Science.gov

Sample records for regulates cardiomyocyte growth

  1. Thymosin β4 Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Growth by Regulating Wnt/WISP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Guleria, Rakeshwar S; Thakur, Suresh; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Pan, Jing; Baker, Kenneth M; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2016-08-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. However, the role of Tβ4 in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the cardio-protective effect of Tβ4 in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiomyocyte growth. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVM) were pretreated with Tβ4 followed by Ang II stimulation. Cell size, hypertrophy marker gene expression and Wnt signaling components, β-catenin, and Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of cell size, hypertrophy marker genes and Wnt-associated gene expression, and protein levels; induced by Ang II in cardiomyocyte. WISP-1 was overexpressed in NRVM and, the effect of Tβ4 in Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth was evaluated. WISP-1 overexpression promoted cardiomyocytes growth and was reversed by pretreatment with Tβ4. This is the first report which demonstrates that Tβ4 targets Wnt/WISP-1 to protect Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1737-1744, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26627308

  2. Regulation of the Cardiomyocyte Population in the Developing Heart

    PubMed Central

    Thornburg, Kent; Jonker, Sonnet; O’Tierney, Perrie; Chattergoon, Natasha; Louey, Samantha; Faber, Job; Giraud, George

    2011-01-01

    During fetal life the myocardium expands through replication of cardiomyocytes. In sheep, cardiomyocytes begin the process of becoming terminally differentiated at about 100 gestation days out of 145 days term. In this final step of development, cardiomyocytes become binucleated and stop dividing. The number of cells at birth is important in determining the number of cardiomyocytes for life. Therefore, the regulation of cardiomyocyte growth in the womb is critical to long term disease outcome. Growth factors that stimulate proliferation of fetal cardiomyocytes include angiotensin II, cortisol and insulin-like growth factor-1. Increased ventricular wall stress leads to short term increases in proliferation but longer term loss of cardiomyocyte generative capacity. Two normally circulating hormones have been identified that suppress proliferation: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and tri-iodo-L-thyronine (T3). Atrial natriuretic peptide signals through the NPRA receptor that serves as a guanylate cyclase and signals through cGMP. ANP powerfully suppresses mitotic activity in cardiomyocytes in the presence of angiotensin II in culture. Addition of a cGMP analogue has the same effect as ANP. ANP suppresses both the extracellular receptor kinases and the phosphoinositol 3 kinase pathways. T3 also suppresses increased mitotic activity of stimulated cardiomyocytes but does so by increasing the cell cycle suppressant, p21, and decreasing the cell cycle activator, cyclin D1. PMID:21147149

  3. Innervating sympathetic neurons regulate heart size and the timing of cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, R E; Birren, S J

    2015-12-01

    Sympathetic drive to the heart is a key modulator of cardiac function and interactions between heart tissue and innervating sympathetic fibres are established early in development. Significant innervation takes place during postnatal heart development, a period when cardiomyocytes undergo a rapid transition from proliferative to hypertrophic growth. The question of whether these innervating sympathetic fibres play a role in regulating the modes of cardiomyocyte growth was investigated using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to abolish early sympathetic innervation of the heart. Postnatal chemical sympathectomy resulted in rats with smaller hearts, indicating that heart growth is regulated by innervating sympathetic fibres during the postnatal period. In vitro experiments showed that sympathetic interactions resulted in delays in markers of cardiomyocyte maturation, suggesting that changes in the timing of the transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes could underlie changes in heart size in the sympathectomized animals. There was also an increase in the expression of Meis1, which has been linked to cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal, suggesting that sympathetic signalling suppresses cell cycle withdrawal. This signalling involves β-adrenergic activation, which was necessary for sympathetic regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. The effect of β-adrenergic signalling on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy underwent a developmental transition. While young postnatal cardiomyocytes responded to isoproterenol (isoprenaline) with a decrease in cell size, mature cardiomyocytes showed an increase in cell size in response to the drug. Together, these results suggest that early sympathetic effects on proliferation modulate a key transition between proliferative and hypertrophic growth of the heart and contribute to the sympathetic regulation of adult heart size. PMID:26420487

  4. Systems proteomics of cardiac chromatin identifies nucleolin as a regulator of growth and cellular plasticity in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Monte, Emma; Mouillesseaux, Kevin; Chen, Haodong; Kimball, Todd; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Chen, Jau-Nian; Vondriska, Thomas M; Franklin, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    Myocyte hypertrophy antecedent to heart failure involves changes in global gene expression, although the preceding mechanisms to coordinate DNA accessibility on a genomic scale are unknown. Chromatin-associated proteins alter chromatin structure by changing their association with DNA, thereby altering the gene expression profile. Little is known about the global changes in chromatin subproteomes that accompany heart failure, and the mechanisms by which these proteins alter chromatin structure. The present study tests the fundamental hypothesis that cardiac growth and plasticity in the setting of disease recapitulates conserved developmental chromatin remodeling events. We used quantitative proteomics to identify chromatin-associated proteins extracted via detergent and to quantify changes in their abundance during disease. Our study identified 321 proteins in this subproteome, demonstrating it to have modest conservation (37%) with that revealed using strong acid. Of these proteins, 176 exhibited altered expression during cardiac hypertrophy and failure; we conducted extensive functional characterization of one of these proteins, Nucleolin. Morpholino-based knockdown of nucleolin nearly abolished protein expression but surprisingly had little impact on gross morphological development. However, hearts of fish lacking Nucleolin displayed severe developmental impairment, abnormal chamber patterning and functional deficits, ostensibly due to defects in cardiac looping and myocyte differentiation. The mechanisms underlying these defects involve perturbed bone morphogenetic protein 4 expression, decreased rRNA transcription, and a shift to more heterochromatic chromatin. This study reports the quantitative analysis of a new chromatin subproteome in the normal and diseased mouse heart. Validation studies in the complementary model system of zebrafish examine the role of Nucleolin to orchestrate genomic reprogramming events shared between development and disease. PMID

  5. The miRNA-212/132 family regulates both cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyocyte autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Ahmet; Gupta, Shashi K.; Fiedler, Jan; Erikci, Erdem; Kardasinski, Michal; Batkai, Sandor; Dangwal, Seema; Kumarswamy, Regalla; Bang, Claudia; Holzmann, Angelika; Remke, Janet; Caprio, Massimiliano; Jentzsch, Claudia; Engelhardt, Stefan; Geisendorf, Sabine; Glas, Carolina; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Schiffer, Mario; Carrier, Lucie; Napp, L. Christian; Bauersachs, Johann; Chowdhury, Kamal; Thum, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Pathological growth of cardiomyocytes (hypertrophy) is a major determinant for the development of heart failure, one of the leading medical causes of mortality worldwide. Here we show that the microRNA (miRNA)-212/132 family regulates cardiac hypertrophy and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Hypertrophic stimuli upregulate cardiomyocyte expression of miR-212 and miR-132, which are both necessary and sufficient to drive the hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes. MiR-212/132 null mice are protected from pressure-overload-induced heart failure, whereas cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the miR-212/132 family leads to pathological cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure and death in mice. Both miR-212 and miR-132 directly target the anti-hypertrophic and pro-autophagic FoxO3 transcription factor and overexpression of these miRNAs leads to hyperactivation of pro-hypertrophic calcineurin/NFAT signalling and an impaired autophagic response upon starvation. Pharmacological inhibition of miR-132 by antagomir injection rescues cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in mice, offering a possible therapeutic approach for cardiac failure. PMID:23011132

  6. Timing of cardiomyocyte growth, maturation, and attrition in perinatal sheep.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Sonnet S; Louey, Samantha; Giraud, George D; Thornburg, Kent L; Faber, J Job

    2015-10-01

    Studies in altricial rodents attribute dramatic changes in perinatal cardiomyocyte growth, maturation, and attrition to stimuli associated with birth. Our purpose was to determine whether birth is a critical trigger controlling perinatal cardiomyocyte growth, maturation and attrition in a precocial large mammal, sheep (Ovis aries). Hearts from 0-61 d postnatal lambs were dissected or enzymatically dissociated. Cardiomyocytes were measured by micromorphometry, cell cycle activity assessed by immunohistochemistry, and nuclear number counted after DNA staining. Integration of this new data with published fetal data from our laboratory demonstrate that a newly appreciated >30% decrease in myocyte number occurred in the last 10 d of gestation (P < 0.0005) concomitant with an increase in cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (P < 0.05), indicative of apoptosis. Bisegmental linear regressions show that most changes in myocyte growth kinetics occur before birth (median = 15.2 d; P < 0.05). Right ventricular but not left ventricular cell number increases in the neonate, by 68% between birth and 60 d postnatal (P = 0.028). We conclude that in sheep few developmental changes in cardiomyocytes result from birth, excepting the different postnatal degrees of free wall hypertrophy between the ventricles. Furthermore, myocyte number is reduced in both ventricles immediately before term, but proliferation increases myocyte number in the neonatal right ventricle. PMID:26139099

  7. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte directly regulates myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology remains unknown. We hypothesized that the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte plays a role in regulating myo...

  8. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte directly regulates myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology remains unknown. We hypothesized that circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte plays a role in regulating myocardia...

  9. Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells Is Regulated by the Combined Low Dose Treatment of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and 5-Azacytidine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shutian; Wu, Xingxin; Wang, Xiao; Hao, Wen; Miao, Huangtai; Zhen, Lei; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are used in cardiac tissue engineering for the regeneration of diseased hearts. We examined the differentiation of rat BMMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells when induced with a combined low dose treatment of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and 5-azacytidine (5-AZA). Results showed that cell proliferation in the combined low dose treatment group of TGF-β1 and 5-AZA was increased compared with the TGF-β1 group or the 5-AZA group. The cell apoptosis was relieved by combined TGF-β1 and 5-AZA treatment compared to 5-AZA treatment alone. The number of cells positive for myosin heavy chain, connexin-43, α-actin, and troponin I in the combined treatment group was higher than those observed in the TGF-β1 group or the 5-AZA group. Moreover, the combined low dose treatment group of TGF-β1 and 5-AZA reveals the strongest expression of troponin I, α-actin, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (p-ErK1/2) among the treatment groups. These results suggest that the combined low dose treatment of TGF-β1 and 5-AZA can improve the differentiation potential of rat BMMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells and alleviate cell damage effects in vitro. The mechanism that is involved in influencing differentiation may be associated with p-ErK1/2. PMID:26697074

  10. Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells Is Regulated by the Combined Low Dose Treatment of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and 5-Azacytidine

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shutian; Wu, Xingxin; Wang, Xiao; Hao, Wen; Miao, Huangtai; Zhen, Lei; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are used in cardiac tissue engineering for the regeneration of diseased hearts. We examined the differentiation of rat BMMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells when induced with a combined low dose treatment of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and 5-azacytidine (5-AZA). Results showed that cell proliferation in the combined low dose treatment group of TGF-β1 and 5-AZA was increased compared with the TGF-β1 group or the 5-AZA group. The cell apoptosis was relieved by combined TGF-β1 and 5-AZA treatment compared to 5-AZA treatment alone. The number of cells positive for myosin heavy chain, connexin-43, α-actin, and troponin I in the combined treatment group was higher than those observed in the TGF-β1 group or the 5-AZA group. Moreover, the combined low dose treatment group of TGF-β1 and 5-AZA reveals the strongest expression of troponin I, α-actin, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (p-ErK1/2) among the treatment groups. These results suggest that the combined low dose treatment of TGF-β1 and 5-AZA can improve the differentiation potential of rat BMMSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells and alleviate cell damage effects in vitro. The mechanism that is involved in influencing differentiation may be associated with p-ErK1/2. PMID:26697074

  11. Noncoding RNAs as regulators of cardiomyocyte proliferation and death.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Maria-Teresa; Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Thum, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease, in particular, is responsible for the majority of cardiac-related deaths. Given the negligible regenerative potential of the human myocardium, there is a strong need for therapeutic strategies aiming at enhancing cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation following injury or at inhibiting their death. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules regulating gene expression at a post-transcriptional level with important functions in cardiovascular physiology and disease. It has been demonstrated that miRNAs can influence the ability of cardiomyocytes to enter the cell cycle and/or escape from death pathways. Additionally, long non coding-RNAs could be involved in such pathways. This review summarizes recent evidences on noncoding RNAs regulating proliferation and death of cardiomyocytes representing a future therapeutic for the treatment of heart diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Non-coding RNAs. PMID:25665459

  12. Mechanosensitive Kinases Regulate Stiffness-Induced Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer L.; Kretchmer, Kyle; Ondeck, Matthew G.; Zambon, Alexander C.; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Cells secrete and assemble extracellular matrix throughout development, giving rise to time-dependent, tissue-specific stiffness. Mimicking myocardial matrix stiffening, i.e. ~10-fold increase over 1 week, with a hydrogel system enhances myofibrillar organization of embryonic cardiomyocytes compared to static hydrogels, and thus we sought to identify specific mechanosensitive proteins involved. Expression and/or phosphorylation state of 309 unique protein kinases were examined in embryonic cardiomyocytes plated on either dynamically stiffening or static mature myocardial stiffness hydrogels. Gene ontology analysis of these kinases identified cardiogenic pathways that exhibited time-dependent up-regulation on dynamic versus static matrices, including PI3K/AKT and p38 MAPK, while GSK3β, a known antagonist of cardiomyocyte maturation, was down-regulated. Additionally, inhibiting GSK3β on static matrices improved spontaneous contraction and myofibril organization, while inhibiting agonist AKT on dynamic matrices reduced myofibril organization and spontaneous contraction, confirming its role in mechanically-driven maturation. Together, these data indicate that mechanically-driven maturation is at least partially achieved via active mechanosensing at focal adhesions, affecting expression and phosphorylation of a variety of protein kinases important to cardiomyogenesis. PMID:25236849

  13. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositol-3 kinase mediate IGF-1 induced proliferation of fetal sheep cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundgren, Nathan C; Giraud, George D; Schultz, Jess M; Lasarev, Michael R; Stork, Philip J S; Thornburg, Kent L

    2003-12-01

    Growth of the fetal heart involves cardiomyocyte enlargement, division, and maturation. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is implicated in many aspects of growth and is likely to be important in developmental heart growth. IGF-1 stimulates the IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) and downstream signaling pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K). We hypothesized that IGF-1 stimulates cardiomyocyte proliferation and enlargement through stimulation of the ERK cascade and stimulates cardiomyocyte differentiation through the PI3K cascade. In vivo administration of Long R3 IGF-1 (LR3 IGF-1) did not stimulate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but led to a decreased percentage of cells that were binucleated in vivo. In culture, LR3 IGF-1 increased myocyte bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake by three- to five-fold. The blockade of either ERK or PI3K signaling (by UO-126 or LY-294002, respectively) completely abolished BrdU uptake stimulated by LR3 IGF-1. LR3 IGF-1 did not increase footprint area, but as expected, phenylephrine stimulated an increase in binucleated cardiomyocyte size. We conclude that 1) IGF-1 through IGF1R stimulates cardiomyocyte division in vivo; hyperplastic growth is the most likely explanation of IGF-1 stimulated heart growth in vivo; 2) IGF-1 through IGF1R does not stimulate binucleation in vitro or in vivo; 3) IGF-1 through IGF1R does not stimulate hypertrophy either in vivo or in vitro; and 4) IGF-1 through IGF1R requires both ERK and PI3K signaling for proliferation of near-term fetal sheep cardiomyocytes in vitro. PMID:12947030

  14. Mechanism of cardiomyocyte PGC-1α gene regulation by ERRα.

    PubMed

    Ramjiawan, Angela; Bagchi, Rushita A; Albak, Laura; Czubryt, Michael P

    2013-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) regulates critical genes involved in cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, and its loss is associated with impaired metabolism and various cardiac pathologies. Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) targets many of the same genes as PGC-1α, and extensive cross talk exists between these 2 regulators. Here we report the identification of an evolutionarily conserved ERRα binding site within the PGC-1α promoter. Using luciferase reporter assays and overexpression, inhibition, or knockdown of ERRα, we show that PGC-1α expression is critically dependent upon ERRα in primary cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate that short-term hypoxia results in reduced ERRα mRNA expression, which precedes a similar loss of PGC-1α mRNA. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that despite a key role for ERRα in regulating PGC-1α in normoxic cardiomyocytes, ERRα loss is not responsible for PGC-1α loss in hypoxia. Histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) has previously been demonstrated to strongly inhibit expression of PGC-1α, and we show that overexpression of ERRα is sufficient to overcome this repressive effect. Our data elucidates the mechanism by which ERRα regulates cardiac PGC-1α gene expression, and suggests that ERRα may provide a means to normalize PGC-1α expression that could be useful in the development of strategies aimed at improving cardiac metabolism in disease. PMID:23668787

  15. A cardiomyocyte-based biosensor for antiarrhythmic drug evaluation by simultaneously monitoring cell growth and beating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianxing; Hu, Ning; Cao, Jiayue; Wu, Jieying; Su, Kaiqi; Wang, Ping

    2013-11-15

    Drug-induced cardiotoxicity greatly endangers the human health and results in resource waste. Also, it is a leading attribution to drug withdrawal and late-stage attrition in pharmaceutical industry. In the study, a dual function cardiomyocyte-based biosensor was introduced for rapid drug evaluation with xCELLigence RTCA Cardio system. The cardiomyocyte-based biosensor can monitor the cardiomyocyte growth and beating status simultaneously under the drug effects. Two typical cardiovascular drug, verapamil and flecainide were selected as treatment agents to test the performance of this biosensor. The experiment results showed that the performance of cardiomyocyte-based biosensor verified the basic drug effects by beating status and also tested the drug cytotoxicity by the cell index curves of cardiomyocyte growth. Based on the advanced sensor detection technology and cell culture technology, this cardiomyocyte-based biosensor will be a utility platform for the drug preclinical assessment. PMID:23708811

  16. Genetics of Cardiac Developmental Disorders: Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Growth and Relevance to Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Wilsbacher, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-23

    Cardiac developmental disorders represent the most common of human birth defects, and anomalies in cardiomyocyte proliferation drive many of these disorders. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms of prenatal cardiac growth. Trabeculation represents the initial ventricular growth phase and is necessary for embryonic survival. Later in development, the bulk of the ventricular wall derives from the compaction process, yet the arrest of this process can still be compatible with life. Cardiomyocyte proliferation and growth form the basis of both trabeculation and compaction, and mouse models indicate that cardiomyocyte interactions with the surrounding environment are critical for these proliferative processes. The human genetics of left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy suggest that cardiomyocyte cell-autonomous mechanisms contribute to the compaction process. Understanding the determinants of prenatal or early postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation and growth provides critical information that identifies risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including heart failure and its associated complications of arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. PMID:26925501

  17. Efficient Differentiation of Cardiomyocytes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells with Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajneesh; Xu, Ren-He; Xu, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells have tremendous replicative capacity and demonstrated potential to generate functional cardiomyocytes. These cardiomyocytes represent a promising source for cell replacement therapy to treat heart disease and may serve as a useful tool for drug discovery and disease modeling. Efficient cardiomyocyte differentiation, a prerequisite for the application of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, can be achieved with a growth factor-guided method. Undifferentiated cells are sequentially treated with activin A and BMP4 in a serum-free and insulin-free medium and then maintained in a serum-free medium with insulin. This method yields as much as >75% cardiomyocytes in the differentiation culture within 2 weeks, and the beating cardiomyocytes have expected molecular, cellular and electrophysiological characteristics. In this chapter, we describe in detail the differentiation protocol and follow-up characterization focusing on immunocytochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis. PMID:25836579

  18. Btg2 is a Negative Regulator of Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy through a Decrease in Cytosolic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Masumura, Yuki; Higo, Shuichiro; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kato, Hisakazu; Yan, Yi; Ishino, Saki; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Kioka, Hidetaka; Hayashi, Takaharu; Shintani, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Satoru; Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei; Takashima, Seiji; Sakata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Under hypertrophic stimulation, cardiomyocytes enter a hypermetabolic state and accelerate biomass accumulation. Although the molecular pathways that regulate protein levels are well-studied, the functional implications of RNA accumulation and its regulatory mechanisms in cardiomyocytes remain elusive. Here, we have elucidated the quantitative kinetics of RNA in cardiomyocytes through single cell imaging and c-Myc (Myc)-mediated hypermetabolic analytical model using cultured cardiomyocytes. Nascent RNA labeling combined with single cell imaging demonstrated that Myc protein significantly increased the amount of global RNA production per cardiomyocyte. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing clarified that overexpressed Myc bound to a specific set of genes and recruits RNA polymerase II. Among these genes, we identified Btg2 as a novel target of Myc. Btg2 overexpression significantly reduced cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of Btg2 accelerated adrenergic stimulus-induced hypertrophy. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we determined that Btg2 binds a series of proteins that comprise mRNA deadenylation complexes. Intriguingly, Btg2 specifically suppresses cytosolic, but not nuclear, RNA levels. Btg2 knockdown further enhances cytosolic RNA accumulation in cardiomyocytes under adrenergic stimulation, suggesting that Btg2 negatively regulates reactive hypertrophy by negatively regulating RNA accumulation. Our findings provide insight into the functional significance of the mechanisms regulating RNA levels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:27346836

  19. Btg2 is a Negative Regulator of Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy through a Decrease in Cytosolic RNA.

    PubMed

    Masumura, Yuki; Higo, Shuichiro; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kato, Hisakazu; Yan, Yi; Ishino, Saki; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Kioka, Hidetaka; Hayashi, Takaharu; Shintani, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Satoru; Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Komuro, Issei; Takashima, Seiji; Sakata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Under hypertrophic stimulation, cardiomyocytes enter a hypermetabolic state and accelerate biomass accumulation. Although the molecular pathways that regulate protein levels are well-studied, the functional implications of RNA accumulation and its regulatory mechanisms in cardiomyocytes remain elusive. Here, we have elucidated the quantitative kinetics of RNA in cardiomyocytes through single cell imaging and c-Myc (Myc)-mediated hypermetabolic analytical model using cultured cardiomyocytes. Nascent RNA labeling combined with single cell imaging demonstrated that Myc protein significantly increased the amount of global RNA production per cardiomyocyte. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing clarified that overexpressed Myc bound to a specific set of genes and recruits RNA polymerase II. Among these genes, we identified Btg2 as a novel target of Myc. Btg2 overexpression significantly reduced cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of Btg2 accelerated adrenergic stimulus-induced hypertrophy. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we determined that Btg2 binds a series of proteins that comprise mRNA deadenylation complexes. Intriguingly, Btg2 specifically suppresses cytosolic, but not nuclear, RNA levels. Btg2 knockdown further enhances cytosolic RNA accumulation in cardiomyocytes under adrenergic stimulation, suggesting that Btg2 negatively regulates reactive hypertrophy by negatively regulating RNA accumulation. Our findings provide insight into the functional significance of the mechanisms regulating RNA levels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:27346836

  20. Two inhibitory systems and CKIs regulate cell cycle exit of mammalian cardiomyocytes after birth.

    PubMed

    Tane, Shoji; Okayama, Hitomi; Ikenishi, Aiko; Amemiya, Yuki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-10-16

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes actively proliferate during embryonic stages, following which they exit their cell cycle after birth, and the exit is maintained. Previously, we showed that two inhibitory systems (the G1-phase inhibitory system: repression of cyclin D1 expression; the M-phase inhibitory system: inhibition of CDK1 activation) maintain the cell cycle exit of mouse adult cardiomyocytes. We also showed that two CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1), regulate the cell cycle exit in a portion of postnatal cardiomyocytes. It remains unknown whether the two inhibitory systems are involved in the cell cycle exit of postnatal cardiomyocytes and whether p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) also inhibit entry to M-phase. Here, we showed that more than 40% of cardiomyocytes entered an additional cell cycle by induction of cyclin D1 expression at postnatal stages, but M-phase entry was inhibited in the majority of cardiomyocytes. Marked cell cycle progression and endoreplication were observed in cardiomyocytes of p21(Cip1) knockout mice at 4 weeks of age. In addition, tri- and tetranucleated cardiomyocytes increased significantly in p21(Cip1) knockout mice. These data showed that the G1-phase inhibitory system and two CKIs (p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1)) inhibit entry to an additional cell cycle in postnatal cardiomyocytes, and that the M-phase inhibitory system and p21(Cip1) inhibit M-phase entry of cardiomyocytes which have entered the additional cell cycle. PMID:26363457

  1. Nucleoporin 35 regulates cardiomyocyte pH homeostasis by controlling Na+-H+ exchanger-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Pan, Lei; Li, Jun; Huang, Bijun; Feng, Jing; Li, Changming; Wang, Shiyi; The, Erlinda; Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Tianyou; Zhen, Lixiao; Liang, Dandan; Liu, Yi; Li, Li; Cui, Yingyu; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Luying; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-10-01

    The mammalian nuclear pore complex is comprised of ∼ 30 different nucleoporins (Nups). It governs the nuclear import of gene expression modulators and the export of mRNAs. In cardiomyocytes, Na(+)-H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE1) is an integral membrane protein that exclusively regulates intracellular pH (pHi) by exchanging one intracellular H(+) for one extracellular Na(+). However, the role of Nups in cardiac NHE1 expression remains unknown. We herein report that Nup35 regulates cardiomyocyte NHE1 expression by controlling the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of nhe1 mRNA. The N-terminal domain of Nup35 determines nhe1 mRNA nuclear export by targeting the 5'-UTR (-412 to -213 nt) of nhe1 mRNA. Nup35 ablation weakens the resistance of cardiomyocytes to an acid challenge by depressing NHE1 expression. Moreover, we identify that Nup35 and NHE1 are simultaneously downregulated in ischemic cardiomyocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Enforced expression of Nup35 effectively counteracts the anoxia-induced intracellular acidification. We conclude that Nup35 selectively regulates cardiomyocyte pHi homeostasis by posttranscriptionally controlling NHE1 expression. This finding reveals a novel regulatory mechanism of cardiomyocyte pHi, and may provide insight into the therapeutic strategy for ischemic cardiac diseases. PMID:26260029

  2. Talin Is Required Continuously for Cardiomyocyte Remodeling during Heart Growth in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bogatan, Simina; Cevik, Duygu; Demidov, Valentin; Vanderploeg, Jessica; Panchbhaya, Abdullah; Vitkin, Alex; Jacobs, J. Roger

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction of tension can govern the remodeling of cardiomyocytes during growth or cardiomyopathy. Tension is signaled through the integrin adhesion complexes found at muscle insertions and costameres but the relative importance of signalling during cardiomyocyte growth versus remodelling has not been assessed. Employing the Drosophila cardiomyocyte as a genetically amenable model, we depleted the levels of Talin, a central component of the integrin adhesion complex, at different stages of heart growth and remodeling. We demonstrate a continuous requirement for Talin during heart growth to maintain the one-to-one apposition of myofibril ends between cardiomyocytes. Retracted myofibrils cannot regenerate appositions to adjacent cells after restoration of normal Talin expression, and the resulting deficit reduces heart contraction and lifespan. Reduction of Talin during heart remodeling after hatching or during metamorphosis results in pervasive degeneration of cell contacts, myofibril length and number, for which restored Talin expression is insufficient for regeneration. Resultant dilated cardiomyopathy results in a fibrillating heart with poor rhythmicity. Cardiomyocytes have poor capacity to regenerate deficits in myofibril orientation and insertion, despite an ongoing capacity to remodel integrin based adhesions. PMID:26110760

  3. The mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, NCLX, regulates automaticity of HL-1 cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ayako; Kim, Bongju; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ is known to change dynamically, regulating mitochondrial as well as cellular functions such as energy metabolism and apoptosis. The NCLX gene encodes the mitochondrial Na+-Ca2+ exchanger (NCXmit), a Ca2+ extrusion system in mitochondria. Here we report that the NCLX regulates automaticity of the HL-1 cardiomyocytes. NCLX knockdown using siRNA resulted in the marked prolongation of the cycle length of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation and action potential generation. The upstrokes of action potential and Ca2+ transient were markedly slower, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ handling were compromised in the NCLX knockdown cells. Analyses using a mathematical model of HL-1 cardiomyocytes demonstrated that blocking NCXmit reduced the SR Ca2+ content to slow spontaneous SR Ca2+ leak, which is a trigger of automaticity. We propose that NCLX is a novel molecule to regulate automaticity of cardiomyocytes via modulating SR Ca2+ handling. PMID:24067497

  4. Copper reverses cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated reduction in the cell size.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Jiang, Youchun; Kang, Y James

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that dietary copper supplementation reversed heart hypertrophy induced by pressure overload in a mouse model. The present study was undertaken to understand the cellular basis of copper-induced regression of cardiac hypertrophy. Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were treated with phenylephrine (PE) at a final concentration of 100 microM in cultures for 48 h to induce cellular hypertrophy. The hypertrophied cardiomyocytes were exposed to copper sulfate at a final concentration of 5 microM in cultures for additional 24 h. This copper treatment reduced the size of the hypertrophied cardiomyocytes, as measured by flow cytometry, protein content in cells, cell volume and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy markers including beta-myosin heavy chain protein, skeletal alpha-actin, and atrial natriuretic peptide. Cell cycle analysis and cell sorting of p-histone-3 labeled cardiomyocytes indicated that cell division was not involved in the copper-induced regression of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Copper also inhibited PE-induced apoptosis, determined by a TUNEL assay. Because copper stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production through activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, an anti-VEGF antibody at a final concentration of 2 ng/ml in cultures was used and shown to blunt copper-induced regression of cell hypertrophy. Conversely, VEGF alone at a final concentration of 0.2 microg/ml reversed cell hypertrophy as the same as copper did. This study demonstrates that both copper and VEGF reduce the size of hypertrophied cardiomyocytes, and copper regression of cardiac hypertrophy is VEGF-dependent. PMID:18495151

  5. Doxorubicin Impairs the Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 System and Causes Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Resistance in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Patrizia; Spallarossa, Paolo; Garibaldi, Silvano; Barisione, Chiara; Mura, Marzia; Altieri, Paola; Rebesco, Barbara; Monti, Maria Gaia; Canepa, Marco; Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Brunelli, Claudio; Ameri, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes the survival of cardiomyocytes by activating type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R). Within the myocardium, IGF-1 action is modulated by IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which sequesters IGF-1 away from IGF-1R. Since cardiomyocyte apoptosis is implicated in anthracycline cardiotoxicity, we investigated the effects of the anthracycline, doxorubicin, on the IGF-1 system in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results Besides inducing apoptosis, concentrations of doxorubicin comparable to those observed in patients after bolus infusion (0.1-1 µM) caused a progressive decrease in IGF-1R and increase in IGFBP-3 expression. Exogenous IGF-1 was capable to rescue cardiomyocytes from apoptosis triggered by 0.1 and 0.5 µM, but not 1 µM doxorubicin. The loss of response to IGF-1 was paralleled by a significant reduction in IGF-1 availability and signaling, as assessed by free hormone levels in conditioned media and Akt phosphorylation in cell lysates, respectively. Doxorubicin also dose-dependently induced p53, which is known to repress the transcription of IGF1R and induce that of IGFBP3. Pre-treatment with the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, prevented apoptosis and the changes in IGF-1R and IGFBP-3 elicited by doxorubicin. The decrease in IGF-1R and increase in IGFBP-3, as well as apoptosis, were also antagonized by pre-treatment with the antioxidant agents, N-acetylcysteine, dexrazoxane, and carvedilol. Conclusions Doxorubicin down-regulates IGF-1R and up-regulates IGFBP-3 via p53 and oxidative stress in H9c2 cells. This leads to resistance to IGF-1 that may contribute to doxorubicin-initiated apoptosis. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in human cardiomyocytes and explore the possibility of manipulating the IGF-1 axis to protect against anthracycline cardiotoxicity. PMID:25955698

  6. CUEDC2 modulates cardiomyocyte oxidative capacity by regulating GPX1 stability.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhao; Liang, Bing; Pan, Xin; Xu, Guang; Guo, Sai-Sai; Li, Ting; Zhou, Tao; Xiao, Ying-Bin; Li, Ai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes due to oxidative stress is the main cause of heart dysfunction following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and ageing-induced cardiomyopathy. Here, we report that CUEDC2, a CUE domain-containing protein, plays a critical role in oxidative stress-induced cardiac injury. Cuedc2(-/-) cardiomyocytes exhibited a greater resistance to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Loss of CUEDC2 enhanced the antioxidant capacity of cardiomyocytes, promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, and subsequently inhibited the redox-dependent activation of signaling pathways. Notably, CUEDC2 promoted E3 ubiquitin ligases tripartite motif-containing 33 (TRIM33)-mediated the antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) ubiquitination, and proteasome-dependent degradation. Ablation of CUEDC2 upregulated the protein level of GPX1 in the heart significantly. Strikingly, in vivo, the infarct size of Cuedc2(-/-) heart was significantly decreased after I/R injury, and aged Cuedc2(-/-) mice preserved better heart function as the overall ROS levels in their hearts were significantly lower. Our results demonstrated a novel role of CUEDC2 in cardiomyocyte death regulation. Manipulating CUEDC2 level might be an attractive therapeutic strategy for promoting cardiomyocyte survival following oxidative stress-induced cardiac injury. PMID:27286733

  7. Effects of cerivastatin on adrenergic pathways, hypertrophic growth and TGFbeta expression in adult ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Maxeiner, Hagen; Abdallah, Yaser; Kuhlmann, Christoph Rüdiger Wolfram; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Wenzel, Sibylle

    2012-05-01

    The effects of statin treatment in the setting of heart failure have already been shown. Nevertheless, there is little knowledge about its influence on adrenergic pathways in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, this study investigated the impact of cerivastatin on adrenoceptor-mediated signalling pathways in isolated adult ventricular cardiomyocytes. It focused on two endpoints: hypertrophic growth and TGFbeta expression. Cultured cardiomyocytes were used to study rac activation (analysed by its translocation into the membrane fraction), ROS formation (H(2)DCF fluorescence) and hypertrophic growth ((14)C-phenylalanine incorporation). Alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulation showed significant differences regarding rac activation, ROS formation, and p38 MAP kinase activation. Both alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulation induced TGFbeta expression. Upon activation of alpha-adrenergic signalling - although ROS formation was not influenced by cerivastatin - TGFbeta expression decreased. Following beta stimulation, TGFbeta expression as well as rac and p38 MAP kinase activation were reduced after pre-treatment with cerivastatin. Statin treatment did not show any influence on hypertrophic growth. In summary, this study clearly demonstrates the ability of adrenoceptor stimulation to increase TGFbeta expression. One component of the beneficial effects of statin therapy on heart failure might therefore be due to a dominant reduction and inhibition of TGFbeta, which is involved in many pathophysiological processes in cardiomyocytes. PMID:22365145

  8. MAP kinase mediates epidermal growth factor- and phorbol ester-induced prostacyclin formation in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi Quintaje, S; Rebsamen, M; Church, D J; Vallotton, M B; Lang, U

    1998-05-01

    We studied the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced prostacyclin (PGI2) production in cultured, spontaneously-beating neonatal ventricular rat cardiomyocytes. To this purpose, the effect of EGF on cardiomyocyte MAPK phosphorylation, MAPK activity and PGI2-production were investigated, and compared to those induced by the PKC activator 4 beta phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both EGF (0.1 microM) and PMA (0.1 microM) induced the rapid and reversible phosphorylation of 42 KDa-MAPK in ventricular cardiomyocytes, responses that were accompanied by transient increases in MAPK activity (190-230% of control values within 5 min), and two- to three-fold increases in PGI2 formation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors lavendustin (1 microM) and genistein (10 microM) strongly inhibited EGF-induced MAPK activation and PGI2-formation, but had no effect on PMA-stimulated responses. Experiments with the PKC inhibitor CGP 41251 (1 microM) or with PKC-downregulated cells demonstrated that in contrast to the PMA-stimulated responses, EGF-induced MAPK activation and PGI2-production were PKC-independent processes. Investigating the role of MAPK in EGF- and in PMA-promoted PGI2-formation, we found that the MAPK-inhibitor 6-thioguanine (500 microM), as well as the MAPK-kinase-inhibitor PD98059 (50 microM) abolished both EGF- and PMA-stimulated PGI2-production in cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that MAPK-activation is at the basis of both growth factor receptor and PKC-dependent eicosanoid-formation in ventricular cardiomyocytes, where EGF-induced prostaglandin-production takes place via a PKC-independent pathway. PMID:9618234

  9. The Cardiomyocyte Molecular Clock Regulates the Circadian Expression of Kcnh2 and Contributes to Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Burgess, Don E.; Zhang, Xiping; Lefta, Mellani; Smith, Jennifer L.; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Bartos, Daniel C.; Elayi, Claude S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Delisle, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) follows a diurnal variation. Data suggest the timing of SCD is influenced by circadian (~24 hour) changes in neurohumoral and cardiomyocyte-specific regulation of the heart’s electrical properties. Objective The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK coordinate the circadian expression of select genes. We tested whether Bmal1 expression in cardiomyocytes contributes to K+ channel expression and diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization. Methods We utilized transgenic mice that allow for the inducible cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Bmal1 (iCSΔBmal1−/−). We used quantitative PCR, voltage-clamping, promoter-reporter bioluminescence assays, and electrocardiographic (ECG) telemetry. Results Although several K+ channel gene transcripts were downregulated in iCSΔBmal1−/− mouse hearts, only Kcnh2 exhibited a robust circadian pattern of expression that was disrupted in iCSΔBmal1−/− hearts. Kcnh2 underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K+ current (IKr), and IKr recorded from iCSΔBmal1−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes was ~50% compared to control myocytes. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrated that the human Kcnh2 promoter is transactivated by the co-expression of BMAL1 and CLOCK. ECG analysis showed iCSΔBmal1−/− mice developed a prolongation in the heart rate corrected QT (QTc) interval during the light (resting)-phase. This was secondary to an augmented circadian rhythm in the uncorrected QT interval without a corresponding change in the RR interval. Conclusion The molecular clock in the heart regulates the circadian expression of Kcnh2, modifies K+ channel gene expression and is important for normal ventricular repolarization. Disruption of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock mechanism likely unmasks diurnal changes in ventricular repolarization that could contribute to an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias/SCD. PMID:25701773

  10. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Regulates Ca2+ Channel in Early Developmental Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lin; Wang, Min; Yin, Wen-Xuan; Yuan, Qi; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Fleischmann, Bernd; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ji, Guangju

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiomyocytes derived from murine embryonic stem (ES) cells possess various membrane currents and signaling cascades link to that of embryonic hearts. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in regulation of membrane potentials and Ca2+ currents has not been investigated in developmental cardiomyocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the role of ANP in regulating L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICaL) in different developmental stages of cardiomyocytes derived from ES cells. ANP decreased the frequency of action potentials (APs) in early developmental stage (EDS) cardiomyocytes, embryonic bodies (EB) as well as whole embryo hearts. ANP exerted an inhibitory effect on basal ICaL in about 70% EDS cardiomyocytes tested but only in about 30% late developmental stage (LDS) cells. However, after stimulation of ICaL by isoproterenol (ISO) in LDS cells, ANP inhibited the response in about 70% cells. The depression of ICaL induced by ANP was not affected by either Nω, Nitro-L-Arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) inhibitor, or KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) selective inhibitor, in either EDS and LDS cells; whereas depression of ICaL by ANP was entirely abolished by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a selective inhibitor of type 2 phosphodiesterase(PDE2) in most cells tested. Conclusion/Significances Taken together, these results indicate that ANP induced depression of action potentials and ICaL is due to activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC), cGMP production and cGMP-activation of PDE2 mediated depression of adenosine 3′, 5′–cyclic monophophate (cAMP)–cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in early cardiomyogenesis. PMID:20107504

  11. miR-483-3p regulates hyperglycaemia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhao, Yanli; Liu, Yan; Ma, Ning; Wang, Chuxuan; Zou, Jiaqi; Liu, Zhiyan; Zhou, Zhongqiu; Han, Dong; He, Jun; Sun, Qian; Liu, Yicong; Xu, Changqing; Du, Zhimin; Huang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy represents severe heart complications, and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. Although a few microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in diabetes-related complications, a functional association between miRNAs and cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy remains to be demonstrated. Our results show that miR-483-3p is upregulated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and cultured cardiomyocytes mimicking hyperglycemia. Overexpressing miR-483-3p in transgenic mice with diabetes mellitus (DM) exacerbated cardiomyocyte apoptosis by transcriptionally repressing insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1). Therefore, we have uncovered a novel signaling pathway, involving miR-483-3p-IGF1, that promotes myocardial cell apoptosis under high blood-glucose condition. Further, our study indicates that miR-483-3p could be a potential therapeutic target for managing diabetes-associated heart complications. PMID:27346130

  12. Mitofusin 1 Is Negatively Regulated by MicroRNA 140 in Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jincheng; Li, Yuzhen; Jiao, Jianqin; Wang, Jianxun; Li, Yanrui

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that mediate posttranscriptional gene silencing. Mitochondrial fission participates in the induction of apoptosis. It remains largely unknown whether miRNAs can regulate mitochondrial fission. Reactive oxygen species and doxorubicin could induce mitochondrial fission and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Concomitantly, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) was downregulated, whereas miRNA 140 (miR-140) was upregulated upon apoptotic stimulation. We investigated whether Mfn1 and miR-140 play a functional role in mitochondrial fission and apoptosis. Ectopic expression of Mfn1 attenuated mitochondrial fission and apoptosis. Knockdown of miR-140 inhibited mitochondrial fission. Our results further revealed that knockdown of miR-140 was able to reduce myocardial infarct sizes in an animal model. We observed that miR-140 could suppress the expression of Mfn1, and it exerted its effect on mitochondrial fission and apoptosis through targeting Mfn1. Our data revealed that mitochondrial fission occurs in cardiomyocytes and can be counteracted by Mfn1. However, the function of Mfn1 is negatively regulated by miR-140. Our present work suggests that Mfn1 and miR-140 are integrated into the program of cardiomyocyte apoptosis. PMID:24615014

  13. BRG1 and BRM SWI/SNF ATPases redundantly maintain cardiomyocyte homeostasis by regulating cardiomyocyte mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bultman, Scott J; Holley, Darcy Wood; G de Ridder, Gustaaf; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Sidorova, Tatiana N; Murray, Katherine T; Jensen, Brian C; Wang, Zhongjing; Bevilacqua, Ariana; Chen, Xin; Quintana, Megan T; Tannu, Manasi; Rosson, Gary B; Pandya, Kumar; Willis, Monte S

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increasing recognition that mitochondrial perturbations play a central role in human heart failure. Mitochondrial networks, whose function is to maintain the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy ('mitophagy') and mitochondrial fusion/fission, are new potential therapeutic targets. Yet our understanding of the molecular underpinning of these processes is just emerging. We recently identified a role of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in the metabolic homeostasis of the adult cardiomyocyte using cardiomyocyte-specific and inducible deletion of the SWI/SNF ATPases BRG1 and BRM in adult mice (Brg1/Brm double mutant mice). To build upon these observations in early altered metabolism, the present study looks at the subsequent alterations in mitochondrial quality control mechanisms in the impaired adult cardiomyocyte. We identified that Brg1/Brm double-mutant mice exhibited increased mitochondrial biogenesis, increases in 'mitophagy', and alterations in mitochondrial fission and fusion that led to small, fragmented mitochondria. Mechanistically, increases in the autophagy and mitophagy-regulated proteins Beclin1 and Bnip3 were identified, paralleling changes seen in human heart failure. Evidence for perturbed cardiac mitochondrial dynamics included decreased mitochondria size, reduced numbers of mitochondria, and an altered expression of genes regulating fusion (Mfn1, Opa1) and fission (Drp1). We also identified cardiac protein amyloid accumulation (aggregated fibrils) during disease progression along with an increase in pre-amyloid oligomers and an upregulated unfolded protein response including increased GRP78, CHOP, and IRE-1 signaling. Together, these findings described a role for BRG1 and BRM in mitochondrial quality control, by regulating mitochondrial number, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics not previously recognized in the adult cardiomyocyte. As critical to the pathogenesis of heart failure, epigenetic

  14. Exposure to rosiglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, in late gestation reduces the abundance of factors regulating cardiac metabolism and cardiomyocyte size in the sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    Lie, Shervi; Hui, Melisa; McMillen, I Caroline; Muhlhausler, Beverly S; Posterino, Giuseppe S; Dunn, Stacey L; Wang, Kimberley C; Botting, Kimberley J; Morrison, Janna L

    2014-03-15

    It is unknown whether cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the transition to fatty acid oxidation as the main source of energy after birth is dependent on the maturation of the cardiomyocytes' metabolic system, or on the limitation of substrate availability before birth. This study aimed to investigate whether intrafetal administration of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonist, rosiglitazone, during late gestation can stimulate the expression of factors regulating cardiac growth and metabolism in preparation for birth, and the consequences of cardiac contractility in the fetal sheep at ∼140 days gestation. The mRNA expression and protein abundance of key factors regulating growth and metabolism were quantified using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Cardiac contractility was determined by measuring the Ca(2+) sensitivity and maximum Ca(2+)-activated force of skinned cardiomyocyte bundles. Rosiglitazone-treated fetuses had a lower cardiac abundance of insulin-signaling molecules, including insulin receptor-β, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phospho-IRS-1 (Tyr-895), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) regulatory subunit p85, PI3K catalytic subunit p110α, phospho-3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (Ser-241), protein kinase B (Akt-1), phospho-Akt (Ser-273), PKCζ, phospho-PKCζ(Thr-410), Akt substrate 160 kDa (AS160), phospho-AS160 (Thr-642), and glucose transporter type-4. Additionally, cardiac abundance of regulators of fatty acid β-oxidation, including adiponectin receptor 1, AMPKα, phospho-AMPKα (Thr-172), phospho-acetyl CoA carboxylase (Ser-79), carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, and PGC-1α was lower in the rosiglitazone-treated group. Rosiglitazone administration also resulted in a decrease in cardiomyocyte size. Rosiglitazone administration in the late-gestation sheep fetus resulted in a decreased abundance of factors regulating cardiac glucose uptake, fatty acid β-oxidation, and

  15. Oncostatin M-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation regulates the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy through B-Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Ma, Sai; Zhang, Ran; Li, Shuang; Zhu, Di; Han, Dong; Li, Xiujuan; Li, Congye; Yan, Wei; Sun, Dongdong; Xu, Bin; Wang, Yabin; Cao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that oncostatin M (OSM) could initiate cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation both in vivo and in vitro. OSM-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation might be a new target for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study was designed to determine the role of OSM in cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and the progression of DCM. A mouse DCM model was established to evaluate the effects of OSM in vivo. Echocardiography was applied to determine cardiac function. Sirius red staining was used to detect fibrosis area. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate mitochondria impairment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were performed to detect relative mRNA expressions and cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation-related protein expressions, respectively. OSM treatment induced similar impaired cardiac function and cardiac ultrastructure impairment to those detected in DCM mice. The expressions of dedifferentiation markers of cardiomyocyte (Runx1, and α-SM-actin) were up-regulated in the OSM-treated mice compared with those in the control group. To further demonstrate the important role of OSM, OSM receptor knockout (Oβ(ko)) mice were used. In Oβ(ko) mice, cardiomyocytes dedifferentiation markers of c-kit, Runx1, and atrial natriuretic peptide were down-regulated, with attenuated DCM injury and abrogated OSM/B-Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway. In conclusion, OSM-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation plays a crucial role in the progression of DCM. The mechanism of OSM-induced cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation is associated with B-Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway through the OSM receptor Oβ. PMID:26837420

  16. Prostanoid Receptors Involved in Regulation of the Beating Rate of Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mechiche, Hakima; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Robinet, Arnaud; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Devillier, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Although prostanoids are known to be involved in regulation of the spontaneous beating rate of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, the various subtypes of prostanoid receptors have not been investigated in detail. In our experiments, prostaglandin (PG)F2α and prostanoid FP receptor agonists (fluprostenol, latanoprost and cloprostenol) produced a decrease in the beating rate. Two prostanoid IP receptor agonists (iloprost and beraprost) induced first a marked drop in the beating rate and then definitive abrogation of beating. In contrast, the prostanoid DP receptor agonists (PGD2 and BW245C) and TP receptor agonists (U-46619) produced increases in the beating rate. Sulprostone (a prostanoid EP1 and EP3 receptor agonist) induced marked increases in the beating rate, which were suppressed by SC-19220 (a selective prostanoid EP1 antagonist). Butaprost (a selective prostanoid EP2 receptor agonist), misoprostol (a prostanoid EP2 and EP3 receptor agonist), 11-deoxy-PGE1 (a prostanoid EP2, EP3 and EP4 receptor agonist) did not alter the beating rate. Our results strongly suggest that prostanoid EP1 receptors are involved in positive regulation of the beating rate. Prostanoid EP1 receptor expression was confirmed by western blotting with a selective antibody. Hence, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes express both prostanoid IP and FP receptors (which negatively regulate the spontaneous beating rate) and prostanoid TP, DP1 and EP1 receptors (which positively regulate the spontaneous beating rate). PMID:22984630

  17. Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 regulates the early differentiation of cardiomyocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Youm, Jae Boum; Cho, Sung Woo; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial for maintaining the properties of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and for regulating their subsequent differentiation into diverse cell lineages, including cardiomyocytes. However, mitochondrial regulators that manage the rate of differentiation or cell fate have been rarely identified. This study aimed to determine the potential mitochondrial factor that controls the differentiation of ESCs into cardiac myocytes. We induced cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse ESCs (mESCs) and performed microarray assays to assess messenger RNA (mRNA) expression changes at differentiation day 8 (D8) compared with undifferentiated mESCs (D0). Among the differentially expressed genes, Pdp1 expression was significantly decreased (27-fold) on D8 compared to D0, which was accompanied by suppressed mitochondrial indices, including ATP levels, membrane potential, ROS and mitochondrial Ca(2+). Notably, Pdp1 overexpression significantly enhanced the mitochondrial indices and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and reduced the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate compared to a mock control. In confirmation of this, a knockdown of the Pdp1 gene promoted the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial PDP1 is a potential regulator that controls cardiac differentiation at an early differentiation stage in ESCs. PMID:27538372

  18. Mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 regulates the early differentiation of cardiomyocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Hye Jin; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Youm, Jae Boum; Cho, Sung Woo; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial for maintaining the properties of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and for regulating their subsequent differentiation into diverse cell lineages, including cardiomyocytes. However, mitochondrial regulators that manage the rate of differentiation or cell fate have been rarely identified. This study aimed to determine the potential mitochondrial factor that controls the differentiation of ESCs into cardiac myocytes. We induced cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse ESCs (mESCs) and performed microarray assays to assess messenger RNA (mRNA) expression changes at differentiation day 8 (D8) compared with undifferentiated mESCs (D0). Among the differentially expressed genes, Pdp1 expression was significantly decreased (27-fold) on D8 compared to D0, which was accompanied by suppressed mitochondrial indices, including ATP levels, membrane potential, ROS and mitochondrial Ca2+. Notably, Pdp1 overexpression significantly enhanced the mitochondrial indices and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and reduced the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate compared to a mock control. In confirmation of this, a knockdown of the Pdp1 gene promoted the expression of cardiac differentiation marker mRNA and the cardiac differentiation rate. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial PDP1 is a potential regulator that controls cardiac differentiation at an early differentiation stage in ESCs. PMID:27538372

  19. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  20. Cyclic stretch of Embryonic Cardiomyocytes Increases Proliferation, Growth, and Expression While Repressing Tgf-β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indroneal; Carrion, Katrina; Serrano, Ricardo; Dyo, Jeffrey; Sasik, Roman; Lund, Sean; Willems, Erik; Aceves, Seema; Meili, Rudolph; Mercola, Mark; Chen, Ju; Zambon, Alexander; Hardiman, Gary; Doherty, Taylor A; Lange, Stephan; del Álamo, Juan C.; Nigam, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed biomechanical stimuli are thought to be critical for the pathogenesis of a number of congenital heart defects, including Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). While embryonic cardiomyocytes experience biomechanical stretch every heart beat, their molecular responses to biomechanical stimuli during heart development are poorly understood. We hypothesized that biomechanical stimuli activate specific signaling pathways that impact proliferation, gene expression and myocyte contraction. The objective of this study was to expose embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes (EMCM) to cyclic stretch and examine key molecular and phenotypic responses. Analysis of RNA-Sequencing data demonstrated that gene ontology groups associated with myofibril and cardiac development were significantly modulated. Stretch increased EMCM proliferation, size, cardiac gene expression, and myofibril protein levels. Stretch also repressed several components belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (Tgf-β) signaling pathway. EMCMs undergoing cyclic stretch had decreased Tgf-β expression, protein levels, and signaling. Furthermore, treatment of EMCMs with a Tgf-β inhibitor resulted in increased EMCM size. Functionally, Tgf-β signaling repressed EMCM proliferation and contractile function, as assayed via dynamic monolayer force microscopy (DMFM). Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that biomechanical stimuli play a vital role in normal cardiac development and for cardiac pathology, including HLHS. PMID:25446186

  1. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase plays an essential role in hypertrophic agonists, endothelin-1 and phenylephrine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yue, T L; Gu, J L; Wang, C; Reith, A D; Lee, J C; Mirabile, R C; Kreutz, R; Wang, Y; Maleeff, B; Parsons, A A; Ohlstein, E H

    2000-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is activated by hypertrophic stimuli in cardiomyocytes. However, whether ERK plays an essential role or is implicated in all major components of cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. Using a selective MEK inhibitor, U0126, and a selective Raf inhibitor, SB-386023, to block the ERK signaling pathway at two different levels and adenovirus-mediated transfection of dominant-negative Raf, we studied the role of ERK signaling in response of cultured rat cardiomyocytes to hypertrophic agonists, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and phenylephrine (PE). U0126 and SB-386023 blocked ET-1 and PE-induced ERK but not p38 and JNK activation in cardiomyocytes. Both compounds inhibited ET-1 and PE-induced protein synthesis and increased cell size, sarcomeric reorganization, and expression of beta-myosin heavy chain in myocytes with IC(50) values of 1-2 microm. Furthermore, both inhibitors significantly reduced ET-1- and PE-induced expression of atrial natriuretic factor. In cardiomyocytes transfected with a dominant-negative Raf, ET-1- and PE-induced increase in cell size, sarcomeric reorganization, and atrial natriuretic factor production were remarkably attenuated compared with the cells infected with an adenovirus-expressing green fluorescence protein. Taken together, our data strongly support the notion that the ERK signal pathway plays an essential role in ET-1- and PE-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:10984495

  2. FOG-2 mediated recruitment of the NuRD complex regulates cardiomyocyte proliferation during heart development.

    PubMed

    Garnatz, Audrey S; Gao, Zhiguang; Broman, Michael; Martens, Spencer; Earley, Judy U; Svensson, Eric C

    2014-11-01

    FOG-2 is a multi-zinc finger protein that binds the transcriptional activator GATA4 and modulates GATA4-mediated regulation of target genes during heart development. Our previous work has demonstrated that the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex physically interacts with FOG-2 and is necessary for FOG-2 mediated repression of GATA4 activity in vitro. However, the relevance of this interaction for FOG-2 function in vivo has remained unclear. In this report, we demonstrate the importance of FOG-2/NuRD interaction through the generation and characterization of mice homozygous for a mutation in FOG-2 that disrupts NuRD binding (FOG-2(R3K5A)). These mice exhibit a perinatal lethality and have multiple cardiac malformations, including ventricular and atrial septal defects and a thin ventricular myocardium. To investigate the etiology of the thin myocardium, we measured the rate of cardiomyocyte proliferation in wild-type and FOG-2(R3K5A) developing hearts. We found cardiomyocyte proliferation was reduced by 31±8% in FOG-2(R3K5A) mice. Gene expression analysis indicated that the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a (p21(cip1)) is up-regulated 2.0±0.2-fold in FOG-2(R3K5A) hearts. In addition, we demonstrate that FOG-2 can directly repress the activity of the Cdkn1a gene promoter, suggesting a model by which FOG-2/NuRD promotes ventricular wall thickening by repression of this cell cycle inhibitor. Consistent with this notion, the genetic ablation of Cdkn1a in FOG-2(R3K5A) mice leads to an improvement in left ventricular function and a partial rescue of left ventricular wall thickness. Taken together, our results define a novel mechanism in which FOG-2/NuRD interaction is required for cardiomyocyte proliferation by directly down-regulating the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a during heart development. PMID:25196150

  3. FOG-2 Mediated Recruitment of the NuRD Complex Regulates Cardiomyocyte Proliferation during Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Garnatz, Audrey S.; Gao, Zhiguang; Broman, Michael; Martens, Spencer; Earley, Judy U.; Svensson, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY FOG-2 is a multi-zinc finger protein that binds the transcriptional activator GATA4 and modulates GATA4-mediated regulation of target genes during heart development. Our previous work has demonstrated that the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex physically interacts with FOG-2 and is necessary for FOG-2 mediated repression of GATA4 activity in vitro. However, the relevance of this interaction for FOG-2 function in vivo has remained unclear. In this report, we demonstrate the importance of FOG-2/NuRD interaction through the generation and characterization of mice homozygous for a mutation in FOG-2 that disrupts NuRD binding (FOG-2R3K5A). These mice exhibit a perinatal lethality and have multiple cardiac malformations, including ventricular and atrial septal defects and a thin ventricular myocardium. To investigate the etiology of the thin myocardium, we measured the rate of cardiomyocyte proliferation in wild-type and FOG-2R3K5A developing hearts. We found cardiomyocyte proliferation was reduced by 31 ± 8% in FOG-2R3K5A mice. Gene expression analysis indicated that the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a (p21cip1) is up-regulated 2.0 ± 0.2-fold in FOG-2R3K5A hearts. In addition, we demonstrate that FOG-2 can directly repress the activity of the Cdkn1a gene promoter, suggesting a model by which FOG-2/NuRD promotes ventricular wall thickening by repression of this cell cycle inhibitor. Consistent with this notion, the genetic ablation of Cdkn1a in FOG-2R3K5A mice leads to an improvement in left ventricular function and a partial rescue of left ventricular wall thickness. Taken together, our results define a novel mechanism in which FOG-2/NuRD interaction is required for cardiomyocyte proliferation by directly down-regulating the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1a during heart development. PMID:25196150

  4. Sildenafil prevents the up-regulation of transient receptor potential canonical channels in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Kiso, Hironori; Ohba, Takayoshi; Iino, Kenji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Terata, Yutaka; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC1, 3 and 6) are up-regulated by ET-1. •Sildenafil inhibited hypertrophic responses (BNP, Ca entry, NFAT activation). •Sildenafil suppressed TRPC1, 3 and 6 expression. -- Abstract: Background: Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels are up-regulated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Sildenafil inhibits TRPC6 activation and expression, leading to the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the effects of sildenafil on the expression of other TRPCs remain unknown. We hypothesized that in addition to its effects of TRPC6, sildenafil blocks the up-regulation of other TRPC channels to suppress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Methods and results: In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, a 48 h treatment with 10 nM endothelin (ET)-1 induced hypertrophic responses characterized by nuclear factor of activated T cells activation and enhancement of brain natriuretic peptide expression and cell surface area. Co-treatment with sildenafil (1 μM, 48 h) inhibited these ET-1-induced hypertrophic responses. Although ET-1 enhanced the gene expression of TRPCs, sildenafil inhibited the enhanced gene expression of TRPC1, C3 and C6. Moreover, co-treatment with sildenafil abolished the augmentation of SOCE in the hypertrophied cardiomyocytes. Conclusions: These results suggest that sildenafil inhibits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by suppressing the up-regulation of TRPC expression.

  5. Role of diacylglycerol kinase in cellular regulatory processes: a new regulator for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Goto, Kaoru; Kubota, Isao

    2007-09-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates and converts DAG to phosphatidic acid. DGK regulates cellular DAG levels and attenuates DAG signaling. The 10 mammalian DGK isoforms have been identified to date. In cardiac myocytes, DGKalpha, epsilon, and zeta are expressed, and DGKzeta is the predominant isoform. DGKzeta inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) activation and subsequent hypertrophic programs in response to endothelin-1 (ET-1) in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. DGKzeta blocks cardiac hypertrophy induced by G protein-coupled receptor agonists and pressure overload in vivo. DGKzeta attenuates ventricular remodeling and improves survival after myocardial infarction. These data provide a novel insight for subcellular mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, and DGKzeta may be a new therapeutic target to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and progression to heart failure. PMID:17659347

  6. Zinc-induced metallothionein overexpression prevents doxorubicin toxicity in cardiomyocytes by regulating the peroxiredoxins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Li, Lizhong; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Zhiwei; Peng, Shuangqing

    2016-08-01

    1. Cardiotoxicity is an important factor that limits the clinical use of doxorubicin (Dox). Metallothionein (MT) can antagonize the Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. Using a proteomics approach we have detected that major peroxiredoxins (Prxs) may be involved in this process. In the present study, we further investigate the mechanisms of the MT effects against Dox-induced cytotoxicity and the interactions between MT and Prxs. 2. We have established a primary cardiomyocyte culture system from MT-I/II null (MT(-/-)) and corresponding wild type (MT(+/+)) neonatal mice, and pretreated the MT(+/+) cardiomyocytes with ZnCl2 to establish the MT overexpression cardiomyocyte model. 3. Based on the results, in MT(+/+) cardiomyocytes, ZnCl2 pretreatment significantly increased the cardiomyocytes MT levels and inhibited the cardiotoxicity of Dox; it can resist LDH leakage, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, DNA damage, ROS accumulation and inhibit the decrease in activity of antioxidant enzymes induced by Dox. Moreover, ZnCl2 enhanced the expression of Prx-2, -3, -5 and -6, it can inhibit the expression of Prxs decrease in MT(+/+) cardiomyocytes induced by Dox, but had no effect in MT(-/-) cardiomyocytes. 4. Therefore, the present study suggests that ZnCl2 can protect the cardiomyocytes from the Dox-induced oxidative injury and can inhibit the changes in Prxs expression through induced MT overexpression. PMID:26599915

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Signaling in Adult Cardiomyocytes Increases Contractility and Results in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cilvik, Sarah N.; Wang, Joy I.; Lavine, Kory J.; Uchida, Keita; Castro, Angela; Gierasch, Carolyn M.; Weinheimer, Carla J.; House, Stacey L.; Kovacs, Attila; Nichols, Colin G.; Ornitz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors are highly conserved signaling molecules that have been implicated in postnatal cardiac remodeling. However, it is not known whether cardiomyocyte-expressed FGF receptors are necessary or sufficient for ventricular remodeling in the adult heart. To determine whether cardiomyocytes were competent to respond to an activated FGF receptor, and to determine if this signal would result in the development of hypertrophy, we engineered a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific, constitutively active FGF receptor mouse model (αMHC-rtTA, TRE-caFgfr1-myc). Echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis indicated that acute expression of caFGFR1 rapidly and directly increased cardiac contractility, while chronic expression resulted in significant hypertrophy with preservation of systolic function. Subsequent histologic analysis showed increased cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and regions of myocyte disarray and fibrosis, classic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Analysis of downstream pathways revealed a lack of clear activation of classical FGF-mediated signaling pathways, but did demonstrate a reduction in Serca2 expression and troponin I phosphorylation. Isolated ventricular myocytes showed enhanced contractility and reduced relaxation, an effect that was partially reversed by inhibition of actin-myosin interactions. We conclude that adult cardiomyocytes are competent to transduce FGF signaling and that FGF signaling is sufficient to promote increased cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro and in vivo through enhanced intrinsic actin-myosin interactions. Long-term, FGFR overexpression results in HCM with a dynamic outflow tract obstruction, and may serve as a unique model of HCM. PMID:24349409

  8. Mechanical Stretch Inhibits MicroRNA499 via p53 to Regulate Calcineurin-A Expression in Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Su-Kiat; Wang, Bao-Wei; Lien, Li-Ming; Lo, Huey-Ming; Chiu, Chiung-Zuan; Shyu, Kou-Gi

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs play an important role in cardiac remodeling. MicroRNA 499 (miR499) is highly enriched in cardiomyocytes and targets the gene for Calcineurin A (CnA), which is associated with mitochondrial fission and apoptosis. The mechanism regulating miR499 in stretched cardiomyocytes and in volume overloaded heart is unclear. We sought to investigate the mechanism regulating miR499 and CnA in stretched cardiomyocytes and in volume overload-induced heart failure. Methods & Results Rat cardiomyocytes grown on a flexible membrane base were stretched via vacuum to 20% of maximum elongation at 60 cycles/min. An in vivo model of volume overload with aorta-caval shunt in adult rats was used to study miR499 expression. Mechanical stretch downregulated miR499 expression, and enhanced the expression of CnA protein and mRNA after 12 hours of stretch. Expression of CnA and calcineurin activity was suppressed with miR499 overexpression; whereas, expression of dephosphorylated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) was suppressed with miR499 overexpression and CnA siRNA. Adding p53 siRNA reversed the downregulation of miR499 when stretched. A gel shift assay and promoter-activity assay demonstrated that stretch increased p53 DNA binding activity but decreased miR499 promoter activity. When the miR499 promoter p53-binding site was mutated, the inhibition of miR499 promoter activity with stretch was reversed. The in vivo aorta-caval shunt also showed downregulated myocardial miR499 and overexpression of miR499 suppressed CnA and cellular apoptosis. Conclusion The miR499-controlled apoptotic pathway involving CnA and Drp1 in stretched cardiomyocytes may be regulated by p53 through the transcriptional regulation of miR499. PMID:26859150

  9. Autoantibodies in dilated cardiomyopathy induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression in cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saygili, Erol; Noor-Ebad, Fawad; Schröder, Jörg W.; Mischke, Karl; Saygili, Esra; Rackauskas, Gediminas; Marx, Nikolaus; Kelm, Malte; Rana, Obaida R.

