rer1, for Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Komano, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the deposition of Aβ, which is generated from the amyloid precursor protein through its cleavage by β- and γ-secretases. The γ-secretase complex component nicastrin (NCT) plays significant roles in the assembly and proper trafficking of the γ-secretase complex and in the recognition of amyloid precursor protein. NCT is incorporated into the γ-secretase complex in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and glycosylated in the Golgi. In contrast, unassembled NCT is retrieved or retained in the ER by the protein Retention in endoplasmic reticulum 1 (Rer1). We reported previously that synoviolin (Syvn), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, degrades NCT and affects the generation of Aβ. Here, we examined in more detail the effect of Syvn on the generation of Aβ. We found that overexpression of a dominant negative form of Syvn (C307A mutant) and a Syvn-RNAi decreased the generation of Aβ. These results indicate that the ubiquitin ligase activity of Syvn up-regulates the generation of Aβ. We hypothesized, therefore, that Syvn regulates the assembly or localization of the γ-secretase complex by ubiquitinating Rer1, resulting in its subsequent degradation. Our findings that the level of Rer1 was increased in Syvn knockout fibroblasts because of inhibition of its degradation support this hypothesis. Moreover, we found that Rer1 interacts with Syvn in the ER, is ubiquitinated by Syvn, and is then degraded via the proteasome or lysosomal pathways. Finally, we showed that localization of mature NCT to the plasma membrane as well as γ-secretase complex levels are decreased in fibroblasts of Syvn knockout mice. Thus, it is likely that Syvn regulates the assembly of the γ-secretase complex via the degradation of Rer1, which results in the generation of Aβ. PMID:23129766

  9. The metazoan protein disaggregase and amyloid depolymerase system

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Mariana P; Shorter, James

    2013-01-01

    A baffling aspect of metazoan proteostasis is the lack of an Hsp104 ortholog that rapidly disaggregates and reactivates misfolded polypeptides trapped in stress induced disordered aggregates, preamyloid oligomers, or amyloid fibrils. By contrast, in bacteria, protozoa, chromista, fungi, and plants, Hsp104 orthologs are highly conserved and confer huge selective advantages in stress tolerance. Moreover, in fungi, the amyloid remodeling activity of Hsp104 has enabled deployment of prions for various beneficial modalities. Thus, a longstanding conundrum has remained unanswered: how do metazoan cells renature aggregated proteins or resolve amyloid fibrils without Hsp104? Here, we highlight recent advances that unveil the metazoan protein-disaggregase machinery, comprising Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, which synergize to dissolve disordered aggregates, but are unable to rapidly solubilize stable amyloid fibrils. However, Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40 exploit the slow monomer exchange dynamics of amyloid, and can slowly depolymerize amyloid fibrils from their ends in a manner that is stimulated by small heat shock proteins. Upregulation of this system could have key therapeutic applications in various protein-misfolding disorders. Intriguingly, yeast Hsp104 can interface with metazoan Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40 to rapidly eliminate disease associated amyloid. Thus, metazoan proteostasis is receptive to augmentation with exogenous disaggregases, which opens a number of therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24401655

  10. Critical role for sphingosine kinase-1 in regulating survival of neuroblastoma cells exposed to amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Brouchet, Anne; Pchejetski, Dimitri; Brizuela, Leyre; Garcia, Virginie; Altié, Marie-Françoise; Maddelein, Marie-Lise; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    We examined the role of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), a critical regulator of the ceramide/sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) biostat, in the regulation of death and survival of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in response to amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide (25-35). Upon incubation with Abeta, SH-SY5Y cells displayed a marked down-regulation of SphK1 activity coupled with an increase in the ceramide/S1P ratio followed by cell death. This mechanism was redox-sensitive; N-acetylcysteine totally abrogated the down-regulation of SphK1 activity and strongly inhibited Abeta-induced cell death. SphK1 overexpression impaired the cytotoxicity of Abeta, whereas SphK1 silencing by RNA interference mimicked Abeta-induced cell death, thereby establishing a critical role for SphK1. We further demonstrated that SphK1 could mediate the well established cytoprotective action of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) against Abeta toxicity. A dominant-negative form of SphK1 or its pharmacological inhibition not only abrogated IGF-I-triggered stimulation of SphK1 but also hampered IGF-I protective effect. Similarly to IGF-I, the neuroprotective action of TGF-beta1 was also dependent on SphK1 activity; activation of SphK1 as well as cell survival were impeded by a dominant-negative form of SphK1. Taken together, these results provide the first illustration of SphK1 role as a critical regulator of death and survival of Abeta-treated cells. PMID:17522181

