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Sample records for regulates filament formation

  1. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  2. The role of interstellar filaments in shaping the IMF and regulating star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, P.; Könyves, V.; Roy, A.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize the star formation scenario favored by Herschel studies of the nearest molecular clouds of the Galaxy which point to the key role of the quasi-universal filamentary structure pervading the cold ISM. This scenario provides new insight into the origin of the initial mass function and the regulation of star formation in dense gas.

  3. The role of Cdc42 and Gic1 in the regulation of septin filament formation and dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Sadian, Yashar; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Patasi, Csilla; Hofnagel, Oliver; Goody, Roger S; Farkašovský, Marian; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that polymerize into filamentous and higher-order structures. Cdc42 and its effector Gic1 are involved in septin recruitment, ring formation and dissociation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we have used electron microscopy and cryo electron tomography to elucidate the structural basis of the Gic1-septin and Gic1-Cdc42-septin interaction. We show that Gic1 acts as a scaffolding protein for septin filaments forming long and flexible filament cables. Cdc42 in its GTP-form binds to Gic1, which ultimately leads to the dissociation of Gic1 from the filament cables. Surprisingly, Cdc42-GDP is not inactive, but in the absence of Gic1 directly interacts with septin filaments resulting in their disassembly. We suggest that this unanticipated dual function of Cdc42 is crucial for the cell cycle. Based on our results we propose a novel regulatory mechanism for septin filament formation and dissociation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01085.001 PMID:24286829

  4. Recent observations of the formation of filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sara F.

    1986-12-01

    Two examples of the formation of small filaments in H alpha are described and illustrated. In both cases, the formation is seen to be the spontaneous appearance of strands of absorbing mass that evolve from no previous structure. The initial development of the filaments appears to consist of the accumulation of these absorptive strands along approximately parallel paths in a channel between large-scale, opposite polarity magnetic fields on either side of the filaments. The strands exhibit continuous changes in shape and degree of absorption which can be due to successive condensations resulting in new strands, mass motions within the strands, and outflow of the mass from the strands. For at least several hours before the formation of both filaments, small-scale fragments of opposite polarity, line-of-sight magnetic flux adjacent to or immediately below the filaments, and at the ends of the filaments, were cancelling. This type of magnetic flux disappearance continued during the development of the filaments and is commonly observed in association with established filaments. Cancellation is interpreted as an important evolutionary change in the magnetic field that can lead to configurations suitable for the formation of filaments.

  5. Filaments in simulations of molecular cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, Gilberto C.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-08-20

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse soon becomes nearly pressureless, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in the cloud and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalling gas. Correspondingly, the velocity along the filament exhibits a hierarchy of jumps at the locations of the clumps. Two prominent filaments in the simulation have lengths ∼15 pc and masses ∼600 M {sub ☉} above density n ∼ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –3} (∼2 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} at n > 50 cm{sup –3}). The density profile exhibits a central flattened core of size ∼0.3 pc and an envelope that decays as r {sup –2.5} in reasonable agreement with observations. Accretion onto the filament reaches a maximum linear density rate of ∼30 M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} pc{sup –1}.

  6. Filament Channel Formation by Helicity Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.

    2013-12-01

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear, in the form of filament channels, at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear also represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. Consequently, the observations raise the question: Why is helicity observed to be concentrated along PILs? Preliminary results of 3D MHD simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) are presented that support the magnetic-helicity condensation model of filament-channel formation (Antiochos 2013). In this work, we address the problem of filament-channel formation by considering supergranular twisting of a quasi-potential flux system, bounded by a PIL and containing a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse-cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH boundary. This, in effect, produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth and, in agreement with Antiochos (2013), are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH. We present a detailed analysis of our simulation results and discuss their implications for observations.

  7. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Protein Filament Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Cohen, Samuel I. A.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    We establish the Hamiltonian structure of the rate equations describing the formation of protein filaments. We then show that this formalism provides a unified view of the behavior of a range of biological self-assembling systems as diverse as actin, prions, and amyloidogenic polypeptides. We further demonstrate that the time-translation symmetry of the resulting Hamiltonian leads to previously unsuggested conservation laws that connect the number and mass concentrations of fibrils and allow linear growth phenomena to be equated with autocatalytic growth processes. We finally show how these results reveal simple rate laws that provide the basis for interpreting experimental data in terms of specific mechanisms controlling the proliferation of fibrils.

  8. Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin; Pu Ye; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2005-06-15

    We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Models of Filament-Prominence Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Brian T.

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  10. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Protein Filament Formation.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Cohen, Samuel I A; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-01-22

    We establish the Hamiltonian structure of the rate equations describing the formation of protein filaments. We then show that this formalism provides a unified view of the behavior of a range of biological self-assembling systems as diverse as actin, prions, and amyloidogenic polypeptides. We further demonstrate that the time-translation symmetry of the resulting Hamiltonian leads to previously unsuggested conservation laws that connect the number and mass concentrations of fibrils and allow linear growth phenomena to be equated with autocatalytic growth processes. We finally show how these results reveal simple rate laws that provide the basis for interpreting experimental data in terms of specific mechanisms controlling the proliferation of fibrils. PMID:26849615

  11. A Conceptual Model of the Formation of Filament Barbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. F.

    1997-05-01

    Barbs are the structures along the sides of a filament that connect its horizontal axis to chromosphere. The barbs, previously called 'legs' can be considered as magnetic field conduits along which mass is continuously guided and transported to and from the chromosphere. In the model presented, the barbs represent a secondary stage in filament formation which follows an intial stage in which a nearly horizontal axial magnetic field is first formed along a filament channel. Barb formation is most effectively and readily illustrated where the filament channel is broad and well-developed such as exists among the decaying network remnants of active regions. In these circumstances, the filament channel is a region of relatively low magnetic flux density compared to adjacent areas further from the polarity inversion. H-alpha filtergrams show that the axial parts of the filament are low and nearly contiguous with the chromosphere. The low height of the axial field, and the relative absence of concentrations of network magnetic field, are favorable conditions for magnetic reconnection between the axial field of the filament and new ephemeral regions and intranetwork magnetic fields beneath the filament. These reconnections lead to the formation of the barbs joining parts of the newly emerged fields to the axial field of the filament. Barb formation and motions seen in H-alpha filtergrams provide the evidence for this initial part of the conceptual model. The remaining part of the model is a demonstration of why only right-bearing barbs are seen on dextral filaments and left-bearing barbs on sinistral filaments; this is due to the sinistral or dextral magnetic configuration of the filament channel which does not permit the survival of barbs of the non-observed chirality as will be illustrated.

  12. Cores, Filaments, and Bundles: Hierarchical core formation in the B213 filament in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacar, Alvaro; Tafalla, Mario; Kauffmann, Jens; Kovacs, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the dense core formation in filaments is a critical step for our understanding of the star formation process within molecular clouds. Using different molecular tracers to study the gas kinematics at different scales and density regimes, we have investigated the dense core formation in the B213/L1495 filament in Taurus, one of the most prominent structures identified in nearby clouds (see Hacar et al 2013, A&A, 554, A55). Our analysis of its internal kinematics demonstrates that this filament is actually a bundle of 35 velocity-coherent filaments, typically with lengths of ˜ 0.5 pc and oscillatory-like and sonic velocity field, each of them exhibiting linear masses close to the expected mass for a filament in hydrostatic equilibrium. Among them, only a small fraction of these filaments (˜1/4) are "fertile" and efficiently fragment forming all the cores identified within this region, while most of them (˜3/4) do not form cores and remain "sterile". Our observations then suggest that core formation in Taurus occurs in two steps. First, 0.5 pc-long velocity-coherent filaments condense out of the cloud gas, probably as a result of the turbulent cascade. After that, the dense cores condense quasi-statically in only those "fertile" filaments that have accumulated enough mass to became gravitational unstable, inheriting their kinematic properties. The formation of these velocity-coherent filaments appears therefore as a critical step on the star formation process being the first subsonic structures formed out of the turbulent regime that dominates the cloud dynamics at large scales.

  13. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition. PMID:26240174

  14. Regulation of filamentation in the human fungal pathogen Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuyu; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Yue, Huizhen; Liang, Weihong; Cao, Chengjun; Dai, Yu; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-02-01

    The yeast-filament transition is essential for the virulence of a variety of fungi that are pathogenic to humans. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is a potent inducer of filamentation in Candida albicans and thermally dimorphic fungi such as Histoplasma capsulatum and Blastomyces dermatitidis. However, GlcNAc suppresses rather than promotes filamentation in Candida tropicalis, a fungal species that is closely related to C. albicans. Despite the intensive study in C. albicans, the regulatory mechanism of filamentation is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the cAMP signaling pathway plays a central role in the regulation of filamentation in C. tropicalis. By screening an overexpression library of 156 transcription factors, we have identified approximately 40 regulators of filamentous growth. Although most of the regulators (e.g., Tec1, Gat2, Nrg1, Sfl1, Sfl2 and Ash1) demonstrate a conserved role in the regulation of filamentation, similar to their homologues in C. albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a number of transcription factors (e.g., Wor1, Bcr1, Stp4, Efh1, Csr1 and Zcf17) play a specific role in C. tropicalis. Our findings indicate that multiple interconnected signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of filamentation in C. tropicalis. These mechanisms have conserved and divergent features among different Candida species. PMID:26466925

  15. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, M. D.

    2013-06-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

  16. Formation of a solar Hα filament from orphan penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, D.; Lagg, A.; van Noort, M.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The formation and evolution of an Hα filament in active region (AR) 10953 is described. Methods: Observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite starting from UT 18:09 on 27th April 2007 until UT 06:08 on 1st May 2007 were analysed. 20 scans of the 6302 Å Fe I line pair recorded by SOT/SP were inverted using the spatially coupled version of the SPINOR code. The inversions were analysed together with co-spatial SOT/BFI G-band and Ca II H and SOT/NFI Hα observations. Results: Following the disappearance of an initial Hα filament aligned along the polarity inversion line (PIL) of the AR, a new Hα filament formed in its place some 20 h later, which remained stable for, at least, another 1.5 days. The creation of the new Hα filament was driven by the ascent of horizontal magnetic fields from the photosphere into the chromosphere at three separate locations along the PIL. The magnetic fields at two of these locations were situated directly underneath the initial Hα filament and formed orphan penumbrae already aligned along the Hα filament channel. The 700 G orphan penumbrae were stable and trapped in the photosphere until the disappearance of the overlying initial Hα filament, after which they started to ascend into the chromosphere at 10 ± 5 m/s. Each ascent was associated with a simultaneous magnetic flux reduction of up to 50% in the photosphere. The ascended orphan penumbrae formed dark seed structures in Hα in parallel with the PIL, which elongated and merged to form an Hα filament. The filament channel featured horizontal magnetic fields of on average 260 G at log (τ) = -2 suspended above the nearly field-free lower photosphere. The fields took on an overall inverse configuration at log (τ) = -2 suggesting a flux rope topology for the new Hα filament. The destruction of the initial Hα filament was likely caused by the flux emergence at the third location along the PIL. Conclusions: We present a new

  17. Formation of a solar Hα filament from orphan penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, D.; Lagg, A.; van Noort, M.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: The formation and evolution of an Hα filament in active region (AR) 10953 is described. Methods: Observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite starting from UT 18:09 on 27th April 2007 until UT 06:08 on 1st May 2007 were analysed. 20 scans of the 6302 Å Fe I line pair recorded by SOT/SP were inverted using the spatially coupled version of the SPINOR code. The inversions were analysed together with co-spatial SOT/BFI G-band and Ca II H and SOT/NFI Hα observations. Results: Following the disappearance of an initial Hα filament aligned along the polarity inversion line (PIL) of the AR, a new Hα filament formed in its place some 20 h later, which remained stable for, at least, another 1.5 days. The creation of the new Hα filament was driven by the ascent of horizontal magnetic fields from the photosphere into the chromosphere at three separate locations along the PIL. The magnetic fields at two of these locations were situated directly underneath the initial Hα filament and formed orphan penumbrae already aligned along the Hα filament channel. The 700 G orphan penumbrae were stable and trapped in the photosphere until the disappearance of the overlying initial Hα filament, after which they started to ascend into the chromosphere at 10 ± 5 m/s. Each ascent was associated with a simultaneous magnetic flux reduction of up to 50% in the photosphere. The ascended orphan penumbrae formed dark seed structures in Hα in parallel with the PIL, which elongated and merged to form an Hα filament. The filament channel featured horizontal magnetic fields of on average 260 G at log (τ) = -2 suspended above the nearly field-free lower photosphere. The fields took on an overall inverse configuration at log (τ) = -2 suggesting a flux rope topology for the new Hα filament. The destruction of the initial Hα filament was likely caused by the flux emergence at the third location along the PIL. Conclusions: We present a new

  18. Regulators of actin filament barbed ends at a glance.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Shashank; Pernier, Julien; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-03-15

    Cells respond to external stimuli by rapidly remodeling their actin cytoskeleton. At the heart of this function lies the intricately controlled regulation of individual filaments. The barbed end of an actin filament is the hotspot for the majority of the biochemical reactions that control filament assembly. Assays performed in bulk solution and with single filaments have enabled characterization of a plethora of barbed-end-regulating proteins. Interestingly, many of these regulators work in tandem with other proteins, which increase or decrease their affinity for the barbed end in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, often through simultaneous binding of two regulators at the barbed ends, in addition to standard mutually exclusive binding schemes. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we discuss key barbed-end-interacting proteins and the kinetic mechanisms by which they regulate actin filament assembly. We take F-actin capping protein, gelsolin, profilin and barbed-end-tracking polymerases, including formins and WH2-domain-containing proteins, as examples, and illustrate how their activity and competition for the barbed end regulate filament dynamics. PMID:26940918

  19. Reorganization of actin filaments by ADF/cofilin is involved in formation of microtubule structures during Xenopus oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the reorganization of actin filaments and microtubules during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Surrounding the germinal vesicle (GV) in immature oocytes, the cytoplasmic actin filaments reorganized to accumulate beneath the vegetal side of the GV, where the microtubule-organizing center and transient microtubule array (MTOC-TMA) assembled, just before GV breakdown (GVBD). Immediately after GVBD, both Xenopus ADF/cofilin (XAC) and its phosphatase Slingshot (XSSH) accumulated into the nuclei and intranuclear actin filaments disassembled from the vegetal side with the shrinkage of the GV. As the MTOC-TMA developed well, cytoplasmic actin filaments were retained at the MTOC-TMA base region. Suppression of XAC dephosphorylation by anti-XSSH antibody injection inhibited both actin filament reorganization and proper formation and localization of both the MTOC-TMA and meiotic spindles. Stabilization of actin filaments by phalloidin also inhibited formation of the MTOC-TMA and disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments without affecting nuclear shrinkage. Nocodazole also caused the MTOC-TMA and the cytoplasmic actin filaments at its base region to disappear, which further impeded disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments from the vegetal side. XAC appears to reorganize cytoplasmic actin filaments required for precise assembly of the MTOC and, together with the MTOC-TMA, regulate the intranuclear actin filament disassembly essential for meiotic spindle formation. PMID:26424802

  20. The formation and disappearance of filament barbs observed by SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leping; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Employing six-day (August 16-21, 2010) SDO/AIA observations, we systematically investigate the formation and disappearance of 58 barbs of a northern (~N60) polar crown filament. Three different ways of barb formation are discovered, including (1) the convergence of surrounding moving materials (55.2%), (2) the flows of materials from the filament (37.9%), and (3) the material injections from neighboring brightening regions (6.9%). We also find three different types of barb disappearance, involving: (i) the bi-lateral movements (44.8%), and (ii) the outflowing (27.6%) of barb material resulting in the barb disappearance, as well as (iii) the barb disappearance associated with neighboring brightenings (27.6%). We propose that barbs exchange materials with the filament, surrounding atmosphere, and nearby brightening regions, causing the barb formation and disappearance.

  1. Filament fragmentation in high-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, H.; Ragan, S. E.; Johnston, K.; Henning, Th.; Hacar, A.; Kainulainen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Filamentary structures in the interstellar medium are crucial ingredients of the star formation process. They fragment to form individual star-forming cores, and at the same time they may also funnel gas toward the central gas cores, providing an additional gas reservoir. Aims: We want to resolve the length scales for filament formation and fragmentation (resolution ≤0.1 pc), in particular the Jeans length and cylinder fragmentation scale. Methods: We have observed the prototypical high-mass star-forming filament IRDC 18223 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) in the 3.2 mm continuum and N2H+(1-0) line emission in a ten-field mosaic at a spatial resolution of ~ 4'' (~14 000 au). Results: The dust continuum emission resolves the filament into a chain of at least 12 relatively regularly spaced cores. The mean separation between cores is ~0.40(± 0.18) pc. While this is approximately consistent with the fragmentation of an infinite, isothermal, and gravitationally bound gas cylinder, a high mass-to-length ratio of M/l ≈ 1000 M⊙ pc-1 requires additional turbulent and/or magnetic support against radial collapse of the filament. The N2H+(1-0) data reveal a velocity gradient perpendicular to the main filament. Although rotation of the filament cannot be excluded, the data are also consistent with the main filament being comprised of several velocity-coherent subfilaments. Furthermore, this velocity gradient perpendicular to the filament resembles results toward Serpens south that are interpreted as signatures of filament formation within magnetized and turbulent sheet-like structures. Lower-density gas tracers ([CI] and C18O) reveal a similar red- and blueshifted velocity structure on scales around 60'' east and west of the filament. This may tentatively be interpreted as a signature of the large-scale cloud and the smaller scale filament being kinematically coupled. We do not identify a velocity gradient along the axis of the filament. This may

  2. Septin Filament Formation is Essential in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Michael A.; Bertin, Aurelie; Garcia, Galo; Lam, Lisa; Nogales, Eva; Thorner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form ordered, rod-like multimeric complexes and polymerize into filaments, but how such supramolecular structure is related to septin function was unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four septins form an apolar hetero-octamer (Cdc11–Cdc12–Cdc3–Cdc10–Cdc10–Cdc3–Cdc12–Cdc11) that associates end-to-end to form filaments. We show that septin filament assembly displays previously unanticipated plasticity. Cells lacking Cdc10 or Cdc11 are able to divide because the now-exposed subunits (Cdc3 or Cdc12, respectively) retain an ability to homodimerize via their so-called G interface, thereby allowing for filament assembly. In such cdc10Δ and cdc11Δ cells, the remaining septins, like wild-type complexes, localize to the cortex at the bud neck and compartmentalize non-septin factors, consistent with a diffusion barrier composed of continuous filaments in intimate contact with the plasma membrane. Conversely, Cdc10 or Cdc11 mutants that cannot self-associate, but “cap” Cdc3 or Cdc12, respectively, prevent filament formation, block cortical localization, and kill cells. PMID:21497764

  3. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation in a Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    A major unanswered problem in solar physics has been explaining the presence of sheared filament channels above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs) and the simultaneous lack of structure in the ‘loop’ portion of the coronal magnetic field. The shear inherent in filament channels represents not only a form of magnetic energy, but also magnetic helicity. As a result, models of filament channel formation need to explain not only why helicity is observed above PILs, but also why it is apparently not observed anywhere else in the corona. Previous results (Knizhnik, Antiochos & DeVore, 2015) have suggested that any helicity injected into the coronal field inverse-cascades in scale, a process known as magnetic helicity condensation (Antiochos, 2013). In this work, we present high resolution numerical simulations of photospheric helicity injection into a coronal magnetic field that contains both a PIL and a coronal hole (CH). We show conclusively that the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity terminates at the PIL, resulting in the formation of highly sheared filament channels and a smooth, untwisted corona. We demonstrate that even though magnetic helicity is injected throughout the flux system, it accumulates only at the PIL, where it manifests itself in the form of highly sheared filament channels, while any helicity obtained by the CH is ejected out of the system. We show that the formation of filament channels is both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with observations and discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.This work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, LWS TR&T and H-SR Programs.

  4. Rapid Formation and Disappearance of a Filament Barb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Srivastava, Nandita; Mathew, Shibu K.; Martin, Sara F.

    2013-11-01

    We present observations of an activated quiescent filament obtained in Hα from the high-resolution Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 20 August 2010. The filament developed a barb in 10 min, which disappeared within the next 35 min. A data set from the DOT spanning 2 h was used to analyse this event. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images, which reveal flows in filament spine during this period. Photospheric magnetograms were used from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The analysis shows flows in the filament spine towards the barb location preceding its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Magnetograms reveal patches of minority polarity flux close to the end of the barb at its greatest elongation. The flows in the spine and barbs are along numerous threads that compose these typical filament structures. The flows are consistent with field-aligned threads and demonstrate that the replacement time of the mass in barbs, and by inference, in the spine is very rapid.

  5. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  6. FILAMENT FORMATION BY ESCHERICHIA COLI AT INCREASED HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES1

    PubMed Central

    Zobell, Claude E.; Cobet, Andre B.

    1964-01-01

    ZoBell, Claude E. (University of California, La Jolla), and Andre B. Cobet. Filament formation by Escherichia coli at increased hydrostatic pressures. J. Bacteriol. 87:710–719. 1964.—The reproduction as well as the growth of Escherichia coli is retarded by hydrostatic pressures ranging from 200 to 500 atm. Reproduction was indicated by an increase in the number of cells determined by plating on EMB Agar as well as by direct microscopic counts. Growth, which is not necessarily synonymous with reproduction, was indicated by increase in dry weight and protein content of the bacterial biomass. At increased pressures, cells of three different strains of E. coli tended to form long filaments. Whereas most normal cells of E. coli that developed at 1 atm were only about 2 μ long, the mean length of those that developed at 475 atm was 2.93 μ for strain R4, 3.99 μ for strain S, and 5.82 μ for strain B cells. Nearly 90% of the bacterial biomass produced at 475 atm by strain B was found in filaments exceeding 5 μ in length; 74.7 and 16.4% of the biomass produced at 475 atm by strains S and R4, respectively, occurred in such filaments. Strain R4 formed fewer and shorter (5 to 35 μ) filaments than did the other two strains, whose filaments ranged in length from 5 to >100 μ. The bacterial biomass produced at all pressures had approximately the same content of protein and nucleic acids. But at increased pressures appreciably more ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proportionately less deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was found per unit of biomass. Whereas the RNA content per cell increased with cell length, the amount of DNA was nearly the same in long filaments formed at increased pressure as in cells of normal length formed at 1 atm. The inverse relationship between the concentration of DNA and cell length in all three strains of E. coli suggests that the failure of DNA to replicate at increased pressure may be responsible for a repression of cell division and consequent filament

  7. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L). PMID:27103628

  8. NO Formation and Consumption Mechanisms in a Plasma Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter; Chaszeyka Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratory Team

    2013-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements have been performed on nitric oxide, oxygen atoms, and nitrogen atoms in low temperature, diffuse plasma filaments of air and air/fuel mixtures. The results have been compared to a one-dimensional numerical model and show that NO is rapidly formed in air as a result of excited species within the plasma and is consumed quickly by the reverse Zel'dovich mechanism. The evolution of the nitric oxide concentration in hydrogen and ethylene fuels is presented and the possibility of additional NO formation channels is discussed.

  9. GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE AND FILAMENT FORMATION: COMPARISON WITH THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Hartmann, Lee

    2009-10-20

    Recent models of molecular cloud formation and evolution suggest that such clouds are dynamic and generally exhibit gravitational collapse. We present a simple analytic model of global collapse onto a filament and compare this with our numerical simulations of the flow-driven formation of an isolated molecular cloud to illustrate the supersonic motions and infall ram pressures expected in models of gravity-driven cloud evolution. We compare our results with observations of the Pipe Nebula, an especially suitable object for our purposes as its low star formation activity implies insignificant perturbations from stellar feedback. We show that our collapsing cloud model can explain the magnitude of the velocity dispersions seen in the {sup 13}CO filamentary structure by Onishi et al. and the ram pressures required by Lada et al. to confine the lower-mass cores in the Pipe Nebula. We further conjecture that higher-resolution simulations will show small velocity dispersions in the densest core gas, as observed, but which are infall motions and not supporting turbulence. Our results point out the inevitability of ram pressures as boundary conditions for molecular cloud filaments, and the possibility that especially lower-mass cores still can be accreting mass at significant rates, as suggested by observations.

  10. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  11. Actin Filaments Regulate Exocytosis at the Hair Cell Ribbon Synapse.

    PubMed

    Guillet, Marie; Sendin, Gaston; Bourien, Jérôme; Puel, Jean-Luc; Nouvian, Régis

    2016-01-20

    Exocytosis at the inner hair cell ribbon synapse is achieved through the functional coupling between calcium channels and glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles. Using membrane capacitance measurements, we investigated whether the actin network regulates the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles at the mouse auditory hair cell. Our results suggest that actin network disruption increases exocytosis and that actin filaments may spatially organize a subfraction of synaptic vesicles with respect to the calcium channels. Significance statement: Inner hair cells (IHCs), the auditory sensory cells of the cochlea, release glutamate onto the afferent auditory nerve fibers to encode sound stimulation. To achieve this task, the IHC relies on the recruitment of glutamate-filled vesicles that can be located in close vicinity to the calcium channels or more remotely from them. The molecular determinants responsible for organizing these vesicle pools are not fully identified. Using pharmacological tools in combination with membrane capacitance measurements, we show that actin filament disruption increases exocytosis in IHCs and that actin filaments most likely position a fraction of vesicles away from the calcium channels. PMID:26791198

  12. Cardiac thin filament regulation and the Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Inoue, Takahiro; Shintani, Seine A; Oyama, Kotaro; Terui, Takako; Minamisawa, Susumu; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Norio

    2014-07-01

    The heart has an intrinsic ability to increase systolic force in response to a rise in ventricular filling (the Frank-Starling law of the heart). It is widely accepted that the length dependence of myocardial activation underlies the Frank-Starling law of the heart. Recent advances in muscle physiology have enabled the identification of the factors involved in length-dependent activation, viz., titin (connectin)-based interfilament lattice spacing reduction and thin filament "on-off" regulation, with the former triggering length-dependent activation and the latter determining the number of myosin molecules recruited to thin filaments. Patients with a failing heart have demonstrated reduced exercise tolerance at least in part via depression of the Frank-Starling mechanism. Recent studies revealed that various mutations occur in the thin filament regulatory proteins, such as troponin, in the ventricular muscle of failing hearts, which consequently alter the Frank-Starling mechanism. In this article, we review the molecular mechanisms of length-dependent activation, and the influence of troponin mutations on the phenomenon. PMID:24788476

  13. Formation and maintenance of nitrogen-fixing cell patterns in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-García, Javier; Ares, Saúl

    2016-05-31

    Cyanobacteria forming one-dimensional filaments are paradigmatic model organisms of the transition between unicellular and multicellular living forms. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, in filaments of the genus Anabaena, some cells differentiate into heterocysts, which lose the possibility to divide but are able to fix environmental nitrogen for the colony. These heterocysts form a quasiregular pattern in the filament, representing a prototype of patterning and morphogenesis in prokaryotes. Recent years have seen advances in the identification of the molecular mechanism regulating this pattern. We use these data to build a theory on heterocyst pattern formation, for which both genetic regulation and the effects of cell division and filament growth are key components. The theory is based on the interplay of three generic mechanisms: local autoactivation, early long-range inhibition, and late long-range inhibition. These mechanisms can be identified with the dynamics of hetR, patS, and hetN expression. Our theory reproduces quantitatively the experimental dynamics of pattern formation and maintenance for wild type and mutants. We find that hetN alone is not enough to play the role as the late inhibitory mechanism: a second mechanism, hypothetically the products of nitrogen fixation supplied by heterocysts, must also play a role in late long-range inhibition. The preponderance of even intervals between heterocysts arises naturally as a result of the interplay between the timescales of genetic regulation and cell division. We also find that a purely stochastic initiation of the pattern, without a two-stage process, is enough to reproduce experimental observations. PMID:27162328

  14. Star formation efficiency in the outer filaments of Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Hamer, S.; Heywood, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the northern filaments of Centaurus A (at a distance of ˜ 20 kpc from the galaxy center) based on FUV (GALEX), FIR (Herschel) and CO (SEST and ALMA) emission. We also searched for HCN and HCO^+ (ATCA) and observed optical emission lines (VLT/MUSE) in different places of the filament. An upper limit of the dense gas of L'_{HCN}<4.8× 10^3 K.km.s^{-1}.pc^2 at 3σ leads to a dense-to-molecular gas fraction <23% in this region. We compared the CO masses with the SFR estimates and found very long depletion times (11 Gyr on 730 pc scales) and a large scatter in the KS-relation with a standard conversion factor. Applying a metallicity correction to the CO/H_2 conversion factor would lead to even more massive clouds with higher depletion times. Using ALMA archive data, we found 3 unresolved CO(2-1) clumps of size <37× 21 pc and masses around 10^4 M_⊙. The 3 clumps show resolved line profiles (Δ v˜ 10 km.s^{-1}) and are all three dynamically clearly separated by ˜ 10-20 km.s^{-1}. We derived a virial parameter α_{vir}˜ 10-16 which indicates that the clumps are not gravitationally bound and input of energy likely inhibits star formation.

  15. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains of the Myosin Rod

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) “head” is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  16. Dictyostelium myosin bipolar thick filament formation: importance of charge and specific domains of the myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Daniel; Rice, Sarah; Dean, Sara; Altman, David; McMahon, Peggy M; Sutton, Shirley; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Spudich, James A

    2004-11-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) "head" is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  17. FORMATION OF SOLAR FILAMENTS BY STEADY AND NONSTEADY CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Chen, P. F.; Keppens, R.; Van Marle, A. J.

    2011-08-10

    It has been established that cold plasma condensations can form in a magnetic loop subject to localized heating of its footpoints. In this paper, we use grid-adaptive numerical simulations of the radiative hydrodynamic equations to investigate the filament formation process in a pre-shaped loop with both steady and finite-time chromospheric heating. Compared to previous works, we consider low-lying loops with shallow dips and use a more realistic description for radiative losses. We demonstrate for the first time that the onset of thermal instability satisfies the linear instability criterion. The onset time of the condensation is roughly {approx}2 hr or more after the localized heating at the footpoint is effective, and the growth rate of the thread length varies from 800 km hr{sup -1} to 4000 km hr{sup -1}, depending on the amplitude and the decay length scale characterizing this localized chromospheric heating. We show how single or multiple condensation segments may form in the coronal portion. In the asymmetric heating case, when two segments form, they approach and coalesce, and the coalesced condensation later drains down into the chromosphere. With steady heating, this process repeats with a periodicity of several hours. While our parametric survey confirms and augments earlier findings, we also point out that steady heating is not necessary to sustain the condensation. Once the condensation is formed, it keeps growing even after the localized heating ceases. In such a finite-heating case, the condensation instability is maintained by chromospheric plasma that gets continuously siphoned into the filament thread due to the reduced gas pressure in the corona. Finally, we show that the condensation can survive the continuous buffeting of perturbations from photospheric p-mode waves.

  18. Formation of Solar Filaments by Steady and Nonsteady Chromospheric Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Chen, P. F.; Keppens, R.; van Marle, A. J.

    2011-08-01

    It has been established that cold plasma condensations can form in a magnetic loop subject to localized heating of its footpoints. In this paper, we use grid-adaptive numerical simulations of the radiative hydrodynamic equations to investigate the filament formation process in a pre-shaped loop with both steady and finite-time chromospheric heating. Compared to previous works, we consider low-lying loops with shallow dips and use a more realistic description for radiative losses. We demonstrate for the first time that the onset of thermal instability satisfies the linear instability criterion. The onset time of the condensation is roughly ~2 hr or more after the localized heating at the footpoint is effective, and the growth rate of the thread length varies from 800 km hr-1 to 4000 km hr-1, depending on the amplitude and the decay length scale characterizing this localized chromospheric heating. We show how single or multiple condensation segments may form in the coronal portion. In the asymmetric heating case, when two segments form, they approach and coalesce, and the coalesced condensation later drains down into the chromosphere. With steady heating, this process repeats with a periodicity of several hours. While our parametric survey confirms and augments earlier findings, we also point out that steady heating is not necessary to sustain the condensation. Once the condensation is formed, it keeps growing even after the localized heating ceases. In such a finite-heating case, the condensation instability is maintained by chromospheric plasma that gets continuously siphoned into the filament thread due to the reduced gas pressure in the corona. Finally, we show that the condensation can survive the continuous buffeting of perturbations from photospheric p-mode waves.

  19. A Model of Filamentous Cyanobacteria Leading to Reticulate Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tamulonis, Carlos; Kaandorp, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena, has been shown to produce reticulate patterns that are thought to be the result of its gliding motility. Similar fossilized structures found in the geological record constitute some of the earliest signs of life on Earth. It is difficult to tie these fossils, which are billions of years old, directly to the specific microorganisms that built them. Identifying the physicochemical conditions and microorganism properties that lead microbial mats to form macroscopic structures can lead to a better understanding of the conditions on Earth at the dawn of life. In this article, a cell-based model is used to simulate the formation of reticulate patterns in cultures of Pseudanabaena. A minimal system of long and flexible trichomes capable of gliding motility is shown to be sufficient to produce stable patterns consisting of a network of streams. Varying model parameters indicate that systems with little to no cohesion, high trichome density and persistent movement are conducive to reticulate pattern formation, in conformance with experimental observations. PMID:25370380

  20. Formation of cold clumps and filaments around superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntormousi, Evangelia; Dawson, Joanne; Del Sordo, Fabio; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The combined feedback of supernova explosions and stellar winds from associations of massive stars has a dramatic impact on their environment: Large amounts of energy coming from the ejecta create dense shocks around the associations, compressing the surrounding ISM and triggering the formation of molecular clouds and new stars. In this work we employ high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations of this process with the MHD code RAMSES to explore the effects of self-gravity and magnetic fields on the structure of the shells. Two superbubbles expand and collide in a turbulent diffuse medium. In the expansion phase rich dense structure appears on the surface of the shocks due to hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic instabilities. Although gravity seems to play a minor role in the formation and evolution of these dense clumps, magnetic fields completely alter both the expansion of the superbubble and the morphology of the dense gas, slowing the expansion down and causing the appearance of large-scale filaments. The collision does not help increase the amount of cold gas, but rather destroys a lot of the pre-existing dense structures. Finally, we compare clouds formed in these simulations with observations of a molecular cloud crushed between two superbubbles.

  1. Mitochondrial membrane potential is regulated by vimentin intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Chernoivanenko, Ivan S.; Matveeva, Elena A.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Goldman, Robert D.; Minin, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the association of mitochondria with vimentin intermediate filaments (VIFs) measurably increases their membrane potential. This increase is detected by quantitatively comparing the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the membrane potential-sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine-ethyl ester (TMRE) in murine vimentin-null fibroblasts with that in the same cells expressing human vimentin (∼35% rise). When vimentin expression is silenced by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to reduce vimentin by 90%, the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria decreases by 20%. The increase in membrane potential is caused by specific interactions between a subdomain of the non-α-helical N terminus (residues 40 to 93) of vimentin and mitochondria. In rho 0 cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and consequently missing several key proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (ρ0 cells), the membrane potential generated by an alternative anaerobic process is insensitive to the interactions between mitochondria and VIF. The results of our studies show that the close association between mitochondria and VIF is important both for determining their position in cells and their physiologic activity.—Chernoivanenko, I. S., Matveeva, E. A., Gelfand, V. I., Goldman, R. D., Minin, A. A. Mitochondrial membrane potential is regulated by vimentin intermediate filaments. PMID:25404709

  2. Formation and propagation of meter-scale laser filaments in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, M. H.; Jones, T. G.; Peñano, J. R.; Kaganovich, D.; Ting, A.

    2013-09-01

    We report the demonstration, characterization, and modeling of meter-scale underwater optical filaments using a nanosecond pulsed laser. We observed single filament formation for P/PCRIT = 1-5, where PCRIT ˜ 1 MW in water. We employed a variable distance water tube to characterize laser pulse evolution and filament formation. Filaments with uniform radius 50 ± 10 μm persisted for 55 cm (>35 Rayleigh lengths). Significant forward Stimulated Raman Scattering (up to 60%) was observed and characterized. Simulation results for propagation distances and radii were in agreement with experiment, and predict a structured plasma with peak density of 1.5 × 1018 cm-3.