    2015-09-11

    Background: Autoantibodies have been identified as major predisposing factors for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Patients with DCM show elevated serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) whose source is unknown. Besides its well-investigated effects on angiogenesis, evidence is present that VEGF signaling is additionally involved in fibroblast proliferation and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, hence in cardiac remodeling. Whether autoimmune effects in DCM impact cardiac VEGF signaling needs to be elucidated. Methods: Five DCM patients were treated by the immunoadsorption (IA) therapy on five consecutive days. The eluents from the IA columns were collected and prepared for cell culture. Cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats (NRCM) were incubated with increasing DCM-immunoglobulin-G (IgG) concentrations for 48 h. Polyclonal IgG (Venimmun N), which was used to restore IgG plasma levels in DCM patients after the IA therapy was additionally used for control cell culture purposes. Results: Elevated serum levels of VEGF decreased significantly after IA (Serum VEGF (ng/ml); DCM pre-IA: 45 ± 9.1 vs. DCM post–IA: 29 ± 6.7; P < 0.05). In cell culture, pretreatment of NRCM by DCM-IgG induced VEGF expression in a time and dose dependent manner. Biologically active VEGF that was secreted by NRCM significantly increased BNP mRNA levels in control cardiomyocytes and induced cell-proliferation of cultured cardiac fibroblast (Fibroblast proliferation; NRCM medium/HC-IgG: 1 ± 0.0 vs. NRCM medium/DCM-IgG 100 ng/ml: 5.6 ± 0.9; P < 0.05). Conclusion: The present study extends the knowledge about the possible link between autoimmune signaling in DCM and VEGF induction. Whether this observation plays a considerable role in cardiac remodeling during DCM development needs to be further elucidated. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of remodeling in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are not fully understood. • Autoantibodies have been identified as major predisposing factors

  10. Growth regulation of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of an Ortho-UCLA Symposium on growth regulation of cancer. Included are the following chapters: Swiss 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts transfected with a human Prepro-GRP gene synthesize and secrete Pro-GRP rather than GRP, proto-oncogenes as mediators of growth and development: discussion summary, animal studies and clinical trials.

  11. KLF15 and PPARα Cooperate to Regulate Cardiomyocyte Lipid Gene Expression and Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; John, Jenine E.; Zhang, Lilei; Efraim, Elizabeth S.; Zhang, Rongli; Liao, Xudong; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic myocardium is an omnivore and utilizes various carbon substrates to meet its energetic demand. While the adult heart preferentially consumes fatty acids (FAs) over carbohydrates, myocardial fuel plasticity is essential for organismal survival. This metabolic plasticity governing fuel utilization is under robust transcriptional control and studies over the past decade have illuminated members of the nuclear receptor family of factors (e.g., PPARα) as important regulators of myocardial lipid metabolism. However, given the complexity of myocardial metabolism in health and disease, it is likely that other molecular pathways are likely operative and elucidation of such pathways may provide the foundation for novel therapeutic approaches. We previously demonstrated that Kruppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) is an independent regulator of cardiac lipid metabolism thus raising the possibility that KLF15 and PPARα operate in a coordinated fashion to regulate myocardial gene expression requisite for lipid oxidation. In the current study, we show that KLF15 binds to, cooperates with, and is required for the induction of canonical PPARα-mediated gene expression and lipid oxidation in cardiomyocytes. As such, this study establishes a molecular module involving KLF15 and PPARα and provides fundamental insights into the molecular regulation of cardiac lipid metabolism. PMID:25815008

  12. Early origins of heart disease: low birth weight and determinants of cardiomyocyte endowment.

    PubMed

    Botting, K J; Wang, K C W; Padhee, M; McMillen, I C; Summers-Pearce, B; Rattanatray, L; Cutri, N; Posterino, G S; Brooks, D A; Morrison, J L

    2012-09-01

    1. World-wide epidemiological and experimental animal studies demonstrate that adversity in fetal life, resulting in intrauterine growth restriction, programmes the offspring for a greater susceptibility to ischaemic heart disease and heart failure in adult life. 2. After cardiogenesis, cardiomyocyte endowment is determined by a range of hormones and signalling pathways that regulate cardiomyocyte proliferation, apoptosis and the timing of multinucleation/terminal differentiation. 3. The small fetus may have reduced cardiomyocyte endowment owing to the impact of a suboptimal intrauterine environment on the signalling pathways that regulate cardiomyocyte proliferation, apoptosis and the timing of terminal differentiation. PMID:22126336

  13. TGF-β1 mediates the hypertrophic cardiomyocyte growth induced by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Jo El J.; Witt, Sandra A.; Glascock, Betty J.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Reiser, Peter J.; Nix, Stacey L.; Kimball, Thomas R.; Doetschman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent hypertrophic stimulus, causes significant increases in TGFb1 gene expression. However, it is not known whether there is a causal relationship between increased levels of TGF-β1 and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic analysis revealed that TGF-β1–deficient mice subjected to chronic subpressor doses of Ang II had no significant change in left ventricular (LV) mass and percent fractional shortening during Ang IItreatment. In contrast, Ang II–treated wild-type mice showed a >20% increase in LV mass and impaired cardiac function. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was also markedly increased in Ang II–treated wild-type mice but unchanged in Ang II–treated TGF-β1–deficient mice. No significant levels of fibrosis, mitotic growth, or cytokine infiltration were detected in Ang II–treated mice. Atrial natriuretic factor expression was ∼6-fold elevated in Ang II–treated wild-type, but not TGF-β1–deficient mice. However, the α- to β-myosin heavy chain switch did not occur in Ang II–treated mice, indicating that isoform switching is not obligatorily coupled with hypertrophy or TGF-β1. The Ang IIeffect on hypertrophy was shown not to result from stimulation of the endogenous renin-angiotensis system. These results indicate that TGF-β1 is an important mediator of the hypertrophic growth response of the heart to Ang II. PMID:11901187

  14. Dynamic DNA methylation orchestrates cardiomyocyte development, maturation and disease.

    PubMed

    Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Grüning, Björn A; Schnick, Tilman; Burger, Lukas; Benes, Vladimir; Würch, Andreas; Bönisch, Ulrike; Günther, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Schübeler, Dirk; Hein, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a highly specialized organ with essential function for the organism throughout life. The significance of DNA methylation in shaping the phenotype of the heart remains only partially known. Here we generate and analyse DNA methylomes from highly purified cardiomyocytes of neonatal, adult healthy and adult failing hearts. We identify large genomic regions that are differentially methylated during cardiomyocyte development and maturation. Demethylation of cardiomyocyte gene bodies correlates strongly with increased gene expression. Silencing of demethylated genes is characterized by the polycomb mark H3K27me3 or by DNA methylation. De novo methylation by DNA methyltransferases 3A/B causes repression of fetal cardiac genes, including essential components of the cardiac sarcomere. Failing cardiomyocytes partially resemble neonatal methylation patterns. This study establishes DNA methylation as a highly dynamic process during postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes and their adaptation to pathological stress in a process tightly linked to gene regulation and activity. PMID:25335909

  15. Dynamic DNA methylation orchestrates cardiomyocyte development, maturation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Grüning, Björn A.; Schnick, Tilman; Burger, Lukas; Benes, Vladimir; Würch, Andreas; Bönisch, Ulrike; Günther, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Schübeler, Dirk; Hein, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a highly specialized organ with essential function for the organism throughout life. The significance of DNA methylation in shaping the phenotype of the heart remains only partially known. Here we generate and analyse DNA methylomes from highly purified cardiomyocytes of neonatal, adult healthy and adult failing hearts. We identify large genomic regions that are differentially methylated during cardiomyocyte development and maturation. Demethylation of cardiomyocyte gene bodies correlates strongly with increased gene expression. Silencing of demethylated genes is characterized by the polycomb mark H3K27me3 or by DNA methylation. De novo methylation by DNA methyltransferases 3A/B causes repression of fetal cardiac genes, including essential components of the cardiac sarcomere. Failing cardiomyocytes partially resemble neonatal methylation patterns. This study establishes DNA methylation as a highly dynamic process during postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes and their adaptation to pathological stress in a process tightly linked to gene regulation and activity. PMID:25335909

  16. Andrographolide up-regulates cellular-reduced glutathione level and protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    PubMed

    Woo, Anthony Y H; Waye, Mary M Y; Tsui, Stephen K W; Yeung, Sandy T W; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2008-04-01

    Recent studies revealed that the herb Andrographis paniculata possesses cardioprotective activities. Using neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, the cardioprotective actions of several diterpene lactones derived from A. paniculata including andrographolide, 14-deoxyandrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, and sodium 14-deoxyandrographolide-12-sulfonate were investigated. Pretreatment with andrographolide but not with the other compounds protected the cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury and up-regulated the cellular-reduced glutathione (GSH) level and antioxidant enzyme activities. The cardioprotective action of andrographolide was found to coincide in a time-dependent manner with the up-regulation of GSH, indicating the important role of GSH. The cardioprotective action of andrographolide was also completely abolished by buthionine sulfoximine, which acts as a specific gamma-glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) inhibitor to deplete cellular GSH level. It was subsequently found that the mRNA and protein levels of the GCL catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) were up-regulated by andrographolide. Luciferase reporter assay also demonstrated that andrographolide activated both the GCLC and the GCLM promoters in the transfected rat H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell line. The 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbo-13-acetate response element or the antioxidant response element may be involved in the transactivating actions of andrographolide on the GCLC and GCLM promoters. The present study pinpoints andrographolide as a cardioprotective principle in A. paniculata and reveals its cytoprotective mechanism. PMID:18174384

  17. Identification of genes directly regulated by the intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in cardiovascular physiology (e.g., heart rate, cardiac output) and pathophysiology (e.g., arrhythmias) are firmly established. These phenomena have been attributed primarily to circadian rhythms in neurohumoral influences (e.g., sympathetic activity). Nevertheless, cardiomyocytes ...

  18. PGC-1α and reactive oxygen species regulate human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte function.

    PubMed

    Birket, Matthew J; Casini, Simona; Kosmidis, Georgios; Elliott, David A; Gerencser, Akos A; Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Ed G; Mummery, Christine L

    2013-01-01

    Diminished mitochondrial function is causally related to some heart diseases. Here, we developed a human disease model based on cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), in which an important pathway of mitochondrial gene expression was inactivated. Repression of PGC-1α, which is normally induced during development of cardiomyocytes, decreased mitochondrial content and activity and decreased the capacity for coping with energetic stress. Yet, concurrently, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were lowered, and the amplitude of the action potential and the maximum amplitude of the calcium transient were in fact increased. Importantly, in control cardiomyocytes, lowering ROS levels emulated this beneficial effect of PGC-1α knockdown and similarly increased the calcium transient amplitude. Our results suggest that controlling ROS levels may be of key physiological importance for recapitulating mature cardiomyocyte phenotypes, and the combination of bioassays used in this study may have broad application in the analysis of cardiac physiology pertaining to disease. PMID:24371810

  19. PGC-1α and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Birket, Matthew J.; Casini, Simona; Kosmidis, Georgios; Elliott, David A.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees; Mastroberardino, Pier G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Ed G.; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Diminished mitochondrial function is causally related to some heart diseases. Here, we developed a human disease model based on cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), in which an important pathway of mitochondrial gene expression was inactivated. Repression of PGC-1α, which is normally induced during development of cardiomyocytes, decreased mitochondrial content and activity and decreased the capacity for coping with energetic stress. Yet, concurrently, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were lowered, and the amplitude of the action potential and the maximum amplitude of the calcium transient were in fact increased. Importantly, in control cardiomyocytes, lowering ROS levels emulated this beneficial effect of PGC-1α knockdown and similarly increased the calcium transient amplitude. Our results suggest that controlling ROS levels may be of key physiological importance for recapitulating mature cardiomyocyte phenotypes, and the combination of bioassays used in this study may have broad application in the analysis of cardiac physiology pertaining to disease. PMID:24371810

  20. Uptake of Host Cell Transforming Growth Factor-β by Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigotes in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Waghabi, Mariana C.; Keramidas, Michelle; Bailly, Sabine; Degrave, Wim; Mendonça-Lima, Leila; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré C.; Meirelles, Maria de Nazareth L.; Paciornik, Sidnei; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Feige, Jean-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The cytokine transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays various functions in the control of Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and in the progression of Chagas’ disease. When we immunostained T. cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes (after either in vivo or in vitro infections) for TGF-β, we observed stronger immunoreactivity in parasites than in host cells. TGF-β immunoreactivity evolved during parasite cycle progression, with intense staining in amastigotes versus very faint staining in trypomastigotes. TGF-β was present on the surface of amastigotes, in the flagellar pocket, and in intraparasitic vesicles as revealed by electron microscopy. However, no ortholog TGF-β gene could be identified in the genome of T. cruzi by in silico analysis or by extensive polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction studies. Immunoreactive TGF-β was most probably taken up by the parasite from the host cell cytoplasm because such an internalization process of biotinylated TGF-β could be observed in axenic amastigotes in vitro. These observations represent the first example of a novel mechanism by which a primitive unicellular protozoan can use host cell TGF-β to control its own intracellular life cycle. PMID:16192635

  1. 5-Azacytidine delivered by mesoporous silica nanoparticles regulates the differentiation of P19 cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ding, Qian; Wang, Jia; Deng, Lin; Yang, Lu; Tao, Lei; Lei, Haihong; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-01-28

    Heart disease is one of the deadliest diseases causing mortality due to the limited regenerative capability of highly differentiated cardiomyocytes. Stem cell-based therapy in tissue engineering is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas and raises promising prospects for cardiac repair. In this study, we have synthesized FITC-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) based on a sol-gel method (known as Stöber's method) as a drug delivery platform to transport 5-azacytidine in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells. The surfactant CTAB is utilized as a liquid crystal template to self-aggregate into micelles, resulting in the synthesis of MSNs. Based on the cell viability assay, treatment with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine resulted in much more significant inhibition of the proliferation than 5-azacytidine alone. To study the mechanism, we have tested the differentiation genes and cardiac marker genes in P19 cells and found that these genes have been up-regulated in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells treated with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine + poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), with the changes of histone modifications on the regulatory region. In conclusion, with FMSNs as drug delivery platforms, 5-azacytidine can be more efficiently delivered into stem cells and can be used to monitor and track the transfection process in situ to clarify their effects on stem cell functions and the differentiation process, which can serve as a promising tool in tissue engineering and other biomedical fields. PMID:26699243

  2. 5-Azacytidine delivered by mesoporous silica nanoparticles regulates the differentiation of P19 cells into cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Ding, Qian; Wang, Jia; Deng, Lin; Yang, Lu; Tao, Lei; Lei, Haihong; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the deadliest diseases causing mortality due to the limited regenerative capability of highly differentiated cardiomyocytes. Stem cell-based therapy in tissue engineering is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas and raises promising prospects for cardiac repair. In this study, we have synthesized FITC-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) based on a sol-gel method (known as Stöber's method) as a drug delivery platform to transport 5-azacytidine in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells. The surfactant CTAB is utilized as a liquid crystal template to self-aggregate into micelles, resulting in the synthesis of MSNs. Based on the cell viability assay, treatment with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine resulted in much more significant inhibition of the proliferation than 5-azacytidine alone. To study the mechanism, we have tested the differentiation genes and cardiac marker genes in P19 cells and found that these genes have been up-regulated in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells treated with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine + poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), with the changes of histone modifications on the regulatory region. In conclusion, with FMSNs as drug delivery platforms, 5-azacytidine can be more efficiently delivered into stem cells and can be used to monitor and track the transfection process in situ to clarify their effects on stem cell functions and the differentiation process, which can serve as a promising tool in tissue engineering and other biomedical fields.

  3. Aza-induced cardiomyocyte differentiation of P19 EC-cells by epigenetic co-regulation and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Deepti; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2013-09-10

    Stem cells in cell based therapy for cardiac injury is being potentially considered. However, genetic regulatory networks involved in cardiac differentiation are not clearly understood. Among stem cell differentiation models, mouse P19 embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells, are employed for studying (epi)genetic regulation of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Here, we comprehensively assessed cardiogenic differentiation potential of 5-azacytidine (Aza) on P19 EC-cells, associated gene expression profiles and the changes in DNA methylation, histone acetylation and activated-ERK signaling status during differentiation. Initial exposure of Aza to cultured EC-cells leads to an efficient (55%) differentiation to cardiomyocyte-rich embryoid bodies with a threefold (16.8%) increase in the cTnI+ cardiomyocytes. Expression levels of cardiac-specific gene markers i.e., Isl-1, BMP-2, GATA-4, and α-MHC were up-regulated following Aza induction, accompanied by differential changes in their methylation status particularly that of BMP-2 and α-MHC. Additionally, increases in the levels of acetylated-H3 and pERK were observed during Aza-induced cardiac differentiation. These studies demonstrate that Aza is a potent cardiac inducer when treated during the initial phase of differentiation of mouse P19 EC-cells and its effect is brought about epigenetically and co-ordinatedly by hypo-methylation and histone acetylation-mediated hyper-expression of cardiogenesis-associated genes and involving activation of ERK signaling. PMID:23747406

  4. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- β/Smads Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and β-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and β-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-β/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-β1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- β/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I’s utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  5. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- β/Smads Signalings.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Moon Hee; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and β-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and β-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-β/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-β1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- β/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I's utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  6. MicroRNAs in the Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2)-regulated Gtl2-Dio3 Noncoding RNA Locus Promote Cardiomyocyte Proliferation by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda L; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-09-18

    Understanding cell cycle regulation in postmitotic cardiomyocytes may lead to new therapeutic approaches to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. We have demonstrated previously that microRNAs encoded by the Gtl2-Dio3 noncoding RNA locus function downstream of the MEF2A transcription factor in skeletal muscle regeneration. We have also reported expression of these miRNAs in the heart. Here we investigated the role of two Gtl2-Dio3 miRNAs, miR-410 and miR-495, in cardiac muscle. Overexpression of miR-410 and miR-495 robustly stimulated cardiomyocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Interestingly, unlike our findings in skeletal muscle, these miRNAs did not modulate the activity of the WNT signaling pathway. Instead, these miRNAs targeted Cited2, a coactivator required for proper cardiac development. Consistent with miR-410 and miR-495 overexpression, siRNA knockdown of Cited2 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in robust proliferation. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of Cdkn1c/p57/Kip2, a cell cycle inhibitor, and increased expression of VEGFA, a growth factor with proliferation-promoting effects. Therefore, miR-410 and miR-495 are among a growing number of miRNAs that have the ability to potently stimulate neonatal cardiomyocyte proliferation. PMID:26240138

  7. Role of protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Braconi Quintaje, S; Church, D J; Rebsamen, M; Valloton, M B; Hemmings, B A; Lang, U

    1996-04-25

    Incubation of cultured, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) induced a transient suppression of PP2A activity at 5 min, an effect that was reversed after 15 min of exposure to PMA. This inactivation was correlated with a transient increase in the phosphorylation level of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (193 +/- 38% of control levels at 5 min). Simultaneously to the transient inactivation of PP2A, we observed a rapid and reversible phosphorylation of 42-kDa MAP kinase (474 +/- 65% of control levels at 5 min, and 316 +/- 44% at 15 min) in cardiomyocytes treated with PMA. This transient phosphorylation was accompanied by a transient increase in cytosolic MAP kinase activity (209 +/- 17% of control values at 5 min and 125 +/- 7% at 15 min). Okadaic acid (1 microM ) completely blocked the decrease in the phosphorylation level and activity of MAP kinase occurring after 5 min of exposure to PMA. These data demonstrate that PP2A inactivation and MAP kinase activation are very strongly correlated in cardiomyocytes, indicating that PP2A plays a negative modulatory role in the regulation of MAP kinase activity. PMID:8629997

  8. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter T; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; O'Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Sikkel, Markus B; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A; Lyon, Alexander R; Harding, Sian E; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors. PMID:24345421

  9. Caveolin-3 regulates compartmentation of cardiomyocyte beta2-adrenergic receptor-mediated cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter T.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; O’Hara, Thomas; Diakonov, Ivan; Bhargava, Anamika; Tokar, Sergiy; Schobesberger, Sophie; Shevchuk, Andrew I.; Sikkel, Markus B.; Wilkinson, Ross; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Harding, Sian E.; Gorelik, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether caveolin-3 (Cav3) regulates localization of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and its cAMP signaling in healthy or failing cardiomyocytes. We co-expressed wildtype Cav3 or its dominant-negative mutant (Cav3DN) together with the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor Epac2-camps in adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs). FRET and scanning ion conductance microscopy were used to locally stimulate β2AR and to measure cytosolic cAMP. Cav3 overexpression increased the number of caveolae and decreased the magnitude of β2AR-cAMP signal. Conversely, Cav3DN expression resulted in an increased β2AR-cAMP response without altering the whole-cell L-type calcium current. Following local stimulation of Cav3DN-expressing ARVMs, β2AR response could only be generated in T-tubules. However, the normally compartmentalized β2AR-cAMP signal became diffuse, similar to the situation observed in heart failure. Finally, overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes led to partial β2AR redistribution back into the T-tubules. In conclusion, Cav3 plays a crucial role for the localization of β2AR and compartmentation of β2AR-cAMP signaling to the T-tubules of healthy ARVMs, and overexpression of Cav3 in failing myocytes can partially restore the disrupted localization of these receptors. PMID:24345421

  10. Endocrine and other physiologic modulators of perinatal cardiomyocyte endowment.

    PubMed

    Jonker, S S; Louey, S

    2016-01-01

    Immature contractile cardiomyocytes proliferate to rapidly increase cell number, establishing cardiomyocyte endowment in the perinatal period. Developmental changes in cellular maturation, size and attrition further contribute to cardiac anatomy. These physiological processes occur concomitant with a changing hormonal environment as the fetus prepares itself for the transition to extrauterine life. There are complex interactions between endocrine, hemodynamic and nutritional regulators of cardiac development. Birth has been long assumed to be the trigger for major differences between the fetal and postnatal cardiomyocyte growth patterns, but investigations in normally growing sheep and rodents suggest this may not be entirely true; in sheep, these differences are initiated before birth, while in rodents they occur after birth. The aim of this review is to draw together our understanding of the temporal regulation of these signals and cardiomyocyte responses relative to birth. Further, we consider how these dynamics are altered in stressed and suboptimal intrauterine environments. PMID:26432905

  11. The miR-17-92 cluster regulates FOG-2 expression and inhibits proliferation of mouse embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Rui; Lei, Han; Chen, Mianzhi; Li, Qinwei; Sun, Huan; Ai, Jianzhong; Chen, Tielin; Wang, Honglian; Fang, Yin; Zhou, Qin

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have gradually been recognized as regulators of embryonic development; however, relatively few miRNAs have been identified that regulate cardiac development. A series of recent papers have established an essential role for the miRNA-17-92 (miR-17-92) cluster of miRNAs in the development of the heart. Previous research has shown that the Friend of Gata-2 (FOG-2) is critical for cardiac development. To investigate the possibility that the miR-17-92 cluster regulates FOG-2 expression and inhibits proliferation in mouse embryonic cardiomyocytes we initially used bioinformatics to analyze 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR) of FOG-2 to predict the potential of miR-17-92 to target it. We used luciferase assays to demonstrate that miR-17-5p and miR-20a of miR-17-92 interact with the predicted target sites in the 3′UTR of FOG-2. Furthermore, RT-PCR and Western blot were used to demonstrate the post-transcriptional regulation of FOG-2 by miR-17-92 in embryonic cardiomyocytes from E12.5-day pregnant C57BL/6J mice. Finally, EdU cell assays together with the FOG-2 rescue strategy were employed to evaluate the effect of proliferation on embryonic cardiomyocytes. We first found that the miR-17-5p and miR-20a of miR-17-92 directly target the 3′UTR of FOG-2 and post-transcriptionally repress the expression of FOG-2. Moreover, our findings demonstrated that over-expression of miR-17-92 may inhibit cell proliferation via post-transcriptional repression of FOG-2 in embryonic cardiomyocytes. These results indicate that the miR-17-92 cluster regulates the expression of FOG-2 protein and suggest that the miR-17-92 cluster might play an important role in heart development. PMID:22267003

  12. Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death.

    PubMed

    Parra, Valentina; Moraga, Francisco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Torrealba, Natalia; Criollo, Alfredo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Rothermel, Beverly A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis and degradation of sphingolipids that regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, cell growth, differentiation and death. In cardiomyocytes, ceramides induce apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and promoting cytochrome-c release. Ca(2+) overload is a common feature of all types of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ceramides on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels, mitochondrial function and cardiomyocyte death. Our data show that C2-ceramide induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes by a mechanism involving increased Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial network fragmentation and loss of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffer capacity. These biochemical events increase cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and trigger cardiomyocyte death via the activation of calpains. PMID:23602992

  13. Role of α-crystallin B in regulation of stress induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Subhalakshmi; Mitra, Arkadeep; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recently emerging evidence suggests that cardiomyocyte apoptosis is one of the major pathogenic factors in heart diseases leading to heart failure. Cardiomyocytes undergo apoptosis in response to a wide variety of cellular stresses including protein folding stress at Endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Stressed myocytes elicit an adaptive response referred as Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) by inducing accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) to mitigate the ER stress. HSPs act as molecular chaperons by assisting correct folding of the aggregated misfolded proteins in ER lumen. α-Crystallin B (CRYAB) is an abundant small HSP that confers protection to cardiomyocytes against various stress stimuli. Recent evidence indicates that CRYAB directly interacts with several components of ER stress and also mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Based on currently available literature this mini review will focus on how CRYAB confers protection to stressed myocardium thereby emphasizing its function as antiapoptotic molecule. Understanding the interplay between CRYAB and the key components in the apoptotic signaling cascade mediated by ER and mitochondria will help in development of novel therapies for cardiac diseases. PMID:25613032

  14. Glucose transport and glucose transporter GLUT4 are regulated by product(s) of intermediary metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Y; Böttcher, U; Eblenkamp, M; Thomas, J; Jüngling, E; Rösen, P; Kammermeier, H

    1997-01-01

    )propyl-2-amine]. In conclusion, cardiomyocyte glucose transport is subject to counter-regulation by alternative substrates. The glucose transport system appears to be controlled by (a) compound(s) of intermediary metabolism (other than glucose 6-phosphate), but in a different way than pyruvate dehydrogenase. Transport inhibition eventually occurs via a decrease in the amount of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane. PMID:9032447

  15. Aldosterone-induced cardiomyocyte growth, and fibroblast migration and proliferation are mediated by TRAF3IP2.

    PubMed

    Somanna, Naveen K; Yariswamy, Manjunath; Garagliano, Joseph M; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Mummidi, Srinivas; Valente, Anthony J; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2015-10-01

    Sustained activation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) contributes to the pathogenesis of heart failure. Aldosterone (Aldo) is known to induce both myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis through oxidative stress and proinflammatory pathways. Here we have investigated whether Aldo-mediated cardiomycocyte hypertrophy is dependent on TRAF3IP2, an upstream regulator of IKK and JNK. We also investigated whether the pro-mitogenic and pro-migratory effects of Aldo on cardiac fibroblasts are also mediated by TRAF3IP2. Aldo induced both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes (CM), and upregulated TRAF3IP2 expression in part via the mineralocorticoid receptor and oxidative stress. Silencing TRAF3IP2 blunted Aldo-induced IKKβ, p65, JNK, and c-Jun activation, IL-18, IL-6 and CT-1 upregulation, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In isolated adult mouse cardiac fibroblasts (CF), Aldo stimulated TRAF3IP2-dependent IL-18 and IL-6 production, CTGF, collagen I and III expression, MMP2 activation, and proliferation and migration. These in vitro results suggest that TRAF3IP2 may play a causal role in Aldo-induced adverse cardiac remodeling in vivo, and identify TRAF3IP2 as a potential therapeutic target in hypertensive heart disease. PMID:26148936

  16. Sodium orthovanadate suppresses palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by regulation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Fu, Hui; Chang, Fen; Wang, Jinlan; Zhang, Shangli; Caudle, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Deling

    2016-05-01

    Elevated circulatory free fatty acids (FFAs) especially saturated FFAs, such as palmitate (PA), are detrimental to the heart. However, mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain unknown. Here, the role of JAK2/STAT3 in PA-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate that PA suppressed the JAK2/STAT3 pathway by dephosphorylation of JAK2 (Y1007/1008) and STAT3 (Y705), and thus blocked the translocation of STAT3 into the nucleus. Conversely, phosphorylation of S727, another phosphorylated site of STAT3, was increased in response to PA treatment. Pretreatment of JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor, inhibited STAT3 (S727) activation induced by PA and rescued the phosphorylation of STAT3 (Y705). The data suggested that JNK may be another upstream factor regulating STAT3, and verified the important function of P-STAT3 (Y705) in PA-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Sodium orthovanadate (SOV), a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, obviously inhibited PA-induced apoptosis by restoring JAK2/STAT3 pathways. This effect was diminished by STAT3 inhibitor Stattic. Collectively, our data suggested a novel mechanism that the inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 activation was responsible for palmitic lipotoxicity and SOV may act as a potential therapeutic agent by targeting JAK2/STAT3 in lipotoxic cardiomyopathy treatment. PMID:26921179

  17. β-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Transactivation Of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Decreases Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis Through Differential Subcellular Activation of ERK1/2 and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Grisanti, Laurel A.; Talarico, Jennifer A.; Carter, Rhonda L.; Yu, Justine E.; Repas, Ashley A.; Radcliffe, Scott W.; Tang, Hoang-ai; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Houser, Steven R.; Tilley, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale β-adrenergic receptor (βAR)-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to relay pro-survival effects via unknown mechanisms. Objective We hypothesized that acute βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation in the heart promotes differential subcellular activation of ERK1/2 and Akt, promoting cell survival through modulation of apoptosis. Methods and Results C57BL/6 mice underwent acute i.p. injection with isoproterenol (ISO) ± AG 1478 (EGFR antagonist) to assess the impact of βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation on phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (P-ERK1/2) and Akt (P-Akt) in distinct cardiac subcellular fractions. Increased P-ERK1/2 and P-Akt were observed in cytosolic, plasma membrane and nuclear fractions following ISO stimulation. Whereas the P-ERK1/2 response was EGFR-sensitive in all fractions, the P-Akt response was EGFR-sensitive only in the plasma membrane and nucleus, results confirmed in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (RNCM). βAR-mediated EGFR-transactivation also decreased apoptosis in serum-depleted RNCM, as measured via TUNEL as well as caspase 3 activity/cleavage, which were sensitive to inhibition of either ERK1/2 (PD184352) or Akt (LY-294002) signaling. Caspase 3 activity/cleavage was also sensitive to inhibition of transcription, which, with an increase in nuclear P-ERK1/2 and P-Akt in response to ISO, suggested that βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation may regulate apoptotic gene transcription. An Apoptosis PCR Array identified tnfsf10 (TRAIL) to be altered by ISO in an EGFR-sensitive manner, results confirmed via RT-PCR and ELISA measurement of both membrane-bound and soluble cardiomyocyte TRAIL levels. Conclusions βAR-mediated EGFR transactivation induces differential subcellular activation of ERK1/2 and Akt leading to increased cell survival through the modulation of caspase 3 activity and apoptotic gene expression in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24566221

  18. Cyclosporine A regulate oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: mechanisms via ROS generation, iNOS and Hsp70

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huei-Wen; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2002-01-01

    Previous study suggested that cyclosporine A (CsA) could partially reduce ischaemia/reperfusion-induced injury in isolated heart, but the mechanism was still unclear. In this study, the possible mechanisms of cyclosporine A in regulating oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis were examined. Morphological (cell shrinkage, apoptotic body formation, and DNA fragmentation) and biochemical (annexin-V staining for exposed phosphatidylserine residues) evidences showed that both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypoxia/reoxygenation could induce apoptotic change in the embryonal rat heart myoblast-derived cells (H9c2). These effects were inhibited by pre-treatment with CsA at concentration of 0.01–1.0 μM for 24 h, but were increased with 10.0 μM CsA. While examining the mechanisms of CsA in protecting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, we found that the collapse of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by oxidative stress was partially reversed by CsA (0.01–1.0 μM). Compared to the control, CSA at the concentration of 0.1 and 10.0 μM significantly increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to 117.2±12.4% and 234.4±9.3%, respectively. Co-incubating with the antioxidant, ascorbic acid (10.0 μM), could partially reduce the protective effect of CsA (0.01–1.0 μM) and the toxic effect of 10.0 μM CsA. Pre-treatment with CsA at concentration of 0.01–1.0 μM for 24 h produced up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and also induced NO production, indicating that these factors might be associated with the cell protective effects of CsA. These results suggest that CsA could protect the oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis not only by preventing the loss of ΔΨm in mitochondria, but also through ROS generation, Hsp70, and iNOS up-regulation. PMID:12411407

  19. Challenges measuring cardiomyocyte renewal

    PubMed Central

    Soonpaa, Mark H.; Rubart, Michael; Field, Loren J.

    2012-01-01

    Interventions to effect therapeutic cardiomyocyte renewal have received considerable interest of late. Such interventions, if successful, could give rise to myocardial regeneration in diseased hearts. Regenerative interventions fall into two broad categories, namely approaches based on promoting renewal of pre-existing cardiomyocytes and approaches based on cardiomyogenic stem cell activity. The latter category can be further subdivided into approaches promoting differentiation of endogenous cardiomyogenic stem cells, approaches wherein cardiomyogenic stem cells are harvested, amplified or enriched ex vivo, and subsequently engrafted into the heart, and approaches wherein an exogenous stem cell is induced to differentiate in vitro, and the resulting cardiomyocytes are engrafted into the heart. There is disagreement in the literature regarding the degree to which cardiomyocyte renewal occurs in the normal and injured heart, the mechanism(s) by which this occurs, and the degree to which therapeutic interventions can enhance regenerative growth. This review discusses several caveats which are encountered when attempting to measure cardiomyocyte renewal in vivo which likely contribute, at least in part, to the disagreement regarding the levels at which this occurs in normal, injured and treated hearts. PMID:23142641

  20. Origin of Cardiomyocytes in the Adult Heart

    PubMed Central

    Leri, Annarosa; Rota, Marcello; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Goichberg, Polina; Anversa, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This review article discusses the mechanisms of cardiomyogenesis in the adult heart. They include the reentry of cardiomyocytes into the cell cycle; dedifferentiation of preexisting cardiomyocytes which assume an immature replicating cell phenotype; transdifferentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cardiomyocytes; and cardiomyocytes derived from activation and lineage specification of resident cardiac stem cells. The recognition of the origin of cardiomyocytes is of critical importance for the development of strategies capable of enhancing the growth response of the myocardium; in fact, cell therapy for the decompensated heart has to be based on the acquisition of this fundamental biological knowledge. PMID:25552694

  1. Pleiotropic effects of the beta-adrenoceptor blocker carvedilol on calcium regulation during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruijuan; Miura, Toshiro; Harada, Nozomu; Kametani, Ryosuke; Shibuya, Masaki; Fukagawa, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Shuji; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Hara, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2006-07-01

    Carvedilol is a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blocker with multiple pleiotropic actions. A recent clinical study suggested that carvedilol may be superior to other beta-adrenoceptor blockers in the treatment of heart failure. Despite numerous investigations, the underlying mechanisms of carvedilol on improving heart failure are yet to be fully established. The purpose of this study is to clarify the pleiotropic effect of carvedilol on cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium regulation during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Carvedilol (10 microM), but not metoprolol (10 microM), reduced H2O2 (100 microM)-induced apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. During the process, changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial calcium concentration ([Ca2+]m) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) were measured by fluorescent probes [Fluo-3/acetoxymethyl ester (AM), Rhod-2/AM, and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester, respectively] and imaged by laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that H2O2 caused [Ca2]m overload first, followed by [Ca2+]i overload, leading to DeltaPsim dissipation and the induction of apoptosis. Carvedilol (10 microM) significantly delayed these processes and reduced apoptosis. These effects were not observed with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers (metoprolol, atenolol, and propranolol) or with a combination of the alpha (phentolamine)- and the beta-adrenoceptor blocker. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM) and the combination of NAC and propranolol (10 microM) showed an effect similar to that of carvedilol. Therefore, the effect of carvedilol on H2O2-induced changes in [Ca2+]m, [Ca2+]i, and DeltaPsi(m) is independent of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors but is probably dependent on the antioxidant effect. PMID:16611853

  2. Vertebrate heart growth is regulated by functional antagonism between Gridlock and Gata5

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haibo; King, Isabelle N.; Chopra, Sameer S.; Wan, Haiyan; Ni, Terri T.; Jiang, Charlie; Guan, Xiaoqun; Wells, Sam; Srivastava, Deepak; Zhong, Tao P.

    2007-01-01

    Embryonic organs attain their final dimensions through the generation of proper cell number and size, but the control mechanisms remain obscure. Here, we establish Gridlock (Grl), a Hairy-related basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factor, as a negative regulator of cardiomyocyte proliferative growth in zebrafish embryos. Mutations in grl cause an increase in expression of a group of immediate-early growth genes, myocardial genes, and development of hyperplastic hearts. Conversely, cardiomyocytes with augmented Grl activity have diminished cell volume and fail to divide, resulting in a marked reduction in heart size. Both bHLH domain and carboxyl region are required for Grl negative control of myocardial proliferative growth. These Grl-induced cardiac effects are counterbalanced by the transcriptional activator Gata5 but not Gata4, which promotes cardiomyocyte expansion in the embryo. Biochemical analyses show that Grl forms a complex with Gata5 through the carboxyl region and can repress Gata5-mediated transcription via the bHLH domain. Hence, our studies suggest that Grl regulates embryonic heart growth via opposing Gata5, at least in part through their protein interactions in modulating gene expression. PMID:17715064

  3. Epicardium is required for sarcomeric maturation and cardiomyocyte growth in the ventricular compact layer mediated by transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor before the onset of coronary circulation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makiko; Yamagishi, Toshiyuki; Narematsu, Mayu; Kamimura, Tatsuya; Kai, Masatake; Nakajima, Yuji

    2014-08-01

    The epicardium, which is derived from the proepicardial organ (PE) as the third epithelial layer of the developing heart, is crucial for ventricular morphogenesis. An epicardial deficiency leads to a thin compact layer for the developing ventricle; however, the mechanisms leading to the impaired development of the compact layer are not well understood. Using chick embryonic hearts, we produced epicardium-deficient hearts by surgical ablation or blockade of the migration of PE and examined the mechanisms underlying a thin compact myocardium. Sarcomeric maturation (distance between Z-lines) and cardiomyocyte growth (size) were affected in the thin compact myocardium of epicardium-deficient ventricles, in which the amounts of phospho-smad2 and phospho-ERK as well as expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)β2 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 were reduced. TGFβ and FGF were required for the maturation of sarcomeres and growth of cardiomyocytes in cultured ventricles. In ovo co-transfection of dominant negative (dN)-Alk5 (dN-TGFβ receptor I) and dN-FGF receptor 1 to ventricles caused a thin compact myocardium. Our results suggest that immature sarcomeres and small cardiomyocytes are the causative architectures of an epicardium-deficient thin compact layer and also that epicardium-dependent signaling mediated by TGFβ and FGF plays a role in the development of the ventricular compact layer before the onset of coronary circulation. PMID:24666202

  4. Glutaredoxin Regulates Apoptosis in Cardiomyocytes via NFκB Targets Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL: Implications for Cardiac Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly M.; Shelton, Melissa D.; Qanungo, Suparna; Pai, Harish V.; Starke, David W.; Hoppel, Charles L.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a well-established contributor to irreversible injury following myocardial infarction (MI). Increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis is associated also with aging in animal models, exacerbated by MI; however, mechanisms for this increased sensitivity to oxidative stress are unknown. Protein mixed-disulfide formation with glutathione (protein glutathionylation) is known to change the function of intermediates that regulate apoptosis. Since glutaredoxin (Grx) specifically catalyzes protein deglutathionylation, we examined its status with aging and its influence on regulation of apoptosis. Grx1 content and activity are decreased by ∼40% in elderly (24-mo) Fischer 344 rat hearts compared to adult (6-mo) controls. A similar extent of Grx1 knockdown in H9c2 cardiomyocytes led to increased apoptosis, decreased NFκB-dependent transcriptional activity, and decreased production (mRNA and protein) of anti-apoptotic NFκB target genes, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Knockdown of Bcl-2 and/or Bcl-xL in wild-type H9c2 cells to the same extent (∼50%) as observed in Grx1-knockdown cells increased baseline apoptosis; and knockdown of Bcl-xL, but not Bcl-2, also increased oxidant-induced apoptosis analogous to Grx1-knockdown cells. Natural Grx1-deficient cardiomyocytes isolated from elderly rats also displayed diminished NFκB activity and Bcl-xL content. Taken together, these data indicate diminution of Grx1 in elderly animals contributes to increased apoptotic susceptibility via regulation of NFκB function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1339–1353. PMID:19938943

  5. An Enhancer Polymorphism at the Cardiomyocyte Intercalated Disc Protein NOS1AP Locus Is a Major Regulator of the QT Interval

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Ashish; Sekar, Rajesh B.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Morley, Michael; Pihur, Vasyl; Chatterjee, Sumantra; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Moravec, Christine S.; Pulit, Sara L.; Pfeufer, Arne; Mullikin, Jim; Ross, Mark; Green, Eric D.; Bentley, David; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Arking, Dan E.; Halushka, Marc K.; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2014-01-01

    QT interval variation is assumed to arise from variation in repolarization as evidenced from rare Na- and K-channel mutations in Mendelian QT prolongation syndromes. However, in the general population, common noncoding variants at a chromosome 1q locus are the most common genetic regulators of QT interval variation. In this study, we use multiple human genetic, molecular genetic, and cellular assays to identify a functional variant underlying trait association: a noncoding polymorphism (rs7539120) that maps within an enhancer of NOS1AP and affects cardiac function by increasing NOS1AP transcript expression. We further localized NOS1AP to cardiomyocyte intercalated discs (IDs) and demonstrate that overexpression of NOS1AP in cardiomyocytes leads to altered cellular electrophysiology. We advance the hypothesis that NOS1AP affects cardiac electrical conductance and coupling and thereby regulates the QT interval through propagation defects. As further evidence of an important role for propagation variation affecting QT interval in humans, we show that common polymorphisms mapping near a specific set of 170 genes encoding ID proteins are significantly enriched for association with the QT interval, as compared to genome-wide markers. These results suggest that focused studies of proteins within the cardiomyocyte ID are likely to provide insights into QT prolongation and its associated disorders. PMID:24857694

  6. IGF-2R-mediated signaling results in hypertrophy of cultured cardiomyocytes from fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Brooks, Doug A; Botting, Kimberley J; Morrison, Janna L

    2012-06-01

    Activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is known to play a role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. While IGF-2R is understood to be a clearance receptor for IGF-2, there is also evidence that it may play a role in the induction of pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. It is not known whether IGF-2R activates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during growth of the fetal heart. Fetal sheep hearts (125 ± 0.4 days gestation) were dissected, and the cardiomyocytes isolated from the left and right ventricles for culturing. Cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with either LONG R(3)IGF-1, an IGF-1R agonist; picropodophyllin, an IGF-1R autophosphorylation inhibitor; U0126, an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK); Leu(27)IGF-2, an IGF-2R agonist; Gö6976, a protein kinase C inhibitor; KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII); or KN-92, an L-type calcium channel inhibitor and negative control for KN-93. The cross-sectional area of cultured cardiomyocytes was determined relative to control cardiomyocytes treated with serum-free culture medium. IGF-1R and IGF-2R activation each resulted in ERK signaling, but IGF-2R activation alone induced CaMKII signaling, resulting in hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes in the late gestation sheep fetus. These data suggest that changes in the intrauterine environment that result in increased cardiac IGF-2R may also lead to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the fetus and potentially an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. PMID:22441800

  7. Redox regulation of cardiomyocyte cell cycling via an ERK1/2 and c-Myc-dependent activation of cyclin D2 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Thomas V.A.; Smyrnias, Ioannis; Schnelle, Moritz; Mistry, Rajesh K.; Zhang, Min; Beretta, Matteo; Martin, Daniel; Anilkumar, Narayana; de Silva, Shana M.; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian cardiomyocytes have a very limited capacity to proliferate, and consequently the loss of cells after cardiac stress promotes heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that administration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), can regulate redox-dependent signalling pathway(s) to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation in vitro, but the potential relevance of such a pathway in vivo has not been tested. We have generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the H2O2-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), is overexpressed within the postnatal cardiomyocytes, and observed that the hearts of 1–3 week old Tg mice pups are larger in comparison to wild type (Wt) littermate controls. We demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes of Tg mouse pups have increased cell cycling capacity in vivo as determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine. Further, microarray analyses of the transcriptome of these Tg mouse hearts suggested that the expression of cyclin D2 is significantly increased. We investigated the molecular mechanisms which underlie this more proliferative phenotype in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) in vitro, and demonstrate that Nox4 overexpression mediates an H2O2-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which in turn phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor c-myc. This results in a significant increase in cyclin D2 expression, which we show to be mediated, at least in part, by cis-acting c-myc binding sites within the proximal cyclin D2 promoter. Overexpression of Nox4 in NRCs results in an increase in their proliferative capacity that is ablated by the silencing of cyclin D2. We further demonstrate activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, increased phosphorylation of c-myc and significantly increased expression of cyclin D2 protein in the Nox4 Tg hearts. We suggest that this pathway acts to maintain the proliferative capacity of cardiomyocytes in Nox4 Tg pups in vivo and so delays their exit from the cell

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RACK1 triggers cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by regulating the interaction between p300 and GATA4.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Funamoto, Masafumi; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The zinc finger protein GATA4 is a transcription factor involved in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. It forms a functional complex with the intrinsic histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300. The HAT activity of p300 is required for the acetylation and transcriptional activity of GATA4, as well as for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the development of heart failure. In the present study, we have identified Receptor for Activated Protein Kinase C1 (RACK1) as a novel GATA4-binding protein using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry analyses. We found that exogenous RACK1 repressed phenylephrine (PE)-induced hypertrophic responses, such as myofibrillar organization, increased cell size, and hypertrophy-associated gene transcription, in cultured cardiomyocytes. RACK1 physically interacted with GATA4 and the overexpression of RACK1 reduced PE-induced formation of the p300/GATA4 complex and the acetylation and DNA binding activity of GATA4. In response to hypertrophic stimulation in cultured cardiomyocytes and in the hearts of hypertensive heart disease model rats, the tyrosine phosphorylation of RACK1 was increased, and the binding between GATA4 and RACK1 was reduced. In addition, the tyrosine phosphorylation of RACK1 was required for the disruption of the RACK1/GATA4 complex and for the formation of the p300/GATA4 complex. These findings demonstrate that RACK1 is involved in p300/GATA4-dependent hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes and is a promising therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27208796

  9. Casz1 is required for cardiomyocyte G1-to-S phase progression during mammalian cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Dorr, Kerry M; Amin, Nirav M; Kuchenbrod, Lauren M; Labiner, Hanna; Charpentier, Marta S; Pevny, Larysa H; Wessels, Andy; Conlon, Frank L

    2015-06-01

    Organ growth occurs through the integration of external growth signals during the G1 phase of the cell cycle to initiate DNA replication. Although numerous growth factor signals have been shown to be required for the proliferation of cardiomyocytes, genetic studies have only identified a very limited number of transcription factors that act to regulate the entry of cardiomyocytes into S phase. Here, we report that the cardiac para-zinc-finger protein CASZ1 is expressed in murine cardiomyocytes. Genetic fate mapping with an inducible Casz1 allele demonstrates that CASZ1-expressing cells give rise to cardiomyocytes in the first and second heart fields. We show through the generation of a cardiac conditional null mutation that Casz1 is essential for the proliferation of cardiomyocytes in both heart fields and that loss of Casz1 leads to a decrease in cardiomyocyte cell number. We further report that the loss of Casz1 leads to a prolonged or arrested S phase, a decrease in DNA synthesis, an increase in phospho-RB and a concomitant decrease in the cardiac mitotic index. Taken together, these studies establish a role for CASZ1 in mammalian cardiomyocyte cell cycle progression in both the first and second heart fields. PMID:25953344

  10. Increased expression of 78 kD glucose-regulated protein promotes cardiomyocyte apoptosis in a rat model of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Huiying; Lv, Minli; Jia, Jiantao; Fan, Yimin; Tian, Xiaoxia; Li, Xujiong; Li, Baohong; Ji, Jingquan; Wang, Limin; Zhao, Zhongfu; Han, Dewu; Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study was to investigate the role and underlying mechanism of 78 kD glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in cardiomyocyte apoptosis in a rat model of liver cirrhosis. Methods: A rat model of liver cirrhosis was established with multiple pathogenic factors. A total of 42 male SD rats were randomly divided into the liver cirrhosis group and control group. Cardiac structure analysis was performed to assess alterations in cardiac structure. Cardiomyocytes apoptosis was detected by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. Expression of GRP78, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), caspase-12, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p65 subunit (NF-κB p65) and B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results: The ratios of left ventricular wall thickness to heart weight and heart weight to body weight were significantly increased with the progression of liver cirrhosis (P < 0.05). Apoptosis index of cardiomyocytes was significantly increased with the progression of liver cirrhosis (P < 0.05). The expression levels of GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12 were significantly increased in the progression of liver cirrhosis (P < 0.05). The expression levels of NF-κB p65 and Bcl-2 were highest in the 4-wk liver cirrhosis, and they were decreased in the 6-wk and 8-wk in the progression of liver cirrhosis. GRP78 expression levels were positively correlated with apoptosis index, CHOP and caspase-12 expression levels (P < 0.05). CHOP expression levels were negatively correlated with NF-κB p65 and Bcl-2 expression levels (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Increased expression of GRP78 promotes cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rats with cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26464674

  11. T-type Ca2+ signalling regulates aldosterone-induced CREB activation and cell death through PP2A activation in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Laurent; Ruchon, Yann; Renaud, Jean-François; Capuano, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Aims We have investigated Ca2+ signalling generated by aldosterone-induced T-type current (ICaT), the effects of ICaT in neonatal cardiomyocytes, and a putative role for ICaT in cardiomyocytes during cardiac pathology induced by stenosis in an adult rat. Methods and results Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated with aldosterone showed an increase in ICaT density, principally due to the upregulation of the T-type channel Cav3.1 (by 80%). Aldosterone activated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), and this activation was enhanced by blocking ICaT or by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Aldosterone induced PP2A activity, an induction that was prevented upon ICaT blockade. ICaT exerted a negative feedback regulation on the transcription of the Cav3.1 gene, and the activation of PP2A by ICaT led to increased levels of the pro-apoptotic markers caspase 9 and Bcl-xS and decreased levels of the anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2. These findings were corroborated by flow cytometry analysis for apoptosis and necrosis. Similarly, in a rat model of cardiac disease, ICaT re-emergence was associated with a decrease in CREB activation and was correlated with increases in caspase 9 and Bcl-xS and a decrease in Bcl-2 levels. Conclusion Our findings establish PP2A/CREB as targets of ICaT-generated Ca2+ signalling and identify an important role for ICaT in cardiomyocyte cell death. PMID:21123217

  12. Postnatal growth of cardiomyocytes in the left ventricle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wulfsohn, D; Nyengaard, J R; Tang, Y

    2004-03-01

    We studied the development of myocytes and interstitium using perfusion-fixed left ventricles obtained from normal female Wistar rats at 5 days (n = 5), 25 days (n = 5), and 125 days (n = 5) of age. Using design-based stereological methods and light microscopy, we estimated the following parameters: volume of left ventricle made up by myocytes, myocyte nuclei, and interstitium; total numbers of myocyte and non-myocyte nuclei; mean volumes of myocyte nuclei; the total volume, surface area, and length of fibers; and the mean star volumes of fibers. Some derived parameters were also calculated, namely, the mean myocardium volume per nucleus and the mean fiber cross-sectional area. We found that postnatal myocyte growth after day 5 in the young rat is largely hypertrophic, while interstitial growth is hyperplastic. The increase in left ventricular mass was 10-fold over the ages studied, whereas total length, surface area, and volume of fibers increased approximately 3-, 8-, and 11-fold over the period. Relative rates of growth implied that fiber growth was dominated by an increase in length compared to other dimensions. The total number of myocyte nuclei ( approximately 30 x 10(6)) did not change between 5 and 25 days of age, but then almost doubled in 125-day-old rats. The number of non-myocyte nuclei increased 9-fold over the period studied in an exponential manner. The mean myocyte nucleus volume tripled between the ages of 5 and 25 days and then remained the same. The volume-weighted mean nucleus volume was highly variable and showed no significant trend with age. Our results provide support for the claim made by some researchers that myocyte proliferation had ceased by day 5 after birth, but do not provide evidence for binucleation of myocytes between 5 and 25 days after birth. Reported numbers of myocyte nuclei express a net growth and do not rule out both myocyte death and creation throughout the early postnatal period. We clearly detect an increase in the

  13. Cardiac metabolism and its interactions with contraction, growth, and survival of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kolwicz, Stephen C; Purohit, Suneet; Tian, Rong

    2013-08-16

    The network for cardiac fuel metabolism contains intricate sets of interacting pathways that result in both ATP-producing and non-ATP-producing end points for each class of energy substrates. The most salient feature of the network is the metabolic flexibility demonstrated in response to various stimuli, including developmental changes and nutritional status. The heart is also capable of remodeling the metabolic pathways in chronic pathophysiological conditions, which results in modulations of myocardial energetics and contractile function. In a quest to understand the complexity of the cardiac metabolic network, pharmacological and genetic tools have been engaged to manipulate cardiac metabolism in a variety of research models. In concert, a host of therapeutic interventions have been tested clinically to target substrate preference, insulin sensitivity, and mitochondrial function. In addition, the contribution of cellular metabolism to growth, survival, and other signaling pathways through the production of metabolic intermediates has been increasingly noted. In this review, we provide an overview of the cardiac metabolic network and highlight alterations observed in cardiac pathologies as well as strategies used as metabolic therapies in heart failure. Lastly, the ability of metabolic derivatives to intersect growth and survival are also discussed. PMID:23948585

  14. miR-153 regulates apoptosis and autophagy of cardiomyocytes by targeting Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuhai; Liu, Wenting; Zhang, Jinxia; Xiang, Dingcheng

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of important regulators, which are involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Oxidative stress‑induced apoptosis is the predominant factor accounting for cardiac ischemia‑reperfusion injury. miR‑153 has been previously shown to have an antitumor effect in cancer. However, whether miR‑153 is involved in oxidative stress‑induced apoptosis in the heart remains to be elucidated. To this end, the present study used reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect miR-153 levels upon oxidative stress, and evaluated apoptosis, autophagy and expression of critical genes by western blotting. A luciferase assay was also used to confirm the potential target gene. In the present study, it was found that the expression of miR‑153 was significantly increased upon H2O2 stimulation, and the inhibition of endogenous miR‑153 decreased apoptosis. To further identify the mechanism underlying the pro‑apoptotic effect of miR‑153, the present study analyzed the 3'untranslated region of myeloid cell leukemia‑1 (Mcl‑1), and found that Mcl‑1 was potentially targeted by miR‑153. The forced expression of miR‑153 inhibited the expression of Mcl‑1 and luciferase activity, which was reversed by its antisense inhibitor. Furthermore, it was shown that the inhibition of miR‑153 induced autophagy during oxidative stress, and that its effects of autophagy induction and apoptosis inhibition were efficiently abrogated by Mcl‑1 small interfering RNA. In conclusion, the results of the present study elucidated a novel mechanism by which miR‑153 regulates the survival of cardimyocytes during oxidative stress through the modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. These effects may be mediated directly by targeting Mcl‑1. These finding revealed the potential clinical value of miR‑153 in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220418

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 regulates calcium homeostasis and electrophysiological activities of HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chazo, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone with antidiabetic effects through stimulating insulin secretion, β cell neogenesis, satiety sensation, and inhibiting glucagon secretion. Administration of GLP-1 provides cardioprotective effects through attenuating cardiac inflammation and insulin resistance. GLP-1 also modulates the heart rate and systolic pressure, which suggests that GLP-1 may have cardiac electrical effects. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate whether GLP-1 has direct cardiac effects and identify the underlying mechanisms. Patch clamp, confocal microscopy with Fluo-3 fluorescence, and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics, calcium homeostasis, and calcium regulatory proteins in HL-1 atrial myocytes with and without GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) incubation for 24h. GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) and control cells had similar action potential durations. However, GLP-1 at 10nM significantly increased calcium transients and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) contents. Compared to the control, GLP-1 (10nM)-treated cells significantly decreased phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor at S2814 and total phospholamban, but there were similar protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase and the sodium-calcium exchanger. Moreover, exendin (9-39) amide (a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, 10nM) attenuated GLP-1-mediated effects on total SR content and phosphorylated ryanodine receptor S2814. This study demonstrates GLP-1 may regulate HL-1 cell arrhythmogenesis through modulating calcium handling proteins. PMID:26930508

  16. Lumican deficiency results in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with altered collagen assembly.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Loren E; Berger, Matthew G; Feldman, Samuel; Doucette, Lorna; Fowlkes, Vennece; Chakravarti, Shukti; Thibaudeau, Sarah; Alcala, Nicolas E; Bradshaw, Amy D; Kern, Christine B

    2015-07-01

    The ability of the heart to adapt to increased stress is dependent on the modification of its extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture that is established during postnatal development as cardiomyocytes differentiate, a process that is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) lumican (LUM), which binds collagen and facilitates collagen assembly in other tissues, may play a critical role in establishing the postnatal murine myocardial ECM. Although previous studies suggest that LUM deficient mice (lum(-/-)) exhibit skin anomalies consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, lum(-/-) hearts have not been evaluated. These studies show that LUM was immunolocalized to non-cardiomyocytes of the cardiac ventricles and its expression increased throughout development. Lumican deficiency resulted in significant (50%) perinatal death and further examination of the lum(-/-) neonatal hearts revealed an increase in myocardial tissue without a significant increase in cell proliferation. However cardiomyocytes from surviving postnatal day 0 (P0), 1 month (1 mo) and adult (4 mo) lum(-/-) hearts were significantly larger than their wild type (WT) littermates. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increased cardiomyocyte size in the lum(-/-) hearts correlated with alteration of the cardiomyocyte pericellular ECM components collagenα1(I) and the class I SLRP decorin (DCN). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the ratio of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) decorated DCN to core DCN was reduced in P0 and 1 mo lum(-/-) hearts. There was also a reduction in the β and γ forms of collagenα1(I) in lum(-/-) hearts. While the total insoluble collagen content was significantly reduced, the fibril size was increased in lum(-/-) hearts, indicating that LUM may play a role in collagen fiber stability and lateral fibril assembly. These results suggest that LUM controls cardiomyocyte growth by regulating the pericellular ECM and also indicates that LUM may coordinate

  17. Endothelial-Cardiomyocyte Interactions in Cardiac Development and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Patrick C.H.; Davis, Michael E.; Lisowski, Laura K.; Lee, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Communication between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes regulates not only early cardiac development but also adult cardiomyocyte function, including the contractile state. In the normal mammalian myocardium, each cardiomyocyte is surrounded by an intricate network of capillaries and is next to endothelial cells. Cardiomyocytes depend on endothelial cells not only for oxygenated blood supply but also for local protective signals that promote cardiomyocyte organization and survival. While endothelial cells direct cardiomyocytes, cardiomyocytes reciprocally secrete factors that impact endothelial cell function. Understanding how endothelial cells communicate with cardiomyocytes will be critical for cardiac regeneration, in which the ultimate goal is not simply to improve systolic function transiently but to establish new myocardium that is both structurally and functionally normal in the long term. PMID:16460266

  18. Regulation of cardiac autophagy by insulin-like growth factor 1.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Rodrigo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Espinoza, Sandra P; Navarro-Marquez, Mario F; Oyarzún, Alejandra P; Riquelme, Jaime A; Garcia-Carvajal, Ivonne; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo; García, Lorena; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is a key pathway in the control of cell growth and survival. Three critical nodes in the IGF-1 signaling pathway have been described in cardiomyocytes: protein kinase Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Ras/Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phospholipase C (PLC)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3 )/Ca(2+) . The Akt/mTOR and Ras/Raf/ERK signaling arms govern survival in the settings of cardiac stress and hypertrophic growth. By contrast, PLC/InsP3 /Ca(2+) functions to regulate metabolic adaptability and gene transcription. Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in protein degradation, organelle turnover, and nonselective breakdown of cytoplasmic components during nutrient starvation or stress. In the heart, autophagy is observed in a variety of human pathologies, where it can be either adaptive or maladaptive, depending on the context. We proposed the hypothesis that IGF-1 protects the heart by rescuing the mitochondrial metabolism and the energetics state, reducing cell death and controls the potentially exacerbate autophagic response to nutritional stress. In light of the importance of IGF-1 and autophagy in the heart, we review here IGF-1 signaling and autophagy regulation in the context of cardiomyocyte nutritional stress. PMID:23671040

  19. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life. PMID:24954142

  20. MicroRNA-17-mediated down-regulation of apoptotic protease activating factor 1 attenuates apoptosome formation and subsequent apoptosis of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Song, Seungjun; Seo, Hyang-Hee; Lee, Se-Yeon; Lee, Chang Yeon; Lee, Jiyun; Yoo, Kyung-Jong; Yoon, Cheesoon; Choi, Eunhyun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Lee, Seahyoung

    2015-09-18

    Heart diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) can damage individual cardiomyocytes, leading to the activation of cell death programs. The most scrutinized type of cell death in the heart is apoptosis, and one of the key events during the propagation of apoptotic signaling is the formation of apoptosomes, which relay apoptotic signals by activating caspase-9. As one of the major components of apoptosomes, apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) facilitates the formation of apoptosomes containing cytochrome c (Cyto-c) and deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP). Thus, it may be possible to suppress the activation of the apoptotic program by down-regulating the expression of Apaf-1 using miRNAs. To validate this hypothesis, we selected a number of candidate miRNAs that were expected to target Apaf-1 based on miRNA target prediction databases. Among these candidate miRNAs, we empirically identified miR-17 as a novel Apaf-1-targeting miRNA. The delivery of exogenous miR-17 suppressed Apaf-1 expression and consequently attenuated formation of the apoptosome complex containing caspase-9, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, miR-17 suppressed the cleavage of procaspase-9 and the subsequent activation of caspase-3, which is downstream of activated caspase-9. Cell viability tests also indicated that miR-17 pretreatment significantly prevented the norepinephrine-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, suggesting that down-regulation of apoptosome formation may be an effective strategy to prevent cellular apoptosis. These results demonstrate the potential of miR-17 as an effective anti-apoptotic agent. PMID:26265044

  1. Regulation of autophagy in cardiomyocytes by Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and IP(3)-receptors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Albert; Grubb, David R; Cooley, Nicola; Luo, Jieting; Woodcock, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a process that removes damaged proteins and organelles and is of particular importance in terminally differentiated cells such as cardiomyocytes, where it has primarily a protective role. We investigated the involvement of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P(3)) and its receptors in autophagic responses in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). Treatment with the IP(3)-receptor (IP(3)-R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) at 5 or 20 μmol/L resulted in an increase in autophagosome content, defined as puncta labeled by antibody to microtubule associated light chain 3 (LC3). 2-APB also increased autophagic flux, indicated by heightened LC3II accumulation, which was further enhanced by bafilomycin (10nmol/L). Expression of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) 5-phosphatase (IP(3)-5-Pase) to deplete Ins(1,4,5)P(3) also increased LC3-labeled puncta and LC3II content, suggesting that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) inhibits autophagy. The IP(3)-R can act as an inhibitory scaffold sequestering the autophagic effector, beclin-1 to its ligand binding domain (LBD). Expression of GFP-IP(3)-R-LBD inhibited autophagic signaling and furthermore, beclin-1 co-immunoprecipitated with the IP(3)-R-LBD. A mutant GFP-IP(3)-R-LBD with reduced ability to bind Ins(1,4,5)P(3) bound beclin-1 and inhibited autophagy similarly to the wild type sequence. These data provide evidence that Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and IP(3)-R act as inhibitors of autophagic responses in cardiomyocytes. By suppressing autophagy, IP(3)-R may contribute to cardiac pathology. PMID:23137780

  2. Identification of transcripts regulated by CUG-BP, Elav-like family member 1 (CELF1) in primary embryonic cardiomyocytes by RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Blech-Hermoni, Yotam; Ladd, Andrea N.