  11. TREM2 Haplodeficiency in Mice and Humans Impairs the Microglia Barrier Function Leading to Decreased Amyloid Compaction and Severe Axonal Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Condello, Carlo; Keene, C Dirk; Wang, Yaming; Bird, Thomas D; Paul, Steven M; Luo, Wenjie; Colonna, Marco; Baddeley, David; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2016-05-18

    Haplodeficiency of the microglia gene TREM2 increases risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) but the mechanisms remain uncertain. To investigate this, we used high-resolution confocal and super-resolution (STORM) microscopy in AD-like mice and human AD tissue. We found that microglia processes, rich in TREM2, tightly surround early amyloid fibrils and plaques promoting their compaction and insulation. In Trem2- or DAP12-haplodeficient mice and in humans with R47H TREM2 mutations, microglia had a markedly reduced ability to envelop amyloid deposits. This led to an increase in less compact plaques with longer and branched amyloid fibrils resulting in greater surface exposure to adjacent neurites. This was associated with more severe neuritic tau hyperphosphorylation and axonal dystrophy around amyloid deposits. Thus, TREM2 deficiency may disrupt the formation of a neuroprotective microglia barrier that regulates amyloid compaction and insulation. Pharmacological modulation of this barrier could be a novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:27196974

  12. Apolipoprotein serum amyloid A down-regulates smooth-muscle cell lipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, B M; Veverbrants, M; Fine, R E; Blusztajn, J K; Salmona, M; Patel, A; Sipe, J D

    1999-01-01

    The addition of acute-phase apolipoprotein serum amyloid A (SAA) to cultured aortic smooth-muscle cells caused a decrease in the incorporation of [(14)C]acetate into lipids. Optimal inhibition of lipid biosynthesis was achieved with 2 microM SAA, and the effect was maintained for up to 1 week when SAA was included in the culture medium. Lipid extracts were subjected to TLC and it was determined that the SAA-induced decrease in [(14)C]acetate incorporation into lipids was attributable to decreases in cholesterol, phospholipid and triglyceride levels. The accumulated mass of cholesterol and phospholipid in SAA-treated cultures was significantly less than that of controls, with no change in the accumulated protein. Moreover, SAA had no effect on either protein synthesis or DNA synthesis, suggesting that SAA specifically alters lipid synthesis. By using a peptide corresponding to the cholesterol-binding domain of acute-phase SAA (amino acids 1-18), it was shown that this region of the molecule was as effective as the full-length protein in decreasing lipid synthesis and the accumulation of cholesterol and phospholipid. The implications of these findings for atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease are discussed. PMID:10548527

  13. Regulation of distinct pools of amyloid β-protein by multiple cellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Leissring, Malcolm A; Turner, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular and intracellular deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The study of rare, familial forms of AD has shown that sustained elevations in the production of Aβ (either all forms or specific pathogenic variants thereof) are sufficient to trigger the full spectrum of cognitive and histopathological features of the disease. Although the exact cause or causes remain unknown, emerging evidence suggests that impairments in the clearance of Aβ, after it is produced, may underlie the vast majority of sporadic AD cases. This review focuses on Aβ-degrading proteases (AβDPs), which have emerged as particularly important mediators of Aβ clearance. A wide variety of proteases that - by virtue of their particular regional and subcellular localization profiles - define distinct pools of Aβ have been identified. Different pools of Aβ, in turn, may contribute differentially to the pathogenesis of the disease. The study of individual AβDPs, therefore, promises to offer new insights into the mechanistic basis of AD pathogenesis and, ultimately, may facilitate the development of effective methods for its prevention or treatment or both. PMID:23953275