  3. Small RNAs regulate plant responses to filamentous pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Tung; Zhai, Yi; Ma, Wenbo

    2016-08-01

    Small RNAs are central players of RNA silencing in eukaryotes. These short RNA molecules (20-25 nucleotides in length) repress target gene expression based on sequence complementarity. While small RNAs are well-known for their essential function in regulating growth and development, recent research has revealed that they also influence plant immunity. Extensive changes in small RNA accumulation have been observed during infection. This review focuses on specific small RNA changes that are involved in plant responses to filamentous eukaryotic pathogens including fungi and oomycetes. We describe how changes in small RNA accumulation influence plant immunity and summarize the cellular processes affected by these small RNAs. In particular, we discuss secondary small interfering RNAs that directly modulate the expression of defense-related genes. PMID:27208726

  4. The More the Tubular: Dynamic Bundling of Actin Filaments for Membrane Tube Formation

    PubMed Central

    Weichsel, Julian; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2016-01-01

    Tubular protrusions are a common feature of living cells, arising from polymerization of stiff protein filaments against a comparably soft membrane. Although this process involves many accessory proteins in cells, in vitro experiments indicate that similar tube-like structures can emerge without them, through spontaneous bundling of filaments mediated by the membrane. Using theory and simulation of physical models, we have elaborated how nonequilibrium fluctuations in growth kinetics and membrane shape can yield such protrusions. Enabled by a new grand canonical Monte Carlo method for membrane simulation, our work reveals a cascade of dynamical transitions from individually polymerizing filaments to highly cooperatively growing bundles as a dynamical bottleneck to tube formation. Filament network organization as well as adhesion points to the membrane, which bias filament bending and constrain membrane height fluctuations, screen the effective attractive interactions between filaments, significantly delaying bundling and tube formation. PMID:27384915

  5. The More the Tubular: Dynamic Bundling of Actin Filaments for Membrane Tube Formation.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, Julian; Geissler, Phillip L

    2016-07-01

    Tubular protrusions are a common feature of living cells, arising from polymerization of stiff protein filaments against a comparably soft membrane. Although this process involves many accessory proteins in cells, in vitro experiments indicate that similar tube-like structures can emerge without them, through spontaneous bundling of filaments mediated by the membrane. Using theory and simulation of physical models, we have elaborated how nonequilibrium fluctuations in growth kinetics and membrane shape can yield such protrusions. Enabled by a new grand canonical Monte Carlo method for membrane simulation, our work reveals a cascade of dynamical transitions from individually polymerizing filaments to highly cooperatively growing bundles as a dynamical bottleneck to tube formation. Filament network organization as well as adhesion points to the membrane, which bias filament bending and constrain membrane height fluctuations, screen the effective attractive interactions between filaments, significantly delaying bundling and tube formation. PMID:27384915

  6. The importance of corona generation and leader formation during laser filament guided discharges in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; French, David; White, William; Lucero, Adrian; Roach, William P.; Hasson, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Images taken with an intensified CCD camera show the dynamics during filament guided discharge events. The images reveal that filament initiated corona plays a role in the presented results. Furthermore, the images show the formation of leaders, propagating and eventually bridging the gap between the high voltage (HV) electrodes. Analysis of the images and comparison to oscilloscope traces of voltage and current dynamics reveal the origin of the delay between the filament and HV discharge and allows for a probability of discharge analysis.

  7. A Simple Dynamical Model for Filament Formation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Filament formation in the solar corona is considered in the case of a slowly evolving force-free magnetic field. The strong-field approximation is used, which takes into account the magnetohydrodynamic equations of motion, induction, and compressibility. Methods for solving the relevant equations are presented and applied to filament modeling. A three-dimensional calculation is presented, which uses linear force-free magnetic fields. The boundary conditions are chosen to resemble the qualitative linkage model for the formation of filaments, suggested by Martens and Zwaan (2001). Consistent with this model, dense formations, reminiscent of filament pillars, are shown to appear in the corona above the region of converging and canceling magnetic bipoles. The results demonstrate the principal role of magnetic field in the dynamical processes of dense plasma accumulation and support in filaments. The model can be useful for clarifying the role of flux emergence in coronal mass ejection initiation.

  8. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: OBSERVATIONAL ANALYSIS OF FILAMENTS IN THE SERPENS SOUTH MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-López, M.; Looney, L.; Lee, K.; Segura-Cox, D.; Arce, H. G.; Plunkett, A.; Mundy, L. G.; Storm, S.; Teuben, P. J.; Pound, M.; Isella, A.; Kauffmann, J.; Tobin, J. J.; Rosolowsky, E.; Kwon, W.; Ostriker, E.; Tassis, K.; Shirley, Y. L.

    2014-08-01

    We present the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0) map of the Serpens South molecular cloud obtained as part of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey. The observations cover 250 arcmin{sup 2} and fully sample structures from 3000 AU to 3 pc with a velocity resolution of 0.16 km s{sup –1}, and they can be used to constrain the origin and evolution of molecular cloud filaments. The spatial distribution of the N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is characterized by long filaments that resemble those observed in the dust continuum emission by Herschel. However, the gas filaments are typically narrower such that, in some cases, two or three quasi-parallel N{sub 2}H{sup +} filaments comprise a single observed dust continuum filament. The difference between the dust and gas filament widths casts doubt on Herschel ability to resolve the Serpens South filaments. Some molecular filaments show velocity gradients along their major axis, and two are characterized by a steep velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the filament axis. The observed velocity gradient along one of these filaments was previously postulated as evidence for mass infall toward the central cluster, but these kind of gradients can be interpreted as projection of large-scale turbulence.

  9. Tetrahedral collapse: a rotational toy model of simultaneous dark-matter halo, filament and wall formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss an idealized model of halo formation, in which a collapsing halo node is tetrahedral, with a filament extruding from each of its four faces, and with a wall connecting each pair of filaments. In the model, filaments generally spin when they form, and the halo spins if and only if there is some rotation in filaments. This is the simplest possible fully three-dimensional halo collapse in the `origami approximation', in which voids are irrotational, and the dark-matter sheet out of which dark-matter structures form is allowed to fold in position-velocity phase space, but not stretch (i.e. it cannot vary in density along a stream). Up to an overall scaling, the four filament directions, and only three other quantities, such as filament spins, suffice to determine all of the collapse's properties: the shape, mass, and spin of the halo; the densities per unit length and spins of all filaments; and masses per unit area of the walls. If the filaments are arranged regular-tetrahedrally, filament properties obey simple laws, reminiscent of angular-momentum conservation. The model may be most useful in understanding spin correlations between neighbouring galaxies joined by filaments; these correlations would give intrinsic alignments between galaxies, essential to understand for accurate cosmological weak-lensing measurements.

  10. Tetrahedral collapse: a rotational toy model of simultaneous dark-matter halo, filament and wall formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss an idealized model of halo formation, in which a collapsing halo node is tetrahedral, with a filament extruding from each of its four faces, and with a wall connecting each pair of filaments. In the model, filaments generally spin when they form, and the halo spins if and only if there is some rotation in filaments. This is the simplest-possible fully three-dimensional halo collapse in the `origami approximation,' in which voids are irrotational, and the dark-matter sheet out of which dark-matter structures form is allowed to fold in position-velocity phase space, but not stretch (i.e., it cannot vary in density along a stream). Up to an overall scaling, the four filament directions, and only three other quantities, such as filament spins, suffice to determine all of the collapse's properties: the shape, mass, and spin of the halo; the densities per unit length and spins of all filaments; and masses per unit area of the walls. If the filaments are arranged regular-tetrahedrally, filament properties obey simple laws, reminiscent of angular-momentum conservation. The model may be most useful in understanding spin correlations between neighbouring galaxies joined by filaments; these correlations would give intrinsic alignments between galaxies, essential to understand for accurate cosmological weak-lensing measurements.

  11. Formation of Opposite-Sign Magnetic Helicity by an Erupting Filament in a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Kurokawa, Hiroki

    2004-06-01

    It is unclear whether it is possible for magnetic helical fields of opposite signs to co-exist in a coronal mass ejection (CME). During filament eruption with high-cadence observations for the initial stage, evidence is found for the formation of right-handed helical fields in a rising dextral filament that is embedded in a CME with helical fields in a left-handed sense. The data include Mees multi-off-band Hα observations with 16s cadence and TRACE 1600Å observations of 2s cadence. The filament material is ejected outward and is associated with the expanding CME, suggesting that both of the opposite-sign helical fields are injected into interplanetary space. In this paper, we consider the key observational features, including the formation of a coil-like structure (due to barb reconnections) and the alignment of reconnected field lines with the primary axis of the filament. It is found that they are consistent with the predicted changes during filament eruption by the filament model of Martin and McAllister. However, our results do not reject the filament model of Rust and Kumar. Moreover, a model that reconciles both of them seems to be more convenient for understanding the complicated observations. Therefore, the formation of opposite-sign helicity in an eruptive flux rope should be common for such types of filament eruptions.

  12. Galactic cold cores. VII. Filament formation and evolution: Methods and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Marston, A.; Martin, P. G.; Pagani, L.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Marshall, D. J.; Montier, L.; Tóth, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The association of filaments with protostellar objects has made these structures a priority target in star formation studies. However, little is known about the link between filament properties and their local environment. Aims: The datasets from the Herschel Galactic Cold cores key programme allow for a statistical study of filaments with a wide range of intrinsic and environmental characteristics. Characterisation of this sample can therefore be used to identify key physical parameters and quantify the role of the environment in the formation of supercritical filaments. These results are necessary to constrain theoretical models of filament formation and evolution. Methods: Filaments were extracted from fields at distance D< 500 pc with the getfilaments algorithm and characterised according to their column density profiles and intrinsic properties. Each profile was fitted with a beam-convolved Plummer-like function, and the filament structure was quantified based on the relative contributions from the filament "core", represented by a Gaussian, and "wing" component, dominated by the power-law behaviour of the Plummer-like function. These filament parameters were examined for populations associated with different background levels. Results: Filaments increase their core (Mline,core) and wing (Mline,wing) contributions while increasing their total linear mass density (Mline,tot). Both components appear to be linked to the local environment, with filaments in higher backgrounds having systematically more massive Mline,core and Mline,wing. This dependence on the environment supports an accretion-based model of filament evolution in the local neighbourhood (D ≤ 500 pc). Structures located in the highest backgrounds develop the highest central AV, Mline,core, and Mline,wing as Mline,tot increases with time, favoured by the local availability of material and the enhanced gravitational potential. Our results indicate that filaments acquiring a significantly

  13. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  14. Capping complex formation at the slow-growing end of the actin filament.

    PubMed

    Kostyukova, A S

    2008-12-01

    Actin filaments are polar; their barbed (fast-growing) and pointed (slow-growing) ends differ in structure and dynamic properties. The slow-growing end is regulated by tropomodulins, a family of capping proteins that require tropomyosins for optimal function. There are four tropomodulin isoforms; their distributions vary depending on tissue type and change during development. The C-terminal half of tropomodulin contains one compact domain represented by alternating alpha-helices and beta-structures. The tropomyosin-independent actin-capping site is located at the C-terminus. The N-terminal half has no regular structure; however, it contains a tropomyosin-dependent actin-capping site and two tropomyosin-binding sites. One tropomodulin molecule can bind two tropomyosin molecules. Effectiveness of tropomodulin binding to tropomyosin depends on the tropomyosin isoform. Regulation of tropomodulin binding at the pointed end as well as capping effectiveness in the presence of specific tropomyosins may affect formation of local cytoskeleton and dynamics of actin filaments in cells. PMID:19216712

  15. Laser-filamentation-induced condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjing; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-04-01

    Using 1 kHz, 9 mJ femtosecond laser pulses, we demonstrate laser-filamentation-induced spectacular snow formation in a cloud chamber. An intense updraft of warm moist air is generated owing to the continuous heating by the high-repetition filamentation. As it encounters the cold air above, water condensation and large-sized particles spread unevenly across the whole cloud chamber via convection and cyclone like action on a macroscopic scale. This indicates that high-repetition filamentation plays a significant role in macroscopic laser-induced water condensation and snow formation. PMID:22466199

  16. Arabidopsis FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in the pollen tube

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Ruihui; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of pollen tube growth. Actin filaments have distinct distribution patterns and dynamic properties within different regions of the pollen tube. Apical actin filaments are highly dynamic and crucial for pollen tube growth. However, how apical actin filaments are generated and properly constructed remains an open question. Here we showed that Arabidopsis fimbrin5 (FIM5) decorates filamentous structures throughout the entire tube but is apically concentrated. Apical actin structures are disorganized to different degrees in the pollen tubes of fim5 loss-of-function mutants. Further observations suggest that apical actin structures are not constructed properly because apical actin filaments cannot be maintained at the cortex of fim5 pollen tubes. Actin filaments appeared to be more curved in fim5 pollen tubes and this was confirmed by measurements showing that the convolutedness and the rate of change of convolutedness of actin filaments was significantly increased in fim5 pollen tubes. This suggests that the rigidity of the actin filaments may be compromised in fim5 pollen tubes. Further, the apical cell wall composition is altered, implying that tip-directed vesicle trafficking events are impaired in fim5 pollen tubes. Thus, we found that FIM5 decorates apical actin filaments and regulates their organization in order to drive polarized pollen tube growth. PMID:27117336

  17. Calcium ion-regulated thin filaments from vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marston, S B; Trevett, R M; Walters, M

    1980-01-01

    Myosin and actin competition tests indicated the presence of both thin-filament and myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory systems in pig aorta and turkey gizzard smooth-muscle actomyosin. A thin-filament preparation was obtained from pig aortas. The thin filaments had no significant ATPase activity [1.1 +/- 2.6 nmol/mg per min (mean +/- S.D.)], but they activated skeletal-muscle myosin ATPase up to 25-fold [500 nmol/mg of myosin per min (mean +/- S.D.)] in the presence of 10(-4) M free Ca2+. At 10(-8) M-Ca2+ the thin filaments activated myosin ATPase activity only one-third as much. Thin-filament activation of myosin ATPase activity increased markedly in the range 10(-6)-10(-5) M-Ca2+ and was half maximal at 2.7 x 10(-6) M (pCa2+ 5.6). The skeletal myosin-aorta-thin-filament mixture gave a biphasic ATPase-rate-versus-ATP-concentration curve at 10(-8) M-Ca2+ similar to the curve obtained with skeletal-muscle thin filaments. Thin filaments bound up to 9.5 mumol of Ca2+/g in the presence of MgATP2-. In the range 0.06-27 microM-Ca2+ binding was hyperbolic with an estimated binding constant of (0.56 +/- 0.07) x 10(6) M-1 (mean +/- S.D.) and maximum binding of 8.0 +/- 0.8 mumol/g (mean +/- S.D.). Significantly less Ca2+ bound in the absence of ATP. The thin filaments contained actin, tropomyosin and several other unidentified proteins. 6 M-Urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis at pH 8.3 showed proteins that behaved like troponin I and troponin C. This was confirmed by forming interspecific complexes between radioactive skeletal-muscle troponin I and troponin C and the aorta thin-filament proteins. The thin filaments contained at least 1.4 mumol of a troponin C-like protein/g and at least 1.1 mumol of a troponin I-like protein/g. PMID:6446898

  18. Metal ion-dependent, reversible, protein filament formation by designed beta-roll polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Scotter, Andrew J; Guo, Meng; Tomczak, Melanie M; Daley, Margaret E; Campbell, Robert L; Oko, Richard J; Bateman, David A; Chakrabartty, Avijit; Sykes, Brian D; Davies, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    Background A right-handed, calcium-dependent β-roll structure found in secreted proteases and repeat-in-toxin proteins was used as a template for the design of minimal, soluble, monomeric polypeptides that would fold in the presence of Ca2+. Two polypeptides were synthesised to contain two and four metal-binding sites, respectively, and exploit stacked tryptophan pairs to stabilise the fold and report on the conformational state of the polypeptide. Results Initial analysis of the two polypeptides in the presence of calcium suggested the polypeptides were disordered. The addition of lanthanum to these peptides caused aggregation. Upon further study by right angle light scattering and electron microscopy, the aggregates were identified as ordered protein filaments that required lanthanum to polymerize. These filaments could be disassembled by the addition of a chelating agent. A simple head-to-tail model is proposed for filament formation that explains the metal ion-dependency. The model is supported by the capping of one of the polypeptides with biotin, which disrupts filament formation and provides the ability to control the average length of the filaments. Conclusion Metal ion-dependent, reversible protein filament formation is demonstrated for two designed polypeptides. The polypeptides form filaments that are approximately 3 nm in diameter and several hundred nm in length. They are not amyloid-like in nature as demonstrated by their behaviour in the presence of congo red and thioflavin T. A capping strategy allows for the control of filament length and for potential applications including the "decoration" of a protein filament with various functional moieties. PMID:17908326

  19. A Simple Dynamical Model for Filament Formation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-09-01

    Filament formation in the solar atmosphere is considered. In the limit of sub-Alfvénic but supersonic motion, plasma flow in the solar corona is driven via the induction equation by a slow evolution of force-free magnetic fields. Methods for solving the relevant magnetohydrodynamic equations are presented and applied to filament modeling in two and three dimensions. An illustrative two-dimensional example is given, which is based on a potential magnetic field with a dip. The example describes the formation of a normal filament between two bipolar regions on the Sun. Next a detailed three-dimensional calculation is presented, which uses linear force-free magnetic fields. The boundary conditions are chosen to resemble the qualitative ``head-to-tail'' linkage model for the formation of filaments, suggested by Martens & Zwaan. Consistent with this model, dense formations, reminiscent of filament pillars, are shown to appear in the corona above the region of converging and canceling magnetic bipoles. The numerical results are consistent with the principal role of magnetic field in the dynamical processes of dense plasma accumulation and support in filaments, advocated by Martens & Zwaan.

  20. The formation of an intense filament controlled by interference of ultraviolet femtosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yongdong; Zhang Yisan; Chen Peng; Shi Liping; Lu Xin; Wu Jian; Ding Liang'en; Zeng Heping

    2011-03-14

    We experimentally investigated the formation of a wavelength-scale photonic plasma grating induced by interference-assisted coalescence of two noncollinear ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses. The period of the created plasma grating decreased with the crossing angle of the interacting laser pulses. For a proper small crossing angle, the noncollinear ultraviolet filaments were coalesced and an intense single ultraviolet filament was formed with a diameter of 5 {mu}m which was below the focused limitation. This may provide a way to control ultraviolet femtosecond filamentation.

  1. Nobeyama 45m CO Galactic Plane Survey: Filament properties and star formation in M17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Atsushi; Umemoto, Tomofumi; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Kuno, Nario; Tosaki, Tomoka; Fujita, Shinji; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Yuya; Ohashi, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    We present the 12CO(J=1-0), 13CO(J=1-0), and C18O(J=1-0) maps of M17 molecular clouds obtained as part of the Nobeyama 45m CO Galactic Plane Survey. The observations cover the entire area of M17 Cloud A and M17 SW with an angular resolution of ~15" which corresponds to ~0.15 pc, and they can be used to trace the formation and evolution of filamentary structure of molecular clouds in GMC scale. The Cloud A consists of a couple of twisted filaments, they are extended in parallel toward the HII region. The typicall width of the filaments is ~0.4 pc in 13CO intensity map. They are twisted with an interval of ~5 pc, and an amplitude of ~2 pc. Some filaments have a bright rim structure in 8μm at the filament edge facing the HII region. Therefore, the filaments might be formed by the feedback of the HII region. The mass distribution have a gradient depending on the distance of M17 HII region. Most of the filaments have points where the line mass exceed the critical value of 16 M⊙ pc-1. This indicates that the high-density cores can be formed on the most of the filaments in the Cloud A. In addition, YSOs distribution from MYStIX infrared excess source catalog shows that the most of YSOs are on the filaments in the Cloud A. Hence the filamentally structure plays an important role to form stars in Cloud A. However, the fact that most of the OB stars are located away from filaments suggests that the Cloud A filaments could not trigger the formation of the M17 cluster including OB stars. We found high-velocity clumps (Vlsr~23 km sec-1) which are associated with OB stars. The distribution of high-velocity clumps is anticorrelated with Cloud A and M17 SW. The Cloud A filaments (Vlsr~20 km sec-1) are corresponding to IRDCs identified by Spitzer, while the high-velocity clumps have no IRDC counterpart. Therefore, Cloud A filaments are located near side of the HII region and the high-velocity clumps are located far side of the HII region. One possibility which satisfy the

  2. Alpha-herpesvirus infection induces the formation of nuclear actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Feierbach, Becket; Piccinotti, Silvia; Bisher, Margaret; Denk, Winfried; Enquist, Lynn W

    2006-08-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate in the nuclei of infected cells. Spatial control of viral replication and assembly in the host nucleus is achieved by the establishment of nuclear compartments that serve to concentrate viral and host factors. How these compartments are established and maintained remains poorly understood. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is an alpha-herpesvirus often used to study herpesvirus invasion and spread in the nervous system. Here, we report that PRV and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of neurons results in formation of actin filaments in the nucleus. Filamentous actin is not found in the nucleus of uninfected cells. Nuclear actin filaments appear physically associated with the viral capsids, as shown by serial block-face scanning electron micropscopy and confocal microscopy. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged viral capsid protein (VP26), we show that nuclear actin filaments form prior to capsid assembly and are required for the efficient formation of viral capsid assembly sites. We find that actin polymerization dynamics (e.g., treadmilling) are not necessary for the formation of these sites. Green fluorescent protein-VP26 foci co-localize with the actin motor myosin V, suggesting that viral capsids travel along nuclear actin filaments using myosin-based directed transport. Viral transcription, but not viral DNA replication, is required for actin filament formation. The finding that infection, by either PRV or herpes simplex virus type 1, results in formation of nuclear actin filaments in neurons, and that PRV infection of an epithelial cell line results in a similar phenotype is evidence that F-actin plays a conserved role in herpesvirus assembly. Our results suggest a mechanism by which assembly domains are organized within infected cells and provide insight into how the viral infectious cycle and host actin cytoskeleton are integrated to promote the infection process. PMID:16933992

  3. Core and filament formation in magnetized, self-gravitating isothermal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loo, Sven; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    We examine the role of the gravitational instability in an isothermal, self-gravitating layer threaded by magnetic fields on the formation of filaments and dense cores. Using a numerical simulation, we follow the non-linear evolution of a perturbed equilibrium layer. The linear evolution of such a layer is described in the analytic work of Nagai et al. We find that filaments and dense cores form simultaneously. Depending on the initial magnetic field, the resulting filaments form either a spiderweb-like network (for weak magnetic fields) or a network of parallel filaments aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field lines (for strong magnetic fields). Although the filaments are radially collapsing, the density profile of their central region (up to the thermal scale height) can be approximated by a hydrodynamical equilibrium density structure. Thus, the magnetic field does not play a significant role in setting the density distribution of the filaments. The density distribution outside of the central region deviates from the equilibrium. The radial column density distribution is then flatter than the expected power law of r {sup –4} and similar to filament profiles observed with Herschel. Our results do not explain the near constant filament width of ∼0.1pc. However, our model does not include turbulent motions. It is expected that the accretion-driven amplification of these turbulent motions provides additional support within the filaments against gravitational collapse. Finally, we interpret the filamentary network of the massive star forming complex G14.225-0.506 in terms of the gravitational instability model and find that the properties of the complex are consistent with being formed out of an unstable layer threaded by a strong, parallel magnetic field.

  4. Antagonism between Ena/VASP proteins and actin filament capping regulates fibroblast motility.

    PubMed

    Bear, James E; Svitkina, Tatyana M; Krause, Matthias; Schafer, Dorothy A; Loureiro, Joseph J; Strasser, Geraldine A; Maly, Ivan V; Chaga, Oleg Y; Cooper, John A; Borisy, Gary G; Gertler, Frank B

    2002-05-17

    Cell motility requires lamellipodial protrusion, a process driven by actin polymerization. Ena/VASP proteins accumulate in protruding lamellipodia and promote the rapid actin-driven motility of the pathogen Listeria. In contrast, Ena/VASP negatively regulate cell translocation. To resolve this paradox, we analyzed the function of Ena/VASP during lamellipodial protrusion. Ena/VASP-deficient lamellipodia protruded slower but more persistently, consistent with their increased cell translocation rates. Actin networks in Ena/VASP-deficient lamellipodia contained shorter, more highly branched filaments compared to controls. Lamellipodia with excess Ena/VASP contained longer, less branched filaments. In vitro, Ena/VASP promoted actin filament elongation by interacting with barbed ends, shielding them from capping protein. We conclude that Ena/VASP regulates cell motility by controlling the geometry of actin filament networks within lamellipodia. PMID:12086607

  5. Characteristics and trihalomethane formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter in effluents from membrane bioreactors with and without filamentous bulking.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chufan; Ma, Defang; Gao, Baoyu; Hu, Xinxiao; Yue, Qinyan; Meng, Yingjie; Kang, Shuyu; Zhang, Bei; Qi, Yuanfeng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, synthetic wastewater was treated by two identical membrane bioreactors (MBRs): the normal sludge MBR (NS-MBR) and the bulking sludge MBR (BS-MBR). Effects of filamentous bulking on the characteristics and trihalomethane (THM) formation reactivity of MBR effluent dissolved organic matter (EfOM) were investigated. Filamentous sludge bulking had no significant influence on the regulated MBR effluent water quality except NO2-N and NO3-N. NS-MBR effluent had more low molecular weight (LMW) (<5kDa) EfOM (92.43%) than BS-MBR (75.18%). About two-thirds of EfOM from BS-MBR were hydrophilic substances. On the contrary, EfOM from NS-MBR exhibited higher hydrophobicity. The ratio of polysaccharides and proteins in MBR effluents increased after filamentous bulking. There were more protein-like materials, fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like in BS-MBR EfOM. The THM formation reactivity of BS-MBR EfOM was 30.15% of NS-MBR EfOM, whereas BS-MBR EfOM exhibited higher formation reactivity of bromine containing species. PMID:27017128

  6. Formation of conical emission of supercontinuum during filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandidov, V. P.; Smetanina, E. O.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Kompanets, V. O.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2011-09-01

    The formation of conical emission of supercontinuum during filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses with central wavelengths in a wide range is studied experimentally, numerically, and analytically. The frequency-angular intensity distribution of the spectral components of conical emission is determined by the interference of supercontinuum emission in a filament of a femtosecond laser pulse. The interference of supercontinuum emission has a general character, exists at different regimes of group velocity dispersion, gives rise to the fine spectral structure after the pulse splitting into subpulses and the formation of a distributed supercontinuum source in an extended filament, and causes the decomposition of the continuous spectrum of conical emission into many high-contrast maxima after pulse refocusing in the filament. In spectroscopic studies with a tunable femtosecond radiation source based on a TOPAS parametric amplifier, we used an original scheme with a wedge fused silica sample. Numerical simulations have been performed using a system of equations of nonlinear-optical interaction of laser radiation under conditions of diffraction, wave nonstationarity, and material dispersion in fused silica. The analytic study is based on the interference model of formation of conical emission by supercontinuum sources moving in a filament.

  7. Formation of conical emission of supercontinuum during filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Kandidov, V. P. Smetanina, E. O.; Dormidonov, A. E.; Kompanets, V. O.; Chekalin, S. V.

    2011-09-15

    The formation of conical emission of supercontinuum during filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses with central wavelengths in a wide range is studied experimentally, numerically, and analytically. The frequency-angular intensity distribution of the spectral components of conical emission is determined by the interference of supercontinuum emission in a filament of a femtosecond laser pulse. The interference of supercontinuum emission has a general character, exists at different regimes of group velocity dispersion, gives rise to the fine spectral structure after the pulse splitting into subpulses and the formation of a distributed supercontinuum source in an extended filament, and causes the decomposition of the continuous spectrum of conical emission into many high-contrast maxima after pulse refocusing in the filament. In spectroscopic studies with a tunable femtosecond radiation source based on a TOPAS parametric amplifier, we used an original scheme with a wedge fused silica sample. Numerical simulations have been performed using a system of equations of nonlinear-optical interaction of laser radiation under conditions of diffraction, wave nonstationarity, and material dispersion in fused silica. The analytic study is based on the interference model of formation of conical emission by supercontinuum sources moving in a filament.

  8. Direct observation of conductive filament formation in Alq3 based organic resistive memories

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Y. Pireaux, J.-J.; Nau, S.; Sax, S.; List-Kratochvil, E. J. W.; Novak, J.; Banerjee, R.; Schreiber, F.

    2015-08-21

    This work explores resistive switching mechanisms in non-volatile organic memory devices based on tris(8-hydroxyquinolie)aluminum (Alq{sub 3}). Advanced characterization tools are applied to investigate metal diffusion in ITO/Alq{sub 3}/Ag memory device stacks leading to conductive filament formation. The morphology of Alq{sub 3}/Ag layers as a function of the metal evaporation conditions is studied by X-ray reflectivity, while depth profile analysis with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is applied to characterize operational memory elements displaying reliable bistable current-voltage characteristics. 3D images of the distribution of silver inside the organic layer clearly point towards the existence of conductive filaments and allow for the identification of the initial filament formation and inactivation mechanisms during switching of the device. Initial filament formation is suggested to be driven by field assisted diffusion of silver from abundant structures formed during the top electrode evaporation, whereas thermochemical effects lead to local filament inactivation.

  9. AoRim15 is involved in conidial stress tolerance, conidiation and sclerotia formation in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Kikuma, Takashi; Jin, Feng Jie; Maruyama, Jun-Ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Rim15p is a master regulator of stress signaling and is required for stress tolerance and sexual sporulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, in filamentous fungi that reproduce asexually via conidiation, the physiological function of Rim15p homologs has not been extensively analyzed. Here, we functionally characterized the protein homolog of Rim15p in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae, by deleting and overexpressing the corresponding Aorim15 gene and examining the role of this protein in stress tolerance and development. Deletion of Aorim15 resulted in an increase in the sensitivity of conidia to oxidative and heat stresses, whereas conidia of the Aorim15 overexpressing strain were more resistant to these stresses. These results indicated that AoRim15 functions in stress tolerance, similar to S. cerevisiae Rim15p. Phenotypic analysis revealed that conidiation was markedly reduced by overexpression of Aorim15 in A. oryzae, and was completely abolished in the deletion strain. In addition, the formation of sclerotia, which is another type of developmental structure in filamentous fungi, was decreased by the deletion of Aorim15, whereas Aorim15 overexpression increased the number of sclerotia. These results indicated that AoRim15 is a positive regulator of sclerotia formation and that overexpression of AoRim15 shifts the developmental balance from conidiation towards sclerotia formation. Collectively, we demonstrated that AoRim15 is involved in the stress tolerance of conidia and differentially regulates between the two developmental fates of conidiation and sclerotia formation. PMID:26467693

  10. STAR FORMATION IN THE TAURUS FILAMENT L 1495: FROM DENSE CORES TO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzl, Markus; Kainulainen, Jouni; Henning, Thomas; Launhardt, Ralf; Quanz, Sascha P.; Alves, Joao; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.

    2010-12-10

    We present a study of dense structures in the L 1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud and examine its star-forming properties. In particular, we construct a dust extinction map of the filament using deep near-infrared observations, exposing its small-scale structure in unprecedented detail. The filament shows highly fragmented substructures and a high mass-per-length value of M{sub line} = 17 M{sub sun} pc{sup -1}, reflecting star-forming potential in all parts of it. However, a part of the filament, namely B 211, is remarkably devoid of young stellar objects. We argue that in this region the initial filament collapse and fragmentation is still taking place and star formation is yet to occur. In the star-forming part of the filament, we identify 39 cores with masses from 0.4 to 10 M{sub sun} and preferred separations in agreement with the local Jeans length. Most of these cores exceed the Bonnor-Ebert critical mass, and are therefore likely to collapse and form stars. The dense core mass function follows a power law with exponent {Gamma} = 1.2 {+-} 0.2, a form commonly observed in star-forming regions.

  11. Self-propelled worm-like filaments: spontaneous spiral formation, structure, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Isele-Holder, Rolf E; Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-09-28

    Worm-like filaments that are propelled homogeneously along their tangent vector are studied by Brownian dynamics simulations. Systems in two dimensions are investigated, corresponding to filaments adsorbed to interfaces or surfaces. A large parameter space covering weak and strong propulsion, as well as flexible and stiff filaments is explored. For strongly propelled and flexible filaments, the free-swimming filaments spontaneously form stable spirals. The propulsion force has a strong impact on dynamic properties, such as the rotational and translational mean square displacement and the rate of conformational sampling. In particular, when the active self-propulsion dominates thermal diffusion, but is too weak for spiral formation, the rotational diffusion coefficient has an activity-induced contribution given by v(c)/ξ(P), where v(c) is the contour velocity and ξ(P) the persistence length. In contrast, structural properties are hardly affected by the activity of the system, as long as no spirals form. The model mimics common features of biological systems, such as microtubules and actin filaments on motility assays or slender bacteria, and artificially designed microswimmers. PMID:26256415

  12. EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M.; Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.; Okamoto, T. J.; Otsuji, K.

    2010-07-20

    We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

  13. Kinetic factors determining conducting filament formation in solid polymer electrolyte based planar devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Karthik; Aono, Masakazu; Tsuruoka, Tohru

    2016-07-01

    Resistive switching characteristics and conducting filament formation dynamics in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based planar-type atomic switches, with opposing active Ag and inert Pt electrodes, have been investigated by optimizing the device configuration and experimental parameters such as the gap distance between the electrodes, the salt inclusion in the polymer matrix, and the compliance current applied in current-voltage measurements. The high ionic conductivities of SPE enabled us to make scanning electron microscopy observations of the filament formation processes in the sub-micrometer to micrometer ranges. It was found that switching behaviour and filament growth morphology depend strongly on several kinetic factors, such as the redox reaction rate at the electrode-polymer interfaces, ion mobility in the polymer matrix, electric field strength, and the reduction sites for precipitation. Different filament formations, resulting from unidirectional and dendritic growth behaviours, can be controlled by tuning specified parameters, which in turn improves the stability and performance of SPE-based devices.Resistive switching characteristics and conducting filament formation dynamics in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based planar-type atomic switches, with opposing active Ag and inert Pt electrodes, have been investigated by optimizing the device configuration and experimental parameters such as the gap distance between the electrodes, the salt inclusion in the polymer matrix, and the compliance current applied in current-voltage measurements. The high ionic conductivities of SPE enabled us to make scanning electron microscopy observations of the filament formation processes in the sub-micrometer to micrometer ranges. It was found that switching behaviour and filament growth morphology depend strongly on several kinetic factors, such as the redox reaction rate at the electrode-polymer interfaces, ion mobility in the polymer matrix, electric field strength

  14. Length regulation of mechanosensitive stereocilia depends on very slow actin dynamics and filament-severing proteins.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Praveena; Chatterton, Paul; Ikeda, Akihiro; Ikeda, Sakae; Corey, David P; Ervasti, James M; Perrin, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    Auditory sensory hair cells depend on stereocilia with precisely regulated lengths to detect sound. Since stereocilia are primarily composed of crosslinked, parallel actin filaments, regulated actin dynamics are essential for controlling stereocilia length. Here we assessed stereocilia actin turnover by monitoring incorporation of inducibly expressed β-actin-GFP in adult mouse hair cells in vivo and by directly measuring β-actin-GFP turnover in explants. Stereocilia actin incorporation is remarkably slow and restricted to filament barbed ends in a small tip compartment, with minimal accumulation in the rest of the actin core. Shorter rows of stereocilia, which have mechanically gated ion channels, show more variable actin turnover than the tallest stereocilia, which lack channels. Finally, the proteins ADF and AIP1, which both mediate actin filament severing, contribute to stereocilia length maintenance. Altogether, the data support a model whereby stereocilia actin cores are largely static, with dynamic regulation at the tips to maintain a critical length. PMID:25897778

  15. THE IMPACT OF THERMODYNAMICS ON GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE: FILAMENT FORMATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Federrath, Christoph; Smith, Rowan J.; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Banerjee, Robi; Sur, Sharanya

    2012-12-01

    Stars form by the gravitational collapse of interstellar gas. The thermodynamic response of the gas can be characterized by an effective equation of state. It determines how gas heats up or cools as it gets compressed, and hence plays a key role in regulating the process of stellar birth on virtually all scales, ranging from individual star clusters up to the galaxy as a whole. We present a systematic study of the impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse in the context of high-redshift star formation, but argue that our findings are also relevant for present-day star formation in molecular clouds. We consider a polytropic equation of state, P = k{rho}{sup {Gamma}}, with both sub-isothermal exponents {Gamma} < 1 and super-isothermal exponents {Gamma} > 1. We find significant differences between these two cases. For {Gamma} > 1, pressure gradients slow down the contraction and lead to the formation of a virialized, turbulent core. Weak magnetic fields are strongly tangled and efficiently amplified via the small-scale turbulent dynamo on timescales corresponding to the eddy-turnover time at the viscous scale. For {Gamma} < 1, on the other hand, pressure support is not sufficient for the formation of such a core. Gravitational contraction proceeds much more rapidly and the flow develops very strong shocks, creating a network of intersecting sheets and extended filaments. The resulting magnetic field lines are very coherent and exhibit a considerable degree of order. Nevertheless, even under these conditions we still find exponential growth of the magnetic energy density in the kinematic regime.