    2015-01-01

    CUG-BP, Elav-like family member 1 (CELF1) is a multi-functional RNA binding protein that regulates pre-mRNA alternative splicing in the nucleus, as well as polyadenylation status, mRNA stability, and translation in the cytoplasm [1]. Dysregulation of CELF1 has been implicated in cardiomyopathies in myotonic dystrophy type 1 and diabetes [2], [3], [4], [5], but the targets of CELF1 regulation in the heart have not been systematically investigated. We previously demonstrated that in the developing heart CELF1 expression is restricted to the myocardium and peaks during embryogenesis [6], [7], [8]. To identify transcripts regulated by CELF1 in the embryonic myocardium, RNA-seq was used to compare the transcriptome of primary embryonic cardiomyocytes following siRNA-mediated knockdown of CELF1 to that of controls. Raw data files of the RNA-seq reads have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus [9] under the GEO Series accession number GSE67360. These data can be used to identify transcripts whose levels or alternative processing (i.e., alternative splicing or polyadenylation site usage) are regulated by CELF1, and should provide insight into the pathways and processes modulated by this important RNA binding protein during normal heart development and during cardiac pathogenesis. PMID:26366374

  3. Sulfiredoxin-1 protects against simulated ischaemia/reperfusion injury in cardiomyocyte by inhibiting PI3K/AKT-regulated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; He, Zhangyou; Guo, Jinhua; Li, Zhe; Wang, Xiaohong; Yang, Chun; Cui, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered cardiac cell injury is recognized as the major contributor for the pathogenesis progression of ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. Sulfiredoxin-1 (Srx-1) is an endogenous antioxidant and exerts the crucial neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischaemia. However, its function and the underlying mechanism in ischaemic heart diseases remain poorly defined. Here, a dramatical decrease in Srx-1 was validated in H9c2 cardiomyocytes upon simulated ischaemia–reperfusion (SI/R) injury. Moreover, Srx-1 protected H9c2 cells from SI/R-injured injury as the evidences that Srx-1 up-regulation attenuated the inhibitory effects on cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cell apoptosis upon SI/R treatment. Knockdown of Srx-1 accelerated cell injury upon SI/R. Mechanism assay corroborated that SI/R treatment noticeably aggravated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), which was remarkably abated in Ad-Srx-1 groups. Importantly, Srx-1 elevation substantially reduced cytochrome c release, the activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3, accompany with the subsequent decrease in the cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP). Concomitantly, overexpression of Srx-1 also decreased the expression of pro-apoptosis protein Bax and increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression. Further analysis substantiated that Srx-1 treatment remarkably induced the activation of PI3K/AKT signalling. Preconditioning with LY294002 dramatically decreased Srx-1-enhanced cell resistance to SI/R injury. Importantly, LY294002 mitigated the inhibitory effects of Srx-1 on Δψm loss, cytochrome c release, caspase-9/3 activity, and the expression of Bcl-2 family. Together, these results suggested that Srx-1 might protect cardiomyocyte injury upon SI/R by suppressing PI3K/AKT-mediated mitochondria dependent apoptosis, revealing a promising therapeutic agent against ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26992405

  4. Data on the gene expression of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xue, Xiaodong; Xu, Yinli; Zhang, Yuji; Li, Zhi; Wang, Huishan

    2016-09-01

    Hypothermia is widely used in neurosurgery and cardiac surgeries. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. We previously reported that the transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia, "The transcriptome responses of cardiomyocyte exposed to hypothermia" [4]. Herein, we provide the hypothermia inhibited proliferation of cardiomyocyte cells in vitro and the details of transcription factors in regulation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:27274530

  5. Mitochondrial fission is required for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy mediated by a Ca2+-calcineurin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pennanen, Christian; Parra, Valentina; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E.; del Campo, Andrea; Gutierrez, Tomás; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Chiong, Mario; Zorzano, Antonio; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has been associated with diminished mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondria are crucial organelles for the production of ATP, and their morphology and function are regulated by the dynamic processes of fusion and fission. The relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still poorly understood. Here, we show that treatment of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine promotes mitochondrial fission (characterized by a decrease in mitochondrial mean volume and an increase in the relative number of mitochondria per cell) and a decrease in mitochondrial function. We demonstrate that norepinephrine acts through α1-adrenergic receptors to increase cytoplasmic Ca2+, activating calcineurin and promoting migration of the fission protein Drp1 (encoded by Dnml1) to mitochondria. Dominant-negative Drp1 (K38A) not only prevented mitochondrial fission, it also blocked hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine. Remarkably, an antisense adenovirus against the fusion protein Mfn2 (AsMfn2) was sufficient to increase mitochondrial fission and stimulate a hypertrophic response without agonist treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial dynamics in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and metabolic remodeling. PMID:24777478

  6. Mitochondrial fission is required for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy mediated by a Ca2+-calcineurin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pennanen, Christian; Parra, Valentina; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Del Campo, Andrea; Gutierrez, Tomás; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Chiong, Mario; Zorzano, Antonio; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-15

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has been associated with diminished mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondria are crucial organelles for the production of ATP, and their morphology and function are regulated by the dynamic processes of fusion and fission. The relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is still poorly understood. Here, we show that treatment of cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine promotes mitochondrial fission (characterized by a decrease in mitochondrial mean volume and an increase in the relative number of mitochondria per cell) and a decrease in mitochondrial function. We demonstrate that norepinephrine acts through α1-adrenergic receptors to increase cytoplasmic Ca(2+), activating calcineurin and promoting migration of the fission protein Drp1 (encoded by Dnml1) to mitochondria. Dominant-negative Drp1 (K38A) not only prevented mitochondrial fission, it also blocked hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine. Remarkably, an antisense adenovirus against the fusion protein Mfn2 (AsMfn2) was sufficient to increase mitochondrial fission and stimulate a hypertrophic response without agonist treatment. Collectively, these results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial dynamics in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and metabolic remodeling. PMID:24777478

  7. Regulation of muscle growth in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review reports recent findings on the multiple factors that regulate skeletal muscle growth in neonates. Skeletal muscle is the fastest growing protein mass in neonates. The high rate of neonatal muscle growth is due to accelerated rates of protein synthesis accompanied by the rapid accumulatio...

  8. Chemical Growth Regulators for Guayule Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, M. N.; Schubert, W. W.; Petersen, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test Tubes containing Guayule - tissue cultures were used in experiments to test effects of chemical-growth regulators. The shoots grew in response to addition of 2-(3,4-dichlorophenoxy)-triethylamine (triethylamine (TEA) derivative) to agar medium. Preliminary results indicate that a class of compounds that promotes growth in soil may also promote growth in a culture medium. Further experiments are needed to define the effect of the TEA derivative.

  9. Unexpected maturation of PI3K and MAPK-ERK signaling in fetal ovine cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chattergoon, N N; Louey, S; Stork, P J; Giraud, G D; Thornburg, K L

    2014-10-15

    In the first two-thirds of gestation, ovine fetal cardiomyocytes undergo mitosis to increase cardiac mass and accommodate fetal growth. Thereafter, some myocytes continue to proliferate while others mature and terminally differentiate into binucleated cells. At term (145 days gestational age; dGA) about 60% of cardiomyocytes become binucleated and exit the cell cycle under hormonal control. Rising thyroid hormone (T3) levels near term (135 dGA) inhibit proliferation and stimulate maturation. However, the degree to which intracellular signaling patterns change with age in response to T3 is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro activation of ERK, Akt, and p70(S6K) by two regulators of cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity, T3 and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), would be similar in cardiomyocytes at gestational ages 100 and 135 dGA. IGF-1 and T3 each independently stimulated phosphorylation of ERK, Akt, and p70(S6K) in cells at both ages. In the younger mononucleated myocytes, the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt was reduced in the presence of IGF-1 and T3. However, the same hormone combination led to a dramatic twofold increase in the phosphorylation of these signaling proteins in the 135 dGA cardiomyocytes-even in cells that were not proliferating. In the older cells, both mono- and binucleated cells were affected. In conclusion, fetal ovine cardiomyocytes undergo profound maturation-related changes in signaling in response to T3 and IGF-1, but not to either factor alone. Differences in age-related response are likely to be related to milestones in fetal cardiac development as the myocardium prepares for ex utero life. PMID:25128174

  10. Lumican Deficiency Results In Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy With Altered Collagen Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Loren E.; Berger, Matthew G.; Feldman, Samuel; Doucette, Lorna; Fowlkes, Vennece; Chakravarti, Shukti; Thibaudeau, Sarah; Alcala, Nicolas E.; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Kern, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the heart to adapt to increased stress is dependent on modification of its extracellular matrix (ECM) architecture that is established during postnatal development as cardiomyocytes differentiate, a process that is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) lumican (LUM), which binds collagen and facilitates collagen assembly in other tissues, may play a critical role in establishing the postnatal murine myocardial ECM. Although previous studies suggest LUM deficient mice (lum−/−) exhibit skin anomalies consistent with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, lum−/− hearts have not been evaluated. These studies show LUM was immunolocalized to non-cardiomyocytes of the cardiac ventricles and its expression increased throughout development. Lumican deficiency resulted in significant (50%) perinatal death and further examination of the lum−/− neonatal hearts revealed an increase in myocardial tissue without a significant increase in cell proliferation. However cardiomyocytes from surviving postnatal day 0 (P0), 1 month (1 mo) and adult (4 mo) lum−/− hearts were significantly larger than their wild type (WT) littermates. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increased cardiomyocyte size in the lum−/− hearts correlated with alteration of the cardiomyocyte pericellular ECM components collagenα1(I) and the class I SLRP decorin (DCN). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the ratio of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) decorated DCN to core DCN was reduced in P0 and 1 mo lum−/− hearts. There was also a reduction in the β and γ forms of collagenα1(I) in lum−/− hearts. While the total insoluble collagen content was significantly reduced, the fibril size was increased in lum−/− hearts, indicating LUM may play a role in collagen fiber stability and lateral fibril assembly. These results suggest that LUM controls cardiomyocyte growth by regulating the pericellular ECM and also indicates that LUM may coordinate

  11. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes. PMID:26595272

  12. Mathematics Coursework Regulates Growth in Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), we examined the extent to which students' mathematics coursework regulates (influences) the rate of growth in mathematics achievement during middle and high school. Graphical analysis showed that students who started middle school with higher achievement took individual mathematics…

  13. IL-10 Inhibits the NF-κB and ERK/MAPK-Mediated Production of Pro-Inflammatory Mediators by Up-Regulation of SOCS-3 in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Siffo, Sofía; Mirkin, Gerardo A.; Goren, Nora B.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection produces an intense inflammatory response which is critical for the control of the evolution of Chagas’ disease. Interleukin (IL)-10 is one of the most important anti-inflammatory cytokines identified as modulator of the inflammatory reaction. This work shows that exogenous addition of IL-10 inhibited ERK1/2 and NF-κB activation and reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), metalloprotease (MMP) -9 and MMP-2 expression and activities, as well as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 expression, in T. cruzi-infected cardiomyocytes. We found that T. cruzi and IL-10 promote STAT3 phosphorylation and up-regulate the expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 thereby preventing NF-κB nuclear translocation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Specific knockdown of SOCS-3 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) impeded the IL-10-mediated inhibition of NF-κB and ERK1/2 activation. As a result, the levels of studied pro-inflammatory mediators were restored in infected cardiomyocytes. Our study reports the first evidence that T. cruzi up- regulates SOCS-3 expression and highlights the relevance of IL-10 in the modulation of pro-inflammatory response of cardiomyocytes in Chagas’ disease. PMID:24260222

  14. Autonomous beating rate adaptation in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W; Protas, Lev; Gagliardi, Mark; Brown, Kristy; Kass, Robert S; Keller, Gordon; Robinson, Richard B; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic success of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes critically depends on their ability to respond to and integrate with the surrounding electromechanical environment. Currently, the immaturity of human cardiomyocytes derived from stem cells limits their utility for regenerative medicine and biological research. We hypothesize that biomimetic electrical signals regulate the intrinsic beating properties of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that electrical conditioning of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in three-dimensional culture promotes cardiomyocyte maturation, alters their automaticity and enhances connexin expression. Cardiomyocytes adapt their autonomous beating rate to the frequency at which they were stimulated, an effect mediated by the emergence of a rapidly depolarizing cell population, and the expression of hERG. This rate-adaptive behaviour is long lasting and transferable to the surrounding cardiomyocytes. Thus, electrical conditioning may be used to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and establish their automaticity, with implications for cell-based reduction of arrhythmia during heart regeneration. PMID:26785135

  15. Autonomous beating rate adaptation in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W.; Protas, Lev; Gagliardi, Mark; Brown, Kristy; Kass, Robert S.; Keller, Gordon; Robinson, Richard B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic success of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes critically depends on their ability to respond to and integrate with the surrounding electromechanical environment. Currently, the immaturity of human cardiomyocytes derived from stem cells limits their utility for regenerative medicine and biological research. We hypothesize that biomimetic electrical signals regulate the intrinsic beating properties of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that electrical conditioning of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in three-dimensional culture promotes cardiomyocyte maturation, alters their automaticity and enhances connexin expression. Cardiomyocytes adapt their autonomous beating rate to the frequency at which they were stimulated, an effect mediated by the emergence of a rapidly depolarizing cell population, and the expression of hERG. This rate-adaptive behaviour is long lasting and transferable to the surrounding cardiomyocytes. Thus, electrical conditioning may be used to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and establish their automaticity, with implications for cell-based reduction of arrhythmia during heart regeneration. PMID:26785135

  16. Mena/VASP and αII-Spectrin complexes regulate cytoplasmic actin networks in cardiomyocytes and protect from conduction abnormalities and dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the heart, cytoplasmic actin networks are thought to have important roles in mechanical support, myofibrillogenesis, and ion channel function. However, subcellular localization of cytoplasmic actin isoforms and proteins involved in the modulation of the cytoplasmic actin networks are elusive. Mena and VASP are important regulators of actin dynamics. Due to the lethal phenotype of mice with combined deficiency in Mena and VASP, however, distinct cardiac roles of the proteins remain speculative. In the present study, we analyzed the physiological functions of Mena and VASP in the heart and also investigated the role of the proteins in the organization of cytoplasmic actin networks. Results We generated a mouse model, which simultaneously lacks Mena and VASP in the heart. Mena/VASP double-deficiency induced dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction abnormalities. In wild-type mice, Mena and VASP specifically interacted with a distinct αII-Spectrin splice variant (SH3i), which is in cardiomyocytes exclusively localized at Z- and intercalated discs. At Z- and intercalated discs, Mena and β-actin localized to the edges of the sarcomeres, where the thin filaments are anchored. In Mena/VASP double-deficient mice, β-actin networks were disrupted and the integrity of Z- and intercalated discs was markedly impaired. Conclusions Together, our data suggest that Mena, VASP, and αII-Spectrin assemble cardiac multi-protein complexes, which regulate cytoplasmic actin networks. Conversely, Mena/VASP deficiency results in disrupted β-actin assembly, Z- and intercalated disc malformation, and induces dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction abnormalities. PMID:23937664

  17. Endogenous cholecystokinin regulates growth of human cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Gomez, G; Townsend, C M; Rajaraman, S; Thompson, J C

    1989-01-01

    Exogenous administration of cholecystokinin (CCK) or caerulein inhibits growth of SLU-132, a human cholangiocarcinoma that we have shown to possess receptors for CCK. Chronic administration of cholestyramine, a resin that binds bile salts, increases release of CCK and growth of the pancreas in guinea pigs. Feeding the bile salt, taurocholate, inhibits meal-stimulated release of CCK. The purpose of this study was to determine whether endogenous CCK affects growth of the human cholangiocarcinoma, SLU-132. We implanted SLU-132 subcutaneously into athymic nude mice. The bile salt pool was depleted by feeding 4% cholestyramine for 40 days, either alone or enriched with 0.5% taurocholate for 32 days. When the mice were killed, tumors and pancreas were removed. Cholestyramine significantly inhibited the growth of SLU-132 and stimulated growth of the normal pancreas. Feeding of taurocholate acted to stimulate tumor growth. These results demonstrate that endogenous levels of CCK regulate growth of this human cholangiocarcinoma. Our findings suggest that manipulation of levels of endogenous gut hormones may, in the future, play a role in management of patients with certain gastrointestinal cancers. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2476084

  18. Gαi2- and Gαi3-Specific Regulation of Voltage-Dependent L-Type Calcium Channels in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dizayee, Sara; Kaestner, Sonja; Kuck, Fabian; Hein, Peter; Klein, Christoph; Piekorz, Roland P.; Meszaros, Janos; Matthes, Jan; Nürnberg, Bernd; Herzig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Two pertussis toxin sensitive Gi proteins, Gi2 and Gi3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous Gi isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of Gi proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC). Methods Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gαi2 (Gαi2−/−) or Gαi3 (Gαi3−/−). mRNA levels of Gαi/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gαi and Cavα1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. Results In cardiac tissue from Gαi2−/− mice, Gαi3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187±21% and 567±59%, respectively. In Gαi3−/− mouse hearts, Gαi2 mRNA (127±5%) and protein (131±10%) levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gαi2−/− mice was lowered (−7.9±0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05) compared to wild-type cells (−10.7±0.5 pA/pF, n = 22), whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gαi3−/− mice (−14.3±0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05). Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gαi2 (but not of Gαi3) and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gαi3−/−. The pore forming Cavα1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Cavα1 and Cavβ2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gαi2. Conclusion Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform-specific modulation of L-VDCC by G

  19. Investigating mitochondrial metabolism in contracting HL-1 cardiomyocytes following hypoxia and pharmacological HIF activation identifies HIF-dependent and independent mechanisms of regulation.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Lucy J A; Abd-Jamil, Amira H; Gomes, Renata S M; Carter, Emma E; Carr, Carolyn A; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxia is a consequence of cardiac disease and downregulates mitochondrial metabolism, yet the molecular mechanisms through which this occurs in the heart are incompletely characterized. Therefore, we aimed to use a contracting HL-1 cardiomyocyte model to investigate the effects of hypoxia on mitochondrial metabolism. Cells were exposed to hypoxia (2% O2) for 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours to characterize the metabolic response. Cells were subsequently treated with the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-activating compound, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), to determine whether hypoxia-induced mitochondrial changes were HIF dependent or independent, and to assess the suitability of this cultured cardiac cell line for cardiovascular pharmacological studies. Hypoxic cells had increased glycolysis after 24 hours, with glucose transporter 1 and lactate levels increased 5-fold and 15-fold, respectively. After 24 hours of hypoxia, mitochondrial networks were more fragmented but there was no change in citrate synthase activity, indicating that mitochondrial content was unchanged. Cellular oxygen consumption was 30% lower, accompanied by decreases in the enzymatic activities of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I and IV, and aconitase by 81%, 96%, and 72%, relative to controls. Pharmacological HIF activation with DMOG decreased cellular oxygen consumption by 43%, coincident with decreases in the activities of aconitase and complex I by 26% and 30%, indicating that these adaptations were HIF mediated. In contrast, the hypoxia-mediated decrease in complex IV activity was not replicated by DMOG treatment, suggesting HIF-independent regulation of this complex. In conclusion, 24 hours of hypoxia increased anaerobic glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial respiration, which was associated with changes in ETC and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme activities in contracting HL-1 cells. Pharmacological HIF activation in this cardiac cell line allowed both HIF-dependent and independent

  20. Quercetin and hydroxytyrosol attenuates xanthine/xanthine oxidase-induced toxicity in H9c2 cardiomyocytes by regulation of oxidative stress and stress-sensitive signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Namik; Bali, Elif B; Karasu, Cimen

    2015-10-01

    The increased activity of xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) has been suggested as a risk factor for heart disease and herbal polyphenols exhibits cardioprotection in vitro and in vivo. To understand the cardioprotective action mechanisms of polyphenol quercetin and hydroxytyrosol, the expression levels of stress-responsive proteins were studied in X/XO-induced toxicity model of H9c2 cardiomyocyocytes. Pretreatment with each polypenol (0.1-10 μg/ml; 24 h) enhanced viability (p < 0.01; MTT test) and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (p < 0.001; H2DCFDA assay) against 12 h exposure to a free radical generating system, X (0.5 mM) and XO (5 mU/ml). Western blotting experiments showed that X/XO increases the phosphorylation of downstream substrate of p38, MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2), p44/42-MAPK (Erk1/2) and cleaved caspase-3 (p < 0.001, vs. Control), however inhibits the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun and Hsp27 (p < 0.01, vs. Control). Pretreatment with quercetin or hydroxytyrosol attenuated the phosphorylation of MAPKAPK-2 and cleaved caspase-3 in X/XO-exposed cells (p < 0.01, vs. X/XO). Hydroxytyrosol enhanced the reduction of phosphorylation of a transcriptional target c-Jun and led to overphosphorylation in protective proteins, p44/42-MAPK and Hsp27 in X/XO-exposed cells (p < 0.01, vs. X/XO). Our data suggest that quercetin and hydroxytyrosol protects cardiomyocytes against X/XO-induced oxidative toxicity by diminishing intracellular ROS and the regulation of stress-sensitive protein kinase cascades and transcription factors. PMID:26374991

  1. No Evidence for Cardiomyocyte Number Expansion in Preadolescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Alkass, Kanar; Panula, Joni; Westman, Mattias; Wu, Ting-Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Bergmann, Olaf

    2015-11-01

    The magnitude of cardiomyocyte generation in the adult heart has been heavily debated. A recent report suggests that during mouse preadolescence, cardiomyocyte proliferation leads to a 40% increase in the number of cardiomyocytes. Such an expansion would change our understanding of heart growth and have far-reaching implications for cardiac regeneration. Here, using design-based stereology, we found that cardiomyocyte proliferation accounted for 30% of postnatal DNA synthesis; however, we were unable to detect any changes in cardiomyocyte number after postnatal day 11. (15)N-thymidine and BrdU analyses provided no evidence for a proliferative peak in preadolescent mice. By contrast, cardiomyocyte multinucleation comprises 57% of postnatal DNA synthesis, followed by cardiomyocyte nuclear polyploidisation, contributing with 13% to DNA synthesis within the second and third postnatal weeks. We conclude that the majority of cardiomyocytes is set within the first postnatal week and that this event is followed by two waves of non-replicative DNA synthesis. This Matters Arising paper is in response to Naqvi et al. (2014), published in Cell. See also the associated Correspondence by Soonpaa et al. (2015), and the response by Naqvi et al. (2015), published in this issue. PMID:26544945

  2. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Growth Hormone Secretion.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Frederik J; Tolle, Virginie; Chen, Chen; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the main findings that emerged in the intervening years since the previous volume on hormonal control of growth in the section on the endocrine system of the Handbook of Physiology concerning the intra- and extrahypothalamic neuronal networks connecting growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin hypophysiotropic neurons and the integration between regulators of food intake/metabolism and GH release. Among these findings, the discovery of ghrelin still raises many unanswered questions. One important event was the application of deconvolution analysis to the pulsatile patterns of GH secretion in different mammalian species, including Man, according to gender, hormonal environment and ageing. Concerning this last phenomenon, a great body of evidence now supports the role of an attenuation of the GHRH/GH/Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis in the control of mammalian aging. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:687-735, 2016. PMID:27065166

  3. An integrated mechanism of cardiomyocyte nuclear Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Cristián; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Jaimovich, Enrique; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Uhlén, Per; Hill, Joseph A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    In cardiomyocytes, Ca2+ plays a central role in governing both contraction and signaling events that regulate gene expression. Current evidence indicates that discrimination between these two critical functions is achieved by segregating Ca2+ within subcellular microdomains: transcription is regulated by Ca2+ release within nuclear microdomains, and excitation–contraction coupling is regulated by cytosolic Ca2+. Accordingly, a variety of agonists that control cardiomyocyte gene expression, such as endothelin-1, angiotensin-II or insulin-like growth factor-1, share the feature of triggering nuclear Ca2+ signals. However, signaling pathways coupling surface receptor activation to nuclear Ca2+ release, and the phenotypic responses to such signals, differ between agonists. According to earlier hypotheses, the selective control of nuclear Ca2+ signals by activation of plasma membrane receptors relies on the strategic localization of inositol trisphosphate receptors at the nuclear envelope. There, they mediate Ca2+ release from perinuclear Ca2+ stores upon binding of inositol trisphosphate generated in the cytosol, which diffuses into the nucleus. More recently, identification of such receptors at nuclear membranes or perinuclear sarcolemmal invaginations has uncovered novel mechanisms whereby agonists control nuclear Ca2+ release. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the selective control of nuclear Ca2+ signals with special focus on emerging models of agonist receptor activation. PMID:24997440

  4. An integrated mechanism of cardiomyocyte nuclear Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Cristián; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Jaimovich, Enrique; Rothermel, Beverly A; Uhlén, Per; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    In cardiomyocytes, Ca(2+) plays a central role in governing both contraction and signaling events that regulate gene expression. Current evidence indicates that discrimination between these two critical functions is achieved by segregating Ca(2+) within subcellular microdomains: transcription is regulated by Ca(2+) release within nuclear microdomains, and excitation-contraction coupling is regulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). Accordingly, a variety of agonists that control cardiomyocyte gene expression, such as endothelin-1, angiotensin-II or insulin-like growth factor-1, share the feature of triggering nuclear Ca(2+) signals. However, signaling pathways coupling surface receptor activation to nuclear Ca(2+) release, and the phenotypic responses to such signals, differ between agonists. According to earlier hypotheses, the selective control of nuclear Ca(2+) signals by activation of plasma membrane receptors relies on the strategic localization of inositol trisphosphate receptors at the nuclear envelope. There, they mediate Ca(2+) release from perinuclear Ca(2+) stores upon binding of inositol trisphosphate generated in the cytosol, which diffuses into the nucleus. More recently, identification of such receptors at nuclear membranes or perinuclear sarcolemmal invaginations has uncovered novel mechanisms whereby agonists control nuclear Ca(2+) release. In this review, we discuss mechanisms for the selective control of nuclear Ca(2+) signals with special focus on emerging models of agonist receptor activation. PMID:24997440

  5. Unexpected maturation of PI3K and MAPK-ERK signaling in fetal ovine cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Louey, S.; Stork, P. J.; Giraud, G. D.; Thornburg, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    In the first two-thirds of gestation, ovine fetal cardiomyocytes undergo mitosis to increase cardiac mass and accommodate fetal growth. Thereafter, some myocytes continue to proliferate while others mature and terminally differentiate into binucleated cells. At term (145 days gestational age; dGA) about 60% of cardiomyocytes become binucleated and exit the cell cycle under hormonal control. Rising thyroid hormone (T3) levels near term (135 dGA) inhibit proliferation and stimulate maturation. However, the degree to which intracellular signaling patterns change with age in response to T3 is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro activation of ERK, Akt, and p70S6K by two regulators of cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity, T3 and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), would be similar in cardiomyocytes at gestational ages 100 and 135 dGA. IGF-1 and T3 each independently stimulated phosphorylation of ERK, Akt, and p70S6K in cells at both ages. In the younger mononucleated myocytes, the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt was reduced in the presence of IGF-1 and T3. However, the same hormone combination led to a dramatic twofold increase in the phosphorylation of these signaling proteins in the 135 dGA cardiomyocytes—even in cells that were not proliferating. In the older cells, both mono- and binucleated cells were affected. In conclusion, fetal ovine cardiomyocytes undergo profound maturation-related changes in signaling in response to T3 and IGF-1, but not to either factor alone. Differences in age-related response are likely to be related to milestones in fetal cardiac development as the myocardium prepares for ex utero life. PMID:25128174

  6. MicroRNA-322 protects hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes via BDNF gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liguo; Song, Shigang; Lv, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiomyocytes apoptosis under hypoxia condition contributes significantly to various cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of microRNA-322 (miR-322) in regulating hypoxia-induced apoptosis in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes in vitro. Method: Cardiomyocytes of C57BL/6J mice were treated with hypoxia condition in vitro. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay. Gene expression pattern of miR-322 was measured by qRT-PCR. Stable downregulation of miR-322 in cardiomyocytes were achieved by lentiviral transduction, and the effect of miR-322 downregulation on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis was investigated. Possible regulation of miR-322 on its downstream target gene, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was investigated in cardiomyocytes. BDNF was then genetically silenced by siRNA to evaluate its role in miR-137 mediated cardiomyocyte apoptosis protection under hypoxia condition. Results: Under hypoxia condition, significant apoptosis was induced and miR-322 was significantly upregulated in cardiomyocytes in vitro. Through lentiviral transduction, miR-322 was efficiently knocked down in cardiomyocytes. Downregulation of miR-322 protected hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Luciferase assay showed BDNF was the target gene of miR-322. QRT-PCR showed BDNF expression was associated with miR-322 regulation on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Silencing BDNF in cardiomyocyte through siRNA transfection reversed the protective effect of miR-322 downregulation on hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: Our study revealed that miR-322, in association with BDNF, played important role in regulating hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocyte. PMID:27398164

  7. Met signaling in cardiomyocytes is required for normal cardiac function in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Arechederra, María; Carmona, Rita; González-Nuñez, María; Gutiérrez-Uzquiza, Alvaro; Bragado, Paloma; Cruz-González, Ignacio; Cano, Elena; Guerrero, Carmen; Sánchez, Aránzazu; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Schneider, Michael D; Maina, Flavio; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Porras, Almudena

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, Met, are key determinants of distinct developmental processes. Although HGF exerts cardio-protective effects in a number of cardiac pathologies, it remains unknown whether HGF/Met signaling is essential for myocardial development and/or physiological function in adulthood. We therefore investigated the requirement of HGF/Met signaling in cardiomyocyte for embryonic and postnatal heart development and function by conditional inactivation of the Met receptor in cardiomyocytes using the Cre-α-MHC mouse line (referred to as α-MHCMet-KO). Although α-MHCMet-KO mice showed normal heart development and were viable and fertile, by 6 months of age, males developed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, associated with interstitial fibrosis. A significant upregulation in markers of myocardial damage, such as β-MHC and ANF, was also observed. By the age of 9 months, α-MHCMet-KO males displayed systolic cardiac dysfunction. Mechanistically, we provide evidence of a severe imbalance in the antioxidant defenses in α-MHCMet-KO hearts involving a reduced expression and activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase, with consequent reactive oxygen species accumulation. Similar anomalies were observed in females, although with a slower kinetics. We also found that Met signaling down-regulation leads to an increase in TGF-β production and a decrease in p38MAPK activation, which may contribute to phenotypic alterations displayed in α-MHCMet-KO mice. Consistently, we show that HGF acts through p38α to upregulate antioxidant enzymes in cardiomyocytes. Our results highlight that HGF/Met signaling in cardiomyocytes plays a physiological cardio-protective role in adult mice by acting as an endogenous regulator of heart function through oxidative stress control. PMID:23994610

  8. Compartmentalized energy transfer in cardiomyocytes: use of mathematical modeling for analysis of in vivo regulation of respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Aliev, M K; Saks, V A

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical model of the compartmentalized energy transfer system in cardiac myocytes presented includes mitochondrial synthesis of ATP by ATP synthase, phosphocreatine production in the coupled mitochondrial creatine kinase reaction, the myofibrillar and cytoplasmic creatine kinase reactions, ATP utilization by actomyosin ATPase during the contraction cycle, and diffusional exchange of metabolites between different compartments. The model was used to calculate the changes in metabolite profiles during the cardiac cycle, metabolite and energy fluxes in different cellular compartments at high workload (corresponding to the rate of oxygen consumption of 46 mu atoms of O.(g wet mass)-1.min-1) under varying conditions of restricted ADP diffusion across mitochondrial outer membrane and creatine kinase isoenzyme "switchoff." In the complete system, restricted diffusion of ADP across the outer mitochondrial membrane stabilizes phosphocreatine production in cardiac mitochondria and increases the role of the phosphocreatine shuttle in energy transport and respiration regulation. Selective inhibition of myoplasmic or mitochondrial creatine kinase (modeling the experiments with transgenic animals) results in "takeover" of their function by another, active creatine kinase isoenzyme. This mathematical modeling also shows that assumption of the creatine kinase equilibrium in the cell may only be a very rough approximation to the reality at increased workload. The mathematical model developed can be used as a basis for further quantitative analyses of energy fluxes in the cell and their regulation, particularly by adding modules for adenylate kinase, the glycolytic system, and other reactions of energy metabolism of the cell. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 7 PMID:9199806

  9. Transcriptional Landscape of Cardiomyocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Uosaki, Hideki; Cahan, Patrick; Lee, Dong I.; Wang, Songnan; Miyamoto, Matthew; Fernandez, Laviel; Kass, David A.; Kwon, Chulan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Decades of progress in developmental cardiology has advanced our understanding of the early aspects of heart development, including cardiomyocyte (CM) differentiation. However, control of CM maturation which is subsequently required to generate adult myocytes, remains elusive. Here, we analyzed over 200 microarray datasets from early embryonic to adult hearts and identified a large number of genes whose expression shifts gradually and continuously during maturation. We generated an atlas of integrated gene expression, biological pathways, transcriptional regulators, and gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which show discrete sets of key transcriptional regulators and pathways activated or suppressed during CM maturation. We developed a GRN-based program named MatStatCM that indexes CM maturation status. MatStatCM reveals that pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs mature early in culture, but are arrested at the late embryonic stage with aberrant regulation of key transcription factors. Our study provides a foundation for understanding CM maturation. PMID:26586429

  10. Electrical stimulation of primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes using pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Martherus, Ruben S R M; Zeijlemaker, Volkert A; Ayoubi, Torik A Y

    2010-01-01

    The study of gene regulation in cardiac myocytes requires a reliable in vitro model. However, monolayer cultures used for this purpose are typically not exposed to electrical stimulation, though this has been shown to strongly affect cardiomyocyte gene expression. Based on pacemakers for clinical use, we developed an easy-to-use portable system that allows the user to perform electro-stimulation of cardiomyocyte cultures in standard tissue incubators without the need for bulky equipment. In addition, we present a refined protocol for culturing high-purity cardiomyocyte cultures with excellent contractile properties for a wide variety of applications. PMID:20078430

  11. Process for producing vegetative and tuber growth regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W. (Inventor); Yorio, Neil C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process of making a vegetative and tuber growth regulator. The vegetative and tuber growth regulator is made by growing potato plants in a recirculating hydroponic system for a sufficient time to produce the growth regulator. Also, the use of the vegetative and growth regulator on solanaceous plants, tuber forming plants and ornamental seedlings by contacting the roots or shoots of the plant with a sufficient amount of the growth regulator to regulate the growth of the plant and one more of canopy size, plant height, stem length, internode number and presence of tubers in fresh mass. Finally, a method for regulating the growth of potato plants using a recirculating hydroponic system is described.

  12. Atorvastatin protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by inhibiting LOX-1 expression and cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Linfang; Wang, Qiqi; Zhou, Dongchen; Wu, Zhigang; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major health problem worldwide. The most severe form of CAD is acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of atorvastatin in ACS; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been fully clarified. Growing evidence indicates that activation of the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis during ACS. In this study, we examined whether atorvastatin inhibits H2O2-induced LOX-1 expression and H9c2 cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and investigated the underlying signaling pathway. Treatment of H9c2 cardiomyocytes with H2O2 resulted in elevated expression of LOX-1 mRNA and protein, as well as increased caspase-3 and -9 protein expression and cell apoptosis. H2O2-induced LOX-1 expression, caspase protein expression, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were attenuated by pretreatment with atorvastatin. Atorvastatin activated H2O2-inhibited phosphorylation of Akt in a concentration-dependent manner. The Akt inhibitor, LY294002, inhibited the effect of atorvastatin on inducing Akt phosphorylation and on suppressing H2O2-mediated caspase up-regulation and cell apoptosis. These findings indicate that atorvastatin protects cardiomyocyte from oxidative stress via inhibition of LOX-1 expression and apoptosis, and that activation of H2O2-inhibited phosphorylation of Akt may play an important role in the protective function of atorvastatin. PMID:25630653

  13. Microscopic heat pulses induce contraction of cardiomyocytes without calcium transients

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Kotaro; Mizuno, Akari; Shintani, Seine A.; Itoh, Hideki; Serizawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Norio; Suzuki, Madoka

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infra-red laser beam generates microscopic heat pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat pulses induce contraction of cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca{sup 2+} transients during the contraction were not detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Skinned cardiomyocytes in free Ca{sup 2+} solution also contracted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat pulses regulated the contractions without Ca{sup 2+} dynamics. -- Abstract: It was recently demonstrated that laser irradiation can control the beating of cardiomyocytes and hearts, however, the precise mechanism remains to be clarified. Among the effects induced by laser irradiation on biological tissues, temperature change is one possible effect which can alter physiological functions. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which heat pulses, produced by infra-red laser light under an optical microscope, induce contractions of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that microscopic heat pulses induce contraction of rat adult cardiomyocytes. The temperature increase, {Delta}T, required for inducing contraction of cardiomyocytes was dependent upon the ambient temperature; that is, {Delta}T at physiological temperature was lower than that at room temperature. Ca{sup 2+} transients, which are usually coupled to contraction, were not detected. We confirmed that the contractions of skinned cardiomyocytes were induced by the heat pulses even in free Ca{sup 2+} solution. This heat pulse-induced Ca{sup 2+}-decoupled contraction technique has the potential to stimulate heart and skeletal muscles in a manner different from the conventional electrical stimulations.

  14. Chronic Hypoxemia in Late Gestation Decreases Cardiomyocyte Number but Does Not Change Expression of Hypoxia‐Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Botting, Kimberley J.; McMillen, I. Caroline; Forbes, Heather; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placental insufficiency is the leading cause of intrauterine growth restriction in the developed world and results in chronic hypoxemia in the fetus. Oxygen is essential for fetal heart development, but a hypoxemic environment in utero can permanently alter development of cardiomyocytes. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of placental restriction and chronic hypoxemia on total number of cardiomyocytes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, total length of coronary capillaries, and expression of genes regulated by hypoxia. Methods and Results We induced experimental placental restriction from conception, which resulted in fetal growth restriction and chronic hypoxemia. Fetal hearts in the placental restriction group had fewer cardiomyocytes, but interestingly, there was no difference in the percentage of apoptotic cardiomyocytes; the abundance of the transcription factor that mediates hypoxia‐induced apoptosis, p53; or expression of apoptotic genes Bax and Bcl2. Likewise, there was no difference in the abundance of autophagy regulator beclin 1 or expression of autophagic genes BECN1, BNIP3, LAMP1, and MAP1LC3B. Furthermore, fetuses exposed to normoxemia (control) or chronic hypoxemia (placental restriction) had similar mRNA expression of a suite of hypoxia‐inducible factor target genes, which are essential for angiogenesis (VEGF, Flt1, Ang1, Ang2, and Tie2), vasodilation (iNOS and Adm), and glycolysis (GLUT1 and GLUT3). In addition, there was no change in the expression of PKC‐ε, a cardioprotective gene with transcription regulated by hypoxia in a manner independent of hypoxia‐inducible factors. There was an increased capillary length density but no difference in the total length of capillaries in the hearts of the chronically hypoxemic fetuses. Conclusion The lack of upregulation of hypoxia target genes in response to chronic hypoxemia in the fetal heart in late gestation may be due to a decrease in the number of cardiomyocytes (decreased

  15. Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Valentina; Moraga, Francisco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Torrealba, Natalia; Criollo, Alfredo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis and degradation of sphingolipids that regulatenumerous cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, cell growth, differentiation and death. In cardiomyocytes, ceramides induce apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and promoting cytochrome-c release. Ca2+ overload is a common feature of all types of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ceramides on cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels, mitochondrial function and cardiomyocyte death. Our data show that C2-ceramide induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes by a mechanism involving increased Ca2+ influx, mitochondrial network fragmentation and loss of the mitochondrial Ca2+ buffer capacity. These biochemical events increase cytosolic Ca2+ levels and trigger cardiomyocyte death via the activation of calpains. PMID:23602992

  16. Cardiomyocyte degeneration with calpain deficiency reveals a critical role in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Diwan, Abhinav; Odley, Amy M; Hahn, Harvey S; Osinska, Hanna; Melendez, Jaime G; Robbins, Jeffrey; Lynch, Roy A; Marreez, Yehia; Dorn, Gerald W

    2007-04-13

    Regulating the balance between synthesis and proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins is essential for tissue growth and maintenance, but the critical pathways regulating protein ubiquitination and degradation are incompletely defined. Although participation of calpain calcium-activated proteases in post-necrotic myocardial autolysis is well characterized, their importance in homeostatic turnover of normal cardiac tissue is controversial. Hence, we evaluated the consequences of physiologic calpain (calcium-activated protease) activity in cultured cardiomyocytes and unstressed mouse hearts. Comparison of in vitro proteolytic activities of cardiac-expressed calpains 1 and 2 revealed calpain 1, but not calpain 2, activity at physiological calcium concentrations. Physiological calpain 1 activation was evident in adenoviral transfected cultured cardiomyocytes as proteolysis of specific substrates, generally increased protein ubiquitination, and accelerated protein turnover, that were each inhibited by coexpression of the inhibitor protein calpastatin. Conditional forced expression of calpain 1, but not calpain 2, in mouse hearts demonstrated substrate-specific proteolytic activity under basal conditions, with hyperubiquitination of cardiac proteins and increased 26S proteasome activity. Loss of myocardial calpain activity by forced expression of calpastatin diminished ubiquitination of 1 or more specific myocardial proteins, without affecting overall ubiquitination or proteasome activity, and resulted in a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by accumulation of intracellular protein aggregates, formation of autophagosomes, and degeneration of sarcomeres. Thus, calpain 1 is upstream of, and necessary for, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of a subset of myocardial proteins whose abnormal accumulation produces autophagosomes and degeneration of cardiomyocytes with functional decompensation. PMID:17332428

  17. mTOR, cardiomyocytes and inflammation in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lifen; Brink, Marijke

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionary conserved kinase that senses the nutrient and energy status of cells, the availability of growth factors, stress stimuli and other cellular and environmental cues. It responds by regulating a range of cellular processes related to metabolism and growth in accordance with the available resources and intracellular needs. mTOR has distinct functions depending on its assembly in the structurally distinct multiprotein complexes mTORC1 or mTORC2. Active mTORC1 enhances processes including glycolysis, protein, lipid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and it inhibits autophagy. Reported functions for mTORC2 after growth factor stimulation are very diverse, are tissue and cell-type specific, and include insulin-stimulated glucose transport and enhanced glycogen synthesis. In accordance with its cellular functions, mTOR has been demonstrated to regulate cardiac growth in response to pressure overload and is also known to regulate cells of the immune system. The present manuscript presents recently obtained insights into mechanisms whereby mTOR may change anabolic, catabolic and stress response pathways in cardiomocytes and discusses how mTOR may affect inflammatory cells in the heart during hemodynamic stress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26775585

  18. Building and re-building the heart by cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Matthew J; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The adult human heart does not regenerate significant amounts of lost tissue after injury. Rather than making new, functional muscle, human hearts are prone to scarring and hypertrophy, which can often lead to fatal arrhythmias and heart failure. The most-cited basis of this ineffective cardiac regeneration in mammals is the low proliferative capacity of adult cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian cardiomyocytes can avidly proliferate during fetal and neonatal development, and both adult zebrafish and neonatal mice can regenerate cardiac muscle after injury, suggesting that latent regenerative potential exists. Dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cardiomyocyte proliferation throughout life, deciphering why proliferative capacity normally dissipates in adult mammals, and deriving means to boost this capacity are primary goals in cardiovascular research. Here, we review our current understanding of how cardiomyocyte proliferation is regulated during heart development and regeneration. PMID:26932668

  19. Calcium-sensing receptor induces rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocyte apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yihua; Liu Meina; Li Hong; Shi Sa; Zhao Yajun; Wang Rui; Xu Changqing . E-mail: syh200415@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-12-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) exists in many tissues, and its expression has been identified in rat cardiac tissue. However, Physiological importance and pathophysiological involvement of CaSR in homeostatic regulation of cardiac function are unclear. To investigate the relation of CaSR and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes, we examined the role of the CaSR activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) in rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes. Expression of the CaSR protein was observed by Western blot. The apoptotic ratio of rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes was measured with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence techniques. A laser scan confocal microscope was used to detect the intracellular concentration of calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes using the acetoxymethyl ester of fluo-3 (fluo-3/(AM)) as a fluorescent dye. The results showed that GdCl{sub 3} increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal protein kinases (JNK), and p38. GdCl{sub 3} also activated caspase 9 and increased apoptosis in myocyte by increasing [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. In conclusion, these results suggest that CaSR promotes cardiomyocyte apoptosis in rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and caspase 9 signaling pathways.

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  1. Disruption of Smad5 gene induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanxun; Zhou Jiang; Liao Xudong; Lue Yaxin; Deng Chuxia; Huang Peitang; Chen Quan; Yang Xiao . E-mail: yangx@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2005-05-15

    Our previous studies have shown that SMAD5, an important intracellular mediator of transforming growth factor {beta} (TGF-{beta}) family, is required for normal development of the cardiovascular system in vivo. In the current study, we reported that the lack of the Smad5 gene resulted in apoptosis of cardiac myocytes in vivo. To further investigate the mechanism of the Smad5 gene in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, the embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation system was employed. We found that the myotubes that differentiated from the homozygous Smad5 {sup ex6/ex6} mutant ES cells underwent collapse and degeneration during the late stages of in vitro differentiation, mimicking the in vivo observation. By electron microscopy, abnormal swollen mitochondria were observed in cardiomyocytes both from Smad5-deficient embryos and from ES-differentiated cells. There was also a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi} {sub m}) and a leakage of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol of myocytes differentiated from Smad5 mutant ES cells. The expression of p53 and p21 was found to be elevated in the differentiated Smad5 mutant myocytes, and this was accompanied by an up-regulation in caspase 3 expression. These results suggest that the Smad5-mediated TGF-{beta} signals may protect cardiomyocytes from apoptosis by maintaining the integrity of the mitochondria, probably through suppression of p53 mediated pathways.

  2. Endocrine Regulation of Compensatory Growth in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eugene T.; Borski, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Compensatory growth (CG) is a period of accelerated growth that occurs following the alleviation of growth-stunting conditions during which an organism can make up for lost growth opportunity and potentially catch up in size with non-stunted cohorts. Fish show a particularly robust capacity for the response and have been the focus of numerous studies that demonstrate their ability to compensate for periods of fasting once food is made available again. CG is characterized by an elevated growth rate resulting from enhanced feed intake, mitogen production, and feed conversion efficiency. Because little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive the response, this review describes the sequential endocrine adaptations that lead to CG; namely during the precedent catabolic phase (fasting) that taps endogenous energy reserves, and the following hyperanabolic phase (refeeding) when accelerated growth occurs. In order to elicit a CG response, endogenous energy reserves must first be moderately depleted, which alters endocrine profiles that enhance appetite and growth potential. During this catabolic phase, elevated ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) production increase appetite and protein-sparing lipolysis, while insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are suppressed, primarily due to hepatic GH resistance. During refeeding, temporal hyperphagia provides an influx of energy and metabolic substrates that are then allocated to somatic growth by resumed IGF signaling. Under the right conditions, refeeding results in hyperanabolism and a steepened growth trajectory relative to constantly fed controls. The response wanes as energy reserves are re-accumulated and homeostasis is restored. We ascribe possible roles for select appetite and growth-regulatory hormones in the context of the prerequisite of these catabolic and hyperanabolic phases of the CG response in teleosts, with emphasis on GH, IGFs, cortisol, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, ghrelin, and leptin. PMID:23847591

  3. Endocrine regulation of longitudinal bone growth.

    PubMed

    Wit, Jan M; Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal growth is primarily influenced by the GH-IGF-I axis, which is a mixed endocrine-paracrine-autocrine system. Further, classical hormones such as thyroxine, glucocorticosteroids and sex steroids play a role, as well as primarily paracrine systems. In the GH-IGF-I axis, seven disorders can be differentiated: (1) GH deficiency; (2) GHR defects; (3) defects in the GH signal transduction pathway; (4) IGF1 defects; (5) IGFALS defects; (6) IGF1R defects, and (7) IGF2 defects. Children with one of the first 3 disorders have near-normal prenatal growth, while children with defects of IGF1, IGF1R or IGF2 show prenatal as well as postnatal growth retardation. Hypothyroidism or a thyroid hormone resistance cause growth failure, but the effect of hyperthyroidism on growth is modest. Hypercortisolism causes poor growth, while FGD caused by ACTH insensitivity is associated with tall stature. Increased sex steroids in childhood cause advanced growth but even more skeletal maturation, so that adult height is decreased. Finally, the paracrine-autocrine SHOX-BNP pathway and the related CNP-NPR2 pathway are also involved in growth, as very many other growth factors and their receptors and mediators. PMID:21865752

  4. Mechanochemical regulation of growth cone motility

    PubMed Central

    Kerstein, Patrick C.; Nichol IV, Robert H.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones are exquisite sensory-motor machines capable of transducing features contacted in their local extracellular environment into guided process extension during development. Extensive research has shown that chemical ligands activate cell surface receptors on growth cones leading to intracellular signals that direct cytoskeletal changes. However, the environment also provides mechanical support for growth cone adhesion and traction forces that stabilize leading edge protrusions. Interestingly, recent work suggests that both the mechanical properties of the environment and mechanical forces generated within growth cones influence axon guidance. In this review we discuss novel molecular mechanisms involved in growth cone force production and detection, and speculate how these processes may be necessary for the development of proper neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:26217175

  5. MEF2D deficiency in neonatal cardiomyocytes triggers cell cycle re-entry and programmed cell death in vitro.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Nelsa L; Clark, Amanda L; Desjardins, Cody A; Nocco, Sarah E; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-10-01

    The cardiomyocyte cell cycle is a poorly understood process. Mammalian cardiomyocytes permanently withdraw from the cell cycle shortly after birth but can re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate when subjected to injury within a brief temporal window in the neonatal period. Thus, investigating the mechanisms of cell cycle regulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes may provide critical insight into the molecular events that prevent adult myocytes from proliferating in response to injury or stress. MEF2D is a key transcriptional mediator of pathological remodeling in the adult heart downstream of various stress-promoting insults. However, the specific gene programs regulated by MEF2D in cardiomyocytes are unknown. By performing genome-wide transcriptome analysis using MEF2D-depleted neonatal cardiomyocytes, we found a significant impairment in the cell cycle, characterized by the up-regulation of numerous positive cell cycle regulators. Expression of Pten, the primary negative regulator of PI3K/Akt, was significantly reduced in MEF2D-deficient cardiomyocytes and found to be a direct target gene of MEF2D. Consistent with these findings mutant cardiomyocytes showed activation of the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Paradoxically, prolonged deficiency of MEF2D in neonatal cardiomyocytes did not trigger proliferation but instead resulted in programmed cell death, which is likely mediated by the E2F transcription factor. These results demonstrate a critical role for MEF2D in cell cycle regulation of post-mitotic, neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. PMID:26294766

  6. Enhancement of Cellular Antioxidant-Defence Preserves Diastolic Dysfunction via Regulation of Both Diastolic Zn2+ and Ca2+ and Prevention of RyR2-Leak in Hyperglycemic Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tuncay, Erkan; Okatan, Esma N.; Toy, Aysegul; Turan, Belma

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether cellular antioxidant-defence enhancement preserves diastolic dysfunction via regulation of both diastolic intracellular free Zn2+ and Ca2+ levels ([Zn2+]i and [Ca2+]i) levels N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment (4 weeks) of diabetic rats preserved altered cellular redox state and also prevented diabetes-induced tissue damage and diastolic dysfunction with marked normalizations in the resting [Zn2+]i and [Ca2+]i. The kinetic parameters of transient changes in Zn2+ and Ca2+ under electrical stimulation and the spatiotemporal properties of Zn2+ and Ca2+ sparks in resting cells are found to be normal in the treated diabetic group. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the NAC treatment also antagonized hyperphosphorylation of cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) and significantly restored depleted protein levels of both RyR2 and calstabin2. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with 10 µM ZnCl2 exerted hyperphosphorylation in RyR2 as well as higher phosphorphorylations in both PKA and CaMKII in a concentration-dependent manner, similar to hyperglycemia. Our present data also showed that a subcellular oxidative stress marker, NF-κB, can be activated if the cells are exposed directly to Zn2+. We thus for the first time report that an enhancement of antioxidant defence in diabetics via directly targeting heart seems to prevent diastolic dysfunction due to modulation of RyR2 macromolecular-complex thereby leading to normalized [Ca2+]i and [Zn2+]i in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24693334

  7. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; MacLellan, W Robb; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  8. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  9. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  10. Recent Insights into the Regulation of the Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Julian C.; Nilsson, Ola; Baron, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    For most bones, elongation is driven primarily by chondrogenesis at the growth plates. This process results from chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy, and extracellular matrix secretion and is carefully orchestrated by complex networks of local paracrine factors and modulated by endocrine factors. We review here recent advances in the understanding of growth plate physiology. These advances include new approaches to study expression patterns of large numbers of genes in the growth plate, using microdissection followed by microarray. This approach has been combined with genome-wide association studies to provide insights into the regulation of the human growth plate. We also review recent studies elucidating the roles of bone morphogenetic proteins, fibroblast growth factors, C-type natriuretic peptide, and suppressor of cytokine signaling in the local regulation of growth plate chondrogenesis and longitudinal bone growth. PMID:24740736

  11. Osmotic regulation of seamless tube growth.

    PubMed

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Ghabrial, Amin S

    2013-02-01

    Most organs are composed of tubes of differing cellular architectures, including intracellular 'seamless' tubes. Two studies examining the morphogenesis of the seamless tubes formed by the excretory canal cell in Caenorhabditis elegans reveal a previously unappreciated role for osmoregulation of tubulogenesis: hyperosmotic shock recruits canalicular vesicles to the lumenal membrane to promote seamless tube growth. PMID:23377027

  12. Discontinuous thoracic venous cardiomyocytes and heart exhibit synchronized developmental switch of troponin isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Kracklauer, Martin P.; Feng, Han-Zhong; Jiang, Wenrui; Lin, Jenny L.-C.; Lin, Jim J.-C.; Jin, J.-P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte-like cells have been reported in thoracic veins of rodents and other mammals, but their differentiation state and relationship to the muscle mass in the heart remain to be characterized. Here we investigated the distribution, ultrastructure, and the expression and developmental regulation of myofilament proteins in mouse and rat pulmonary and azygos venous cardiomyocytes. Tracing cardiomyocytes in transgenic mouse tissues with a lacZ reporter gene driven by cloned rat cardiac troponin T promoter demonstrated scattered distribution of cardiomyocytes discontinuous from the atrial sleeves. The longitudinal axis of venous cardiomyocytes is perpendicular to that of the vessel. These cells contain typical sarcomere structures and intercalated discs as shown in electron microscopic images and express cardiac isoforms of troponin T, troponin I and myosin. The expression of troponin I isoform genes and the alternative splicing of cardiac troponin T in thoracic venous cardiomyocytes are regulated during postnatal development in a precise synchrony with that in the heart. Nonetheless, the patterns of cardiac troponin T splicing in adult rat thoracic venous cardiomyocytes are slightly but clearly distinct from those in the atrial and ventricular muscles. The data indicate that mouse and rat thoracic venous cardiomyocytes residing in extra-cardiac tissue possess a physiologically differentiated state and an intrinsically preset developmental clock, which are apparently independent of the very different hemodynamic environments and functional features of the vessels and heart. PMID:23176202

  13. The electrophysiological development of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Laksman, Zachary; Backx, Peter H

    2016-01-15

    The generation of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has become an important resource for modeling human cardiac disease and for drug screening, and also holds significant potential for cardiac regeneration. Many challenges remain to be overcome however, before innovation in this field can translate into a change in the morbidity and mortality associated with heart disease. Of particular importance for the future application of this technology is an improved understanding of the electrophysiologic characteristics of CMs, so that better protocols can be developed and optimized for generating hPSC-CMs. Many different cell culture protocols are currently utilized to generate CMs from hPSCs and all appear to yield relatively “developmentally” immature CMs with highly heterogeneous electrical properties. These hPSC-CMs are characterized by spontaneous beating at highly variable rates with a broad range of depolarization-repolarization patterns, suggestive of mixed populations containing atrial, ventricular and nodal cells. Many recent studies have attempted to introduce approaches to promote maturation and to create cells with specific functional properties. In this review, we summarize the studies in which the electrical properties of CMs derived from stem cells have been examined. In order to place this information in a useful context, we also review the electrical properties of CMs as they transition from the developing embryo to the adult human heart. The signal pathways involved in the regulation of ion channel expression during development are also briefly considered. PMID:26788696

  14. Mechanical regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Soybean and eggplant grown and shaken in a greenhouse exhibited decreased internode length, internode diameter, leaf area, and fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots in much the same way as outdoor-exposed plants. Perhaps more important than decreased dimensions of plant parts resulting from periodic seismic treatment is the inhibition of photosynthetic productivity that accompanies this stress. Soybeam plants briefly shaken or rubbed twice daily experienced a decrease in relative as well as absolute growth rate compared to that of undisturbed controls. Growth dynamics analysis revealed that virtually all of the decline in relative growth rate (RGR) was due to a decline in net assimilation rate (NAR), but not in leaf area ratio (LAR). Lower NAR suggests that the stress-induced decrease in dry weight gain is due to a decline in photosynthetic efficiency. Possible effects on stomatal aperture was investigated by measuring rates of whole plant transpiration as a function of seismo-stress, and a transitory decrease followed by a gradual, partial recovery was detected.

  15. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  16. Cytosolic pH: A conserved regulator of cell growth?

    PubMed Central

    Dechant, Reinhard; Peter, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Although target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase and Ras are central regulators of cell growth in yeast and mammals, the molecular mechanisms underlying their regulation by nutrients are still poorly understood. Interestingly, recent studies identified cytosolic pH as a critical regulatory signal for both pathways, which might have widespread implications for tumor cell biology PMID:27308377

  17. ADVANCES IN INTEGRATING INSECT GROWTH REGULATORS INTO STORAGE PEST MANAGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are insecticides that mimic insect-produced hormones that regulate the developmental process. They generally have little or no mammalian toxicity, and are considered reduced-risk insecticides that are often exempt from tolerance requirements of regulatory agencies. Al...