  14. Regulation of distinct pools of amyloid β-protein by multiple cellular proteases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive, age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular and intracellular deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). The study of rare, familial forms of AD has shown that sustained elevations in the production of Aβ (either all forms or specific pathogenic variants thereof) are sufficient to trigger the full spectrum of cognitive and histopathological features of the disease. Although the exact cause or causes remain unknown, emerging evidence suggests that impairments in the clearance of Aβ, after it is produced, may underlie the vast majority of sporadic AD cases. This review focuses on Aβ-degrading proteases (AβDPs), which have emerged as particularly important mediators of Aβ clearance. A wide variety of proteases that – by virtue of their particular regional and subcellular localization profiles – define distinct pools of Aβ have been identified. Different pools of Aβ, in turn, may contribute differentially to the pathogenesis of the disease. The study of individual AβDPs, therefore, promises to offer new insights into the mechanistic basis of AD pathogenesis and, ultimately, may facilitate the development of effective methods for its prevention or treatment or both. PMID:23953275

  15. The stress response neuropeptide CRF increases amyloid-β production by regulating γ-secretase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Ran, Yong; Jung, Joo In; Holmes, Oliver; Price, Ashleigh R; Smithson, Lisa; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Han, Chul; Wolfe, Michael S; Daaka, Yehia; Ryabinin, Andrey E; Kim, Seong-Hun; Hauger, Richard L; Golde, Todd E; Felsenstein, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    The biological underpinnings linking stress to Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk are poorly understood. We investigated how corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), a critical stress response mediator, influences amyloid-β (Aβ) production. In cells, CRF treatment increases Aβ production and triggers CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1) and γ-secretase internalization. Co-immunoprecipitation studies establish that γ-secretase associates with CRFR1; this is mediated by β-arrestin binding motifs. Additionally, CRFR1 and γ-secretase co-localize in lipid raft fractions, with increased γ-secretase accumulation upon CRF treatment. CRF treatment also increases γ-secretase activityin vitro, revealing a second, receptor-independent mechanism of action. CRF is the first endogenous neuropeptide that can be shown to directly modulate γ-secretase activity. Unexpectedly, CRFR1 antagonists also increased Aβ. These data collectively link CRF to increased Aβ through γ-secretase and provide mechanistic insight into how stress may increase AD risk. They also suggest that direct targeting of CRF might be necessary to effectively modulate this pathway for therapeutic benefit in AD, as CRFR1 antagonists increase Aβ and in some cases preferentially increase Aβ42 via complex effects on γ-secretase. PMID:25964433

  16. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs thave been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  17. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  18. Adenoviral expression of murine serum amyloid A proteins to study amyloid fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kindy, M S; King, A R; Yu, J; Gerardot, C; Whitley, J; de Beer, F C

    1998-06-15

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are one of the most inducible acute-phase reactants and are precursors of secondary amyloidosis. In the mouse, SAA1 and SAA2 are induced in approximately equal quantities in response to amyloid induction models. These two isotypes differ in only 9 of 103 amino acid residues; however, only SAA2 is selectively deposited into amyloid fibrils. SAA expression in the CE/J mouse species is an exception in that gene duplication did not occur and the CE/J variant is a hybrid molecule sharing features of SAA1 and SAA2. However, even though it is more closely related to SAA2 it is not deposited as amyloid fibrils. We have developed an adenoviral vector system to overexpress SAA proteins in cell culture to determine the ability of these proteins to form amyloid fibrils, and to study the structural features in relation to amyloid formation. Both the SAA2 and CE/J SAA proteins were synthesized in large quantities and purified to homogeneity. Electron microscopic analysis of the SAA proteins revealed that the SAA2 protein was capable of forming amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J SAA was incapable. Radiolabelled SAAs were associated with normal or acute-phase high-density lipoproteins (HDLs); we examined them for their clearance from the circulation. In normal mice, SAA2 had a half-life of 70 min and CE/J SAA had a half-life of 120 min; however, in amyloid mice 50% of the SAA2 cleared in 55 min, compared with 135 min for the CE/J protein. When the SAA proteins were associated with acute-phase HDLs, SAA2 clearance was decreased to 60 min in normal mice compared with 30 min in amyloidogenic mice. Both normal and acute-phase HDLs were capable of depositing SAA2 into preformed amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J protein did not become associated with amyloid fibrils. This established approach opens the doors for large-scale SAA production and for the examination of specific amino acids involved in the fibrillogenic capability of the SAA2 molecule in vitro