  16. Ca2+ sensitivity of regulated cardiac thin filament sliding does not depend on myosin isoform

    PubMed Central

    Schoffstall, Brenda; Brunet, Nicolas M; Williams, Shanedah; Miller, Victor F; Barnes, Alyson T; Wang, Fang; Compton, Lisa A; McFadden, Lori A; Taylor, Dianne W; Seavy, Margaret; Dhanarajan, Rani; Chase, P Bryant

    2006-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in vertebrate striated muscles are distinguished functionally by differences in chemomechanical kinetics. These kinetic differences may influence the cross-bridge-dependent co-operativity of thin filament Ca2+ activation. To determine whether Ca2+ sensitivity of unloaded thin filament sliding depends upon MHC isoform kinetics, we performed in vitro motility assays with rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin (rsHMM) or porcine cardiac myosin (pcMyosin). Regulated thin filaments were reconstituted with recombinant human cardiac troponin (rhcTn) and α-tropomyosin (rhcTm) expressed in Escherichia coli. All three subunits of rhcTn were coexpressed as a functional complex using a novel construct with a glutathione S-transferase (GST) affinity tag at the N-terminus of human cardiac troponin T (hcTnT) and an intervening tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease site that allows purification of rhcTn without denaturation, and removal of the GST tag without proteolysis of rhcTn subunits. Use of this highly purified rhcTn in our motility studies resulted in a clear definition of the regulated motility profile for both fast and slow MHC isoforms. Maximum sliding speed (pCa 5) of regulated thin filaments was roughly fivefold faster with rsHMM compared with pcMyosin, although speed was increased by 1.6- to 1.9-fold for regulated over unregulated actin with both MHC isoforms. The Ca2+ sensitivity of regulated thin filament sliding speed was unaffected by MHC isoform. Our motility results suggest that the cellular changes in isoform expression that result in regulation of myosin kinetics can occur independently of changes that influence thin filament Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:17008370

  17. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Summary Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free-head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens reveals that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal here has been to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction reveals intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC, and fitted to the reconstruction an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 crystal structure. The fitting suggests an intramolecular interaction between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free-head and its own S2 and two intermolecular interactions—between the cardio-loop of the free head and the ELC of the blocked head, and between the Leu-305 - Gln-327 “interaction loop” (loop I) of the free-head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked-head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help to switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament. PMID:18951904

  18. Kinetic factors determining conducting filament formation in solid polymer electrolyte based planar devices.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Karthik; Aono, Masakazu; Tsuruoka, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    Resistive switching characteristics and conducting filament formation dynamics in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based planar-type atomic switches, with opposing active Ag and inert Pt electrodes, have been investigated by optimizing the device configuration and experimental parameters such as the gap distance between the electrodes, the salt inclusion in the polymer matrix, and the compliance current applied in current-voltage measurements. The high ionic conductivities of SPE enabled us to make scanning electron microscopy observations of the filament formation processes in the sub-micrometer to micrometer ranges. It was found that switching behaviour and filament growth morphology depend strongly on several kinetic factors, such as the redox reaction rate at the electrode-polymer interfaces, ion mobility in the polymer matrix, electric field strength, and the reduction sites for precipitation. Different filament formations, resulting from unidirectional and dendritic growth behaviours, can be controlled by tuning specified parameters, which in turn improves the stability and performance of SPE-based devices. PMID:27109426

  19. ASC filament formation serves as a signal amplification mechanism for inflammasomes

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Mathias S.; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Rühl, Sebastian; Hiller, Sebastian; Broz, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of inflammasome activation is the ASC speck, a micrometre-sized structure formed by the inflammasome adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), which consists of a pyrin domain (PYD) and a caspase recruitment domain (CARD). Here we show that assembly of the ASC speck involves oligomerization of ASCPYD into filaments and cross-linking of these filaments by ASCCARD. ASC mutants with a non-functional CARD only assemble filaments but not specks, and moreover disrupt endogenous specks in primary macrophages. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of ASCPYD is used to identify oligomerization-deficient ASC mutants and demonstrate that ASC speck formation is required for efficient processing of IL-1β, but dispensable for gasdermin-D cleavage and pyroptosis induction. Our results suggest that the oligomerization of ASC creates a multitude of potential caspase-1 activation sites, thus serving as a signal amplification mechanism for inflammasome-mediated cytokine production. PMID:27329339

  20. Filament formation and evolution in buoyant coastal waters: Observation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iermano, Ilaria; Liguori, Giovanni; Iudicone, Daniele; Buongiorno Nardelli, Bruno; Colella, Simone; Zingone, Adriana; Saggiomo, Vincenzo; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the formation and subsequent evolution of filament-like structures observed in a relatively small area of the mid-Tyrrhenian Sea (Mediterranean Sea). The filament dynamics and potential impact on the cross-shelf exchange budget are investigated based on a combined use of remote sensing imagery, in situ data and numerical modelling. The complexity of these phenomena is shown by focusing on four distinct events that led to cross-shelf transport, each representative of a different dynamic process and a distinct expected impact on the coastal area. A systematic analysis of available observations for the years 1998-2006 underlines the role of the interplay of atmospheric freshwater fluxes, river loads and wind stress variations, which may create favourable conditions for the convergence of shelf waters (particularly at coastal capes) and the subsequent formation of short-lived filaments along the coast. The response of the buoyant coastal waters to periods of wind reversal and fluctuating freshwater discharge rates is examined through idealised Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) simulations. The filaments observed in remote sensing imagery were well reproduced by the numerical exercise, where the filaments appear as organised submesoscale structures that possess high relative vorticity and develop at the river mouths or adjacent capes. In both scenarios, the filaments appear largely determined by (i) the presence of a buoyancy anomaly, (ii) the angle between the wind pulse direction and the coast and (iii) irregularities in the coastal profile. The ensemble of results suggests that the occurrence of such transient, intense structures may contribute considerably to the biological variability and cross-shelf exchange in coastal areas with similar traits.

  1. Invertebrate muscles: thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    This is the second in a series of canonical reviews on invertebrate muscle. We cover here thin and thick filament structure, the molecular basis of force generation and its regulation, and two special properties of some invertebrate muscle, catch and asynchronous muscle. Invertebrate thin filaments resemble vertebrate thin filaments, although helix structure and tropomyosin arrangement show small differences. Invertebrate thick filaments, alternatively, are very different from vertebrate striated thick filaments and show great variation within invertebrates. Part of this diversity stems from variation in paramyosin content, which is greatly increased in very large diameter invertebrate thick filaments. Other of it arises from relatively small changes in filament backbone structure, which results in filaments with grossly similar myosin head placements (rotating crowns of heads every 14.5 nm) but large changes in detail (distances between heads in azimuthal registration varying from three to thousands of crowns). The lever arm basis of force generation is common to both vetebrates and invertebrates, and in some invertebrates this process is understood on the near atomic level. Invertebrate actomyosin is both thin (tropomyosin:troponin) and thick (primarily via direct Ca++ binding to myosin) filament regulated, and most invertebrate muscles are dually regulated. These mechanisms are well understood on the molecular level, but the behavioral utility of dual regulation is less so. The phosphorylation state of the thick filament associated giant protein, twitchin, has been recently shown to be the molecular basis of catch. The molecular basis of the stretch activation underlying asynchronous muscle activity, however, remains unresolved. PMID:18616971

  2. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  3. Pattern formation and dynamics of plasma filaments in dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegari, T.; Bernecker, B.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2014-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) operating in a transient glow discharge regime offer a large variety of self-organized filamentary static or dynamical structures and constitute an excellent physical system for the study of nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation. The plasma filaments of DBDs can exhibit particle-like behavior, with motion, generation, annihilation, and scattering as well as collective effects leading to self-organized structures (hexagons, stripes, concentric rings, spirals, etc) that are typical of reaction-diffusion systems. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the detailed physics of pattern formation in DBDs on the basis of numerical fluid simulations and experiments in order to provide a deeper understanding of the nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the self-organization and dynamics of filaments.

  4. Structural characterization of a capping protein interaction motif defines a family of actin filament regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Kim, Taekyung; Kannan, Balakrishnan; Tung, Alvin; Aguda, Adeleke H; Larsson, Mårten; Cooper, John A; Robinson, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) regulates actin dynamics by binding the barbed ends of actin filaments. Removal of CP may be one means to harness actin polymerization for processes such as cell movement and endocytosis. Here we structurally and biochemically investigated a CP interaction (CPI) motif present in the otherwise unrelated proteins CARMIL and CD2AP. The CPI motif wraps around the stalk of the mushroom-shaped CP at a site distant from the actin-binding interface, which lies on the top of the mushroom cap. We propose that the CPI motif may act as an allosteric modulator, restricting CP to a low-affinity, filament-binding conformation. Structure-based sequence alignments extend the CPI motif–containing family to include CIN85, CKIP-1, CapZIP and a relatively uncharacterized protein, WASHCAP (FAM21). Peptides comprising these CPI motifs are able to inhibit CP and to uncap CP-bound actin filaments. PMID:20357771

  5. Filaments, ridges and a mini-starburst - HOBYS' view of high mass star formation with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T.; Motte, F.; Didelon, P.

    2012-03-01

    With its unprecedented spatial resolution and high sensitivity, Herschel is revolutionising our understanding of high mass star formation and the interstellar medium (ISM). In particular, Herschel is unveiling the filamentary structure and molecular cloud constituents of the ISM where star formation takes place. The Herschel Imaging Survey of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS; Motte, Zavagno, Bontemps, see http://www.herschel.fr/cea/hobys/en/index.php) key program targets burgeoning young stellar objects with the aim of characterising them and the environments in which they form. HOBYS has already proven fruitful with many clear examples of high-mass star formation in nearby molecular cloud complexes (e.g. Motte et al., 2010). Through multi-wavelength Herschel observations I will introduce select regions of the HOBYS program, including Vela C, M16 and W48 to start. These data are rich with filamentary structures and a wealth of sources which span a large mass range including, low, intermediate and high-mass objects in the pre-collapse or protostellar phase of formation, many of which will proceed to form stars. The natal filaments themselves come in many shapes and sizes, they can form thick ridge-like structures, be dispersed in low column density regions or cluster in higher density regions. In Vela C, high-mass star formation proceeds preferentially in high column density supercritical filaments, called ridges, which may result from the constructive convergence of flows (Hill et al., 2011). I will present other examples of ridges identified in HOBYS regions. In addition, I will present the latest results on the Eagle Nebula (M16). This region was made iconic by Hubble, but only Herschel can trace the cold, dense early prestellar phases of star formation, and their natal interstellar filaments, in this infamous star-forming complex. The cavity ionised by the nearby OB cluster in M16 serves to heat the Pillars of Creation and the surrounding interstellar filaments

  6. Formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses was experimentally and theoretically studied together with theoreticians of the Moscow State University and the Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The influence of various characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses on these plasma channels is discussed. Plasma channels formed under filamentation of focused laser beams with a wavefront distorted by spherical aberration (introduced by adaptive optics) and by astigmatism, with cross-section spatially formed by various diaphragms and with different UV and IR wavelengths, were experimentally and numerically studied. The influence of plasma channels created by a filament of a focused UV or IR femtosecond laser pulse (λ = 248 nm or 740 nm) on characteristics of other plasma channels formed by a femtosecond pulse at the same wavelength following the first one with varied nanosecond time delay was also experimentally studied. An application of plasma channels formed due to the filamentation of focused UV ultrashort laser pulses including a train of such pulses and a combination of ultrashort and long (~100 ns) laser pulses for triggering and guiding long (~1 m) electric discharges is discussed.

  7. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared. PMID:22253541

  8. Filament formation associated with spirochetal infection: a comparative approach to Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2011-01-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis is an emerging infectious disease that causes lameness, decreased milk production, and weight loss in livestock. Proliferative stages of bovine digital dermatitis demonstrate keratin filament formation in skin above the hooves in affected animals. The multifactorial etiology of digital dermatitis is not well understood, but spirochetes and other coinfecting microorganisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this veterinary illness. Morgellons disease is an emerging human dermopathy characterized by the presence of filamentous fibers of undetermined composition, both in lesions and subdermally. While the etiology of Morgellons disease is unknown, there is serological and clinical evidence linking this phenomenon to Lyme borreliosis and coinfecting tick-borne agents. Although the microscopy of Morgellons filaments has been described in the medical literature, the structure and pathogenesis of these fibers is poorly understood. In contrast, most microscopy of digital dermatitis has focused on associated pathogens and histology rather than the morphology of late-stage filamentous fibers. Clinical, laboratory, and microscopic characteristics of these two diseases are compared. PMID:22253541

  9. Different inhibitory response of cyanidin and methylene blue for filament formation of tau microtubule-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Masaki; Sugino, Etsuko; Minoura, Katsuhiko In, Yasuko; Sumida, Miho; Taniguchi, Taizo; Tomoo, Koji; Ishida, Toshimasa

    2008-09-12

    One of the priorities in Alzheimer research is to develop a compound that inhibits the filament formation of tau protein. Since the three- or four-repeat microtubule-binding domain (MBD) in tau protein plays an essential role in filament formation, the inhibitory behavior of cyanidin (Cy) and methylene blue (MB) with respect to heparin-induced filament formation of MBD in a neutral solution (pH 7.6) was characterized by fluorescence, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy measurements. The planar aromatic ring of Cy and the N-unsubstituted phenothiazine ring of MB were shown to be necessary for the inhibition. However, the inhibitory responses with respect to heparin-induced filament formation to the second and third repeat peptides of MBD were different: Cy suppresses the formation and MB does not prevent the formation. This suggests the importance of the first and fourth repeat peptides in the inhibitory activity of MB for MBD filament formation. In this study, we showed that the decrease of thioflavin S fluorescence intensity is not always linked to inhibition of filament formation.

  10. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  11. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c-regulated dynamic actin filament arrays.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  12. ER sheet persistence is coupled to myosin 1c–regulated dynamic actin filament arrays

    PubMed Central

    Joensuu, Merja; Belevich, Ilya; Rämö, Olli; Nevzorov, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Puhka, Maija; Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Jokitalo, Eija

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) network with diverse structural and functional domains. Proper ER operation requires an intricate balance within and between dynamics, morphology, and functions, but how these processes are coupled in cells has been unclear. Using live-cell imaging and 3D electron microscopy, we identify a specific subset of actin filaments localizing to polygons defined by ER sheets and tubules and describe a role for these actin arrays in ER sheet persistence and, thereby, in maintenance of the characteristic network architecture by showing that actin depolymerization leads to increased sheet fluctuation and transformations and results in small and less abundant sheet remnants and a defective ER network distribution. Furthermore, we identify myosin 1c localizing to the ER-associated actin filament arrays and reveal a novel role for myosin 1c in regulating these actin structures, as myosin 1c manipulations lead to loss of the actin filaments and to similar ER phenotype as observed after actin depolymerization. We propose that ER-associated actin filaments have a role in ER sheet persistence regulation and thus support the maintenance of sheets as a stationary subdomain of the dynamic ER network. PMID:24523293

  13. Localization of RHO-4 Indicates Differential Regulation of Conidial versus Vegetative Septation in the Filamentous Fungus Neurospora crassa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Carolyn G.; Glass, N. Louise

    2007-01-01

    rho-4 mutants of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa lack septa and asexual spores (conidia) and grow slowly. In this report, localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged RHO-4 is used to elucidate the differences in factors controlling RHO-4 localization during vegetative growth versus asexual development. RHO-4 forms a ring at incipient vegetative septation sites that constricts with the formation of the septum toward the septal pore; RHO-4 persists around the septal pore after septum completion. During the formation of conidia, RHO-4 localizes to the primary septum but subsequently is relocalized to the cytoplasm after the placement of the secondary septum. Cytoplasmic localization and inactivation of RHO-4 are mediated by a direct physical interaction with RDI-1, a RHO guanosine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. Inappropriate activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway during vegetative growth causes mislocalization of RHO-4 away from septa to the cytoplasm, a process which was dependent upon RDI-1. An adenylate cyclase cr-1 mutant partially suppresses the aconidial defect of rho-4 mutants but only rarely suppresses the vegetative septation defect, indicating that conidial septation is negatively regulated by CR-1. These data highlight the differences in the regulation of septation during conidiation versus vegetative septation in filamentous fungi. PMID:17496127

  14. A Real Source of a Stealth CME - Energetics of a Filament Eruption and Giant Arcade Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Ishii, Takako T.; Otsuji, Kenichi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Various active phenomena occurring on the solar surface are sources of disturbances in the solar-terrestrial environment. It is, however, sometimes said that solar flares, the most energetic explosions in the active phenome on the sun, are not crucially important for space weather researches, but coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are more significant. This is because not all flares are associated with CMEs, and therefore, not geo-effective, and because geo-effective CMEs sometimes occur without any notable active phenomena (such as flares) on the sun. The latter is sometimes called as a “stealth CME” event. However, for even such cases, we often see filament eruptions in H-alpha observations and formations of giant arcade in X-ray and/or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations.The geomagnetic storm with the Dst index of -105 nT that occurred on October 8, 2012 was such a stealth event. We, on the other hand, recognize formation of an X-ray giant arcade and activation of an H-alpha filament on October 5, 2012. We examined the velocity field of the filament by using the H-alpha wing data obtained with SMART telescope at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. We also derived the temperature and the volume emission measure by using the X-ray and EUV data obtained by Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA. We discuss the energetics of this event on the solar surface

  15. An Integrative Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Heterocyst Pattern Formation in Cyanobacteria Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Falo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria filaments is one of the simplest examples of cellular differentiation and pattern formation in multicellular organisms. Despite of the many experimental studies addressing the evolution and sustainment of heterocyst patterns and the knowledge of the genetic circuit underlying the behavior of single cyanobacterium under nitrogen deprivation, there is still a theoretical gap connecting these two macroscopic and microscopic processes. As an attempt to shed light on this issue, here we explore heterocyst differentiation under the paradigm of systems biology. This framework allows us to formulate the essential dynamical ingredients of the genetic circuit of a single cyanobacterium into a set of differential equations describing the time evolution of the concentrations of the relevant molecular products. As a result, we are able to study the behavior of a single cyanobacterium under different external conditions, emulating nitrogen deprivation, and simulate the dynamics of cyanobacteria filaments by coupling their respective genetic circuits via molecular diffusion. These two ingredients allow us to understand the principles by which heterocyst patterns can be generated and sustained. In particular, our results point out that, by including both diffusion and noisy external conditions in the computational model, it is possible to reproduce the main features of the formation and sustainment of heterocyst patterns in cyanobacteria filaments as observed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the validity and possible improvements of the model. PMID:25816286

  16. Filaments in curved flow: Rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Young; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development in S. aureus.We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in curved flow to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory and slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation in S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  17. Filaments in curved streamlines: rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development of S. aureus. We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in flows with curved streamlines to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory of slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation of S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  18. Role of Reactive Intermediates in Manganese Oxide Formation By Filamentous Ascomycete Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiner, C. A.; Anderton, C.; Wu, S.; Purvine, S.; Zink, E.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Santelli, C. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic manganese (Mn) oxide minerals are ubiquitous in the environment, and their high reactivity can profoundly impact the fate of contaminants and cycling of carbon and nutrients. In contrast to bacteria, the pathways utilized by fungi to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III,IV) oxides remain largely unknown. Here, we explore the mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation by a phylogenetically diverse group of filamentous Ascomycete fungi using a combination of chemical assays and bulk and spatially-resolved mass spectrometry. We show that the mechanisms of Mn(II) oxidation vary with fungal species, over time during secretome compositional changes, and in the presence of other fungi. Specifically, our work implicates a dynamic transition in Mn(II) oxidation pathways that varies between species. In particular, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced via transmembrane NADPH oxidases are involved in initial oxidation, over time, secreted enzymes become important Mn(II) oxidation mediators for some species. In addition, the overall secretome oxidation capacity varies with time and fungal species. Secretome analysis reveals a surprising absence of enzymes currently considered to be Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes in these organisms, and instead highlights a wide variety of redox-active enzymes. Furthermore, we implicate fungal cell defense mechanisms in the formation of distinct Mn oxide patterns when fungi are grown in head-to-head competition. The identification and regulation of these secreted enzymes are under current investigation within the bulk secretome and within the interaction zone of structured fungal communities. Overall, our findings illustrate that Ascomycete Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms are highly variable and are dictated by complex environmental and ecological interactions. Future work will explore the connection between Ascomycete Mn(II) oxidation and the ability to degrade cellulose, a key carbon reservoir for biofuel production.

  19. Single-filament kinetic studies provide novel insights into regulation of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Polarized assembly of actin filaments forms the basis of actin-based motility and is regulated both spatially and temporally. Cells use a variety of mechanisms by which intrinsically slower processes are accelerated, and faster ones decelerated, to match rates observed in vivo. Here we discuss how kinetic studies of individual reactions and cycles that drive actin remodeling have provided a mechanistic and quantitative understanding of such processes. We specifically consider key barbed-end regulators such as capping protein and formins as illustrative examples. We compare and contrast different kinetic approaches, such as the traditional pyrene-polymerization bulk assays, as well as more recently developed single-filament and single-molecule imaging approaches. Recent development of novel biophysical methods for sensing and applying forces will in future allow us to address the very important relationship between mechanical stimulus and kinetics of actin-based motility. PMID:26715420

  20. Molecular Regulation of β-Lactam Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Brakhage, Axel A.

    1998-01-01

    The most commonly used β-lactam antibiotics for the therapy of infectious diseases are penicillin and cephalosporin. Penicillin is produced as an end product by some fungi, most notably by Aspergillus (Emericella) nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum. Cephalosporins are synthesized by both bacteria and fungi, e.g., by the fungus Acremonium chrysogenum (Cephalosporium acremonium). The biosynthetic pathways leading to both secondary metabolites start from the same three amino acid precursors and have the first two enzymatic reactions in common. Penicillin biosynthesis is catalyzed by three enzymes encoded by acvA (pcbAB), ipnA (pcbC), and aatA (penDE). The genes are organized into a cluster. In A. chrysogenum, in addition to acvA and ipnA, a second cluster contains the genes encoding enzymes that catalyze the reactions of the later steps of the cephalosporin pathway (cefEF and cefG). Within the last few years, several studies have indicated that the fungal β-lactam biosynthesis genes are controlled by a complex regulatory network, e.g., by the ambient pH, carbon source, and amino acids. A comparison with the regulatory mechanisms (regulatory proteins and DNA elements) involved in the regulation of genes of primary metabolism in lower eukaryotes is thus of great interest. This has already led to the elucidation of new regulatory mechanisms. Furthermore, such investigations have contributed to the elucidation of signals leading to the production of β-lactams and their physiological meaning for the producing fungi, and they can be expected to have a major impact on rational strain improvement programs. The knowledge of biosynthesis genes has already been used to produce new compounds. PMID:9729600

  1. Movement of scallop myosin on Nitella actin filaments: regulation by calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Vale, R D; Szent-Gyorgyi, A G; Sheetz, M P

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine if Ca2+ regulates scallop myosin movement on actin, we have measured motility of scallop myosin along actin filaments using a direct visual assay. This procedure consists of covalently linking myosin to 1-micron beads and pipetting them onto a parallel array of actin filaments located on the cytoplasmic face of a Nitella internodal cell. In the absence of Ca2+, scallop myosin-coated beads exhibit no directed motion; however, in the presence of pCa2+ of greater than 5.84, these beads undergo linear translocations with average velocities of 2.0 micron/s. This Ca2+ -sensitive motility requires the presence of regulatory light chains on the scallop myosin. Removal of regulatory light chains with 10 mM EDTA produces a "desensitized" myosin, no longer sensitive to Ca2+, which moves at rates of 0.09-0.3 micron in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Readdition of regulatory light chains to preparations of desensitized myosin once again confers Ca2+-sensitive motility. The Ca2+ dependence of scallop-myosin motility shows a sharp transition, consistent with the Ca2+ activation sensitivity of the actin-activated ATPase. Furthermore, relative rates of movement of calcium-regulated myosins from various molluscan species are consistent with their respective rates of ATP hydrolysis. Thus, myosin motility along actin filaments provides a sensitive and direct assay of myosin activity and is suitable for studying myosin regulation. PMID:6238334

  2. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  3. Laser-filamentation-induced water condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber filled with different ambient gases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonghong; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Liang, Hong; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Tiejun; Tian, Ye; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yi; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated femtosecond laser-filamentation-induced airflow, water condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber filled respectively with air, argon and helium. The mass of snow induced by laser filaments was found being the maximum when the chamber was filled with argon, followed by air and being the minimum with helium. We also discussed the mechanisms of water condensation in different gases. The results show that filaments with higher laser absorption efficiency, which result in higher plasma density, are beneficial for triggering intense airflow and thus more water condensation and precipitation. PMID:27137026

  4. Peripheral Leptin Regulates Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Kalra, Satya P.; Wong, Carmen P.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Boghossian, Stephane; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence does not support the prevailing view that leptin, acting through a hypothalamic relay, decreases bone accrual by inhibiting bone formation. To clarify the mechanisms underlying regulation of bone architecture by leptin, we evaluated bone growth and turnover in wild type (WT) mice, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and ob/ob mice treated with leptin. We also performed hypothalamic leptin gene therapy to determine the effect of elevated hypothalamic leptin levels on osteoblasts. Finally, to determine the effects of loss of peripheral leptin signaling on bone formation and energy metabolism, we used bone marrow (BM) from WT or db/db donor mice to reconstitute the hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments in lethally irradiated WT recipient mice. Decreases in bone growth, osteoblast-lined bone perimeter and bone formation rate were observed in ob/ob mice and greatly increased in ob/ob mice following subcutaneous administration of leptin. Similarly, hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast-lined bone perimeter in ob/ob mice. In spite of normal osteoclast-lined bone perimeter, db/db mice exhibited a mild but generalized osteopetrotic-like (calcified cartilage encased by bone) skeletal phenotype and greatly reduced serum markers of bone turnover. Tracking studies and histology revealed quantitative replacement of BM cells following BM transplantation. WT mice engrafted with db/db BM did not differ in energy homeostasis from untreated WT mice or WT mice engrafted with WT BM. Bone formation in WT mice engrafted with WT BM did not differ from WT mice, whereas bone formation in WT mice engrafted with db/db cells did not differ from the low rates observed in untreated db/db mice. In summary, our results indicate that leptin, acting primarily through peripheral pathways, increases osteoblast number and activity. PMID:22887758

  5. Formation and evolution of magnetised filaments in wind-swept turbulent clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragan, Wladimir Eduardo; Federrath, Christoph; Crocker, Roland M.; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Parkin, Elliot Ross

    2015-08-01

    Using high-resolution three-dimensional simulations, we examine the formation and evolution of filamentary structures arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and turbulent clumps in the interstellar medium. Previous numerical studies assumed homogenous density profiles, null velocity fields, and uniformly distributed magnetic fields as the initial conditions for interstellar clumps. Here, we have, for the first time, incorporated fractal clumps with log-normal density distributions, random velocity fields and turbulent magnetic fields (superimposed on top of a uniform background field). Disruptive processes, instigated by dynamical instabilities and akin to those observed in simulations with uniform media, lead to stripping of clump material and the subsequent formation of filamentary tails. The evolution of filaments in uniform and turbulent models is, however, radically different as evidenced by comparisons of global quantities in both scenarios. We show, for example, that turbulent clumps produce tails with higher velocity dispersions, increased gas mixing, greater kinetic energy, and lower plasma beta than their uniform counterparts. We attribute the observed differences to: 1) the turbulence-driven enhanced growth of dynamical instabilities (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities) at fluid interfaces, and 2) the localised amplification of magnetic fields caused by the stretching of field lines trapped in the numerous surface deformations of fractal clumps. We briefly discuss the implications of this work to the physics of the optical filaments observed in the starburst galaxy M82.

  6. Identification of a Gene Essential for Sheathed Structure Formation in Sphaerotilus natans, a Filamentous Sheathed Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium that causes bulking in activated sludge processes, can assume two distinct morphologies, depending on the substrate concentration for growth; in substrate-rich media it grows as single rod-shaped cells, whereas in substrate-limited media it grows as filaments. To identify genes responsible for sheath formation, we carried out transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Of the approximately 20,000 mutants obtained, 7 did not form sheathed structures. Sequencing of the Tn5-flanking regions showed that five of the seven Tn5 insertions converged at the same open reading frame, designated sthA. The deduced amino acids encoded by sthA were found to be homologous to glycosyltransferase, which is known to be involved in linking sugars to lipid carriers during bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene of the wild-type strain by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette also resulted in sheathless growth under either type of nutrient condition. These findings indicate that sthA is a crucial component responsible for sheath formation. PMID:11772646

  7. A new look at thin filament regulation in vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Squire, J M; Morris, E P

    1998-07-01

    It is 30 years since Ebashi and colleagues showed that Ca2+ ions directly affect regulation of the myosin-actin interaction in muscle through the action of tropomyosin and troponin on muscle thin filaments. It is more than 20 years since the idea was put forward that tropomyosin might act, at least in part, by changing its position on actin, thus uncovering or modifying the myosin binding site on actin when troponin molecules take up Ca2+. Since that time, a great deal of evidence for and against this steric blocking mechanism has been published: a structure for actin filaments at close to atomic resolution has been proposed, and the whole regulation story has become both more complicated and more subtle. Here we review structural and biochemical aspects of regulation in vertebrate skeletal muscle. We show that some basic ideas of the steric blocking mechanism remain valid. We also show that additional factors, such as troponin movements and structural changes within the actin monomers themselves, may be crucial. A number of the resulting regulation scenarios need to be distinguished. PMID:9657517

  8. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  9. Nucleation-dependent tau filament formation: the importance of dimerization and an estimation of elementary rate constants.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Erin E; Kim, Sohee; Bonchak, Jonathan; Songrug, Tanakorn; Matzavinos, Anastasios; Kuret, Jeff

    2008-05-16

    Filamentous inclusions composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau are found in Alzheimer disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases, but the mechanisms underlying their formation from full-length protein monomer under physiological conditions are unclear. To address this issue, the fibrillization of recombinant full-length four-repeat human tau was examined in vitro as a function of time and submicromolar tau concentrations using electron microscopy assay methods and a small-molecule inducer of aggregation, thiazine red. Data were then fit to a simple homogeneous nucleation model with rate constant constraints established from filament dissociation rate, critical concentration, and mass-per-unit length measurements. The model was then tested by comparing the predicted time-dependent evolution of length distributions to experimental data. Results indicated that once assembly-competent conformations were attained, the rate-limiting step in the fibrillization pathway was tau dimer formation. Filament elongation then proceeded by addition of tau monomers to nascent filament ends. Filaments isolated at reaction plateau contained approximately 2 tau protomers/beta-strand spacing on the basis of mass-per-unit length measurements. The model suggests four key steps in the aggregation pathway that must be surmounted for tau filaments to form in disease. PMID:18359772

  10. The formation of wrinkles caused by transition of keratin intermediate filaments after repetitive UVB exposure.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomohiko; Kume, Takuji; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kawada, Hiromitsu; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Takema, Yasunori

    2005-02-01

    It has been reported that the formation of wrinkles involves changes in the elastic properties of the dermis due to the denaturation of elastic fibers. Several studies have shown that the hydration condition of the stratum corneum is also important in wrinkle formation. It is, however, still unclear how the stratum corneum contributes to wrinkle formation. Here we investigated the relationship between the formation of wrinkles and changes in the physical properties and condition of the skin after repetitive ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of hairless mice (HR/ICR). Repetitive UVB irradiation caused wrinkles on the dorsal skin of the mice. The elasticity (E') of the stratum corneum of UVB-irradiated mice was significantly lower than that of age-matched control (unirradiated) mice. UVB exposure also caused a deterioration of the fibrous ultrastructure of keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) in the skin. We conclude that the deterioration of KIFs in the stratum corneum caused by repetitive UVB irradiation decreases the elastic properties of the stratum corneum, resulting in the formation of wrinkles. PMID:15599582

  11. Polar pattern formation in driven filament systems requires non-binary particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2015-10-01

    From the self-organization of the cytoskeleton to the synchronous motion of bird flocks, living matter has the extraordinary ability to behave in a concerted manner. The Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particles is frequently used in silico to link a system’s meso- or macroscopic behaviour to the microscopic dynamics of its constituents. But so far such studies have relied on an assumption of simplified binary collisions owing to a lack of experimental data suggesting otherwise. We report here experimentally determined binary-collision statistics by studying a recently introduced molecular system, the high-density actomyosin motility assay. We demonstrate that the alignment induced by binary collisions is too weak to account for the observed ordering transition. The transition density for polar pattern formation decreases quadratically with filament length, indicating that multi-filament collisions drive the observed ordering phenomenon and that a gas-like picture cannot explain the transition of the system to polar order. Our findings demonstrate that the unique properties of biological active-matter systems require a description that goes well beyond that developed in the framework of kinetic theories.

  12. Metallic filament formation by aligned oxygen vacancies in ZnO-based resistive switches

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Tingkun

    2014-05-28

    The electronic structure of ZnO with defects of oxygen vacancies were investigated by using first-principles methods. Some structure models were constructed in order to investigate the effects of the distribution of oxygen vacancies on the electronic properties of ZnO. By analyzing the calculated results, we found that only the aligned oxygen vacancies can form the conducting channel in ZnO, and the transformation of the oxygen vacancy from charged state to neutral state is consistent with the energetics rule of the forming aligned oxygen vacancies. As for the heterojunction of Pt/ZnO/Pt, the oxygen vacancies near the interface of Pt/ZnO depress the local Schottky barrier effectively, and the aligned oxygen vacancies in ZnO form a conducting filament connecting two Pt electrodes. The metallic filament formation in Pt/ZnO/Pt resistive switching cells should be closely related to the carrier injection from Pt electrode into ZnO and the arrangement of oxygen vacancies in ZnO slab.

  13. A Model for the Formation of Filament Channels on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, Kalman J.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2014-06-01

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear, in the form of filament channels, at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear also represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. Consequently, the observations raise the question: Why is the magnetic shear observed to be concentrated along PILs? Results of 3D MHD simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) are presented that support the magnetic-helicity condensation model of filament-channel formation (Antiochos 2013). In this work, we consider the supergranular twisting of a quasi-potential flux system that is bounded by a PIL and contains a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by the small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse-cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH boundary. This process produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth, and are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH, in agreement with Antiochos (2013). The accumulated helicity and shear flux are shown to be in excellent quantitative agreement with the helicity-condensation model. We present a detailed analysis of the simulation, including comparisons of our analytical and numerical results, and discuss their implications for observations. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA TR&T and SR&T programs.

  14. Metallic filament formation by aligned oxygen vacancies in ZnO-based resistive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tingkun

    2014-05-01

    The electronic structure of ZnO with defects of oxygen vacancies were investigated by using first-principles methods. Some structure models were constructed in order to investigate the effects of the distribution of oxygen vacancies on the electronic properties of ZnO. By analyzing the calculated results, we found that only the aligned oxygen vacancies can form the conducting channel in ZnO, and the transformation of the oxygen vacancy from charged state to neutral state is consistent with the energetics rule of the forming aligned oxygen vacancies. As for the heterojunction of Pt/ZnO/Pt, the oxygen vacancies near the interface of Pt/ZnO depress the local Schottky barrier effectively, and the aligned oxygen vacancies in ZnO form a conducting filament connecting two Pt electrodes. The metallic filament formation in Pt/ZnO/Pt resistive switching cells should be closely related to the carrier injection from Pt electrode into ZnO and the arrangement of oxygen vacancies in ZnO slab.

  15. Low-power resistive random access memory by confining the formation of conducting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen; Shen, Tzu-Hsien; Lee, Lan-Hsuan; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Lee, Si-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Owing to their small physical size and low power consumption, resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices are potential for future memory and logic applications in microelectronics. In this study, a new resistive switching material structure, TiOx/silver nanoparticles/TiOx/AlTiOx, fabricated between the fluorine-doped tin oxide bottom electrode and the indium tin oxide top electrode is demonstrated. The device exhibits excellent memory performances, such as low operation voltage (<±1 V), low operation power, small variation in resistance, reliable data retention, and a large memory window. The current-voltage measurement shows that the conducting mechanism in the device at the high resistance state is via electron hopping between oxygen vacancies in the resistive switching material. When the device is switched to the low resistance state, conducting filaments are formed in the resistive switching material as a result of accumulation of oxygen vacancies. The bottom AlTiOx layer in the device structure limits the formation of conducting filaments; therefore, the current and power consumption of device operation are significantly reduced.