  18. Pro-survival function of MEF2 in cardiomyocytes is enhanced by β-blockers

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, S; Salma, J; Wales, S; McDermott, JC

    2015-01-01

    β1-Adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) stimulation increases apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins function as important regulators of myocardial gene expression. Previously, we reported that PKA signaling directly represses MEF2 activity. We determined whether (a) MEF2 has a pro-survival function in cardiomyocytes, and (b) whether β-adrenergic/PKA signaling modulates MEF2 function in cardiomyocytes. Initially, we observed that siRNA-mediated gene silencing of MEF2 induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis as indicated by flow cytometry. β1-AR activation by isoproterenol represses MEF2 activity and promotes apoptosis in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. Importantly, β1-AR mediated apoptosis was abrogated in cardiomyocytes expressing a PKA-resistant form of MEF2D (S121/190A). We also observed that a β1-blocker, Atenolol, antagonizes isoproterenol-induced apoptosis while concomitantly enhancing MEF2 transcriptional activity. β-AR stimulation modulated MEF2 cellular localization in cardiomyocytes and this effect was reversed by β-blocker treatment. Furthermore, Kruppel-like factor 6, a MEF2 target gene in the heart, functions as a downstream pro-survival factor in cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that (a) MEF2 has an important pro-survival role in cardiomyocytes, and (b) β-adrenergic signaling antagonizes the pro-survival function of MEF2 in cardiomyocytes and β-blockers promote it. These observations have important clinical implications that may contribute to novel strategies for preventing cardiomyocyte apoptosis associated with heart pathology. PMID:27551452

  19. Glucocorticoid signaling in the heart: A cardiomyocyte perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Robert H; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-09-01

    Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death in the Western world. Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones that regulate a vast array of biological processes, and synthetic derivatives of these steroids have been mainstays in the clinic for the last half century. Abnormal levels of glucocorticoids are known to negatively impact the cardiovascular system; however, surprisingly little is known about the direct role of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart. The actions of glucocorticoids are mediated classically by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In certain cells, such as cardiomyocytes, glucocorticoid occupancy and activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) may also contribute to the observed response. Recently, there has been a surge of reports investigating the in vivo function of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart using transgenic mice that specifically target GR or MR in cardiomyocytes. Results from these studies suggest that GR signaling in cardiomyocytes is critical for the normal development and function of the heart. In contrast, MR signaling in cardiomyocytes participates in the development and progression of cardiac disease. In the following review, we discuss these genetic mouse models and the new insights they are providing into the direct role cardiomyocyte glucocorticoid signaling plays in heart physiology and pathophysiology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid Perspectives'. PMID:25804222

  20. Profilin modulates sarcomeric organization and mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Viola; Viswanathan, Meera C.; Lee, Dong I.; Rainer, Peter P.; Schmidt, William; Kronert, William A.; Harding, Sian E.; Kass, David A.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Aims Heart failure is often preceded by cardiac hypertrophy, which is characterized by increased cell size, altered protein abundance, and actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Profilin is a well-conserved, ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional actin-binding protein, and its role in cardiomyocytes is largely unknown. Given its involvement in vascular hypertrophy, we aimed to test the hypothesis that profilin-1 is a key mediator of cardiomyocyte-specific hypertrophic remodelling. Methods and results Profilin-1 was elevated in multiple mouse models of hypertrophy, and a cardiomyocyte-specific increase of profilin in Drosophila resulted in significantly larger heart tube dimensions. Moreover, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of profilin-1 in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) induced a hypertrophic response, measured by increased myocyte size and gene expression. Profilin-1 silencing suppressed the response in NRVMs stimulated with phenylephrine or endothelin-1. Mechanistically, we found that profilin-1 regulates hypertrophy, in part, through activation of the ERK1/2 signalling cascade. Confocal microscopy showed that profilin localized to the Z-line of Drosophila myofibrils under normal conditions and accumulated near the M-line when overexpressed. Elevated profilin levels resulted in elongated sarcomeres, myofibrillar disorganization, and sarcomeric disarray, which correlated with impaired muscle function. Conclusion Our results identify novel roles for profilin as an important mediator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We show that overexpression of profilin is sufficient to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and sarcomeric remodelling, and silencing of profilin attenuates the hypertrophic response. PMID:26956799

  1. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. PMID:25443853

  2. Multiple Transcription Factor Families Regulate Axon Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Darcie L.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding axon regenerative failure remains a major goal in neuroscience, and reversing this failure remains a major goal for clinical neurology. While an inhibitory CNS environment clearly plays a role, focus on molecular pathways within neurons has begun to yield fruitful insights. Initial steps forward investigated the receptors and signaling pathways immediately downstream of environmental cues, but recent work has also shed light on transcriptional control mechanisms that regulate intrinsic axon growth ability, presumably through whole cassettes of gene target regulation. Here we will discuss transcription factors that regulate neurite growth in vitro and in vivo, including p53, SnoN, E47, CREB, STAT3, NFAT, c-Jun, ATF3, Sox11, NFκB, and Kruppel-like factors (KLFs). Revealing the similarities and differences among the functions of these transcription factors may further our understanding of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in axon growth and regeneration. PMID:21674813

  3. Importance of Thickness in Human Cardiomyocyte Network for Effective Electrophysiological Stimulation Using On-Chip Extracellular Microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Tomoyo; Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a three-dimensionally controlled in vitro human cardiomyocyte network assay for the measurements of drug-induced conductivity changes and the appearance of fatal arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation for more precise in vitro predictive cardiotoxicity. To construct an artificial conductance propagation model of a human cardiomyocyte network, first, we examined the cell concentration dependence of the cell network heights and found the existence of a height limit of cell networks, which was double-layer height, whereas the cardiomyocytes were effectively and homogeneously cultivated within the microchamber maintaining their spatial distribution constant and their electrophysiological conductance and propagation were successfully recorded using a microelectrode array set on the bottom of the microchamber. The pacing ability of a cardiomyocyte's electrophysiological response has been evaluated using microelectrode extracellular stimulation, and the stimulation for pacing also successfully regulated the beating frequencies of two-layered cardiomyocyte networks, whereas monolayered cardiomyocyte networks were hardly stimulated by the external electrodes using the two-layered cardiomyocyte stimulation condition. The stability of the lined-up shape of human cardiomyocytes within the rectangularly arranged agarose microchambers was limited for a two-layered cardiomyocyte network because their stronger force generation shrunk those cells after peeling off the substrate. The results indicate the importance of fabrication technology of thickness control of cellular networks for effective extracellular stimulation and the potential concerning thick cardiomyocyte networks for long-term cultivation.

  4. Angiogenic growth factor axis in autophagy regulation.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Marissa J; Dutta, Samikshan; Polavaram, Navatha Shree; Roy, Sohini; Muders, Michael H; Datta, Kaustubh

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms promoting therapy resistance is important. Previously, we reported that VEGFC can promote cancer cell survival during stress via interaction with its receptor NRP2. While examining the molecular mechanisms involved in this survival, we performed a microarray study in which we identified two genes, WDFY1 and LAMP2, which have been suggested to function in autophagy. Our subsequent studies further confirmed the regulation of autophagy by the VEGFC-NRP2 axis in cancer during starvation- and chemotherapy-induced stress. We are currently in the process of determining the mechanism(s) through which WDFY1 and LAMP2 control autophagy; however, we did observe an increase in MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1) activity after the depletion of the VEGFC-NRP2 axis. It would therefore be interesting to study whether WDFY1 and LAMP2 can influence MTORC1 activity and regulate autophagy. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting the VEGFC-NRP2 axis in combination with chemotherapy could be an effective treatment for advanced cancers. PMID:23388383

  5. [Debt, regulations and economic growth in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Vélez-Fernández Varela, F

    1989-01-01

    In the Mexican economy four policies forced the State to redefine its strategy of development. They were: 1) the considerable purchase by the government of firms that were not strategic or of national priority; 2) the preservation of a structure of high industrial protection; 3) an excessive reliance of the economy on oil, and 4) the perception of the increase in the price of oil as a permanent and not a temporary phenomenon. By the seventies the first two phenomena restricted the possibilities of economic growth which translated into inflation. In the eighties the high dependency on oil and the weakness of its monetary value deepened those trends. The external debt became the single most significant constraint of development. The government was forced to reduce drastically substantive public expenditure. Health was one of the areas more severely affected. PMID:2662429

  6. Periconceptional events perturb postnatal growth regulation in sheep.

    PubMed

    Jaquiery, Anne L; Oliver, Mark H; Bloomfield, Frank H; Harding, Jane E

    2011-09-01

    Periconceptional undernutrition and twin conception alter intrauterine growth and metabolism and are associated with later adverse metabolic outcomes. The contribution of postnatal growth to these outcomes is less well defined. We investigated whether maternal periconceptional undernutrition or twin conception altered postnatal growth regulation in ways that could lead to metabolic disease. Single and twin offspring of ewes undernourished (UN) from 61 d before until 30 d after mating, fed to achieve and maintain 10-15% weight loss (UN), were compared with offspring of maintenance-fed controls (N). At 2 h and 1, 6, and 12 wk after birth, lambs were weighed and plasma hormone and metabolite concentrations analyzed. Milk intake, measured by deuterium oxide dilution, was inversely related to birth weight only in N singles, although twins had the greatest postnatal growth velocity. Positive associations were seen between milk intake, growth velocity, and leptin concentrations in N, but not UN, offspring. We conclude that periconceptional undernutrition alters the relationships between regulators of postnatal growth, including nutrient intake and key hormonal axes, in both singles and twins without affecting size at birth or postnatal growth velocity. Dissociation of growth from its key regulators is one possible mechanism underlying adverse metabolic outcomes after periconceptional undernutrition. PMID:21587096

  7. Effects of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase on cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Huang, Qiuju; Shu, Zhaohui; Liu, Peiqing; Chen, Shaorui; Pan, Xuediao; Zang, Linquan; Zhou, Sigui

    2016-07-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), a key enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, plays an important role in cardiac hypertrophy. However, its effect on the cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unknown. We aimed to determine the role of SCAD in tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The mRNA and protein expression of SCAD were significantly down-regulated in the cardiomyocyte apoptosis model. Inhibition of SCAD with siRNA-1186 significantly decreased SCAD expression, enzyme activity and ATP content, but obviously increased the content of free fatty acids. Meanwhile, SCAD siRNA treatment triggered the same apoptosis as cardiomyocytes treated with tBHP, such as the increase in cell apoptotic rate, the activation of caspase3 and the decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which showed that SCAD may play an important role in primary cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The changes of phosphonate AMP-activated protein kinase α (p-AMPKα) and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were consistent with that of SCAD. Furthermore, PPARα activator fenofibrate and AMPKα activator AICAR treatment significantly increased the expression of SCAD and inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, for the first time our findings directly demonstrated that SCAD may be as a new target to prevent cardiomyocyte apoptosis through the AMPK/PPARα/SCAD signal pathways. PMID:26989860

  8. Postnatal telomere dysfunction induces cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest through p21 activation.

    PubMed

    Aix, Esther; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Óscar; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlota; Aguado, Tania; Flores, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive mammalian cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle soon after birth remain largely unknown. Here, we identify telomere dysfunction as a critical physiological signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest. We show that telomerase activity and cardiomyocyte telomere length decrease sharply in wild-type mouse hearts after birth, resulting in cardiomyocytes with dysfunctional telomeres and anaphase bridges and positive for the cell-cycle arrest protein p21. We further show that premature telomere dysfunction pushes cardiomyocytes out of the cell cycle. Cardiomyocytes from telomerase-deficient mice with dysfunctional telomeres (G3 Terc(-/-)) show precocious development of anaphase-bridge formation, p21 up-regulation, and binucleation. In line with these findings, the cardiomyocyte proliferative response after cardiac injury was lost in G3 Terc(-/-) newborns but rescued in G3 Terc(-/-)/p21(-/-) mice. These results reveal telomere dysfunction as a crucial signal for cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest after birth and suggest interventions to augment the regeneration capacity of mammalian hearts. PMID:27241915

  9. Mitochondrial Lon protease controls ROS-dependent apoptosis in cardiomyocyte under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chan-Yen; Chiu, Yi-Chieh; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-07-01

    Apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, under ischemic conditions, has been identified as an essential process in the progression of heart failure. Under hypoxic conditions, mitochondria can become a threat to the cell because of their capacity to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). As ROS appear to have a critical role in heart failure, there has been considerable interest in identifying the candidate proteins involved and in developing strategies to reduce oxidative stress. Lon protease (Lon) is a multifunctional protein that mediates protein quality control and stress response in mitochondria. However, comprehensive and detailed studies, on the role of Lon in hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, have yet to be carried out. In the present study, we demonstrated that hypoxia induced ROS-dependent cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Lon was upregulated in hypoxia-induced cardiomyocytes. Lon downregulation attenuated hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through a reduction of ROS level. Moreover, overexpression of Lon stimulated ROS production and induced apoptosis under normoxic conditions in cardiomyocytes. Our results identify Lon as a novel regulator of cardiomyocyte fate and offers exciting new insights into the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. PMID:25922169

  10. Growth factors in critical illness: regulation and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H

    1998-03-01

    The erosion of lean body mass observed during catabolic illness is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The known anabolic actions of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I have stimulated interest in the use of these agents to mitigate the loss of muscle protein after injury. This review summarizes advances in our understanding of how nutrition, hormones and proinflammatory cytokines regulate the somatotropic axis in health and disease, and recent studies involving the use of growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I in the treatment of critically ill patients. PMID:10565348

  11. How to make a cardiomyocyte.

    PubMed

    Später, Daniela; Hansson, Emil M; Zangi, Lior; Chien, Kenneth R

    2014-12-01

    During development, cardiogenesis is orchestrated by a family of heart progenitors that build distinct regions of the heart. Each region contains diverse cell types that assemble to form the complex structures of the individual cardiac compartments. Cardiomyocytes are the main cell type found in the heart and ensure contraction of the chambers and efficient blood flow throughout the body. Injury to the cardiac muscle often leads to heart failure due to the loss of a large number of cardiomyocytes and its limited intrinsic capacity to regenerate the damaged tissue, making it one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this Primer we discuss how insights into the molecular and cellular framework underlying cardiac development can be used to guide the in vitro specification of cardiomyocytes, whether by directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells or via direct lineage conversion. Additional strategies to generate cardiomyocytes in situ, such as reactivation of endogenous cardiac progenitors and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation, will also be discussed. PMID:25406392

  12. The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

    2011-01-01

    Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming. PMID:20921199

  13. An opioid growth factor regulates the replication of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zagon, I S; McLaughlin, P J

    1992-01-01

    An opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met5]-enkephalin, interacts with the zeta (zeta) opioid receptor to modulate development of eukaryotes. We have found that [Met5]-enkephalin, an endogenous opioid peptide serves to inhibit the growth of S. aureus. This effect on growth involves cell proliferative events and is under tonic control, since potent opioid antagonists accelerate cell replication. Both the OGF and zeta opioid receptor were associated with these microorganisms. Other opioid receptors (mu, delta and kappa) were not detected. OGF also controlled the growth of other bacteria: P. aeruginosa and S. marcesans. These results indicate that OGF and its receptor, known to be important in the regulation of mammalian development, also function in the growth of simple unicellular organisms. We suggest that the endogenous opioid system related to growth originated billions of years ago. PMID:1313136

  14. In Scarcity and Abundance: Metabolic Signals Regulating Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Shady; Peter, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Although nutrient availability is a major driver of cell growth, and continuous adaptation to nutrient supply is critical for the development and survival of all organisms, the molecular mechanisms of nutrient sensing are only beginning to emerge. Here, we highlight recent advances in the field of nutrient sensing and discuss arising principles governing how metabolism might regulate growth-promoting pathways. In addition, we discuss signaling functions of metabolic enzymes not directly related to their metabolic activity. PMID:23997189

  15. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression. PMID:25639875

  16. Myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy is regulated through dual phosphorylation and acetylation of the actin capping protein CapZ.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Warren, Chad M; Li, Jieli; McKinsey, Timothy A; Russell, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    The mechanotransduction signaling pathways initiated in heart muscle by increased mechanical loading are known to lead to long-term transcriptional changes and hypertrophy, but the rapid events for adaptation at the sarcomeric level are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that actin filament assembly during cardiomyocyte growth is regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs) of CapZβ1. In rapidly hypertrophying neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) stimulated by phenylephrine (PE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) of CapZβ1 revealed a shift toward more negative charge. Consistent with this, mass spectrometry identified CapZβ1 phosphorylation on serine-204 and acetylation on lysine-199, two residues which are near the actin binding surface of CapZβ1. Ectopic expression of dominant negative PKCɛ (dnPKCɛ) in NRVMs blunted the PE-induced increase in CapZ dynamics, as evidenced by the kinetic constant (Kfrap) of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and concomitantly reduced phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1. Furthermore, inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) increased lysine-199 acetylation on CapZβ1, which increased Kfrap of CapZ and stimulated actin dynamics. Finally, we show that PE treatment of NRVMs results in decreased binding of HDAC3 to myofibrils, suggesting a signal-dependent mechanism for the regulation of sarcomere-associated CapZβ1 acetylation. Taken together, this dual regulation through phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1 provides a novel model for the regulation of myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27185186

  17. Roles and post-translational regulation of cardiac class IIa histone deacetylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Kate L; Avkiran, Metin

    2015-04-15

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is an integral component of pathological cardiac remodelling in response to mechanical and chemical stresses in settings such as chronic hypertension or myocardial infarction. For hypertrophy to ensue, the pertinent mechanical and chemical signals need to be transmitted from membrane sensors (such as receptors for neurohormonal mediators) to the cardiomyocyte nucleus, leading to altered transcription of the genes that regulate cell growth. In recent years, nuclear histone deacetylases (HDACs) have attracted considerable attention as signal-responsive, distal regulators of the transcriptional reprogramming that in turn precipitates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, with particular focus on the role of members of the class IIa family, such as HDAC4 and HDAC5. These histone deacetylase isoforms appear to repress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through mechanisms that involve protein interactions in the cardiomyocyte nucleus, particularly with pro-hypertrophic transcription factors, rather than via histone deacetylation. In contrast, evidence indicates that class I HDACs promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through mechanisms that are dependent on their enzymatic activity and thus sensitive to pharmacological HDAC inhibitors. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles of post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation, oxidation and proteolytic cleavage in regulating class IIa HDAC localisation and function, more work is required to explore the contributions of other PTMs, such as ubiquitination and sumoylation, as well as potential cross-regulatory interactions between distinct PTMs and between class IIa and class I HDAC isoforms. PMID:25362149

  18. Roles and post-translational regulation of cardiac class IIa histone deacetylase isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Kate L; Avkiran, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is an integral component of pathological cardiac remodelling in response to mechanical and chemical stresses in settings such as chronic hypertension or myocardial infarction. For hypertrophy to ensue, the pertinent mechanical and chemical signals need to be transmitted from membrane sensors (such as receptors for neurohormonal mediators) to the cardiomyocyte nucleus, leading to altered transcription of the genes that regulate cell growth. In recent years, nuclear histone deacetylases (HDACs) have attracted considerable attention as signal-responsive, distal regulators of the transcriptional reprogramming that in turn precipitates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, with particular focus on the role of members of the class IIa family, such as HDAC4 and HDAC5. These histone deacetylase isoforms appear to repress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through mechanisms that involve protein interactions in the cardiomyocyte nucleus, particularly with pro-hypertrophic transcription factors, rather than via histone deacetylation. In contrast, evidence indicates that class I HDACs promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through mechanisms that are dependent on their enzymatic activity and thus sensitive to pharmacological HDAC inhibitors. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles of post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation, oxidation and proteolytic cleavage in regulating class IIa HDAC localisation and function, more work is required to explore the contributions of other PTMs, such as ubiquitination and sumoylation, as well as potential cross-regulatory interactions between distinct PTMs and between class IIa and class I HDAC isoforms. PMID:25362149

  19. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  20. Comparison of the hypertrophic effect of phorbol ester, norepinephrine, angiotensin II and contraction on cultured cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Allo, S.N.; Carl, L.L.; Morgan, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), norepinephrine (NE), angiotensin II (AII) and contraction stimulate cardiomyocyte growth. Differences exist in the time course and extent of protein and RNA accumulation. Cells plated at 4 {times} 10{sup 6} cells/60mm dish and arrested with 50 mM KCl demonstrated no significant growth. Treatment with PMA stimulated growth to a maximum of 17% at 48 h. In contrast, maximal stimulation of growth was 36% at 48 h and 31% at 72 h for contracting and NE treated cells, respectively. Maximal stimulation of the capacity for protein synthesis was 32% for PMA treated cells at 24 h as compared to 59% and 77% for NE treated and contracting cells respectively at 72 h. In support of a primary role for altered capacity in the regulation of protein synthesis, there was a significant correlation between RNA and protein content independent of the stimulus used. AII increased RNA content by 28% at 48h, but had no effect on growth up to 72h. Treatment with staurosporine blocked the stimulation of growth, suggestive of a role for protein kinase C (PKC). However, the inhibition of contraction-induced growth was due in part to a reduction in the rate of contraction. It was concluded that: significant differences existed in the time course of growth stimulation and RNA accumulation, depending on the stimulus; and growth inhibition by staurosporine is suggestive of an important role of PKC in hypertrophic growth induced by these stimuli.

  1. Substrate and nutrient limitation regulating microbial growth in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Microbial activity and growth in soil is regulated by several abiotic factors, including temperature, moisture and pH as the most important ones. At the same time nutrient conditions and substrate availability will also determine microbial growth. Amount of substrate will not only affect overall microbial growth, but also affect the balance of fungal and bacterial growth. The type of substrate will also affect the latter. Furthermore, according to Liebig law of limiting factors, we would expect one nutrient to be the main limiting one for microbial growth in soil. When this nutrient is added, the initial second liming factor will become the main one, adding complexity to the microbial response after adding different substrates. I will initially describe different ways of determining limiting factors for bacterial growth in soil, especially a rapid method estimating bacterial growth, using the leucine incorporation technique, after adding C (as glucose), N (as ammonium nitrate) and P (as phosphate). Scenarios of different limitations will be covered, with the bacterial growth response compared with fungal growth and total activity (respiration). The "degree of limitation", as well as the main limiting nutrient, can be altered by adding substrate of different stoichiometric composition. However, the organism group responding after alleviating the nutrient limitation can differ depending on the type of substrate added. There will also be situations, where fungi and bacteria appear to be limited by different nutrients. Finally, I will describe interactions between abiotic factors and the response of the soil microbiota to alleviation of limiting factors.

  2. Cyp26b1 within the growth plate regulates bone growth in juvenile mice

    SciTech Connect

    Minegishi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Yasuo; Yahara, Yasuhito; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hosokawa, Ko; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Retinoic acid and Cyp26b1 were oppositely localized in growth plate cartilage. • Cyp26b1 deletion in chondrocytes decreased bone growth in juvenile mice. • Cyp26b1 deletion reduced chondrocyte proliferation and growth plate height. • Vitamin A-depletion partially reversed growth plate abnormalities caused by Cyp26b1 deficiency. • Cyp26b1 regulates bone growth by controlling chondrocyte proliferation. - Abstract: Retinoic acid (RA) is an active metabolite of vitamin A and plays important roles in embryonic development. CYP26 enzymes degrade RA and have specific expression patterns that produce a RA gradient, which regulates the patterning of various structures in the embryo. However, it has not been addressed whether a RA gradient also exists and functions in organs after birth. We found localized RA activities in the diaphyseal portion of the growth plate cartilage were associated with the specific expression of Cyp26b1 in the epiphyseal portion in juvenile mice. To disturb the distribution of RA, we generated mice lacking Cyp26b1 specifically in chondrocytes (Cyp26b1{sup Δchon} cKO). These mice showed reduced skeletal growth in the juvenile stage. Additionally, their growth plate cartilage showed decreased proliferation rates of proliferative chondrocytes, which was associated with a reduced height in the zone of proliferative chondrocytes, and closed focally by four weeks of age, while wild-type mouse growth plates never closed. Feeding the Cyp26b1 cKO mice a vitamin A-deficient diet partially reversed these abnormalities of the growth plate cartilage. These results collectively suggest that Cyp26b1 in the growth plate regulates the proliferation rates of chondrocytes and is responsible for the normal function of the growth plate and growing bones in juvenile mice, probably by limiting the RA distribution in the growth plate proliferating zone.

  3. Tropomyosin flexural rigidity and single ca(2+) regulatory unit dynamics: implications for cooperative regulation of cardiac muscle contraction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Loong, Campion K P; Badr, Myriam A; Chase, P Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated by dynamic and cooperative interactions among Ca(2+), troponin, and tropomyosin on the thin filament. While Ca(2+) regulation has been extensively studied, little is known about the dynamics of individual regulatory units and structural changes of individual tropomyosin molecules in relation to their mechanical properties, and how these factors are altered by cardiomyopathy mutations in the Ca(2+) regulatory proteins. In this hypothesis paper, we explore how various experimental and analytical approaches could broaden our understanding of the cooperative regulation of cardiac contraction in health and disease. PMID:22493584

  4. Isoflurane Preconditioning Elicits Competent Endogenous Mechanisms of Protection from Oxidative Stress in Cardiomyocytes Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sepac, Ana; Sedlic, Filip; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Lough, John; Duncan, Stephen A.; Bienengraeber, Martin; Park, Frank; Kim, Jinhee; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes potentially represent a powerful experimental model complementary to myocardium obtained from patients, relatively inaccessible for research purposes. We tested whether anesthetic-induced preconditioning (APC) with isoflurane elicits competent protective mechanisms in hESC-derived cardiomyocytes against oxidative stress to be used as a model of human cardiomyocytes for studying preconditioning. Methods H1 hESC cell line was differentiated into cardiomyocytes using growth factors activin A and bone morphogenetic protein-4. Living ventricular hESC-derived cardiomyocytes were identified using lentiviral vector expressing a reporter gene (enhanced green fluorescent protein) driven by a cardiac-specific human myosin light chain 2v promoter. Mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and survival of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes were assessed using confocal microscopy. Oxygen consumption was measured in contracting cell clusters. Results Differentiation yielded a high percentage (∼85%) of cardiomyocytes in beating clusters that were positive for cardiac-specific markers and exhibited action potentials resembling mature cardiomyocytes. Isoflurane depolarized mitochondria, attenuated oxygen consumption, and stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species. APC protected these cells from oxidative stress-induced death and delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Conclusions APC elicits competent protective mechanisms against oxidative stress in hESC-derived cardiomyocytes, suggesting the feasibility to use these cells as a model of human cardiomyocytes for studying APC and potentially other treatments/diseases. Our differentiation protocol is very efficient and yields a high percentage of cardiomyocytes. These results also suggest a promising ability of APC to protect and improve engraftment of h

  5. New research with insect growth regulators and fogging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are seen as reduced-risk insecticides to replace conventional neurotoxins for insect pest management in stored products. The use of IGRs will be discussed, with reference to different application methods and available commercial products. Similarly, aerosol insecticid...

  6. Evaluation of Growth Regulators on In Vitro Hibiscus Shoot Regeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple shoot induction and plant regeneration was achieved from shoot apices in two genotypes (red and green variants) of Hibiscus acetosella Welw. ex. Hiern using the growth regulators thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N’-1,2,3-thidazol-5-ylurea, TDZ) and 6-benzyladenine (BA). Shoot apices were cultured for ...

  7. Heparin localization and fine structure regulate Burkitt's lymphoma growth

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, David; Lynn, David M.; Berry, Eric; Sasisekharan, Ram; Langer, Robert . E-mail: rlanger@mit.edu

    2006-09-29

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a B-cell malignancy associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Mounting evidence has implicated heparan sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate-like glycosaminoglycans (HSGAGs) in the initiation, severity, and progression of the malignancy. The importance of HSGAGs in regulating BL cell growth was therefore examined. Extracellular exogenous heparin inhibited cell growth >30%, while heparin internalized with poly({beta}-amino ester)s promoted proliferation up to 58%. The growth-modulating effects of heparin and internalized heparin were dependent on cell surface HSGAGs, PI3K, and Erk/Mek. Treatment of cells with protamine sulfate or with heparinases potently inhibited proliferation, with the greatest effects induced by heparinase I. Cell surface HSGAGs therefore play an important role in regulating BL proliferation and may offer a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Maternal effects and the endocrine regulation of mandrill growth.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Robin M; Setchell, Joanna M; Verrier, Delphine; Knapp, Leslie A

    2012-10-01

    Maternal effects can influence offspring growth and development, and thus fitness. However, the physiological factors mediating these effects in nonhuman primates are not well understood. We investigated the impact of maternal effects on variation in three important components of the endocrine regulation of growth in male and female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), from birth to 9 years of age. Using a mixed longitudinal set (N = 252) of plasma samples, we measured concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), growth hormone binding protein (GHBP), and free testosterone (free T). We evaluated the relationship of ontogenetic patterns of changes in hormone concentration to patterns of growth in body mass and body length, and determined that these endocrine factors play a significant role in growth of both young (infant and juvenile) and adolescent male mandrills, but only in growth of young female mandrills. We also use mixed models analysis to determine the relative contribution of the effects of maternal rank, parity, and age on variation in hormone and binding protein concentrations. Our results suggest that all of these maternal effects account for significant variation in hormone and binding protein concentrations in all male age groups. Of the maternal effects measured, maternal rank was the most frequently identified significant maternal effect on variation in hormone and binding protein concentrations. We suggest that these endocrine factors provide mechanisms that contribute to the maternal effects on offspring growth previously noted in this population. PMID:22696170

  9. Ablation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Prevents Cardiomyocytes Contractile Dysfunction in Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Prathipati, Priyanka; Metreveli, Naira; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Tyagi, Suresh C.; Mishra, Paras K.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and decreased contractility of cardiomyocytes are documented in diabetic hearts. However, it is unclear whether MMP is involved in the regulation of contractility of cardiomyocytes in diabetic hearts. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MMP9 regulates contractility of cardiomyocytes in diabetic hearts, and ablation of MMP9 prevents impaired contractility of cardiomyocytes in diabetic hearts. To determine the specific role of MMP9 in cardiomyocyte contractility, we used 12–14 week male WT (normoglycemic sibling of Akita), Akita, and Ins2+∕−/MMP9−∕− (DKO) mice. DKO mice were generated by cross-breeding male Ins2+∕− Akita (T1D) with female MMP9 knockout (MMP9−∕−) mice. We isolated cardiomyocytes from the heart of the above three groups of mice and measured their contractility and calcium transients. Moreover, we determined mRNA and protein levels of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2a (SERCA-2a), which is involved in calcium handling during contractility of cardiomyocytes in WT, Akita, and DKO hearts using QPCR, Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Our results revealed that in Akita hearts where increased expression and activity of MMP9 is reported, the rates of shortening and re-lengthening (±dL/dt) of cardiomyocytes were decreased, time to 90% peak height and baseline during contractility was increased, rate of calcium decay was increased, and calcium transient was decreased as compared to WT cardiomyocytes. However, these changes in Akita were blunted in DKO cardiomyocytes. The molecular analyses of SERCA-2a in the hearts showed that it was downregulated in Akita as compared to WT but was comparatively upregulated in DKO. These results suggest that abrogation of MMP9 gene prevents contractility of cardiomyocytes, possibly by increasing SERCA-2a and calcium transients. We conclude that MMP9 plays a crucial role in the regulation

  10. Effects of Substrate Mechanics on Contractility of Cardiomyocytes Generated from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hazeltine, Laurie B.; Simmons, Chelsey S.; Salick, Max R.; Lian, Xiaojun; Badur, Mehmet G.; Han, Wenqing; Delgado, Stephanie M.; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro; Crone, Wendy C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-) derived cardiomyocytes have potential applications in drug discovery, toxicity testing, developmental studies, and regenerative medicine. Before these cells can be reliably utilized, characterization of their functionality is required to establish their similarity to native cardiomyocytes. We tracked fluorescent beads embedded in 4.4–99.7 kPa polyacrylamide hydrogels beneath contracting neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and cardiomyocytes generated from hPSCs via growth-factor-induced directed differentiation to measure contractile output in response to changes in substrate mechanics. Contraction stress was determined using traction force microscopy, and morphology was characterized by immunocytochemistry for α-actinin and subsequent image analysis. We found that contraction stress of all types of cardiomyocytes increased with substrate stiffness. This effect was not linked to beating rate or morphology. We demonstrated that hPSC-derived cardiomyocyte contractility responded appropriately to isoprenaline and remained stable in culture over a period of 2 months. This study demonstrates that hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes have appropriate functional responses to substrate stiffness and to a pharmaceutical agent, which motivates their use in further applications such as drug evaluation and cardiac therapies. PMID:22649451

  11. Role of heterotrimeric G protein and calcium in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Loreto; Cea, Paola; Rocco, Paola; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejias, Pablo; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Quiroga, Clara; Criollo, Alfredo; Ibarra, Cristian; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    In the heart, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a peptide with pro-hypertrophic and anti-apoptotic actions. The pro-hypertrophic properties of IGF-1 have been attributed to the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Recently, we reported that IGF-1 also increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels through a pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein. Here we investigate whether this Ca(2+) signal is involved in IGF-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our results show that the IGF-1-induced increase in Ca(2+) level is abolished by the IGF-1 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG538, PTX and the peptide inhibitor of Gβγ signaling, βARKct. Increases in the activities of Ca(2+) -dependent enzymes calcineurin, calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), and protein kinase Cα (PKCα) were observed at 5 min after IGF-1 exposure. AG538, PTX, βARKct, and the dominant negative PKCα prevented the IGF-1-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Participation of calcineurin and CaMKII in ERK phosphorylation was discounted. IGF-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, determined by cell size and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), was prevented by AG538, PTX, βARKct, dominant negative PKCα, and the MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Inhibition of calcineurin with CAIN did not abolish IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that IGF-1 induces hypertrophy in cultured cardiomyocytes by activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity/βγ-subunits of a PTX-sensitive G protein/Ca(2+) /PKCα/ERK pathway without the participation of calcineurin. PMID:24243530

  12. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on intracellular calcium transients in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinhong; Sun, Junqing; Xu, Hao; Shi, Liang; Sun, Lijun; Zhang, Jianbao

    2015-03-01

    Calcium transients play an essential role in cardiomyocytes and electromagnetic fields (EMF) and affect intracellular calcium levels in many types of cells. Effects of EMF on intracellular calcium transients in cardiomyocytes are not well studied. The aim of this study was to assess whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) could affect intracellular calcium transients in cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to rectangular-wave pulsed ELF-EMF at four different frequencies (15 Hz, 50 Hz, 75 Hz and 100 Hz) and at a flux density of 2 mT. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured using Fura-2/AM and spectrofluorometry. Perfusion of cardiomyocytes with a high concentration of caffeine (10 mM) was carried out to verify the function of the cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and the activity of sarco(endo)-plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a). The results showed that ELF-EMF enhanced the activities of NCX and SERCA2a, increased [Ca(2+)]i baseline level and frequency of calcium transients in cardiomyocytes and decreased the amplitude of calcium transients and calcium level in sarcoplasmic reticulum. These results indicated that ELF-EMF can regulate calcium-associated activities in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24499289

  13. NAF-1 antagonizes starvation-induced autophagy through AMPK signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaohong; Xiao, Renjie; Xiao, Fan; Chen, Yong; Hua, Fuzhou; Yu, Shuchun; Xu, Guohai

    2015-07-01

    NAF-1 (nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1), an autophagy-related gene-related (ATG) protein, has been implicated in the autophagic pro-survival response. However, its role in autophagy has not been examined in the cardiomyocytes. In this study, we found that nutritional stress (NS) induced by glucose deprivation strongly induced autophagy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, which was associated with NAF-1 down-regulation in cardiomyocytes under NS conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of NAF-1 was sufficient to inhibit autophagy in cardiomyocytes under glucose deprivation conditions. Moreover, results of the co-immunoprecipitation assay indicate that NAF-1 antagonized autophagy by promoting the interaction between Beclin1 and Bcl-2 in NS-induced cardiomyocytes. Importantly, our results indicate that overexpression of NAF-1 significantly inhibited AMPK activity and protected cardiomyocytes from NS-induced cell death. Taken together, these data show that ectopic expression of NAF-1 antagonizes the degree of autophagy in cardiomyocytes and enhances cell survival during starvation conditions. PMID:25689847

  14. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  15. Redox regulation in shoot growth, SAM maintenance and flowering.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Jos Hm; Foyer, Christine H; van Dongen, Joost T

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and associated reduction/oxidation (redox) controls involving glutathione, glutaredoxins and thioredoxins play key roles in the regulation of plant growth and development. While many questions remain concerning redox functions in the shoot apical meristem (SAM), accumulating evidence suggests that redox master switches integrate major hormone signals and transcriptional networks in the SAM, and so regulate organ growth, polarity and floral development. Auxin-induced activation of plasma-membrane located NADPH-oxidases and mitochondrial respiratory bioenergetics are likely regulators of the ROS bursts that drive the cell cycle in proliferating regions, with other hormones such as jasmonic acid playing propagating or antagonistic roles in gene regulation. Moreover, the activation of oxygen production by photosynthesis and oxygen-dependent N-end rule controls are linked to the transition from cell proliferation to cell expansion and differentiation. While much remains to be understood, the nexus of available redox controls provides a key underpinning mechanism linking hormonal controls, energy metabolism and bioenergetics to plant growth and development. PMID:26799134

  16. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  17. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  18. Regulation of Growth Hormone by the Splanchnic Area.

    PubMed

    Barja-Fernandez, Silvia; Folgueira, Cintia; Castelao, Cecilia; Leis, Rosaura; Crujeiras, Ana B; Casanueva, Felipe F; Seoane, Luisa M

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of growth hormone (GH) was traditionally thought to be under the control of two main hypothalamic neuropeptides; GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin. In 1999, with the isolation of ghrelin, as a gastric-derived peptide with potent GH-releasing activity, concept of regulation of the somatotropic axis completely changed. In addition to its GH-releasing activity, ghrelin exhibited the capacity to modulate food intake and body weight. The role of this splanchnic factor in regulating GH as a nexus of energy balance control and GH are explored in this chapter. From a physiological standpoint, a novel mechanism of GH regulation mediated by ghrelin exists, implicating the peripheral modulation of the cannabinoid receptor. PMID:26940386

  19. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  20. Growth-regulated synthesis and secretion of biologically active nerve growth factor by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, E; Marchisio, P C; Bondanza, S; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R; De Luca, M

    1991-11-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) transcripts were identified in normal human keratinocytes in primary and secondary culture. The expression of the NGF mRNA was strongly down-regulated by corticosteroids and was maximal when keratinocytes were in the exponential phase of growth. Immunofluorescence studies on growing keratinocytes colonies and on elutriated keratinocytes obtained from growing colonies and mature stratified epithelium showed specific staining of the Golgi apparatus only in basal keratinocytes in the exponential phase of growth. The keratinocyte-derived NGF was secreted in a biologically active form as assessed by neurite induction in sensory neurons obtained from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia. Based on these data we suggest that the basal keratinocyte is the cell synthesizing and secreting NGF in the human adult epidermis. The paracrine secretion of NGF by keratinocytes might have a major role in regulating innervation, lymphocyte function, and melanocyte growth and differentiation in epidermal morphogenesis as well as during wound healing. PMID:1718982

  1. Na+/H+ Exchanger Isoform 1-Induced Osteopontin Expression Facilitates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Iman A.; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre; Fliegel, Larry; Lopaschuk, Gary; Mlih, Mohamed; Abdulrahman, Nabeel; Fillmore, Natasha; Mraiche, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced expression and activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) has been implicated in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in various experimental models. The upregulation of NHE1 was correlated with an increase in osteopontin (OPN) expression in models of cardiac hypertrophy (CH), and the mechanism for this remains to be delineated. To determine whether the expression of active NHE1-induces OPN and contributes to the hypertrophic response in vitro, cardiomyocytes were infected with the active form of the NHE1 adenovirus or transfected with OPN silencing RNA (siRNA-OPN) and characterized for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Expression of NHE1 in cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy markers: cell surface area, protein content, ANP mRNA and expression of phosphorylated-GATA4. NHE1 activity was also significantly increased in cardiomyocytes expressing active NHE1. Interestingly, transfection of cardiomyocytes with siRNA-OPN significantly abolished the NHE1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. siRNA-OPN also significantly reduced the activity of NHE1 in cardiomyocytes expressing NHE1 (68.5±0.24%; P<0.05), confirming the role of OPN in the NHE1-induced hypertrophic response. The hypertrophic response facilitated by NHE1-induced OPN occurred independent of the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases and Akt, but required p90-ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). The ability of OPN to facilitate the NHE1-induced hypertrophic response identifies OPN as a potential therapeutic target to reverse the hypertrophic effect induced by the expression of active NHE1. PMID:25884410

  2. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments. PMID:26905653

  3. Canonical transient receptor potential channels promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through activation of calcineurin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bush, Erik W; Hood, David B; Papst, Philip J; Chapo, Joseph A; Minobe, Wayne; Bristow, Michael R; Olson, Eric N; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2006-11-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a central role in the control of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to pathological stimuli. Although calcineurin is present at high levels in normal heart, its activity appears to be unaffected by calcium during the course of a cardiac cycle. The mechanism(s) whereby calcineurin is selectively activated by calcium under pathological conditions has remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that diverse signals for cardiac hypertrophy stimulate expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. TRPC consists of a family of seven membrane-spanning nonselective cation channels that have been implicated in the nonvoltage-gated influx of calcium in response to G protein-coupled receptor signaling, receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, and depletion of internal calcium stores. TRPC3 expression is up-regulated in multiple rodent models of pathological cardiac hypertrophy, whereas TRPC5 expression is induced in failing human heart. We demonstrate that TRPC promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through activation of calcineurin and its downstream effector, the nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor. These results define a novel role for TRPC channels in the control of cardiac growth, and suggest that a TRPC-derived pool of calcium contributes to selective activation of calcineurin in diseased heart. PMID:16950785

  4. Aromatic fluorine compounds. VIII. Plant growth regulators and intermediates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finger, G.C.; Gortatowski, M.J.; Shiley, R.H.; White, R.H.

    1959-01-01

    The preparation and properties of 41 fluorophenoxyacetic acids, 4 fluorophenoxypropionic acids, 2 fluorobenzoic acids, several indole derivatives, and a number of miscellaneous compounds are described. Data are given for many intermediates such as new fluorinated phenols, anisoles, anilines and nitrobenzenes. Most of the subject compounds are related to a number of well-known herbicides or plant growth regulators such as 2,4-D, 2,4,5-T and others.

  5. Regulation of wound healing by growth factors and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sabine; Grose, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving blood clotting, inflammation, new tissue formation, and finally tissue remodeling. It is well described at the histological level, but the genes that regulate skin repair have only partially been identified. Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated varied, but in most cases beneficial, effects of exogenous growth factors on the healing process. However, the roles played by endogenous growth factors have remained largely unclear. Initial approaches at addressing this question focused on the expression analysis of various growth factors, cytokines, and their receptors in different wound models, with first functional data being obtained by applying neutralizing antibodies to wounds. During the past few years, the availability of genetically modified mice has allowed elucidation of the function of various genes in the healing process, and these studies have shed light onto the role of growth factors, cytokines, and their downstream effectors in wound repair. This review summarizes the results of expression studies that have been performed in rodents, pigs, and humans to localize growth factors and their receptors in skin wounds. Most importantly, we also report on genetic studies addressing the functions of endogenous growth factors in the wound repair process. PMID:12843410

  6. ERM proteins regulate growth cone responses to Sema3A

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C. David; Carcea, Ioana; McNickle, Daniel G.; Dickson, Tracey C.; Ge, Yongchao; Salton, Stephen R.J.; Benson, Deanna L.

    2008-01-01

    Axonal growth cones initiate and sustain directed growth in response to cues in their environment. A variety of events such as receptor internalization, kinase activation, and actin rearrangement can be stimulated by guidance cues and are essential for mediating targeted growth cone behavior. Surprisingly little is known about how such disparate actions are coordinated. Our data suggest that ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERMs), a family of highly homologous, multifunctional proteins may be able to coordinate growth cone responses to the guidance cue, Sema3A. We show that active ERMs concentrate asymmetrically in neocortical growth cones, are rapidly and transiently inactivated by Sema3A, and are required for Sema3A-mediated growth cone collapse and guidance. The FERM domain of active ERMs regulates internalization of the Sema3A receptor, Npn1 and its co-receptor, L1CAM, while the ERM C-terminal domain binds and caps F-actin. Our data support a model in which ERMs can coordinate membrane and actin dynamics in response to Sema3A. PMID:18651636

  7. LAT1 regulates growth of uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Xia Luo; Coon, John S; Su, Emily; Pearson, Elizabeth Kerry; Ping Yin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bulun, Serdar E

    2010-09-01

    L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and LAT2 were shown to encode system L, which mediates the Na(+)-independent transport of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. We demonstrated previously that LAT2 is a progesterone receptor target gene involved in leiomyoma growth. The role of LAT1 in the regulation of human uterine leiomyoma growth, however, remains unelucidated. We herein investigated the function of LAT1 and its progesterone-mediated regulation within human uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle (LSM) cells (n = 8) and tissues (n = 29). In vivo, LAT1 expression was higher in leiomyoma than in myometrial tissue. LAT1 knockdown augmented cell proliferation and viability. Treatment of LSM cells with RU486 markedly increased LAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels but decreased proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. L-type amino acid transporter 1 as a downstream target, however, did not entirely account for this antiproliferative effect of RU486 on LSM cells. Taken together, LAT1 may have a critical and complex role in regulating human leiomyoma cell growth. PMID:20601542

  8. RNAi screens in mice identify physiological regulators of oncogenic growth

    PubMed Central

    Beronja, Slobodan; Janki, Peter; Heller, Evan; Lien, Wen-Hui; Keyes, Brice; Oshimori, Naoki; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tissue growth is the multifaceted outcome of a cell’s intrinsic capabilities and its interactions with the surrounding environment. Decoding these complexities is essential for understanding human development and tumorigenesis. Here, we tackle this problem by carrying out the first genome-wide RNAi-mediated screens in mice. Focusing on skin development and oncogenic (HrasG12V-induced) hyperplasia, our screens uncover novel as well as anticipated regulators of embryonic epidermal growth. Among top oncogenic screen hits are Mllt6 and the Wnt effector β-catenin; they maintain HrasG12V-dependent hyperproliferation. We also expose β-catenin as an unanticipated antagonist of normal epidermal growth, functioning through Wnt-independent intercellular adhesion. Finally, we document physiological relevance to mouse and human cancers, thereby establishing the feasibility of in vivo mammalian genome-wide investigations to dissect tissue development and tumorigenesis. By documenting some oncogenic growth regulators, we pave the way for future investigations of other hits and raise promise for unearthing new targets for cancer therapies. PMID:23945586

  9. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita; Estevez, José M

    2016-07-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca(2+) and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  10. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita

    2016-01-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca2+) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca2+ and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  11. Nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, Katrina; Brooks, Gavin; Kaiser, Pete; Chen Hongying; Dove, Brian K.; Hiscox, Julian A.; E-mail: j.a.hiscox@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-07-08

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is located to the nucleolus. In tissue culture cells, the stability of nucleolin is related to the proliferation status of the cell. During development, rat cardiomyocytes proliferate actively with increases in the mass of the heart being due to both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The timing of this shift in the phenotype of the myocyte from one capable of undergoing hyperplasia to one that can grow only by hypertrophy occurs within 4 days of post-natal development. Thus, cardiomyocytes are an ideal model system in which to study the regulation of nucleolin during growth in vivo. Using Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan) we found that the amount of nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation during the development of the cardiomyocyte. However, in cells which had exited the cell cycle and were subsequently given a hypertrophic stimulus, nucleolin was regulated post-transcriptionally.

  12. Nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Katrina; Brooks, Gavin; Kaiser, Pete; Chen, Hongying; Dove, Brian K; Hiscox, Julian A

    2005-07-01

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is located to the nucleolus. In tissue culture cells, the stability of nucleolin is related to the proliferation status of the cell. During development, rat cardiomyocytes proliferate actively with increases in the mass of the heart being due to both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The timing of this shift in the phenotype of the myocyte from one capable of undergoing hyperplasia to one that can grow only by hypertrophy occurs within 4 days of post-natal development. Thus, cardiomyocytes are an ideal model system in which to study the regulation of nucleolin during growth in vivo. Using Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan) we found that the amount of nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation during the development of the cardiomyocyte. However, in cells which had exited the cell cycle and were subsequently given a hypertrophic stimulus, nucleolin was regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:15925566

  13. Autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from the myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury through the clearance of CLP36

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chao; Gu, Lei; Wang, Lina; Shang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiong; Wan, Junyi; Shi, Jian; Wang, Fang; Xu, Zhiliang; Ji, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of the death worldwide. An increasing number of studies have found that autophagy is involved in the progression or prevention of CVD. However, the precise mechanism of autophagy in CVD, especially the myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury (MI/R injury), is unclear and controversial. Here, we show that the cardiomyocyte-specific disruption of autophagy by conditional knockout of Atg7 leads to severe contractile dysfunction, myofibrillar disarray and vacuolar cardiomyocytes. A negative cytoskeleton organization regulator, CLP36, was found to be accumulated in Atg7-deficient cardiomyocytes. The cardiomyocyte-specific knockout of Atg7 aggravates the MI/R injury with cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, myofibrillar disarray and severe cardiac fibrosis, most probably due to CLP36 accumulation in cardiomyocytes. Altogether, this work reveals autophagy may protect cardiomyocytes from the MI/R injury through the clearance of CLP36, and these findings define a novel relationship between autophagy and the regulation of stress fibre in heart. PMID:27512143

  14. Influence of growth regulators on plant growth, yield, and skin color of specialty potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2,4-D has been used since the 1950’s to enhance color in red-skinned potatoes, but there is little research on the potential use of other plant growth regulators to improve tuber skin color in the wide range of specialty potatoes now available on the market. Field trials conducted at Parma, ID in 20...

  15. Measuring fast calcium fluxes in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes have multiple Ca(2+) fluxes of varying duration that work together to optimize function (1,2). Changes in Ca(2+) activity in response to extracellular agents is predominantly regulated by the phospholipase Cβ- Gα(q;) pathway localized on the plasma membrane which is stimulated by agents such as acetylcholine (3,4). We have recently found that plasma membrane protein domains called caveolae(5,6) can entrap activated Gα(q;)(7). This entrapment has the effect of stabilizing the activated state of Gα(q;) and resulting in prolonged Ca(2+) signals in cardiomyocytes and other cell types(8). We uncovered this surprising result by measuring dynamic calcium responses on a fast scale in living cardiomyocytes. Briefly, cells are loaded with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. In our studies, we used Ca(2+) Green (Invitrogen, Inc.) which exhibits an increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon binding of calcium ions. The fluorescence intensity is then recorded for using a line-scan mode of a laser scanning confocal microscope. This method allows rapid acquisition of the time course of fluorescence intensity in pixels along a selected line, producing several hundreds of time traces on the microsecond time scale. These very fast traces are transferred into excel and then into Sigmaplot for analysis, and are compared to traces obtained for electronic noise, free dye, and other controls. To dissect Ca(2+) responses of different flux rates, we performed a histogram analysis that binned pixel intensities with time. Binning allows us to group over 500 traces of scans and visualize the compiled results spatially and temporally on a single plot. Thus, the slow Ca(2+) waves that are difficult to discern when the scans are overlaid due to different peak placement and noise, can be readily seen in the binned histograms. Very fast fluxes in the time scale of the measurement show a narrow distribution of intensities in the very short time bins whereas longer Ca(2+) waves

  16. HMGCR positively regulated the growth and migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihua; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Chenzhi; Liu, Chao; Huang, Yongkai; Han, Deqing; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-01-15

    The metabolic program of cancer cells is significant different from the normal cells, which makes it possible to develop novel strategies targeting cancer cells. Mevalonate pathway and its rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) have shown important roles in the progression of several cancer types. However, their roles in glioblastoma cells remain unknown. In this study, up-regulation of HMGCR in the clinical glioblastoma samples was observed. Forced expression of HMGCR promoted the growth and migration of U251 and U373 cells, while knocking down the expression of HMGCR inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that HMGCR positively regulated the expression of TAZ, an important mediator of Hippo pathway, and the downstream target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), suggesting HMGCR might activate Hippo pathway in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the oncogenic roles of HMGCR in glioblastoma cells and HMGCR might be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:26432005

  17. FAK Forms a Complex with MEF2 to Couple Biomechanical Signaling to Transcription in Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Alisson Campos; Pereira, Ana Helena Macedo; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Consonni, Silvio Roberto; Rocha de Oliveira, Renata; Bajgelman, Marcio Chain; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes; Franchini, Kleber Gomes

    2016-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has emerged as a mediator of mechanotransduction in cardiomyocytes, regulating gene expression during hypertrophic remodeling. However, how FAK signaling is relayed onward to the nucleus is unclear. Here, we show that FAK interacts with and regulates myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), a master cardiac transcriptional regulator. In cardiomyocytes exposed to biomechanical stimulation, FAK accumulates in the nucleus, binds to and upregulates the transcriptional activity of MEF2 through an interaction with the FAK focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain. In the crystal structure (2.9 Å resolution), FAT binds to a stably folded groove in the MEF2 dimer, known to interact with regulatory cofactors. FAK cooperates with MEF2 to enhance the expression of Jun in cardiomyocytes, an important component of hypertrophic response to mechanical stress. These findings underscore a connection between the mechanotransduction involving FAK and transcriptional regulation by MEF2, with potential relevance to the pathogenesis of cardiac disease. PMID:27427476

  18. Hedgehog signaling in prostate epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Ching; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction, and is also an organ prone to diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. The prostate consists of ducts with an inner layer of epithelium surrounded by stroma. Reciprocal signaling between these two cell compartments is instrumental to normal prostatic development, homeostasis, regeneration, as well as tumor formation. Hedgehog (HH) signaling is a master regulator in numerous developmental processes. In many organs, HH plays a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal signaling that regulates organ growth and tissue differentiation, and abnormal HH signaling has been implicated in the progression of various epithelial carcinomas. In this review, we focus on recent studies exploring the multipotency of endogenous postnatal and adult epithelial and stromal stem cells and studies addressing the role of HH in prostate development and cancer. We discuss the implications of the results for a new understanding of prostate development and disease. Insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation should provide a basis for devising innovative therapies to combat diseases of the prostate. PMID:25641695

  19. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Enhances Endogenous Cardiomyocyte Regeneration after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Masato; Nagai, Toshio; Takahashi, Toshinao; Liu, Mei Lan; Kondou, Naomichi; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Sashida, Goro; Iwama, Atsushi; Komuro, Issei; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac stem cells or precursor cells regenerate cardiomyocytes; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. We generated CreLacZ mice in which more than 99.9% of the cardiomyocytes in the left ventricular field were positive for 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactoside (X-gal) staining immediately after tamoxifen injection. Three months after myocardial infarction (MI), the MI mice had more X-gal-negative (newly generated) cells than the control mice (3.04 ± 0.38/mm2, MI; 0.47 ± 0.16/mm2, sham; p < 0.05). The cardiac side population (CSP) cell fraction contained label-retaining cells, which differentiated into X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes after MI. We injected a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-expression construct at the time of MI and identified a significant functional improvement in the LIF-treated group. At 1 month after MI, in the MI border and scar area, the LIF-injected mice had 31.41 ± 5.83 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2, whereas the control mice had 12.34 ± 2.56 X-gal-negative cardiomyocytes/mm2 (p < 0.05). Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyurinide (EdU) administration after MI, the percentages of EdU-positive CSP cells in the LIF-treated and control mice were 29.4 ± 2.7% and 10.6 ± 3.7%, respectively, which suggests that LIF influenced CSP proliferation. Moreover, LIF activated the Janus kinase (JAK)signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK)extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathways in CSPs in vivo and in vitro. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-bone marrow-chimeric CreLacZ mouse results indicated that LIF did not stimulate cardiogenesis via circulating bone marrow-derived cells during the 4 weeks following MI. Thus, LIF stimulates, in part, stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte regeneration by activating cardiac stem or precursor cells. This approach may represent a novel therapeutic

  20. Nitrate-Regulated Glutaredoxins Control Arabidopsis Primary Root Growth.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Kurt; Walters, Laura A; Cooper, Andrew M; Olvera, Jocelyn G; Rosas, Miguel A; Rasmusson, Allan G; Escobar, Matthew A

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is an essential soil nutrient for plants, and lack of nitrogen commonly limits plant growth. Soil nitrogen is typically available to plants in two inorganic forms: nitrate and ammonium. To better understand how nitrate and ammonium differentially affect plant metabolism and development, we performed transcriptional profiling of the shoots of ammonium-supplied and nitrate-supplied Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Seven genes encoding class III glutaredoxins were found to be strongly and specifically induced by nitrate. RNA silencing of four of these glutaredoxin genes (AtGRXS3/4/5/8) resulted in plants with increased primary root length (approximately 25% longer than the wild type) and decreased sensitivity to nitrate-mediated inhibition of primary root growth. Increased primary root growth is also a well-characterized phenotype of many cytokinin-deficient plant lines. We determined that nitrate induction of glutaredoxin gene expression was dependent upon cytokinin signaling and that cytokinins could activate glutaredoxin gene expression independent of plant nitrate status. In addition, crosses between "long-root" cytokinin-deficient plants and "long-root" glutaredoxin-silenced plants generated hybrids that displayed no further increase in primary root length (i.e. epistasis). Collectively, these findings suggest that AtGRXS3/4/5/8 operate downstream of cytokinins in a signal transduction pathway that negatively regulates plant primary root growth in response to nitrate. This pathway could allow Arabidopsis to actively discriminate between different nitrogen sources in the soil, with the preferred nitrogen source, nitrate, acting to suppress primary root growth (vertical dimension) in concert with its well-characterized stimulatory effect on lateral root growth (horizontal dimension). PMID:26662603

  1. Host metabolism regulates intracellular growth of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Engel, Juan C; Jacobi, David; Lee, Chih-Hao; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2013-01-16

    Metabolic coupling of intracellular pathogens with host cells is essential for successful colonization of the host. Establishment of intracellular infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi leads to the development of human Chagas' disease, yet the functional contributions of the host cell toward the infection process remain poorly characterized. Here, a genome-scale functional screen identified interconnected metabolic networks centered around host energy production, nucleotide metabolism, pteridine biosynthesis, and fatty acid oxidation as key processes that fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Additionally, the host kinase Akt, which plays essential roles in various cellular processes, was critical for parasite replication. Targeted perturbations in these host metabolic pathways or Akt-dependent signaling pathways modulated the parasite's replicative capacity, highlighting the adaptability of this intracellular pathogen to changing conditions in the host. These findings identify key cellular process regulating intracellular T. cruzi growth and illuminate the potential to leverage host pathways to limit T. cruzi infection. PMID:23332160

  2. Host metabolism regulates intracellular growth of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Kacey L.; Engel, Juan C.; Jacobi, David; Lee, Chih-Hao; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolic coupling of intracellular pathogens with host cells is essential for successful colonization of the host. Establishment of intracellular infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi leads to the development of human Chagas disease, yet the functional contributions of the host cell toward the infection process remain poorly characterized. Here, a genome-scale functional screen identified interconnected metabolic networks centered around host energy production, nucleotide metabolism, pteridine biosynthesis, and fatty acid oxidation as key processes that fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Additionally, the host kinase Akt, which plays essential roles in various cellular processes, was critical for parasite replication. Targeted perturbations in these host metabolic pathways or Akt-dependent signaling pathways modulated the parasite’s replicative capacity, highlighting the adaptability of this intracellular pathogen to changing conditions in the host. These findings identify key cellular process regulating intracellular T. cruzi growth and illuminate the potential to leverage host pathways to limit T. cruzi infection. PMID:23332160

  3. Defining human insulin-like growth factor I gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Aditi; Alzhanov, Damir; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays an essential role in controlling somatic growth and in regulating multiple physiological processes in humans and other species. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a conserved, secreted 70-amino acid peptide, is a critical mediator of many of the biological effects of GH. Previous studies have demonstrated that GH rapidly and potently promotes IGF-I gene expression in rodents and in some other mammals through the transcription factor STAT5b, leading to accumulation of IGF-I mRNAs and production of IGF-I. Despite this progress, very little is known about how GH or other trophic factors control human IGF1 gene expression, in large part because of the absence of any cellular model systems that robustly express IGF-I. Here, we have addressed mechanisms of regulation of human IGF-I by GH after generating cells in which the IGF1 chromosomal locus has been incorporated into a mouse cell line. Using this model, we found that physiological levels of GH rapidly stimulate human IGF1 gene transcription and identify several potential transcriptional enhancers in chromatin that bind STAT5b in a GH-regulated way. Each of the putative enhancers also activates a human IGF1 gene promoter in reconstitution experiments in the presence of the GH receptor, STAT5b, and GH. Thus we have developed a novel experimental platform that now may be used to determine how human IGF1 gene expression is controlled under different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27406741

  4. Mammalian target of rapamycin is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and heart development in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong; Deng, Changyan; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • mTOR is a critical regulator of many biological processes yet its function in heart is not well understood. • MCK-Cre/Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice were established to delete Mtor in cardiomyocytes. • The mTOR-mKO mice developed normally but die prematurely within 5 weeks after birth due to heart disease. • The mTOR-mKO mice had dilated myocardium and increased cell death. • mTOR-mKO hearts had reduced expression of metabolic genes and activation of mTOR target proteins. - Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive knockout of Mtor leads to embryonic lethality, the in vivo function of mTOR in perinatal development and postnatal growth of heart is not well defined. In this study, we established a muscle-specific mTOR conditional knockout mouse model (mTOR-mKO) by crossing MCK-Cre and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Although the mTOR-mKO mice survived embryonic and perinatal development, they exhibited severe postnatal growth retardation, cardiac muscle pathology and premature death. At the cellular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice had fewer cardiomyocytes due to apoptosis and necrosis, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy. At the molecular level, the cardiac muscle of mTOR-mKO mice expressed lower levels of fatty acid oxidation and glycolysis related genes compared to the WT littermates. In addition, the mTOR-mKO cardiac muscle had reduced Myh6 but elevated Myh7 expression, indicating cardiac muscle degeneration. Furthermore, deletion of Mtor dramatically decreased the phosphorylation of S6 and AKT, two key targets downstream of mTORC1 and mTORC2 mediating the normal function of mTOR. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for cardiomyocyte survival and cardiac muscle function.

  5. Towards regenerating the mammalian heart: challenges in evaluating experimentally induced adult mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zebrowski, David C; Becker, Robert; Engel, Felix B

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in research aimed at regenerating the mammalian heart by promoting endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation. Despite many encouraging successes, it remains unclear if we are any closer to achieving levels of mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation for regeneration as seen during zebrafish regeneration. Furthermore, current cardiac regenerative approaches do not clarify whether the induced cardiomyocyte proliferation is an epiphenomena or responsible for the observed improvement in cardiac function. Moreover, due to the lack of standardized protocols to determine cardiomyocyte proliferation in vivo, it remains unclear if one mammalian regenerative factor is more effective than another. Here, we discuss current methods to identify and evaluate factors for the induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation and challenges therein. Addressing challenges in evaluating adult cardiomyocyte proliferation will assist in determining 1) which regenerative factors should be pursued in large animal studies; 2) if a particular level of cell cycle regulation presents a better therapeutic target than another (e.g., mitogenic receptors vs. cyclins); and 3) which combinatorial approaches offer the greatest likelihood of success. As more and more regenerative studies come to pass, progress will require a system that not only can evaluate efficacy in an objective manner but can also consolidate observations in a meaningful way. PMID:26921436

  6. [Preliminary investigation into the mechanism of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by visfatin].