  19. Seizure-Induced Regulations of Amyloid-β, STEP61, and STEP61 Substrates Involved in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Soo; Royston, Sara E.; Lee, Gunhee; Wang, Shuwei; Chung, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline. Pathologic accumulation of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers impairs synaptic plasticity and causes epileptic seizures, both of which contribute to cognitive dysfunction in AD. However, whether seizures could regulate Aβ-induced synaptic weakening remains unclear. Here we show that a single episode of electroconvulsive seizures (ECS) increased protein expression of membrane-associated STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP61) and decreased tyrosine-phosphorylation of its substrates N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN2B and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in the rat hippocampus at 2 days following a single ECS. Interestingly, a significant decrease in ERK1/2 expression and an increase in APP and Aβ levels were observed at 3-4 days following a single ECS when STEP61 level returned to the baseline. Given that pathologic levels of Aβ increase STEP61 activity and STEP61-mediated dephosphorylation of GluN2B and ERK1/2 leads to NMDAR internalization and ERK1/2 inactivation, we propose that upregulation of STEP61 and downregulation of GluN2B and ERK1/2 phosphorylation mediate compensatory weakening of synaptic strength in response to acute enhancement of hippocampal network activity, whereas delayed decrease in ERK1/2 expression and increase in APP and Aβ expression may contribute to the maintenance of this synaptic weakening. PMID:27127657

  20. Investigating the permanent electric dipole moment of beta-lactoglobulin fibrils, using transient electric birefringence.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S S; Venema, P; van der Ploeg, J P M; van der Linden, E; Sagis, L M C; Donald, A M

    2006-06-15

    Amyloid fibrils, which are polymeric assemblies of protein molecules, have been intensively studied on a structural level, yet due to complications such as the disorder within the molecules, several aspects of their structure remain mysterious. Similarly, the kinetics of assembly are not well understood. Here we investigate the electric dipole moment of beta-lactoglobulin fibrils, a model amyloid fibril system, by applying the technique of transient electric birefringence. This moment appears to be large, and comparable to the total moment of the constituent protein monomers if they were joined in a chain, head-to-tail, without changing conformation, suggesting an ordered joining of monomers in the fibril. Such an ordered assembly may have implications for the assembly mechanism of beta-lactoglobulin fibrils in particular, and amyloid fibrils in general. PMID:16489587

  1. A Stable Mutant Predisposes Antibody Domains to Amyloid Formation through Specific Non-Native Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nokwe, Cardine N; Hora, Manuel; Zacharias, Martin; Yagi, Hisashi; Peschek, Jirka; Reif, Bernd; Goto, Yuji; Buchner, Johannes

    2016-03-27

    The aggregation of mostly antibody light chain variable (VL) domains into amyloid fibrils in various tissues is the main cause of death in systemic amyloid light chain amyloidosis. Point mutations within the domain are important to shift the VL into the fibrillar pathway, but why and how only some site-specific mutations achieve this still remains elusive. We show here that both destabilizing and surprisingly stable mutants readily predispose an amyloid-resistant VL domain to amyloid formation. The decreased thermodynamic stability of the destabilizing mutant results in the accumulation of non-native intermediates that readily populate the amyloid state. Interestingly, the stable mutants establish site-specific non-native interactions with especially nearby serine/threonine residues that unexpectedly do not affect the folding behavior of the VL domain but rather readily induce and stabilize the fibril structure, a previously unrecognized mechanism. These findings provide a new concept for the molecular mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:26827727