  16. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  17. Pattern Formation and Force Generation by Cell Ensembles in a Filamentous Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Schwarz, U. S.

    Adhesion-dependent soft tissue cells both create and sense tension in the extracellular matrix. Therefore cells can actively interact through the mechanics of the surrounding matrix. An intracellular positive feedback loop upregulates cellular contractility in stiff or tensed environments. Here we theoretically address the resulting pattern formation and force generation for the case of a filamentous matrix, which we model as a two-dimensional cable network. Cells are modeled as anisotropic contraction dipoles which move in favor of tensed directions in the matrix. Our Monte Carlo simulations suggest that at small densities, cells align in strings, while at high densities, they form interconnected meshworks. Cellular activation both by biochemical factors and by tension leads to a hyperbolic increase in tissue tension. We also discuss the effect of cell density on tissue tension and shape.

  18. Intermediate Filaments Play a Pivotal Role in Regulating Cell Architecture and Function.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jason; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D

    2015-07-10

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are composed of one or more members of a large family of cytoskeletal proteins, whose expression is cell- and tissue type-specific. Their importance in regulating the physiological properties of cells is becoming widely recognized in functions ranging from cell motility to signal transduction. IF proteins assemble into nanoscale biopolymers with unique strain-hardening properties that are related to their roles in regulating the mechanical integrity of cells. Furthermore, mutations in the genes encoding IF proteins cause a wide range of human diseases. Due to the number of different types of IF proteins, we have limited this short review to cover structure and function topics mainly related to the simpler homopolymeric IF networks composed of vimentin, and specifically for diseases, the related muscle-specific desmin IF networks. PMID:25957409

  19. Intermediate Filaments Play a Pivotal Role in Regulating Cell Architecture and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jason; Kuczmarski, Edward R.; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are composed of one or more members of a large family of cytoskeletal proteins, whose expression is cell- and tissue type-specific. Their importance in regulating the physiological properties of cells is becoming widely recognized in functions ranging from cell motility to signal transduction. IF proteins assemble into nanoscale biopolymers with unique strain-hardening properties that are related to their roles in regulating the mechanical integrity of cells. Furthermore, mutations in the genes encoding IF proteins cause a wide range of human diseases. Due to the number of different types of IF proteins, we have limited this short review to cover structure and function topics mainly related to the simpler homopolymeric IF networks composed of vimentin, and specifically for diseases, the related muscle-specific desmin IF networks. PMID:25957409

  20. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Nobrega, Marcelo M.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Temperini, Marcia L. A.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  1. Spatiotemporal distribution of different extracellular polymeric substances and filamentation mediate Xylella fastidiosa adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K; Nobrega, Marcelo M; Cesar, Carlos L; Temperini, Marcia L A; Carvalho, Hernandes F; de Souza, Alessandra A; Cotta, Monica A

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism pathogenicity strongly relies on the generation of multicellular assemblies, called biofilms. Understanding their organization can unveil vulnerabilities leading to potential treatments; spatially and temporally-resolved comprehensive experimental characterization can provide new details of biofilm formation, and possibly new targets for disease control. Here, biofilm formation of economically important phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa was analyzed at single-cell resolution using nanometer-resolution spectro-microscopy techniques, addressing the role of different types of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) at each stage of the entire bacterial life cycle. Single cell adhesion is caused by unspecific electrostatic interactions through proteins at the cell polar region, where EPS accumulation is required for more firmly-attached, irreversibly adhered cells. Subsequently, bacteria form clusters, which are embedded in secreted loosely-bound EPS, and bridged by up to ten-fold elongated cells that form the biofilm framework. During biofilm maturation, soluble EPS forms a filamentous matrix that facilitates cell adhesion and provides mechanical support, while the biofilm keeps anchored by few cells. This floating architecture maximizes nutrient distribution while allowing detachment upon larger shear stresses; it thus complies with biological requirements of the bacteria life cycle. Using new approaches, our findings provide insights regarding different aspects of the adhesion process of X. fastidiosa and biofilm formation. PMID:25891045

  2. Large-scale filament formation inhibits the activity of CTP synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Rachael M; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Lorestani, Alexander; Charles, Emeric J; Habrian, Chris H; Hansen, Jesse M; Li, Hsin-Jung; Baldwin, Enoch P; Wingreen, Ned S; Kollman, Justin M; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    CTP Synthetase (CtpS) is a universally conserved and essential metabolic enzyme. While many enzymes form small oligomers, CtpS forms large-scale filamentous structures of unknown function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. By simultaneously monitoring CtpS polymerization and enzymatic activity, we show that polymerization inhibits activity, and CtpS's product, CTP, induces assembly. To understand how assembly inhibits activity, we used electron microscopy to define the structure of CtpS polymers. This structure suggests that polymerization sterically hinders a conformational change necessary for CtpS activity. Structure-guided mutagenesis and mathematical modeling further indicate that coupling activity to polymerization promotes cooperative catalytic regulation. This previously uncharacterized regulatory mechanism is important for cellular function since a mutant that disrupts CtpS polymerization disrupts E. coli growth and metabolic regulation without reducing CTP levels. We propose that regulation by large-scale polymerization enables ultrasensitive control of enzymatic activity while storing an enzyme subpopulation in a conformationally restricted form that is readily activatable. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03638.001 PMID:25030911

  3. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-06-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  4. Cla4, but not Rac1, regulates the filamentous response of Ustilago maydis to low ammonium conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lovely, C. Ben

    2011-01-01

    Ustilago maydis, the fungal pathogen of maize, undergoes a dimorphic transition from budding yeast-like growth to filamentous growth, both as part of its program for pathogenesis and distinctly, in response to environmental cues, such as acid pH or low nitrogen availability. Smu1 is a p21-activated protein kinase (PAK) with roles in both the mating response required for the former function, as well as for the nutrient response. Hsl7 may be a negative regulator of Smu1 and appears to play a role in cell length and cell cycle.  Additional proteins that participate in cell polarity and filamentation pathways include the small G protein, Rac1, and its effector PAK kinase, Cla4. Here we describe further experiments that explore the roles of Cla4 and Rac1 in the response to nitrogen availability. While deletion of rac1severely delays filamentous growth on solid media low in ammonium (SLAD), we found that deletion of cla4 does not abolish filamentous cell morphology on solid SLAD. Unexpectedly, however, the Dcla4 mutants also filament in liquid SLAD. The filamentous cell morphology of the cla4 mutant in liquid SLAD has only been seen previously for one other mutant, a strain deleted for hsl7 that simultaneously over-expresses smu1.  PMID:22446524

  5. Formation of a compound flux rope by the merging of two filament channels, the associated dynamics, and its stability

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Inoue, Satoshi; Magara, Tetsuya E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of compound flux rope formation, which occurred on 2014 January 1, via merging of two nearby filament channels, the associated dynamics, and its stability using multiwavelength data. We also discuss the dynamics of cool and hot plasma moving along the newly formed compound flux rope. The merging started after the interaction between the southern leg of the northward filament and the northern leg of the southward filament at ≈01:21 UT and continued until a compound flux rope formed at ≈01:33 UT. During the merging, the cool filament plasma heated up and started to move along both sides of the compound flux rope, i.e., toward the north (≈265 km s{sup –1}) and south (≈118 km s{sup –1}) from the point of merging. After traveling a distance of ≈150 Mm toward the north, the plasma cooled down and started to return back to the south (≈14 km s{sup –1}) after ≈02:00 UT. The observations provide a clear example of compound flux rope formation via merging of two different flux ropes and the occurrence of a flare through tether cutting reconnection. However, the compound flux rope remained stable in the corona and had a confined eruption. The coronal magnetic field decay index measurements revealed that both the filaments and the compound flux rope axis lie within the stability domain (decay index <1.5), which may be the possible cause for their stability. The present study also deals with the relationship between the filament's chirality (sinistral) and the helicity (positive) of the surrounding flux rope.

  6. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5'-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  7. A numerical study of multi filament formation in metal-ion based CBRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berco, Dan; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the underlying mechanisms of multiple conductive filaments (CF) creation in metal-ion based conductive bridge RRAM (CBRAM) by using the Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm and suggests a possible explanation for this phenomenon. The simulation method is demonstrated over a Cu/HfO2 structure, starting from a random initial distribution of oxygen vacancies (OV) defects in the resistive switching layer, to a formed CF and ending in a ruptured state. the results indicate that "Hot Spots" (HS), where agglomeration of OV trap like states for electron hopping based conduction induce local heating, create favorable energy conditions to attract diffused metal species originating from the top electrode. While HS may be created and annihilated by random OV generation and recombination processes, the precipitated metal forms a stem out of which a CF could evolve. The CF stem's final growth stage is mainly driven by drift and diffusion. This process may lead to the formation of one or more CFs as a function of the forming bias voltage. This bias dependence is demonstrated over a large range, where the creation of a single, double and multiple CFs are shown. In addition, the reset process of the multi CF device is presented, and the experimentally observed, step like, gradual CBRAM reset is verified. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental data and promote the idea that OV defect engineering may be used to improve CBRAM performance.

  8. Formation of mesoscopic metallic filaments in manganite thin films imaged by microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Yang, Yongliang; Ma, Yue; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Nakamura, Masao; Sheng, Zhigao; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshi

    2012-02-01

    We study the ferromagnetic metallic domains from the charge-order insulating background at mesoscopic length scale in a Pr0.55Ca0.75Sr0.25MnO3 thin film using a variable temperature microwave impedance microscope (MIM). The metallic state in this compound can be easily induced at a moderate magnetic field as low as 2 T observed by both the transport and MIM. The temperature dependent transport under 1.2 T shows a large hysteresis loop. MIM allows us to observe the formation and melting of metallic domains at different temperatures during the cooling and warming processes. At higher temperatures, the metallic domains first emerge in small isolated filaments along certain crystal axes of the LSAT(110) substrate, suggesting that the local strain plays an important role. Surprisingly, small insulating islands remain in the metallic ground state and persist up to very high magnetic fields, indicating strong pining sites. Lastly, the sizes of the insulating islands at the ground state increase when the film is field cooled at lower speeds, suggesting s glassy order in this compound.

  9. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R.; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y.; Rhee, Jeong S.; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A.T.; Lyons, David A.; Simons, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Summary During central nervous system development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multi-lamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/Cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading. PMID:26166299

  10. The IQGAP1 Protein Is a Calmodulin-regulated Barbed End Capper of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan-Conchaudron, Andrea; Le Clainche, Christophe; Didry, Dominique; Carlier, Marie-France

    2011-01-01

    IQGAP1 is a large modular protein that displays multiple partnership and is thought to act as a scaffold in coupling cell signaling to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in cell migration, adhesion, and cytokinesis. However the molecular mechanisms underlying the activities of IQGAP1 are poorly understood in part because of its large size, poor solubility and lack of functional assays to challenge biochemical properties in various contexts. We have purified bacterially expressed recombinant human IQGAP1. The protein binds Cdc42, Rac1, and the CRIB domain of N-WASP in a calmodulin-sensitive fashion. We further show that in addition to bundling of filaments via a single N-terminal calponin-homology domain, IQGAP1 actually regulates actin assembly. It caps barbed ends, with a higher affinity for ADP-bound terminal subunits (KB = 4 nm). The barbed end capping activity is inhibited by calmodulin, consistent with calmodulin binding to IQGAP1 with a KC of 40 nm, both in the absence and presence of Ca2+ ions. The barbed end capping activity resides in the C-terminal half of IQGAP1. It is possible that the capping activity of IQGAP1 accounts for its stimulation of cell migration. We further find that bacterially expressed recombinant IQGAP1 fragments easily co-purify with nucleic acids that turn out to activate N-WASP protein to branch filaments with Arp2/3 complex. The present results open perspectives for tackling the function of IQGAP1 in more complex reconstituted systems. PMID:21730051

  11. The heptad repeats region is essential for AcMNPV P10 filament formation and not the proline-rich or the C-terminus basic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chunsheng; Deng Fei; Li Dan; Wang Hualin; Hu Zhihong

    2007-09-01

    Baculovirus P10 protein is a small conserved protein and is expressed as bundles of filaments in the host cell during the late phase of virus infection. So far the published results on the domain responsible for filament structural formation have been contradictory. Electron microscopy revealed that the C-terminus basic region was involved in filament structural formation in the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) [van Oers, M.M., Flipsen, J.T., Reusken, C.B., Sliwinsky, E.L., Vlak, J.M., 1993. Functional domains of the p10 protein of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedorsis virus. J. Gen. Virol. 74, 563-574.]. While in the Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), the heptad repeats region but not the C-terminus domain was proven to be responsible for filament formation [Dong, C., Li, D., Long, G., Deng, F., Wang, H., Hu, Z., 2005. Identification of functional domains required for HearNPV P10 filament formation. Virology 338, 112-120.]. In this manuscript, fluorescence confocal microscopy was applied to study AcMNPV P10 filament formation. A set of plasmids containing different P10 structural domains fused with a fluorescent protein were constructed and transfected into Sf-9 cells. The data indicated that the heptad repeats region, but not the proline-rich region or the C-terminus basic region, is essential for AcMNPV P10 filament formation. Co-transfection of P10s tagged with different fluorescent revealed that P10s with defective heptad repeats region could not interact with intact heptad repeats region or even full-length P10s to form filament structure. Within the heptad repeats region, deletion of the three amino acids spacing of AcMNPV P10 appeared to have no significant impact on the formation of filament structures, but the content of the heptad repeats region appeared to play a role in the morphology of the filaments.

  12. The Role of Candida albicans SPT20 in Filamentation, Biofilm Formation and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Wang, Yan; Chen, Weiping; J. Yuen, Grace; Chen, Rosalyn B.; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Anastassopoulou, Cleo; Pukkila-Worley, Read; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a ubiquitous fungus, which can cause very serious and sometimes life-threatening infections in susceptible patients. We used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host to screen a library of C. albicans mutants for decreased virulence and identified SPT20 as important for virulence. The transcription co-activator SPT20 was identified originally as a suppressor of Ty and solo δ insertion mutations, which can cause transcription defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is resistant to the toxicity caused by overexpression of GAL4-VP16. We constructed a C. albicans spt20Δ/Δ mutant and found the spt20Δ/Δ strain was significantly less virulent than the wild-type strain SC5314 in C. elegans (p < 0.0001), Galleria mellonella (p < 0.01) and mice (p < 0.001). Morphologically, spt20Δ/Δ mutant cells demonstrated a “snow-flake” shape and clustered together; prolonged culture times resulted in increased size of the cluster. The clustered morphology was associated with defects in nuclei distribution, as the nuclei were not observed in many cellular compartments. In addition, the C. albicans spt20Δ/Δ mutant resulted in defects in hyphae and biofilm formation (compared to the wild-type strain, p < 0.05), and sensitivity to cell wall and osmotic stressors, and to antifungal agents. Thus our study demonstrated a role of C. albicans SPT20 in overall morphology and distribution of nuclear material, which may cause the defects in filamentation and biofilm formation directly when this gene is deleted. PMID:24732310

  13. In Vitro Analysis of Finasteride Activity against Candida albicans Urinary Biofilm Formation and Filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Lown, Livia; Jahng, Maximillian; Walraven, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the 3rd most common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, with a strong propensity to form drug-resistant catheter-related biofilms. Due to the limited efficacy of available antifungals against biofilms, drug repurposing has been investigated in order to identify novel agents with activities against fungal biofilms. Finasteride is a 5-α-reductase inhibitor commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, with activity against human type II and III isoenzymes. We analyzed the Candida Genome Database and identified a C. albicans homolog of type III 5-α-reductase, Dfg10p, which shares 27% sequence identity and 41% similarity to the human type III 5-α-reductase. Thus, we investigated finasteride for activity against C. albicans urinary biofilms, alone and in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole. Finasteride alone was highly effective in the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation at doses of ≥16 mg/liter and the treatment of preformed biofilms at doses of ≥128 mg/liter. In biofilm checkerboard analyses, finasteride exhibited synergistic activity in the prevention of biofilm formation in a combination of 4 mg/liter finasteride with 2 mg/liter fluconazole. Finasteride inhibited filamentation, thus suggesting a potential mechanism of action. These results indicate that finasteride alone is highly active in the prevention of C. albicans urinary biofilms in vitro and has synergistic activity in combination with fluconazole. Further investigation of the clinical utility of finasteride in the prevention of urinary candidiasis is warranted. PMID:25049253

  14. FROM THE CONVERGENCE OF FILAMENTS TO DISK-OUTFLOW ACCRETION: MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN W33A

    SciTech Connect

    Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Zhang Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Zapata, Luis A.; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2010-12-10

    Interferometric observations of the W33A massive star formation region, performed with the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array at resolutions from 5'' (0.1 pc) to 0.''5 (0.01 pc), are presented. Our three main findings are: (1) parsec-scale, filamentary structures of cold molecular gas are detected. Two filaments at different velocities intersect in the zone where the star formation is occurring. This is consistent with triggering of the star formation activity by the convergence of such filaments, as predicted by numerical simulations of star formation initiated by converging flows. (2) The two dusty cores (MM1 and MM2) at the intersection of the filaments are found to be at different evolutionary stages, and each of them is resolved into multiple condensations. MM1 and MM2 have markedly different temperatures, continuum spectral indices, molecular-line spectra, and masses of both stars and gas. (3) The dynamics of the 'hot-core' MM1 indicates the presence of a rotating disk in its center (MM1-Main) around a faint free-free source. The stellar mass is estimated to be {approx}10 M{sub sun}. A massive molecular outflow is observed along the rotation axis of the disk.

  15. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Pedro J.; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    abstract As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments (“scaffolding”) appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  16. Multiple roles for keratin intermediate filaments in the regulation of epithelial barrier function and apico-basal polarity.

    PubMed

    Salas, Pedro J; Forteza, Radia; Mashukova, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    As multicellular organisms evolved a family of cytoskeletal proteins, the keratins (types I and II) expressed in epithelial cells diversified in more than 20 genes in vertebrates. There is no question that keratin filaments confer mechanical stiffness to cells. However, such a number of genes can hardly be explained by evolutionary advantages in mechanical features. The use of transgenic mouse models has revealed unexpected functional relationships between keratin intermediate filaments and intracellular signaling. Accordingly, loss of keratins or mutations in keratins that cause or predispose to human diseases, result in increased sensitivity to apoptosis, regulation of innate immunity, permeabilization of tight junctions, and mistargeting of apical proteins in different epithelia. Precise mechanistic explanations for these phenomena are still lacking. However, immobilization of membrane or cytoplasmic proteins, including chaperones, on intermediate filaments ("scaffolding") appear as common molecular mechanisms and may explain the need for so many different keratin genes in vertebrates. PMID:27583190

  17. Cores, filaments, and bundles: hierarchical core formation in the L1495/B213 Taurus region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacar, A.; Tafalla, M.; Kauffmann, J.; Kovács, A.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Core condensation is a critical step in the star-formation process, but it is still poorly characterized observationally. Aims: We have studied the 10 pc-long L1495/B213 complex in Taurus to investigate how dense cores have condensed out of the lower density cloud material. Methods: We observed L1495/B213 in C18O(1-0), N2H+(1-0), and SO(JN = 32-21) with the 14 m FCRAO telescope, and complemented the data with dust continuum observations using APEX (870 μm) and IRAM 30 m (1200 μm). Results: From the N2H+ emission, we identify 19 dense cores, some starless and some protostellar. They are not distributed uniformly, but tend to cluster with relative separations on the order of 0.25 pc. From the C18O emission, we identify multiple velocity components in the gas. We have characterized them by fitting Gaussians to the spectra and by studying the distribution of the fits in position-position-velocity space. In this space, the C18O components appear as velocity-coherent structures, and we identify them automatically using a dedicated algorithm (FIVE: Friends In VElocity). Using this algorithm, we identify 35 filamentary components with typical lengths of 0.5 pc, sonic internal velocity dispersions, and mass-per-unit length close to the stability threshold of isothermal cylinders at 10 K. Core formation seems to have occurred inside the filamentary components via fragmentation, with few fertile components with higher mass-per-unit length being responsible for most cores in the cloud. On large scales, the filamentary components appear grouped into families, which we refer to as bundles. Conclusions: Core formation in L1495/B213 has proceeded by hierarchical fragmentation. The cloud fragmented first into several pc-scale regions. Each of these regions later fragmented into velocity-coherent filaments of about 0.5 pc in length. Finally, a small number of these filaments fragmented quasi-statically and produced the individual dense cores we see today. Based on

  18. Formation of filamentous aerobic granules: role of pH and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Yang, Xue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Zhang, Qinlan; Li, Jieni; Liu, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Filamentous overgrowth in aerobic granular sludge processes can cause reactor failure. In this work, aerobic granules were cultivated in five identical sequencing batch reactors with acetate or glucose as the carbon source with various values of influent pH (4.5-8). Microscopic observations revealed that acidic pH, rather than the species of carbon source, epistatically controls the aerobic granules with filamentous structure. An acidic pH shifted the structure of the microbial community in the granules, such that the fungus Geotrichum fragrans was the predominant filamentous microorganism therein. The acidic pH reduced the intracellular cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) content for increasing the motility of the bacteria to washout and increase the growth rate of G. fragrans on glucose or acetate, together causing overgrowth of the fungus. Maintaining the suspension under alkaline condition is proposed as an effective way to suppress filamentous overgrowth and maintain granule stability. PMID:24928656

  19. Filament formation and erasure in molybdenum oxide during resistive switching cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Masaki; Arita, Masashi Ohno, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-10-27

    In-situ filament observations were carried out on the Cu/MoO{sub x}/TiN resistive random access memory (ReRAM) by using transmission electron microscopy. Multiple positive and negative I-V cycles were investigated. Clear set-reset bipolar switch corresponding to the characteristics of conventional ReRAM devices was recognized. Filament grew from TiN to Cu in the set cycle and shrank from TiN to Cu in the reset cycle. However, there was no clear contrast change in the image at the switching moment, and thus, switching is thought to occur in a local region of the filament. When the current was large at reset, the filament shrank much, and its position tended to change.

  20. From diffuse ISM to cores : formation of molecular clouds, filaments and prestellar condensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, P.

    2012-03-01

    I will review the various processes and subsequent steps that theorists believe to be triggering the evolution of the diffuse interstellar medium into prestellar condensations. More precisely, I will first describe the mechanisms through which molecular clouds form out of the diffuse atomic gas, then the various possible origins of filaments within molecular clouds and finally how self-gravitating prestellar cores form inside molecular clouds and their possible link to filaments.

  1. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species.

  2. Regulation of cellulase gene expression in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed Central

    Ilmén, M; Saloheimo, A; Onnela, M L; Penttilä, M E

    1997-01-01

    Basic features of regulation of expression of the genes encoding the cellulases of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei QM9414, the genes cbh1 and cbh2 encoding cellobiohydrolases and the genes egl1, egl2 and egl5 encoding endoglucanases, were studied at the mRNA level. The cellulase genes were coordinately expressed under all conditions studied, with the steady-state mRNA levels of cbh1 being the highest. Solka floc cellulose and the disaccharide sophorose induced expression to almost the same level. Moderate expression was observed when cellobiose or lactose was used as the carbon source. It was found that glycerol and sorbitol do not promote expression but, unlike glucose, do not inhibit it either, because the addition of 1 to 2 mM sophorose to glycerol or sorbitol cultures provokes high cellulase expression levels. These carbon sources thus provide a useful means to study cellulase regulation without significantly affecting the growth of the fungus. RNA slot blot experiments showed that no expression could be observed on glucose-containing medium and that high glucose levels abolish the inducing effect of sophorose. The results clearly show that distinct and clear-cut mechanisms of induction and glucose repression regulate cellulase expression in an actively growing fungus. However, derepression of cellulase expression occurs without apparent addition of an inducer once glucose has been depleted from the medium. This expression seems not to arise simply from starvation, since the lack of carbon or nitrogen as such is not sufficient to trigger significant expression. PMID:9097427

  3. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  4. Mechanisms of leiomodin 2-mediated regulation of actin filament in muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Kondrashkina, Elena; Ma, Jianpeng; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Leiomodin (Lmod) is a class of potent tandem-G-actin–binding nucleators in muscle cells. Lmod mutations, deletion, or instability are linked to lethal nemaline myopathy. However, the lack of high-resolution structures of Lmod nucleators in action severely hampered our understanding of their essential cellular functions. Here we report the crystal structure of the actin–Lmod2162–495 nucleus. The structure contains two actin subunits connected by one Lmod2162–495 molecule in a non–filament-like conformation. Complementary functional studies suggest that the binding of Lmod2 stimulates ATP hydrolysis and accelerates actin nucleation and polymerization. The high level of conservation among Lmod proteins in sequence and functions suggests that the mechanistic insights of human Lmod2 uncovered here may aid in a molecular understanding of other Lmod proteins. Furthermore, our structural and mechanistic studies unraveled a previously unrecognized level of regulation in mammalian signal transduction mediated by certain tandem-G-actin–binding nucleators. PMID:26417072

  5. Dynamic Filament Formation by a Divergent Bacterial Actin-Like ParM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, Anthony J.; Jensen, Slade O.; Barton, Deborah A.; Davies, Danielle S.; Overall, Robyn L.; Skurray, Ronald A.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Actin-like proteins (Alps) are a diverse family of proteins whose genes are abundant in the chromosomes and mobile genetic elements of many bacteria. The low-copy-number staphylococcal multiresistance plasmid pSK41 encodes ParM, an Alp involved in efficient plasmid partitioning. pSK41 ParM has previously been shown to form filaments in vitro that are structurally dissimilar to those formed by other bacterial Alps. The mechanistic implications of these differences are not known. In order to gain insights into the properties and behavior of the pSK41 ParM Alp in vivo, we reconstituted the parMRC system in the ectopic rod-shaped host, E. coli, which is larger and more genetically amenable than the native host, Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence microscopy showed a functional fusion protein, ParM-YFP, formed straight filaments in vivo when expressed in isolation. Strikingly, however, in the presence of ParR and parC, ParM-YFP adopted a dramatically different structure, instead forming axial curved filaments. Time-lapse imaging and selective photobleaching experiments revealed that, in the presence of all components of the parMRC system, ParM-YFP filaments were dynamic in nature. Finally, molecular dissection of the parMRC operon revealed that all components of the system are essential for the generation of dynamic filaments. PMID:27310470

  6. Regulation of the acuF Gene, Encoding Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Draht, Oliver W.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key enzyme required for gluconeogenesis when microorganisms grow on carbon sources metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Aspergillus nidulans acuF mutants isolated by their inability to use acetate as a carbon source specifically lack PEPCK. The acuF gene has been cloned and shown to encode a protein with high similarity to PEPCK from bacteria, plants, and fungi. The regulation of acuF expression has been studied by Northern blotting and by the construction of lacZ fusion reporters. Induction by acetate is abolished in mutants unable to metabolize acetate via the TCA cycle, and induction by amino acids metabolized via 2-oxoglutarate is lost in mutants unable to form 2-oxoglutarate. Induction by acetate and proline is not additive, consistent with a single mechanism of induction. Malate and succinate result in induction, and it is proposed that PEPCK is controlled by a novel mechanism of induction by a TCA cycle intermediate or derivative, thereby allowing gluconeogenesis to occur during growth on any carbon source metabolized via the TCA cycle. It has been shown that the facB gene, which mediates acetate induction of enzymes specifically required for acetate utilization, is not directly involved in PEPCK induction. This is in contrast to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Cat8p and Sip4p, homologs of FacB, regulate PEPCK as well as the expression of other genes necessary for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources in response to the carbon source present. This difference in the control of gluconeogenesis reflects the ability of A. nidulans and other filamentous fungi to use a wide variety of carbon sources in comparison with S. cerevisiae. The acuF gene was also found to be subject to activation by the CCAAT binding protein AnCF, a protein homologous to the S. cerevisiae Hap complex and the mammalian NFY complex. PMID:11741859

  7. Interference of amino-terminal desmin fragments with desmin filament formation.

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Sharma, Sarika; Kleiner, Helga; Mücke, Norbert; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Katus, Hugo A; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2009-11-01

    Short polypeptides from intermediate filament (IF) proteins containing one of the two IF-consensus motifs interfere severely with filament assembly in vitro. We now have systematically investigated a series of larger fragments of the muscle-specific IF protein desmin representing entire functional domains such as coil1 or coil 2. "Half molecules" comprising the amino-terminal portion of desmin, such as DesDeltaC240 and the "tagged" derivative Des(ESA)DeltaC244, assembled into large, roundish aggregates already at low ionic strength, DesDeltaC250 formed extended, relatively uniform filaments, whereas DesDeltaC265 and DesDeltaC300 were soluble under these conditions. Surprisingly, all mutant desmin fragments assembled very rapidly into long thick filaments or spacious aggregates when the ionic strength was raised to standard assembly conditions. In contrast, when these desmin mutants were assembled in the presence of wild-type (WT) desmin, their assembly properties were completely changed: The elongation of the two shorter desmin fragments was completely inhibited by WT desmin, whereas DesDeltaC250, DesDeltaC265 and DesDeltaC300 coassembled with desmin into filaments, but these mixed filaments were distinctly disturbed and exhibited a very different phenotype for each mutant. After transfection into fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, the truncated mutant Des (ESA)DeltaC244 localized largely to the cytoplasm, as revealed by a tag-specific monoclonal antibody, and also partially colocalized there with the collapsed endogenous vimentin and desmin systems indicating its interference with IF-organizing processes. In contrast, in cells without an authentic cytoplasmic IF system such as line SW13, Des(ESA)DeltaC242 entered the nucleus and was deposited in small dot-like structures in chromatin-free spaces without any noticeable effect on nuclear morphology. PMID:19530175

  8. Formation of current filaments and magnetic field generation in a quantum current-carrying plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Taghadosi, M. R.; Majedi, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability and magnetic field in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the presence of quantum effects using the quantum hydrodynamic model. A new nonlinear partial differential equation is obtained for the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic field in the diffusion regime. This equation is solved by applying the Adomian decomposition method, and then the profiles of magnetic field and electron density are plotted. It is shown that the saturation time of filamentation instability increases and, consequently, the instability growth rate and the magnetic field amplitude decrease in the presence of quantum effects.

  9. How Galactic Environment Regulates Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidt, Sharon E.

    2016-02-01

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  10. Liprin-α1 is a regulator of vimentin intermediate filament network in the cancer cell adhesion machinery

    PubMed Central

    Pehkonen, Henna; von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Grenman, Reidar; Lehti, Kaisa; Monni, Outi

    2016-01-01

    PPFIA1 is located at the 11q13 region, which is one of the most commonly amplified regions in several epithelial cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma. Considering the location of PPFIA1 in this amplicon, we examined whether protein encoded by PPFIA1, liprin-α1, possesses oncogenic properties in relevant carcinoma cell lines. Our results indicate that liprin-α1 localizes to different adhesion and cytoskeletal structures to regulate vimentin intermediate filament network, thereby altering the invasion and growth properties of the cancer cells. In non-invasive cells liprin-α1 promotes expansive growth behavior with limited invasive capacity, whereas in invasive cells liprin-α1 has significant impact on mesenchymal cancer cell invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Current results identify liprin-α1 as a novel regulator of the tumor cell intermediate filaments with differential oncogenic properties in actively proliferating or motile cells. PMID:27075696

  11. The Rapid Formation of a Filament Caused by Magnetic Reconnection between Two Sets of Dark Threadlike Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Yu, Shunping; Xu, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of the high spatiotemporal resolution observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present rare observations of the rapid formation of a filament caused by magnetic reconnection between two sets of dark threadlike structures. The two sets of dark threadlike structures belong to distinct flux systems with their adjacent ends anchored in an opposite-polarity magnetic field region, where the calculated photospheric velocity field shows that converging flows dominate there. Due to the converging flows, opposite-polarity magnetic flux converged and then canceled, leading to the formation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) brightening that spread in opposite directions along the spine of the dark threadlike structures. Meanwhile, very weak remote brightening in the other terminals of the dark threadlike structures, as well as EUV loops, which rooted in the opposite-polarity magnetic field region, appeared. In addition, all of the AIA Fe line observations reveal that a flux rope was formed and underwent a rolling motion during the fadeaway of the EUV brightening. Soon after, as the EUV brightening disappeared, a filament that is very likely composed of two sets of intertwined dark threadlike structures was formed. Via differential emission measure (EM) analysis, it is found that both the EM and temperature of the plasma around the flux-canceling site increased during the brightening, implying that there, magnetic reconnection may occur to heat the plasma. These observations provide evidence that the filament is formed by magnetic reconnection associated with flux convergence and cancellation, and the magnetic structure of the filament is most likely a flux rope.

  12. The role of Bni5 in the regulation of septin higher-order structure formation.

    PubMed

    Patasi, Csilla; Godočíková, Jana; Michlíková, Soňa; Nie, Yan; Káčeriková, Radka; Kválová, Katarína; Raunser, Stefan; Farkašovský, Marian

    2015-12-01

    Septins are a family of conserved cytoskeletal proteins playing an essential role in cytokinesis and in many other cellular processes in fungi and animals. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, septins form filaments and higher-order structures at the mother-bud neck depending on the particular stage of the cell cycle. Septin structures at the division plane serve as a scaffold to recruit the proteins required for particular cellular processes. The formation and localization of septin structures at particular stages of the cell cycle also determine functionality of these proteins. Many different proteins participate in regulating septin assembly. Despite recent developments, we are only beginning to understand how specific protein-protein interactions lead to changes in the polymerization of septin filaments or assembly of higher-order structures. Here, using fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that Bni5 crosslinks septin filaments into networks by bridging pairs or multiple filaments, forming structures that resemble railways. Furthermore, Bni5 appears to be a substrate of the Elm1 protein kinase in vitro. Moreover, Elm1 induces in the presence of Bni5 disassembly of long septin filaments, suggesting that these proteins may participate in the hourglass to double ring transition. This work gives new insight into the regulatory role of Bni5 in the structural changes of septins. PMID:26351911

  13. Chaperonin filaments: The archaeal cytoskeleton?

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, Eric; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1997-01-01

    Chaperonins are high molecular mass double-ring structures composed of 60-kDa protein subunits. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae the two chaperonin proteins represent ≈4% of its total protein and have a combined intracellular concentration of >30 mg/ml. At concentrations ≥ 0.5 mg/ml purified chaperonins form filaments in the presence of Mg2+ and nucleotides. Filament formation requires nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), and occurs at physiological temperatures in biologically relevant buffers, including a buffer made from cell extracts. These observations suggest that chaperonin filaments may exist in vivo and the estimated 4600 chaperonins per cell suggest that such filaments could form an extensive cytostructure. We observed filamentous structures in unfixed, uranyl-acetate-stained S. shibatae cells, which resemble the chaperonin filaments in size and appearance. ImmunoGold (Janssen) labeling using chaperonin antibodies indicated that many chaperonins are associated with insoluble cellular structures and these structures appear to be filamentous in some areas, although they could not be uranyl-acetate-stained. The existence of chaperonin filaments in vivo suggests a mechanism whereby their protein-folding activities can be regulated. More generally, the filaments themselves may play a cytoskeletal role in Archaea. PMID:9144246

  14. The Ustilago maydis Nit2 Homolog Regulates Nitrogen Utilization and Is Required for Efficient Induction of Filamentous Growth

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Robin J.; Zeh, Christine; Saur, Alexandra; Sonnewald, Sophia; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) is a regulatory strategy found in microorganisms that restricts the utilization of complex and unfavored nitrogen sources in the presence of favored nitrogen sources. In fungi, this concept has been best studied in yeasts and filamentous ascomycetes, where the GATA transcription factors Gln3p and Gat1p (in yeasts) and Nit2/AreA (in ascomycetes) constitute the main positive regulators of NCR. The reason why functional Nit2 homologs of some phytopathogenic fungi are required for full virulence in their hosts has remained elusive. We have identified the Nit2 homolog in the basidiomycetous phytopathogen Ustilago maydis and show that it is a major, but not the exclusive, positive regulator of nitrogen utilization. By transcriptome analysis of sporidia grown on artificial media devoid of favored nitrogen sources, we show that only a subset of nitrogen-responsive genes are regulated by Nit2, including the Gal4-like transcription factor Ton1 (a target of Nit2). Ustilagic acid biosynthesis is not under the control of Nit2, while nitrogen starvation-induced filamentous growth is largely dependent on functional Nit2. nit2 deletion mutants show the delayed initiation of filamentous growth on maize leaves and exhibit strongly compromised virulence, demonstrating that Nit2 is required to efficiently initiate the pathogenicity program of U. maydis. PMID:22247264

  15. The Ustilago maydis Nit2 homolog regulates nitrogen utilization and is required for efficient induction of filamentous growth.