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Liao, Yanbiao; Lu, Lihui; Lu, Lihui; Feng, Jun; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of visfatin on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes were exposed to visfatin at different concentrations for different periods of time, and the markers of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were detected. Moreover, pravastatin, the inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) or thapsigargin, an ERS agonist was used respectively to pre-treat the cells before visfatin stimulation. F-actin staining was performed to measure the cell surface change. The mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and ERS markers including glucose-regulated protein 78(GRP78), C/EPB homologous protein (CHOP) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) were assessed by real time RT-PCR. The change of protein level of GRP78 and CHOP was detected by Western blot. The experimental data demonstrated that exposure to 100 or 150 ng/mL concentrations of visfatin for 24 h, or 100 ng/mL of visfatin for 24 or 48 h, significantly increased the expression of markers for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Visfatin stimulation provoked ERS in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, pre-treatment with pravastatin partially inhibited the visfatin-induced mRNA expression of ANP and BNP in H9c2 cells, whereas thapsigargin promoted the visfatin-induced expression of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy markers. The results suggest that visfatin might induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via ERS -dependent pathways. PMID:25039146

  7. Evidence for Cardiomyocyte Renewal in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, O; Bhardwaj, R D; Bernard, S; Zdunek, S; Barnabe-Heider, F; Walsh, S; Zupicich, J; Alkass, K; Buchholz, B A; Druid, H; Jovinge, S; Frisen, J

    2008-10-14

    It has been difficult to establish whether we are limited to the heart muscle cells we are born with or if cardiomyocytes are generated also later in life. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, into DNA to establish the age of cardiomyocytes in humans. We report that cardiomyocytes renew, with a gradual decrease from 1% turning over annually at the age of 20 to 0.3% at the age of 75. Less than 50% of cardiomyocytes are exchanged during a normal lifespan. The capacity to generate cardiomyocytes in the adult human heart suggests that it may be rational to work towards the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to stimulate this process in cardiac pathologies.

  8. MEPE is a novel regulator of growth plate cartilage mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Staines, K.A.; Mackenzie, N.C.W.; Clarkin, C.E.; Zelenchuk, L.; Rowe, P.S.; MacRae, V.E.; Farquharson, C.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) belongs to the SIBLING protein family which play key roles in biomineralization. Although the growth plates of MEPE-overexpressing mice display severe morphological disruption, the expression and function of MEPE in growth plate matrix mineralization remains largely undefined. Here we show MEPE and its cleavage product, the acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM) peptide, to be localised to the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. We also demonstrate that the phosphorylated (p)ASARM peptide inhibits ATDC5 chondrocyte matrix mineralization. Stable MEPE-overexpressing ATDC5 cells also had significantly reduced matrix mineralization in comparison to the control cells. Interestingly, we show that the addition of the non-phosphorylated (np)ASARM peptide promoted mineralization in the ATDC5 cells. The peptides and the overexpression of MEPE did not affect the differentiation of the ATDC5 cells. For a more physiologically relevant model, we utilized the metatarsal organ culture model. We show the pASARM peptide to inhibit mineralization at two stages of development, as shown by histological and μCT analysis. Like in the ATDC5 cells, the peptides did not affect the differentiation of the metatarsals indicating that the effects seen on mineralization are direct, as is additionally confirmed by no change in alkaline phosphatase activity or mRNA expression. In the metatarsal organ cultures, the pASARM peptide also reduced endothelial cell markers and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression. Taken together these results show MEPE to be an important regulator of growth plate chondrocyte matrix mineralization through its cleavage to an ASARM peptide. PMID:22766095

  9. ANG II promotes IGF-IIR expression and cardiomyocyte apoptosis by inhibiting HSF1 via JNK activation and SIRT1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C-Y; Kuo, W-W; Yeh, Y-L; Ho, T-J; Lin, J-Y; Lin, D-Y; Chu, C-H; Tsai, F-J; Tsai, C-H; Huang, C-Y

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis are major characteristics of early-stage heart failure. Our previous studies found that the activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor II (IGF-IIR) signaling was critical for hypertensive angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanism by which ANG II regulates IGF-IIR in heart cells remains elusive. In this study, we found that ANG II activated its downstream kinase JNK to increase IGF-IIR expression through the ANG II receptor angiotensin type 1 receptor. JNK activation subsequently led to sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) degradation via the proteasome, thus preventing SIRT1 from deacetylating heat-shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). The resulting increase in the acetylation of HSF1 impaired its ability to bind to the IGF-IIR promoter region (nt −748 to −585). HSF1 protected cardiomyocytes by acting as a repressor of IGF-IIR gene expression, and ANG II diminished this HSF1-mediated repression through enhanced acetylation, thus activating the IGF-IIR apoptosis pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that HSF1 represses IGF-IIR gene expression to protect cardiomyocytes. ANG II activates JNK to degrade SIRT1, resulting in HSF1 acetylation, which induces IGF-IIR expression and eventually results in cardiac hypertrophy and apoptosis. HSF1 could be a valuable target for developing treatments for cardiac diseases in hypertensive patients. PMID:24786827

  10. Economic growth and energy regulation in the environmental Kuznets curve.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Daniel Balsalobre; Álvarez-Herranz, Agustín

    2016-08-01

    This study establishes the existence of a pattern of behavior, between economic growth and environmental degradation, consistent with the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) hypothesis for 17 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries between 1990 and 2012. Based on this EKC pattern, it shows that energy regulation measures help reduce per capita greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To validate this hypothesis, we also add the explanatory variables: renewable energy promotion, energy innovation processes, and the suppression effect of income level on the contribution of renewable energy sources to total energy consumption. It aims to be a tool for decision-making regarding energy policy. This paper provides a two-stage econometric analysis of instrumental variables with the aim of correcting the existence of endogeneity in the variable GDP per capita, verifying that the instrumental variables used in this research are appropriate for our aim. To this end, it first makes a methodological contribution before incorporating additional variables associated with environmental air pollution into the EKC hypothesis and showing how they positively affect the explanation of the correction in the GHG emission levels. This study concludes that air pollution will not disappear on its own as economic growth increases. Therefore, it is necessary to promote energy regulation measures to reduce environmental pollution. PMID:27164892

  11. Genetic analysis of growth-regulator-induced parthenocarpy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vivian-Smith, A; Koltunow, A M

    1999-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, seedless silique development or parthenocarpy can be induced by the application of various plant growth regulators (PGRs) to unfertilized pistils. Ecotype-specific responses were observed in the Arabidopsis ecotypes Columbia and Landsberg relative to the type of PGR and level applied. The parthenocarpic response was greatest in ecotype Landsberg, and comparisons of fruit growth and morphology were studied primarily in this ecotype. Gibberellic acid application (10 micromol pistil(-1)) caused development similar to that in pollinated pistils, while benzyladenine (1 micromol pistil(-1)) and naphthylacetic acid (10 micromol pistil(-1)) treatment produced shorter siliques. Naphthylacetic acid primarily modified mesocarp cell expansion. Arabidopsis mutants were employed to examine potential dependencies on gibberellin biosynthesis (ga1-3, ga4-1, and ga5-1) and perception (spy-4 and gai) during parthenocarpic silique development. Emasculated spy-4 pistils were neither obviously parthenocarpic nor deficient in PGR perception. By contrast, emasculated gai mutants did not produce parthenocarpic siliques following gibberellic acid application, but silique development occurred following pollination or application of auxin and cytokinin. Pollinated gai siliques had decreased cell numbers and morphologically resembled auxin-induced parthenocarpic siliques. This shows that a number of independent and possibly redundant pathways can direct hormone-induced parthenocarpy, and that endogenous gibberellins play a role in regulating cell expansion and promoting cell division in carpels. PMID:10517835

  12. GLP1 protects cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis via Akt/GSK3b/b-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Ying; Zhu, Huazhang; Liang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaosong; Li, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Activation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes by saturated palmitic acids contributes to cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Beta-catenin (b-catenin) is a transcriptional regulator of several genes involved in survival/anti-apoptosis. However, its role in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unclear. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) has been shown to exhibit potential cardioprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the role of b-catenin signalling in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effects of GLP1 on palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Exposure of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to palmitate increased the fatty acid transporter CD36-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, decreased accumulation and nuclear translocation of active b-catenin, and reduced expression of b-catenin target protein survivin and BCL2. These detrimental effects of palmitate were significantly attenuated by GLP1 co-treatment. However, the anti-apoptotic effects of GLP1 were markedly abolished when b-catenin was silenced with a specific short hairpin RNA. Furthermore, analysis of the upstream molecules and mechanisms responsible for GLP1-associated cardiac protection revealed that GLP1 restored the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase-3b (GSK3b) in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes. In contrast, inhibition of Akt with an Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206 or blockade of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) with a competitive antagonist exendin-(9–39) significantly abrogated the GLP1-mediated activation of GSK3b/b-catenin signalling, leading to increased apoptosis in palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrated for the first time that the attenuated b-catenin signalling may contribute to palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while GLP1 can protect cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis through

  13. Erdr1 Suppresses Murine Melanoma Growth via Regulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyun; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, one of the aggressive cancers, is known to be resistant to chemotherapy. Because of its aggressive nature, effectively inducing apoptosis is necessary to treat melanoma. Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be a stress-related survival factor exhibiting anti-cancer effects in several cancers. However, little is known about the functions and underlying mechanisms of Erdr1 so far. To demonstrate the effect of Erdr1 in melanoma apoptosis, recombinant murine Erdr1 was injected into mice implanted with B16F10 melanoma cells. In vivo tumor growth was significantly inhibited in mice injected with Erdr1 compared to the control. In addition, the tumor from Erdr1-injected mice showed an increased level of apoptosis. Accordingly, apoptosis-regulating factors including anti-apoptotic marker Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic marker Bax in the tumor tissues were examined. As expected, the decreased level of Bcl-2 and increased level of Bax were detected in tumors within the mice injected with Erdr1. Based on the in vivo study, the role of Erdr1 in tumor apoptosis was further tested by incubating it with cells of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. Erdr1-induced apoptosis in B16F10 cells was observed. Additionally, Erdr1 downregulated STAT3 activity, inhibiting apoptosis via regulation of the Bcl-2 family. Overall, data demonstrate that Erdr1 induced murine melanoma apoptosis through the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax. These findings suggest that Erdr1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in melanoma. PMID:26784177

  14. Mkk4 Is a Negative Regulator of the Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Signaling Associated With Atrial Remodeling and Arrhythmogenesis With Age

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Laura; Jin, Jiawei; Shen, Weijin; Tsui, Hoyee; Shi, Ying; Wang, Yanwen; Zhang, Yanmin; Hao, Guoliang; Wu, Jingjing; Chen, Si; Fraser, James A.; Dong, Nianguo; Christoffels, Vincent; Ravens, Ursula; Huang, Christopher L.‐H.; Zhang, Henggui; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Wang, Xin; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF), often associated with structural, fibrotic change in cardiac tissues involving regulatory signaling mediators, becomes increasingly common with age. In the present study, we explored the role of mitogen‐activated protein kinase kinase 4 (Mkk4), a critical component of the stress‐activated mitogen‐activated protein kinase family, in age‐associated AF. Methods and Results We developed a novel mouse model with a selective inactivation of atrial cardiomyocyte Mkk4 (Mkk4ACKO). We characterized and compared electrophysiological, histological, and molecular features of young (3‐ to 4‐month), adult (6‐month), and old (1‐year) Mkk4ACKO mice with age‐matched control littermates (Mkk4F/F). Aging Mkk4ACKO mice were more susceptible to atrial tachyarrhythmias than the corresponding Mkk4F/F mice, showing characteristic slow and dispersed atrial conduction, for which modeling studies demonstrated potential arrhythmic effects. These differences paralleled increased interstitial fibrosis, upregulated transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF‐β1) signaling and dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinases in Mkk4ACKO, compared to Mkk4F/F, atria. Mkk4 inactivation increased the sensitivity of cultured cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II–induced activation of TGF‐β1 signaling. This, in turn, enhanced expression of profibrotic molecules in cultured cardiac fibroblasts, suggesting cross‐talk between these two cell types in profibrotic signaling. Finally, human atrial tissues in AF showed a Mkk4 downregulation associated with increased production of profibrotic molecules, compared to findings in tissue from control subjects in sinus rhythm. Conclusions These findings together demonstrate, for the first time, that Mkk4 is a negative regulator of the TGF‐β1 signaling associated with atrial remodeling and arrhythmogenesis with age, establishing Mkk4 as a new potential therapeutic target for treating AF. PMID:24721794

  15. Sulf1A and HGF regulate satellite-cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Roop; Hitchins, Laura; Fletcher, Fenella; Dhoot, Gurtej K.

    2010-01-01

    The role of Sulf1A, sulfation and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in satellite-cell growth was examined in an in vitro model of dissociated whole skeletal muscle fibres. Pax7-positive quiescent satellite cells express little or no Sulf1A but show rapid re-expression in regenerating myoblasts and myotubes, similar to embryonic muscle and in vitro satellite cells preceding asynchronous MyoD activation. Once activated, Sulf1A and MyoD re-expression persists up to 72 hours in most satellite cells under normal culture conditions and following moderate changes in sulfation, whereas Sulf1A neutralisation by antibodies not only enhances satellite-cell proliferation but also downregulates MyoD and Pax7 expression in a large proportion of the satellite cells. The HGF exposure also induces similar but even more pronounced changes characterised by variable sulfation levels and rapid downregulation of MyoD and Pax7 without myogenin activation in a sub-set of cells. This Pax7-MyoD-myogenin-negative sub-population expresses Sulf1A and Myf5. The transfer of all such satellite-cell progenies onto gelatin-coated-substratum re-activates MyoD and Pax7 gene expression in all cells, thus detecting a distinct sub-population of satellite cells. We conclude that HGF and fine-tuned sulfation levels are major contributory factors controlling satellite-cell growth by regulating the relative activities of actively proliferating and differentiating cells. PMID:20442248

  16. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  17. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  18. Glucocorticoids promote structural and functional maturation of foetal cardiomyocytes: a role for PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Rog-Zielinska, E A; Craig, M-A; Manning, J R; Richardson, R V; Gowans, G J; Dunbar, D R; Gharbi, K; Kenyon, C J; Holmes, M C; Hardie, D G; Smith, G L; Chapman, K E

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid levels rise dramatically in late gestation to mature foetal organs in readiness for postnatal life. Immature heart function may compromise survival. Cardiomyocyte glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is required for the structural and functional maturation of the foetal heart in vivo, yet the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we asked if GR activation in foetal cardiomyocytes in vitro elicits similar maturational changes. We show that physiologically relevant glucocorticoid levels improve contractility of primary-mouse-foetal cardiomyocytes, promote Z-disc assembly and the appearance of mature myofibrils, and increase mitochondrial activity. Genes induced in vitro mimic those induced in vivo and include PGC-1α, a critical regulator of cardiac mitochondrial capacity. SiRNA-mediated abrogation of the glucocorticoid induction of PGC-1α in vitro abolished the effect of glucocorticoid on myofibril structure and mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Using RNA sequencing we identified a number of transcriptional regulators, including PGC-1α, induced as primary targets of GR in foetal cardiomyocytes. These data demonstrate that PGC-1α is a key mediator of glucocorticoid-induced maturation of foetal cardiomyocyte structure and identify other candidate transcriptional regulators that may play critical roles in the transition of the foetal to neonatal heart. PMID:25361084

  19. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    de Brot, Simone; Ntekim, Atara; Cardenas, Ryan; James, Victoria; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Heery, David M; Bates, David O; Ødum, Niels; Persson, Jenny L; Mongan, Nigel P

    2015-06-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy affecting men in the western world. Although radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy can successfully treat PCa in the majority of patients, up to ~30% will experience local recurrence or metastatic disease. Prostate carcinogenesis and progression is typically an androgen-dependent process. For this reason, therapies for recurrent PCa target androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor function. Such androgen deprivation therapies (ADT) are effective initially, but the duration of response is typically ≤24 months. Although ADT and taxane-based chemotherapy have delivered survival benefits, metastatic PCa remains incurable. Therefore, it is essential to establish the cellular and molecular mechanisms that enable localized PCas to invade and disseminate. It has long been accepted that metastases require angiogenesis. In the present review, we examine the essential role for angiogenesis in PCa metastases, and we focus in particular on the current understanding of the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in localized and metastatic PCa. We highlight recent advances in understanding the role of VEGF in regulating the interaction of cancer cells with tumor-associated immune cells during the metastatic process of PCa. We summarize the established mechanisms of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of VEGF in PCa cells and outline the molecular insights obtained from preclinical animal models of PCa. Finally, we summarize the current state of anti-angiogenesis therapies for PCa and consider how existing therapies impact VEGF signaling. PMID:25870249

  20. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  1. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b6f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  2. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  3. Juvenile hormone regulates extreme mandible growth in male stag beetles.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Cornette, Richard; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Okada, Yasukazu; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Miura, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The morphological diversity of insects is one of the most striking phenomena in biology. Evolutionary modifications to the relative sizes of body parts, including the evolution of traits with exaggerated proportions, are responsible for a vast range of body forms. Remarkable examples of an insect trait with exaggerated proportions are the mandibular weapons of stag beetles. Male stag beetles possess extremely enlarged mandibles which they use in combat with rival males over females. As with other sexually selected traits, stag beetle mandibles vary widely in size among males, and this variable growth results from differential larval nutrition. However, the mechanisms responsible for coupling nutrition with growth of stag beetle mandibles (or indeed any insect structure) remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that during the development of male stag beetles (Cyclommatus metallifer), juvenile hormone (JH) titers are correlated with the extreme growth of an exaggerated weapon of sexual selection. We then investigate the putative role of JH in the development of the nutritionally-dependent, phenotypically plastic mandibles, by increasing hemolymph titers of JH with application of the JH analog fenoxycarb during larval and prepupal developmental periods. Increased JH signaling during the early prepupal period increased the proportional size of body parts, and this was especially pronounced in male mandibles, enhancing the exaggerated size of this trait. The direction of this response is consistent with the measured JH titers during this same period. Combined, our results support a role for JH in the nutrition-dependent regulation of extreme mandible growth in this species. In addition, they illuminate mechanisms underlying the evolution of trait proportion, the most salient feature of the evolutionary diversification of the insects. PMID:21731659

  4. Effect of biophysical cues on reprogramming to cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Yu, Pengzhi; Srivastava, Deepak; Li, Song

    2016-10-01

    Reprogramming of fibroblasts to cardiomyocytes offers exciting potential in cell therapy and regenerative medicine, but has low efficiency. We hypothesize that physical cues may positively affect the reprogramming process, and studied the effects of periodic mechanical stretch, substrate stiffness and microgrooved substrate on reprogramming yield. Subjecting reprogramming fibroblasts to periodic mechanical stretch and different substrate stiffness did not improve reprogramming yield. On the other hand, culturing the cells on microgrooved substrate enhanced the expression of cardiomyocyte genes by day 2 and improved the yield of partially reprogrammed cells at day 10. By combining microgrooved substrate with an existing optimized culture protocol, yield of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes with striated cardiac troponin T staining and spontaneous contractile activity was increased. We identified the regulation of Mkl1 activity as a new mechanism by which microgroove can affect reprogramming. Biochemical approach could only partially recapitulate the effect of microgroove. Microgroove demonstrated an additional effect of enhancing organization of sarcomeric structure, which could not be recapitulated by biochemical approach. This study provides insights into new mechanisms by which topographical cues can affect cellular reprogramming. PMID:27376554

  5. Cardiomyocyte specific deletion of PP2A causes cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Fang, Chao; Xu, Di; Xu, Yidan; Fu, Heling; Li, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common pathological alteration in heart disease, which has been reported to be connected with serine/threonine protein phosphatases that control the dephosphorylation of a variety of cardiac proteins. Herein, we generated protein phosphatase type 2A knockout expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase protein fused to two mutant estrogen-receptor ligand-binding domains (MerCreMer) under the control of the a-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac function of mice was determined by echocardiography. Decrease in PP2A activity leads to increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Loss of PP2ACα leads to the heart failure, including the changes of EF, FS, LV, ANP and BNP. On the molecular level, knockout mice shows increased expression of B55a and B56e at 60 days after tamoxifen injection. Additionally, the regulation of the Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway is severely disturbed in knockout mice. In conclusion, cardiomyocyte specific deletion of PP2A gene causes the cardiac hypertrophy. We will use the knockout mice to generate a type of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy mouse model with myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27186301

  6. Protein Quality Control and Degradation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejun; Su, Huabo; Ranek, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The heart is constantly under stress and cardiomyocytes face enormous challenges to correctly fold nascent polypeptides and keep mature proteins from denaturing. To meet the challenge, cardiomyocytes have developed multi-layered protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms which are carried out primarily by chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system mediated proteolysis. Autophagy may also participate in PQC in cardiomyocytes, especially under pathological conditions. Cardiac PQC often becomes inadequate in heart disease, which may play an important role in the development of congestive heart failure. PMID:18495153

  7. Chondroitin-4-sulfation negatively regulates axonal guidance and growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; McCann, Thomas E.; Unsworth, Edward; Goldsmith, Paul; Yu, Zu-Xi; Tan, Fei; Santiago, Lizzie; Mills, Edward M.; Wang, Yu; Symes, Aviva J.; Geller, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains endow extracellular matrix proteoglycans with diversity and complexity based upon the length, composition, and charge distribution of the polysaccharide chain. Using cultured primary neurons, we show that specific sulfation in the GAG chains of chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediates neuronal guidance cues and axonal growth inhibition. Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS-A), but not chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS-C), exhibits a strong negative guidance cue to mouse cerebellar granule neurons. Enzymatic and gene-based manipulations of 4-sulfation in the GAG side chains alter their ability to direct growing axons. Furthermore, 4-sulfated CS GAG chains are rapidly and significantly increased in regions that do not support axonal regeneration proximal to spinal cord lesions in mice. Thus, our findings provide the evidence showing that specific sulfation along the carbohydrate backbone carries instructions to regulate neuronal function. PMID:18768934

  8. Environmental and toxicological aspects of insect growth regulators.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J E

    1976-01-01

    Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are a class of new chemicals that interfere with maturation and reproduction in insects. Proposed hypotheses on the biochemical mechanism of action are presented herein. The environmental aspects as metabolism in soils, plants, insects, and animals suggest strongly that these chemicals undergo rapid degradation and metabolism to innocuous metabolites. The toxicological properties determined for registration of the IGR methoprene, isopropyl (E,E)-11-methoxy-3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4-dodecadienoate, reflected no significant effects against any of the species tested. Toxicological evaluations in swine, sheep, hamsters, rats, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, and cattle revealed no clinical signs of toxicosis. Additionally, teratological studies in swine, sheep, hamsters, rats, and rabbits also resulted in no observable effects in the animals at the levels administered. PMID:789059

  9. Nodal and Lefty signaling regulates the growth of pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-Qing; Sterling, Lori; Stotland, Aleksandr; Hua, Hong; Kritzik, Marcie; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Nodal and its antagonist, Lefty, are important mediators specifying the laterality of the organs during embryogenesis. Nodal signals through activin receptors in the presence of its co-receptor, Cripto. In the present study, we investigated the possible roles of Nodal and Lefty signaling during islet development and regeneration. We found that both Nodal and Lefty are expressed in the pancreas during embryogenesis and islet regeneration. In vitro studies demonstrated that Nodal inhibits, whereas Lefty enhances, the proliferation of a pancreatic cell line. In addition, we showed that Lefty-1 activates MAPK and Akt phosphorylation in these cells. In vivo blockade of endogenous Lefty using neutralizing Lefty-1 monoclonal antibody results in a significantly decreased proliferation of duct epithelial cells during islet regeneration. This is the first study to decipher the expression and function of Nodal and Lefty in pancreatic growth. Importantly, our results highlight a novel function of Nodal-Lefty signaling in the regulation of expansion of pancreatic cells. PMID:18393305

  10. 'Advanced' generation lentiviruses as efficient vectors for cardiomyocyte gene transduction in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bonci, D; Cittadini, A; Latronico, M V G; Borello, U; Aycock, J K; Drusco, A; Innocenzi, A; Follenzi, A; Lavitrano, M; Monti, M G; Ross, J; Naldini, L; Peschle, C; Cossu, G; Condorelli, G

    2003-04-01

    Efficient gene transduction in cardiomyocytes is a task that can be accomplished only by viral vectors. Up to now, the most commonly used vectors for this purpose have been adenoviral-derived ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can transduce growth-arrested cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells. Moreover, a modified form of lentiviral vector (the 'advanced' generation), containing an mRNA-stabilizer sequence and a nuclear import sequence, has been shown to significantly improve gene transduction in growth-arrested cells as compared to the third-generation vector. Therefore, we tested whether the 'advanced' generation lentivirus is capable of infecting and transducing cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, comparing efficacy in vitro against the third-generation of the same vector. Here we report that 'advanced' generation lentiviral vectors infected most (>80%) cardiomyocytes in culture, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence and FACS analyses: in contrast the percentage of cardiomyocytes infected by third-generation lentivirus was three- to four-fold lower. Moreover, 'advanced' generation lentivirus was also capable of infecting and inducing stable gene expression in adult myocardium in vivo. Thus, 'advanced' generation lentiviral vectors can be used for both in vitro and in vivo gene expression studies in the cardiomyocyte. PMID:12692591

  11. Targeted inhibition of ANKRD1 disrupts sarcomeric ERK-GATA4 signal transduction and abrogates phenylephrine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lin; Chiusa, Manuel; Cadar, Adrian G.; Lin, Angel; Samaras, Susan; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Lim, Chee C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Accumulating evidence suggest that sarcomere signalling complexes play a pivotal role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by communicating stress signals to the nucleus to induce gene expression. Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (ANKRD1) is a transcriptional regulatory protein that also associates with sarcomeric titin; however, the exact role of ANKRD1 in the heart remains to be elucidated. We therefore aimed to examine the role of ANKRD1 in cardiomyocyte hypertrophic signalling. Methods and results In neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we found that ANKRD1 is part of a sarcomeric signalling complex that includes ERK1/2 and cardiac transcription factor GATA4. Treatment with hypertrophic agonist phenylephrine (PE) resulted in phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and GATA4 followed by nuclear translocation of the ANKRD1/ERK/GATA4 complex. Knockdown of Ankrd1 attenuated PE-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and GATA4, inhibited nuclear translocation of the ANKRD1 complex, and prevented cardiomyocyte growth. Mice lacking Ankrd1 are viable with normal cardiac function. Chronic PE infusion in wild-type mice induced significant cardiac hypertrophy with reactivation of the cardiac fetal gene program which was completely abrogated in Ankrd1 null mice. In contrast, ANKRD1 does not play a role in haemodynamic overload as Ankrd1 null mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction developed cardiac hypertrophy comparable to wild-type mice. Conclusion Our study reveals a novel role for ANKRD1 as a selective regulator of PE-induced signalling whereby ANKRD1 recruits and localizes GATA4 and ERK1/2 in a sarcomeric macro-molecular complex to enhance GATA4 phosphorylation with subsequent nuclear translocation of the ANKRD1 complex to induce hypertrophic gene expression. PMID:25770146

  12. Computational insight into the chemical space of plant growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Bushkov, Nikolay A; Veselov, Mark S; Chuprov-Netochin, Roman N; Marusich, Elena I; Majouga, Alexander G; Volynchuk, Polina B; Shumilina, Daria V; Leonov, Sergey V; Ivanenkov, Yan A

    2016-02-01

    An enormous technological progress has resulted in an explosive growth in the amount of biological and chemical data that is typically multivariate and tangled in structure. Therefore, several computational approaches have mainly focused on dimensionality reduction and convenient representation of high-dimensional datasets to elucidate the relationships between the observed activity (or effect) and calculated parameters commonly expressed in terms of molecular descriptors. We have collected the experimental data available in patent and scientific publications as well as specific databases for various agrochemicals. The resulting dataset was then thoroughly analyzed using Kohonen-based self-organizing technique. The overall aim of the presented study is to investigate whether the developed in silico model can be applied to predict the agrochemical activity of small molecule compounds and, at the same time, to offer further insights into the distinctive features of different agrochemical categories. The preliminary external validation with several plant growth regulators demonstrated a relatively high prediction power (67%) of the constructed model. This study is, actually, the first example of a large-scale modeling in the field of agrochemistry. PMID:26723884

  13. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Freeman, D. Carl; McArthur, E.D.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at five times the rate observed in nonsymbiotic plants. Endophytes also influenced sexual reproduction of mature big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plants. Two spatially distinct big sagebrush subspecies and their hybrids were symbiotic with unique fungal endophytes, despite being separated by only 380 m distance and 60 m elevation. A double reciprocal transplant experiment of parental and hybrid plants, and soils across the hybrid zone showed that fungal endophytes interact with the soils and different plant genotypes to confer enhanced plant reproduction in soil native to the endophyte and reduced reproduction in soil alien to the endophyte. Moreover, the most prevalent endophyte of the hybrid zone reduced the fitness of both parental subspecies. Because these endophytes are passed to the next generation of plants on seed coats, this interaction provides a selective advantage, habitat specificity, and the means of restricting gene flow, thereby making the hybrid zone stable, narrow and potentially leading to speciation. ?? 2009 Landes Bioscience.

  14. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  15. Regulation of skeletal muscle capillary growth in exercise and disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Tara L; Nwadozi, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Capillaries, which are the smallest and most abundant type of blood vessel, form the primary site of gas, nutrient, and waste transfer between the vascular and tissue compartments. Skeletal muscle exhibits the capacity to generate new capillaries (angiogenesis) as an adaptation to exercise training, thus ensuring that the heightened metabolic demand of the active muscle is matched by an improved capacity for distribution of gases, nutrients, and waste products. This review summarizes the current understanding of the regulation of skeletal muscle capillary growth. The multi-step process of angiogenesis is coordinated through the integration of a diverse array of signals associated with hypoxic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and mechanical stresses within the active muscle. The contributions of metabolic and mechanical factors to the modulation of key pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules are discussed within the context of responses to a single aerobic exercise bout and short-term and long-term training. Finally, the paradoxical lack of angiogenesis in peripheral artery disease and diabetes and the implications for disease progression and muscle health are discussed. Future studies that emphasize an integrated analysis of the mechanisms that control skeletal muscle capillary growth will enable development of targeted exercise programs that effectively promote angiogenesis in healthy individuals and in patient populations. PMID:26554747

  16. DUSP10 regulates intestinal epithelial cell growth and colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Png, C W; Weerasooriya, M; Guo, J; James, S J; Poh, H M; Osato, M; Flavell, R A; Dong, C; Yang, H; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-14

    Dual specificity phosphatase 10 (DUSP10), also known as MAP kinase phosphatase 5 (MKP5), negatively regulates the activation of MAP kinases. Genetic polymorphisms and aberrant expression of this gene are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in humans. However, the role of DUSP10 in intestinal epithelial tumorigenesis is not clear. Here, we showed that DUSP10 knockout (KO) mice had increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and migration and developed less severe colitis than wild-type (WT) mice in response to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) treatment, which is associated with increased ERK1/2 activation and Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) expression in IEC. In line with increased IEC proliferation, DUSP10 KO mice developed more colon tumours with increased severity compared with WT mice in response to administration of DSS and azoxymethane (AOM). Furthermore, survival analysis of CRC patients demonstrated that high DUSP10 expression in tumours was associated with significant improvement in survival probability. Overexpression of DUSP10 in Caco-2 and RCM-1 cells inhibited cell proliferation. Our study showed that DUSP10 negatively regulates IEC growth and acts as a suppressor for CRC. Therefore, it could be targeted for the development of therapies for colitis and CRC. PMID:25772234

  17. CDK9 and its repressor LARP7 modulate cardiomyocyte proliferation and response to injury in the zebrafish heart

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Wilson, Kathryn S.; Maqsood, Sana; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.; Denvir, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk)9 acts through the positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) complex to activate and expand transcription through RNA polymerase II. It has also been shown to regulate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, with recent evidence linking it to cardiomyocyte proliferation. We hypothesised that modification of CDK9 activity could both impair and enhance the cardiac response to injury by modifying cardiomyocyte proliferation. Cdk9 expression and activity were inhibited in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo. We show that dephosphorylation of residue Ser2 on the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II is associated with impaired cardiac structure and function, and cardiomyocyte proliferation and also results in impaired functional recovery following cardiac laser injury. In contrast, de-repression of Cdk9 activity, through knockdown of La-related protein (Larp7) increases phosphorylation of Ser2 in RNA polymerase II and increases cardiomyocyte proliferation. Larp7 knockdown rescued the structural and functional phenotype associated with knockdown of Cdk9. The balance of Cdk9 and Larp7 plays a key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and response to injury. Larp7 represents a potentially novel therapeutic target to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation and recovery from injury. PMID:26542022

  18. Cytoprotective and Cytotoxic Effects of Rice Bran Extracts in Rat H9c2(2-1) Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xian Wen; Bhave, Mrinal; Fong, Alan Yean Yip; Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Shen, Lian Hua; Hwang, Siaw San

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at preliminarily assessing the cytoprotective and antioxidative effects of rice bran extracts (RBEs) from a Sarawak local rice variety (local name: “BJLN”) and a commercial rice variety, “MR219,” on oxidative stress in rat H9c2(2-1) cardiomyocytes. The cardiomyocytes were incubated with different concentrations of RBE and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), respectively, to identify their respective IC50 values and safe dose ranges. Two nonlethal and close-to-IC50 doses of RBE were selected to evaluate their respective effects on H2O2 induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Both RBEs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity effects on cardiomyocytes. H2O2 induction of cardiomyocytes pretreated with RBE further revealed the dose-dependent cytoprotective and antioxidative effects of RBE via an increase in IC50 values of H2O2. Preliminary analyses of induction effects of RBE and H2O2 on cellular antioxidant enzyme, catalase (CAT), also revealed their potential in regulating these activities and expression profile of related gene on oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Pretreated cardiomyocytes significantly upregulated the enzymatic activity and expression level of CAT under the exposure of H2O2 induced oxidative stress. This preliminary study has demonstrated the potential antioxidant effects of RBE in alleviating H2O2-mediated oxidative injuries via upregulation in enzymatic activities and expression levels of CAT. PMID:27239253

  19. Cytoprotective and Cytotoxic Effects of Rice Bran Extracts in Rat H9c2(2-1) Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xian Wen; Bhave, Mrinal; Fong, Alan Yean Yip; Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Shen, Lian Hua; Hwang, Siaw San

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at preliminarily assessing the cytoprotective and antioxidative effects of rice bran extracts (RBEs) from a Sarawak local rice variety (local name: "BJLN") and a commercial rice variety, "MR219," on oxidative stress in rat H9c2(2-1) cardiomyocytes. The cardiomyocytes were incubated with different concentrations of RBE and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), respectively, to identify their respective IC50 values and safe dose ranges. Two nonlethal and close-to-IC50 doses of RBE were selected to evaluate their respective effects on H2O2 induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Both RBEs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity effects on cardiomyocytes. H2O2 induction of cardiomyocytes pretreated with RBE further revealed the dose-dependent cytoprotective and antioxidative effects of RBE via an increase in IC50 values of H2O2. Preliminary analyses of induction effects of RBE and H2O2 on cellular antioxidant enzyme, catalase (CAT), also revealed their potential in regulating these activities and expression profile of related gene on oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Pretreated cardiomyocytes significantly upregulated the enzymatic activity and expression level of CAT under the exposure of H2O2 induced oxidative stress. This preliminary study has demonstrated the potential antioxidant effects of RBE in alleviating H2O2-mediated oxidative injuries via upregulation in enzymatic activities and expression levels of CAT. PMID:27239253

  20. [Effects of growth regulators and growth media on root-hair development of Poncirus trifoliate].

    PubMed

    Zhang, De-Jian; Xia, Ren-Xue; Cao, Xiu; Wang, Peng; Shu, Bo

    2011-06-01

    By using river sand and mixed soil as growth media, and treating with different concentration IBA, ETH, and NAA, this paper studied the root-hair development of Poncirus trifoliate seedlings, and the development cycle and distribution pattern of the root-hairs under phosphorus deficiency in sand culture. The root-hairs had a development cycle of about 4 days, and formed block-shaped and clumped, mainly around root, and with uneven distribution. Sand culture gave rise to the production of more root hairs, with an average of 486.3 per tap root, and treating with 1.0 micromol x L(-1) of IBA and ETH notablypromoted root-hair development. The phosphorous deficiency in sand culture induced more roothair formation (636.3 per tap root). Mixed soil culture produced lesser root-hairs (212.3 per taproot), and all the test growth regulators had no obvious effects on the root-hair development. PMID:21941742

  1. Fibronectin contributes to pathological cardiac hypertrophy but not physiological growth

    PubMed Central

    Konstandin, Mathias H.; Völkers, Mirko; Collins, Brett; Quijada, Pearl; Quintana, Mercedes; De La Torre, Andrea; Ormachea, Lucy; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Toko, Haruhiro; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ability of the heart to undergo pathological or physiological hypertrophy upon increased wall stress is critical for long-term compensatory function in response to increased workload demand. While substantial information has been published on the nature of the fundamental molecular signaling involved in hypertrophy, the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein Fibronectin (Fn) in hypertrophic signaling is unclear. Objective Delineate the role of Fn during pressure overload-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy and physiological growth prompted by exercise. Methods and Results Genetic conditional ablation of Fn in adulthood blunts cardiomyocyte hypertrophy upon pressure overload via attenuated activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT). Loss of Fn delays development of heart failure and improves survival. In contrast, genetic deletion of Fn has no impact on physiological cardiac growth induced by voluntary wheel running. Down regulation of the transcription factor c/EBPβ (Ccaat-enhanced binding protein β), which is essential for induction of the physiological growth program, is unaffected by Fn deletion. Nuclear NFAT translocation is triggered by Fn in conjunction with up-regulation of the fetal gene program and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Furthermore, activation of the physiological gene program induced by Insulin stimulation in vitro is attenuated by Fn, whereas Insulin had no impact on Fn-induced pathological growth program. Conclusion Fn contributes to pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo via NFAT activation. Fn is dispensable for physiological growth in vivo, and Fn attenuates the activation of the physiological growth program in vitro. PMID:23912225

  2. Neuregulin stimulation of cardiomyocyte regeneration in mice and human myocardium reveals a therapeutic window.

    PubMed

    Polizzotti, Brian D; Ganapathy, Balakrishnan; Walsh, Stuart; Choudhury, Sangita; Ammanamanchi, Niyatie; Bennett, David G; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Haubner, Bernhard J; Penninger, Josef M; Kühn, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Therapies developed for adult patients with heart failure have been shown to be ineffective in pediatric clinical trials, leading to the recognition that new pediatric-specific therapies for heart failure must be developed. Administration of the recombinant growth factor neuregulin-1 (rNRG1) stimulates regeneration of heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) in adult mice. Because proliferation-competent cardiomyocytes are more abundant in growing mammals, we hypothesized that administration of rNRG1 during the neonatal period might be more effective than in adulthood. If so, neonatal rNRG1 delivery could be a new therapeutic strategy for treating heart failure in pediatric patients. To evaluate the effectiveness of rNRG1 administration in cardiac regeneration, newborn mice were subjected to cryoinjury, which induced myocardial dysfunction and scar formation and decreased cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity. Early administration of rNRG1 to mice from birth to 34 days of age improved myocardial function and reduced the prevalence of transmural scars. In contrast, administration of rNRG1 from 4 to 34 days of age only transiently improved myocardial function. The mechanisms of early administration involved cardiomyocyte protection (38%) and proliferation (62%). We also assessed the ability of rNRG1 to stimulate cardiomyocyte proliferation in intact cultured myocardium from pediatric patients. rNRG1 induced cardiomyocyte proliferation in myocardium from infants with heart disease who were less than 6 months of age. Our results identify an effective time period within which to execute rNRG1 clinical trials in pediatric patients for the stimulation of cardiomyocyte regeneration. PMID:25834111

  3. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes. PMID:18251508

  4. Isolation and Physiological Analysis of Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Gretchen M.; Bader, David M.; Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes, the workhorse cell of the heart, contain exquisitely organized cytoskeletal and contractile elements that generate the contractile force used to pump blood. Individual cardiomyocytes were first isolated over 40 years ago in order to better study the physiology and structure of heart muscle. Techniques have rapidly improved to include enzymatic digestion via coronary perfusion. More recently, analyzing the contractility and calcium flux of isolated myocytes has provided a vital tool in the cellular and sub-cellular analysis of heart failure. Echocardiography and EKGs provide information about the heart at an organ level only. Cardiomyocyte cell culture systems exist, but cells lack physiologically essential structures such as organized sarcomeres and t-tubules required for myocyte function within the heart. In the protocol presented here, cardiomyocytes are isolated via Langendorff perfusion. The heart is removed from the mouse, mounted via the aorta to a cannula, perfused with digestion enzymes, and cells are introduced to increasing calcium concentrations. Edge and sarcomere detection software is used to analyze contractility, and a calcium binding fluorescent dye is used to visualize calcium transients of electrically paced cardiomyocytes; increasing understanding of the role cellular changes play in heart dysfunction. Traditionally used to test drug effects on cardiomyocytes, we employ this system to compare myocytes from WT mice and mice with a mutation that causes dilated cardiomyopathy. This protocol is unique in its comparison of live cells from mice with known heart function and known genetics. Many experimental conditions are reliably compared, including genetic or environmental manipulation, infection, drug treatment, and more. Beyond physiologic data, isolated cardiomyocytes are easily fixed and stained for cytoskeletal elements. Isolating cardiomyocytes via perfusion is an extremely versatile method, useful in studying cellular changes

  5. Bone marrow stromal cells as an inducer for cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengming; Johkura, Kohei; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Nagai, Mika; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2010-09-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) secrete soluble factors and display varied cell-biological functions. To confirm the ability and efficiency of BMSCs to induce embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiomyocytes, mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were co-cultured with rat BMSCs. After about 10 days, areas of rhythmically contracting cells in more solid aggregates became evident with bundle-like structures formed along borders between EB outgrowth and BMSC layer. ESC-derived cardiomyocytes exhibited sarcomeric striations when stained with troponin I (Trop I), organized in separated bundles. Besides, the staining for connexin 43 was detected in cell-cell junctions, which demonstrated that ESC-derived cardiomyocytes were coupled by gap junction in culture. The related genes of cardiomyocytes were found in these beating and no-beating EBs co-cultured with BMSCs. In addition, an improved efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESC-BMSC co-culture was found in the serum-free medium: 5-fold up-regulation in the number of beating area compared with the serum medium. Effective cardiac differentiation was also recognized in transfer filter assay and in condition medium obtained from BMSC culture. A clear increase in the expression of cardiac genes and TropI protein confirmed further cardiac differentiation by BMP4 and Retinoic Acid (RA) treatment. These results demonstrate that BMSCs can induce cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESCs through soluble factors and enhance it with BMP4 or RA treatment. Serum-free ESC-BMSC co-culture represents a defined in vitro model for identifying the cardiomyocyte-inducing activity from BMSCs and, in addition, a straightforward experimental system for assessing clinical applications. PMID:20801009

  6. Black hole evolution - I. Supernova-regulated black hole growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Volonteri, Marta; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-09-01

    The growth of a supermassive black hole (BH) is determined by how much gas the host galaxy is able to feed it, which in turn is controlled by the cosmic environment, through galaxy mergers and accretion of cosmic flows that time how galaxies obtain their gas, and also by internal processes in the galaxy, such as star formation and feedback from stars and the BH itself. In this paper, we study the growth of a 1012 M⊙ halo at z = 2, which is the progenitor of a group of galaxies at z = 0, and of its central BH by means of a high-resolution zoomed cosmological simulation, the Seth simulation. We study the evolution of the BH driven by the accretion of cold gas in the galaxy, and explore the efficiency of the feedback from supernovae (SNe). For a relatively inefficient energy input from SNe, the BH grows at the Eddington rate from early times, and reaches self-regulation once it is massive enough. We find that at early cosmic times z > 3.5, efficient feedback from SNe forbids the formation of a settled disc as well as the accumulation of dense cold gas in the vicinity of the BH and starves the central compact object. As the galaxy and its halo accumulate mass, they become able to confine the nuclear inflows provided by major mergers and the BH grows at a sustained near-to-Eddington accretion rate. We argue that this mechanism should be ubiquitous amongst low-mass galaxies, corresponding to galaxies with a stellar mass below ≲ 109 M⊙ in our simulations.

  7. INFLUENCE OF AN INSECT GROWTH REGULATOR ON LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF A MARINE CRUSTACEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larval survival, growth, and energy metabolism of an estuarine shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were altered by exposure to low micrograms/l concentrations of an insect growth regulator (the juvenile hormone analogue, methoprene). Larvae were several orders of magnitude more sensitive...

  8. Small molecule-mediated directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells toward ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Senyei, Grant D; Hansen, Jens; Kong, Chi-Wing; Azeloglu, Evren U; Stillitano, Francesca; Lieu, Deborah K; Wang, Jiaxian; Ren, Lihuan; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Iyengar, Ravi; Li, Ronald A; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The generation of human ventricular cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells and/or induced pluripotent stem cells could fulfill the demand for therapeutic applications and in vitro pharmacological research; however, the production of a homogeneous population of ventricular cardiomyocytes remains a major limitation. By combining small molecules and growth factors, we developed a fully chemically defined, directed differentiation system to generate ventricular-like cardiomyocytes (VCMs) from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency and reproducibility. Molecular characterization revealed that the differentiation recapitulated the developmental steps of cardiovascular fate specification. Electrophysiological analyses further illustrated the generation of a highly enriched population of VCMs. These chemically induced VCMs exhibited the expected cardiac electrophysiological and calcium handling properties as well as the appropriate chronotropic responses to cardioactive compounds. In addition, using an integrated computational and experimental systems biology approach, we demonstrated that the modulation of the canonical Wnt pathway by the small molecule IWR-1 plays a key role in cardiomyocyte subtype specification. In summary, we developed a reproducible and efficient experimental platform that facilitates a chemical genetics-based interrogation of signaling pathways during cardiogenesis that bypasses the limitations of genetic approaches and provides a valuable source of ventricular cardiomyocytes for pharmacological screenings as well as cell replacement therapies. PMID:24324277

  9. Cardiomyocytes induce endothelial cells to trans-differentiate into cardiac muscle: implications for myocardium regeneration.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, G; Borello, U; De Angelis, L; Latronico, M; Sirabella, D; Coletta, M; Galli, R; Balconi, G; Follenzi, A; Frati, G; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Gioglio, L; Amuchastegui, S; Adorini, L; Naldini, L; Vescovi, A; Dejana, E; Cossu, G

    2001-09-11

    The concept of tissue-restricted differentiation of postnatal stem cells has been challenged by recent evidence showing pluripotency for hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neural stem cells. Furthermore, rare but well documented examples exist of already differentiated cells in developing mammals that change fate and trans-differentiate into another cell type. Here, we report that endothelial cells, either freshly isolated from embryonic vessels or established as homogeneous cells in culture, differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes and express cardiac markers when cocultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes or when injected into postischemic adult mouse heart. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells also differentiate into cardiomyocytes under similar experimental conditions and transiently coexpress von Willebrand factor and sarcomeric myosin. In contrast, neural stem cells, which efficiently differentiate into skeletal muscle, differentiate into cardiomyocytes at a low rate. Fibroblast growth factor 2 and bone morphogenetic protein 4, which activate cardiac differentiation in embryonic cells, do not activate cardiogenesis in endothelial cells or stimulate trans-differentiation in coculture, suggesting that different signaling molecules are responsible for cardiac induction during embryogenesis and in successive periods of development. The fact that endothelial cells can generate cardiomyocytes sheds additional light on the plasticity of endothelial cells during development and opens perspectives for cell autologous replacement therapies. PMID:11535818

  10. Cardiomyocytes induce endothelial cells to trans-differentiate into cardiac muscle: Implications for myocardium regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, G.; Borello, U.; De Angelis, L.; Latronico, M.; Sirabella, D.; Coletta, M.; Galli, R.; Balconi, G.; Follenzi, A.; Frati, G.; Cusella De Angelis, M. G.; Gioglio, L.; Amuchastegui, S.; Adorini, L.; Naldini, L.; Vescovi, A.; Dejana, E.; Cossu, G.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of tissue-restricted differentiation of postnatal stem cells has been challenged by recent evidence showing pluripotency for hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and neural stem cells. Furthermore, rare but well documented examples exist of already differentiated cells in developing mammals that change fate and trans-differentiate into another cell type. Here, we report that endothelial cells, either freshly isolated from embryonic vessels or established as homogenous cells in culture, differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes and express cardiac markers when cocultured with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes or when injected into postischemic adult mouse heart. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells also differentiate into cardiomyocytes under similar experimental conditions and transiently coexpress von Willebrand factor and sarcomeric myosin. In contrast, neural stem cells, which efficiently differentiate into skeletal muscle, differentiate into cardiomyocytes at a low rate. Fibroblast growth factor 2 and bone morphogenetic protein 4, which activate cardiac differentiation in embryonic cells, do not activate cardiogenesis in endothelial cells or stimulate trans-differentiation in coculture, suggesting that different signaling molecules are responsible for cardiac induction during embryogenesis and in successive periods of development. The fact that endothelial cells can generate cardiomyocytes sheds additional light on the plasticity of endothelial cells during development and opens perspectives for cell autologous replacement therapies. PMID:11535818

  11. Cardiomyocyte marker expression in a human lymphocyte cell line using mouse cardiomyocyte extract.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Zahra; Tavakolinejad, Sima; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Rasooli, Manuchehr

    2011-03-01

    Cell transplantation shows potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases. Embryonic stem cells, cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have been suggested as sources for transplantation therapy. Because of some technical limitations with the use of stem cells, transdifferentiation of fully differentiated cells is a potentially useful alternative. We investigated whether human peripheral blood cells could transdifferentiate into cardiomyocyte. Transdifferentiation was induced in a human B lymphocyte cell line (Raji). Cardiomyocyte extract was prepared from adult mouse cardiomyocytes. The cells were treated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, permeabilized with streptolysin O, and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract. They were cultured for 10 days, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected with immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed that some cells expressed myosin heavy chain, α-actinin and cardiac troponin T after 3 and 4 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed these data. In cells exposed to trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract, troponin T expression was seen in 3.53% of the cells and 3.11% of them expressed α-actinin. After exposure to the cardiomyocyte extract, some permeabilized cells adhered to the plate loosely; however, the morphology did not change significantly, and they continued to show a rounded shape after 4 weeks. Our treated lymphocytes expressed cardiomyocyte markers. Our results suggest that lymphocytes may be useful in future research as a source of cells for reprogramming procedures. PMID:21547694

  12. Regulation of low affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) by early growth response (Egr) transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoguang; Daugherty, Rebecca L.; Tourtellotte, Warren G.

    2007-01-01

    The low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR is a multifunctional receptor with important roles in neurotrophin signaling, axon outgrowth, and oligodendroglia and neuron survival. It is transcriptionally regulated with spatial and temporal precision during nervous system development, injury and regeneration. Very little is known about how p75NTR expression is dynamically regulated but it is likely to influence how p75NTR signals in particular cellular contexts. Here, we identify the early growth response (Egr) transcriptional regulators, Egr1 and Egr3, as direct modulators of p75NTR gene expression. Egr1 and Egr3 bind and transactivate the p75NTR promoter in vitro and in vivo, using distinct response elements on the p75NTR promoter. Consistent with these results, p75NTR expression is greatly diminished in muscle spindle stretch receptors and in peripheral nerve Schwann cells in Egr gene deficient mice. Taken together, the results elucidate a novel mechanism whereby Egr proteins can directly modulate p75NTR expression and signaling in vivo. PMID:17916431

  13. Immaturity of human stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes in culture: fatal flaw or soluble problem?

    PubMed

    Veerman, Christiaan C; Kosmidis, Georgios; Mummery, Christine L; Casini, Simona; Verkerk, Arie O; Bellin, Milena

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) are increasingly used to model cardiac disease, test drug efficacy and for safety pharmacology. Nevertheless, a major hurdle to more extensive use is their immaturity and similarity to fetal rather than adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we provide an overview of the strategies currently being used to increase maturation in culture, which include prolongation of time in culture, exposure to electrical stimulation, application of mechanical strain, growth in three-dimensional tissue configuration, addition of non-cardiomyocytes, use of hormones and small molecules, and alteration of the extracellular environment. By comparing the outcomes of these studies, we identify the approaches most likely to improve functional maturation of hPSC-CMs in terms of their electrophysiology and excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:25583389

  14. Targeting Pin1 Protects Mouse Cardiomyocytes from High-Dose Alcohol-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuehong; Li, Zizhuo; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Sun, Jiantao; Shan, Lina; Li, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Long-term heavy alcohol consumption is considered to be one of the main causes of left ventricular dysfunction in alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM). As previously suggested, high-dose alcohol induces oxidation stress and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that high-dose alcohol treatment stimulated expression and activity of Pin1 in mouse primary cardiomyocytes. While siRNA-mediated knockdown of Pin1 suppressed alcohol-induced mouse cardiomyocyte apoptosis, overexpression of Pin1 further upregulated the numbers of apoptotic mouse cardiomyocytes. We further demonstrated that Pin1 promotes mitochondria oxidative stress and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential but suppresses endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in the presence of alcohol. Taken together, our results revealed a pivotal role of Pin1 in regulation of alcohol-induced mouse cardiomyocytes apoptosis by promoting reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and repressing eNOS expression, which could be potential therapeutic targets for ACM. PMID:26697133

  15. miR-218 Involvement in Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Is Likely through Targeting REST

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Cui-Mei; Li, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Yu-Mei; Miao, Wei; Wu, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Wen-Jing; Liu, Chang; Wang, Duo; Wang, Kang; Li, Li; Peng, Lu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as key players in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which is associated with significant risks of heart failure. However, many microRNAs are still not recognized for their functions in pathophysiological processes. In this study, we evaluated effects of miR-218 in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy using both in vitro and in vivo models. We found that miR-218 was evidently downregulated in a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse model. Overexpression of miR-218 is sufficient to reduce hypertrophy, whereas the suppression of miR-218 aggravates hypertrophy in primary cardiomyocytes induced by isoprenaline (ISO). In addition, we identified RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST) as a novel target of miR-218; it negatively regulated the expression of REST in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes and the TAC model. These results showed that miR-218 plays a crucial role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, likely via targeting REST, suggesting a potential candidate target for interfering hypertrophy. PMID:27258257

  16. Nuclear relocation of DGKζ in cardiomyocytes under conditions of ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, H; Hozumi, Y; Nakano, T; Kubota, I; Goto, K

    2011-11-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are generated under various conditions, such as ligand stimulation and several stresses. They serve as second messengers to respond to pathophysiological conditions. DG kinase (DGK) catalyzes DG to produce PA. It is regarded as a regulator of these lipid messengers. Previous studies show that DGKζ, a nuclear isozyme, translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in hippocampal neurons under transient ischemia and never relocates to the nucleus after reperfusion. This study examined whether a similar phenomenon is observed in cardiomyocytes, which represent another type of postmitotic, terminally differentiated cell. We performed immunostaining on ischemic hearts induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and on primary cultured cardiomyocytes under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In the animal model, 10 min ischemia is sufficient to cause DGKζ to disappear from the nucleus in cardiomyocytes. However, DGKζ is observed again in the nucleus at 10 min following reperfusion after 10 min ischemia, which contrasts sharply with ischemic hippocampal neurons. Similar results were obtained from experiments using primary cultured cardiomyocytes under OGD conditions, except that DGKζ relocates autonomously, if at all, to the nucleus, even under continuous OGD conditions. Results suggest that DGKζ is involved in the acute phase of cellular response to ischemic stress in cardiomyocytes in a similar, but not identical, manner to that of neurons. PMID:21938675

  17. MITOCHONDRIOCENTRIC PATHWAY TO CARDIOMYOCYTE NECROSIS IN ALDOSTERONISM: CARDIOPROTECTIVE RESPONSES TO CARVEDILOL AND NEBIVOLOL

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Yaser; Sherrod, Jonathan N.; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Ahokas, Robert A.; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    Foci of fibrosis, footprints of cardiomyocyte necrosis, are scattered throughout the failing myocardium and are a major component to its pathologic remodeling. Understanding pathogenic mechanisms contributing to hormone-mediated necrosis are therefore fundamental to developing cardioprotective strategies. In this context, a mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector (MSTE) pathway to necrosis is emerging. Our first objective, using cardiomyocytes and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) harvested from rats receiving 4 wks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST), was to identify major components of this pathway. Secondly, to validate this pathway we used mitochondria-targeted pharmaceutical interventions as cardioprotective strategies using 4 wks cotreatment with either carvedilol (Carv) or nebivolol (Nebiv). Compared to controls, we found 4 wks ALDOST to be accompanied by: elevated cardiomyocyte free [Ca2+]i and SSM free [Ca2+]m; increased H2O2 production and 8-isoprostane in SSM, cardiac tissue and plasma; and enhanced opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and myocardial scarring. Increments in antioxidant capacity augmented by increased cytosolic free [Zn2+]i were overwhelmed. Cotreatment with either Carv or Nebiv attenuated [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m overloading, prevented oxidative stress and reduced mPTP opening while augmenting [Zn2+]i and conferring cardioprotection. Thus, major components of the MSTE pathway to cardiomyocyte necrosis seen with ALDOST include intracellular Ca2+ overloading coupled to oxidative stress and mPTP opening. This subcellular pathway can be favorably regulated by Carv or Nebiv cotreatment to salvage cardiomyocytes and prevent fibrosis. PMID:21558884

  18. [Regulation of osteoclastogenesis by osteocytes through growth differentiation factor-15].

    PubMed

    Hinoi, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone. However, little attention has been paid to their role in bone remodeling. In this study, osteoclast differentiation was significantly enhanced by conditioned media derived from cultures of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells that were cultured under hypoxic conditions. Using microarray analysis, we identified growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF15) as a pivotal factor secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia. Indeed, treatment with recombinant GDF15 markedly increased osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Further to investigate the importance of GDF15 in vivo, we used a hypoxic murine model that involved ligation of the right femoral artery. The volume of cancellous bone in the proximal tibia of the ligated limb was significantly reduced, together with a significant increase in osteoclast-related parameters. Addition of anti-GDF15 antibody prevented bone loss and osteoclastic activation in the tibiae of mice that had undergone femoral artery ligation. These results suggest that GDF15, which is secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia during bone remodeling, may be a positive regulator of osteoclastic differentiation. The in vivo usefulness of the anti-GDF15 antibody might provide insights for the development of novel therapeutics for bone disorders related to hypoxia or ischemic insults. PMID:25452236

  19. Regulation of scar formation by vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Wilgus, Traci A.; Ferreira, Ahalia M.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Bergdall, Valerie K.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is known for its effects on endothelial cells and as a positive mediator of angiogenesis. VEGF is thought to promote the repair of cutaneous wounds due to its pro-angiogenic properties, but its ability to regulate other aspects of wound repair, such as the generation of scar tissue has not been well studied. We examined the role of VEGF in scar tissue production utilizing models of scarless and fibrotic repair. Scarless fetal wounds had lower levels of VEGF and were less vascular than fibrotic fetal wounds, and the scarless phenotype could be converted to a scar-forming phenotype by adding exogenous VEGF. Similarly, neutralization of VEGF reduced vascularity and decreased scar formation in adult wounds. These results show that VEGF levels have a strong influence on scar tissue formation. Our data suggest that VEGF may not simply function as a mediator of wound angiogenesis, but instead may play a more diverse role in the wound repair process. PMID:18427552

  20. Circadian clock regulation of skeletal muscle growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somik; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the circadian clock, a transcriptional/translational feedback circuit that generates ~24-hour oscillations in behavior and physiology, is a key temporal regulatory mechanism involved in many important aspects of muscle physiology. Given the clock as an evolutionarily-conserved time-keeping mechanism that synchronizes internal physiology to environmental cues, locomotor activities initiated by skeletal muscle enable entrainment to the light-dark cycles on earth, thus ensuring organismal survival and fitness. Despite the current understanding of the role of molecular clock in preventing age-related sarcopenia, investigations into the underlying molecular pathways that transmit clock signals to the maintenance of skeletal muscle growth and function are only emerging. In the current review, the importance of the muscle clock in maintaining muscle mass during development, repair and aging, together with its contribution to muscle metabolism, will be discussed. Based on our current understandings of how tissue-intrinsic muscle clock functions in the key aspects muscle physiology, interventions targeting the myogenic-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of muscular diseases. Studies of mechanisms underlying circadian clock function and regulation in skeletal muscle warrant continued efforts. PMID:27540471

  1. Insect growth regulators and insect control: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Siddall, J B

    1976-01-01

    Insect growth regulators (IGRs) of the juvenile hormone type alter physiological processes essential to insect development and appear to act specifically on insects. Three natural juvenile hormones have been found in insects but not in other organisms. Future use of antagonists or inhibitors of hormone synthesis may be technically possible as an advantageous extension of pest control by IGRs. A documented survey of the properties, metabolism, toxicology, and uses of the most commercially advanced chemical, methoprene, shows it to be environmentally acceptable and toxicologically innocuous. Derivation of its current use patterns is discussed and limitations on these are noted. Residue levels and their measurement in the ppb region have allowed exemption from the requirement of tolerances in the EPA registered use of methoprene for mosquito control. Tolerances for foods accompany its fully approved use for control of manure breeding flies through a cattle feed supplement. The human health effects of using this chemical appear to be purely beneficial, but further advances through new IGR chemicals appear unlikely without major changes in regulatory and legislative policy. PMID:976222

  2. Circadian clock regulation of skeletal muscle growth and repair

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Somik; Ma, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the circadian clock, a transcriptional/translational feedback circuit that generates ~24-hour oscillations in behavior and physiology, is a key temporal regulatory mechanism involved in many important aspects of muscle physiology. Given the clock as an evolutionarily-conserved time-keeping mechanism that synchronizes internal physiology to environmental cues, locomotor activities initiated by skeletal muscle enable entrainment to the light-dark cycles on earth, thus ensuring organismal survival and fitness. Despite the current understanding of the role of molecular clock in preventing age-related sarcopenia, investigations into the underlying molecular pathways that transmit clock signals to the maintenance of skeletal muscle growth and function are only emerging. In the current review, the importance of the muscle clock in maintaining muscle mass during development, repair and aging, together with its contribution to muscle metabolism, will be discussed. Based on our current understandings of how tissue-intrinsic muscle clock functions in the key aspects muscle physiology, interventions targeting the myogenic-modulatory activities of the clock circuit may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of muscular diseases. Studies of mechanisms underlying circadian clock function and regulation in skeletal muscle warrant continued efforts. PMID:27540471

  3. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes. PMID:27408918

  4. Essential role of STIM1 in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohba, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Sato, Takako; Ono, Kyoichi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2009-11-06

    Store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) through transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is important in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Recently, stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) was identified as a key regulator of SOCE. In this study, we examined whether STIM1 is involved in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. RT-PCR showed that cultured rat cardiomyocytes constitutively expressed STIM1. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) treatment for 48 h enhanced TRPC1 expression, SOCE, and nuclear factor of activated T cells activation without upregulating STIM1. However, the knockdown of STIM1 suppressed these effects, thereby preventing a hypertrophic response. These results suggest that STIM1 plays an essential role in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  5. Role of Mitochondrial fission and fusion in cardiomyocyte contractility

    PubMed Central

    Givvimani, S; Pushpakumar, SB; Metreveli, N; Veeranki, S; Kundu, S; Tyagi, SC

    2015-01-01

    Background Mitochondria constitute 30% of cell volume and are engaged in two dynamic processes called fusion and fission, regulated by Drp-1(Dynamin related protein) and mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). Previously, we showed that Drp-1 inhibition ameliorates cardiovascular dysfunction following pressure overload in aortic banding model and myocardial infarction. As dynamic organelles, mitochondria are capable of changing their morphology in response to stress. However, whether such changes can alter their function and in turn cellular function is unknown. Further, a direct role of fission and fusion in cardiomyocyte contractility has not yet been studied. In this study, we hypothesize that disrupted fission and fusion balance by increased Drp-1 and decreased Mfn2 expression in cardiomyocytes affect their contractility through alterations in the calcium and potassium concentrations. Methods To verify this, we used freshly isolated ventricular myocytes from wild type mouse and transfected them with either siRNA to Drp-1 or Mfn2. Myocyte contractility studies were performed by IonOptix using a myopacer. Intracellular calcium and potassium measurements were done using flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) was done to evaluate live cell mitochondria and its membrane potential. Protein expression was done by Western blot and Immunocytochemistry. Results We found that silencing mitochondrial fission increased the myocyte contractility, while fusion inhibition decreased contractility with simultaneous changes in calcium and potassium. Also, we observed that increase in fission prompted decrease in Serca-2a and increase in cytochrome c leading to mitophagy. Conclusion Our results suggested that regulating mitochondrial fission and fusion have direct effects on overall cardiomyocyte contractility and thus function. PMID:25841124

  6. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  7. Kaempferol protects cardiomyocytes against anoxia/reoxygenation injury via mitochondrial pathway mediated by SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Liao, Zhangping; Huang, Liqing; Liu, Dan; Yin, Dong; He, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis is a critical mechanism of anoxia/ reoxygenation (A/R)-induced injury in cardiomyocytes. Kaempferol (Kae) is a natural polyphenol and a type of flavonoid, which has been demonstrated to protect myocardium against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanism is still not fully elucidated. We hypothesize that Kae may improve the mitochondrial function during I/R injury via a potential signal pathway. In this study, an in vitro I/R model was replicated on neonatal rat primary cardiomyocytes by A/R treatment. Cell viability was monitored by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2-yl)-5-(3- carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2 H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Protein expression was detected by Western Blotting. mPTP opening and the activity of caspase-3 were measured by colorimetric method. The results showed that Kae effectively enhanced the cell viability and decreased the LDH release in cardiomyocytes subjected to A/R injury. Kae reduced the A/R-induced reactive oxygen species generation, the loss of Δψm, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol. Kae inhibited the A/R-stimulated mPTP opening and activation of caspase-3, and ultimate decrease in cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Furthermore, we found Kae up-regulated Human Silent Information Regulator Type 1 (SIRT1) expression, indicating SIRT1 signal pathway likely involved the cardioprotection of Kae. Sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor, abolished the protective effect of Kae in cardiomyocytes subjected to A/R. Additionally, Kae significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2. Thus, we firstly demonstrate that Kae protects cardiomyocytes against A/R injury through mitochondrial pathway mediated by SIRT1. PMID:26086862

  8. Increased expression of estrogen-related receptor β during adaptation of adult cardiomyocytes to sustained hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kathryn F; Beeson, Gyda C; Beeson, Craig C; McDermott, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related Receptors (ERR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors that regulate expression of genes required for energy metabolism including mitochondrial biogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While ERRα and EPPγ isoforms are known to share a wide array of target genes in the adult myocardium, the function of ERRβ has not been characterized in cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of ERRβ in regulating energy metabolism in adult cardiomyocytes in primary culture. Adult feline cardiomyocytes were electrically stimulated to contract in either hypoxia (0.5% O2) or normoxia (21% O2). As compared to baseline values measured in normoxia, ERRβ mRNA levels increased significantly after 8 hours of hypoxia and remained elevated over 24 h. Conversely, ERRβ mRNA decreased to normoxic levels after 4 hours of reoxygenation. Hypoxia increased expression of the α and β isoforms of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1 (PGC-1) mRNA by 6-fold and 3-fold, respectively. Knockdown of ERRβ expression via adenoviral-mediated delivery of ERRβ shRNA blocked hypoxia-induced increases in PGC-1β mRNA, but not PGC-1α mRNA. Loss of ERRβ had no effect on mtDNA content as measured after 24 h of hypoxia. To determine whether loss of ERRβ affected mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates (OCR) were measured in contracting versus quiescent cardiomyocytes in normoxia. OCR was significantly lower in contracting cardiomyocytes expressing ERRβ shRNA than scrambled shRNA controls. Maximal OCR also was reduced by ERRβ knockdown. In conclusion: 1) hypoxia increases in ERRβ mRNA expression in contracting cardiomyocytes; 2) ERRβ is required for induction of the PGC-1β isoform in response to hypoxia; 3) ERRβ expression is required to sustain OCR in normoxic conditions. PMID:27335690

  9. Rac regulates vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated motility.

    PubMed

    Soga, N; Connolly, J O; Chellaiah, M; Kawamura, J; Hruska, K A

    2001-01-01

    During angiogenesis endothelial cells migrate towards a chemotactic stimulus. Understanding the mechanism of endothelial cell migration is critical to the therapeutic manipulation of angiogenesis and ultimately cancer prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent chemotactic stimulus of endothelial cells during angiogenesis. The endothelial cell signal transduction pathway of VEGF represents a potential target for cancer therapy, but the mechanisms of post-receptor signal transduction including the roles of rho family GTPases in regulating the cytoskeletal effects of VEGF in endothelial cells are not understood. Here we analyze the mechanisms of cell migration in the mouse brain endothelial cell line (bEND3). Stable transfectants containing a tetracycline repressible expression vector were used to induce expression of Rac mutants. Endothelial cell haptotaxis was stimulated by constitutively active V12Rac on collagen and vitronectin coated supports, and chemotaxis was further stimulated by VEGF. Osteopontin coated supports were the most stimulatory to bEND3 haptotaxis, but VEGF was not effective in further increasing migration on osteopontin coated supports. Haptotaxis on support coated with collagen, vitronectin, and to a lesser degree osteopontin was inhibited by N17 Rac. N17 Rac expression blocked stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis by VEGF. As part of the chemotactic stimulation, VEGF caused a loss of actin organization at areas of cell-cell contact and increased stress fiber expression in endothelial cells which were directed towards pores in the transwell membrane. N17 Rac prevented the stimulation of cell-cell contact disruption and the stress fiber stimulation by VEGF. These data demonstrate two pathways of regulating endothelial cell motility, one in which Rac is activated by matrix/integrin stimulation and is a crucial modulator of endothelial cell haptotaxis. The other pathway, in the presence of osteopontin, is Rac independent

  10. Simultaneous Assessment of Cardiomyocyte DNA Synthesis and Ploidy: A Method to Assist Quantification of Cardiomyocyte Regeneration and Turnover.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Gavin D

    2016-01-01

    Although it is accepted that the heart has a limited potential to regenerate cardiomyocytes following injury and that low levels of cardiomyocyte turnover occur during normal ageing, quantification of these events remains challenging. This is in part due to the rarity of the process and the fact that multiple cellular sources contribute to myocardial maintenance. Furthermore, DNA duplication within cardiomyocytes often leads to a polyploid cardiomyocyte and only rarely leads to new cardiomyocytes by cellular division. In order to accurately quantify cardiomyocyte turnover discrimination between these processes is essential. The protocol described here employs long term nucleoside labeling in order to label all nuclei which have arisen as a result of DNA replication and cardiomyocyte nuclei identified by utilizing nuclei isolation and subsequent PCM1 immunolabeling. Together this allows the accurate and sensitive identification of the nucleoside labeling of the cardiomyocyte nuclei population. Furthermore, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole labeling and analysis of nuclei ploidy, enables the discrimination of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei from nuclei which have incorporated nucleoside during polyploidization. Although this method cannot control for cardiomyocyte binucleation, it allows a rapid and robust quantification of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei while accounting for polyploidization. This method has a number of downstream applications including assessing the potential therapeutics to enhance cardiomyocyte regeneration or investigating the effects of cardiac disease on cardiomyocyte turnover and ploidy. This technique is also compatible with additional downstream immunohistological techniques, allowing quantification of nucleoside incorporation in all cardiac cell types. PMID:27285379

  11. Simultaneous Assessment of Cardiomyocyte DNA Synthesis and Ploidy: A Method to Assist Quantification of Cardiomyocyte Regeneration and Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Gavin D.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is accepted that the heart has a limited potential to regenerate cardiomyocytes following injury and that low levels of cardiomyocyte turnover occur during normal ageing, quantification of these events remains challenging. This is in part due to the rarity of the process and the fact that multiple cellular sources contribute to myocardial maintenance. Furthermore, DNA duplication within cardiomyocytes often leads to a polyploid cardiomyocyte and only rarely leads to new cardiomyocytes by cellular division. In order to accurately quantify cardiomyocyte turnover discrimination between these processes is essential. The protocol described here employs long term nucleoside labeling in order to label all nuclei which have arisen as a result of DNA replication and cardiomyocyte nuclei identified by utilizing nuclei isolation and subsequent PCM1 immunolabeling. Together this allows the accurate and sensitive identification of the nucleoside labeling of the cardiomyocyte nuclei population. Furthermore, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole labeling and analysis of nuclei ploidy, enables the discrimination of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei from nuclei which have incorporated nucleoside during polyploidization. Although this method cannot control for cardiomyocyte binucleation, it allows a rapid and robust quantification of neo-cardiomyocyte nuclei while accounting for polyploidization. This method has a number of downstream applications including assessing the potential therapeutics to enhance cardiomyocyte regeneration or investigating the effects of cardiac disease on cardiomyocyte turnover and ploidy. This technique is also compatible with additional downstream immunohistological techniques, allowing quantification of nucleoside incorporation in all cardiac cell types. PMID:27285379

  12. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  13. Regulation and 3 dimensional culture of tertiary follicle growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    It has been revealed that multiple cohorts of tertiary follicles develop during some animal estrous cycle and the human menstrual cycle. To reach developmental competence, oocytes need the support of somatic cells. During embryogenesis, the primordial germ cells appear, travel to the gonadal rudiments, and form follicles. The female germ cells develop within the somatic cells of the ovary, granulosa cells, and theca cells. How the oocyte and follicle cells support each other has been seriously studied. The latest technologies in genes and proteins and genetic engineering have allowed us to collect a great deal of information about folliculogenesis. For example, a few web pages (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; http://mrg.genetics.washington.edu) provide access to databases of genomes, sequences of transcriptomes, and various tools for analyzing and discovering genes important in ovarian development. Formation of the antrum (tertiary follicle) is the final phase of folliculogenesis and the transition from intraovarian to extraovian regulation. This final step coordinates with the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. On the other hand, currently, follicle physiology is under intense investigation, as little is known about how to overcome women's ovarian problems or how to develop competent oocytes from in vitro follicle culture or transplantation. In this review, some of the known roles of hormones and some of the genes involved in tertiary follicle growth and the general characteristics of tertiary follicles are summarized. In addition, in vitro culture of tertiary follicles is also discussed as a study model and an assisted reproductive technology model. PMID:23106040

  14. miR-138 protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis via MLK3/JNK/c-jun pathway

    SciTech Connect

    He, Siyi; Liu, Peng; Jian, Zhao; Li, Jingwei; Zhu, Yun; Feng, Zezhou; Xiao, Yingbin

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •First time to find miR-138 is up-regulated in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. •First time to find miR-138 targets MLK3 and regulates JNK/c-jun pathway. •Rare myocardial biopsy of patients with CHD were collected. •Both silence and overexpression of miR-138 were implemented. •Various methods were used to detect cell function. -- Abstract: Cardiomyocytes experience a series of complex endogenous regulatory mechanisms against apoptosis induced by chronic hypoxia. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate cellular pathophysiological processes. Recently, microRNA-138 (miR-138) has been found related to hypoxia, and beneficial for cell proliferation. Therefore, we intend to study the role of miR-138 in hypoxic cardiomyocytes and the main mechanism. Myocardial samples of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) were collected to test miR-138 expression. Agomir or antagomir of miR-138 was transfected into H9C2 cells to investigate its effect on cell apoptosis. Higher miR-138 expression was observed in patients with cyanotic CHD, and its expression gradually increased with prolonged hypoxia time in H9C2 cells. Using MTT and LDH assays, cell growth was significantly greater in the agomir group than in the negative control (NC) group, while antagomir decreased cell survival. Dual luciferase reporter gene and Western-blot results confirmed MLK3 was a direct target of miR-138. It was found that miR-138 attenuated hypoxia-induced apoptosis using TUNEL, Hoechst staining and Annexin V-PE/7-AAD flow cytometry analysis. We further detected expression of apoptosis-related proteins. In the agomir group, the level of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved-caspase-3, cleaved-PARP and Bad significantly reduced, while Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax ratio increased. Opposite changes were observed in the antagomir group. Downstream targets of MLK3, JNK and c-jun, were also suppressed by miR-138. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of miR-138 plays

  15. The location of energetic compartments affects energetic communication in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Birkedal, Rikke; Laasmaa, Martin; Vendelin, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The heart relies on accurate regulation of mitochondrial energy supply to match energy demand. The main regulators are Ca2+ and feedback of ADP and Pi. Regulation via feedback has intrigued for decades. First, the heart exhibits a remarkable metabolic stability. Second, diffusion of ADP and other molecules is restricted specifically in heart and red muscle, where a fast feedback is needed the most. To explain the regulation by feedback, compartmentalization must be taken into account. Experiments and theoretical approaches suggest that cardiomyocyte energetic compartmentalization is elaborate with barriers obstructing diffusion in the cytosol and at the level of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). A recent study suggests the barriers are organized in a lattice with dimensions in agreement with those of intracellular structures. Here, we discuss the possible location of these barriers. The more plausible scenario includes a barrier at the level of MOM. Much research has focused on how the permeability of MOM itself is regulated, and the importance of the creatine kinase system to facilitate energetic communication. We hypothesize that at least part of the diffusion restriction at the MOM level is not by MOM itself, but due to the close physical association between the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and mitochondria. This will explain why animals with a disabled creatine kinase system exhibit rather mild phenotype modifications. Mitochondria are hubs of energetics, but also ROS production and signaling. The close association between SR and mitochondria may form a diffusion barrier to ADP added outside a permeabilized cardiomyocyte. But in vivo, it is the structural basis for the mitochondrial-SR coupling that is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-transients to regulate energetics, and for avoiding Ca2+-overload and irreversible opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. PMID:25324784

  16. Effects of growth regulator herbicide on downy brome (Bromus tectorum) seed production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research showed growth regulator herbicides, such as picloram and aminopyralid, have a sterilizing effect on Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus Thunb.) that can reduce this invasive annual grass’s seed production nearly 100%. This suggests growth regulators might be used to control invasive ...

  17. Protein kinase Cα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizong; Wang, Nan; Li, Man; Gong, Huiqin; Liao, Xinghua; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Tongcun

    2015-09-01

    Myocardin plays a key role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the upstream signals that control the stability and transactivity of myocardin remain to be fully understood. The expression of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) also induces cardiac hypertrophy. An essential downstream molecule of PKCα, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, was reported to negatively regulate the activities of myocardin. But, the effect of cooperation between PKCα and myocardin and the potential molecular mechanism by which PKCα regulates myocardin-mediated cardiac hypertrophy are unclear. In this study, a luciferase assay was performed using H9C2 cells transfected with expression plasmids for PKCα and myocardin. Surprisingly, the results showed that PKCα inhibited the transcriptional activity of myocardin. PKCα inhibited myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by the decrease in cell surface area and fetal gene expression, in cardiomyocyte cells overexpressing PKCα and myocardin. The potential mechanism underlying the inhibition effect of PKCα on the function of myocardin is further explored. PKCα directly promoted the basal phosphorylation of endogenous myocardin at serine and threonine residues. In myocardin-overexpressing cardiomyocyte cells, PKCα induced the excessive phosphorylation of myocardin, resulting in the degradation of myocardin and a transcriptional suppression of hypertrophic genes. These results demonstrated that PKCα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation. PMID:26206583

  18. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators. PMID:27353089

  19. Antioxidative activity and growth regulation of Brassicaceae induced by oxygen radical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Ono, Reoto; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yonesu, Akira

    2015-06-01

    The growth regulation characteristics of plants are investigated when plant seeds are irradiated with atmospheric discharge plasma. Enhancement of the germination and lengths of the stem and root of plants are observed after seeding. The total length of the stem and root increases approximately 1.6 times after a cultivation period of 72 h. The growth regulation effect is found to be maintained for 80 h of cultivation after seeding. The growth regulation originates from the change in the antioxidative activity of plant cells induced by active oxygen species generated in the oxygen plasma, which leads to the production of growth factor in plants.

  20. Increased efflux of glutathione conjugate in acutely diabetic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Ting, Simon; Lau, Howard; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; An, Ding; Qi, Dake; Abrahani, Mohammed A; Rodrigues, Brian

    2004-10-01

    In diabetes, cell death and resultant cardiomyopathy have been linked to oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidants like glutathione (GSH). Although the de novo synthesis and recycling of GSH have been extensively studied in the chronically diabetic heart, their contribution in modulating cardiac oxidative stress in acute diabetes has been largely ignored. Additionally, the possible contribution of cellular efflux in regulating GSH levels during diabetes is unknown. We used streptozotocin to make Wistar rats acutely diabetic and after 4 days examined the different processes that regulate cardiac GSH. Reduction in myocyte GSH in diabetic rats was accompanied by increased oxidative stress, excessive reactive oxygen species, and an elevated apoptotic cell death. The effect on GSH was not associated with any change in either synthesis or recycling, as both gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene expression (responsible for bio syn thesis) and glutathione reductase activity (involved with GSH recycling) remained unchanged. However, gene expression of multidrug resistance protein 1, a transporter implicated in effluxing GSH during oxidative stress, was elevated. GSH conjugate efflux mediated by multidrug resistance protein 1 also increased in diabetic cardiomyocytes, an effect that was blocked using MK-571, a specific inhibitor of this transporter. As MK-571 also decreased oxidative stress in diabetic cardiomyocytes, an important role can be proposed for this transporter in GSH and reactive oxygen species homeostasis in the acutely diabetic heart. PMID:15573148

  1. Insulin Stimulates Mitochondrial Fusion and Function in Cardiomyocytes via the Akt-mTOR-NFκB-Opa-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Valentina; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Iglewski, Myriam; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Jones, Deborah; Zhu, Yi; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Pennanen, Christian; Lopez‑Crisosto, Camila; Jaña, Fabián; Ferreira, Jorge; Noguera, Eduard; Chiong, Mario; Bernlohr, David A.; Klip, Amira; Hill, Joseph A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Abel, Evan Dale; Zorzano, Antonio; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Insulin regulates heart metabolism through the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Studies have indicated that insulin can also regulate mitochondrial function. Relevant to this idea, mitochondrial function is impaired in diabetic individuals. Furthermore, the expression of Opa-1 and mitofusins, proteins of the mitochondrial fusion machinery, is dramatically altered in obese and insulin-resistant patients. Given the role of insulin in the control of cardiac energetics, the goal of this study was to investigate whether insulin affects mitochondrial dynamics in cardiomyocytes. Confocal microscopy and the mitochondrial dye MitoTracker Green were used to obtain three-dimensional images of the mitochondrial network in cardiomyocytes and L6 skeletal muscle cells in culture. Three hours of insulin treatment increased Opa-1 protein levels, promoted mitochondrial fusion, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and elevated both intracellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption in cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, the silencing of Opa-1 or Mfn2 prevented all the metabolic effects triggered by insulin. We also provide evidence indicating that insulin increases mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes through the Akt-mTOR-NFκB signaling pathway. These data demonstrate for the first time in our knowledge that insulin acutely regulates mitochondrial metabolism in cardiomyocytes through a mechanism that depends on increased mitochondrial fusion, Opa-1, and the Akt-mTOR-NFκB pathway. PMID:24009260

  2. Hormonal regulation of wheat growth during hydroponic culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherell, Donald

    1988-01-01

    Hormonal control of root growth has been explored as one means to alleviate the crowding of plant root systems experienced in prototype hydroponic biomass production chambers being developed by the CELSS Breadboard Project. Four plant hormones, or their chemical analogs, which have been reported to selectively inhibit root growth, were tested by adding them to the nutrient solutions on day 10 of a 25 day growth test using spring wheat in hydroponic cultures. Growth and morphological changes is both shoot and root systems were evaluated. In no case was it possible to inhibit root growth without a comparable inhibition of shoot growth. It was concluded that this approach is unlikely to prove useful for wheat.

  3. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S.; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Results A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC–UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. Conclusions These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. PMID

  4. Direct observation of mammalian cell growth and size regulation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sungmin; Tzur, Amit; Weng, Yaochung; Jorgensen, Paul; Kim, Jisoo; Kirschner, Marc W.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a microfluidic system for simultaneously measuring single cell mass and cell cycle progression over multiple generations. We use this system to obtain over 1,000 hours of growth data from mouse lymphoblast and pro-B-cell lymphoid cell lines. Cell lineage analysis revealed a decrease in the growth rate variability at the G1/S phase transition, which suggests the presence of a growth rate threshold for maintaining size homeostasis. PMID:22863882

  5. Comparison of growth and metabolic regulation between wild, domesticated and transgenic salmonids.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the aspects underlying normal and growth hormone enhanced growth in salmonids, quantitative expression analysis was performed for a number of genes related to muscle growth, metabolism, immunology and energy regulation. This analysis was performed in liver and musc...

  6. Tuning the conductivity and inner structure of electrospun fibers to promote cardiomyocyte elongation and synchronous beating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaowen; Lu, Jinfu; Xu, Guisen; Wei, Jiaojun; Zhang, Zhibin; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-12-01

    The key to addressing the challenges facing cardiac tissue engineering is the integration of physical, chemical, and electrical cues into scaffolds. Aligned and conductive scaffolds have been fabricated as synthetic microenvironments to improve the function of cardiomyocytes. However, up to now, the influence of conductive capability and inner structure of fibrous scaffolds have not been determined on the cardiomyocyte morphologies and beating patterns. In the current study, highly aligned fibers were fabricated with loaded up to 6% of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to modulate the electrical conductivity, while blend and coaxial electrospinning were utilized to create a bulk distribution of CNTs in fiber matrices and a spatial embedment in fiber cores, respectively. Conductive networks were formed in the fibrous scaffolds after the inoculation of over 3% CNTs, and the increase in the conductivity could maintain the cell viabilities, induce the cell elongation, enhance the production of sarcomeric α-actinin and troponin I, and promote the synchronous beating of cardiomyocytes. Although the conductivity of blend fibers is slightly higher than that of coaxial fibers with the same CNT loadings, the lower exposures to CNTs resulted in higher cell viability, elongation, extracellular matrix secretion and beating rates for cardiomyocytes on coaxial fibers. Taken altogether, core-sheath fibers with loaded 5% of CNTs in the fiber cores facilitated the cardiomyocyte growth with a production of organized contractile proteins and a pulsation frequency close to that of the atrium. It is suggested that electrospun scaffolds that couple conductivity and fibrous structure considerations may provide optimal stimuli to foster cell morphology and functions for myocardial regeneration or establishment of in vitro cardiomyocyte culture platform for drug screening. PMID:27612781

  7. Greater cardiomyocyte density on aligned compared with random carbon nanofibers in polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Asiri, Abdullah M; Marwani, Hadi M; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) randomly embedded in poly (lactic-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA) composites have recently been shown to promote cardiomyocyte growth when compared with conventional PLGA without CNFs. It was shown then that PLGA:CNF composites were conductive and that conductivity increased as greater amounts of CNFs were added to pure PLGA. Moreover, tensile tests showed that addition of CNFs increased the tensile strength of the PLGA composite to mimic that of natural heart tissue. Most importantly, throughout all cytocompatibility experiments, cardiomyocytes were viable and expressed important biomarkers that were greatest on 50:50 wt% CNF:PLGA composites. The increased selective adsorption of fibronectin and vitronectin (critical proteins that mediate cardiomyocyte function) onto such composites proved to be the mechanism of action. However, the natural myocardium is anisotropic in terms of mechanical and electrical properties, which was not emulated in these prior PLGA:CNF composites. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to create and characterize CNFs aligned in PLGA composites (at 50:50 wt%, including their mechanical and electrical properties and cardiomyocyte density), comparing such results with randomly oriented CNFs in PLGA. Specifically, CNFs were added to soluble biodegradable PLGA (50:50 PGA:PLA weight ratio) and aligned by applying a voltage and then allowing the polymer to cure. CNF surface micron patterns (20 μm wide) on PLGA were then fabricated through a mold method to further mimic myocardium anisotropy. The results demonstrated anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties and significantly improved cardiomyocyte density for up to 5 days on CNFs aligned in PLGA compared with being randomly oriented in PLGA. These results indicate that CNFs aligned in PLGA should be further explored for improving cardiomyocyte density, which is necessary in numerous cardiovascular applications. PMID:25489241

  8. Effects of oxytocin on cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hatami, Leili; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2007-04-12

    This study sought to investigate the presence of oxytocin receptors and the possible biological role of oxytocin as an effective factor in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiomyocytes. Mouse ESCs were cultivated in hanging drops to form embryoid bodies (EBs). The EBs were then treated with and without oxytocin (experimental and control groups). Up to 30 days after plating, contraction and beating frequency were monitored and evaluated daily. The growth characteristics of the ESC-derived cardiomyocytes were assessed by cardioactive drugs, immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the experimental group, the percentage of the EBs with spontaneous contraction was significantly increased from 17th day onward. The spontaneous beating frequency of each EB in both groups was also changed with cardioactive drugs such as Bay K, carbachol, isopernaline and phenylephrine. However, in the experimental group, changes with isopernaline were more pronounced at the early and intermediate stages of cardiomyocyte development. The beating cells of both groups, stained positive with anti alpha-actinin, desmin, cardiac troponin I and connexin antibodies, and revealed similar ultrastructural features. Oxytocin receptors were detected on the ESCs and derived-differentiated cells. In addition, cardiac-specific genes such as cardiac alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain, myosin light chain-2v, and atrial natriuretic factor were also detected in the ESC-derived differentiated cells of both groups. In the experimental group, all the specific genes, with the exception of alpha-myosin heavy chain, were more pronounced at the early stage of cardiomyocyte development. In conclusion, oxytocin has receptors on undifferentiated ESCs and derived differentiated cells, and in spite of better improvement of the EBs with spontaneous contraction, it can only promote the early maturation of ESC

  9. MiR-25 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by targeting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei; Huang, Bi-Jun; Ma, Xiu-E; Wang, Shi-Yi; Feng, Jing; Lv, Fei; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yi; Li, Chang-Ming; Liang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jun; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs, whose expression levels vary in different cell types and tissues. Emerging evidence indicates that tissue-specific and -enriched miRNAs are closely associated with cellular development and stress responses in their tissues. MiR-25 has been documented to be abundant in cardiomyocytes, but its function in the heart remains unknown. Here, we report that miR-25 can protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by down-regulating mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). MiR-25 was markedly elevated in response to oxidative stimulation in cardiomyocytes. Further overexpression of miR-25 protected cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by inactivating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. MCU was identified as a potential target of miR-25 by bioinformatical analysis. MCU mRNA level was reversely correlated with miR-25 under the exposure of H2O2, and MCU protein level was largely decreased by miR-25 overexpression. The luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-25 bound directly to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of MCU mRNA. MiR-25 significantly decreased H2O2-induced elevation of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, which is likely to be the result of decreased activity of MCU. We conclude that miR-25 targets MCU to protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damages. This finding provides novel insights into the involvement of miRNAs in oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. PMID:25764156

  10. Proteins Secreted By Embryonic Stem Cells Activate Cardiomyocytes Through Ligand Binding Pathways

    PubMed Central

    LaFramboise, W. A.; Petrosko, P.; Krill-Burger, J. M.; Morris, D. R.; McCoy, A. R.; Scalise, D.; Malehorn, D. E.; Guthrie, R. D.; Becich, M. J.; Dhir, R.

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) underly embryogenesis but paracrine signals associated with the process are unknown. This study was designed to 1) profile native proteins secreted by undifferentiated hESC and 2) determine their biological effects on primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. We utilized multi-analyte, immunochemical assays to characterize media conditioned by undifferentiated hESC versus unconditioned media. Expression profiling was performed on cardiomyocytes subjected to these different media conditions and altered transcripts were mapped to critical pathways. Thirty-two of 109 proteins were significantly elevated in conditioned media ranging in concentration from thrombospondin (57.2 ± 5.0 ng/ml) to nerve growth factor (7.4 ± 1.2 pg/ml) and comprising chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and proteins involved in cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conditioned media induced karyokinesis, cytokinesis and proliferation in mono- and binucleate cardiomyocytes. Pathway analysis revealed comprehensive activation of the ROCK 1 and 2 G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) pathway associated with cytokinesis, and the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and JAK/STAT-cytokine pathway involved in cell cycle progression. These results provide a partial database of proteins secreted by pluripotent hESC that potentiate cell division in cardiomyocytes via a paracrine mechanism suggesting a potential role for these stem cell factors in cardiogenesis and cardiac repair. PMID:20045494

  11. SIRT1 regulates the mouse gastric emptying and intestinal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addressed physiological significance of SIRT1 gene on mouse gastrointestinal growth and function (gastric emptying and intestinal growth). SIRT1 (a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase) is a key cellular energy sensor, and involved in a wide variety of cellular functions including energy me...

  12. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure. PMID:27622691

  13. Cardiomyocyte Overexpression of FABP4 Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Qiao, Congzhen; Chang, Lin; Guo, Yanhong; Fan, Yanbo; Villacorta, Luis; Chen, Y. Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a member of the intracellular lipid-binding protein family, responsible for the transportation of fatty acids. It is considered to express mainly in adipose tissues, and be strongly associated with inflammation, obesity, diabetes and cardiovasculardiseases. Here we report that FABP4 is also expressed in cardiomyocytes and plays an important role in regulating heart function under pressure overload. We generated heart-specific transgenic FABP4 (FABP4-TG) mice using α myosin-heavy chain (α-MHC) promoter and human FABP4 sequence, resulting in over-expression of FABP4 in cardiomyocytes. The FABP4-TG mice displayed normal cardiac morphology and contractile function. When they were subjected to the transverse aorta constriction (TAC) procedure, the FABP4-TG mice developed more cardiac hypertrophy correlated with significantly increased ERK phosphorylation, compared with wild type controls. FABP4 over-expression in cardiomyocytes activated phosphor-ERK signal and up-regulate the expression of cardiac hypertrophic marker genes. Conversely, FABP4 induced phosphor-ERK signal and hypertrophic gene expressions can be markedly inhibited by an ERK inhibitor PD098059 as well as the FABP4 inhibitor BMS309403. These results suggest that FABP4 over-expression in cardiomyocytes can aggravate the development of cardiac hypertrophy through the activation of ERK signal pathway. PMID:27294862

  14. Cardiomyocyte Overexpression of FABP4 Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Qiao, Congzhen; Chang, Lin; Guo, Yanhong; Fan, Yanbo; Villacorta, Luis; Chen, Y Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a member of the intracellular lipid-binding protein family, responsible for the transportation of fatty acids. It is considered to express mainly in adipose tissues, and be strongly associated with inflammation, obesity, diabetes and cardiovasculardiseases. Here we report that FABP4 is also expressed in cardiomyocytes and plays an important role in regulating heart function under pressure overload. We generated heart-specific transgenic FABP4 (FABP4-TG) mice using α myosin-heavy chain (α-MHC) promoter and human FABP4 sequence, resulting in over-expression of FABP4 in cardiomyocytes. The FABP4-TG mice displayed normal cardiac morphology and contractile function. When they were subjected to the transverse aorta constriction (TAC) procedure, the FABP4-TG mice developed more cardiac hypertrophy correlated with significantly increased ERK phosphorylation, compared with wild type controls. FABP4 over-expression in cardiomyocytes activated phosphor-ERK signal and up-regulate the expression of cardiac hypertrophic marker genes. Conversely, FABP4 induced phosphor-ERK signal and hypertrophic gene expressions can be markedly inhibited by an ERK inhibitor PD098059 as well as the FABP4 inhibitor BMS309403. These results suggest that FABP4 over-expression in cardiomyocytes can aggravate the development of cardiac hypertrophy through the activation of ERK signal pathway. PMID:27294862

  15. Coupled local translation and degradation regulate growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Colak, Dilek; Hengst, Ulrich; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    Local translation mediates axonal responses to Semaphorin3A (Sema3A) and other guidance cues. However, only a subset of the axonal proteome is locally synthesized, while most proteins are trafficked from the soma. The reason why only specific proteins are locally synthesized is unknown. Here we show that local protein synthesis and degradation are linked events in growth cones. We find that growth cones exhibit high levels of ubiquitination and that local signaling pathways trigger the ubiquitination and degradation of RhoA, a mediator of Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. Inhibition of RhoA degradation is sufficient to remove the protein-synthesis requirement for Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. In addition to RhoA, we find that locally translated proteins are the main targets of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in growth cones. Thus, local protein degradation is a major feature of growth cones and creates a requirement for local translation to replenish proteins needed to maintain growth cone responses. PMID:25901863

  16. Ecdysone promotes growth of imaginal discs through the regulation of Thor in D. melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Herboso, Leire; Oliveira, Marisa M; Talamillo, Ana; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Martín, David; Sutherland, James D; Shingleton, Alexander W; Mirth, Christen K; Barrio, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a determined species-specific body size that results from the combined action of hormones and signaling pathways regulating growth rate and duration. In Drosophila, the steroid hormone ecdysone controls developmental transitions, thereby regulating the duration of the growth period. Here we show that ecdysone promotes the growth of imaginal discs in mid-third instar larvae, since imaginal discs from larvae with reduced or no ecdysone synthesis are smaller than wild type due to smaller and fewer cells. We show that insulin-like peptides are produced and secreted normally in larvae with reduced ecdysone synthesis, and upstream components of insulin/insulin-like signaling are activated in their discs. Instead, ecdysone appears to regulate the growth of imaginal discs via Thor/4E-BP, a negative growth regulator downstream of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor/Tor pathways. Discs from larvae with reduced ecdysone synthesis have elevated levels of Thor, while mutations in Thor partially rescue their growth. The regulation of organ growth by ecdysone is evolutionarily conserved in hemimetabolous insects, as shown by our results obtained using Blattella germanica. In summary, our data provide new insights into the relationship between components of the insulin/insulin-like/Tor and ecdysone pathways in the control of organ growth. PMID:26198204

  17. Ecdysone promotes growth of imaginal discs through the regulation of Thor in D. melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Herboso, Leire; Oliveira, Marisa M.; Talamillo, Ana; Pérez, Coralia; González, Monika; Martín, David; Sutherland, James D.; Shingleton, Alexander W.; Mirth, Christen K.; Barrio, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a determined species-specific body size that results from the combined action of hormones and signaling pathways regulating growth rate and duration. In Drosophila, the steroid hormone ecdysone controls developmental transitions, thereby regulating the duration of the growth period. Here we show that ecdysone promotes the growth of imaginal discs in mid-third instar larvae, since imaginal discs from larvae with reduced or no ecdysone synthesis are smaller than wild type due to smaller and fewer cells. We show that insulin-like peptides are produced and secreted normally in larvae with reduced ecdysone synthesis, and upstream components of insulin/insulin-like signaling are activated in their discs. Instead, ecdysone appears to regulate the growth of imaginal discs via Thor/4E-BP, a negative growth regulator downstream of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor/Tor pathways. Discs from larvae with reduced ecdysone synthesis have elevated levels of Thor, while mutations in Thor partially rescue their growth. The regulation of organ growth by ecdysone is evolutionarily conserved in hemimetabolous insects, as shown by our results obtained using Blattella germanica. In summary, our data provide new insights into the relationship between components of the insulin/insulin-like/Tor and ecdysone pathways in the control of organ growth. PMID:26198204

  18. Growth Factors Regulate Expression of Mineral Associated Genes in Cementoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Saygin, N. Esra; Tokiyasu, Yoshihiko; Giannobile, William V.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the responsiveness of cells within the periodontal region to specific bioactive agents is important for improving regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of specific growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on cementoblasts in vitro and ex vivo. Methods Osteocalcin (OC) promoter driven SV40 transgenic mice were used to obtain immortalized cementoblasts. Growth factor effects on DNA synthesis were assayed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Northern analysis was used to determine the effects of growth factors on gene expression profile. Effects of growth factors on cementoblast induced biomineralization were determined in vitro (von Kossa stain) and ex vivo (re-implantation of cells in immunodeficient (SCID) mice). Results All growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis compared to control. Twenty-four hour exposure of cells to PDGF-BB or TGF-β resulted in a decrease in bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNAs while PDGF-BB also increased osteopontin (OPN) mRNA. Cells exposed to IGF-I for 24 hours exhibited decreased transcripts for OCN and OPN with an upregulation of BSP mRNA noted at 72 hours. In vitro mineralization was inhibited by continuous application of PDGF-BB or TGF-β, while cells exposed to these factors prior to implantation into SCID mice still promoted biomineralization. Conclusions These data indicate IGF-I, PDGF-BB, and TGF-β influence mitogenesis, phenotypic gene expression profile, and biomineralization potential of cementoblasts suggesting that such factors alone or in combination with other agents may provide trigger factors required for regenerating periodontal tissues. PMID:11063392

  19. Angiotensin II regulates growth of the developing papillas ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Khalili, Ali; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lack of angiotensin (ANG) II production in angiotensinogen (AGT)-deficient mice or pharmacologic antagonism of ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) impairs growth of the developing papillas ex vivo, thus contributing to the hypoplastic renal medulla phenotype observed in AGT- or AT1R-null mice. Papillas were dissected from Hoxb7GFP+ or AGT+/+, +/−, −/− mouse metanephroi on postnatal day P3 and grown in three-dimentional collagen matrix gels in the presence of media (control), ANG II (10−5 M), or the specific AT1R antagonist candesartan (10−6 M) for 24 h. Percent reduction in papillary length was attenuated in AGT+/+ and in AGT+/− compared with AGT−/− (−18.4 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, −22.8 ± 1.3 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). ANG II blunted the decrease in papilla length observed in respective media-treated controls in Hoxb7GFP+ (−1.5 ± 0.3 vs. −10.0 ± 1.4%, P < 0.05) or AGT+/+, +/−, and −/− papillas (−12.8 ± 0.7 vs. −18.4 ± 1.3%, P < 0.05, −16.8 ± 1.1 vs. −23 ± 1.2%, P < 0.05; −26.2 ± 1.6 vs. −32.2 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05, respectively). In contrast, percent decrease in the length of Hoxb7GFP+ papillas in the presence of the AT1R antagonist candesartan was higher compared with control (−24.3 ± 2.1 vs. −10.5 ± 1.8%, P < 0.05). The number of proliferating phospho-histone H3 (pH3)-positive collecting duct cells was lower, whereas the number of caspase 3-positive cells undergoing apoptosis was higher in candesartan- vs. media-treated papillas (pH3: 12 ± 1.4 vs. 21 ± 2.1, P < 0.01; caspase 3: 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). Using quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrate that AT1R signaling regulates the expression of genes implicated in morphogenesis of the renal medulla. We conclude that AT1R prevents shrinkage of the developing papillas observed ex vivo via control of Wnt7b, FGF7, β-catenin, calcineurin B1, and α3 integrin gene expression, collecting duct cell

  20. Cardiomyocyte Marker Expression in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts by Cell-Free Cardiomyocyte Extract and Epigenetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Heidari, Fatemeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Vojdani, Zahra; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohrah; Rohani, Leili

    2014-01-01

    Background: The regenerative capacity of the mammalian heart is quite limited. Recent reports have focused on reprogramming mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether fibroblasts could transdifferentiate into myocardium. Methods: Mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with Trichostatin A (TSA) and 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC). The treated cells were permeabilized with streptolysin O and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract and cultured for 1, 10, and 21 days. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected by immunohistochemistry. Alkaline phosphatase activity and OCT4 were also detected in cells treated by chromatin-modifying agents. Results: The cells exposed to a combination of 5-aza-dC and TSA and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract showed morphological changes. The cells were unable to express cardiomyocyte markers after 24 h. Immunocytochemical assays showed a notable degree of myosin heavy chain and α-actinin expressions after 10 days. The expression of the natriuretic factor and troponin T occurred after 21 days in these cells. The cells exposed to chromatin-modifying agents also expressed cardiomyocyte markers; however, the proportion of reprogrammed cells was clearly smaller than that in the cultures exposed to 5-aza-dC , TSA, and extract. Conclusion: It seems that the fibroblasts were able to eliminate the previous epigenetic markers and form new ones according to the factors existing in the extract. Since no beating was observed, at least up to 21 days, the cells may need an appropriate extracellular matrix for their function. PMID:24753644

  1. INTRINSIC CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS IN THE CARDIOMYOCYTE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cardiomyocyte possesses a fully functional circadian clock. Circadian clocks are a set of proteins that generate self-sustained transcriptional positive and negative feedback loops with a free-running period of 24 hours. These intracellular molecular mechanisms confer the selective advantage of ...

  2. Isolation and Cryopreservation of Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vandergriff, Adam C.; Hensley, Michael Taylor; Cheng, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture has become increasingly important in cardiac research, but due to the limited proliferation of cardiomyocytes, culturing cardiomyocytes is difficult and time consuming. The most commonly used cells are neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs), which require isolation every time cells are needed. The birth of the rats can be unpredictable. Cryopreservation is proposed to allow for cells to be stored until needed, yet freezing/thawing methods for primary cardiomyocytes are challenging due to the sensitivity of the cells. Using the proper cryoprotectant, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), cryopreservation was achieved. By slowly extracting the DMSO while thawing the cells, cultures were obtained with viable NRCMs. NRCM phenotype was verified using immunocytochemistry staining for α-sarcomeric actinin. In addition, cells also showed spontaneous contraction after several days in culture. Cell viability after thawing was acceptable at 40–60%. In spite of this, the methods outlined allow one to easily cryopreserve and thaw NRCMs. This gives researchers a greater amount of flexibility in planning experiments as well as reducing the use of animals. PMID:25938862

  3. DNA hydroxymethylation controls cardiomyocyte gene expression in development and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Carolina M.; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Rubino, Marcello; Larcher, Veronica; Carullo, Pierluigi; Anselmo, Achille; Kurz, Kerstin; Carell, Thomas; Angius, Andrea; Latronico, Michael V. G.; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at 5-cytosine (5-mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification associated recently with cardiac disease. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)—5-mC's oxidation product—in cardiac biology and disease is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in embryonic, neonatal, adult and hypertrophic mouse cardiomyocytes, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks during heart development and failure. DNA hydroxymethylation marks the body of highly expressed genes as well as distal regulatory regions with enhanced activity. Moreover, pathological hypertrophy is characterized by a shift towards a neonatal 5-hmC distribution pattern. We also show that the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme regulates the expression of key cardiac genes, such as Myh7, through 5-hmC deposition on the gene body and at enhancers. Thus, we provide a genome-wide analysis of 5-hmC in the cardiomyocyte and suggest a role for this epigenetic modification in heart development and disease. PMID:27489048

  4. Negative elongation factor controls energy homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haihui; Qin, Kunhua; Guo, Zhanyong; Ma, Yonggang; April, Craig; Gao, Xiaoli; Andrews, Thomas G; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yidong; Weintraub, Susan T; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Degeng; Hu, Yanfen; Aune, Gregory J; Lindsey, Merry L; Li, Rong

    2014-04-10

    Negative elongation factor (NELF) is known to enforce promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a pervasive phenomenon observed across multicellular genomes. However, the physiological impact of NELF on tissue homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that whole-body conditional deletion of the B subunit of NELF (NELF-B) in adult mice results in cardiomyopathy and impaired response to cardiac stress. Tissue-specific knockout of NELF-B confirms its cell-autonomous function in cardiomyocytes. NELF directly supports transcription of those genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. NELF also shares extensively transcriptional target genes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of energy metabolism in the myocardium. Mechanistically, NELF helps stabilize the transcription initiation complex at the metabolism-related genes. Our findings strongly indicate that NELF is part of the PPARα-mediated transcription regulatory network that maintains metabolic homeostasis in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24656816

  5. DNA hydroxymethylation controls cardiomyocyte gene expression in development and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Carolina M; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Rubino, Marcello; Larcher, Veronica; Carullo, Pierluigi; Anselmo, Achille; Kurz, Kerstin; Carell, Thomas; Angius, Andrea; Latronico, Michael V G; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at 5-cytosine (5-mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification associated recently with cardiac disease. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)-5-mC's oxidation product-in cardiac biology and disease is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in embryonic, neonatal, adult and hypertrophic mouse cardiomyocytes, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks during heart development and failure. DNA hydroxymethylation marks the body of highly expressed genes as well as distal regulatory regions with enhanced activity. Moreover, pathological hypertrophy is characterized by a shift towards a neonatal 5-hmC distribution pattern. We also show that the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme regulates the expression of key cardiac genes, such as Myh7, through 5-hmC deposition on the gene body and at enhancers. Thus, we provide a genome-wide analysis of 5-hmC in the cardiomyocyte and suggest a role for this epigenetic modification in heart development and disease. PMID:27489048

  6. Differentially phased leaf growth and movements in Arabidopsis depend on coordinated circadian and light regulation.

    PubMed

    Dornbusch, Tino; Michaud, Olivier; Xenarios, Ioannis; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to vastly studied hypocotyl growth, little is known about diel regulation of leaf growth and its coordination with movements such as changes in leaf elevation angle (hyponasty). We developed a 3D live-leaf growth analysis system enabling simultaneous monitoring of growth and movements. Leaf growth is maximal several hours after dawn, requires light, and is regulated by daylength, suggesting coupling between growth and metabolism. We identify both blade and petiole positioning as important components of leaf movements in Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal a temporal delay between growth and movements. In hypocotyls, the combination of circadian expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 and their light-regulated protein stability drives rhythmic hypocotyl elongation with peak growth at dawn. We find that PIF4 and PIF5 are not essential to sustain rhythmic leaf growth but influence their amplitude. Furthermore, EARLY FLOWERING3, a member of the evening complex (EC), is required to maintain the correct phase between growth and movement. Our study shows that the mechanisms underlying rhythmic hypocotyl and leaf growth differ. Moreover, we reveal the temporal relationship between leaf elongation and movements and demonstrate the importance of the EC for the coordination of these phenotypic traits. PMID:25281688

  7. AMPK regulation of the growth of cultured human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Asish K. . E-mail: aksaha@bu.edu; Persons, Kelly; Safer, Joshua D.; Luo Zhijun; Holick, Michael F.; Ruderman, Neil B.

    2006-10-20

    AMP kinase (AMPK) is a fuel sensing enzyme that responds to cellular energy depletion by increasing processes that generate ATP and inhibiting others that require ATP but are not acutely necessary for survival. In the present study, we examined the relationship between AMPK activation and the growth (proliferation) of cultured human keratinocytes and assessed whether the inhibition of keratinocyte growth by vitamin D involves AMPK activation. In addition, we explored whether the inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation as they approach confluence could be AMPK-related. Keratinocytes were incubated for 12 h with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-{beta}-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). At concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -3} M, AICAR inhibited keratinocyte growth by 50% and 95%, respectively, based on measurements of thymidine incorporation into DNA. It also increased AMPK and acetyl CoA carboxylase phosphorylation (P-AMPK and P-ACC) and decreased the concentration of malonyl CoA confirming that AMPK activation had occurred. Incubation with the thiazolidinedione, troglitazone (10{sup -6} M) caused similar alterations in P-AMPK, P-ACC, and cell growth. In contrast, the well known inhibition of keratinocyte growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (10{sup -7} and 10{sup -6} M) was not associated with changes in P-AMPK or P-ACC. Like most cells, the growth of keratinocytes diminished as they approached confluence. Thus, it was of note that we found a progressive increase in P-AMPK (1.5- to 2-fold, p < 0.05) as keratinocytes grown in control medium went from 25% to 100% confluence. In conclusion, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of AMPK acts as a signal to diminish the proliferation of cultured keratinocytes as they approach confluence. They also suggest that AMPK activators, such as AICAR and troglitazone, inhibit keratinocyte growth and that the inhibition of cell growth by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} is AMPK-independent.

  8. Information Integration and Communication in Plant Growth Regulation.

    PubMed

    Chaiwanon, Juthamas; Wang, Wenfei; Zhu, Jia-Ying; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2016-03-10

    Plants are equipped with the capacity to respond to a large number of diverse signals, both internal ones and those emanating from the environment, that are critical to their survival and adaption as sessile organisms. These signals need to be integrated through highly structured intracellular networks to ensure coherent cellular responses, and in addition, spatiotemporal actions of hormones and peptides both orchestrate local cell differentiation and coordinate growth and physiology over long distances. Further, signal interactions and signaling outputs vary significantly with developmental context. This review discusses our current understanding of the integrated intracellular and intercellular signaling networks that control plant growth. PMID:26967291

  9. Genetic Regulation of Phenotypic Plasticity and Canalisation in Yeast Growth.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a genotype to show diverse phenotypes in different environments is called phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity helps populations to evade extinctions in novel environments, facilitates adaptation and fuels evolution. However, most studies focus on understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic regulation in specific environments. As a result, while it's evolutionary relevance is well established, genetic mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and their overlap with the environment specific regulators is not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly sensitive to the environment, which acts as not just external stimulus but also as signalling cue for this unicellular, sessile organism. We used a previously published dataset of a biparental yeast population grown in 34 diverse environments and mapped genetic loci regulating variation in phenotypic plasticity, plasticity QTL, and compared them with environment-specific QTL. Plasticity QTL is one whose one allele exhibits high plasticity whereas the other shows a relatively canalised behaviour. We mapped phenotypic plasticity using two parameters-environmental variance, an environmental order-independent parameter and reaction norm (slope), an environmental order-dependent parameter. Our results show a partial overlap between pleiotropic QTL and plasticity QTL such that while some plasticity QTL are also pleiotropic, others have a significant effect on phenotypic plasticity without being significant in any environment independently. Furthermore, while some plasticity QTL are revealed only in specific environmental orders, we identify large effect plasticity QTL, which are order-independent such that whatever the order of the environments, one allele is always plastic and the other is canalised. Finally, we show that the environments can be divided into two categories based on the phenotypic diversity of the population within them and the two categories have differential regulators of

  10. High-efficiency reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes requires suppression of pro-fibrotic signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanbiao; Londono, Pilar; Cao, Yingqiong; Sharpe, Emily J; Proenza, Catherine; O'Rourke, Rebecca; Jones, Kenneth L; Jeong, Mark Y; Walker, Lori A; Buttrick, Peter M; McKinsey, Timothy A; Song, Kunhua

    2015-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes by forced expression of cardiomyogenic factors, GMT (GATA4, Mef2C, Tbx5) or GHMT (GATA4, Hand2, Mef2C, Tbx5), has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for cardiac repair. However, current approaches are inefficient. Here we demonstrate that pro-fibrotic signalling potently antagonizes cardiac reprogramming. Remarkably, inhibition of pro-fibrotic signalling using small molecules that target the transforming growth factor-β or Rho-associated kinase pathways converts embryonic fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocyte-like cells, with the efficiency up to 60%. Conversely, overactivation of these pro-fibrotic signalling networks attenuates cardiac reprogramming. Furthermore, inhibition of pro-fibrotic signalling dramatically enhances the kinetics of cardiac reprogramming, with spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes emerging in less than 2 weeks, as opposed to 4 weeks with GHMT alone. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac conversion of fibroblasts and would enhance efforts to generate cardiomyocytes for clinical applications. PMID:26354680

  11. High-efficiency reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes requires suppression of pro-fibrotic signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanbiao; Londono, Pilar; Cao, Yingqiong; Sharpe, Emily J.; Proenza, Catherine; O'Rourke, Rebecca; Jones, Kenneth L.; Jeong, Mark Y.; Walker, Lori A.; Buttrick, Peter M.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Song, Kunhua

    2015-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes by forced expression of cardiomyogenic factors, GMT (GATA4, Mef2C, Tbx5) or GHMT (GATA4, Hand2, Mef2C, Tbx5), has recently been demonstrated, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for cardiac repair. However, current approaches are inefficient. Here we demonstrate that pro-fibrotic signalling potently antagonizes cardiac reprogramming. Remarkably, inhibition of pro-fibrotic signalling using small molecules that target the transforming growth factor-β or Rho-associated kinase pathways converts embryonic fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocyte-like cells, with the efficiency up to 60%. Conversely, overactivation of these pro-fibrotic signalling networks attenuates cardiac reprogramming. Furthermore, inhibition of pro-fibrotic signalling dramatically enhances the kinetics of cardiac reprogramming, with spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes emerging in less than 2 weeks, as opposed to 4 weeks with GHMT alone. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac conversion of fibroblasts and would enhance efforts to generate cardiomyocytes for clinical applications. PMID:26354680

  12. Application of plant growth regulators mitigates chlorotic foliar injury by the black pecan aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorotic feeding injury by the black pecan aphid, Melanocallis caryaefoliae (Davis) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), to pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch) foliage can result in leaf senescence and abscission. The plant growth regulators chlorforfenuron (CPPU), gibberellic acid (GA3) and aminoet...

  13. INFLUENCE OF AN INSECT GROWTH REGULATOR ON THE LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF AN ESTUARINE SHRIMP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of methoprene, an insect growth regulator used in mosquito control, on larval development of the estuarine grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) was examined in the laboratory. o grass shrimp larvae successfully completed metamorphosis when continuously exposed to 1000 ...

  14. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  15. Growth Phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetellae are Gram negative bacterial respiratory pathogens. Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, is a human-restricted variant of Bordetella bronchiseptica, which infects a broad range of mammals causing chronic and often asymptomatic infections. Growth phase dependent gen...

  16. Growth regulation and other secondary effects of herbicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As all herbicides act on pathways or processes crucial to plants, in an inhibitory or stimulatory way, low doses of any herbicide might be used to beneficially modify plant growth, development, or composition. Glyphosate, the most used herbicide all over the world, is widely applied at low rates to ...

  17. Regulation of liver regeneration by growth factors and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Friederike; Köhler, Ulrike A; Speicher, Tobias; Werner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    The capability of the liver to fully regenerate after injury is a unique phenomenon essential for the maintenance of its important functions in the control of metabolism and xenobiotic detoxification. The regeneration process is histologically well described, but the genes that orchestrate liver regeneration have been only partially characterized. Of particular interest are cytokines and growth factors, which control different phases of liver regeneration. Historically, their potential functions in this process were addressed by analyzing their expression in the regenerating liver of rodents. Some of the predicted roles were confirmed using functional studies, including systemic delivery of recombinant growth factors, neutralizing antibodies or siRNAs prior to liver injury or during liver regeneration. In particular, the availability of genetically modified mice and their use in liver regeneration studies has unraveled novel and often unexpected functions of growth factors, cytokines and their downstream signalling targets in liver regeneration. This review summarizes the results obtained by functional studies that have addressed the roles and mechanisms of action of growth factors and cytokines in liver regeneration after acute injury to this organ. PMID:20652897

  18. Characterization and estrogen regulation of uterine growth factor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Acid extracts of rat, bovine and rabbit uterus stimulated glucose transport, measured by phosphorylation of 2-deoxyglucose and DNA synthesis, measured by {sup 3}H-thymidne incorporation, in uterine tumor cells and in primary cultures of rat uterine cells. The stimulation of glucose transport was of the same magnitude and followed the same time course as estradiol stimulation in vivo. Uteri from estradiol-treated rat uteri contained 4 times more glucose transport-stimulating activity as control uteri. DNA synthetic activity in rat uterine homogenates was elevated 3-fold within 18-24 h after estradiol injection. Gel filtration showed molecular weight heterogeneity with activity eluting between 10-30 kDA. Both activities were acid and heat stable, were reduced by trypsin but not by dextran-coated charcoal. The effect of purified growth factors on DNA synthesis in primary cultures of rat uterine cells was examined. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblasts growth factor (bFGF), and transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) had no effect on {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation.

  19. Orchestrated structure evolution: modeling growth-regulated nanomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Shaghayegh; Kitayaporn, Sathana; Schwartz, Daniel T; Böhringer, Karl F

    2011-04-22

    Orchestrated structure evolution (OSE) is a scalable manufacturing method that combines the advantages of top-down (tool-directed) and bottom-up (self-propagating) approaches. The method consists of a seed patterning step that defines where material nucleates, followed by a growth step that merges seeded islands into the final patterned thin film. We develop a model to predict the completed pattern based on a computationally efficient approximate Green's function solution of the diffusion equation plus a Voronoi diagram based approach that defines the final grain boundary structure. Experimental results rely on electron beam lithography to pattern the seeds, followed by the mass transfer limited growth of copper via electrodeposition. The seed growth model is compared with experimental results to quantify nearest neighbor seed-to-seed interactions as well as how seeds interact with the pattern boundary to impact the local growth rate. Seed-to-seed and seed-to-pattern interactions are shown to result in overgrowth of seeds on edges and corners of the shape, where seeds have fewer neighbors. We explore how local changes to the seed location can be used to improve the patterning quality without increasing the manufacturing cost. OSE is shown to enable a unique set of trade-offs between the cost, time, and quality of thin film patterning. PMID:21393828

  20. Does OsPHR2, central Pi-signaling regulator, regulate some unknown factors crucial for plant growth?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiming

    2010-01-01

    OsPHR2, the homolog of AtPHR1, is a central Pi-signaling regulator. The Pi-signaling pathway downstream of AtPHR1, similarly of OsPHR2,1,2 involves a noncoding RNA which targets mimicry of miR399. miRNA399 mediates cleavage of PHO2.3,4 The regulating pathway downstream of OsPHR2 is negatively regulated by the Pi-signaling responsive gene OsSPX1.5,6 Overexpression of AtPHR1 and OsPHR2 leads to an increased concentration of Pi in the shoot tissues with leaf toxic symptom and growth retardation similar as the phenotype of pho2 mutant, especially under Pi abundant conditions.2,6,7 It has been known that the low affinity Pi transporter OsPT2 mainly contributes to the shoot Pi accumulation mediated by OsPHR2, and overexpression of OsPT2 results in shoot Pi accumulation and leaf toxic symptom and growth retardation under Pi abundant conditions.6 Two curious questions are emerging from the reported results: How Os SPX1 functions on the negative regulation of the pathway and what mechanism of the growth retardation mediated by OsPHR2. For the second question, our favored hypothesis is that the growth inhibition mediated by overexpression of OsPHR2 is caused by toxic physiological effects due to excessive Pi accumulation in shoots (Pi toxicity). In fact, the toxic symptoms become diminished with decreased Pi levels in growth medium. However, the plant growth retardation mediated by overexpression of OsPHR2 may be caused by some unknown genetic factor(s) regulated by OsPHR2. PMID:20404569

  1. GRP78 Interacting Partner Bag5 Responds to ER Stress and Protects Cardiomyocytes From ER Stress-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish K; Tahrir, Farzaneh G; Knezevic, Tijana; White, Martyn K; Gordon, Jennifer; Cheung, Joseph Y; Khalili, Kamel; Feldman, Arthur M

    2016-08-01

    Bag5 is a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone regulators and is unusual in that it consists of five BAG domains, which function as modulators of chaperone activity. Bag family proteins play a key role in cellular as well as in cardiac function and their differential expression is reported in heart failure. In this study, we examined the importance of a Bag family member protein, Bag5, in cardiomyocytes during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We found that expression of Bag5 in cardiomyocytes is significantly increased with the induction of ER stress in a time dependent manner. We have taken gain-in and loss-of functional approaches to characterize Bag5 protein function in cardiomyocytes. Adenoviral mediated expression of Bag5 significantly decreased cell death as well as improved cellular viability in ER stress. Along with this, ER stress-induced CHOP protein expression is significantly decreased in cells that overexpress Bag5. Conversely, we found that siRNA-mediated knockdown of Bag5 caused cell death, increased cytotoxicity, and decreased cellular viability in cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, we found that Bag5 protein expression is significantly increased in the ER during ER stress and that this in turn modulates GRP78 protein stability and reduces ER stress. This study suggests that Bag5 is an important regulator of ER function and so could be exploited as a tool to improve cardiomyocyte function under stress conditions. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1813-1821, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729625

  2. Physical and Biological Regulation of Neuron Regenerative Growth and Network Formation on Recombinant Dragline Silks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenwen; He, Jiuyang; Jones, Justin; Lewis, Randolph V.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant spider silks produced in transgenic goat milk were studied as cell culture matrices for neuronal growth. Major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) supported neuronal growth, axon extension and network connectivity, with cell morphology comparable to the gold standard poly-lysine. In addition, neurons growing on MaSp1 films had increased neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression at both mRNA and protein levels. The results indicate that MaSp1 films present useful surface charge and substrate stiffness to support the growth of primary rat cortical neurons. Moreover, a putative neuron-specific surface binding sequence GRGGL within MaSp1 may contribute to the biological regulation of neuron growth. These findings indicate that MaSp1 could regulate neuron growth through its physical and biological features. This dual regulation mode of MaSp1 could provide an alternative strategy for generating functional silk materials for neural tissue engineering. PMID:25701039

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide System and Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Zobi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into energetically efficient cardiomyocytes contributes to functional cardiac repair and is envisioned to ameliorate progressive degenerative cardiac diseases. Advanced cell maturation strategies are therefore needed to create abundant mature cardiomyocytes. In this study, we tested whether the redox-sensitive heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system, operating through mitochondrial biogenesis, acts as a mechanism for ES cell differentiation and cardiomyocyte maturation. Results: Manipulation of HO-1/CO to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis demonstrates a direct pathway to ES cell differentiation and maturation into beating cardiomyocytes that express adult structural markers. Targeted HO-1/CO interventions up- and downregulate specific cardiogenic transcription factors, transcription factor Gata4, homeobox protein Nkx-2.5, heart- and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 1, and MEF2C. HO-1/CO overexpression increases cardiac gene expression for myosin regulatory light chain 2, atrial isoform, MLC2v, ANP, MHC-β, and sarcomere α-actinin and the major mitochondrial fusion regulators, mitofusin 2 and MICOS complex subunit Mic60. This promotes structural mitochondrial network expansion and maturation, thereby supporting energy provision for beating embryoid bodies. These effects are prevented by silencing HO-1 and by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species scavenging, while disruption of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA depletion by loss of mitochondrial transcription factor A compromise infrastructure. This leads to failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and maturation and contractile dysfunction. Innovation: The capacity to augment cardiomyogenesis via a defined mitochondrial pathway has unique therapeutic potential for targeting ES cell maturation in cardiac disease. Conclusion: Our findings establish the HO-1/CO system and redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis as

  4. [Luminescent and physiological indices of triticale under the treatment of seeds with growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Kalmatskaia, O A; Karavaev, V A; Gunar, L É; Miakin'kov, A G

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the before-sowing treatment of triticale seeds with growth regulators epin and zircon resulted in the increase in the F742/F686 ratio of the stationary fluorescence intensities of the plant leaves at the wavelength bands, 742 and 686 nm, corresponding to the maxima in the leaf fluorescence spectrum. Triticale under the treatment of seeds with growth regulators showed higher chlorophyll content, higher productivity and higher indices of the crop yield. PMID:25868356

  5. Understanding Growth in Self-Regulation: International Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade or so, the importance of self-regulation for academic development and later life success has become increasingly clear (Morrison, Bachman, & Connor, 2005). This article is a commentary regarding the articles in a special issue of "Early Education and Development," which broaden the understanding of the important…

  6. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  7. A Novel Function for p53: Regulation of Growth Cone Motility through Interaction with Rho Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qingyu; Baudry, Michel; Liao, Guanghong; Noniyev, Albert; Galeano, James; Bi, Xiaoning

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 suppresses tumorgenesis by regulating cell proliferation and migration. We investigated whether p53 could also control cell motility in postmitotic neurons. P53 isoforms recognized by phospho-p53-specific (at Ser15) or “mutant” conformation specific antibodies were highly and specifically expressed in axons and axonal growth cones in primary hippocampal neurons. Inhibition of p53 function by inhibitors, siRNAs, or by dominant negative forms, induced axonal growth cone collapse, whereas p53 over-expression led to larger growth cones. Furthermore, deletion of the p53 nuclear export signal blocked its axonal distribution and induced growth cone collapse. P53 inhibition-induced axonal growth cone collapse was significantly reduced by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632. Our results reveal a new function for p53 as a critical regulator of axonal growth cone behavior by suppressing ROCK activity. PMID:19386914

  8. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Steve A.