    PubMed

    Horst, Robin J; Zeh, Christine; Saur, Alexandra; Sonnewald, Sophia; Sonnewald, Uwe; Voll, Lars M

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) is a regulatory strategy found in microorganisms that restricts the utilization of complex and unfavored nitrogen sources in the presence of favored nitrogen sources. In fungi, this concept has been best studied in yeasts and filamentous ascomycetes, where the GATA transcription factors Gln3p and Gat1p (in yeasts) and Nit2/AreA (in ascomycetes) constitute the main positive regulators of NCR. The reason why functional Nit2 homologs of some phytopathogenic fungi are required for full virulence in their hosts has remained elusive. We have identified the Nit2 homolog in the basidiomycetous phytopathogen Ustilago maydis and show that it is a major, but not the exclusive, positive regulator of nitrogen utilization. By transcriptome analysis of sporidia grown on artificial media devoid of favored nitrogen sources, we show that only a subset of nitrogen-responsive genes are regulated by Nit2, including the Gal4-like transcription factor Ton1 (a target of Nit2). Ustilagic acid biosynthesis is not under the control of Nit2, while nitrogen starvation-induced filamentous growth is largely dependent on functional Nit2. nit2 deletion mutants show the delayed initiation of filamentous growth on maize leaves and exhibit strongly compromised virulence, demonstrating that Nit2 is required to efficiently initiate the pathogenicity program of U. maydis. PMID:22247264

  16. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS. PMID:26552991

  17. Formation of dense structures induced by filament collisions. Correlation of density, kinematics, and magnetic field in the Pipe nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.; Onishi, T.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The Pipe nebula is a molecular cloud that lacks star formation feedback and has a relatively simple morphology and velocity structure. This makes it an ideal target for testing cloud evolution through collisions. Aims: We aim at drawing a comprehensive picture of this relatively simple cloud to better understand the formation and evolution of molecular clouds on large scales. Methods: We use archival data to compare the optical polarization properties, the visual extinction, and the 13CO velocities and linewidths of the entire cloud in order to identify trends among the observables. Results: The Pipe nebula can be roughly divided into two filaments with different orientations and gas velocity ranges: E-W at 2-4 km s-1 and N-S at 6-7 km s-1. The two filaments overlap at the bowl, where the gas shows a velocity gradient spanning from 2 to 7 km s-1. Compared to the rest of the Pipe nebula, the bowl gas appears to be denser and exhibits larger linewidths. In addition, the polarization data at the bowl shows lower angular dispersion and higher polarization degree. Cores in the bowl tend to cluster in space and to follow the 13CO velocity gradient. In the stem, cores tend to cluster in regions with properties similar to those of the bowl. Conclusions: The velocity pattern points to a collision between the filaments in the bowl region. The magnetic field seems to be compressed and strengthened in the shocked region. The proportional increase in density and magnetic field strength by a factor similar to the Alfvénic Mach number suggests a continuous shock at low Alfvénic Mach number under the flux-freezing condition. Shocked regions seem to enhance the formation and clustering of dense cores. A movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Hormonal and Local Regulation of Bone Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canalis, Ernesto

    1985-01-01

    Reviews effects of hormones, systemic factors, and local regulators on bone formation. Identifies and explains the impact on bone growth of several hormones as well as the components of systemic and local systems. Concentrates on bone collagen and DNA synthesis. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  19. The identification of filaments on far-infrared and submillimiter images: Morphology, physical conditions and relation with star formation of filamentary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schisano, E.; Carey, S.; Paladini, R.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Busquet, G.; Billot, N.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Glover, S. C. O.; Vázquez-Semadeni, E.

    2014-08-10

    Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary, rather than spherical geometries. The association of pre- and proto-stellar cores with the filaments suggests a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires representative samples from different environments for an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic, filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ∼500 filaments, in the longitude range of l = 216.°5 to l = 225.°5, with lengths from ∼1 pc up to ∼30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} and 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N{sub H{sub 2}} > 6 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.

  20. The Identification of Filaments on Far-infrared and Submillimiter Images: Morphology, Physical Conditions and Relation with Star Formation of Filamentary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schisano, E.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Molinari, S.; Busquet, G.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Polychroni, D.; Billot, N.; Carey, S.; Paladini, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Glover, S. C. O.; Vázquez-Semadeni, E.

    2014-08-01

    Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary, rather than spherical geometries. The association of pre- and proto-stellar cores with the filaments suggests a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires representative samples from different environments for an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic, filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ~500 filaments, in the longitude range of l = 216.°5 to l = 225.°5, with lengths from ~1 pc up to ~30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 1020 cm-2 and 1022 cm-2. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N_H_{2} > 6 × 1021 cm-2. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.

  1. Modelling of oxygen vacancy aggregates in monoclinic HfO2: can they contribute to conductive filament formation?

    PubMed

    Bradley, Samuel R; Bersuker, Gennadi; Shluger, Alexander L

    2015-10-21

    Formation of metal rich conductive filaments and their rearrangements determine the switching characteristics in HfO2 based resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices. The initiation of a filament formation process may occur either via aggregation of pre-existing vacancies randomly distributed in the oxide or via generation of new oxygen vacancies close to the pre-existing ones. We evaluate the feasibility of vacancy aggregation processes by calculating the structures and binding energies of oxygen vacancy aggregates consisting of 2, 3 and 4 vacancies in bulk monoclinic (m)-HfO2 using density functional theory (DFT). We demonstrate that formation of neutral oxygen vacancy aggregates is accompanied by small energy gain, which depends on the size and shape of the aggregate. In the most strongly bound configurations, vacancies are unscreened by Hf cations and form voids within the crystal, with the larger aggregates having larger binding energy per vacancy (-0.11 to  -0.18 eV). The negatively charged di-vacancy was found to have similar binding energies to the neutral one, while the positively charged di-vacancy was found to be unstable. Thus aggregation process of either neutral or negatively charged oxygen vacancies is energetically feasible. PMID:26414778

  2. Formation of an actin-like filament concurrent with the enzymatic synthesis of inorganic polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-García, María R.; Kornberg, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (poly P), a chain of hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in every cell in nature and is commonly produced from ATP by poly P kinases (e.g., PPK1). Dictyostelium discoideum, the social slime mold, possesses a PPK activity (DdPPK1) with sequence similarity to bacterial PPKs. We find here a previously unrecognized PPK (DdPPK2) in D. discoideum with the sequences and properties of actin-related proteins (Arps) that are similar to muscle actins in size, properties, and globular-filamentous structural transitions. Significantly, the unique actin inhibitors, phalloidin and DNase I, also inhibit synthesis of poly P by DdPPK2. Thus, this particular Arp complex is an enzyme that can polymerize into an actin-like filament concurrent with its synthesis of a poly P chain in a fully reversible reaction. PMID:15496465

  3. Non-muscle myosin-II-B filament regulation of paracellular resistance in cervical epithelial cells is associated with modulation of the cortical acto-myosin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Gorodeski, George

    2007-01-01

    Objective To understand myosin regulation of epithelial permeability. Methods Experimental study, using human cervical epithelial cells CaSki. Endpoints were paracellular permeability (determined in terms of transepithelial electrical resistance); non-muscle myosin-II-B (NMM-II-B) cellular localization; NMM-II-B phosphorylation status; NMM-II-B – actin interaction (determined in-vitro by the immunoprecipitation-immunoreactivity method); and NMM-II-B filamentation (determined in-vitro using purified NMM-II-B filaments in terms of filaments disassembly / assembly ratios. Results Treatment of cells with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 or with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid decreased the Resistance of the Lateral Intercellular Space (RLIS), and increased phosphorylation of non-muscle myosin-II-B (NMM-II-B) on threonine and serine residues. Y-27632 induced disorganization of the cortical acto-myosin and decreased co-immunoprecipitation of actin with NMM-II-B. Homodimerization assays using NMM-II-B filaments from cells treated with Y-27632 or okadaic acid revealed decreased filamentation compared to control cells. However, okadaic acid blocked Y-27632 decreased filamentation. Treatment with DRB, CK2 inhibitor, induced opposing effects to those of Y-27632 and okadaic acid. Treatment with DRB did not involve modulation of actin depolymerization, suggesting that NMM-II-B regulation of the RLIS was independent of actin polymerization status. Exposure of NMM-II-B filaments to CK2 increased filamentation, regardless of prior treatments in-vivo with Y-27632, okadaic acid, or DRB. Conclusions The results suggest that NMM-II-B filaments are in steady-state equilibrium of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mediated by CK2 and by ROCK-regulated myosin heavy chain phosphatase, respectively. Increased phosphorylation would tend to inhibit assembly of NMM-II-B filaments and lead to decreased actin-myosin interaction, which would tend to decrease the RLIS and increase the

  4. Dark Filaments, Clouds and Cores: A Multiband IR Study of the Early Stages of Star Formation in Extended Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard

    Star formation typically begins in cold, dark clouds that are not spherically symmetric, but elongated as infrared dark clouds or long linear filaments. Their star-forming characteristics are thought to be sensitive to the geometries. We propose a systematic, detailed study of a sample of 168 of these dark clouds spanning a wide range of parameters using new archival data from Herschel and Spitzer. Archival Herschel photometry in particular enables for the first time a sensitive, systematic study of the full far-infrared continuum of these objects. We have distance determinations and ancillary molecule line measurements for all of our sources. Ten-band photometry (from 3.5um to 500um) will let us determine the luminosities, spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and estimate masses of these cold structures as functions of their star-formation activity. We will produce dust temperature and optical depth maps that will enable statistical studies of filaments and their cores; we expect statistics on over 500 protostellar cores. Our selected sources span a range of physical conditions: distances from 1 to 8 kpc, lengths from 0.1 to 80 pc, aspect ratios from below 2 to above 8, nominal core masses from about 1 to 500 Mo, and a range of geometries including linear, branching, hub-filament, and network configurations. We plan to use the extended Robitaille YSO models and SUNRISE radiative transfer models for prestellar cores to analyze a generic set of the most common objects, and then test their applicability across the sample. We will also bring other data to bear (WISE; 2MASS, millimeter) as is useful. We address three current, multi-faceted problems: (1) What are the density, temperature and optical depth structures of filaments and their cores? How do these parameters vary spatially for cores and the inter-core regions? How do these parameters correlate to filamentary or environmental properties? (2) What is the statistical distribution of these properties; in

  5. Regulators of Autophagosome Formation in Drosophila Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Zirin, Jonathan; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Samsonova, Anastasia; Tao, Rong; Perrimon, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Given the diversity of autophagy targets and regulation, it is important to characterize autophagy in various cell types and conditions. We used a primary myocyte cell culture system to assay the role of putative autophagy regulators in the specific context of skeletal muscle. By treating the cultures with rapamycin (Rap) and chloroquine (CQ) we induced an autophagic response, fully suppressible by knockdown of core ATG genes. We screened D. melanogaster orthologs of a previously reported mammalian autophagy protein-protein interaction network, identifying several proteins required for autophagosome formation in muscle cells, including orthologs of the Rab regulators RabGap1 and Rab3Gap1. The screen also highlighted the critical roles of the proteasome and glycogen metabolism in regulating autophagy. Specifically, sustained proteasome inhibition inhibited autophagosome formation both in primary culture and larval skeletal muscle, even though autophagy normally acts to suppress ubiquitin aggregate formation in these tissues. In addition, analyses of glycogen metabolic genes in both primary cultured and larval muscles indicated that glycogen storage enhances the autophagic response to starvation, an important insight given the link between glycogen storage disorders, autophagy, and muscle function. PMID:25692684

  6. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  7. An Actin Filament Population Defined by the Tropomyosin Tpm3.1 Regulates Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Anthony J.; Yang, Lingyan; Lucas, Christine A.; Greenberg, Michael J.; Martel, Nick; Leong, Gary M.; Hughes, William E.; Cooney, Gregory J.; James, David E.; Ostap, E. Michael; Han, Weiping; Gunning, Peter W.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2016-01-01

    Actin has an ill-defined role in the trafficking of GLUT4 glucose transporter vesicles to the plasma membrane (PM). We have identified novel actin filaments defined by the tropomyosin Tpm3.1 at glucose uptake sites in white adipose tissue (WAT) and skeletal muscle. In Tpm 3.1-overexpressing mice, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased; while Tpm3.1-null mice they were more sensitive to the impact of high-fat diet on glucose uptake. Inhibition of Tpm3.1 function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes abrogates insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. In WAT, the amount of filamentous actin is determined by Tpm3.1 levels and is paralleled by changes in exocyst component (sec8) and Myo1c levels. In adipocytes, Tpm3.1 localizes with MyoIIA, but not Myo1c, and it inhibits Myo1c binding to actin. We propose that Tpm3.1 determines the amount of cortical actin that can engage MyoIIA and generate contractile force, and in parallel limits the interaction of Myo1c with actin filaments. The balance between these actin filament populations may determine the efficiency of movement and/or fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the PM. PMID:25783006

  8. A deep radio and X-ray view of cluster formation at the crossroads of filaments .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, J.; van Weeren, R. J.; Raychaudhury, S.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Intema, H. T.; Miniati, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Markevitch, M.; Erben, T.

    Deep X-ray data from Chandra and XMM-Newton, and GMRT radio data are presented for ZwCl 2341.1+0000 , an extremely unusual and complex merging cluster of galaxies at the intersection of optical filaments. We propose that energetics of multiple mergers and accretion flows has resulted in wide-spread shocks, acceleration of cosmic ray particles and amplification of weak magnetic fields. This results in Mpc-scale peripheral radio relics and halo like non-thermal emission observed near the merging center.

  9. A network of filaments detected by Herschel in the Serpens core. A laboratory to test simulations of low-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatagliata, V.; Dale, J. E.; Ratzka, T.; Testi, L.; Burkert, A.; Koepferl, C.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Eiroa, C.; Gaczkowski, B.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Filaments represent a key structure during the early stages of the star formation process. Simulations show that filamentary structures commonly formed before and during the formation of cores. Aims: The Serpens core is an ideal laboratory for testing the state of the art of simulations of turbulent giant molecular clouds. Methods: We used Herschel observations of the Serpens core to compute temperature and column density maps of the region. We selected the early stages of a recent simulation of star-formation, before stellar feedback was initiated, with similar total mass and physical size as the Serpens core. We also derived temperature and column density maps from the simulations. The observed distribution of column densities of the filaments was analyzed, first including and then masking the cores. The same analysis was performed on the simulations as well. Results: A radial network of filaments was detected in the Serpens core. The analyzed simulation shows a striking morphological resemblance to the observed structures. The column density distribution of simulated filaments without cores shows only a log-normal distribution, while the observed filaments show a power-law tail. The power-law tail becomes evident in the simulation if the focus is only the column density distribution of the cores. In contrast, the observed cores show a flat distribution. Conclusions: Even though the simulated and observed filaments are subjectively similar-looking, we find that they behave in very different ways. The simulated filaments are turbulence-dominated regions; the observed filaments are instead self-gravitating structures that will probably fragment into cores. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. FRET study of the structural and kinetic effects of PKC phosphomimetic cardiac troponin T mutants on thin filament regulation.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, William; Zhou, Zhiqun; Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-05-15

    FRET was used to investigate the structural and kinetic effects that PKC phosphorylations exert on Ca(2+) and myosin subfragment-1 dependent conformational transitions of the cardiac thin filament. PKC phosphorylations of cTnT were mimicked by glutamate substitution. Ca(2+) and S1-induced distance changes between the central linker of cTnC and the switch region of cTnI (cTnI-Sr) were monitored in reconstituted thin filaments using steady state and time resolved FRET, while kinetics of structural transitions were determined using stopped flow. Thin filament Ca(2+) sensitivity was found to be significantly blunted by the presence of the cTnT(T204E) mutant, whereas pseudo-phosphorylation at additional sites increased the Ca(2+)-sensitivity. The rate of Ca(2+)-dissociation induced structural changes was decreased in the C-terminal end of cTnI-Sr in the presence of pseudo-phosphorylations while remaining unchanged at the N-terminal end of this region. Additionally, the distance between cTnI-Sr and cTnC was decreased significantly for the triple and quadruple phosphomimetic mutants cTnT(T195E/S199E/T204E) and cTnT(T195E/S199E/T204E/T285E), which correlated with the Ca(2+)-sensitivity increase seen in these same mutants. We conclude that significant changes in thin filament Ca(2+)-sensitivity, structure and kinetics are brought about through PKC phosphorylation of cTnT. These changes can either decrease or increase Ca(2+)-sensitivity and likely play an important role in cardiac regulation. PMID:24708997

  11. FRET Study of the Structural and Kinetic Effects of PKC Phosphomimetic Cardiac Troponin T Mutants on Thin Filament Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, William; Zhou, Zhiqun; Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-01-01

    FRET was used to investigate the structural and kinetic effects that PKC phosphorylations exert on Ca2+ and myosin subfragment-1 dependent conformational transitions of the cardiac thin filament. PKC phosphorylations of cTnT were mimicked by glutamate substitution. Ca2+ and S1-induced distance changes between the central linker of cTnC and the switch region of cTnI (cTnI-Sr) were monitored in reconstituted thin filaments using steady state and time resolved FRET, while kinetics of structural transitions were determined using stopped flow. Thin filament Ca2+ sensitivity was found to be significantly blunted by the presence of the cTnT(T204E) mutant, whereas pseudo-phosphorylation at additional sites increased the Ca2+-sensitivty. The rate of Ca2+-dissociation induced structural changes was decreased in the C-terminal end of cTnI-Sr in the presence of pseudo-phosphorylations while remaining unchanged at the N-terminal end of this region. Additionally, the distance between cTnI-Sr and cTnC was decreased significantly for the triple and quadruple phosphomimetic mutants cTnT(T195E/S199E/T204E) and cTnT(T195E/S199E/T204E/T285E), which correlated with the Ca2+-sensitivity increase seen in these same mutants. We conclude that significant changes in thin filament Ca2+-sensitivity, structure and kinetics are brought about through PKC phosphorylation of cTnT. These changes can either decrease or increase Ca2+-sensitivity and likely play an important role in cardiac regulation. PMID:24708997

  12. Type III Secretion System Translocon Component EseB Forms Filaments on and Mediates Autoaggregation of and Biofilm Formation by Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi Peng; Nie, Pin; Lu, Jin Fang; Liu, Lu Yi; Xiao, Tiao Yi; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Edwardsiella tarda plays an important role in infection by translocating effector proteins into host cells. EseB, a component required for effector translocation, is reported to mediate autoaggregation of E. tarda. In this study, we demonstrate that EseB forms filamentous appendages on the surface of E. tarda and is required for biofilm formation by E. tarda in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). Biofilm formation by E. tarda in DMEM does not require FlhB, an essential component for assembling flagella. Dynamic analysis of EseB filament formation, autoaggregation, and biofilm formation shows that the formation of EseB filaments occurs prior to autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The addition of an EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures before bacterial autoaggregation prevents autoaggregation and biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of the EseB antibody to E. tarda cultures in which biofilm is already formed does not destroy the biofilm. Therefore, EseB filament-mediated bacterial cell-cell interaction is a prerequisite for autoaggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:26116669

  13. Hormonal regulation of secondary cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Didi, Vojtěch; Jackson, Phil; Hejátko, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) have critical functional importance but also constitute a high proportion of the plant biomass and have high application potential. This is true mainly for the lignocellulosic constituents of the SCWs in xylem vessels and fibres, which form a structured layer between the plasma membrane and the primary cell wall (PCW). Specific patterning of the SCW thickenings contributes to the mechanical properties of the different xylem cell types, providing the plant with mechanical support and facilitating the transport of solutes via vessels. In the last decade, our knowledge of the basic molecular mechanisms controlling SCW formation has increased substantially. Several members of the multi-layered regulatory cascade participating in the initiation and transcriptional regulation of SCW formation have been described, and the first cellular components determining the pattern of SCW at the subcellular resolution are being uncovered. The essential regulatory role of phytohormones in xylem development is well known and the molecular mechanisms that link hormonal signals to SCW formation are emerging. Here, we review recent knowledge about the role of individual plant hormones and hormonal crosstalk in the control over the regulatory cascades guiding SCW formation and patterning. Based on the analogy between many of the mechanisms operating during PCW and SCW formation, recently identified mechanisms underlying the hormonal control of PCW remodelling are discussed as potentially novel mechanisms mediating hormonal regulatory inputs in SCW formation. PMID:26002972

  14. SSB diffusion on single stranded DNA stimulates RecA filament formation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rahul; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.; Ha, Taekjip

    2009-01-01

    Single stranded (ss)DNA generated in the cell during DNA metabolism is stabilized and protected by binding of single stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins. E. coli SSB, a representative homotetrameric SSB, binds to ssDNA by wrapping the DNA using its four subunits. However, such a tightly wrapped, high affinity protein-DNA complex still needs to be removed or repositioned quickly for unhindered action of other proteins. Here, we show, using single molecule two and three-color FRET, that tetrameric SSB can spontaneously migrate along ssDNA. Diffusional migration of SSB helps in the local displacement of SSB by an elongating RecA filament. SSB diffusion also melts short DNA hairpins transiently and stimulates RecA filament elongation on DNA with secondary structure. This first observation of diffusional movement of a protein on ssDNA introduces a new paradigm for how an SSB protein can be redistributed, while remaining tightly bound to ssDNA during recombination and repair processes. PMID:19820696

  15. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Amélie; Herrmann, Harald; Davidson, Michael W.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form a dense and dynamic network that is functionally associated with microtubules and actin filaments. We used the GFP-tagged vimentin mutant Y117L to study vimentin-cytoskeletal interactions and transport of vimentin filament precursors. This mutant preserves vimentin interaction with other components of the cytoskeleton, but its assembly is blocked at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. ULFs are easy to track, and they allow a reliable and quantifiable analysis of movement. Our results show that in cultured human vimentin-negative SW13 cells, 2% of vimentin-ULFs move along microtubules bidirectionally, while the majority are stationary and tightly associated with actin filaments. Rapid motor-dependent transport of ULFs along microtubules is enhanced ≥5-fold by depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin B. The microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin ULFs is further regulated by Rho-kinase (ROCK) and p21-activated kinase (PAK): ROCK inhibits ULF transport, while PAK stimulates it. Both kinases act on microtubule transport independently of their effects on actin cytoskeleton. Our study demonstrates the importance of the actin cytoskeleton to restrict IF transport and reveals a new role for PAK and ROCK in the regulation of IF precursor transport.—Robert, A., Herrmann, H., Davidson, M. W., and Gelfand, V. I. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases. PMID:24652946

  16. The Peptidoglycan-Binding Protein SjcF1 Influences Septal Junction Function and Channel Formation in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Mareike; Tetik, Nalan; Ramos-León, Félix; Flinner, Nadine; Ngo, Giang; Stevanovic, Mara; Burnat, Mireia; Pernil, Rafael; Flores, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria exchange nutrients and regulators between cells for diazotrophic growth. Two alternative modes of exchange have been discussed involving transport either through the periplasm or through septal junctions linking adjacent cells. Septal junctions and channels in the septal peptidoglycan are likely filled with septal junction complexes. While possible proteinaceous factors involved in septal junction formation, SepJ (FraG), FraC, and FraD, have been identified, little is known about peptidoglycan channel formation and septal junction complex anchoring to the peptidoglycan. We describe a factor, SjcF1, involved in regulation of septal junction channel formation in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. SjcF1 interacts with the peptidoglycan layer through two peptidoglycan-binding domains and is localized throughout the cell periphery but at higher levels in the intercellular septa. A strain with an insertion in sjcF1 was not affected in peptidoglycan synthesis but showed an altered morphology of the septal peptidoglycan channels, which were significantly wider in the mutant than in the wild type. The mutant was impaired in intercellular exchange of a fluorescent probe to a similar extent as a sepJ deletion mutant. SjcF1 additionally bears an SH3 domain for protein-protein interactions. SH3 binding domains were identified in SepJ and FraC, and evidence for interaction of SjcF1 with both SepJ and FraC was obtained. SjcF1 represents a novel protein involved in structuring the peptidoglycan layer, which links peptidoglycan channel formation to septal junction complex function in multicellular cyanobacteria. Nonetheless, based on its subcellular distribution, this might not be the only function of SjcF1. PMID:26126850

  17. Regulation of actin nucleation and autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Amanda S; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-eating, whereby cytosolic constituents are enclosed by a double-membrane vesicle before delivery to the lysosome for degradation. This is an important process which allows for recycling of nutrients and cellular components and thus plays a critical role in normal cellular homeostasis as well as cell survival during stresses such as starvation or hypoxia. A large number of proteins regulate various stages of autophagy in a complex and still incompletely understood series of events. In this review, we will discuss recent studies which provide a growing body of evidence that actin dynamics and proteins that influence actin nucleation play an important role in the regulation of autophagosome formation and maturation. PMID:27147468

  18. Evolution of shocks and turbulence in the formation of galaxy clusters embedded in Megaparsec-scale filaments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Iapichino, L.; Miniati, F.; Bagchi, J.; Mannheim, K.

    Massive structures like clusters of galaxies, embedded in cosmic filaments, release enormous amounts of energy through their interactions. These events are associated with the production of Mpc-scale shocks and injection of considerable amounts of turbulence, affecting the non-thermal energy budget of the ICM. In order to study this thoroughly, we performed a set of cosmological simulations using the hydrodynamical code Enzo. We studied the formation of clusters undergoing major mergers, the propagation of merger shocks and their interaction with the filamentary cosmic web. This interaction is shown to produce peripheral structures remarkably similar to giant radio relics observed, for example, in Abell 3376 and Abell 3667. We find a relatively long timescale (about 4 Gyr) for turbulence decay in the centre of major merging clusters. This timescale is substantially longer than typically assumed in the turbulent re-acceleration models, invoked for explaining the statistics of observed radio halos.

  19. Star formation in the filament of S254-S258 OB complex: a cluster in the process of being created

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, M. R.; Ojha, D. K.; Jose, J.; Zavagno, A.; Takahashi, S.; Neichel, B.; Kim, J. S.; Chauhan, N.; Pandey, A. K.; Zinchenko, I.; Tamura, M.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared dark clouds are ideal laboratories for studying the initial processes of high-mass star and star-cluster formation. We investigated the star formation activity of an unexplored filamentary dark cloud (size ~5.7 pc × 1.9 pc), which itself is part of a large filament (~20 pc) located in the S254-S258 OB complex at a distance of 2.5 kpc. Using Multi-band Imaging Photometer (MIPS) Spitzer 24 μm data, we uncovered 49 sources with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. We identified 45 sources as candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) of Class I, flat-spectrum, and Class II natures. Additional 17 candidate YSOs (9 Class I and 8 Class II) are also identified using JHK and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry. We find that the protostar-to-Class II sources ratio (~2) and the protostar fraction (~70%) of the region are high. Comparison of the protostar fraction to other young clusters suggests that the star formation in the dark cloud possibly started only 1 Myr ago. Combining the near-infrared photometry of the YSO candidates with the theoretical evolutionary models, we infer that most of the candidate YSOs formed in the dark cloud are low-mass (<2 M⊙). We examine the spatial distribution of the YSOs and find that majority of them are linearly aligned along the highest column density line (N(H2)~1 × 1022 cm-2) of the dark cloud along its long axis at the mean nearest-neighbour separation of ~0.2 pc. Using the observed properties of the YSOs, physical conditions of the cloud and a simple cylindrical model, we explore the possible star formation process of this filamentary dark cloud and suggest that gravitational fragmentation within the filament should have played a dominant role in the formation of the YSOs. From the total mass of the YSOs, the gaseous mass associated with the dark cloud, and the surrounding environment, we infer that the region is presently forming stars at an efficiency of ~3% and a rate ~30 M⊙ Myr-1, and it may emerge

  20. Reliable control of filament formation in resistive memories by self-assembled nanoinsulators derived from a block copolymer.

    PubMed

    You, Byoung Kuk; Park, Woon Ik; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Kwi-Il; Seo, Hyeon Kook; Lee, Jeong Yong; Jung, Yeon Sik; Lee, Keon Jae

    2014-09-23

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is a promising candidate for future nonvolatile memories. Resistive switching in a metal-insulator-metal structure is generally assumed to be caused by the formation/rupture of nanoscale conductive filaments (CFs) under an applied electric field. The critical issue of ReRAM for practical memory applications, however, is insufficient repeatability of the operating voltage and resistance ratio. Here, we present an innovative approach to reliably and reproducibly control the CF growth in unipolar NiO resistive memory by exploiting uniform formation of insulating SiOx nanostructures from the self-assembly of a Si-containing block copolymer. In this way, the standard deviation (SD) of set and reset voltages was markedly reduced by 76.9% and 59.4%, respectively. The SD of high resistance state also decreased significantly, from 6.3 × 10(7) Ω to 5.4 × 10(4) Ω. Moreover, we report direct observations of localized metallic Ni CF formation and their controllable growth using electron microscopy and discuss electrothermal simulation results based on the finite element method supporting our analysis results. PMID:25192434

  1. Hydrogen peroxide formation and actin filament reorganization by Cdc42 are essential for ethanol-induced in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Luo, Jia; Leonard, Stephen S; Harris, Gabriel K; Millecchia, Lyndell; Flynn, Daniel C; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-05-01

    This report focuses on the identification of the molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced in vitro angiogenesis. The manipulation of angiogenesis is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic inflammation. Our results showed that ethanol stimulation altered the integrity of actin filaments and increased the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia in SVEC4-10 cells. Further experiments demonstrated that ethanol stimulation increased cell migration and invasion and induced in vitro angiogenesis in SVEC4-10 cells. Mechanistically, ethanol stimulation activated Cdc42 and produced H(2)O(2) a reactive oxygen species intermediate in SVEC4-10 cells. Measuring the time course of Cdc42 activation and H(2)O(2) production upon ethanol stimulation revealed that the Cdc42 activation and the increase of H(2)O(2) lasted more than 3 h, which indicates the mechanisms of the long duration effects of ethanol on the cells. Furthermore, either overexpression of a constitutive dominant negative Cdc42 or inhibition of H(2)O(2) production abrogated the effects of ethanol on SVEC4-10 cells, indicating that both the activation of Cdc42 and the production of H(2)O(2) are essential for the actions of ethanol. Interestingly, we also found that overexpression of a constitutive dominant positive Cdc42 itself was sufficient to produce H(2)O(2) and to induce in vitro angiogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that ethanol stimulation can induce H(2)O(2) production through the activation of Cdc42, which results in reorganizing actin filaments and increasing cell motility and in vitro angiogenesis. PMID:12598535

  2. Lateral diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 is regulated by actin filaments and 4.1N in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Fukatsu, Kazumi; Bannai, Hiroko; Zhang, Songbai; Nakamura, Hideki; Inoue, Takafumi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2004-11-19

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type1 (IP3R1) plays an important role in neuronal functions; however, the lateral diffusion of IP3R1 on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and its regulation in the living neurons remain unknown. We expressed green fluorescent protein-tagged IP3R1 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and observed the lateral diffusion by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. IP3R1 showed lateral diffusion with an effective diffusion constant of approximately 0.3 microm2/s. Depletion of actin filaments increased the diffusion constant of IP3R1, suggesting that the diffusion of IP3R1 is regulated negatively through actin filaments. We also found that protein 4.1N, which binds to IP3R1 and contains an actin-spectrin-binding region, was responsible for this actin regulation of the IP3R1 diffusion constant. Overexpression of dominant-negative 4.1N and blockade of 4.1N binding to IP3R1 increased the IP3R1 diffusion constant. The diffusion of IP3R type 3 (IP3R3), one of the isoforms of IP3Rs lacking the binding ability to 4.1N, was not dependent on actin filaments but became dependent on actin filaments after the addition of a 4.1N-binding sequence. These data suggest that 4.1N serves as a linker protein between IP3R1 and actin filaments. This actin filament-dependent regulation of IP3R1 diffusion may be important for the spatiotemporal regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:15364918

  3. Regulation of pyrimidine formation in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2007-10-01

    The regulation of pyrimidine formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was investigated at the level of enzyme synthesis and at the level of activity for the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. Although pyrimidine supplementation of succinate-grown P. oryzihabitans cells produced little effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain isolated from P. oryzihabitans ATCC 43272 indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the succinate-grown decarboxylase mutant strain cells, aspartate transcarbamoylase and dihydroorotase activities were found to increase by about 3-fold while dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were also observed to increase relative to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil. At the level of enzyme activity, aspartate transcarbamoylase in P. oryzihabitans was strongly inhibited by pyrophosphate, ADP, ATP and GTP in the presence of saturating substrate concentrations. PMID:17910097

  4. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation. PMID:27039023

  5. The role of non-ionizing radiation pressure in star formation: the stability of cores and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Min; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2016-09-01

    Stars form when filaments and dense cores in molecular clouds fragment and collapse due to self-gravity. In the most basic analyses of gravitational stability, the competition between self-gravity and thermal pressure sets the critical (i.e. maximum stable) mass of spheres and the critical line density of cylinders. Previous work has considered additional support from magnetic fields and turbulence. Here, we consider the effects of non-ionizing radiation, specifically the inward radiation pressure force that acts on dense structures embedded in an isotropic radiation field. Using hydrostatic, isothermal models, we find that irradiation lowers the critical mass and line density for gravitational collapse, and can thus act as a trigger for star formation. For structures with moderate central densities, ˜103 cm-3, the interstellar radiation field in the Solar vicinity has an order unity effect on stability thresholds. For more evolved objects with higher central densities, a significant lowering of stability thresholds requires stronger irradiation, as can be found closer to the Galactic centre or near stellar associations. Even when strong sources of ionizing radiation are absent or extincted, our study shows that interstellar irradiation can significantly influence the star formation process.

  6. The Role of Non-ionizing Radiation Pressure in Star Formation: The Stability of Cores and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Min; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2016-06-01

    Stars form when filaments and dense cores in molecular clouds fragment and collapse due to self-gravity. In the most basic analyses of gravitational stability, the competition between self-gravity and thermal pressure sets the critical (i.e. maximum stable) mass of spheres and the critical line density of cylinders. Previous work has considered additional support from magnetic fields and turbulence. Here, we consider the effects of non-ionizing radiation, specifically the inward radiation pressure force that acts on dense structures embedded in an isotropic radiation field. Using hydrostatic, isothermal models, we find that irradiation lowers the critical mass and line density for gravitational collapse, and can thus act as a trigger for star formation. For structures with moderate central densities, ˜103 cm-3, the interstellar radiation field in the Solar vicinity has an order unity effect on stability thresholds. For more evolved objects with higher central densities, a significant lowering of stability thresholds requires stronger irradiation, as can be found closer to the Galactic center or near stellar associations. Even when strong sources of ionizing radiation are absent or extincted, our study shows that interstellar irradiation can significantly influence the star formation process.

  7. Two Modes of Binding of DinI to RecA Filament Provide a New Insight Into Regulation of SOS Response by DinI Protein

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, Vitold E.; Britt, Rachel L.; Bane, Lukas B.; Yu, Xiong; Cox, Michael M.; Egelman, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    The RecA protein plays a principal role in the bacterial SOS response to DNA damage. The induction of the SOS response is well understood and involves the cleavage of the LexA repressor catalyzed by the RecA nucleoprotein filament. In contrast, our understanding of the regulation and termination of the SOS response is much more limited. RecX and DinI are two major regulators of RecA’s ability to promote LexA cleavage and a strand exchange reaction and are believed to modulate its activity in ongoing SOS events. DinI’s function in the SOS response remains controversial since its interaction with the RecA filament is concentration-dependent and may result in either stabilization or depolymerization of the filament. The 17 C-terminal residues of RecA modulate the interaction between DinI and RecA. We demonstrate that DinI binds to the active RecA filament in two distinct structural modes. In the first mode DinI binds to the C-terminus of a RecA protomer. In the second mode DinI resides deeply in the groove of the RecA filament with its negatively charged C-terminal helix proximal to the L2 loop of RecA. The deletion of the 17 C-terminal residues of RecA favors the second mode of binding. We suggest that the negatively charged C-terminus of RecA prevents DinI from entering the groove and protects the RecA filament from depolymerization. Polymorphic binding of DinI to RecA filaments implies an even more complex role of DinI in the bacterial SOS response. PMID:21458462

  8. Formation of proto-multiple systems in a magnetized, fragmenting filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charles L. H.