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  9. Regulation of gene expression mediating indeterminate muscle growth in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, A K Shakur; Asaduzzaman, Md; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo; Kinoshita, Shigeharu

    2015-08-01

    Teleosts are unique among vertebrates due to their indeterminate muscle growth, i.e., continued production of neonatal muscle fibers until death. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying this property is unknown. Here, we focused on the torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM2528-1, which is specifically expressed in neonatal muscle fibers produced by indeterminate muscle growth. We examined the flanking region of MYHM2528-1 through an in vivo reporter assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and identified a 2100 bp 5'-flanking sequence that contained sufficient promoter activity to allow specific gene expression. The effects of enhanced promoter activity were observed at the outer region of the fast muscle and the dorsal edge of slow muscle in zebrafish larvae. At the juvenile stage, the promoter was specifically activated in small diameter muscle fibers scattered throughout fast muscle and in slow muscle near the septum separating slow and fast muscles. This spatio-temporal promoter activity overlapped with known myogenic zones involved in teleost indeterminate muscle growth. A deletion mutant analysis revealed that the -2100 to -600 bp 5'flanking sequence of MYHM2528-1 is essential for promoter activity. This region contains putative binding sites for several representative myogenesis-related transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), a transcription activator involved in regeneration of mammalian adult skeletal muscle. A significant reduction in the promoter activity of the MYHM2528-1 deletion constructs was observed in accordance with a reduction in the number of these binding sites, suggesting the involvement of specific transcription factors in indeterminate muscle growth. PMID:25842264

  10. Early growth response 1 regulates glucose deprivation-induced necrosis

    PubMed Central

    JEON, HYUN MIN; LEE, SU YEON; JU, MIN KYUNG; KIM, CHO HEE; PARK, HYE GYEONG; KANG, HO SUNG

    2013-01-01

    Necrosis is commonly found in the core region of solid tumours due to metabolic stress such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation (GD) resulting from insufficient vascularization. Necrosis promotes tumour growth and development by releasing the tumour-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1); however, the molecular mechanism underlying necrotic cell death remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that early growth response 1 (Egr-1) is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner by GD in several cell lines such as A549, MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cells that exhibit necrosis upon GD. We found that Egr-1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) prevented GD-induced necrosis and HMGB1 release. Necrosis-inhibiting activity of Egr-1 shRNA was also seen in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTSs), an in vitro tumour model system. In contrast, Egr-1 overexpression appeared to make tumour cells more susceptible to GD-induced necrosis. Finally, Egr-1 shRNA suppressed the growth of MTSs. These findings demonstrate that Egr-1 is implicated in GD-induced necrosis and tumour progression. PMID:23152075

  11. Nitric Oxide Synthase Regulates Growth Coordination During Drosophila melanogaster Imaginal Disc Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jaszczak, Jacob S; Wolpe, Jacob B; Dao, Anh Q; Halme, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that coordinate growth during development are essential for producing animals with proper organ proportion. Here we describe a pathway through which tissues communicate to coordinate growth. During Drosophila melanogaster larval development, damage to imaginal discs activates a regeneration checkpoint through expression of Dilp8. This both produces a delay in developmental timing and slows the growth of undamaged tissues, coordinating regeneration of the damaged tissue with developmental progression and overall growth. Here we demonstrate that Dilp8-dependent growth coordination between regenerating and undamaged tissues, but not developmental delay, requires the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the prothoracic gland. NOS limits the growth of undamaged tissues by reducing ecdysone biosynthesis, a requirement for imaginal disc growth during both the regenerative checkpoint and normal development. Therefore, NOS activity in the prothoracic gland coordinates tissue growth through regulation of endocrine signals. PMID:26081194

  12. Emergence of robust growth laws from optimal regulation of ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Matthew; Klumpp, Stefan; Mateescu, Eduard M; Hwa, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria must constantly adapt their growth to changes in nutrient availability; yet despite large-scale changes in protein expression associated with sensing, adaptation, and processing different environmental nutrients, simple growth laws connect the ribosome abundance and the growth rate. Here, we investigate the origin of these growth laws by analyzing the features of ribosomal regulation that coordinate proteome-wide expression changes with cell growth in a variety of nutrient conditions in the model organism Escherichia coli. We identify supply-driven feedforward activation of ribosomal protein synthesis as the key regulatory motif maximizing amino acid flux, and autonomously guiding a cell to achieve optimal growth in different environments. The growth laws emerge naturally from the robust regulatory strategy underlying growth rate control, irrespective of the details of the molecular implementation. The study highlights the interplay between phenomenological modeling and molecular mechanisms in uncovering fundamental operating constraints, with implications for endogenous and synthetic design of microorganisms. PMID:25149558

  13. PTH Receptor Signaling in Osteoblasts Regulates Endochondral Vascularization in Maintenance of Postnatal Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tao; Xian, Lingling; Crane, Janet; Wen, Chunyi; Hilton, Matthew; Lu, William; Newman, Peter; Cao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal growth of postnatal bone requires precise control of growth plate cartilage chondrocytes and subsequent osteogenesis and bone formation. Little is known about the role of angiogenesis and bone remodeling in maintenance of cartilaginous growth plate. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulates bone remodeling by activating PTH receptor (PTH1R). Mice with conditional deletion of PTH1R in osteoblasts showed disrupted trabecular bone formation. The mice also exhibited postnatal growth retardation with profound defects in growth plate cartilage, ascribable predominantly to a decrease in number of hypertrophic chondrocytes, resulting in premature fusion of the growth plate and shortened long bones. Further characterization of hypertrophic zone and primary spongiosa revealed that endochondral angiogenesis and vascular invasion of the cartilage were impaired, which was associated with aberrant chondrocyte maturation and cartilage development. These studies reveal that PTH1R signaling in osteoblasts regulates cartilaginous growth plate for postnatal growth of bone. PMID:25196529

  14. Klotho inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/beta catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangzhu; Meng, Wei; Ding, Jieqiong; Cheng, Menglin

    2016-04-29

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for cardiac morbidity and mortality. The antiaging protein klotho reportedly possesses a protective role in cardiac diseases. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of klotho remain unknown. This study was aimed to determine the effects of klotho on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertrophy in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and the possible mechanism of actions. We found that klotho significantly inhibited Ang II-induced hypertrophic growth of neonatal cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased [(3)H]-Leucine incorporation, cardiomyocyte surface area and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) mRNA expression. Meanwhile, klotho inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased protein expression of active β-catenin, downregulated protein and mRNA expression of the β-catenin target genes c-myc and cyclin D1, and increased β-catenin phosphorylation. Inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by the specific inhibitor XAV939 markedly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The further study revealed that klotho treatment significantly downregulated protein expression of Ang II receptor type I (AT1R) but not type II (AT2R). The AT1R antagonist losartan inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that klotho inhibits Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/β-catenin signaling pathway, which may provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the protective effects of klotho in heart diseases, and raise the possibility that klotho may act as an endogenous antihypertrophic factor by inhibiting the Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:26970306

  15. Microarray and functional analysis of growth-phase dependent gene regulation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth-phase dependent gene regulation has recently been demonstrated to occur in B. pertussis, with many transcripts, including known virulence factors, significantly decreasing during the transition from logarithmic to stationary-phase growth. Given that B. pertussis is thought to have derived fro...

  16. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates metabolism, growth, and lifespan in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TOR is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and lifespan in yeast and animals. In plants growth and lifespan are intertwined with not only nutrient acquisition but also nutrition generation and unique aspects of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these process...

  17. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual grass Seed Production Under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth regulator herbicides, such as 2,4-D, dicamba, picloram, and aminopyralid, are commonly used to control broadleaf weeds in grasslands, non-croplands and cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley). If applied to cereals at late growth stages, while the grasses are developing reproductive parts, the her...

  18. Protection of Cardiomyocytes from Ischemic/Hypoxic Cell Death via Drbp1 and pMe2GlyDH in Cardio-specific ARC Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jong-Ok; Nah, Jihoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Chang, Jae-Woong; Song, Young-Wha; Yang, Dong-Kwon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung; Chae, Soo-Wan; Hwang, Seung-Yong; Kim, Seung-Jun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Cho, Chunghee; Oh, Chang-Gyu; Park, Woo Jin; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2008-01-01

    The ischemic death of cardiomyocytes is associated in heart disease and heart failure. However, the molecular mechanism underlying ischemic cell death is not well defined. To examine the function of apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) in the ischemic/hypoxic damage of cardiomyocytes, we generated cardio-specific ARC transgenic mice using a mouse α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Compared with the control, the hearts of ARC transgenic mice showed a 3-fold overexpression of ARC. Langendoff preparation showed that the hearts isolated from ARC transgenic mice exhibited improved recovery of contractile performance during reperfusion. The cardiomyocytes cultured from neonatal ARC transgenic mice were significantly resistant to hypoxic cell death. Furthermore, the ARC C-terminal calcium-binding domain was as potent to protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxic cell death as ARC. Genome-wide RNA expression profiling uncovered a list of genes whose expression was changed (>2-fold) in ARC transgenic mice. Among them, expressional regulation of developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drbp1) or the dimethylglycine dehydrogenase precursor (pMe2GlyDH) affected hypoxic death of cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that ARC may protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxic cell death by regulating its downstream, Drbp1 and pMe2GlyDH, shedding new insights into the protection of heart from hypoxic damages. PMID:18782777

  19. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  20. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Phytoremediation of Hexachlorocyclohexane-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Chouychai, Waraporn; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Lee, Hung

    2015-01-01

    The influence of three plant growth regulators, indolebutyric acid (IBA), thidiazuron (TDZ) and gibberellic acid (GA3), either individually or in pair-wise combinations, on the ability of waxy corn plant to remove hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) from contaminated soil was studied. Waxy corn seeds were immersed for 3 h in solutions of 1.0 mg/l IBA, 0.01 mg/l TDZ, 0.1 mg/l GA3, or a mixture of two of the growth regulators, and then inoculated in soil contaminated with 46.8 mg/kg HCH for 30 days. Pretreatment of corn seeds with the plant growth regulators did not enhance corn growth when compared with those immersed in distilled water (control), but the pretreatment enhanced HCH removal significantly. On day 30, HCH concentration in the bulk soil planted with corn seeds pretreated with GA3 or TDZ+GA3 decreased by 97.4% and 98.4%, respectively. In comparison, HCH removal in soil planted with non-pretreated control waxy corn seeds was only 35.7%. The effect of several growth regulator application methods was tested with 0.01 mg/l TDZ. The results showed that none of the methods, which ranged from seed immersion, watering in soil, or spraying on shoots, affected HCH removal from soil. However, the method of applying the growth regulators may affect corn growth. Watering the corn plant with TDZ in soil led to higher root fresh weight (2.2 g) and higher root dried weight (0.57 g) than the other treatments (0.2-1.7 g root fresh weight and 0.02-0.43 g root dried weight) on day 30. Varying the concentrations of GA3 did not affect the enhancement of corn growth and HCH removal on day 30. The results showed that plant growth regulators may have potential for use to enhance HCH phytoremediation. PMID:25985054

  1. DNA Walker-Regulated Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-06-16

    We demonstrate a DNAzyme-based walker system as a controlled oligonucleotide drug AS1411 release platform for breast cancer treatment. In this system, AS1411 strands are released from fuel strands as a walker moves along its carbon nanotube track. The release rate and amount of anticancer oligonucleotides are controlled by the walker operation. With a walker system embedded within the collagen extracellular matrix, we show that this drug release system can be used for in situ cancer cell growth inhibition. PMID:27059426

  2. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation. PMID:26898161

  3. Root growth regulation and gravitropism in maize roots does not require the epidermis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have earlier published observations showing that endogenous alterations in growth rate during gravitropism in maize roots (Zea mays L.) are unaffected by the orientation of cuts which remove epidermal and cortical tissue in the growing zone (Bjorkman and Cleland, 1988, Planta 176, 513-518). We concluded that the epidermis and cortex are not essential for transporting a growth-regulating signal in gravitropism or straight growth, nor for regulating the rate of tissue expansion. This conclusion has been challenged by Yang et al. (1990, Planta 180, 530-536), who contend that a shallow girdle around the entire perimeter of the root blocks gravitropic curvature and that this inhibition is the result of a requirement for epidermal cells to transport the growth-regulating signal. In this paper we demonstrate that the entire epidermis can be removed without blocking gravitropic curvature and show that the position of narrow girdles does not affect the location of curvature. We therefore conclude that the epidermis is not required for transport of a growth-regulating substance from the root cap to the growing zone, nor does it regulate the growth rate of the elongating zone of roots.

  4. [Rat cardiomyocyte remodeling after neonatal cryptosporidiosis. II. Elongation, excessive polyploidization and HIF-1alpha overexpression].

    PubMed

    Anatskaia, O V; Sidorenko, N V; Matveev, I V; Kropotov, A V; Vinogradov, A E

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective epidemyological studies evidence that infant diseases leave survivors with an increased susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases in later life. At the same time, the mechanisms of this link remain poorly understood. Based on medical statistics reporting that infectious gastroenteritis is the most common cause of maladies in babies, infants and children, we analysed the effects of moderate cryptosporidial gastroenteritis on the heart and ventricular cardiomyocyte remodelling in rats of the first month of life. The disease was challenged by a worldwide human protozoic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum (Apicomplexa, Sporozoa). The main symptoms manifested in the growth retardation moderate diarrhea. Using real-time PCR, cytophotometry, confocal microscopy and image analysis, we indicated that cryptosporidiosis was associated, with the atrophy heart and the elongation, narrowing, protein content decrease and hyperpolyploidization of cardiomyocytes and the moderate overexpression of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) mRNA. Cardiomyocyte shape remodeling and heart atrophy presented in all age groups. The severity of these changes, hovewer, declined gradually from younger to older groups. In contrast, hyperpolyploidization and HIF-1alpha mRNA overexpression were registered mainly among animals aged between 6 and 13 days, and were barely detected and non-significant in older age groups. In the rat the time period covering 6-13 days after birth is known to coincide with the intensive cardiomyocyte polyploidization and the switch from proliferation to hypertrophy. Thus, our data indicate that neonatal cryptosporidiosis may be potential cardiovascular diseases risk factor and that one of the critical time windows for the growing heart covers the time period when cardiomyocyte undergo polyploidization. PMID:23074852

  5. The plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 signalling in cardiac fibroblasts mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Abou-Leisa, Riham; Stafford, Nicholas; Maqsood, Arfa; Zi, Min; Prehar, Sukhpal; Baudoin-Stanley, Florence; Wang, Xin; Neyses, Ludwig; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Oceandy, Delvac

    2016-01-01

    The heart responds to pathological overload through myocyte hypertrophy. Here we show that this response is regulated by cardiac fibroblasts via a paracrine mechanism involving plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4). Pmca4 deletion in mice, both systemically and specifically in fibroblasts, reduces the hypertrophic response to pressure overload; however, knocking out Pmca4 specifically in cardiomyocytes does not produce this effect. Mechanistically, cardiac fibroblasts lacking PMCA4 produce higher levels of secreted frizzled related protein 2 (sFRP2), which inhibits the hypertrophic response in neighbouring cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, we show that treatment with the PMCA4 inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) inhibits and reverses cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload in mice. Our results reveal that PMCA4 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy and provide proof of principle for a therapeutic approach to treat this condition. PMID:27020607

  6. An integrated network of Arabidopsis growth regulators and its use for gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Sabaghian, Ehsan; Drebert, Zuzanna; Inzé, Dirk; Saeys, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that govern plant growth has been an important topic in plant research, and current advances in large-scale data generation call for computational tools that efficiently combine these different data sources to generate novel hypotheses. In this work, we present a novel, integrated network that combines multiple large-scale data sources to characterize growth regulatory genes in Arabidopsis, one of the main plant model organisms. The contributions of this work are twofold: first, we characterized a set of carefully selected growth regulators with respect to their connectivity patterns in the integrated network, and, subsequently, we explored to which extent these connectivity patterns can be used to suggest new growth regulators. Using a large-scale comparative study, we designed new supervised machine learning methods to prioritize growth regulators. Our results show that these methods significantly improve current state-of-the-art prioritization techniques, and are able to suggest meaningful new growth regulators. In addition, the integrated network is made available to the scientific community, providing a rich data source that will be useful for many biological processes, not necessarily restricted to plant growth. PMID:26620795

  7. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications. PMID:27352146

  8. Characterizing functional stem cell–cardiomyocyte interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, Nenad; Kirkton, Robert D; McSpadden, Luke C; Liau, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Despite the progress in traditional pharmacological and organ transplantation therapies, heart failure still afflicts 5.3 million Americans. Since June 2000, stem cell-based approaches for the prevention and treatment of heart failure have been pursued in clinics with great excitement; however, the exact mechanisms of how transplanted cells improve heart function remain elusive. One of the main difficulties in answering these questions is the limited ability to directly access and study interactions between implanted cells and host cardiomyocytes in situ. With the growing number of candidate cell types for potential clinical use, it is becoming increasingly more important to establish standardized, well-controlled in vitro and in situ assays to compare the efficacy and safety of different stem cells in cardiac repair. This article describes recent innovative methodologies to characterize direct functional interactions between stem cells and cardiomyocytes, aimed to facilitate the rational design of future cell-based therapies for heart disease. PMID:20017697

  9. Mitochondriocentric pathway to cardiomyocyte necrosis in aldosteronism: cardioprotective responses to carvedilol and nebivolol.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Yaser; Sherrod, Jonathan N; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Ahokas, Robert A; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2011-07-01

    Foci of fibrosis, footprints of cardiomyocyte necrosis, are scattered throughout the failing myocardium and are a major component to its pathologic remodeling. Understanding pathogenic mechanisms contributing to hormone-mediated necrosis is therefore fundamental to developing cardioprotective strategies. In this context, a mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway to necrosis is emerging. Our first objective, using cardiomyocytes and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) harvested from rats receiving a 4-week aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST), was to identify the major components of this pathway. Second, to validate this pathway, we used mitochondria-targeted pharmaceutical interventions as cardioprotective strategies using 4-week cotreatment with either carvedilol (Carv) or nebivolol (Nebiv). Compared with controls, we found the 4-week ALDOST to be accompanied by elevated cardiomyocyte free [Ca(2+)]i and SSM free [Ca(2+)]m; increased H(2)O(2) production and 8-isoprostane in SSM, cardiac tissue, and plasma; and enhanced opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and myocardial scarring. Increments in the antioxidant capacity augmented by increased cytosolic free [Zn(2+)]i were overwhelmed. Cotreatment with either Carv or Nebiv attenuated [Ca(2+)]i and [Ca(2+)]m overloading, prevented oxidative stress, and reduced mPTP opening while augmenting [Zn(2+)]i and conferring cardioprotection. Thus, major components of the mitochondriocentric signal-transducer-effector pathway to cardiomyocyte necrosis seen with ALDOST include intracellular Ca overloading coupled to oxidative stress and mPTP opening. This subcellular pathway can be favorably regulated by Carv or Nebiv cotreatment to salvage cardiomyocytes and prevent fibrosis. PMID:21558884

  10. The impact of caffeine on connexin expression in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes are electrically coupled by gap junctions, defined as clusters of low-resistance multisubunit transmembrane channels composed of connexins (Cxs). The expression of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45, which are present in cardiomyocytes, is known to be developmentally regulated. This study investigates the premise that alterations in gap junction proteins are one of the mechanisms by which teratogens may act. Specifically, those molecules known to be teratogenic in humans could cause their effects via disruption of cell-to-cell communication pathways, resulting in an inability to co-ordinate tissue development. Caffeine significantly inhibited contractile activity at concentrations above and including 1500 μm (P < 0.05), while not affecting cell viability and total protein, in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system. The effects of caffeine on key cardiac gap junction protein (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression were analysed using immunocytochemistry and in-cell Western blotting. The results indicated that caffeine altered the expression pattern of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 at non-cytotoxic concentrations (≥2000 μm), i.e., at concentrations that did not affect total cell protein and cell viability. In addition the effects of caffeine on cardiomyocyte formation and function (contractile activity score) were correlated with modulation of Cxs (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression, at above and including 2000 μm caffeine concentrations (P < 0.05). These experiments provide evidence that embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture may be a useful in vitro method for mechanistic studies of perturbation of embryonic heart development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26304238

  11. An expandable, inducible hemangioblast state regulated by fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vereide, David T; Vickerman, Vernella; Swanson, Scott A; Chu, Li-Fang; McIntosh, Brian E; Thomson, James A

    2014-12-01

    During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that "trap" murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These "expandable" hemangioblasts (eHBs) are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines. PMID:25458896

  12. Epidermal growth factor system regulates mucin production in airways

    PubMed Central

    Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Dabbagh, Karim; Lee, Heung-Man; Agustí, Carlos; Lausier, James A.; Ueki, Iris F.; Grattan, Kathleen M.; Nadel, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    Goblet-cell hyperplasia is a critical pathological feature in hypersecretory diseases of airways. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown, and no effective therapy exists. Here we show that stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) by its ligands, EGF and transforming growth factor α (TGFα), causes MUC5AC expression in airway epithelial cells both in in vitro and in vivo. We found that a MUC5AC-inducing epithelial cell line, NCI-H292, expresses EGF-R constitutively; EGF-R gene expression was stimulated further by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). EGF-R ligands increased the expression of MUC5AC at both gene and protein levels, and this effect was potentiated by TNFα. Selective EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked MUC5AC expression induced by EGF-R ligands. Pathogen-free rats expressed little EGF-R protein in airway epithelial cells; intratracheal instillation of TNFα induced EGF-R in airway epithelial cells, and subsequent instillation of EGF-R ligands increased the number of goblet cells, Alcian blue–periodic acid–Schiff staining (reflecting mucous glycoconjugates), and MUC5AC gene expression, whereas TNFα, EGF, or TGFα alone was without effect. In sensitized rats, three intratracheal instillations of ovalbumin resulted in EGF-R expression and goblet-cell production in airway epithelium. Pretreatment with EGF-R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, BIBX1522, prevented goblet-cell production both in rats stimulated by TNFα-EGF-R ligands and in an asthma model. These findings suggest potential roles for inhibitors of the EGF-R cascade in hypersecretory diseases of airways. PMID:10077640

  13. Resolving the growth-promoting and metabolic effects of growth hormone: Differential regulation of GH-IGF-I system components.

    PubMed

    Norbeck, Lindsey A; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    Growth hormone regulates numerous processes in vertebrates including growth promotion and lipid mobilization. During periods of food deprivation, growth is arrested yet lipid depletion is promoted. In this study, we used rainbow trout on different nutritional regimens to examine the regulation of growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) system elements in order to resolve the growth-promoting and lipid catabolic actions of GH. Fish fasted for 2 or 6 weeks displayed significantly reduced growth compared to their fed counterparts despite elevated plasma GH, while refeeding for 2 weeks following 4 weeks of fasting partially restored growth and lowered plasma GH. Fish fasted for 6 weeks also exhausted their mesenteric adipose tissue reserves. Sensitivity to GH in the liver was reduced in fasting fish as evidenced by reduced expression of GH receptor type 1 (GHR 1) and GHR 2 mRNAs and by reduced (125)I-GH binding capacity. Expression of GHR 1 and GHR 2 mRNAs also was reduced in the gill of fasted fish. In adipose tissue, however, sensitivity to GH, as indicated by GHR 1 expression and by (125)I-GH binding capacity, increased after 6 weeks of fasting in concert with the observed lipid depletion. Fasting-associated growth retardation was accompanied by reduced expression of total IGF-I mRNA in the liver, adipose and gill, and by reduced plasma levels of IGF-I. Sensitivity to IGF-I was reduced in the gill of fasted fish as indicated by reduced expression of type 1 IGF-I receptor (IGFR 1A and IGFR 1B) mRNAs. By contrast, fasting did not affect expression of IGFR 1 mRNAs or (125)I-IGF-I binding in skeletal muscle and increased expression of IGFR 1 mRNAs and (125)I-IGF-I binding in cardiac muscle. These results indicate that nutritional state differentially regulates GH-IGF-I system components in a tissue-specific manner and that such alterations disable the growth-promoting actions of GH and promote the lipid-mobilizing actions of the hormone. PMID:17376444

  14. Organ-specific regulation of growth-defense tradeoffs by plants.

    PubMed

    Smakowska, Elwira; Kong, Jixiang; Busch, Wolfgang; Belkhadir, Youssef

    2016-02-01

    Plants grow while also defending themselves against phylogenetically unrelated pathogens. Because defense and growth are both costly programs, a plant's success in colonizing resource-scarce environments requires tradeoffs between the two. Here, we summarize efforts aimed at understanding how plants use iterative tradeoffs to modulate differential organ growth when defenses are elicited. First, we focus on shoots to illustrate how light, in conjunction with the growth hormone gibberellin (GA) and the defense hormone jasmonic acid (JA), act to finely regulate defense and growth programs in this organ. Second, we expand on the regulation of growth-defense trade-offs in the root, a less well-studied topic despite the critical role of this organ in acquiring resources in an environment deeply entrenched with disparate populations of microbes. PMID:26802804

  15. Regulation of planar growth by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN.

    PubMed

    Enugutti, Balaji; Kirchhelle, Charlotte; Oelschner, Maxi; Torres Ruiz, Ramón Angel; Schliebner, Ivo; Leister, Dario; Schneitz, Kay

    2012-09-11

    The spatial coordination of growth is of central importance for the regulation of plant tissue architecture. Individual layers, such as the epidermis, are clonally propagated and structurally maintained by symmetric cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer. The developmental control of this process is poorly understood. The simple cellular basis and sheet-like structure of Arabidopsis integuments make them an attractive model system to address planar growth. Here we report on the characterization of the Arabidopsis UNICORN (UCN) gene. Analysis of ucn integuments reveals localized distortion of planar growth, eventually resulting in an ectopic multicellular protrusion. In addition, ucn mutants exhibit ectopic growth in filaments and petals, as well as aberrant embryogenesis. We further show that UCN encodes an active AGC VIII kinase. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological data suggest that UCN suppresses ectopic growth in integuments by directly repressing the KANADI transcription factor ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE. Our findings indicate that UCN represents a unique plant growth regulator that maintains planar growth of integuments by repressing a developmental regulator involved in the control of early integument growth and polarity. PMID:22927420

  16. Regulation of planar growth by the Arabidopsis AGC protein kinase UNICORN

    PubMed Central

    Enugutti, Balaji; Kirchhelle, Charlotte; Oelschner, Maxi; Torres Ruiz, Ramón Angel; Schliebner, Ivo; Leister, Dario; Schneitz, Kay

    2012-01-01

    The spatial coordination of growth is of central importance for the regulation of plant tissue architecture. Individual layers, such as the epidermis, are clonally propagated and structurally maintained by symmetric cell divisions that are oriented along the plane of the layer. The developmental control of this process is poorly understood. The simple cellular basis and sheet-like structure of Arabidopsis integuments make them an attractive model system to address planar growth. Here we report on the characterization of the Arabidopsis UNICORN (UCN) gene. Analysis of ucn integuments reveals localized distortion of planar growth, eventually resulting in an ectopic multicellular protrusion. In addition, ucn mutants exhibit ectopic growth in filaments and petals, as well as aberrant embryogenesis. We further show that UCN encodes an active AGC VIII kinase. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological data suggest that UCN suppresses ectopic growth in integuments by directly repressing the KANADI transcription factor ABERRANT TESTA SHAPE. Our findings indicate that UCN represents a unique plant growth regulator that maintains planar growth of integuments by repressing a developmental regulator involved in the control of early integument growth and polarity. PMID:22927420

  17. Cancer induces cardiomyocyte remodeling and hypoinnervation in the left ventricle of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Das, Suman Kumar; Heinzel, Frank R; Schmidt, Albrecht; Post, Heiner; Schauer, Silvia; Papadakis, Tamara; Kummer, Wolfgang; Hoefler, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is often associated with cachexia, cardiovascular symptoms and autonomic dysregulation. We tested whether extracardiac cancer directly affects the innervation of left ventricular myocardium. Mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (tumor group, TG) or PBS (control group, CG) were analyzed after 21 days. Cardiac function (echocardiography), serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 (ELISA), structural alterations of cardiomyocytes and their innervation (design-based stereology) and levels of innervation-related mRNA (quantitative RT-PCR) were analysed. The groups did not differ in various functional parameters. Serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 were elevated in TG. The total length of axons in the left ventricle was reduced. The number of dense core vesicles per axon profile was reduced. Decreased myofibrillar volume, increased sarcoplasmic volume and increased volume of lipid droplets were indicative of metabolic alterations of TG cardiomyocytes. In the heart, the mRNA level of nerve growth factor was reduced whereas that of β1-adrenergic receptor was unchanged in TG. In the stellate ganglion of TG, mRNA levels of nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y were decreased and that of tyrosine hydroxylase was increased. In summary, cancer induces a systemic pro-inflammatory state, a significant reduction in myocardial innervation and a catabolic phenotype of cardiomyocytes in the mouse. Reduced expression of nerve growth factor may account for the reduced myocardial innervation. PMID:21637823

  18. Cardiomyocyte death in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Wei; Shi, Jianjian; Li, Yuan-Jian; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most widely used and successful antitumor drugs, but its cumulative and dose-dependent cardiac toxicity has been the major concern of oncologists in cancer therapeutic practice for decades. With the increasing population of cancer survivals, there is a growing need to develop preventive strategies and effective therapies against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, in particular, the late onset cardiomyopathy. Although intensive investigations on the DOX-induced cardiotoxicity have been continued for decades, the underlying mechanisms responsible for DOX-induced cardiotoxicity have not been completely elucidated. A rapidly expanding body of evidence supports that cardiomyocyte death by apoptosis and necrosis is a primary mechanism of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and other types of cell death, such as autophagy and senescence/aging, may participate in this process. In this review, we will focus on the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying DOX-induced cardiomyocyte death, including the major primary mechanism of excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other recently discovered ROS-independent mechanisms. Different sensitivity to DOX-induced cell death signals between adult and young cardiomyocytes will also be discussed. PMID:19866340

  19. A novel endoplasmic reticulum stress‑induced apoptosis model using tunicamycin in primary cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingzhi; Wang, Lin; Guo, Xiaowang; Xue, Qiao; Huo, Cong; Li, Xing; Fan, Li; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is key in the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is a lack of a systemic ER stress‑induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis model. In the present study, primary cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to tunicamycin. Cell viability was determined by an MTT assay, and cell damage was detected by a lactose dehydrogenase assay. Flow cytometry was used and the activity of caspase‑3 was analyzed in order to measure apoptosis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to examine the expression of glucose‑regulated protein 78‑kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). As a result, tunicamycin significantly increased cardiomyocyte injury, which occurred in a time- and concentration‑dependent manner. In addition, tunicamycin treatment resulted in apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Molecularly, tunicamycin (100 ng/ml) increased the levels of GRP78 and CHOP 6 h after administration. In addition, GRP78 and CHOP reached maximum mRNA and protein levels 24 h after administration. In conclusion, the results implicate that the tunicamycin‑induced ER stress‑induced apoptotic model was successfully constructed in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. A 100 ng/ml concentration of tunicamycin was selected, and MTT, LDH release and flow cytometry assay was at 72 h. In addition, GRP78 and GRP94 were detected 24 h following administration. The results of the present study indicate a novel experimental basis for the investigation of ERS-induced cardiac apoptosis. PMID:26151415

  20. Directed cardiomyocyte differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells by modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling under fully defined conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Azarin, Samira M.; Zhu, Kexian; Hazeltine, Laurie B.; Bao, Xiaoping; Hsiao, Cheston; Kamp, Timothy J.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    The protocols described here efficiently direct human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to functional cardiomyocytes in a completely defined, serum-free system by temporal modulation of regulators of canonical Wnt signaling. Appropriate temporal application of Gsk3 inhibitor followed by expression of β-catenin shRNA or a chemical Wnt inhibitor is sufficient to produce a high yield (0.8–1.3 million cardiomyocytes/cm2) of virtually pure (80%–98%) functional cardiomyocytes from multiple hPSC lines without cell sorting or selection. Characterization of differentiated cells is performed in qualitative (immunostaining) and quantitative (flow cytometry) manners to assess expression of cardiac transcription factors and myofilament proteins. Flow cytometry of BrdU incorporation or Ki67 expression in conjuction with cardiac sarcomere myosin protein expression can be used to determine the proliferative capacity of hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. Functional human cardiomyocytes differentiated via these protocols may constitute a potential cell source for heart disease modeling, drug screening, and cell-based therapeutic applications. PMID:23257984

  1. Direct Cardiomyocyte Reprogramming: A New Direction for Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yi, B. Alexander; Mummery, Christine L.; Chien, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have seen unexpected new developments in direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming. Direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming potentially offers an entirely novel approach to cardiovascular regenerative medicine by converting cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes in situ. There is much to be learned, however, about the mechanisms of direct reprogramming in order that the process can be made more efficient. Early efforts have suggested that this new technology can be technically challenging. Moreover, new methods of inducing heart reprogramming will need to be developed before this approach can be translated to the bedside. Despite this, direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming may lead to new therapeutic options for sufferers of heart disease. PMID:24003244

  2. Dual Control of Muscle Cell Survival by Distinct Growth Factor-Regulated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Margaret A.; Feng, Xiuhong; Everding, Daniel R.; Sieger, Kerry; Stewart, Claire E. H.; Rotwein, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In addition to their ability to stimulate cell proliferation, polypeptide growth factors are able to maintain cell survival under conditions that otherwise lead to apoptotic death. Growth factors control cell viability through regulation of critical intracellular signal transduction pathways. We previously characterized C2 muscle cell lines that lacked endogenous expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). These cells did not differentiate but underwent apoptotic death in low-serum differentiation medium. Death could be prevented by IGF analogues that activated the IGF-I receptor or by unrelated growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). Here we analyze the signaling pathways involved in growth factor-mediated myoblast survival. PDGF treatment caused sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and -2), while IGF-I only transiently induced these enzymes. Transient transfection of a constitutively active Mek1, a specific upstream activator of ERKs, maintained myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of Mek1 by the drug UO126 blocked PDGF-mediated but not IGF-stimulated survival. Although both growth factors activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) to similar extents, only IGF-I treatment led to sustained stimulation of its downstream kinase, Akt. Transient transfection of a constitutively active PI3-kinase or an inducible Akt promoted myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of PI3-kinase activity by the drug LY294002 selectively blocked IGF- but not PDGF-mediated muscle cell survival. In aggregate, these observations demonstrate that distinct growth factor-regulated signaling pathways independently control myoblast survival. Since IGF action also stimulates muscle differentiation, these results suggest a means to regulate myogenesis through selective manipulation of different signal transduction pathways. PMID:10757809

  3. Cardiomyocyte-specific conditional knockout of the histone chaperone HIRA in mice results in hypertrophy, sarcolemmal damage and focal replacement fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicolas; Fan, Qiying; Fa'ak, Faisal; Soibam, Benjamin; Nagandla, Harika; Liu, Yu; Schwartz, Robert J; McConnell, Bradley K; Stewart, M David

    2016-03-01

    HIRA is the histone chaperone responsible for replication-independent incorporation of histone variant H3.3 within gene bodies and regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes, and within the bivalent promoter regions of developmentally regulated genes. The HIRA gene lies within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome critical region; individuals with this syndrome have multiple congenital heart defects. Because terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have exited the cell cycle, histone variants should be utilized for the bulk of chromatin remodeling. Thus, HIRA is likely to play an important role in epigenetically defining the cardiac gene expression program. In this study, we determined the consequence of HIRA deficiency in cardiomyocytes in vivo by studying the phenotype of cardiomyocyte-specific Hira conditional-knockout mice. Loss of HIRA did not perturb heart development, but instead resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and susceptibility to sarcolemmal damage. Cardiomyocyte degeneration gave way to focal replacement fibrosis and impaired cardiac function. Gene expression was widely altered in Hira conditional-knockout hearts. Significantly affected pathways included responses to cellular stress, DNA repair and transcription. Consistent with heart failure, fetal cardiac genes were re-expressed in the Hira conditional knockout. Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation by HIRA is crucial for cardiomyocyte homeostasis. PMID:26935106

  4. Cardiomyocyte-specific conditional knockout of the histone chaperone HIRA in mice results in hypertrophy, sarcolemmal damage and focal replacement fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicolas; Fan, Qiying; Fa'ak, Faisal; Soibam, Benjamin; Nagandla, Harika; Liu, Yu; Schwartz, Robert J.; McConnell, Bradley K.; Stewart, M. David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIRA is the histone chaperone responsible for replication-independent incorporation of histone variant H3.3 within gene bodies and regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes, and within the bivalent promoter regions of developmentally regulated genes. The HIRA gene lies within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome critical region; individuals with this syndrome have multiple congenital heart defects. Because terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have exited the cell cycle, histone variants should be utilized for the bulk of chromatin remodeling. Thus, HIRA is likely to play an important role in epigenetically defining the cardiac gene expression program. In this study, we determined the consequence of HIRA deficiency in cardiomyocytes in vivo by studying the phenotype of cardiomyocyte-specific Hira conditional-knockout mice. Loss of HIRA did not perturb heart development, but instead resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and susceptibility to sarcolemmal damage. Cardiomyocyte degeneration gave way to focal replacement fibrosis and impaired cardiac function. Gene expression was widely altered in Hira conditional-knockout hearts. Significantly affected pathways included responses to cellular stress, DNA repair and transcription. Consistent with heart failure, fetal cardiac genes were re-expressed in the Hira conditional knockout. Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation by HIRA is crucial for cardiomyocyte homeostasis. PMID:26935106

  5. Modification of intracellular calcium concentration in cardiomyocytes by inhibition of sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Saini, Harjot K; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2006-12-01

    Although the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) is considered to be involved in regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) through the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, the exact mechanisms of its participation in Ca(2+) handling by cardiomyocytes are not fully understood. Isolated rat cardiomyocytes were treated with or without agents that are known to modify Ca(2+) movements in cardiomyocytes and exposed to an NHE inhibitor, 5-(N-methyl-N-isobutyl)amiloride (MIA). [Ca(2+)](i) in cardiomyocytes was measured spectrofluorometrically with fura 2-AM in the absence or presence of KCl, a depolarizing agent. MIA increased basal [Ca(2+)](i) and augmented the KCl-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in a concentration-dependent manner. The MIA-induced increase in basal [Ca(2+)](i) was unaffected by extracellular Ca(2+), antagonists of the sarcolemmal (SL) L-type Ca(2+) channel, and inhibitors of the SL Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, SL Ca(2+) pump ATPase and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. However, the MIA-induced increase in basal [Ca(2+)](i) was attenuated by inhibitors of SL Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) transport. On the other hand, the MIA-mediated augmentation of the KCl response was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) concentration and attenuated by agents that inhibit SL L-type Ca(2+) channels, the SL Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, SL Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, and SR Ca(2+) release channels and the SR Ca(2+) pump. However, the effect of MIA on the KCl-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) remained unaffected by treatment with inhibitors of SL Ca(2+) pump ATPase and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. MIA and a decrease in extracellular pH lowered intracellular pH and increased basal [Ca(2+)](i), whereas a decrease in extracellular pH, in contrast to MIA, depressed the KCl-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that NHE may be involved in regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) and that MIA-induced increases in basal [Ca(2+)](i), as well as augmentation of the

  6. Mechanical Stress Regulation of Plant Growth and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Growth dynamics analysis was used to determine to what extent the seismic stress induced reduction in photosynthetic productivity in shaken soybeans was due to less photosynthetic surface, and to what extent to lower efficiency of assimulation. Seismic stress reduces shoot transpiration rate 17% and 15% during the first and second 45 minute periods following a given treatment. Shaken plants also had a 36% greater leaf water potential 30 minutes after treatment. Continuous measurement of whole plant photosynthetic rate shows that a decline in CO2 fixation began within seconds after the onset of shaking treatment and continued to decline to 16% less than that of controls 20 minutes after shaking, after which gradual recovery of photosynthesis begins. Photosynthetic assimilation recovered completely before the next treatment 5 hours later. The transitory decrease in photosynthetic rate was due entirely to a two fold increase in stomatal resistance to CO2 by the abaxial leaf surface. Mesophyll resistance was not significantly affected by periodic seismic treatment. Temporary stomatal aperture reduction and decreased CO2 fixation are responsible for the lower dry weight of seismic stressed plants growing in a controlled environment.

  7. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Little, M.G.; Kistler, R.; Horodyskyj, U.N.; Leeman, W.P.; Agranier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  8. Regulating continent growth and composition by chemical weathering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Morton, Douglas M.; Little, Mark G.; Kistler, Ronald; Horodyskyj, Ulyana N.; Leeman, William P.; Agranier, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Continents ride high above the ocean floor because they are underlain by thick, low-density, Si-rich, and Mg-poor crust. However, the parental magmas of continents were basaltic, which means they must have lost Mg relative to Si during their maturation into continents. Igneous differentiation followed by lower crustal delamination and chemical weathering followed by subduction recycling are possible solutions, but the relative magnitudes of each process have never been quantitatively constrained because of the lack of appropriate data. Here, we show that the relative contributions of these processes can be obtained by simultaneous examination of Mg and Li (an analog for Mg) on the regional and global scales in arcs, delaminated lower crust, and river waters. At least 20% of Mg is lost from continents by weathering, which translates into >20% of continental mass lost by weathering (40% by delamination). Chemical weathering leaves behind a more Si-rich and Mg-poor crust, which is less dense and hence decreases the probability of crustal recycling by subduction. Net continental growth is thus modulated by chemical weathering and likely influenced by secular changes in weathering mechanisms. PMID:18362343

  9. Evidence That Up-Regulation of MicroRNA-29 Contributes to Postnatal Body Growth Deceleration

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Fariha; Andrade, Anenisia C.; Nella, Aikaterini A.; Clokie, Samuel J.; Rezvani, Geoffrey; Nilsson, Ola; Baron, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Body growth is rapid in infancy but subsequently slows and eventually ceases due to a progressive decline in cell proliferation that occurs simultaneously in multiple organs. We previously showed that this decline in proliferation is driven in part by postnatal down-regulation of a large set of growth-promoting genes in multiple organs. We hypothesized that this growth-limiting genetic program is orchestrated by microRNAs (miRNAs). Bioinformatic analysis identified target sequences of the miR-29 family of miRNAs to be overrepresented in age–down-regulated genes. Concomitantly, expression microarray analysis in mouse kidney and lung showed that all members of the miR-29 family, miR-29a, -b, and -c, were strongly up-regulated from 1 to 6 weeks of age. Real-time PCR confirmed that miR-29a, -b, and -c were up-regulated with age in liver, kidney, lung, and heart, and their expression levels were higher in hepatocytes isolated from 5-week-old mice than in hepatocytes from embryonic mouse liver at embryonic day 16.5. We next focused on 3 predicted miR-29 target genes (Igf1, Imp1, and Mest), all of which are growth-promoting. A 3′-untranslated region containing the predicted target sequences from each gene was placed individually in a luciferase reporter construct. Transfection of miR-29 mimics suppressed luciferase gene activity for all 3 genes, and this suppression was diminished by mutating the target sequences, suggesting that these genes are indeed regulated by miR-29. Taken together, the findings suggest that up-regulation of miR-29 during juvenile life drives the down-regulation of multiple growth-promoting genes, thus contributing to physiological slowing and eventual cessation of body growth. PMID:25866874

  10. PIF4 Integrates Multiple Environmental and Hormonal Signals for Plant Growth Regulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyunmo; Oh, Eunkyoo

    2016-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants must be able to adapt to the environment. Plants respond to the environment by adjusting their growth and development, which is mediated by sophisticated signaling networks that integrate multiple environmental and endogenous signals. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that a bHLH transcription factor PIF4 plays a major role in the multiple signal integration for plant growth regulation. PIF4 is a positive regulator in cell elongation and its activity is regulated by various environmental signals, including light and temperature, and hormonal signals, including auxin, gibberellic acid and brassinosteroid, both transcriptionally and post-translationally. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the circadian clock and metabolic status regulate endogenous PIF4 level. The PIF4 transcription factor cooperatively regulates the target genes involved in cell elongation with hormone-regulated transcription factors. Therefore, PIF4 is a key integrator of multiple signaling pathways, which optimizes growth in the environment. This review will discuss our current understanding of the PIF4-mediated signaling networks that control plant growth. PMID:27432188

  11. PIF4 Integrates Multiple Environmental and Hormonal Signals for Plant Growth Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmo; Oh, Eunkyoo

    2016-08-31

    As sessile organisms, plants must be able to adapt to the environment. Plants respond to the environment by adjusting their growth and development, which is mediated by sophisticated signaling networks that integrate multiple environmental and endogenous signals. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that a bHLH transcription factor PIF4 plays a major role in the multiple signal integration for plant growth regulation. PIF4 is a positive regulator in cell elongation and its activity is regulated by various environmental signals, including light and temperature, and hormonal signals, including auxin, gibberellic acid and brassinosteroid, both transcriptionally and post-translationally. Moreover, recent studies have shown that the circadian clock and metabolic status regulate endogenous PIF4 level. The PIF4 transcription factor cooperatively regulates the target genes involved in cell elongation with hormone-regulated transcription factors. Therefore, PIF4 is a key integrator of multiple signaling pathways, which optimizes growth in the environment. This review will discuss our current understanding of the PIF4-mediated signaling networks that control plant growth. PMID:27432188

  12. Mitochondrial Remodeling in Mice with Cardiomyocyte-Specific Lipid Overload

    PubMed Central

    Elezaby, Aly; Sverdlov, Aaron L.; Tu, Vivian H.; Soni, Kanupriya; Luptak, Ivan; Qin, Fuzhong; Liesa, Marc; Shirihai, Orian S.; Rimer, Jamie; Schaffer, Jean E.; Colucci, Wilson S.; Miller, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity leads to metabolic heart disease (MHD) that is associated with a pathologic increase in myocardial fatty acid (FA) uptake and impairment of mitochondrial function. The mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction in MHD, which results in oxidant production and decreased energetics, is poorly understood but may be related to excess FAs. Determining the effects of cardiac FA excess on mitochondria can be hindered by the systemic sequelae of obesity. Mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the fatty acid transport protein FATP1 have increased cardiomyocyte FA uptake and develop MHD in the absence of systemic lipotoxicity, obesity or diabetes. We utilized this model to assess 1) the effect of cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation on mitochondrial structure and energetic function and 2) the role of lipid-driven transcriptional regulation, signaling, toxic metabolite accumulation, and mitochondrial oxidative stress in lipid-induced MHD. Methods Cardiac lipid species, lipid-dependent signaling, and mitochondrial structure / function were examined from FATP1 mice. Cardiac structure and function were assessed in mice overexpressing both FATP1 and mitochondrial-targeted catalase. Results FATP1 hearts exhibited a net increase (+12%) in diacylglycerol, with increases in several very long-chain diacylglycerol species (+160-212%, p<0.001) and no change in ceramide, sphingomyelin, or acylcarnitine content. This was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of PKCα and PKCδ, and a decrease in phosphorylation of AKT and expression of CREB, PGC1α, PPARα and the mitochondrial fusion genes MFN1, MFN2 and OPA1. FATP1 overexpression also led to marked decreases in mitochondrial size (-49%, p<0.01), complex II-driven respiration (-28.6%, p<0.05), activity of isolated complex II (-62%, p=0.05), and expression of complex II subunit B (SDHB) (-60% and -31%, p<0.01) in the absence of change in ATP synthesis. Hydrogen peroxide production was not increased in FATP1

  13. Integrin β1 regulates leiomyoma cytoskeletal integrity and growth

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Minnie; Segars, James; Catherino, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are characterized by an excessive extracellular matrix, increased mechanical stress, and increased active RhoA. Previously, we observed that mechanical signaling was attenuated in leiomyoma, but the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Integrins, especially integrin β1, are transmembrane adhesion receptors that couple extracellular matrix stresses to the intracellular cytoskeleton to influence cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we characterized integrin and laminin to signaling in leiomyoma cells. We observed a 2.25 ± 0.32 fold increased expression of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. Antibody-mediated inhibition of integrin β1 led to significant growth inhibition in leiomyoma cells and a loss of cytoskeletal integrity. Specifically, polymerization of actin filaments and formation of focal adhesions were reduced by inhibition of integrin p1. Inhibition of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells led to 0.81 ± 0.02 fold decrease in active RhoA, and resembled levels found in serum-starved cells. Likewise, inhibition of integrin β1 was accompanied by a decrease in phospho-ERK. Compared to myometrial cells, leiomyoma cells demonstrated increased expression of integrin α6 subunit to laminin receptor (1.91 ± 0.11 fold), and increased expression of laminin 5α (1.52±0.02), laminin 5β (3.06±0.92), and laminin 5γ (1.66 ± 0.06). Of note, leiomyoma cells grown on laminin matrix appear to realign themselves. Taken together, the findings reveal that the attenuated mechanical signaling in leiomyoma cells is accompanied by an increased expression and a dependence on integrin β1 signaling in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. PMID:23023061

  14. GSK3β Regulates Differentiation and Growth Arrest in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Korur, Serdar; Huber, Roland M.; Sivasankaran, Balasubramanian; Petrich, Michael; Morin, Pier; Hemmings, Brian A.; Merlo, Adrian; Lino, Maria Maddalena

    2009-01-01

    Cancers are driven by a population of cells with the stem cell properties of self-renewal and unlimited growth. As a subpopulation within the tumor mass, these cells are believed to constitute a tumor cell reservoir. Pathways controlling the renewal of normal stem cells are deregulated in cancer. The polycomb group gene Bmi1, which is required for neural stem cell self-renewal and also controls anti-oxidant defense in neurons, is upregulated in several cancers, including medulloblastoma. We have found that Bmi1 is consistently and highly expressed in GBM. Downregulation of Bmi1 by shRNAs induced a differentiation phenotype and reduced expression of the stem cell markers Sox2 and Nestin. Interestingly, expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), which was found to be consistently expressed in primary GBM, also declined. This suggests a functional link between Bmi1 and GSK3β. Interference with GSK3β activity by siRNA, the specific inhibitor SB216763, or lithium chloride (LiCl) induced tumor cell differentiation. In addition, tumor cell apoptosis was enhanced, the formation of neurospheres was impaired, and clonogenicity reduced in a dose-dependent manner. GBM cell lines consist mainly of CD133-negative (CD133-) cells. Interestingly, ex vivo cells from primary tumor biopsies allowed the identification of a CD133- subpopulation of cells that express stem cell markers and are depleted by inactivation of GSK3β. Drugs that inhibit GSK3, including the psychiatric drug LiCl, may deplete the GBM stem cell reservoir independently of CD133 status. PMID:19823589

  15. FGF signaling in the osteoprogenitor lineage non-autonomously regulates postnatal chondrocyte proliferation and skeletal growth.

    PubMed

    Karuppaiah, Kannan; Yu, Kai; Lim, Joohyun; Chen, Jianquan; Smith, Craig; Long, Fanxin; Ornitz, David M

    2016-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is important for skeletal development; however, cell-specific functions, redundancy and feedback mechanisms regulating bone growth are poorly understood. FGF receptors 1 and 2 (Fgfr1 and Fgfr2) are both expressed in the osteoprogenitor lineage. Double conditional knockout mice, in which both receptors were inactivated using an osteoprogenitor-specific Cre driver, appeared normal at birth; however, these mice showed severe postnatal growth defects that include an ∼50% reduction in body weight and bone mass, and impaired longitudinal bone growth. Histological analysis showed reduced cortical and trabecular bone, suggesting cell-autonomous functions of FGF signaling during postnatal bone formation. Surprisingly, the double conditional knockout mice also showed growth plate defects and an arrest in chondrocyte proliferation. We provide genetic evidence of a non-cell-autonomous feedback pathway regulating Fgf9, Fgf18 and Pthlh expression, which led to increased expression and signaling of Fgfr3 in growth plate chondrocytes and suppression of chondrocyte proliferation. These observations show that FGF signaling in the osteoprogenitor lineage is obligately coupled to chondrocyte proliferation and the regulation of longitudinal bone growth. PMID:27052727

  16. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  17. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  18. A response regulator promotes Francisella tularensis intramacrophage growth by repressing an anti-virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn M; Dove, Simon L

    2016-08-01

    The orphan response regulator PmrA is essential for the intramacrophage growth and survival of Francisella tularensis. PmrA was thought to promote intramacrophage growth by binding directly to promoters on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) and positively regulating the expression of FPI genes, which encode a Type VI secretion system required for intramacrophage growth. Using both ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq we identify those regions of the F. tularensis chromosome occupied by PmrA and those genes that are regulated by PmrA. We find that PmrA associates with 252 distinct regions of the F. tularensis chromosome, but exerts regulatory effects at only a few of these locations. Rather than by functioning directly as an activator of FPI gene expression we present evidence that PmrA promotes intramacrophage growth by repressing the expression of a single target gene we refer to as priM (PmrA-repressed inhibitor of intramacrophage growth). Our findings thus indicate that the role of PmrA in facilitating intracellular growth is to repress a previously unknown anti-virulence factor. PriM is the first bacterially encoded factor to be described that can interfere with the intramacrophage growth and survival of F. tularensis. PMID:27169554

  19. Subcellular Profiling Reveals Distinct and Developmentally Regulated Repertoire of Growth Cone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zivraj, Krishna H.; Tung, Yi Chun Loraine; Piper, Michael; Gumy, Laura; Fawcett, James W.; Yeo, Giles S. H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-directed axon guidance depends partly on local translation in growth cones. Many mRNA transcripts are known to reside in developing axons, yet little is known about their subcellular distribution or, specifically, which transcripts are in growth cones. Here laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate the growth cones of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons of two vertebrate species, mouse and Xenopus, coupled with unbiased genomewide microarray profiling. An unexpectedly large pool of mRNAs defined predominant pathways in protein synthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, cancer, neurological disease, and signaling. Comparative profiling of “young” (pathfinding) versus “old” (target-arriving) Xenopus growth cones revealed that the number and complexity of transcripts increases dramatically with age. Many presynaptic protein mRNAs are present exclusively in old growth cones, suggesting that functionally related sets of mRNAs are targeted to growth cones in a developmentally regulated way. Remarkably, a subset of mRNAs was significantly enriched in the growth cone compared with the axon compartment, indicating that mechanisms exist to localize mRNAs selectively to the growth cone. Furthermore, some receptor transcripts (e.g., EphB4), present exclusively in old growth cones, were equally abundant in young and old cell bodies, indicating that RNA trafficking from the soma is developmentally regulated. Our findings show that the mRNA repertoire in growth cones is regulated dynamically with age and suggest that mRNA localization is tailored to match the functional demands of the growing axon tip as it transforms into the presynaptic terminal. PMID:21084603

  20. Endogenous rhythmic growth in oak trees is regulated by internal clocks rather than resource availability

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, S.; Recht, S.; Boenn, M.; Feldhahn, L.; Angay, O.; Fleischmann, F.; Tarkka, M T.; Grams, T.E.E.; Buscot, F.

    2015-01-01

    Common oak trees display endogenous rhythmic growth with alternating shoot and root flushes. To explore the mechanisms involved, microcuttings of the Quercus robur L. clone DF159 were used for 13C/15N labelling in combination with RNA sequencing (RNASeq) transcript profiling of shoots and roots. The effect of plant internal resource availability on the rhythmic growth of the cuttings was tested through inoculation with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Piloderma croceum. Shoot and root flushes were related to parallel shifts in above- and below-ground C and, to a lesser extent, N allocation. Increased plant internal resource availability by P. croceum inoculation with enhanced plant growth affected neither the rhythmic growth nor the associated resource allocation patterns. Two shifts in transcript abundance were identified during root and shoot growth cessation, and most concerned genes were down-regulated. Inoculation with P. croceum suppressed these transcript shifts in roots, but not in shoots. To identify core processes governing the rhythmic growth, functions [Gene Ontology (GO) terms] of the genes differentially expressed during the growth cessation in both leaves and roots of non-inoculated plants and leaves of P. croceum-inoculated plants were examined. Besides genes related to resource acquisition and cell development, which might reflect rather than trigger rhythmic growth, genes involved in signalling and/or regulated by the circadian clock were identified. The results indicate that rhythmic growth involves dramatic oscillations in plant metabolism and gene regulation between below- and above-ground parts. Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis may play a previously unsuspected role in smoothing these oscillations without modifying the rhythmic growth pattern. PMID:26320242

  1. Endogenous rhythmic growth in oak trees is regulated by internal clocks rather than resource availability.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, S; Recht, S; Boenn, M; Feldhahn, L; Angay, O; Fleischmann, F; Tarkka, M T; Grams, T E E; Buscot, F

    2015-12-01

    Common oak trees display endogenous rhythmic growth with alternating shoot and root flushes. To explore the mechanisms involved, microcuttings of the Quercus robur L. clone DF159 were used for (13)C/(15)N labelling in combination with RNA sequencing (RNASeq) transcript profiling of shoots and roots. The effect of plant internal resource availability on the rhythmic growth of the cuttings was tested through inoculation with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Piloderma croceum. Shoot and root flushes were related to parallel shifts in above- and below-ground C and, to a lesser extent, N allocation. Increased plant internal resource availability by P. croceum inoculation with enhanced plant growth affected neither the rhythmic growth nor the associated resource allocation patterns. Two shifts in transcript abundance were identified during root and shoot growth cessation, and most concerned genes were down-regulated. Inoculation with P. croceum suppressed these transcript shifts in roots, but not in shoots. To identify core processes governing the rhythmic growth, functions [Gene Ontology (GO) terms] of the genes differentially expressed during the growth cessation in both leaves and roots of non-inoculated plants and leaves of P. croceum-inoculated plants were examined. Besides genes related to resource acquisition and cell development, which might reflect rather than trigger rhythmic growth, genes involved in signalling and/or regulated by the circadian clock were identified. The results indicate that rhythmic growth involves dramatic oscillations in plant metabolism and gene regulation between below- and above-ground parts. Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis may play a previously unsuspected role in smoothing these oscillations without modifying the rhythmic growth pattern. PMID:26320242

  2. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel expression in cancer: hormones, growth factors and auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Brackenbury, William J; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M; Campbell, Thomas M; Coombes, R Charles; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2014-03-19

    Although ion channels are increasingly being discovered in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and shown to contribute to different aspects and stages of the cancer process, much less is known about the mechanisms controlling their expression. Here, we focus on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) which are upregulated in many types of carcinomas where their activity potentiates cell behaviours integral to the metastatic cascade. Regulation of VGSCs occurs at a hierarchy of levels from transcription to post-translation. Importantly, mainstream cancer mechanisms, especially hormones and growth factors, play a significant role in the regulation. On the whole, in major hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast and prostate cancer, there is a negative association between genomic steroid hormone sensitivity and functional VGSC expression. Activity-dependent regulation by positive feedback has been demonstrated in strongly metastatic cells whereby the VGSC is self-sustaining, with its activity promoting further functional channel expression. Such auto-regulation is unlike normal cells in which activity-dependent regulation occurs mostly via negative feedback. Throughout, we highlight the possible clinical implications of functional VGSC expression and regulation in cancer. PMID:24493753

  3. Nucleolin-Mediated RNA Localization Regulates Neuron Growth and Cycling Cell Size.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rotem Ben-Tov; Rishal, Ida; Doron-Mandel, Ella; Kalinski, Ashley L; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Terenzio, Marco; Alber, Stefanie; Koley, Sandip; Lin, Albina; Rozenbaum, Meir; Yudin, Dmitry; Sahoo, Pabitra K; Gomes, Cynthia; Shinder, Vera; Geraisy, Wasim; Huebner, Eric A; Woolf, Clifford J; Yaron, Avraham; Burlingame, Alma L; Twiss, Jeffery L; Fainzilber, Mike

    2016-08-01

    How can cells sense their own size to coordinate biosynthesis and metabolism with their growth needs? We recently proposed a motor-dependent bidirectional transport mechanism for axon length and cell size sensing, but the nature of the motor-transported size signals remained elusive. Here, we show that motor-dependent mRNA localization regulates neuronal growth and cycling cell size. We found that the RNA-binding protein nucleolin is associated with importin β1 mRNA in axons. Perturbation of nucleolin association with kinesins reduces its levels in axons, with a concomitant reduction in axonal importin β1 mRNA and protein levels. Strikingly, subcellular sequestration of nucleolin or importin β1 enhances axonal growth and causes a subcellular shift in protein synthesis. Similar findings were obtained in fibroblasts. Thus, subcellular mRNA localization regulates size and growth in both neurons and cycling cells. PMID:27477284

  4. Hydrogen sulfide mitigates homocysteine mediated pathological remodeling by inducing miR-133a in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kesherwani, Varun; Nandi, Shyam S.; Sharawat, Surender K.; Shahshahan, Hamid R.; Mishra, Paras K.

    2015-01-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine called hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with pathological cardiac remodeling. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a cardioprotective gas, however the mechanism by which H2S mitigates homocysteine mediated pathological remodeling in cardiomyocytes is unclear. We hypothesized that H2S ameliorates HHcy mediated hypertrophy by inducing cardioprotective miR-133a in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, HL1 cardiomyocytes were treated with: 1) plain medium (control, CT), 2) 100μM of homocysteine (Hcy), 3) Hcy with 30μM of H2S (Hcy+H2S), and 4) H2S for 24 hour. The levels of hypertrophy markers: c-fos, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), miR-133a and its transcriptional inducer myosin enhancer factor- 2c (MEF2C) were determined by Western blotting, RT-qPCR, and immunofluorescence. The activity of MEF2C was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation of MEF2C with histone deacetylase -1(HDAC1). Our results show that H2S ameliorates homocysteine mediated up regulation of c-fos, ANP and β-MHC, and down regulation of MEF2C and miR-133a. HHcy induces the binding of MEF2C with HDAC1, whereas H2S releases MEF2C from MEF2C-HDAC1 complex causing activation of MEF2C. These findings elicit that HHcy induces cardiac hypertrophy by promoting MEF2C-HDAC1 complex formation that inactivates MEF2C causing suppression of anti-hypertrophy miR-133a in cardiomyocytes. H2S mitigates hypertrophy by inducing miR-133a through activation of MEF2C in HHcy cardiomyocytes. To our knowledge this is a novel mechanism of H2S mediated activation of MEF2C and induction of miR-133a and inhibition of hypertrophy in HHcy cardiomyocytes. PMID:25763715

  5. Pim-1 Kinase Protects Mitochondrial Integrity in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Borillo, Gwynngelle A.; Mason, Matt; Quijada, Pearl; Völkers, Mirko; Cottage, Christopher; McGregor, Michael; Din, Shabana; Fischer, Kimberlee; Gude, Natalie; Avitable, Daniele; Barlow, Steven; Gustafsson, Asa B.; Glembotski, Christopher; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Brown, Joan Heller; Sussman, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Cardioprotective signaling mediates anti-apoptotic actions through multiple mechanisms including maintenance of mitochondrial integrity. Pim-1 kinase is an essential downstream effector of AKT-mediated cardioprotection but the mechanistic basis for maintenance of mitochondrial integrity by Pim-1 remains unexplored. This study details anti-apoptotic actions responsible for enhanced cell survival in cardiomyocytes with elevated Pim-1 activity. Objective The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that the cardioprotective kinase Pim-1 acts to inhibit cell death by preserving mitochondrial integrity in cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results A combination of biochemical, molecular, and microscopic analyses demonstrate beneficial effects of Pim-1 upon mitochondrial integrity. Pim-1 protein level increases in the mitochondrial fraction with a corresponding decrease in the cytosolic fraction of myocardial lysates from hearts subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Cardiac-specific overexpression of Pim-1 results in higher levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 compared to samples from normal hearts. In response to oxidative stress challenge Pim-1 preserves the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Ultrastructure of the mitochondria is maintained by Pim-1 activity, which prevents swelling induced by calcium overload. Finally, mitochondria isolated from hearts created with cardiac-specific overexpression of Pim-1 show inhibition of cytochrome c release triggered by a truncated form of pro-apoptotic Bid. Conclusion Cardioprotective action of Pim-1 kinase includes preservation of mitochondrial integrity during cardiomyopathic challenge conditions, thereby raising the potential for Pim-1 kinase activation as a therapeutic interventional approach to inhibit cell death by antagonizing pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members that regulate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:20203306

  6. Enhanced animal growth via ligand-regulated GHRH myogenic-injectable vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Malone, P. Brandon; Hill, Leigh Anne; Ellis, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Robert J.; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Regulated animal growth occurred following a single electroporated injection of a mixture of two plasmids (10 microg of DNA), one expressing the GeneSwitch regulator protein, the other an inducible growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) gene, into the tibialis anterior muscles of adult SCID mice. Administration of the ligand mifepristone (MFP) up-regulated GHRH expression, as shown by elevations of IGF-I levels, and when MFP dosing was withdrawn, IGF-I returned to baseline levels. Five cycles of IGF-I induction were observed during a five-month period. Chronic MFP dosing for 25 days increased lean body mass, weight gain, and bone mineral density significantly compared with non-MFP treated controls. In summary, long-term drug-regulated GHRH expression was achieved following plasmid-based gene therapy, and chronic induction of GHRH expression in adult animals led to improvements in weight gain and body composition.

  7. Growth Factor Dependent Regulation of Centrosome Function and Genomic Instability by HuR

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Natalia; Yang, Xiuhua; Nabors, Louis Burt

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA binding protein HuR is over expressed in cancer cells and contributes to disease progression through post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA. The regulation of HuR and how this relates to glioma is the focus of this report. SRC and c-Abl kinases regulate HuR sub-cellular trafficking and influence accumulation in the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) via a growth factor dependent signaling mechanism. Growth factor stimulation of glioma cell lines results in the associate of HuR with the PCM and amplification of centrosome number. This process is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of HuR and is abolished by mutating tyrosine residues. HuR is overexpressed in tumor samples from patients with glioblastoma and associated with a reduced survival. These findings suggest HuR plays a significant role in centrosome amplification and genomic instability, which contributes to a worse disease outcome. PMID:25803745

  8. The turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage into bone may be regulated by osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Lieke G E; van Rietbergen, B; van Donkelaar, C C; Ito, K

    2011-06-01

    During endochondral ossification, growth plate cartilage is replaced with bone. Mineralized cartilage matrix is resorbed by osteoclasts, and new bone tissue is formed by osteoblasts. As mineralized cartilage does not contain any cells, it is unclear how this process is regulated. We hypothesize that, in analogy with bone remodeling, osteoclast and osteoblast activity are regulated by osteocytes, in response to mechanical loading. Since the cartilage does not contain osteocytes, this means that cartilage turnover during endochondral ossification would be regulated by the adjacent bone tissue. We investigated this hypothesis with an established computational bone adaptation model. In this model, osteocytes stimulate osteoblastic bone formation in response to the mechanical bone tissue loading. Osteoclasts resorb bone near randomly occurring microcracks that are assumed to block osteocyte signals. We used finite element modeling to evaluate our hypothesis in a 2D-domain representing part of the growth plate and adjacent bone. Cartilage was added at a constant physiological rate to simulate growth. Simulations showed that osteocyte signals from neighboring bone were sufficient for successful cartilage turnover, since equilibrium between cartilage remodeling and growth was obtained. Furthermore, there was good agreement between simulated bone structures and rat tibia histology, and the development of the trabecular architecture resembled that of infant long bones. Additionally, prohibiting osteoclast invasion resulted in thickened mineralized cartilage, similar to observations in a knock-out mouse model. We therefore conclude that it is well possible that osteocytes regulate the turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage. PMID:21546025

  9. Differential Methylation during Maize Leaf Growth Targets Developmentally Regulated Genes1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Candaele, Jasper; Demuynck, Kirin; Mosoti, Douglas; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Inzé, Dirk; Nelissen, Hilde

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important and widespread epigenetic modification in plant genomes, mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DMTs). DNA methylation is known to play a role in genome protection, regulation of gene expression, and splicing and was previously associated with major developmental reprogramming in plants, such as vernalization and transition to flowering. Here, we show that DNA methylation also controls the growth processes of cell division and cell expansion within a growing organ. The maize (Zea mays) leaf offers a great tool to study growth processes, as the cells progressively move through the spatial gradient encompassing the division zone, transition zone, elongation zone, and mature zone. Opposite to de novo DMTs, the maintenance DMTs were transcriptionally regulated throughout the growth zone of the maize leaf, concomitant with differential CCGG methylation levels in the four zones. Surprisingly, the majority of differentially methylated sequences mapped on or close to gene bodies and not to repeat-rich loci. Moreover, especially the 5′ and 3′ regions of genes, which show overall low methylation levels, underwent differential methylation in a developmental context. Genes involved in processes such as chromatin remodeling, cell cycle progression, and growth regulation, were differentially methylated. The presence of differential methylation located upstream of the gene anticorrelated with transcript expression, while gene body differential methylation was unrelated to the expression level. These data indicate that DNA methylation is correlated with the decision to exit mitotic cell division and to enter cell expansion, which adds a new epigenetic level to the regulation of growth processes. PMID:24488968

  10. Growth Hormone-Regulated mRNAs and miRNAs in Chicken Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huijuan; Shao, Fang; Yu, JianFeng; Jiang, Honglin; Han, Yaoping; Gong, Daoqing; Gu, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a key regulatory factor in animal growth, development and metabolism. Based on the expression level of the GH receptor, the chicken liver is a major target organ of GH, but the biological effects of GH on the chicken liver are not fully understood. In this work we identified mRNAs and miRNAs that are regulated by GH in primary hepatocytes from female chickens through RNA-seq, and analyzed the functional relevance of these mRNAs and miRNAs through GO enrichment analysis and miRNA target prediction. A total of 164 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between GH-treated and control chicken hepatocytes, of which 112 were up-regulated and 52 were down-regulated by GH. A total of 225 chicken miRNAs were identified by the RNA-Seq analysis. Among these miRNAs 16 were up-regulated and 1 miRNA was down-regulated by GH. The GH-regulated mRNAs were mainly involved in growth and metabolism. Most of the GH-upregulated or GH-downregulated miRNAs were predicted to target the GH-downregulated or GH-upregulated mRNAs, respectively, involved in lipid metabolism. This study reveals that GH regulates the expression of many mRNAs involved in metabolism in female chicken hepatocytes, which suggests that GH plays an important role in regulating liver metabolism in female chickens. The results of this study also support the hypothesis that GH regulates lipid metabolism in chicken liver in part by regulating the expression of miRNAs that target the mRNAs involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:25386791

  11. Micropost arrays for measuring stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte contractility.

    PubMed

    Beussman, Kevin M; Rodriguez, Marita L; Leonard, Andrea; Taparia, Nikita; Thompson, Curtis R; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have the potential to be used to study heart disease and maturation, screen drug treatments, and restore heart function. Here, we discuss the procedures involved in using micropost arrays to measure the contractile forces generated by stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte contractility is needed for the heart to pump blood, so measuring the contractile forces of cardiomyocytes is a straightforward way to assess their function. Microfabrication and soft lithography techniques are utilized to create identical arrays of flexible, silicone microposts from a common master. Micropost arrays are functionalized with extracellular matrix protein to allow cardiomyocytes to adhere to the tips of the microposts. Live imaging is used to capture videos of the deflection of microposts caused by the contraction of the cardiomyocytes. Image analysis code provides an accurate means to quantify these deflections. The contractile forces produced by a beating cardiomyocyte are calculated by modeling the microposts as cantilever beams. We have used this assay to assess techniques for improving the maturation and contractile function of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:26344757

  12. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  13. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A regulates cell growth through the p53-p21 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung Hee; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA inhibits normal cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA deficiency leads to an increase in p21 by enhanced p53 acetylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA causes cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway. -- Abstract: MsrA is an oxidoreductase that catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine. Although MsrA is well-characterized as an antioxidant and has been implicated in the aging process and cellular senescence, its roles in cell proliferation are poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role of MsrA in normal cell proliferation and describe the regulation mechanism of cell growth by this protein. Down-regulation of MsrA inhibited cell proliferation, but MsrA overexpression did not promote it. MsrA deficiency led to an increase in p21, a major cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, thereby causing cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. While protein levels of p53 were not altered upon MsrA deficiency, its acetylation level was significantly elevated, which subsequently activated p21 transcription. The data suggest that MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway.

  14. Regulation of integrin and growth factor signaling in biomaterials for osteodifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qiang; Pohl, Theresa L M; Seckinger, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cells respond to the microenvironment (niche) they are located in. Under natural conditions, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is the essential component the in stem cell niche, in which both integrin ligands and growth factors are important regulators to directly or indirectly modulate the cell behavior. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the potential of integrin ligands and growth factors to induce osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, and discuss the signaling pathways that are initiated by both individual and cooperative parameters. The joint effect of integrin ligands and growth factors is highlighted as the multivalent interactions for bone therapy. PMID:26124879

  15. ATROPHIC CARDIOMYOCYTE SIGNALING IN HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A.; Marion, Tony N.; Darazi, Fahed Al; Gerling, Ivan C.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Cardinal pathologic features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle (LV) and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 wks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO4, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared to untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by: a) LV hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; b) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm2) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were re-expressing β-myosin heavy chain; and c) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with mRNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO4 cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function, but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO4 cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  16. Atrophic cardiomyocyte signaling in hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kamalov, German; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Sun, Yao; Ahokas, Robert A; Marion, Tony N; Al Darazi, Fahed; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2013-12-01

    Cardinal pathological features of hypertensive heart disease (HHD) include not only hypertrophied cardiomyocytes and foci of scattered microscopic scarring, a footprint of prior necrosis, but also small myocytes ensnared by fibrillar collagen where disuse atrophy with protein degradation would be predicted. Whether atrophic signaling is concordant with the appearance of HHD and involves oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress remains unexplored. Herein, we examine these possibilities focusing on the left ventricle and cardiomyocytes harvested from hypertensive rats receiving 4 weeks aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) alone or together with ZnSO₄, a nonvasoactive antioxidant, with the potential to attenuate atrophy and optimize hypertrophy. Compared with untreated age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by (1) left ventricle hypertrophy with preserved systolic function; (2) concordant cardiomyocyte atrophy (<1000 μm²) found at sites bordering on fibrosis where they were reexpressing β-myosin heavy chain; and (3) upregulation of ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING-finger protein-1 and atrogin-1, and elevated 8-isoprostane and unfolded protein ER response with messenger RNA upregulation of stress markers. ZnSO₄ cotreatment reduced lipid peroxidation, fibrosis, and the number of atrophic myocytes, together with a further increase in cell area and width of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improved systolic function but did not attenuate elevated blood pressure. We conclude that atrophic signaling, concordant with hypertrophy, occurs in the presence of a reparative fibrosis and induction of oxidative and ER stress at sites of scarring where myocytes are atrophied. ZnSO₄ cotreatment in HHD with ALDOST attenuates the number of atrophic myocytes, optimizes size of atrophied and hypertrophied myocytes, and improves systolic function. PMID:24084216

  17. Acoustical sensing of cardiomyocyte cluster beating

    SciTech Connect

    Tymchenko, Nina; Kunze, Angelika; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Svedhem, Sofia; Steel, Daniella

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •An example of the application of QCM-D to live cell studies. •Detection of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte cluster beating. •Clusters were studied in a thin liquid film and in a large liquid volume. •The QCM-D beating profile provides an individual fingerprint of the hPS-CMCs. -- Abstract: Spontaneously beating human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes clusters (CMCs) represent an excellent in vitro tool for studies of human cardiomyocyte function and for pharmacological cardiac safety assessment. Such testing typically requires highly trained operators, precision plating, or large cell quantities, and there is a demand for real-time, label-free monitoring of small cell quantities, especially rare cells and tissue-like structures. Array formats based on sensing of electrical or optical properties of cells are being developed and in use by the pharmaceutical industry. A potential alternative to these techniques is represented by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique, which is an acoustic surface sensitive technique that measures changes in mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface (from nm to μm). There is an increasing number of studies where QCM-D has successfully been applied to monitor properties of cells and cellular processes. In the present study, we show that spontaneous beating of CMCs on QCM-D sensors can be clearly detected, both in the frequency and the dissipation signals. Beating rates in the range of 66–168 bpm for CMCs were detected and confirmed by simultaneous light microscopy. The QCM-D beating profile was found to provide individual fingerprints of the hPS-CMCs. The presented results point towards acoustical assays for evaluation cardiotoxicity.

  18. Emerging role of PLAG1 as a regulator of growth and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Juma, Almas R; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina E; Grommen, Sylvia V H; Van de Ven, Wim J M; De Groef, Bert

    2016-02-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) belongs to the PLAG family of zinc finger transcription factors along with PLAG-like 1 and PLAG-like 2. The PLAG1 gene is best known as an oncogene associated with certain types of cancer, most notably pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary gland. While the mechanisms of PLAG1-induced tumorigenesis are reasonably well understood, the role of PLAG1 in normal physiology is less clear. It is known that PLAG1 is involved in cell proliferation by directly regulating a wide array of target genes, including a number of growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor 2. This is likely to be a central mode of action for PLAG1 both in embryonic development and in cancer. The phenotype of Plag1 knockout mice suggests an important role for PLAG1 also in postnatal growth and reproduction, as PLAG1 deficiency causes growth retardation and reduced fertility. A role for PLAG1 in growth and reproduction is further corroborated by genome-wide association studies in humans and domestic animals in which polymorphisms in the PLAG1 genomic region are associated with body growth and reproductive traits. Here we review the current evidence for PLAG1 as a regulator of growth and fertility and discuss possible endocrine mechanisms involved. PMID:26577933

  19. Annexin V/beta5 integrin interactions regulate apoptosis of growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Kirsch, Thorsten

    2006-10-13

    Apoptosis of terminally differentiated chondrocytes allows the replacement of growth plate cartilage by bone. Despite its importance, little is known about the regulation of chondrocyte apoptosis. We show that overexpression of annexin V, which binds to the cytoplasmic domain of beta5 integrin and protein kinase C alpha (PKCalpha), stimulates apoptotic events in hypertrophic growth plate chondrocytes. To determine whether the balance between the interactions of annexin V/beta5 integrin and annexin V/active PKCalpha play a role in the regulation of terminally differentiated growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, a peptide mimic of annexin V (Penetratin (Pen)-VVISYSMPD) that binds to beta5 integrin but not to PKCalpha was used. This peptide stimulated apoptotic events in growth plate chondrocytes. Suppression of annexin V expression using small interfering ribonucleic acid decreased caspase-3 activity and increased cell viability in Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated growth plate chondrocytes. An activator of PKC resulted in a further decrease of cell viability and further increase of caspase-3 activity in Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated growth plate chondrocytes, whereas inhibitors of PKCalpha led to an increase of cell viability and decrease of caspase-3 activity of Pen-VVISYSMPD-treated cells. These findings suggest that binding of annexin V to active PKCalpha stimulates apoptotic events in growth plate chondrocytes and that binding of annexin Vto beta5 integrin controls these interactions and ultimately apoptosis. PMID:16914549

  20. Regulation of early human growth: impact on long-term health.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Chourdakis, Michael; Grote, Veit; Hellmuth, Christian; Prell, Christine; Rzehak, Peter; Uhl, Olaf; Weber, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Growth and development are central characteristics of childhood. Deviations from normal growth can indicate serious health challenges. The adverse impact of early growth faltering and malnutrition on later health has long been known. In contrast, the impact of rapid early weight and body fat gain on programming of later disease risk have only recently received increased attention. Numerous observational studies related diet in early childhood and rapid early growth to the risk of later obesity and associated disorders. Causality was confirmed in a large, double-blind randomised trial testing the 'Early Protein Hypothesis'. In this trial we found that attenuation of protein supply in infancy normalized early growth and markedly reduced obesity prevalence in early school age. These results indicate the need to describe and analyse growth patterns and their regulation through diet in more detail and to characterize the underlying metabolic and epigenetic mechanisms, given the potential major relevance for public health and policy. Better understanding of growth patterns and their regulation could have major benefits for the promotion of public health, consumer-orientated nutrition recommendations, and the development of improved food products for specific target populations. PMID:25413647

  1. A multilevel latent growth modelling of the longitudinal changes in motivation regulations in physical education.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Timo; Wang, John; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine individual- and classroom-level differences in the longitudinal change in motivational regulations during physical education students' transition from elementary (Grade 6) across middle school (Grades 7 to 9). A sample of 757 Finnish adolescents (M = 12.71, SD = 0.23) participated in this study. Participants of the study responded to questionnaires collected six times. A multilevel latent growth modelling approach was used to analyze the data. Results showed that motivational regulations in physical education developed at different rates during middle school. More specifically, students': (a) identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9; (b) amotivation increased during middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7; and (c) introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9. Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. The changes in amotivation and introjected regulation were largely due to individual factors, whereas the changes in identified regulation were due to environmental factors. Key pointsStudents' identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9.Students' amotivation increased across middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7.Students' introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9.Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. PMID:25729304

  2. A Multilevel Latent Growth Modelling of the Longitudinal Changes in Motivation Regulations in Physical Education

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Timo; Wang, John; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine individual- and classroom-level differences in the longitudinal change in motivational regulations during physical education students’ transition from elementary (Grade 6) across middle school (Grades 7 to 9). A sample of 757 Finnish adolescents (M = 12.71, SD = 0.23) participated in this study. Participants of the study responded to questionnaires collected six times. A multilevel latent growth modelling approach was used to analyze the data. Results showed that motivational regulations in physical education developed at different rates during middle school. More specifically, students’: (a) identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9; (b) amotivation increased during middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7; and (c) introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9. Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. The changes in amotivation and introjected regulation were largely due to individual factors, whereas the changes in identified regulation were due to environmental factors. Key points Students’ identified regulation increased across Grades 6 to 9. Students’ amotivation increased across middle school transition from Grade 6 to 7. Students’ introjected regulation declined from Grade 8 to 9. Other motivational regulations remained stable across time. PMID:25729304

  3. miR-134 Modulates the Proliferation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells by Targeting Meis2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Han; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Li-Ping; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Wu, Yu-Fei; Zhen, Li-Xiao; Li, Jun; Ge, Dong-Xia; Xu, Liang; Lin, Li; Liu, Yi; Liang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte progenitor cells play essential roles in early heart development, which requires highly controlled cellular organization. microRNAs (miRs) are involved in various cell behaviors by post-transcriptional regulation of target genes. However, the roles of miRNAs in human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) remain to be elucidated. Our previous study showed that miR-134 was significantly downregulated in heart tissue suffering from congenital heart disease, underlying the potential role of miR-134 in cardiogenesis. In the present work, we showed that the upregulation of miR-134 reduced the proliferation of hCMPCs, as determined by EdU assay and Ki-67 immunostaining, while the inhibition of miR-134 exhibited an opposite effect. Both up- and downregulation of miR-134 expression altered the transcriptional level of cell-cycle genes. We identified Meis2 as the target of miR-134 in the regulation of hCMPC proliferation through bioinformatic prediction, luciferase reporter assay and western blot. The over-expression of Meis2 mitigated the effect of miR-134 on hCMPC proliferation. Moreover, miR-134 did not change the degree of hCMPC differentiation into cardiomyocytes in our model, suggesting that miR-134 is not required in this process. These findings reveal an essential role for miR-134 in cardiomyocyte progenitor cell biology and provide new insights into the physiology and pathology of cardiogenesis. PMID:26512644

  4. Latrunculin B modulates electrophysiological characteristics and arrhythmogenesis in pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Yu; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Chen, Yao-Chang; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-05-01

    AF (atrial fibrillation) is the most common sustained arrhythmia, and the PVs (pulmonary veins) play a critical role in triggering AF. Stretch causes structural remodelling, including cytoskeleton rearrangement, which may play a role in the genesis of AF. Lat-B (latrunculin B), an inhibitor of actin polymerization, is involved in Ca(2+) regulation. However, it is unclear whether Lat-B directly modulates the electrophysiological characteristics and Ca(2+) homoeostasis of the PVs. Conventional microelectrodes, whole-cell patch-clamp, and the fluo-3 fluorimetric ratio technique were used to record ionic currents and intracellular Ca(2+) within isolated rabbit PV preparations, or within isolated single PV cardiomyocytes, before and after administration of Lat-B (100 nM). Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were exposed to acute and continuous atrial stretch, and we studied PV electrical activity. Lat-B (100 nM) decreased the spontaneous electrical activity by 16±4% in PV preparations. Lat-B (100 nM) decreased the late Na(+) current, L-type Ca(2+) current, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger current, and stretch-activated BKCa current, but did not affect the Na(+) current in PV cardiomyocytes. Lat-B reduced the transient outward K(+) current and ultra-rapid delayed rectifier K(+) current, but increased the delayed rectifier K(+) current in isolated PV cardiomyocytes. In addition, Lat-B (100 nM) decreased intracellular Ca(2+) transient and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) content in PV cardiomyocytes. Moreover, Lat-B attenuated stretch-induced increased spontaneous electrical activity and trigger activity. The effects of Lat-B on the PV spontaneous electrical activity were attenuated in the presence of Y-27632 [10 μM, a ROCK (Rho-associated kinase) inhibitor] and cytochalasin D (10 μM, an actin polymerization inhibitor). In conclusion, Lat-B regulates PV electrophysiological characteristics and attenuates stretch-induced arrhythmogenesis. PMID:26839418

  5. Nerve growth factor stimulates axon outgrowth through negative regulation of growth cone actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance

    PubMed Central

    Turney, Stephen G.; Ahmed, Mostafa; Chandrasekar, Indra; Wysolmerski, Robert B.; Goeckeler, Zoe M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Whitesides, George M.; Bridgman, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of sensory neurons in the mammalian nervous system. Little is known about how NGF elicits faster axon outgrowth or how growth cones integrate and transform signal input to motor output. Using cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that myosin II (MII) is required for NGF to stimulate faster axon outgrowth. From experiments inducing loss or gain of function of MII, specific MII isoforms, and vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, we determined that NGF causes decreased vinculin-dependent actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance. Inhibition of MII blocked NGF stimulation, indicating the central role of restraint in directed outgrowth. The restraint consists of myosin IIB- and IIA-dependent processes: retrograde actin network flow and transverse actin bundling, respectively. The processes differentially contribute on laminin-1 and fibronectin due to selective actin tethering to adhesions. On laminin-1, NGF induced greater vinculin-dependent adhesion–cytoskeletal coupling, which slowed retrograde actin network flow (i.e., it regulated the molecular clutch). On fibronectin, NGF caused inactivation of myosin IIA, which negatively regulated actin bundling. On both substrates, the result was the same: NGF-induced weakening of MII-dependent restraint led to dynamic microtubules entering the actin-rich periphery more frequently, giving rise to faster elongation. PMID:26631553

  6. Discovery of an ergosterol-signaling factor that regulates Trypanosoma brucei growth[S

    PubMed Central

    Haubrich, Brad A.; Singha, Ujjal K.; Miller, Matthew B.; Nes, Craigen R.; Anyatonwu, Hosanna; Lecordier, Laurence; Patkar, Presheet; Leaver, David J.; Villalta, Fernando; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Chaudhuri, Minu; Nes, W. David

    2015-01-01

    Ergosterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei was analyzed by RNAi silencing and inhibition of sterol C24β-methyltransferase (TbSMT) and sterol 14α-demethylase [TbSDM (TbCYP51)] to explore the functions of sterols in T. brucei growth. Inhibition of the amount or activity of these enzymes depletes ergosterol from cells at <6 fg/cell for procyclic form (PCF) cells or <0.01 fg/cell for bloodstream form (BSF) cells and reduces infectivity in a mouse model of infection. Silencing of TbSMT expression by RNAi in PCF or BSF in combination with 25-azalanosterol (AZA) inhibited parasite growth and this inhibition was restored completely by adding synergistic cholesterol (7.8 μM from lipid-depleted media) with small amounts of ergosterol (1.2 μM) to the medium. These observations are consistent with the proposed requirement for ergosterol as a signaling factor to spark cell proliferation while imported cholesterol or the endogenously formed cholesta-5,7,24-trienol act as bulk membrane components. To test the potential chemotherapeutic importance of disrupting ergosterol biosynthesis using pairs of mechanism-based inhibitors that block two enzymes in the post-squalene segment, parasites were treated with AZA and itraconazole at 1 μM each (ED50 values) resulting in parasite death. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ergosterol pathway is a prime drug target for intervention in T. brucei infection. PMID:25424002

  7. FasL expression in cardiomyocytes activates the ERK1/2 pathway, leading to dilated cardiomyopathy and advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Turdi, Subat; James, Jeanne; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan

    2016-02-01

    Increase in the apoptotic molecule Fas ligand (FasL) in serum and cardiomyocytes has been shown to be associated with progressive dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and congestive heart failure (CHF) in humans. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of FasL-related deterioration of heart function remain obscure. The aim of the present study is to determine roles of myocardial FasL in the activation of alternative pathways such as extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), inflammation or fibrosis and to identify effective treatments of progressive DCM and advanced CHF. Transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of FasL were investigated and treated with an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U-0126), losartan (los), prednisolone (pred) or placebo. Morpho-histological and molecular studies were subsequently performed. FasL mice showed significantly higher mortality compared with wild-type (WT) littermates due to DCM and advanced CHF. Prominent perivascular and interstitial fibrosis, increased interleukin secretion and diffuse CD3-positive cell infiltration were evident in FasL hearts. Up-regulation of the short form of Fas-associated death domain (FADD)-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme (FLICE) inhibitory protein (s-FLIP), RIP (receptor-interacting protein) and ERK1/2 and down-regulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined in the myocardium, whereas expression of ERK1/2, periostin (Postn) and osteopontin increased in cardiac fibroblasts. U-0126 and los increased CHF survival by 75% compared with pred and placebo groups. U-0126 had both anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic effects, whereas los reduced fibrosis only. Myocardial FasL expression in mice activates differential robust fibrotic, apoptotic and inflammatory responses via ERK1/2 in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts inducing DCM and CHF. Blocking the ERK1/2 pathway prevented progression of FasL-induced DCM and CHF by reducing fibrosis, inflammation

  8. Searching for baits with insect growth regulating effects on an invasive crazy ant, Nylanderia pubens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nylanderia pubens is an invasive ant that is currently plaguing parts of Florida and Texas with extremely high populations that dominate landscapes. It is hypothesized that insect growth regulating (IGR) ant baits would be distributed more efficiently among multiple colonies of N. pubens than fast...

  9. Methodology for evaluating the insect growth regulator (IGR) methoprene incorporated into packaging films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect growth regulator methoprene has been impregnated onto various packaging materials to control stored product insects, and is labeled for use in this manner in the United States. Different methodologies were utilized to evaluate efficacy towards Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour b...

  10. Economics of growth regulator treatment of alfalfa seed for interseeding into silage corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have focused on interseeding of alfalfa into corn for use as a temporary cover crop rather than as a means of jump-starting alfalfa production after corn. In ongoing field studies, we are evaluating whether plant growth regulators (PGR) may be used to aid the establishment of inters...

  11. Residual efficacy of the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen for control of stored product insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen is registered in the USA as an aerosol and as a surface treatment to control stored product insects. Field trials with the aerosol show that residues from an application of pyrethrin + pyriproxyfen gave residual control of the red flour beetle, Tribolium cast...

  12. Shaping Self-Regulation in Science Teachers' Professional Growth: Inquiry Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalsky, Tova

    2012-01-01

    This study examined 188 preservice science teachers' professional growth along three dimensions--self-regulated learning (SRL) in a science pedagogical context, pedagogical content knowledge, and self-efficacy in teaching science--comparing four learner-centered, active-learning, peer-collaborative environments for learning to teach higher order…

  13. A possible novel black aphid control approach using plant growth regulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The black pecan aphid, Melanocallis caryaefoliae (Davis) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), elicits localized chlorotic injury to pecan foliage in order to feed, thereby accelerating leaf senescence and defoliation. The action of certain plant growth regulators (i.e., forchlorfenuron, gibberellic acid and avi...

  14. Growth regulators and chemicals stimulate germination of leafy spurge seeds (Euphorbia esula)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to survey the effect of various growth regulator and chemical treatments on germination of leafy spurge seeds. Non-treated seeds in this population were nearly fully imbibed in 3 h and display approximately 35% germination in 21 d under the normal alternating temperature of ...

  15. The F-BAR Protein PACSIN2 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Anthony, Eloise C.; Geerts, Dirk; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling via growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, is key to various cellular processes, such as proliferation, cell survival, and cell migration. In a variety of human diseases such as cancer, aberrant expression and activation of growth factor receptors can lead to disturbed signaling. Intracellular trafficking is crucial for proper signaling of growth factor receptors. As a result, the level of cell surface expression of growth factor receptors is an important determinant for the outcome of downstream signaling. BAR domain-containing proteins represent an important family of proteins that regulate membrane dynamics. In this study, we identify a novel role for the F-BAR protein PACSIN2 in the regulation of EGF receptor signaling. We show that internalized EGF as well as the (activated) EGF receptor translocated to PACSIN2-positive endosomes. Furthermore, loss of PACSIN2 increased plasma membrane expression of the EGF receptor in resting cells and increased EGF-induced phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. As a consequence, EGF-induced activation of Erk and Akt as well as cell proliferation were enhanced in PACSIN2-depleted cells. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel role for the F-BAR-domain protein PACSIN2 in regulating EGF receptor surface levels and EGF-induced downstream signaling. PMID:23129763

  16. Arabidopsis RIC1 Severs Actin Filaments at the Apex to Regulate Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shi, Haifan; Chen, Binqing; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes deliver sperms to the ovule for fertilization via tip growth. The rapid turnover of F-actin in pollen tube tips plays an important role in this process. In this study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana RIC1, a member of the ROP-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein family, regulates pollen tube growth via its F-actin severing activity. Knockout of RIC1 enhanced pollen tube elongation, while overexpression of RIC1 dramatically reduced tube growth. Pharmacological analysis indicated that RIC1 affected F-actin dynamics in pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical assays revealed that RIC1 directly bound and severed F-actin in the presence of Ca2+ in addition to interfering with F-actin turnover by capping F-actin at the barbed ends. In vivo, RIC1 localized primarily to the apical plasma membrane (PM) of pollen tubes. The level of RIC1 at the apical PM oscillated during pollen tube growth. The frequency of F-actin severing at the apex was notably decreased in ric1-1 pollen tubes but was increased in pollen tubes overexpressing RIC1. We propose that RIC1 regulates F-actin dynamics at the apical PM as well as the cytosol by severing F-actin and capping the barbed ends in the cytoplasm, establishing a novel mechanism that underlies the regulation of pollen tube growth. PMID:25804540

  17. CREB-binding protein regulates lung cancer growth by targeting MAPK and CPSF4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhipeng; Yu, Wendan; Zhang, Changlin; Zhao, Shilei; Yu, Zhenlong; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Tang, Ranran; Xuan, Yang; Yang, Wenjing; Hao, Jiaojiao; Xu, Tingting; Zhang, Qianyi; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo; Guo, Wei

    2016-02-01

    CBP (CREB-binding protein) is a transcriptional co-activator which possesses HAT (histone acetyltransferases) activity and participates in many biological processes, including embryonic development, growth control and homeostasis. However, its roles and the underlying mechanisms in the regulation of carcinogenesis and tumor development remain largely unknown. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms and potential targets of CBP involved in tumor growth and survival in lung cancer cells. Elevated expression of CBP was detected in lung cancer cells and tumor tissues compared to the normal lung cells and tissues. Knockdown of CBP by siRNA or inhibition of its HAT activity using specific chemical inhibitor effectively suppressed cell proliferation, migration and colony formation and induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK and activating cytochrome C/caspase-dependent signaling pathways. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the co-localization and interaction between CBP and CPSF4 (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 4) proteins in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CPSF4 inhibited hTERT transcription and cell growth induced by CBP, and vice versa, demonstrating the synergetic effect of CBP and CPSF4 in the regulation of lung cancer cell growth and survival. Moreover, we found that high expression of both CBP and CPSF4 predicted a poor prognosis in the patients with lung adenocarcinomas. Collectively, our results indicate that CBP regulates lung cancer growth by targeting MAPK and CPSF4 signaling pathways. PMID:26628108

  18. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. )

    1988-06-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  19. MicroRNA-29a-3p attenuates ET-1-induced hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Jian; He, Hong-Peng; Gong, Hui-Qin; Zhang, Rui; Song, Tie-Feng; Zhang, Li-Nan; Guo, Zhi-Xia; Cao, Dong-Sun; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells c4 (NFATc4) is the best-characterized target for the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Aberrant microRNA-29 (miR-29) expression is involved in the development of cardiac fibrosis and congestive heart failure. However, whether miR-29 regulates hypertrophic processes is still not clear. In this study, we investigated the potential functions of miR-29a-3p in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We showed that miR-29a-3p was down-regulated in ET-1-treated H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of miR-29a-3p significantly reduced ET-1-induced hypertrophic responses in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, which was accompanied by a decrease in NFATc4 expression. miR-29a-3p targeted directly to the 3'-UTR of NFATc4 mRNA and silenced NFATc4 expression. Our results indicate that miR-29a-3p inhibits ET-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibiting NFATc4 expression. PMID:26992639

  20. miR-526a regulates apoptotic cell growth in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoli; Wang, Cui; Xu, Changzhi; Yan, Zhifeng; Wei, Congwen; Guan, Kai; Ma, Shengli; Cao, Ye; Liu, Liping; Zou, Deyong; He, Xiang; Zhang, Buchang; Ma, Qingjun; Zheng, Zirui

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in the regulation of cell cycle, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Our previous studies showed that miR-526a positively regulated innate immune response by suppressing CYLD expression, however, the functional relevance of miR-526a expression and cell growth remains to be evaluated. In this study, miR-526a overexpression was found to promote cancer cell proliferation, migration, and anchor-independent colony formation. The molecular mechanism(s) of miR-526a-mediated growth stimulation is associated with rapid cell cycle progression and inhibition of cell apoptosis by targeting CYLD. Taken together, these results provide evidence to show the stimulatory role of miR-526a in tumor migration and invasion through modulation of the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26002288

  1. Laminin-511, inducer of hair growth, is down-regulated and its suppressor in hair growth, laminin-332 up-regulated in chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Hisayoshi; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Tateishi, Chiharu; Sugawara, Koji; Paus, Ralf; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Ishii, Masamitsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kunimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Koichi; Jones, Jonathan C.R.; Kobayashi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) has a devastating cosmetic effect, especially in the young. Recent data indicate that two major basement membrane components (laminin-332 and -511) of the skin have opposing effects on hair growth. Objective In this study, we examined the role and localization of laminin-332 and -511 in CIA. Methods We examined the expression of laminin-332 and -511 during the dystrophic catagen form of CIA induced in C57BL/6 mice by cyclophosphamide (CYP) treatment. Results Our data indicate that both laminin-332 and its receptor α6β4 integrin are up-regulated (both quantitatively and spatially) after mid to late dystrophic catagen around the outer root sheath (ORS) in the lower third of hair follicles in CIA. This up-regulation also occurs at the transcriptional level. In contrast, laminin-511 is down-regulated after mid dystrophic catagen at the protein level, with transcriptional inactivation of laminin-511 occurring transiently at the early dystrophic catagen stage in both epidermal and ORS keratinocytes. Laminin-511 expression correlates with expression of α3 integrin in CIA and we also demonstrate that laminin-511 can up-regulate the activity of the α3 integrin promoter in cultured keratinocytes. Injection of a laminin-511 rich protein extract, but not recombinant laminin-332, in the back skin of mice delays hair loss in CYP-induced CIA. Conclusions We propose that abrupt hair loss in CIA is, at least in part, caused by down-regulation of laminin-511 and up-regulation of laminin-332 at the transcriptional and translational levels. PMID:20211547

  2. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  3. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rupesh K. Meachum, Sharon Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel Peretz, Jackye Yao, Humphrey H. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  4. Eupolyphaga sinensis walker displays inhibition on hepatocellular carcinoma through regulating cell growth and metastasis signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhan, Yingzhuan; Zhang, Dongdong; Dai, Bingling; Ma, Weina; Qi, Junpeng; Liu, Rui; He, Langchong

    2014-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are responsible for most cancer patients' deaths. Here, we report that eupolyphaga sinensis walker has an essential role in resisting hepatocellular carcinoma growth and metastasis. Compared with proliferation, colony formation, transwell assay and transplantable tumor in nude mouse in vitro and vivo, eupolyphaga sinensis walker extract (ESWE) showed good inhibition on the SMMC-7721 cell growth and metastasis. Using genome-wide microarray analysis, we found the down-regulated growth and metastasis factors, and selected down-regulated genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. Knockdown of a checkpoint PKCβ by siRNA significantly attenuated tumor inhibition and metastasis effects of ESWE. Moreover, our results indicate ESWE inhibits HCC growth by not only downregulating the signaling of PKCβ, Akt, m-TOR, Erk1/2, MEK-2, Raf and JNK-1, but also increasing cyclin D1 protein levels and decreasing amount of cyclin E, cyclin B1 and cdc2 of the cycle proteins. At the same time, ESWE reduced MMP2, MMP9 and CXCR4, PLG, NFκB and P53 activities. Overall, our studies demonstrate that ESWE is a key factor in growth and metastasis signaling inhibitor targeting the PKC, AKT, MAPK signaling and related metastasis signaling, having potential in cancer therapy. PMID:24980220

  5. From pluripotency to distinct cardiomyocyte subtypes.

    PubMed

    David, Robert; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2012-06-01

    Differentiated adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) lack significant regenerative potential, which is one reason why degenerative heart diseases are the leading cause of death in the western world. For future cardiac repair, stem cell-based therapeutic strategies may become alternatives to donor heart transplantation. The principle of reprogramming adult terminally differentiated cells (iPSC) had a major impact on stem cell biology. One can now generate autologous pluripotent cells that highly resemble embryonic stem cells (ESC) and that are ethically inoffensive as opposed to human ESC. Yet, due to genetic and epigenetic aberrations arising during the full reprogramming process, it is questionable whether iPSC will enter the clinic in the near future. Therefore, the recent achievement of directly reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes via a milder approach, thereby avoiding an initial pluripotent state, may become of great importance. In addition, various clinical scenarios will depend on the availability of specific cardiac cellular subtypes, for which a first step was achieved via our own programming approach to achieve cardiovascular cell subtypes. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the cardiovascular stem cell field addressing the above mentioned aspects. PMID:22689787

  6. Acoustical sensing of cardiomyocyte cluster beating.

    PubMed

    Tymchenko, Nina; Kunze, Angelika; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Svedhem, Sofia; Steel, Daniella

    2013-06-14

    Spontaneously beating human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes clusters (CMCs) represent an excellent in vitro tool for studies of human cardiomyocyte function and for pharmacological cardiac safety assessment. Such testing typically requires highly trained operators, precision plating, or large cell quantities, and there is a demand for real-time, label-free monitoring of small cell quantities, especially rare cells and tissue-like structures. Array formats based on sensing of electrical or optical properties of cells are being developed and in use by the pharmaceutical industry. A potential alternative to these techniques is represented by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique, which is an acoustic surface sensitive technique that measures changes in mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface (from nm to μm). There is an increasing number of studies where QCM-D has successfully been applied to monitor properties of cells and cellular processes. In the present study, we show that spontaneous beating of CMCs on QCM-D sensors can be clearly detected, both in the frequency and the dissipation signals. Beating rates in the range of 66-168 bpm for CMCs were detected and confirmed by simultaneous light microscopy. The QCM-D beating profile was found to provide individual fingerprints of the hPS-CMCs. The presented results point towards acoustical assays for evaluation cardiotoxicity. PMID:23643814

  7. Soybean Homologs of MPK4 Negatively Regulate Defense Responses and Positively Regulate Growth and Development1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Zhong; Horstman, Heidi D.; Braun, Edward; Graham, Michelle A.; Zhang, Chunquan; Navarre, Duroy; Qiu, Wen-Li; Lee, Yeunsook; Nettleton, Dan; Hill, John H.; Whitham, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play important roles in disease resistance in model plant species such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). However, the importance of MAPK signaling pathways in the disease resistance of crops is still largely uninvestigated. To better understand the role of MAPK signaling pathways in disease resistance in soybean (Glycine max), 13, nine, and 10 genes encoding distinct MAPKs, MAPKKs, and MAPKKKs, respectively, were silenced using virus-induced gene silencing mediated by Bean pod mottle virus. Among the plants silenced for various MAPKs, MAPKKs, and MAPKKKs, those in which GmMAPK4 homologs (GmMPK4s) were silenced displayed strong phenotypes including stunted stature and spontaneous cell death on the leaves and stems, the characteristic hallmarks of activated defense responses. Microarray analysis showed that genes involved in defense responses, such as those in salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathways, were significantly up-regulated in GmMPK4-silenced plants, whereas genes involved in growth and development, such as those in auxin signaling pathways and in cell cycle and proliferation, were significantly down-regulated. As expected, SA and hydrogen peroxide accumulation was significantly increased in GmMPK4-silenced plants. Accordingly, GmMPK4-silenced plants were more resistant to downy mildew and Soybean mosaic virus compared with vector control plants. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis and in vitro kinase assays, we determined that GmMKK1 and GmMKK2 might function upstream of GmMPK4. Taken together, our results indicate that GmMPK4s negatively regulate SA accumulation and defense response but positively regulate plant growth and development, and their functions are conserved across plant species. PMID:21878550

  8. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  9. Controllable Expansion of Primary Cardiomyocytes by Reversible Immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Nuglozeh, Edem; Touré, Fatouma; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac tissue engineering will remain only a prospect unless large numbers of therapeutic cells can be provided, either from small samples of cardiac cells or from stem cell sources. In contrast to most adult cells, cardiomyocytes are terminally differentiated and cannot be expanded in culture. We explored the feasibility of enabling the in vitro expansion of primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes by lentivector-mediated cell immortalization, and then reverting the phenotype of the expanded cells back to the cardiomyocyte state. Primary rat cardiomyocytes were transduced with simian virus 40 large T antigen (TAg), or with Bmi-1 followed by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene; the cells were expanded; and the transduced genes were removed by adenoviral vector expressing Cre recombinase. The TAg gene was more efficient in cell transduction than the Bmi-1/hTERT gene, based on the rate of cell proliferation. Immortalized cells exhibited the morphological features of dedifferentiation (increased vimentin expression, and reduced expression of troponin I and Nkx2.5) along with the continued expression of cardiac markers (α-actin, connexin-43, and calcium transients). After the immortalization was reversed, cells returned to their differentiated state. This strategy for controlled expansion of primary cardiomyocytes by gene transfer has potential for providing large amounts of a patient's own cardiomyocytes for cell therapy, and the cardiomyocytes derived by this method could be a useful cellular model by which to study cardiogenesis. PMID:19708763

  10. The Nuclear Receptor DAF-12 Regulates Nutrient Metabolism and Reproductive Growth in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Stoltzfus, Jonathan; You, Young-jai; Ranjit, Najju; Tang, Hao; Xie, Yang; Lok, James B.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate nutrient response is essential for growth and reproduction. Under favorable nutrient conditions, the C. elegans nuclear receptor DAF-12 is activated by dafachronic acids, hormones that commit larvae to reproductive growth. Here, we report that in addition to its well-studied role in controlling developmental gene expression, the DAF-12 endocrine system governs expression of a gene network that stimulates the aerobic catabolism of fatty acids. Thus, activation of the DAF-12 transcriptome coordinately mobilizes energy stores to permit reproductive growth. DAF-12 regulation of this metabolic gene network is conserved in the human parasite, Strongyloides stercoralis, and inhibition of specific steps in this network blocks reproductive growth in both of the nematodes. Our study provides a molecular understanding for metabolic adaptation of nematodes to their environment, and suggests a new therapeutic strategy for treating parasitic diseases. PMID:25774872

  11. In situ growth of juvenile zebra mussels in a regulated stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P., III; Nichols, S. Jerrine; Craig, Jaquelyn M.; Allen, Jeffery D.; Black, M. Glen

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the in situ growth of juvenile zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in a reach of the Huron River (southeast Michigan) below a dam with a control gate that regulates water levels. Growth was significantly different among sample dates over a five-month-long monitoring season. Mean growth of mussels generally decreased from 0.093 mm/day just above the dam to 0.067 mm/day 4 km downstream, then increased to 0.091 mm/day at end of the 17-km-long study area. Significant differences among sites were most numerous in August during a severe drought when discharges fell substantially. Growth was positively correlated with discharges (R2 = 0.94, p a levels in the study area, however, was weak (R2 = 0.69, p < 0.1). Our study suggests that discharge may be one controlling factor for dreissenid populations in small streams.

  12. Cardiomyocyte behavior on biodegradable polyurethane/gold nanocomposite scaffolds under electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Yasaman; Li, Qian; Quabius, Elgar Susanne; Böttner, Martina; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Kasra, Mehran

    2016-02-01

    Following a myocardial infarction (MI), cardiomyocytes are replaced by scar tissue, which decreases ventricular contractile function. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to regenerate such damaged cardiomyocyte tissue. Engineered cardiac patches can be fabricated by seeding a high density of cardiac cells onto a synthetic or natural porous polymer. In this study, nanocomposite scaffolds made of gold nanotubes/nanowires incorporated into biodegradable castor oil-based polyurethane were employed to make micro-porous scaffolds. H9C2 cardiomyocyte cells were cultured on the scaffolds for one day, and electrical stimulation was applied to improve cell communication and interaction in neighboring pores. Cells on scaffolds were examined by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, revealing that the combination of scaffold design and electrical stimulation significantly increased cell confluency of H9C2 cells on the scaffolds. Furthermore, we showed that the gene expression levels of Nkx2.5, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANF) and natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB), which are functional genes of the myocardium, were up-regulated by the incorporation of gold nanotubes/nanowires into the polyurethane scaffolds, in particular after electrical stimulation. PMID:26652343

  13. Rab8, POSH, and TAK1 regulate synaptic growth in a Drosophila model of frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    West, Ryan J.H.; Lu, Yubing; Marie, Bruno; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes essential for protein homeostasis have been identified in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Why mature neurons should be particularly sensitive to such perturbations is unclear. We identified mutations in Rab8 in a genetic screen for enhancement of an FTD phenotype associated with ESCRT-III dysfunction. Examination of Rab8 mutants or motor neurons expressing a mutant ESCRT-III subunit, CHMP2BIntron5, at the Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction synapse revealed synaptic overgrowth and endosomal dysfunction. Expression of Rab8 rescued overgrowth phenotypes generated by CHMP2BIntron5. In Rab8 mutant synapses, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 and TGF-β signaling were overactivated and acted synergistically to potentiate synaptic growth. We identify novel roles for endosomal JNK-scaffold POSH (Plenty-of-SH3s) and a JNK kinase kinase, TAK1, in regulating growth activation in Rab8 mutants. Our data uncover Rab8, POSH, and TAK1 as regulators of synaptic growth responses and point to recycling endosome as a key compartment for synaptic growth regulation during neurodegenerative processes. PMID:25800055

  14. CYCD3 D-type cyclins regulate cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Carl; Maruthi, N. M.; Jahn, Courtney E.

    2015-01-01

    A major proportion of plant biomass is derived from the activity of the cambium, a lateral meristem responsible for vascular tissue formation and radial organ enlargement in a process termed secondary growth. In contrast to our relatively good understanding of the regulation of primary meristems, remarkably little is known concerning the mechanisms controlling secondary growth, particularly how cambial cell divisions are regulated and integrated with vascular differentiation. A genetic loss-of-function approach was used here to reveal a rate-limiting role for the Arabidopsis CYCLIN D3 (CYCD3) subgroup of cell-cycle genes in the control of cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth, providing conclusive evidence of a direct link between the cell cycle and vascular development. It is shown that all three CYCD3 genes are specifically expressed in the cambium throughout vascular development. Analysis of a triple loss-of-function CYCD3 mutant revealed a requirement for CYCD3 in promoting the cambial cell cycle since mutant stems and hypocotyls showed a marked reduction in diameter linked to reduced mitotic activity in the cambium. Conversely, loss of CYCD3 provoked an increase in xylem cell size and the expression of differentiation markers, showing that CYCD3 is required to restrain the differentiation of xylem precursor cells. Together, our data show that tight control of cambial cell division through developmental- and cell type-specific regulation of CYCD3 is required for normal vascular development, constituting part of a novel mechanism controlling organ growth in higher plants. PMID:26022252

  15. The DUSP26 phosphatase activator adenylate kinase 2 regulates FADD phosphorylation and cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Lee, Ho-June; Oh, Yumin; Choi, Seon-Guk; Hong, Se-Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Song-Yi; Choi, Ji-Woo; Su Hwang, Deog; Kim, Key-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Zhang, Jianke; Youn, Hyun-Jo; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2014-02-01

    Adenylate kinase 2 (AK2), which balances adenine nucleotide pool, is a multi-functional protein. Here we show that AK2 negatively regulates tumour cell growth. AK2 forms a complex with dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) phosphatase and stimulates DUSP26 activity independently of its AK activity. AK2/DUSP26 phosphatase protein complex dephosphorylates fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) and regulates cell growth. AK2 deficiency enhances cell proliferation and induces tumour formation in a xenograft assay. This anti-growth function of AK2 is associated with its DUSP26-stimulating activity. Downregulation of AK2 is frequently found in tumour cells and human cancer tissues showing high levels of phospho-FADDSer194. Moreover, reconstitution of AK2 in AK2-deficient tumour cells retards both cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. Consistent with this, AK2+/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit enhanced cell proliferation with a significant alteration in phospho-FADDSer191. These results suggest that AK2 is an associated activator of DUSP26 and suppresses cell proliferation by FADD dephosphorylation, postulating AK2 as a negative regulator of tumour growth.

  16. In Pichia pastoris, growth rate regulates protein synthesis and secretion, mating and stress response

    PubMed Central

    Rebnegger, Corinna; Graf, Alexandra B; Valli, Minoska; Steiger, Matthias G; Gasser, Brigitte; Maurer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2014-01-01

    Protein production in yeasts is related to the specific growth rate μ. To elucidate on this correlation, we studied the transcriptome of Pichia pastoris at different specific growth rates by cultivating a strain secreting human serum albumin at μ = 0.015 to 0.15 h–1 in glucose-limited chemostats. Genome-wide regulation revealed that translation-related as well as mitochondrial genes were upregulated with increasing μ, while autophagy and other proteolytic processes, carbon source-responsive genes and other targets of the TOR pathway as well as many transcriptional regulators were downregulated at higher μ. Mating and sporulation genes were most active at intermediate μ of 0.05 and 0.075 h–1. At very slow growth (μ = 0.015 h–1) gene regulation differs significantly, affecting many transporters and glucose sensing. Analysis of a subset of genes related to protein folding and secretion reveals that unfolded protein response targets such as translocation, endoplasmic reticulum genes, and cytosolic chaperones are upregulated with increasing growth rate while proteolytic degradation of secretory proteins is downregulated. We conclude that a high μ positively affects specific protein secretion rates by acting on multiple cellular processes. PMID:24323948

  17. MicroRNA-145 suppresses ROS-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload of cardiomyocytes by targeting CaMKIIδ

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Min-Ji; Jang, Jin-Kyung; Ham, Onju; Song, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Se-Yeon; Lee, Chang Yeon; Park, Jun-Hee; Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee; Choi, Eunhyun; Jeon, Woo-min; Hwang, Hye Jin; Shin, Hyun-Taek; and others

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •CaMKIIδ mediates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. •miR-145 can inhibit Ca{sup 2+} overload. •A luciferase assay confirms that miR-145 functions as a CaMKIIδ-targeting miRNA. •Overexpression of miR-145 regulates CaMKIIδ-related genes and ameliorates apoptosis. -- Abstract: A change in intracellular free calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) is a common signaling mechanism of reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte death. Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a critical regulator of Ca{sup 2+} signaling and mediates signaling pathways responsible for functions in the heart including hypertrophy, apoptosis, arrhythmia, and heart disease. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are involved in the regulation of cell response, including survival, proliferation, apoptosis, and development. However, the roles of miRNAs in Ca{sup 2+}-mediated apoptosis of cardiomyocytes are uncertain. Here, we determined the potential role of miRNA in the regulation of CaMKII dependent apoptosis and explored its underlying mechanism. To determine the potential roles of miRNAs in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated Ca{sup 2+} overload, we selected and tested 6 putative miRNAs that targeted CaMKIIδ, and showed that miR-145 represses CaMKIIδ protein expression and Ca{sup 2+} overload. We confirmed CaMKIIδ as a direct downstream target of miR-145. Furthermore, miR-145 regulates Ca{sup 2+}-related signals and ameliorates apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-145 regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. Thus, miR-145 affects ROS-mediated gene regulation and cellular injury responses.

  18. Heme-induced contractile dysfunction in human cardiomyocytes caused by oxidant damage to thick filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Gerardo; Jeney, Viktória; Tóth, Attila; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Huynh, An T; Hajnal, Csaba; Kalász, Judit; Pásztor, Enikő T; Édes, István; Gram, Magnus; Akerström, Bo; Smith, Ann; Eaton, John W; Balla, György; Papp, Zoltán; Balla, József

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular free heme predisposes to oxidant-mediated tissue damage. We hypothesized that free heme causes alterations in myocardial contractility via disturbed structure and/or regulation of the contractile proteins. Isometric force production and its Ca(2+)-sensitivity (pCa50) were monitored in permeabilized human ventricular cardiomyocytes. Heme exposure altered cardiomyocyte morphology and evoked robust decreases in Ca(2+)-activated maximal active force (Fo) while increasing Ca(2+)-independent passive force (F passive). Heme treatments, either alone or in combination with H2O2, did not affect pCa50. The increase in F passive started at 3 µM heme exposure and could be partially reversed by the antioxidant dithiothreitol. Protein sulfhydryl (SH) groups of thick myofilament content decreased and sulfenic acid formation increased after treatment with heme. Partial restoration in the SH group content was observed in a protein running at 140 kDa after treatment with dithiothreitol, but not in other proteins, such as filamin C, myosin heavy chain, cardiac myosin binding protein C, and α-actinin. Importantly, binding of heme to hemopexin or alpha-1-microglobulin prevented its effects on cardiomyocyte contractility, suggesting an allosteric effect. In line with this, free heme directly bound to myosin light chain 1 in human cardiomyocytes. Our observations suggest that free heme modifies cardiac contractile proteins via posttranslational protein modifications and via binding to myosin light chain 1, leading to severe contractile dysfunction. This may contribute to systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunctions in hemolytic diseases, heart failure, and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26409224

  19. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Interacts with Proapoptotic Kinase Mst1 to Promote Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    You, Bei; Huang, Shengdong; Qin, Qing; Yi, Bing; Yuan, Yang; Xu, Zhiyun; Sun, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1) is a critical component of the Hippo signaling pathway, which regulates a variety of biological processes ranging from cell contact inhibition, organ size control, apoptosis and tumor suppression in mammals. Mst1 plays essential roles in the heart disease since its activation causes cardiomyocyte apoptosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism underlying Mst1 activation in the heart remains unknown. In a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library with Mst1 as bait, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was identified as an Mst1-interacting protein. The interaction of GAPDH with Mst1 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation in both co-transfected HEK293 cells and mouse heart homogenates, in which GAPDH interacted with the kinase domain of Mst1, whereas the C-terminal catalytic domain of GAPDH mediated its interaction with Mst1. Moreover, interaction of Mst1 with GAPDH caused a robust phosphorylation of GAPDH and markedly increased the Mst1 activity in cells. Chelerythrine, a potent inducer of apoptosis, substantially increased the nuclear translocation and interaction of GAPDH and Mst1 in cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of GAPDH significantly augmented the Mst1 mediated apoptosis, whereas knockdown of GAPDH markedly attenuated the Mst1 activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in response to either chelerythrine or hypoxia/reoxygenation. These findings reveal a novel function of GAPDH in Mst1 activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis and suggest that disruption of GAPDH interaction with Mst1 may prevent apoptosis related heart diseases such as heart failure and ischemic heart disease. PMID:23527007

  20. Effect of Three Statins on Glucose Uptake of Cardiomyocytes and its Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenhuan; Yu, Bo; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different statins on glucose uptake and to confirm its mechanism in primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes after administration of atorvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin. Material/Methods Primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes were randomly assigned to 5 groups: normal control group (OB), insulin group (S1), statin 1-μM (S2), 5-μM (S3), and 10-μM (S4) groups for 3 different statins. The 2-[3H]-DG uptake of each group was determined and the mRNA and protein expression levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), insulin receptor substrate (IRs), and RhoA were assessed. Results After treatment with different concentrations of statins and insulin, the 2-[3H]-DG uptake showed a significant negative correlation with the concentration of atorvastatin (P<0.05), and no significant correlation with pravastatin and rosuvastatin. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GLUT4 and IRs-1 in primary cultured cardiomyocytes were both significantly reduced by atorvastatin treatment (P<0.05). Pravastatin and rosuvastatin showed no significant effects on GLUT4 and IRs-1 expression. The mRNA and protein expression levels of RhoA both showed no significant difference when treated with the 3 statins. Conclusions These results confirm that atorvastatin can inhibit insulin-induced glucose uptake in primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes by regulating the PI3K/Akt insulin signal transduction pathway. PMID:27510725

  1. Effect of Three Statins on Glucose Uptake of Cardiomyocytes and its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhenhuan; Yu, Bo; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different statins on glucose uptake and to confirm its mechanism in primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes after administration of atorvastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin. MATERIAL AND METHODS Primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes were randomly assigned to 5 groups: normal control group (OB), insulin group (S1), statin 1-μM (S2), 5-μM (S3), and 10-μM (S4) groups for 3 different statins. The 2-[3H]-DG uptake of each group was determined and the mRNA and protein expression levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), insulin receptor substrate (IRs), and RhoA were assessed. RESULTS After treatment with different concentrations of statins and insulin, the 2-[3H]-DG uptake showed a significant negative correlation with the concentration of atorvastatin (P<0.05), and no significant correlation with pravastatin and rosuvastatin. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GLUT4 and IRs-1 in primary cultured cardiomyocytes were both significantly reduced by atorvastatin treatment (P<0.05). Pravastatin and rosuvastatin showed no significant effects on GLUT4 and IRs-1 expression. The mRNA and protein expression levels of RhoA both showed no significant difference when treated with the 3 statins. CONCLUSIONS These results confirm that atorvastatin can inhibit insulin-induced glucose uptake in primary cultured rat cardiomyocytes by regulating the PI3K/Akt insulin signal transduction pathway. PMID:27510725

  2. Prioritizing plant defence over growth through WRKY regulation facilitates infestation by non-target herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Jin; Li, Jiancai; Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Qi; Bian, Wenbo; Erb, Matthias; Lou, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Plants generally respond to herbivore attack by increasing resistance and decreasing growth. This prioritization is achieved through the regulation of phytohormonal signaling networks. However, it remains unknown how this prioritization affects resistance against non-target herbivores. In this study, we identify WRKY70 as a specific herbivore-induced, mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated rice transcription factor that physically interacts with W-box motifs and prioritizes defence over growth by positively regulating jasmonic acid (JA) and negatively regulating gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis upon attack by the chewing herbivore Chilo suppressalis. WRKY70-dependent JA biosynthesis is required for proteinase inhibitor activation and resistance against C. suppressalis. In contrast, WRKY70 induction increases plant susceptibility against the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. Experiments with GA-deficient rice lines identify WRKY70-dependent GA signaling as the causal factor in N. lugens susceptibility. Our study shows that prioritizing defence over growth leads to a significant resistance trade-off with important implications for the evolution and agricultural exploitation of plant immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04805.001 PMID:26083713

  3. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo . E-mail: ssjeun@catholic.ac.kr; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-02-24

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin.

  4. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  5. EBP1 regulates organ size through cell growth</