    2016-01-01

    In just the past few years, it has become clear that filamentary structure is present in the star-formation process across many orders of magnitude in spatial scale, from the galactic scales probed by Planck and Herschel all the way down to the AU-scale structures that ALMA has revealed within protoplanetary disks. A similar story can be told of magnetic fields, which play a role in star formation across the same vast range of size scales. Here I will show filamentary structure near three protostars in the Serpens Main star-forming region, as seen with both CARMA (at 1000 AU scales) and ALMA (at 150 AU scales!). Even at such high resolution, these sources have a number of nearby, filamentary blobs/condensations/companions, which may be the beginnings of multiple star systems. Additionally, the filamentary structures along which these companions lie coincide in a tantalizing way with the magnetic fields we mapped with CARMA.

  9. The silicatein propeptide acts as inhibitor/modulator of self-organization during spicule axial filament formation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Muth, Sandra; Gietzen, Sabine; Korzhev, Michael; Grebenjuk, Vlad A; Wiens, Matthias; Schloßmacher, Ute; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-04-01

    Silicateins are crucial enzymes that are involved in formation of the inorganic biosilica scaffold of the spicular skeleton of siliceous sponges. We show that silicatein acquires its structure-guiding and enzymatically active state by processing of silicatein from pro-silicatein to the mature enzyme. A recombinant propeptide (PROP) of silicatein from the siliceous demosponge Suberites domuncula was prepared, and antibodies were raised against the peptide. In sponge tissue, these antibodies reacted with both surface structures and the central region of the spicules. Using phage display expression, spicule-binding 12-mer peptides were identified that are rich in histidine residues. In the predicted tertiary structure of PROP, these histidine residues are only present in the α-helical region. The recombinant PROP was found to inhibit self-assembly of silicatein molecules. By light scattering, it was shown that, in the presence of 4 m urea, the recombinant silicatein is obtained in the mono/oligomeric form with a hydrodynamic radius of 4 nm, while lower urea concentrations promote self-aggregation and assembly of the protein. Finally, it is shown that the enzymatic activity of silicatein is abolished by PROP in silicatein samples that predominantly contain mono- or oligomeric silicatein particles, but the enzyme is not affected if present in the filamentous aggregated form. It is concluded that the functions of silicatein, acting as a structural template for its biosilica product and as an enzyme, are modulated and controlled by its propeptide. PMID:23398942

  10. Regulation of septum formation by the Bud3-Rho4 GTPase module in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Si, Haoyu; Justa-Schuch, Daniela; Seiler, Stephan; Harris, Steven D

    2010-05-01

    The ability of fungi to generate polarized cells with a variety of shapes likely reflects precise temporal and spatial control over the formation of polarity axes. The bud site selection system of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents the best-understood example of such a morphogenetic regulatory system. However, the extent to which this system is conserved in the highly polarized filamentous fungi remains unknown. Here, we describe the functional characterization and localization of the Aspergillus nidulans homolog of the axial bud site marker Bud3. Our results show that AnBud3 is not required for polarized hyphal growth per se, but is involved in septum formation. In particular, our genetic and biochemical evidence implicates AnBud3 as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the GTPase Rho4. Additional results suggest that the AnBud3-Rho4 module acts downstream of the septation initiation network to mediate recruitment of the formin SepA to the site of contractile actin ring assembly. Our observations provide new insight into the signaling pathways that regulate septum formation in filamentous fungi. PMID:20176976

  11. Maintenance of electrostatic stabilization in altered tubulin lateral contacts may facilitate formation of helical filaments in foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Bassen, David M; Hou, Yubo; Bowser, Samuel S; Banavali, Nilesh K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules in foraminiferan protists (forams) can convert into helical filament structures, in which longitudinal intraprotofilament interactions between tubulin heterodimers are thought to be lost, while lateral contacts across protofilaments are still maintained. The coarse geometric features of helical filaments are known through low-resolution negative stain electron microscopy (EM). In this study, geometric restraints derived from these experimental data were used to generate an average atomic-scale helical filament model, which anticipated a modest reorientation in the lateral tubulin heterodimer interface. Restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the nearest neighbor interactions combined with a Genalized Born implicit solvent model were used to assess the lateral, longitudinal, and seam contacts in 13-3 microtubules and the reoriented lateral contacts in the helical filament model. This electrostatic analysis suggests that the change in the lateral interface in the helical filament does not greatly diminish the lateral electrostatic interaction. After longitudinal dissociation, the 13-3 seam interaction is much weaker than the reoriented lateral interface in the helical filament model, providing a plausible atomic-detail explanation for seam-to-lateral contact transition that enables the transition to a helical filament structure. PMID:27539392

  12. Maintenance of electrostatic stabilization in altered tubulin lateral contacts may facilitate formation of helical filaments in foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    Bassen, David M.; Hou, Yubo; Bowser, Samuel S.; Banavali, Nilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules in foraminiferan protists (forams) can convert into helical filament structures, in which longitudinal intraprotofilament interactions between tubulin heterodimers are thought to be lost, while lateral contacts across protofilaments are still maintained. The coarse geometric features of helical filaments are known through low-resolution negative stain electron microscopy (EM). In this study, geometric restraints derived from these experimental data were used to generate an average atomic-scale helical filament model, which anticipated a modest reorientation in the lateral tubulin heterodimer interface. Restrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the nearest neighbor interactions combined with a Genalized Born implicit solvent model were used to assess the lateral, longitudinal, and seam contacts in 13-3 microtubules and the reoriented lateral contacts in the helical filament model. This electrostatic analysis suggests that the change in the lateral interface in the helical filament does not greatly diminish the lateral electrostatic interaction. After longitudinal dissociation, the 13-3 seam interaction is much weaker than the reoriented lateral interface in the helical filament model, providing a plausible atomic-detail explanation for seam-to-lateral contact transition that enables the transition to a helical filament structure. PMID:27539392

  13. Long 5′ untranslated regions regulate the RNA stability of the deep-sea filamentous phage SW1

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Huahua; Xiong, Lei; Xu, Guanpeng; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Virus production in the deep-sea environment has been found to be high, and viruses have been suggested to play significant roles in the overall functioning of this ecosystem. Nevertheless, little is known about these viruses, including the mechanisms that control their production, which makes them one of the least understood biological entities on Earth. Previously, we isolated the filamentous phage SW1, whose virus production and gene transcription were found to be active at low temperatures, from a deep-sea bacterium, Shewanella piezotolerans WP3. In this study, the operon structure of phage SW1 is presented, which shows two operons with exceptionally long 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). In addition, the 5′UTR was confirmed to significantly influence the RNA stability of the SW1 transcripts. Our study revealed novel regulation of the operon and led us to propose a unique regulatory mechanism for Inoviruses. This type of RNA-based regulation may represent a mechanism for significant viral production in the cold deep biosphere. PMID:26898180

  14. MamK, a bacterial actin, forms dynamic filaments in vivo that are regulated by the acidic proteins MamJ and LimJ

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Olga; Byrne, Meghan E.; Li, Zhuo; Keyhani, Sepehr; Cueto Barrozo, Joyce; Jensen, Grant; Komeili, Arash

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial actins, in contrast to their eukaryotic counterparts, are highly divergent proteins whose wide-ranging functions are thought to correlate with their evolutionary diversity. One clade, represented by the MamK protein of magnetotactic bacteria, is required for the subcellular organization of magnetosomes, membrane-bound organelles that aid in navigation along the earth’s magnetic field. Using a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, we find that, like traditional actins, MamK forms dynamic filaments that require an intact NTPase motif for their turnover in vivo. We also uncover two proteins, MamJ and LimJ, which perform a redundant function to promote the dynamic behavior of MamK filaments in wildtype cells. The absence of both MamJ and LimJ leads to static filaments, a disrupted magnetosome chain, and an anomalous build-up of cytoskeletal filaments between magnetosomes. Our results suggest that MamK filaments, like eukaryotic actins, are intrinsically stable and rely on regulators for their dynamic behavior, a feature that stands in contrast to some classes of bacterial actins characterized to date. PMID:21883528

  15. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    The classical "cooling flow" model historically associated with "cool core" clusters of galaxies fails in the absence of an external, non-gravitational heating mechanism needed to offset catastrophic radiative losses of the X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Numerous proposed solutions exist, including feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which may elegantly calibrate fundamental relationships such as the coupled co-evolution of black holes and the stellar component of their host galaxies. AGN feedback cannot completely offset cooling at all times, however, as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in cool core clusters harbor extensive warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 < T < 104 K) gas reservoirs whose physical properties are regulated by ongoing star formation and an unknown, non-stellar heating mechanism. We present a doctoral thesis broadly related to these issues, particularly as they pertain to cooling flows, the triggering of AGN activity, and the associated energetic feedback that may play a critical role in heating the ambient environment on tens to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. We begin with a summary of the relevant background material, and in Chapter 2 we present a multiwavelength study of effervescent AGN heating in the cool core cluster Abell 2597. Previously unpublished Chandra X-ray data show the central regions of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to be highly anisotropic on the scale of the BCG, permeated by a network of kpc-scale X-ray cavities, the largest of which is cospatial in projection with extended 330 MHz radio emission. We present spectral maps of projected, modeled gas properties fit to the X-ray data. The X-ray temperature map reveals two discrete, "hard-edged'' structures, including a ˜15 kpc "cold filament'' and an arc of hot gas which in projection borders the inner edge of the large X-ray cavity. We interpret the latter in the context of the effervescent AGN heating model, in which cavity enthalpy is thermalized as the

  16. Arabidopsis RIC1 Severs Actin Filaments at the Apex to Regulate Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Shi, Haifan; Chen, Binqing; Zhang, Ruihui; Huang, Shanjin; Fu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pollen tubes deliver sperms to the ovule for fertilization via tip growth. The rapid turnover of F-actin in pollen tube tips plays an important role in this process. In this study, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana RIC1, a member of the ROP-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein family, regulates pollen tube growth via its F-actin severing activity. Knockout of RIC1 enhanced pollen tube elongation, while overexpression of RIC1 dramatically reduced tube growth. Pharmacological analysis indicated that RIC1 affected F-actin dynamics in pollen tubes. In vitro biochemical assays revealed that RIC1 directly bound and severed F-actin in the presence of Ca2+ in addition to interfering with F-actin turnover by capping F-actin at the barbed ends. In vivo, RIC1 localized primarily to the apical plasma membrane (PM) of pollen tubes. The level of RIC1 at the apical PM oscillated during pollen tube growth. The frequency of F-actin severing at the apex was notably decreased in ric1-1 pollen tubes but was increased in pollen tubes overexpressing RIC1. We propose that RIC1 regulates F-actin dynamics at the apical PM as well as the cytosol by severing F-actin and capping the barbed ends in the cytoplasm, establishing a novel mechanism that underlies the regulation of pollen tube growth. PMID:25804540

  17. Regulation of myosin IIA and filamentous actin during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Stall, Richard; Ramos, Joseph; Kent Fulcher, F.; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2014-03-10

    Insulin stimulated glucose uptake requires the colocalization of myosin IIA (MyoIIA) and the insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane for proper GLUT4 fusion. MyoIIA facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) reorganization in various cell types. In adipocytes F-actin reorganization is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. What is not known is whether MyoIIA interacts with F-actin to regulate insulin-induced GLUT4 fusion at the plasma membrane. To elucidate the relationship between MyoIIA and F-actin, we examined the colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation as well as the regulation of this interaction. Our findings demonstrated that MyoIIA and F-actin colocalized at the site of GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation. Furthermore, inhibition of MyoII with blebbistatin impaired F-actin localization at the plasma membrane. Next we examined the regulatory role of calcium in MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization. Reduced calcium or calmodulin levels decreased colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane. While calcium alone can translocate MyoIIA it did not stimulate F-actin accumulation at the plasma membrane. Taken together, we established that while MyoIIA activity is required for F-actin localization at the plasma membrane, it alone is insufficient to localize F-actin to the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Insulin induces colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the cortex in adipocytes. • MyoIIA is necessary but not sufficient to localize F-actin at the cell cortex. • MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization is regulated by calcium and calmodulin.

  18. Role of the Unfolded Protein Response in Regulating the Mucin-Dependent Filamentous-Growth Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Hema; Vadaie, Nadia; Chow, Jacky; Caccamise, Lauren M.; Chavel, Colin A.; Li, Boyang; Bowitch, Alexander; Stefan, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling mucins are evolutionarily conserved regulators of signal transduction pathways. The signaling mucin Msb2p regulates the Cdc42p-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in yeast. The cleavage and release of the glycosylated inhibitory domain of Msb2p is required for MAPK activation. We show here that proteolytic processing of Msb2p was induced by underglycosylation of its extracellular domain. Cleavage of underglycosylated Msb2p required the unfolded protein response (UPR), a quality control (QC) pathway that operates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The UPR regulator Ire1p, which detects misfolded/underglycosylated proteins in the ER, controlled Msb2p cleavage by regulating transcriptional induction of Yps1p, the major protease that processes Msb2p. Accordingly, the UPR was required for differentiation to the filamentous cell type. Cleavage of Msb2p occurred in conditional trafficking mutants that trap secretory cargo in the endomembrane system. Processed Msb2p was delivered to the plasma membrane, and its turnover by the ubiquitin ligase Rsp5p and ESCRT attenuated the filamentous-growth pathway. We speculate that the QC pathways broadly regulate signaling glycoproteins and their cognate pathways by recognizing altered glycosylation patterns that can occur in response to extrinsic cues. PMID:25666509

  19. Light-Induced Movements of Chloroplasts and Nuclei Are Regulated in Both Cp-Actin-Filament-Dependent and -Independent Manners in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced chloroplast movement and attachment to the plasma membrane are dependent on actin filaments. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the short actin filaments on the chloroplast envelope, cp-actin filaments, are essential for chloroplast movement and positioning. Furthermore, cp-actin-filament-mediated chloroplast movement is necessary for the strong-light-induced nuclear avoidance response. The proteins CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING 1 (CHUP1), KINESIN-LIKE PROTEIN FOR ACTIN-BASED CHLOROPLAST MOVEMENT 1 (KAC1) and KAC2 are required for the generation and/or maintenance of cp-actin filaments in Arabidopsis. In land plants, CHUP1 and KAC family proteins play pivotal roles in the proper movement of chloroplasts and their attachment to the plasma membrane. Here, we report similar but distinct phenotypes in chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements between chup1 and kac1kac2 mutants. Measurement of chloroplast photorelocation movement indicated that kac1kac2, but not chup1, exhibited a clear strong-light-induced increase in leaf transmittance changes. The chloroplast movement in kac1kac2 depended on phototropin 2, CHUP1 and two other regulators for cp-actin filaments, PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED 1 and THRUMIN 1. Furthermore, kac1kac2 retained a weak but significant nuclear avoidance response although chup1 displayed a severe defect in the nuclear avoidance response. The kac1kac2chup1 triple mutant was completely defective in both chloroplast and nuclear avoidance responses. These results indicate that CHUP1 and the KACs function somewhat independently, but interdependently mediate both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements. PMID:27310016

  20. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  1. Intracellular fibril formation, calcification, and enrichment of chaperones, cytoskeletal, and intermediate filament proteins in the adult hippocampus CA1 following neonatal exposure to the nonprotein amino acid BMAA.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Berg, Anna-Lena; Hanrieder, Jörg; Arnerup, Gunnel; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-03-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies indicate that BMAA can be misincorporated into proteins. BMAA is a developmental neurotoxicant that can induce long-term learning and memory deficits, as well as regionally restricted neuronal degeneration and mineralization in the hippocampal CA1. The aim of the study was to characterize long-term changes (2 weeks to 6 months) further in the brain of adult rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with BMAA (460 mg/kg) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), transmission electron microscopy, and laser capture microdissection followed by LC-MS/MS for proteomic analysis. The histological examination demonstrated progressive neurodegenerative changes, astrogliosis, microglial activation, and calcification in the hippocampal CA1 3-6 months after exposure. The IHC showed an increased staining for α-synuclein and ubiquitin in the area. The ultrastructural examination revealed intracellular deposition of abundant bundles of closely packed parallel fibrils in neurons, axons, and astrocytes of the CA1. Proteomic analysis of the affected site demonstrated an enrichment of chaperones (e.g., clusterin, GRP-78), cytoskeletal and intermediate filament proteins, and proteins involved in the antioxidant defense system. Several of the most enriched proteins (plectin, glial fibrillar acidic protein, vimentin, Hsp 27, and ubiquitin) are known to form complex astrocytic inclusions, so-called Rosenthal fibers, in the neurodegenerative disorder Alexander disease. In addition, TDP-43 and the negative regulator of autophagy, GLIPR-2, were exclusively detected. The present study demonstrates that neonatal exposure to BMAA may offer a novel model for the study of hippocampal fibril formation in vivo. PMID:24798087

  2. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Kudva, Indira T; Bearson, Bradley L; Stasko, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  3. Contributions of EspA Filaments and Curli Fimbriae in Cellular Adherence and Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Kudva, Indira T.; Bearson, Bradley L.; Stasko, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed increased adherence to HEp-2 cells and produced abundant biofilms. Transcriptional analysis revealed increased expression of espA as well as the csgA gene, which encodes curli fimbriae that are essential for biofilm formation. In the present study, we constructed hha espA, hha csgA, and hha csgA espA deletion mutants to determine the relative importance of EspA and CsgA in O157 adherence to HEp-2 cells and biofilm formation. In vitro adherence assays, conducted at 37°C in a tissue culture medium containing 0.1% glucose, showed that HEp-2 cell adherence required EspA because hha espA and hha csgA espA mutants adhered to HEp-2 cells at higher levels only when complemented with an espA-expressing plasmid. Biofilm assays performed at 28°C in a medium lacking glucose showed dependency of biofilm formation on CsgA; however EspA was not produced under these conditions. Despite production of detectable levels of EspA at 37°C in media supplemented with 0.1% glucose, the biofilm formation occurred independent of EspA. These results indicate dependency of O157 adherence to epithelial cells on EspA filaments, while CsgA promoted biofilm formation under conditions mimicking those found in the environment (low temperature with nutrient limitations) and in the digestive tract of an host animal (higher temperature and low levels of glucose). PMID:26900701

  4. The Plant-Specific Actin Binding Protein SCAB1 Stabilizes Actin Filaments and Regulates Stomatal Movement in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Mao, Tonglin; Qu, Xiaolu; Cao, Wanhong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wei; He, Liu; Li, Sidi; Ren, Sulin; Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhu, Guoli; Huang, Shanjin; Ye, Keqiong; Yuan, Ming; Guo, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Microfilament dynamics play a critical role in regulating stomatal movement; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. We report here the identification and characterization of STOMATAL CLOSURE-RELATED ACTIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (SCAB1), an Arabidopsis thaliana actin binding protein. Plants lacking SCAB1 were hypersensitive to drought stress and exhibited reduced abscisic acid-, H2O2-, and CaCl2-regulated stomatal movement. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that SCAB1 binds, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments. SCAB1 shares sequence similarity only with plant proteins and contains a previously undiscovered actin binding domain. During stomatal closure, actin filaments switched from a radial orientation in open stomata to a longitudinal orientation in closed stomata. This switch took longer in scab1 plants than in wild-type plants and was correlated with the delay in stomatal closure seen in scab1 mutants in response to drought stress. Our results suggest that SCAB1 is required for the precise regulation of actin filament reorganization during stomatal closure. PMID:21719691

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Memory Formation and Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zovkic, Iva B.; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C.; Sweatt, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and maintenance of memories is a central goal of the neuroscience community. It is well regarded that an organism's ability to lastingly adapt its behavior in response to a transient environmental stimulus relies on the central nervous system's capability for structural…

  6. Laser-filament-induced snow formation in a subsaturated zone in a cloud chamber: experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Sridharan, Aravindan; Wang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2013-12-01

    1 kHz, 2 mJ, 45 fs, 800 nm laser pulses were fired into a laboratory diffusion cloud chamber through a subsaturated zone (relative humidity ∼73%, T ∼ 4.3 °C). After 60 min of laser irradiation, an oval-shaped snow pile was observed right below the filament center and weighed ∼12.0 mg. The air current velocity at the edge of the vortices was estimated to be ∼16.5 cm/s. Scattering scenes recorded from the side show that filament-induced turbulence were formed inside the cloud chamber with two vortices below the filament. Two-dimensional simulations of the air flow motion in two cross sections of the cloud chamber confirm that the turbulent vortices exist below the filament. Based upon this simulation, we deduce that the vortices indeed have a three-dimensional elliptical shape. Hence, we propose that inside vortices where the humidity was supersaturated or saturated the condensation nuclei, namely, HNO(3), N(2)(+), O(2)(+) and other aerosols and impurities, were activated and grew in size. Large-sized particles would eventually be spun out along the fast moving direction towards the cold plate and formed an oval-shaped snow pile at the end. PMID:24483507

  7. Filamentation and spatiotemporal distribution of extracellular polymeric substances: role on X.fastidiosa single cell adhesion and biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Monteiro, Moniellen P.; César, Carlos L.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms can be defined as a community of microorganisms attached to a surface, living embedded in a self- produced matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which comprises most of the biofilm mass. We have recently used an extensive pool of microscopy techniques (confocal fluorescence, electron and scanning probe microscopies) at the micro and nanoscales in order to create a detailed temporal observation of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, using both wild type strain and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-modified cells of this citrus phytopathogen. We have identified three different EPS compositions, as well as their spatial and temporal distribution from single cell to mature biofilm formation stages. In the initial adhesion stage, soluble-EPS (S-EPS) accumulates at cell polar regions and forms a surface layer which facilitates irreversible cell attachment and cell cluster formation. These small clusters are subsequently connected by filamentous cells; further S-EPS surface coverage facilitates cell attachment and form filaments, leading to a floating framework of mature biofilms. The important role of EPS in X.fastidiosa biology was further investigated by imunolabelling experiments to detect the distribution of XadA1 adhesin, which is expressed in early stages of biofilm formation and released in outer membrane vesicles. This protein is located mainly in S-EPS covered areas, as well as on the filaments, indicating a molecular pathway to the enhanced cell attachment previously observed. These results suggest that S-EPS may thus represent an important target for disease control, slow plant colonization by the bacteria, keeping the plant more productive in the field.

  8. H-treatment impact on conductive-filament formation and stability in Ta2O5-based resistive-switching memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goux, L.; Kim, J. Y.; Magyari-Kope, B.; Nishi, Y.; Redolfi, A.; Jurczak, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we evidence the lower formation energy and improved stability of the conductive filament (CF) formed in TiNTa2O5Ta resistive-switching memory cells treated in NH3 atmosphere at 400 °C. This annealing treatment results in (i) lower forming voltage, (ii) lower CF resistance, and (iii) longer retention lifetime of the oxygen-vacancy (Vo) chain constituting the CF. Atomistic insights into these processes are provided by ab initio calculations performed for hydrogen (H) species incorporated in non-stoichiometric Ta2O5 supercells: (i) Vo formation energy is reduced by the presence of H, (ii) Vo-chain CF conductivity is increased by Vo + OH complex formation, and (iii) Vo-chain retention is strengthened by the stable Vo + OH complex. As a result, efficient CF formation and excellent state stability are obtained after 15 days at 250 °C.

  9. Filament disappearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William J.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomenon of the sudden filament disappearance (Disparition Brusque) is a familiar one to observers at H alpha telescopes. Nevertherless, the importance in Disparition Brusques (DB) continues to grow for several reasons which are cited in the discussion. It is reported that there seems to be more interest on building and maintain filaments than in destroying them. As a consequence, this sub-group is smaller than most of the others. All the same, progress in this area of filament disapperences seems steady and assured. The importance and interest in DBs is discussed and future directions are indicated.

  10. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE FORMATION OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS AND COOL CORES IN GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-04-10

    We present the results of a combined X-ray and H{alpha} study of 10 galaxy groups and 17 galaxy clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter. We find no difference in the morphology or detection frequency of H{alpha} filaments in groups versus clusters over the mass range 10{sup 13} < M{sub 500} < 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. The detection frequency of H{alpha} emission is shown to be only weakly dependent on the total mass of the system at the 52% confidence level. In contrast, we find that the presence of H{alpha} filaments is strongly correlated with both the global (89% confidence level) and core (84%) intracluster medium (ICM) entropy, as well as the X-ray cooling rate (72%). The H{alpha} filaments are therefore an excellent proxy for the cooling ICM. The H{alpha} filaments are more strongly correlated with the cooling properties of the ICM than with the radio properties of the brightest cluster galaxy; this further supports the scenario where these filaments are directly associated with a thermally unstable, rapidly cooling ICM, rather than radio bubbles. The ICM cooling efficiency, defined as the X-ray cooling rate per unit gas mass, is shown to correlate with the total system mass, indicating that groups are more efficient at cooling than clusters. This result implies that, in systems with cool cores, active galactic nucleus feedback scales with the total mass of the system, in agreement with earlier suggestions.

  11. FocVel1 influences asexual production, filamentous growth, biofilm formation, and virulence in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peiqian; Pu, Xiaoming; Feng, Baozhen; Yang, Qiyun; Shen, Huifang; Zhang, Jingxin; Lin, Birun

    2015-01-01

    Velvet genes play critical roles in the regulation of diverse cellular processes. In current study, we identified the gene FocVel1, a homolog of Fusarium graminearum VelA, in the plant pathogenic fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum. This pathogen causes the destructive disease called cucumber Fusarium wilt (CFW), which severely affects the production and marketing of this vegetable worldwide. Transcript analyses revealed high expression of FocVel1 during conidiophore development. Disruption of the FocVel1 gene led to several phenotypic defects, including reduction in aerial hyphal formation and conidial production. The deletion mutant ΔFocVel1 showed increased resistance to both osmotic stress and cell wall-damaging agents, but increased sensitivity to iprodione and prochloraz fungicides, which may be related to changes in cell wall components. In the process of biofilm formation in vitro, the mutant strain ΔFocVel1 displayed not only a reduction in spore aggregation but also a delay in conidial germination on the polystyrene surface, which may result in defects in biofilm formation. Moreover, pathogenicity assays showed that the mutant ΔFocVel1 exhibited impaired virulence in cucumber seedlings. And the genetic complementation of the mutant with the wild-type FocVel1 gene restored all the defects of the ΔFocVel1. Taken together, the results of this study indicated that FocVel1 played a critical role in the regulation of various cellular processes and pathogenicity in F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum. PMID:25999976

  12. Helical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Johnson, Eric; Richardson, Martin

    2014-06-01

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  13. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  14. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic.

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Azzurra; Bucci, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway. PMID:27120621

  15. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila Cigana

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:24578708

  16. Formative Assessment: Assessment Is for Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The article draws from 199 sources on assessment, learning, and motivation to present a detailed decomposition of the values, theories, and goals of formative assessment. This article will discuss the extent to which formative feedback actualizes and reinforces self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies among students. Theoreticians agree that SRL…

  17. 20 CFR 632.3 - Format for these regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Introduction § 632.3 Format for these regulations... Indian programs under title II-B of the Act are set forth in 20 CFR part 632. This part in conjunction with part 636 contains all the regulations under the Act applicable to Indian and Native...

  18. 20 CFR 632.3 - Format for these regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Introduction § 632.3 Format for these regulations... Indian programs under title II-B of the Act are set forth in 20 CFR part 632. This part in conjunction with part 636 contains all the regulations under the Act applicable to Indian and Native...

  19. Investigation of SH and CS radicals formation dynamics inside the hot filament chemical vapor deposition environment by means of cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzaianu, Madalina Dora

    2008-10-01

    The addition of traces amounts of sulfur containing gasses, such as H 2S, during the hot filament chemical vapor deposition of diamond thin films involving methane and hydrogen as a carrier gas, proved to enhance the formation of the nano-structured diamond and cause significant changes in the film growth behavior. The sulfur-incorporated nanocrystalline diamond, showing interesting electronic and tribological properties, raised scientific inquires about the fundamental mechanisms occurring inside the HFCVD reactor during the diamond growth. A better insight into the gas-phase and heterogeneous underlying processes can generate new ides for the customizing and optimization of the diamond synthesis in the view of new prospects of valuable technological applications. The SH and CS radicals, thought to be among the important precursors in the gas-phase and heterogeneous chemistry, were studied by means of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS), a powerful non-intrusive, self-calibrating spectroscopic diagnostic tool, employed to detect the A(0) ← X(0) transition near 323 and 259 nm for SH and CS, respectively, and the A(0) ← X(1) transition near 352 nm for the SH radical. CRDS is particularly suitable to detect SH and CS radicals due to its high sensitivity, discrimination and spatial resolution, as well as the ability to provide absolute values of species concentrations. The fitting of the measured CRD decay traces of the SH and CS radicals provided the corresponding ringdown times. The substantial changes in the ringdown times observed when the filament temperature was raised to 2700 +/- 50 K (from 4.04 +/- 0.04 to 0.260 +/- 0.003 mus for SH and from 4.12 +/- 0.05 to 3.04 +/- 0.03 mus for CS, respectively) are compatible with the presence of SH and CS radicals. A simulation of the rotationally resolved SH and CS spectra near UV, based on the analysis of the radicals' Doppler line width, led to an estimate of their effective rotational temperature. The values

  20. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    SciTech Connect

    Coca-Prados, M.

    1985-08-25

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing (TSP)orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP.

  1. Collagen-like glycoprotein BclS is involved in the formation of filamentous structures of the Lysinibacillus sphaericus exosporium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ni; Ge, Yong; Shi, Tingyu; Hu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Zhiming

    2014-11-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus produces mosquitocidal binary toxins (Bin toxins) deposited within a balloon-like exosporium during sporulation. Unlike Bacillus cereus group strains, the exosporium of L. sphaericus is usually devoid of the hair-like nap, an external filamentous structure formed by a collagen-like protein, BclA. In this study, a new collagen-like exosporium protein encoded by Bsph_0411 (BclS) from L. sphaericus C3-41 was characterized. Thin-section electron microscopy revealed that deletion of bclS resulted in the loss of the filamentous structures that attach to the exosporium basal layer and spread through the interspace of spores. In vivo visualization of BclS-green fluorescent protein (GFP)/mCherry fusion proteins revealed a dynamic pattern of fluorescence that encased the spore from the mother cell-distal (MCD) pole of the forespore, and the BclS-GFP fusions were found to be located in the interspace of the spore, as confirmed by three-dimensional (3D) superresolution fluorescence microscopy. Further studies demonstrated that the bclS mutant spores were more sensitive to wet-heat treatment and germinated at a lower rate than wild-type spores and that these phenotypes were significantly restored in the bclS-complemented strain. These results suggested novel roles of collagen-like protein in exosporium assembly and spore germination, providing a hint for a further understanding of the genetic basis of the high level of persistence of Bin toxins in nature. PMID:25149519

  2. Collagen-Like Glycoprotein BclS Is Involved in the Formation of Filamentous Structures of the Lysinibacillus sphaericus Exosporium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ni; Ge, Yong; Shi, Tingyu; Hu, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus produces mosquitocidal binary toxins (Bin toxins) deposited within a balloon-like exosporium during sporulation. Unlike Bacillus cereus group strains, the exosporium of L. sphaericus is usually devoid of the hair-like nap, an external filamentous structure formed by a collagen-like protein, BclA. In this study, a new collagen-like exosporium protein encoded by Bsph_0411 (BclS) from L. sphaericus C3-41 was characterized. Thin-section electron microscopy revealed that deletion of bclS resulted in the loss of the filamentous structures that attach to the exosporium basal layer and spread through the interspace of spores. In vivo visualization of BclS-green fluorescent protein (GFP)/mCherry fusion proteins revealed a dynamic pattern of fluorescence that encased the spore from the mother cell-distal (MCD) pole of the forespore, and the BclS-GFP fusions were found to be located in the interspace of the spore, as confirmed by three-dimensional (3D) superresolution fluorescence microscopy. Further studies demonstrated that the bclS mutant spores were more sensitive to wet-heat treatment and germinated at a lower rate than wild-type spores and that these phenotypes were significantly restored in the bclS-complemented strain. These results suggested novel roles of collagen-like protein in exosporium assembly and spore germination, providing a hint for a further understanding of the genetic basis of the high level of persistence of Bin toxins in nature. PMID:25149519

  3. Rictor/mTORC2 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics via its effects on gap junction communications and actin filament network

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Ka-Wai; Mruk, Dolores D.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian testis, coexisting tight junctions (TJs), basal ectoplasmic specializations, and gap junctions (GJs), together with desmosomes near the basement membrane, constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB). The most notable feature of the BTB, however, is the extensive network of actin filament bundles, which makes it one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers. The BTB undergoes restructuring to facilitate the transit of preleptotene spermatocytes at stage VIII-IX of the epithelial cycle. Thus, the F-actin network at the BTB undergoes cyclic reorganization via a yet-to-be explored mechanism. Rictor, the key component of mTORC2 that is known to regulate actin cytoskeleton, was shown to express stage-specifically at the BTB in the seminiferous epithelium. Its expression was down-regulated at the BTB in stage VIII-IX tubules, coinciding with BTB restructuring at these stages. Using an in vivo model, a down-regulation of rictor at the BTB was also detected during adjudin-induced BTB disruption, illustrating rictor expression is positively correlated with the status of the BTB integrity. Indeed, the knockdown of rictor by RNAi was found to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ-barrier function in vitro and the BTB integrity in vivo. This loss of barrier function was accompanied by changes in F-actin organization at the Sertoli cell BTB in vitro and in vivo, associated with a loss of interaction between actin and α-catenin or ZO-1. Rictor knockdown by RNAi was also found to impede Sertoli cell-cell GJ communication, disrupting protein distribution (e.g., occludin, ZO-1) at the BTB, illustrating that rictor is a crucial BTB regulator.—Mok, K., Mruk, D. D., Lee, W. M., Cheng, C. Y. Rictor/mTORC2 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics via its effects on gap junction communications and actin filament network. PMID:23288930

  4. Leptin regulates bone formation via the sympathetic nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Levasseur, Regis; Liu, Xiuyun; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L.; Armstrong, Dawna; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that leptin inhibits bone formation by an undefined mechanism. Here, we show that hypothalamic leptin-dependent antiosteogenic and anorexigenic networks differ, and that the peripheral mediators of leptin antiosteogenic function appear to be neuronal. Neuropeptides mediating leptin anorexigenic function do not affect bone formation. Leptin deficiency results in low sympathetic tone, and genetic or pharmacological ablation of adrenergic signaling leads to a leptin-resistant high bone mass. beta-adrenergic receptors on osteoblasts regulate their proliferation, and a beta-adrenergic agonist decreases bone mass in leptin-deficient and wild-type mice while a beta-adrenergic antagonist increases bone mass in wild-type and ovariectomized mice. None of these manipulations affects body weight. This study demonstrates a leptin-dependent neuronal regulation of bone formation with potential therapeutic implications for osteoporosis.

  5. Regulation of sarcoma cell migration, invasion and invadopodia formation by AFAP1L1 through a phosphotyrosine-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Tie, S R; McCarthy, D J; Kendrick, T S; Louw, A; Le, C; Satiaputra, J; Kucera, N; Phillips, M; Ingley, E

    2016-04-21

    Invasion and metastasis are controlled by the invadopodia, which delivers matrix-degrading enzymes to the invasion interface permitting cancer cell penetration and spread into healthy tissue. We have identified a novel pathway that directs Lyn/Src family tyrosine kinase signals to the invadopodia to regulate sarcoma cell invasion via the molecule AFAP-1-like-1 (AFAP1L1), a new member of the AFAP (actin filament-associated protein) family. We show that AFAP1L1 can transform cells, promote migration and co-expression with active Lyn profoundly influences cell morphology and movement. AFAP1L1 intersects several invadopodia pathway components through its multiple domains and motifs, including the following (i) pleckstrin homology domains that bind phospholipids generated at the plasma membrane by phosphoinositide 3-kinase, (ii) a direct filamentous-actin binding domain and (iii) phospho-tyrosine motifs (pY136 and pY566) that specifically bind Vav2 and Nck2 SH2 domains, respectively. These phosphotyrosine motifs are essential for AFAP1L1-mediated cytoskeleton regulation. Through its interaction with Vav2, AFAP1L1 regulates Rac activity and downstream control of PAK1/2/3 (p21-activated kinases) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and MLC2. AFAP1L1 interaction with Nck2 recruits actin-nucleating complexes. Significantly, in osteosarcoma cell lines, knockdown of AFAP1L1 inhibits phosphorylated MLC2 recruitment to filamentous-actin structures, disrupts invadopodia formation, cell attachment, migration and invasion. These data define a novel pathway that directs Lyn/Src family tyrosine kinase signals to sarcoma cell invadopodia through specific recruitment of Vav2 and Nck2 to phosphorylated AFAP1L1, to control cell migration and invasion. PMID:26212012

  6. Filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, A. M.

    The major aspects of filament winding are discussed, emphasizing basic reinforcement and matrix materials, winding procedures, process controls, and cured composite properties. Fiberglass (E-glass and S-glass strengths are 500,000 and 665,000 psi respectively) and polyester resins are the principal reinforcement constituent materials. Graphite and aramid reinforcements are being used more frequently, primarily for the more critical pressure vessels. Matrix systems are most commonly based on epoxy as it has superior mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, and heat resistance as compard with polyesters. A fiberglass overwrap of PVC pipe is an anticipated development in on-site winding and combination winding, and the compression molding of filament wound lay-ups will be investigated. The fabrication of weight-sensitive structural components may be achieved by using such moldings.

  7. H-treatment impact on conductive-filament formation and stability in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based resistive-switching memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goux, L. Redolfi, A.; Jurczak, M.; Kim, J. Y.; Magyari-Kope, B.; Nishi, Y.

    2015-03-28

    In this article, we evidence the lower formation energy and improved stability of the conductive filament (CF) formed in TiN\\Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}\\Ta resistive-switching memory cells treated in NH{sub 3} atmosphere at 400 °C. This annealing treatment results in (i) lower forming voltage, (ii) lower CF resistance, and (iii) longer retention lifetime of the oxygen-vacancy (V{sub o}) chain constituting the CF. Atomistic insights into these processes are provided by ab initio calculations performed for hydrogen (H) species incorporated in non-stoichiometric Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} supercells: (i) V{sub o} formation energy is reduced by the presence of H, (ii) V{sub o}-chain CF conductivity is increased by V{sub o} + OH complex formation, and (iii) V{sub o}-chain retention is strengthened by the stable V{sub o} + OH complex. As a result, efficient CF formation and excellent state stability are obtained after 15 days at 250 °C.

  8. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria. PMID:27116468

  9. DELLA proteins regulate arbuscule formation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Daniela S.; Levy, Julien G.; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    Most flowering plants are able to form endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this mutualistic association, the fungus colonizes the root cortex and establishes elaborately branched hyphae, called arbuscules, within the cortical cells. Arbuscule development requires the cellular reorganization of both symbionts, and the resulting symbiotic interface functions in nutrient exchange. A plant symbiosis signaling pathway controls the development of the symbiosis. Several components of the pathway have been identified, but transcriptional regulators that control downstream pathways for arbuscule formation are still unknown. Here we show that DELLA proteins, which are repressors of gibberellic acid (GA) signaling and function at the nexus of several signaling pathways, are required for arbuscule formation. Arbuscule formation is severely impaired in a Medicago truncatula Mtdella1/Mtdella2 double mutant; GA treatment of wild-type roots phenocopies the della double mutant, and a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) enables arbuscule formation in the presence of GA. Ectopic expression of della1-Δ18 suggests that DELLA activity in the vascular tissue and endodermis is sufficient to enable arbuscule formation in the inner cortical cells. In addition, expression of della1-Δ18 restores arbuscule formation in the symbiosis signaling pathway mutant cyclops/ipd3, indicating an intersection between DELLA and symbiosis signaling for arbuscule formation. GA signaling also influences arbuscule formation in monocots, and a Green Revolution wheat variety carrying dominant DELLA alleles shows enhanced colonization but a limited growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:24297892

  10. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H.; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R.; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E.; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B.; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI−/− and KtyII−/−K8 mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  11. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI(-/-) and KtyII(-/-)(K8) mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  12. N-cadherin prodomain cleavage regulates synapse formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Latefi, Nazlie S; Pedraza, Liliana; Schohl, Anne; Li, Ziwei; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2009-07-01

    Cadherins are initially synthesized bearing a prodomain that is thought to limit adhesion during early stages of biosynthesis. Functional cadherins lack this prodomain, raising the intriguing possibility that cells may utilize prodomain cleavage as a means to temporally or spatially regulate adhesion after delivery of cadherin to the cell surface. In support of this idea, immunostaining for the prodomain of zebrafish N-cadherin revealed enriched labeling at neuronal surfaces at the soma and along axonal processes. To determine whether post-translational cleavage of the prodomain affects synapse formation, we imaged Rohon-Beard cells in zebrafish embryos expressing GFP-tagged wild-type N-cadherin (NCAD-GFP) or a GFP-tagged N-cadherin mutant expressing an uncleavable prodomain (PRON-GFP) rendering it nonadhesive. NCAD-GFP accumulated at synaptic microdomains in a developmentally regulated manner, and its overexpression transiently accelerated synapse formation. PRON-GFP was much more diffusely distributed along the axon and its overexpression delayed synapse formation. Our results support the notion that N-cadherin serves to stabilize pre- to postsynaptic contacts early in synapse development and suggests that regulated cleavage of the N-cadherin prodomain may be a mechanism by which the kinetics of synaptogenesis are regulated. PMID:19365814

  13. DWARF GALAXY FORMATION WITH H{sub 2}-REGULATED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Krumholz, Mark R.; Madau, Piero; Smith, Britton D.; Wise, John

    2012-04-10

    We describe cosmological galaxy formation simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo that incorporate a star formation prescription regulated by the local abundance of molecular hydrogen. We show that this H{sub 2}-regulated prescription leads to a suppression of star formation in low-mass halos (M{sub h} {approx}< 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) at z > 4, alleviating some of the dwarf galaxy problems faced by theoretical galaxy formation models. H{sub 2} regulation modifies the efficiency of star formation of cold gas directly, rather than indirectly reducing the cold gas content with 'supernova feedback'. We determine the local H{sub 2} abundance in our most refined grid cells (76 proper parsec in size at z = 4) by applying the model of Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson, which is based on idealized one-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of H{sub 2} formation-dissociation balance in {approx}100 pc atomic-molecular complexes. Our H{sub 2}-regulated simulations are able to reproduce the empirical (albeit lower z) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, including the low {Sigma}{sub gas} cutoff due to the transition from atomic to molecular phase and the metallicity dependence thereof, without the use of an explicit density threshold in our star formation prescription. We compare the evolution of the luminosity function, stellar mass density, and star formation rate density from our simulations to recent observational determinations of the same at z = 4-8 and find reasonable agreement between the two.

  14. A Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation, Filamentation and Virulence with Low Potential for the Development of Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Lazzell, Anna L.; Powell, Alexander T.; Saville, Stephen. P.; McHardy, Stanton F.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Candida albicans is the principal causative agent of candidiasis, the most common fungal infection in humans. Candidiasis represents the third-to-fourth most frequent nosocomial infection worldwide, as this normal commensal of humans causes opportunistic infections in an expanding population of immune- and medically-compromised patients. These infections are frequently associated with biofilm formation, which complicates treatment and contributes to unacceptably high mortality rates. Methods To address the pressing need for new antifungals we have performed a high content screen of 20,000 small molecules in a chemical library (NOVACore™) to identify compounds that inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation, and conducted a series of follow-up studies to examine the in vitro and in vivo activity of the identified compounds. Results The screen identified a novel series of diazaspiro-decane structural analogs which were largely represented among the bioactive compounds. Characterization of the leading compound from this series indicated that it inhibits processes associated with C. albicans virulence, most notably biofilm formation and filamentation, without having an effect on overall growth or eliciting resistance. This compound demonstrated in vivo activity in clinically-relevant murine models of both invasive and oral candidiasis and as such represents a promising lead for antifungal drug development. Furthermore, these results provide proof of concept for the implementation of anti-virulence approaches against C. albicans and other fungal infections that would be less likely to foster the emergence of resistance. PMID:26691764

  15. Micromechanical thermal assays of Ca2+-regulated thin-filament function and modulation by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutants of human cardiac troponin.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Nicolas M; Mihajlović, Goran; Aledealat, Khaled; Wang, Fang; Xiong, Peng; von Molnár, Stephan; Chase, P Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Microfabricated thermoelectric controllers can be employed to investigate mechanisms underlying myosin-driven sliding of Ca(2+)-regulated actin and disease-associated mutations in myofilament proteins. Specifically, we examined actin filament sliding-with or without human cardiac troponin (Tn) and α-tropomyosin (Tm)-propelled by rabbit skeletal heavy meromyosin, when temperature was varied continuously over a wide range (~20-63°C). At the upper end of this temperature range, reversible dysregulation of thin filaments occurred at pCa 9 and 5; actomyosin function was unaffected. Tn-Tm enhanced sliding speed at pCa 5 and increased a transition temperature (T(t)) between a high activation energy (E(a)) but low temperature regime and a low E(a) but high temperature regime. This was modulated by factors that alter cross-bridge number and kinetics. Three familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) mutations, cTnI R145G, cTnI K206Q, and cTnT R278C, cause dysregulation at temperatures ~5-8°C lower; the latter two increased speed at pCa 5 at all temperatures. PMID:22500102

  16. FAM83H and casein kinase I regulate the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and formation of desmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuga, Takahisa; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Adachi, Jun; Shimizu, Maiko; Saito, Youhei; Koura, Minako; Takeda, Yasunori; Matsuda, Junichiro; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    FAM83H is essential for the formation of dental enamel because a mutation in the FAM83H gene causes amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). We previously reported that the overexpression of FAM83H often occurs and disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton in colorectal cancer cells. We herein show that FAM83H regulates the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and maintains the formation of desmosomes in ameloblastoma cells. FAM83H is expressed and localized on keratin filaments in human ameloblastoma cell lines and in mouse ameloblasts and epidermal germinative cells in vivo. FAM83H shows preferential localization to keratin filaments around the nucleus that often extend to cell-cell junctions. Alterations in the function of FAM83H by its overexpression, knockdown, or an AI-causing truncated mutant prevent the proper organization of the keratin cytoskeleton in ameloblastoma cells. Furthermore, the AI-causing mutant prevents desmosomal proteins from being localized to cell-cell junctions. The effects of the AI-causing mutant depend on its binding to and possible inhibition of casein kinase I (CK-1). The suppression of CK-1 by its inhibitor, D4476, disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that AI caused by the FAM83H mutation is mediated by the disorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of desmosomes in ameloblasts. PMID:27222304

  17. FAM83H and casein kinase I regulate the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and formation of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Takahisa; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Mikami, Toshinari; Miake, Yasuo; Adachi, Jun; Shimizu, Maiko; Saito, Youhei; Koura, Minako; Takeda, Yasunori; Matsuda, Junichiro; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    FAM83H is essential for the formation of dental enamel because a mutation in the FAM83H gene causes amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). We previously reported that the overexpression of FAM83H often occurs and disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton in colorectal cancer cells. We herein show that FAM83H regulates the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton and maintains the formation of desmosomes in ameloblastoma cells. FAM83H is expressed and localized on keratin filaments in human ameloblastoma cell lines and in mouse ameloblasts and epidermal germinative cells in vivo. FAM83H shows preferential localization to keratin filaments around the nucleus that often extend to cell-cell junctions. Alterations in the function of FAM83H by its overexpression, knockdown, or an AI-causing truncated mutant prevent the proper organization of the keratin cytoskeleton in ameloblastoma cells. Furthermore, the AI-causing mutant prevents desmosomal proteins from being localized to cell-cell junctions. The effects of the AI-causing mutant depend on its binding to and possible inhibition of casein kinase I (CK-1). The suppression of CK-1 by its inhibitor, D4476, disorganizes the keratin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that AI caused by the FAM83H mutation is mediated by the disorganization of the keratin cytoskeleton and subsequent disruption of desmosomes in ameloblasts. PMID:27222304

  18. TGF-β Signaling Regulates Cementum Formation through Osterix Expression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hwajung; Ahn, Yu-Hyun; Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Chae; You, Hyung-Keun; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β/BMPs have widely recognized roles in mammalian development, including in bone and tooth formation. To define the functional relevance of the autonomous requirement for TGF-β signaling in mouse tooth development, we analyzed osteocalcin-Cre mediated Tgfbr2 (OCCreTgfbr2fl/fl) conditional knockout mice, which lacks functional TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) in differentiating cementoblasts and cementocytes. Strikingly, OCCreTgfbr2fl/fl mutant mice exhibited a sharp reduction in cellular cementum mass with reduced matrix secretion and mineral apposition rates. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of TGF-β signaling through TβRII in cementogenesis, we established a mouse cementoblast model with decreased TβRII expression using OCCM-30 cells. Interestingly, the expression of osterix (Osx), one of the major regulators of cellular cementum formation, was largely decreased in OCCM-30 cells lacking TβRII. Consequently, in those cells, functional ALP activity and the expression of genes associated with cementogenesis were reduced and the cells were partially rescued by Osx transduction. We also found that TGF-β signaling directly regulates Osx expression through a Smad-dependent pathway. These findings strongly suggest that TGF-β signaling plays a major role as one of the upstream regulators of Osx in cementoblast differentiation and cementum formation. PMID:27180803

  19. TGF-β Signaling Regulates Cementum Formation through Osterix Expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwajung; Ahn, Yu-Hyun; Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Chae; You, Hyung-Keun; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β/BMPs have widely recognized roles in mammalian development, including in bone and tooth formation. To define the functional relevance of the autonomous requirement for TGF-β signaling in mouse tooth development, we analyzed osteocalcin-Cre mediated Tgfbr2 (OC(Cre)Tgfbr2(fl/fl)) conditional knockout mice, which lacks functional TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) in differentiating cementoblasts and cementocytes. Strikingly, OC(Cre)Tgfbr2(fl/fl) mutant mice exhibited a sharp reduction in cellular cementum mass with reduced matrix secretion and mineral apposition rates. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of TGF-β signaling through TβRII in cementogenesis, we established a mouse cementoblast model with decreased TβRII expression using OCCM-30 cells. Interestingly, the expression of osterix (Osx), one of the major regulators of cellular cementum formation, was largely decreased in OCCM-30 cells lacking TβRII. Consequently, in those cells, functional ALP activity and the expression of genes associated with cementogenesis were reduced and the cells were partially rescued by Osx transduction. We also found that TGF-β signaling directly regulates Osx expression through a Smad-dependent pathway. These findings strongly suggest that TGF-β signaling plays a major role as one of the upstream regulators of Osx in cementoblast differentiation and cementum formation. PMID:27180803

  20. Confronting the outflow-regulated cluster formation model with observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Li, Zhi-Yun E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu

    2014-03-10

    Protostellar outflows have been shown theoretically to be capable of maintaining supersonic turbulence in cluster-forming clumps and keeping the star formation rate per free-fall time as low as a few percent. We aim to test two basic predictions of this outflow-regulated cluster formation model, namely, (1) the clump should be close to virial equilibrium and (2) the turbulence dissipation rate should be balanced by the outflow momentum injection rate, using recent outflow surveys toward eight nearby cluster-forming clumps (B59, L1551, L1641N, Serpens Main Cloud, Serpens South, ρ Oph, IC 348, and NGC 1333). We find, for almost all sources, that the clumps are close to virial equilibrium and the outflow momentum injection rate exceeds the turbulence momentum dissipation rate. In addition, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy for intermediate and massive clumps with M {sub cl} ≳ a few × 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉}, suggesting that the outflow feedback is not enough to disperse the clump as a whole. The number of observed protostars also indicates that the star formation rate per free-fall time is as small as a few percent for all clumps. These observationally based results strengthen the case for outflow-regulated cluster formation.

  1. Filament identification through mathematical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new algorithm for detecting filamentary structure FILFINDER. The algorithm uses the techniques of mathematical morphology for filament identification, presenting a complementary approach to current algorithms which use matched filtering or critical manifolds. Unlike other methods, FILFINDER identifies filaments over a wide dynamic range in brightness. We apply the new algorithm to far-infrared imaging data of dust emission released by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey team. Our preliminary analysis characterizes both filaments and fainter striations. We find a typical filament width of 0.09 pc across the sample, but the brightness varies from cloud to cloud. Several regions show a bimodal filament brightness distribution, with the bright mode (filaments) being an order of magnitude brighter than the faint mode (striations). Using the Rolling Hough Transform, we characterize the orientations of the striations in the data, finding preferred directions that agree with magnetic field direction where data are available. There is a suggestive but noisy correlation between typical filament brightness and literature values of the star formation rates for clouds in the Gould Belt.

  2. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  3. High Resolution Characterization of Myosin IIC Protein Tailpiece and Its Effect on Filament Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Masha M.; Ronen, Daniel; Lahav, Noa; Nazirov, Elvira; Ravid, Shoshana; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) must undergo dynamic oligomerization into filaments to perform its cellular functions. A small nonhelical region at the tail of the long coiled-coil region (tailpiece) is a common feature of all dynamically assembling myosin II proteins. This tailpiece is a key regulatory domain affecting NMII filament assembly properties and is subject to phosphorylation in vivo. We previously demonstrated that the positively charged region of the tailpiece binds to assembly-incompetent NMII-C fragments, inducing filament assembly. In the current study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the tailpiece regulates NMII-C self-assembly. Using alanine scan, we found that specific positive and aromatic residues within the positively charged region of the tailpiece are important for inducing NMII-C filament assembly and for filament elongation. Combining peptide arrays with deletion studies allowed us to identify the tailpiece binding sites in the coiled-coil rod. Elucidation of the mechanism by which the tailpiece induces filament assembly permitted us further investigation into the role of tailpiece phosphorylation. Sedimentation and CD spectroscopy identified that phosphorylation of Thr1957 or Thr1960 inhibited the ability of the tailpiece to bind the coiled-coil rod and to induce NMII-C filament formation. This study provides molecular insight into the role of specific residues within the NMII-C tailpiece that are responsible for shifting the oligomeric equilibrium of NMII-C toward filament assembly and determining its morphology. PMID:23426373

  4. Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-03-07

    Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

  5. Characterizing filaments in regions of high-mass star formation: High-resolution submilimeter imaging of the massive star-forming complex NGC 6334 with ArTéMiS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Ph.; Revéret, V.; Könyves, V.; Arzoumanian, D.; Tigé, J.; Gallais, P.; Roussel, H.; Le Pennec, J.; Rodriguez, L.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubreuil, D.; Lortholary, M.; Martignac, J.; Talvard, M.; Delisle, C.; Visticot, F.; Dumaye, L.; De Breuck, C.; Shimajiri, Y.; Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Hennemann, M.; Zavagno, A.; Russeil, D.; Schneider, N.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Hill, T.; Minier, V.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Herschel observations of nearby molecular clouds suggest that interstellar filaments and prestellar cores represent two fundamental steps in the star formation process. The observations support a picture of low-mass star formation according to which filaments of ~0.1 pc width form first in the cold interstellar medium, probably as a result of large-scale compression of interstellar matter by supersonic turbulent flows, and then prestellar cores arise from gravitational fragmentation of the densest filaments. Whether this scenario also applies to regions of high-mass star formation is an open question, in part because the resolution of Herschel is insufficient to resolve the inner width of filaments in the nearest regions of massive star formation. Aims: In an effort to characterize the inner width of filaments in high-mass star-forming regions, we imaged the central part of the NGC 6334 complex at a resolution higher by a factor of >3 than Herschel at 350 μm. Methods: We used the large-format bolometer camera ArTéMiS on the APEX telescope and combined the high-resolution ArTéMiS data at 350 μm with Herschel/HOBYS data at 70-500 μm to ensure good sensitivity to a broad range of spatial scales. This allowed us to study the structure of the main narrow filament of the complex with a resolution of 8″ or <0.07 pc at d ~ 1.7 kpc. Results: Our study confirms that this filament is a very dense, massive linear structure with a line mass ranging from ~500 M⊙/pc to ~2000 M⊙/pc over nearly 10 pc. It also demonstrates for the first time that its inner width remains as narrow as W ~ 0.15 ± 0.05 pc all along the filament length, within a factor of <2 of the characteristic 0.1 pc value found with Herschel for lower-mass filaments in the Gould Belt. Conclusions: While it is not completely clear whether the NGC 6334 filament will form massive stars in the future, it is two to three orders of magnitude denser than the majority of filaments observed in Gould Belt

  6. Regulation of cell proliferation by ERK and signal-dependent nuclear translocation of ERK is dependent on Tm5NM1-containing actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schevzov, Galina; Kee, Anthony J.; Wang, Bin; Sequeira, Vanessa B.; Hook, Jeff; Coombes, Jason D.; Lucas, Christine A.; Stehn, Justine R.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Cretu, Alexandra; Assoian, Richard; Fath, Thomas; Hanoch, Tamar; Seger, Rony; Pleines, Irina; Kile, Benjamin T.; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    ERK-regulated cell proliferation requires multiple phosphorylation events catalyzed first by MEK and then by casein kinase 2 (CK2), followed by interaction with importin7 and subsequent nuclear translocation of pERK. We report that genetic manipulation of a core component of the actin filaments of cancer cells, the tropomyosin Tm5NM1, regulates the proliferation of normal cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Tm5NM1, which have reduced proliferative capacity, are insensitive to inhibition of ERK by peptide and small-molecule inhibitors, indicating that ERK is unable to regulate proliferation of these knockout (KO) cells. Treatment of wild-type MEFs with a CK2 inhibitor to block phosphorylation of the nuclear translocation signal in pERK resulted in greatly decreased cell proliferation and a significant reduction in the nuclear translocation of pERK. In contrast, Tm5NM1 KO MEFs, which show reduced nuclear translocation of pERK, were unaffected by inhibition of CK2. This suggested that it is nuclear translocation of CK2-phosphorylated pERK that regulates cell proliferation and this capacity is absent in Tm5NM1 KO cells. Proximity ligation assays confirmed a growth factor–stimulated interaction of pERK with Tm5NM1 and that the interaction of pERK with importin7 is greatly reduced in the Tm5NM1 KO cells. PMID:25971798

  7. The nonlinear evolution of magnetized solar filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.; Schnack, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal instability driven by optically thin radiation is believed to initiate the formation of plasma filaments in the solar corona. The fact that filaments are observed generally to separate regions of opposite, line-of-sight, magnetic polarity in the underlying photosphere suggests that filament formation requires the presence of a highly sheared, local magnetic field. Two-dimensional, nonlinear, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the local genesis and growth of solar filaments in a force-free, sheared, magnetic field were performed, and the evolution of generic perturbations possessing broad spatial profiles was traced. It was found that simulations of the evolution of initial random-noise perturbations produce filamentary plasma structures that exhibit densities and temperatures characteristic of observed solar filaments. Furthermore, in each of these simulations, the filament axis lies at a finite angle with respect to the local magnetic field, consistent with solar observations.

  8. Presence and regulation of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed Central

    Meixner-Monori, B; Kubicek, C P; Habison, A; Kubicek-Pranz, E M; Röhr, M

    1985-01-01

    alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase has been demonstrated for the first time in cell extracts from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. A minimum protein concentration of 5 mg/ml is necessary for detecting enzyme activity, but a maximum of ca. 0.060 mumol/min per mg of protein is observed only when the protein concentration is above 9 mg/ml. alpha-Ketoglutarate can partly stabilize the enzyme against dilution in the assay system. Neither bovine serum albumin nor a variety of substrates or effectors of the enzyme could stabilize the enzyme against inactivation by dilution. A kinetic analysis of the enzyme revealed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to alpha-ketoglutarate, coenzyme A, and NAD. Thiamine PPi was required for maximal activity. NADH, oxaloacetate, succinate, and cis-aconitate were found to inhibit the enzyme; AMP was without effect. Monovalent cations including NH4+ were inhibitory at high concentrations (greater than 20 mM). The highest enzyme activity was found in rapidly growing mycelia (glucose-NH4+ or glucose-peptone medium). We discuss the possibility that citric acid accumulation is caused by oxaloacetate and NADH inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase of A. niger. PMID:3968029

  9. Role of Filamentous Phage SW1 in Regulating the Lateral Flagella of Shewanella piezotolerans Strain WP3 at Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Huahua; Xiao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Low-temperature ecosystems represent the largest biosphere on Earth, and yet our understanding of the roles of bacteriophages in these systems is limited. Here, the influence of the cold-active filamentous phage SW1 on the phenotype and gene transcription of its host, Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 (WP3), was investigated by construction of a phage-free strain (WP3ΔSW1), which was compared with the wild-type strain. The expression of 49 genes, including 16 lateral flagellar genes, was found to be significantly influenced by SW1 at 4°C, as demonstrated by comparative whole-genome microarray analysis. WP3ΔSW1 was shown to have a higher production of lateral flagella than WP3 and enhanced swarming motility when cultivated on solid agar plates. Besides, SW1 has a remarkable impact on the expression of a variety of host genes in liquid culture, particularly the genes related to the membrane and to the production of lateral flagella. These results suggest that the deep-sea bacterium WP3 might balance the high-energy demands of phage maintenance and swarming motility at low temperatures. The phage SW1 is shown to have a significant influence on the swarming ability of the host and thus may play an important role in adjusting the fitness of the cells in the deep-sea environment. PMID:24038680

  10. Pseudomonas fluorescens Filamentous Hemagglutinin, an Iron-Regulated Protein, Is an Important Virulence Factor that Modulates Bacterial Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i) exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii) displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii) was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv) displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity. PMID:27602029

  11. Pseudomonas fluorescens Filamentous Hemagglutinin, an Iron-Regulated Protein, Is an Important Virulence Factor that Modulates Bacterial Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i) exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii) displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii) was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv) displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity. PMID:27602029

  12. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100–200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500–1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  13. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell.

    PubMed

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100-200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500-1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  14. Contributions of EspA filaments and curli fimbriae in cellular adherence and biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157), the filamentous structure of the type III secretion system is produced from the polymerization of the EspA protein. EspA filaments are essential for O157 adherence to epithelial cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that O157 hha deletion mutants showed incr...

  15. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Tim J.; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  16. Laminin 5 regulates polycystic kidney cell proliferation and cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Joly, Dominique; Berissi, Sophie; Bertrand, Amélie; Strehl, Laetitia; Patey, Natacha; Knebelmann, Bertrand

    2006-09-29

    Renal cyst formation is the hallmark of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). ADPKD cyst-lining cells have an increased proliferation rate and are surrounded by an abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM). We have previously shown that Laminin 5 (Ln-5, a alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(2) trimer) is aberrantly expressed in the pericystic ECM of ADPKD kidneys. We report that ADPKD cells in primary cultures produce and secrete Ln-5 that is incorporated to the pericystic ECM in an in vitro model of cystogenesis. In monolayers, purified Ln-5 induces ERK activation and proliferation of ADPKD cells, whereas upon epidermal growth factor stimulation blocking endogenously produced Ln-5 with anti-gamma(2) chain antibody reduces the sustained ERK activation and inhibits proliferation. In three-dimensional gel culture, addition of purified Ln-5 stimulates cell proliferation and cyst formation, whereas blocking endogenous Ln-5 strongly inhibits cyst formation. Ligation of alpha(6)beta(4) integrin, a major Ln-5 receptor aberrantly expressed by ADPKD cells, induces beta(4) integrin phosphorylation, ERK activation, cell proliferation, and cyst formation. These findings indicate that Ln-5 is an important regulator of ADPKD cell proliferation and cystogenesis and suggest that Ln-5 gamma(2) chain and Ln-5-alpha(6)beta(4) integrin interaction both contribute to these phenotypic changes. PMID:16870608

  17. Perivascular mast cells regulate vein graft neointimal formation and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Grassia, Gianluca; Cambrook, Helen; Ialenti, Armando; MacRitchie, Neil; Carberry, Jaclyn; Lawrence, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Emerging evidence suggests an important role for mast cells in vein graft failure. This study addressed the hypothesis that perivascular mast cells regulate in situ vascular inflammatory and proliferative responses and subsequent vein graft neointimal lesion formation, using an optimized local mast cell reconstitution method. Methods and Results. Neointimal hyperplasia was induced by insertion of a vein graft into the right carotid artery in wild type and mast cell deficient KitW−sh/W−sh mice. In some experiments, mast cells were reconstituted systemically (tail vein injection of bone marrow-derived mast cells) or locally (directly into the right neck area) prior to vein grafting. Vein graft neointimal lesion formation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in KitW−sh/W−sh mice. Mast cell deficiency reduced the number of proliferating cells, and inhibited L-selectin, CCL2, M-CSF and MIP-3α expression in the vein grafts. Local but not systemic mast cell reconstitution restored a perivascular mast cell population that subsequently promoted neointimal formation in mast cell deficient mice. Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that perivascular mast cells play a key role in promoting neointima formation by inducing local acute inflammatory and proliferative responses. These results suggest that ex vivo intraoperative targeting of mast cells may have therapeutic potential for the prevention of pathological vein graft remodeling. PMID:26312183

  18. Centrin2 regulates CP110 removal in primary cilium formation

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Suzanna L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are antenna-like sensory microtubule structures that extend from basal bodies, plasma membrane–docked mother centrioles. Cellular quiescence potentiates ciliogenesis, but the regulation of basal body formation is not fully understood. We used reverse genetics to test the role of the small calcium-binding protein, centrin2, in ciliogenesis. Primary cilia arise in most cell types but have not been described in lymphocytes. We show here that serum starvation of transformed, cultured B and T cells caused primary ciliogenesis. Efficient ciliogenesis in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes required centrin2. We disrupted CETN2 in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells, and despite having intact centrioles, they were unable to make cilia upon serum starvation, showing abnormal localization of distal appendage proteins and failing to remove the ciliation inhibitor CP110. Knockdown of CP110 rescued ciliation in CETN2-deficient cells. Thus, centrin2 regulates primary ciliogenesis through controlling CP110 levels. PMID:25753040

  19. Transcriptional Autoregulation and Inhibition of mRNA Translation of Amino Acid Regulator Gene cpcA of Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Valerius, Oliver; Andermann, Meike; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2001-01-01

    The CPCA protein of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is a member of the c-Jun-like transcriptional activator family. It acts as central transcription factor of the cross-pathway regulatory network of amino acid biosynthesis and is functionally exchangeable for the general control transcriptional activator Gcn4p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to GCN4, expression of cpcA is strongly regulated by two equally important mechanisms with additive effects that lead to a fivefold increased CPCA protein amount under amino acid starvation conditions. One component of cpcA regulation involves a transcriptional autoregulatory mechanism via a CPCA recognition element (CPRE) in the cpcA promoter that causes a sevenfold increased cpcA mRNA level when cells are starved for amino acids. Point mutations in the CPRE cause a constitutively low mRNA level of cpcA and a halved protein level when amino acids are limited. Moreover, two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5′ region of the cpcA mRNA are important for a translational regulatory mechanism. Destruction of both short uORFs results in a sixfold increased CPCA protein level under nonstarvation conditions and a 10-fold increase under starvation conditions. Mutations in both the CPRE and uORF regulatory elements lead to an intermediate effect, with a low cpcA mRNA level but a threefold increased CPCA protein level independent of amino acid availability. These data argue for a combined regulation of cpcA that includes a translational regulation like that of yeast GCN4 as well as a transcriptional regulation like that of the mammalian jun and fos genes. PMID:11553722

  20. Autophagy-Associated Protein SmATG12 Is Required for Fruiting-Body Formation in the Filamentous Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Antonia; Herzog, Britta; Frey, Stefan; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, autophagy functions as a catabolic mechanism to overcome starvation and to control diverse developmental processes under normal nutritional conditions. Autophagy involves the formation of double-membrane vesicles, termed autophagosomes that engulf cellular components and bring about their degradation via fusion with vacuoles. Two ubiquitin-like (UBL) conjugation systems are essential for the expansion of the autophagosomal membrane: the UBL protein ATG8 is conjugated to the lipid phosphatidylethanolamine and the UBL protein ATG12 is coupled to ATG5. We recently showed that in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora autophagy-related genes encoding components of the conjugation systems are required for fruiting-body development and/or are essential for viability. In the present work, we cloned and characterized the S. macrospora (Sm)atg12 gene. Two-hybrid analysis revealed that SmATG12 can interact with SmATG7 and SmATG3. To examine its role in S. macrospora, we replaced the open reading frame of Smatg12 with a hygromycin resistance cassette and generated a homokaryotic ΔSmatg12 knockout strain, which displayed slower vegetative growth under nutrient starvation conditions and was unable to form fruiting bodies. In the hyphae of S. macrospora EGFP-labeled SmATG12 was detected in the cytoplasm and as punctate structures presumed to be phagophores or phagophore assembly sites. Delivery of EGFP-labelled SmATG8 to the vacuole was entirely dependent on SmATG12. PMID:27309377

  1. Autophagy-Associated Protein SmATG12 Is Required for Fruiting-Body Formation in the Filamentous Ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    PubMed

    Werner, Antonia; Herzog, Britta; Frey, Stefan; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, autophagy functions as a catabolic mechanism to overcome starvation and to control diverse developmental processes under normal nutritional conditions. Autophagy involves the formation of double-membrane vesicles, termed autophagosomes that engulf cellular components and bring about their degradation via fusion with vacuoles. Two ubiquitin-like (UBL) conjugation systems are essential for the expansion of the autophagosomal membrane: the UBL protein ATG8 is conjugated to the lipid phosphatidylethanolamine and the UBL protein ATG12 is coupled to ATG5. We recently showed that in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora autophagy-related genes encoding components of the conjugation systems are required for fruiting-body development and/or are essential for viability. In the present work, we cloned and characterized the S. macrospora (Sm)atg12 gene. Two-hybrid analysis revealed that SmATG12 can interact with SmATG7 and SmATG3. To examine its role in S. macrospora, we replaced the open reading frame of Smatg12 with a hygromycin resistance cassette and generated a homokaryotic ΔSmatg12 knockout strain, which displayed slower vegetative growth under nutrient starvation conditions and was unable to form fruiting bodies. In the hyphae of S. macrospora EGFP-labeled SmATG12 was detected in the cytoplasm and as punctate structures presumed to be phagophores or phagophore assembly sites. Delivery of EGFP-labelled SmATG8 to the vacuole was entirely dependent on SmATG12. PMID:27309377

  2. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress. PMID:26854229

  3. Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Kendall, Brian A; Griffin, Allen T; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous mycoses are often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential for good clinical outcomes in immunocompromised patients. The host immune response plays an essential role in determining the course of exposure to potential fungal pathogens. Depending on the effectiveness of immune response and the burden of organism exposure, fungi can either be cleared or infection can occur and progress to a potentially fatal invasive disease. Nonspecific cellular immunity (i.e., neutrophils, natural killer [NK] cells, and macrophages) combined with T-cell responses are the main immunologic mechanisms of protection. The most common potential mold pathogens include certain hyaline hyphomycetes, endemic fungi, the Mucorales, and some dematiaceous fungi. Laboratory diagnostics aimed at detecting and differentiating these organisms are crucial to helping clinicians make informed decisions about treatment. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the medically important fungal pathogens, as well as to discuss the patient characteristics, antifungal-therapy considerations, and laboratory tests used in current clinical practice for the immunocompromised host. PMID:27337469

  4. Competitive effects of oxygen vacancy formation and interfacial oxidation on an ultra-thin HfO2-based resistive switching memory: beyond filament and charge hopping models.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hisao; Asai, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    We studied the quantum transport mechanism of an ultra-thin HfO2-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM) cell with TiN electrodes and proposed the design of a sub-10 nm scale device. It is believed that formation and rupture of the conduction path in the local filament causes the switching between high and low resistive states. However, the validity of this simple filament model is not obvious in the sub-10 nm scale device because the redox processes occur mainly in a few nm range at the interface. Furthermore, the intrinsic transport mechanism of the device, in particular, quantum coherence, depends on device materials and length-scale. The relationship between the redox states and the transport mechanism like ballistic or hopping is still under debate when the device length scale is less than 10 nm. In the present study, we performed first-principles calculations of the non-equilibrium Green's function including electron-phonon interactions. We examined several characteristic structures of the HfO(x) wire (nano-scale conduction path) and the interfaces between the resistive switching layer and electrodes. We found that the metal buffer layer induced a change in the oxygen-reduction site from the interface of HfO(x)/TiN to the buffer layer. Even when the inserted buffer layer is a few atomic layers, this effect plays an important role in the enhancement of the performance of ON/OFF resistive switching and in the reduction of the inelastic electric current by electron-phonon scattering. The latter suppresses the hopping mechanism, which makes the ballistic conduction the dominant mechanism. We evaluated the activation energy in the high temperature limit by using the first-principles results of inelastic current. Our theoretical model explains the observed crossover of the temperature dependence of ReRAM cells and gives a new insight into the principle of operation on a sub-10 nm scale ReRAM device. PMID:26975565

  5. Nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional instabilities of thin and thick electron scale current sheets: Plasmoid formation and current filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2014-07-15

    Nonlinear evolution of three dimensional electron shear flow instabilities of an electron current sheet (ECS) is studied using electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of the evolution on current sheet thickness is examined. For thin current sheets (half thickness =d{sub e}=c/ω{sub pe}), tearing mode instability dominates. In its nonlinear evolution, it leads to the formation of oblique current channels. Magnetic field lines form 3-D magnetic spirals. Even in the absence of initial guide field, the out-of-reconnection-plane magnetic field generated by the tearing instability itself may play the role of guide field in the growth of secondary finite-guide-field instabilities. For thicker current sheets (half thickness ∼5 d{sub e}), both tearing and non-tearing modes grow. Due to the non-tearing mode, current sheet becomes corrugated in the beginning of the evolution. In this case, tearing mode lets the magnetic field reconnect in the corrugated ECS. Later thick ECS develops filamentary structures and turbulence in which reconnection occurs. This evolution of thick ECS provides an example of reconnection in self-generated turbulence. The power spectra for both the thin and thick current sheets are anisotropic with respect to the electron flow direction. The cascade towards shorter scales occurs preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the electron flow.

  6. Transient electrical coupling regulates formation of neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Theresa M; Zoran, Mark J

    2007-01-19

    Electrical synapses are abundant before and during developmental windows of intense chemical synapse formation, and might therefore contribute to the establishment of neuronal networks. Transient electrical coupling develops and is then eliminated between regenerating Helisoma motoneurons 110 and 19 during a period of 48-72 h in vivo and in vitro following nerve injury. An inverse relationship exists between electrical coupling and chemical synaptic transmission at these synapses, such that the decline in electrical coupling is coincident with the emergence of cholinergic synaptic transmission. In this study, we have generated two- and three-cell neuronal networks to test whether predicted synaptogenic capabilities were affected by previous synaptic interactions. Electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that synapses formed in three-cell neuronal networks were not those predicted based on synaptogenic outcomes in two-cell networks. Thus, new electrical and chemical synapse formation within a neuronal network is dependent on existing connectivity of that network. In addition, new contacts formed with established networks have little impact on these existing connections. These results suggest that network-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by gap junctional coupling, regulate synapse formation within simple neural networks. PMID:17156754

  7. Regulation of contractile vacuole formation and activity in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Edwards, Kimberly; Shen, Zhouxin; Sun, Binggang; De Lozanne, Arturo; Briggs, Steven; Firtel, Richard A

    2008-08-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) system is the osmoregulatory organelle required for survival for many free-living cells under hypotonic conditions. We identified a new CV regulator, Disgorgin, a TBC-domain-containing protein, which translocates to the CV membrane at the late stage of CV charging and regulates CV-plasma membrane fusion and discharging. disgorgin(-) cells produce large CVs due to impaired CV-plasma membrane fusion. Disgorgin is a specific GAP for Rab8A-GTP, which also localizes to the CV and whose hydrolysis is required for discharging. We demonstrate that Drainin, a previously identified TBC-domain-containing protein, lies upstream from Disgorgin in this pathway. Unlike Disgorgin, Drainin lacks GAP activity but functions as a Rab11A effector. The BEACH family proteins LvsA and LvsD were identified in a suppressor/enhancer screen of the disgorgin(-) large CV phenotype and demonstrated to have distinct functions in regulating CV formation. Our studies help define the pathways controlling CV function. PMID:18636095

  8. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evan; Risca, Viviana; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia-Jun; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Actin filaments are key components of the cellular machinery, vital for a wide range of processes ranging from cell motility to endocytosis. Actin filaments can branch, and essential in this process is a protein complex known as the Arp2/3 complex, which nucleate new ``daughter'' filaments from pre-existing ``mother'' filaments by attaching itself to the mother filament. Though much progress has been made in understanding the Arp2/3-actin junction, some very interesting questions remain. In particular, F-actin is a dynamic polymer that undergoes a wide range of fluctuations. Prior studies of the Arp2/3-actin junction provides a very static notion of Arp2/3 binding. The question we ask is how differently does the Arp2/3 complex interact with a straight filament compared to a bent filament? In this study, we used Monte Carlo simulations of a surface-tethered worm-like chain to explore possible mechanisms underlying the experimental observation that there exists preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of a curved filament. We show that a fluctuation gating model in which Arp2/3 binding to the actin filament is dependent upon a rare high-local-curvature shape fluctuation of the filament is consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation for Atmospheric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huai Liang; Chin, See Leang

    2011-01-01

    Powerful femtosecond laser pulses propagating in transparent materials result in the formation of self-guided structures called filaments. Such filamentation in air can be controlled to occur at a distance as far as a few kilometers, making it ideally suited for remote sensing of pollutants in the atmosphere. On the one hand, the high intensity inside the filaments can induce the fragmentation of all matters in the path of filaments, resulting in the emission of characteristic fluorescence spectra (fingerprints) from the excited fragments, which can be used for the identification of various substances including chemical and biological species. On the other hand, along with the femtosecond laser filamentation, white-light supercontinuum emission in the infrared to UV range is generated, which can be used as an ideal light source for absorption Lidar. In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress concerning remote sensing of the atmosphere using femtosecond laser filamentation. PMID:22346566

  10. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  11. Supramolecular Assembly in Cytoskeletal Filaments and their Associated Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2002-03-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the emerging proteomics era, the biosciences community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the functions of a large number of interacting proteins. Cellular activity, which is usually tightly regulated, results from protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, which often lead to the formation of very large assemblies of biomolecules for distinct functions. Examples include DNA condensation states during the cell cycle, and bundle and network formation of filamentous proteins in cell attachment, motility, and cytokinesis. We present recent synchrotron x-ray diffraction and optical imaging data, in cell-free systems of cytoskeletal filaments and their associated biomolecules, which reveal novel supramolecular assemblies, spanning lengths from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Supported by NSF DMR-9972246 and NIH GM59288.

  12. Bone marrow adipose tissue: formation, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Suchacki, Karla J; Cawthorn, William P; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-06-01

    The human body requires an uninterrupted supply of energy to maintain metabolic homeostasis and energy balance. To sustain energy balance, excess consumed calories are stored as glycogen, triglycerides and protein, allowing the body to continue to function in states of starvation and increased energy expenditure. Adipose tissue provides the largest natural store of excess calories as triglycerides and plays an important role as an endocrine organ in energy homeostasis and beyond. This short review is intended to detail the current knowledge of the formation and role of bone marrow adipose tissue (MAT), a largely ignored adipose depot, focussing on the role of MAT as an endocrine organ and highlighting the pharmacological agents that regulate MAT. PMID:27022859

  13. Nitric oxide regulates neutrophil migration through microparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Sarah; Dixon, Rachel; Norman, Keith; Hellewell, Paul; Ridger, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating neutrophil migration has been investigated. Human neutrophil migration to interleukin (IL)-8 (1 nmol/L) was measured after a 1-hour incubation using a 96-well chemotaxis plate assay. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced IL-8-induced migration by up to 45%. Anti-CD18 significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited both IL-8-induced and L-NAME enhanced migration. Antibodies to L-selectin or PSGL-1 had no effect on IL-8-induced migration but prevented the increased migration to IL-8 induced by L-NAME. L-NAME induced generation of neutrophil-derived microparticles that was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than untreated neutrophils or D-NAME. This microparticle formation was dependent on calpain activity and superoxide production. Only microparticles from L-NAME and not untreated or D-NAME-treated neutrophils induced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in IL-8-induced migration and transendothelial migration. Pretreatment of microparticles with antibodies to L-selectin (DREG-200) or PSGL-1 (PL-1) significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited this effect. The ability of L-NAME-induced microparticles to enhance migration was found to be dependent on the number of microparticles produced and not an increase in microparticle surface L-selectin or PSGL-1 expression. These data show that NO can modulate neutrophil migration by regulating microparticle formation. PMID:18079439

  14. The effects of transverse plasma flow on laser beam deflection and of ultra-intense laser beam filamentation on channel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.

    1997-11-01

    Recent experiments conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the Nova and Janus lasers demonstrate deflection of the laser beam in plasma with flow transverse to the beam. In gas-filled hohlraum experiments(S. G. Glendinning et al.), the laser spot on the hohlraum wall is ~ 100 μm closer to the laser entrance hole (LEH) than in empty hohlraum experiments, which degrades drive symmetry. In a series of exploding foil experiments(J. D. Moody et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1294 (1996)., intensity dependent deflection of the transmitted beam is observed, and interferometric measurements of laser-produced channels in preformed plasma(P. E. Young et al.), to be submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett., 1997. show beam deflection in the presence of near-sonic transverse flow. Theoretical analysis(D. E. Hinkel et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 1298 (1996). yields simple scaling laws for the formation of ponderomotively (or thermally) created density depressions downstream from the laser beam's high intensity regions, into which the light is refracted. An integrated approach that utilizes plasma parameters from the hydrocode Lasnex, detailed knowledge of the beam structure, and plasma physics analysis and modelling with F3D(R. L. Berger et al.), Phys. Fluids B 5, 2243 (1993)., has been used to develop a predictive capability that successfully quantifies the amount of beam deflection occurring in experiments. Related physics of beam self-focussing and filamentation is of relevance to the Fast Ignitor(M. Tabak et al.), Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994).. In channeling experiments performed on the 100 TW laser at LLNL, the f/3 laser beam, which has a 15 μm waist at best focus, has intensities in excess of IL = 1 × 10^17 W/cm^2. Modelling of these high intensity experiments indicates that channel formation occurs over a wide range of cone angles for an idealized (Gaussian) beam. However, when beam structure is taken into consideration, channel formation in the underdense

  15. Regulation of scar formation by vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Wilgus, Traci A.; Ferreira, Ahalia M.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Bergdall, Valerie K.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is known for its effects on endothelial cells and as a positive mediator of angiogenesis. VEGF is thought to promote the repair of cutaneous wounds due to its pro-angiogenic properties, but its ability to regulate other aspects of wound repair, such as the generation of scar tissue has not been well studied. We examined the role of VEGF in scar tissue production utilizing models of scarless and fibrotic repair. Scarless fetal wounds had lower levels of VEGF and were less vascular than fibrotic fetal wounds, and the scarless phenotype could be converted to a scar-forming phenotype by adding exogenous VEGF. Similarly, neutralization of VEGF reduced vascularity and decreased scar formation in adult wounds. These results show that VEGF levels have a strong influence on scar tissue formation. Our data suggest that VEGF may not simply function as a mediator of wound angiogenesis, but instead may play a more diverse role in the wound repair process. PMID:18427552

  16. Thyrostimulin Regulates Osteoblastic Bone Formation During Early Skeletal Development.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J H Duncan; van der Spek, Anne; Logan, John G; Gogakos, Apostolos; Bagchi-Chakraborty, Jayashree; Murphy, Elaine; van Zeijl, Clementine; Down, Jenny; Croucher, Peter I; Boyde, Alan; Boelen, Anita; Williams, Graham R

    2015-09-01

    The ancestral glycoprotein hormone thyrostimulin is a heterodimer of unique glycoprotein hormone subunit alpha (GPA)2 and glycoprotein hormone subunit beta (GPB)5 subunits with high affinity for the TSH receptor. Transgenic overexpression of GPB5 in mice results in cranial abnormalities, but the role of thyrostimulin in bone remains unknown. We hypothesized that thyrostimulin exerts paracrine actions in bone and determined: 1) GPA2 and GPB5 expression in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, 2) the skeletal consequences of thyrostimulin deficiency in GPB5 knockout (KO) mice, and 3) osteoblast and osteoclast responses to thyrostimulin treatment. Gpa2 and Gpb5 expression was identified in the newborn skeleton but declined rapidly thereafter. GPA2 and GPB5 mRNAs were also expressed in primary osteoblasts and osteoclasts at varying concentrations. Juvenile thyrostimulin-deficient mice had increased bone volume and mineralization as a result of increased osteoblastic bone formation. However, thyrostimulin failed to induce a canonical cAMP response or activate the noncanonical Akt, ERK, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38) signaling pathways in primary calvarial or bone marrow stromal cell-derived osteoblasts. Furthermore, thyrostimulin did not directly inhibit osteoblast proliferation, differentiation or mineralization in vitro. These studies identify thyrostimulin as a negative but indirect regulator of osteoblastic bone formation during skeletal development. PMID:26018249

  17. PTEN regulates retinal interneuron morphogenesis and synaptic layer formation

    PubMed Central

    Sakagami, Kiyo; Chen, Bryan; Nusinowitz, Steven; Wu, Hong; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The lipid phosphatase PTEN is a critical negative regulator of extracellular signal-induced PI3K activities, yet the roles of PTEN in the neural retina remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the function of PTEN during retinal development. Deletion of Pten at the onset of neurogenesis in retinal progenitors results in the reduction of retinal ganglion cells and rod photoreceptors, but increased Müller glial genesis. In addition, PTEN deficiency leads to elevated phosphorylation of Akt, especially in the developing inner plexiform layer, where high levels of PTEN are normally expressed. In Pten mutant retinas, various subtypes of amacrine cells show severe dendritic overgrowth, causing specific expansion of the inner plexiform layer. However, the outer plexiform layer remains relatively undisturbed in the Pten deficient retina. Physiological analysis detects reduced rod function and augmented oscillatory potentials originating from amacrine cells in Pten mutants. Furthermore, deleting Pten or elevating Akt activity in individual amacrine cells is sufficient to disrupt dendritic arborization, indicating that Pten activity is required cell autonomously to control neuronal morphology. Moreover, inhibiting endogenous Akt activity attenuates inner plexiform layer formation in vitro. Together, these findings demonstrate that suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling by PTEN is crucial for proper neuronal differentiation and normal retinal network formation. PMID:22155156

  18. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  19. Schwertmannite formation at cell junctions by a new filament-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing isolate affiliated with the novel genus Acidithrix.

    PubMed

    Mori, Jiro F; Lu, Shipeng; Händel, Matthias; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Iancu, Vasile Vlad; Tarcea, Nicolae; Popp, Jürgen; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A new acidophilic iron-oxidizing strain (C25) belonging to the novel genus Acidithrix was isolated from pelagic iron-rich aggregates ('iron snow') collected below the redoxcline of an acidic lignite mine lake. Strain C25 catalysed the oxidation of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] under oxic conditions at 25 °C at a rate of 3.8 mM Fe(II) day(-1) in synthetic medium and 3.0 mM Fe(II) day(-1) in sterilized lake water in the presence of yeast extract, producing the rust-coloured, poorly crystalline mineral schwertmannite [Fe(III) oxyhydroxylsulfate]. During growth, rod-shaped cells of strain C25 formed long filaments, and then aggregated and degraded into shorter fragments, building large cell-mineral aggregates in the late stationary phase. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of cells during the early growth phase revealed that Fe(III)-minerals were formed as single needles on the cell surface, whereas the typical pincushion-like schwertmannite was observed during later growth phases at junctions between the cells, leaving major parts of the cell not encrusted. This directed mechanism of biomineralization at specific locations on the cell surface has not been reported from other acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria. Strain C25 was also capable of reducing Fe(III) under micro-oxic conditions which led to a dissolution of the Fe(III)-minerals. Thus, strain C25 appeared to have ecological relevance for both the formation and transformation of the pelagic iron-rich aggregates at oxic/anoxic transition zones in the acidic lignite mine lake. PMID:26506965

  20. Class 3 semaphorins negatively regulate dermal lymphatic network formation

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Yutaka; James, Jennifer M.; Suto, Fumikazu; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a patterned lymphatic vascular network is essential for proper lymphatic functions during organ development and homeostasis. Here we report that class 3 semaphorins (SEMA3s), SEMA3F and SEMA3G negatively regulate lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth and sprouting to control dermal lymphatic network formation. Neuropilin2 (NRP2) functions as a receptor for SEMA3F and SEMA3G, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC). In culture, Both SEMA3F and SEMA3G inhibit VEGFC-mediated sprouting and proliferation of human dermal LECs. In the developing mouse skin, Sema3f is expressed in the epidermis and Sema3g expression is restricted to arteries, whereas their receptor Nrp2 is preferentially expressed by lymphatic vessels. Both Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants exhibit increased LEC growth in the skin. In contrast, Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants display increased lymphatic branching, while Nrp2 mutants exhibit reduced lymphatic branching. A targeted mutation in PlexinA1 or PlexinA2, signal transducers forming a receptor complex with NRP2 for SEMA3s, exhibits an increase in LEC growth and lymphatic branching as observed in Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants. Our results provide the first evidence that SEMA3F and SEMA3G function as a negative regulator for dermal lymphangiogenesis in vivo. The reciprocal phenotype in lymphatic branching between Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants suggest a complex NRP2 function that regulates LEC behavior both positively and negatively, through a binding with VEGFC or SEMA3s. PMID:26319580

  1. Class 3 semaphorins negatively regulate dermal lymphatic network formation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yutaka; James, Jennifer M; Suto, Fumikazu; Mukouyama, Yoh-Suke

    2015-01-01

    The development of a patterned lymphatic vascular network is essential for proper lymphatic functions during organ development and homeostasis. Here we report that class 3 semaphorins (SEMA3s), SEMA3F and SEMA3G negatively regulate lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth and sprouting to control dermal lymphatic network formation. Neuropilin2 (NRP2) functions as a receptor for SEMA3F and SEMA3G, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC). In culture, Both SEMA3F and SEMA3G inhibit VEGFC-mediated sprouting and proliferation of human dermal LECs. In the developing mouse skin, Sema3f is expressed in the epidermis and Sema3g expression is restricted to arteries, whereas their receptor Nrp2 is preferentially expressed by lymphatic vessels. Both Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants exhibit increased LEC growth in the skin. In contrast, Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants display increased lymphatic branching, while Nrp2 mutants exhibit reduced lymphatic branching. A targeted mutation in PlexinA1 or PlexinA2, signal transducers forming a receptor complex with NRP2 for SEMA3s, exhibits an increase in LEC growth and lymphatic branching as observed in Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants. Our results provide the first evidence that SEMA3F and SEMA3G function as a negative regulator for dermal lymphangiogenesis in vivo. The reciprocal phenotype in lymphatic branching between Sema3f;Sema3g double mutants and Nrp2 mutants suggest a complex NRP2 function that regulates LEC behavior both positively and negatively, through a binding with VEGFC or SEMA3s. PMID:26319580

  2. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric position

  3. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1 (ts25) ) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric

  4. The SOS Response Master Regulator LexA Is Associated with Sporulation, Motility and Biofilm Formation in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Beata M.; Cartman, Stephen T.; Minton, Nigel P.; Butala, Matej; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The LexA regulated SOS network is a bacterial response to DNA damage of metabolic or environmental origin. In Clostridium difficile, a nosocomial pathogen causing a range of intestinal diseases, the in-silico deduced LexA network included the core SOS genes involved in the DNA repair and genes involved in various other biological functions that vary among different ribotypes. Here we describe the construction and characterization of a lexA ClosTron mutant in C. difficile R20291 strain. The mutation of lexA caused inhibition of cell division resulting in a filamentous phenotype. The lexA mutant also showed decreased sporulation, a reduction in swimming motility, greater sensitivity to metronidazole, and increased biofilm formation. Changes in the regulation of toxin A, but not toxin B, were observed in the lexA mutant in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of levofloxacin. C. difficile LexA is, therefore, not only a regulator of DNA damage but also controls many biological functions associated with virulence. PMID:26682547

  5. Fascin 1 is an actin filament-bundling protein that regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics in the rat testis

    PubMed Central

    Gungor-Ordueri, N. Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler

    2014-01-01

    In the testis, spermatids are polarized cells, with their heads pointing toward the basement membrane during maturation. This polarity is crucial to pack the maximal number of spermatids in the seminiferous epithelium so that millions of sperms can be produced daily. A loss of spermatid polarity is detected after rodents are exposed to toxicants (e.g., cadmium) or nonhormonal male contraceptives (e.g., adjudin), which is associated with a disruption on the expression and/or localization of polarity proteins. In the rat testis, fascin 1, an actin-bundling protein found in mammalian cells, was expressed by Sertoli and germ cells. Fascin 1 was a component of the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific anchoring junction known to confer spermatid adhesion and polarity. Its expression in the seminiferous epithelium was stage specific. Fascin 1 was localized to the basal ES at the Sertoli cell-cell interface of the blood-testis barrier in all stages of the epithelial cycle, except it diminished considerably at late stage VIII. Fascin 1 was highly expressed at the apical ES at stage VII–early stage VIII and restricted to the step 19 spermatids. Its knockdown by RNAi that silenced fascin 1 by ∼70% in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro was found to perturb the tight junction-permeability barrier via a disruption of F-actin organization. Knockdown of fascin 1 in vivo by ∼60–70% induced defects in spermatid polarity, which was mediated by a mislocalization and/or downregulation of actin-bundling proteins Eps8 and palladin, thereby impeding F-actin organization and disrupting spermatid polarity. In summary, these findings provide insightful information on spermatid polarity regulation. PMID:25159326

  6. Fascin 1 is an actin filament-bundling protein that regulates ectoplasmic specialization dynamics in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Gungor-Ordueri, N Ece; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Cheng, C Yan

    2014-11-01

    In the testis, spermatids are polarized cells, with their heads pointing toward the basement membrane during maturation. This polarity is crucial to pack the maximal number of spermatids in the seminiferous epithelium so that millions of sperms can be produced daily. A loss of spermatid polarity is detected after rodents are exposed to toxicants (e.g., cadmium) or nonhormonal male contraceptives (e.g., adjudin), which is associated with a disruption on the expression and/or localization of polarity proteins. In the rat testis, fascin 1, an actin-bundling protein found in mammalian cells, was expressed by Sertoli and germ cells. Fascin 1 was a component of the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific anchoring junction known to confer spermatid adhesion and polarity. Its expression in the seminiferous epithelium was stage specific. Fascin 1 was localized to the basal ES at the Sertoli cell-cell interface of the blood-testis barrier in all stages of the epithelial cycle, except it diminished considerably at late stage VIII. Fascin 1 was highly expressed at the apical ES at stage VII-early stage VIII and restricted to the step 19 spermatids. Its knockdown by RNAi that silenced fascin 1 by ~70% in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro was found to perturb the tight junction-permeability barrier via a disruption of F-actin organization. Knockdown of fascin 1 in vivo by ~60-70% induced defects in spermatid polarity, which was mediated by a mislocalization and/or downregulation of actin-bundling proteins Eps8 and palladin, thereby impeding F-actin organization and disrupting spermatid polarity. In summary, these findings provide insightful information on spermatid polarity regulation. PMID:25159326

  7. Biogenic Iron-Rich Filaments in the Quartz Veins in the Uppermost Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation, Aksu Area, Northwestern Tarim Basin, China: Implications for Iron Oxidizers in Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiqiang; Chen, Daizhao; Tang, Dongjie; Dong, Shaofeng; Guo, Chuan; Guo, Zenghui; Zhang, Yanqiu

    2015-07-01

    Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide-encrusted filamentous microstructures produced by microorganisms have been widely reported in various modern and ancient extreme environments; however, the iron-dependent microorganisms preserved in hydrothermal quartz veins have not been explored in detail because of limited materials available. In this study, abundant well-preserved filamentous microstructures were observed in the hydrothermal quartz veins of the uppermost dolostones of the terminal-Ediacaran Qigebulake Formation in the Aksu area, northwestern Tarim Basin, China. These filamentous microstructures were permineralized by goethite and hematite as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and completely entombed in chalcedony and quartz cements. Microscopically, they are characterized by biogenic filamentous morphologies (commonly 20-200 μm in length and 1-5 μm in diameter) and structures (curved, tubular sheath-like, segmented, and mat-like filaments), similar to the Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) living in modern and ancient hydrothermal vent fields. A previous study revealed that quartz-barite vein swarms were subseafloor channels of low-temperature, silica-rich, diffusive hydrothermal vents in the earliest Cambrian, which contributed silica to the deposition of the overlying bedded chert of the Yurtus Formation. In this context, this study suggests that the putative filamentous FeOB preserved in the quartz veins might have thrived in the low-temperature, silica- and Fe(II)-rich hydrothermal vent channels in subseafloor mixing zones and were rapidly fossilized by subsequent higher-temperature, silica-rich hydrothermal fluids in response to waning and waxing fluctuations of diffuse hydrothermal venting. In view of the occurrence in a relatively stable passive continental margin shelf environment in Tarim Block, the silica-rich submarine hydrothermal vent system may represent a new and important geological niche favorable for FeOB colonization, which is different from their traditional

  8. Lin-28 regulates oogenesis and muscle formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Stratoulias, Vassilis; Heino, Tapio I; Michon, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the control of stem cell (SC) differentiation is important to comprehend developmental processes as well as to develop clinical applications. Lin28 is a conserved molecule that is involved in SC maintenance and differentiation by regulating let-7 miRNA maturation. However, little is known about the in vivo function of Lin28. Here, we report critical roles for lin-28 during oogenesis. We found that let-7 maturation was increased in lin-28 null mutant fly ovaries. We showed that lin-28 null mutant female flies displayed reduced fecundity, due to defects in egg chamber formation. More specifically, we demonstrated that in mutant ovaries, the egg chambers fuse during early oogenesis resulting in abnormal late egg chambers. We also showed that this phenotype is the combined result of impaired germline SC differentiation and follicle SC differentiation. We suggest a model in which these multiple oogenesis defects result from a misregulation of the ecdysone signaling network, through the fine-tuning of Abrupt and Fasciclin2 expression. Our results give a better understanding of the evolutionarily conserved role of lin-28 on GSC maintenance and differentiation. PMID:24963666

  9. Regulation and formation of the Drosophila salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Andrew, D J

    1998-04-15

    The homeotic gene, Sex combs reduced (Scr), is a master regulator of Drosophila salivary gland formation. Embryos in which Scr function is missing do not form salivary glands, and embryos in which SCR protein is expressed everywhere form extra salivary glands. However, other known proteins, including the homeotic protein Abdominal-B, the unusual zinc finger protein Teashirt, and the secreted signaling molecule Decapentaplegic (a TGF-beta family member), limit the recruitment of SCR-expressing cells to salivary glands. To learn the molecular details of how salivary gland gene expression is controlled and as a first step toward understanding how the SCR transcription factor controls salivary gland morphogenesis, we screened for genes expressed in the developing salivary gland. Among our best candidates for potential direct downstream targets of SCR in the salivary gland are the genes trachealess (trh), dCREB-A, jalapeño, and Semaphorin II (SemaII). Our genetic studies suggest distinct and important roles for each of these genes in salivary gland morphogenesis. Current work includes studying the molecular interactions between SCR and these downstream target genes and asking how target genes coordinate their activities to effect the cell biological changes required to build functional salivary glands. PMID:9599294

  10. Filaments from L5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2011-01-01

    We've been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Why do eruptions occur? Basic mechanism is magnetic, and can often include coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and filament eruptions. Use filament eruptions as markers of the more-general eruption. From our studies, we can identify directions for future work to help predict when eruptions might occur.

  11. Hydrodynamics of pairs of interacting cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinar, Tamar; Shelley, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Pairwise filament interactions underlie the dynamics of complex cytoskeletal networks in cells. These networks in turn play a crucial role in many cellular processes such as formation of the mitotic spindle and cell cleavage in cytokinesis. We model interactions of pairs of filaments immersed in a viscous, fluidic environment. The filaments are modeled using a slender body approximation, capturing their indirect interactions mediated by the immersing fluid. Direct filament interactions via molecular motors complexes induce alignment and parallel or anti-parallel sliding. The motor proteins are modeled as simple spring-like structures that walk directionally toward one end of the filament. We examine the resulting stresses in the fluid to better understand how the microscopic interactions lead to bulk behavior of cytoskeletal networks.

  12. A new paradigm for solar filament eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David M.

    2001-11-01

    This article discusses the formation, magnetic structure, and eruption of solar filaments in terms of two contrasting paradigms. The standard paradigm is that filaments are formed by condensation of plasma on coronal magnetic fields that are twisted or dimpled as a result of photospheric motions. According to this paradigm, filaments erupt when photospheric motions shear the fields, increasing their energy and decreasing their stability. According to a new paradigm, subsurface motions generate toroidal magnetic flux ropes, and after these flux ropes emerge to form active regions, the most twisted parts migrate into the corona to form filaments. Filaments become unstable and are ejected after a sufficient accumulation of twist (i.e., magnetic helicity). Various proposed mechanisms for producing the needed helicity are reviewed, and several observational tests are proposed to differentiate among the possible mechanisms.

  13. Origin and Evolution of Filament-Prominence Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Zwaan, Cornelis

    2001-09-01

    We present a ``head-to-tail'' linkage model for the formation, evolution, and eruption of solar filaments. The magnetic field structure of our model is based on the observation that filaments form exclusively in filament channels with no apparent magnetic connections above the polarity inversion line. The formation of a filament in this configuration is driven by flux convergence and cancellation, which produces looplike filament segments with a half-turn. Filament segments of like chirality may connect and form long quiescent filaments. Such filaments are stabilized through footpoint anchoring until further cancellation at the footpoints causes their eruption. The eruption restores the original filament channel so that filament formation may resume immediately. We then demonstrate that the combined workings of Hale's polarity law, Joy's law, and differential rotation introduce a strong hemispheric preference in the chirality of filaments formed poleward of the sunspot belt, which is in agreement with observations. We analyze the magnetic fine structure of filaments formed through our model and find consistency with the observed hemispheric preference for barb orientation and a simple explanation for barb formation. Finally, we consider the flux tubes retracted below the surface in the process of filament formation. We show that every cancellation event that generates a filament obeying the hemispheric chirality preference injects a flux tube below the surface with a poloidal field opposite that of the ongoing cycle. We suggest that this pattern of submergence of flux represents the specific mechanism for the reversal of the poloidal flux in a Babcock-Leighton-Durney-type model for the solar dynamo.

  14. FVVE1 REGULATES FILAMENTOUS GROWTH, THE RATIO OF MICROCONIDIA TO MACROCONIDIA AND CELL WALL FORMATION IN FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene, veA, coordinates asexual and sexual sporulation in the fungal species Aspergillus nidulans. Whether veA has the same role in morphogenesis in other fungi has not been investigated. In this work, we studied the role of the veA homolog, FvVEA, in the fungus Fusarium verticillioides. Delet...

  15. Special issue on filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxin; Milchberg, Howard; Mysyrowicz, André

    2014-05-01

    Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics is delighted to announce a forthcoming special issue on filamentation, to appear in the spring of 2015, and invites you to submit a paper. This special issue will attempt to give an overview of the present status of this field in order to create synergies and foster future developments. The issue is open to papers on the following issues: Theoretical advances on filamentation. Self-focusing and collapse. Filamentation in various media. Pulse self-compression and ultrafast processes in filaments. Molecular alignment and rotation. Filamentation tailoring. Interaction between filaments. Filament weather and pollution control. Filament induced condensation and precipitation. Terahertz science with filaments. Lasing in filaments. Filament induced molecular excitation and reaction. Electric discharge and plasma. Cross-disciplinary applications. Novel concepts related to these topics are particularly welcome. Please submit your article by 1 October 2014 (expected web publication: spring 2015) using our website http://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/jphysb-iop. Submissions received after this date will be considered for the journal, but may not be included in the special issue. The issue will be edited by Ruxin Li, Howard Milchberg and André Mysyrowicz.

  16. Structural Architecture of the CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 Signalosome: Nucleation-Induced Filamentous Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qi; Yang, Chenghua; Zheng, Chao; Fontán, Lorena; David, Liron; Yu, Xiong; Bracken, Clay; Rosen, Monica; Melnick, Ari; Egelman, Edward H.; Wu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The CARMA1/Bcl10/MALT1 (CBM) signalosome mediates antigen receptor-induced NF-κB signaling to regulate multiple lymphocyte functions. While CARMA1 and Bcl10 contain caspase recruitment domains (CARDs), MALT1 is a paracaspase with structural similarity to caspases. Here we show that the reconstituted CBM signalosome is a helical filamentous assembly in which substoichiometric CARMA1 nucleates Bcl10 filaments. Bcl10 filament formation is a highly cooperative process whose threshold is sensitized by oligomerized CARMA1 upon receptor activation. In cells, both cotransfected CARMA1/Bcl10 complex and the endogenous CBM signalosome are filamentous morphologically. Combining crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron microscopy, we reveal the structure of the Bcl10 CARD filament and the mode of interaction between CARMA1 and Bcl10. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirmed the observed interfaces in Bcl10 filament assembly and MALT1 activation in vitro and NF-κB activation in cells. These data support a paradigm of nucleation-induced signal transduction with threshold response due to cooperativity and signal amplification by polymerization. PMID:24074955

  17. Endocytosis and early endosome motility in filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Gero

    2014-01-01

    Hyphal growth of filamentous fungi requires microtubule-based long-distance motility of early endosomes. Since the discovery of this process in Ustilago maydis, our understanding of its molecular basis and biological function has greatly advanced. Studies in U. maydis and Aspergillus nidulans reveal a complex interplay of the motor proteins kinesin-3 and dynein, which co-operate to support bi-directional motion of early endosomes. Genetic screening has shed light on the molecular mechanisms underpinning motor regulation, revealing Hook protein as general motor adapters on early endosomes. Recently, fascinating insight into unexpected roles for endosome motility has emerged. This includes septin filament formation and cellular distribution of the machinery for protein translation. PMID:24835422

  18. How cofilin severs an actin filament.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2009-05-15

    The actin regulatory protein, cofilin, promotes actin assembly dynamics by severing filaments and increasing the number of ends from which subunits add and dissociate. Recent studies provide biophysical descriptions of cooperative filament interactions in energetic, mechanical and structural terms. A one-dimensional Ising model with nearest-neighbor interactions permits thermodynamic analysis of cooperative binding and indicates that one or a few cofilin molecules can sever a filament. Binding and cooperative interactions are entropically driven. A significant fraction of the binding free energy results from the linked dissociation of filament-associated ions (polyelectrolyte effect), which modulate filament structure, stability and mechanics. The remaining binding free energy and essentially all of the cooperative free energy arise from the enhanced conformational dynamics of the cofilactin complex. Filament mechanics are modulated by cofilin such that cofilin-saturated filaments are approximately 10- to 20-fold more compliant in bending and twisting than bare filaments. Cofilin activity is well described by models in which discontinuities in topology, mechanics and conformational dynamics generate stress concentration and promote fracture at junctions of bare and decorated segments, analogous to the grain boundary fracture of crystalline materials and the thermally driven formation of shear transformation zones in colloidal glass. PMID:20700473

  19. Roles of actin filaments and three second-messenger systems in short-term regulation of chick dorsal root ganglion neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Lankford, K L; Letourneau, P C

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study (J. Cell Biol. 109: 1229-1243, 1989), we reported that conditions which increased growth cone calcium levels and induced neurite retraction in cultured chick DRG neurons also resulted in an apparent loss of actin filaments in the growth cone periphery. We further showed that the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin could block or reverse calcium-ionophore-induced neurite retraction, indicating that the behavioral changes were mediated, at least in part, by changes in actin filament stability. In this study, we have further characterized the calcium sensitivity of growth cone behavior to identify which features of calcium-induced behavioral effects can be attributed to effects on actin filaments alone, and to assess whether two other second-messenger systems, cAMP and protein kinase C, might influence neurite outgrowth by altering calcium levels or actin stability. The results indicated that growth cone behavior was highly sensitive to small changes in calcium concentrations. Neurite outgrowth was only observed in calcium-permeabilized cells when extracellular calcium concentrations were between 200 and 300 nM, and changes as small as 50 nM commonly produced detectable changes in behavior. Furthermore, low doses of cytochalasins mimicked all of the grossly observable features of growth cone responses to elevation of intracellular calcium, including the apparent preferential destruction of lamellipodial actin filaments and sparing of filopodial actin, suggesting that the behavioral effects of calcium elevation could be explained by loss of actin filaments alone. The effects of cAMP elevation and protein kinase C activation on growth cone behavior, ultrastructure, and fura2-AM-measured calcium levels indicated that the effects of cAMP manipulations could be partially explained by a cAMP-induced lowering of growth cone calcium levels and concomitant increased stabilization of actin filaments, but protein kinase C appeared to act through an independent

  20. A Single-Domain FlgJ Contributes to Flagellar Hook and Filament Formation in the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Tong, Brian A.; Liu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    FlgJ plays a very important role in flagellar assembly. In the enteric bacteria, flgJ null mutants fail to produce the flagellar rods, hooks, and filaments but still assemble the integral membrane-supramembrane (MS) rings. These mutants are nonmotile. The FlgJ proteins consist of two functional domains. The N-terminal rod-capping domain acts as a scaffold for rod assembly, and the C-terminal domain acts as a peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolase (PGase), which allows the elongating flagellar rod to penetrate through the PG layer. However, the FlgJ homologs in several bacterial phyla (including spirochetes) often lack the PGase domain. The function of these single-domain FlgJ proteins remains elusive. Herein, a single-domain FlgJ homolog (FlgJBb) was studied in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cryo-electron tomography analysis revealed that the flgJBb mutant still assembled intact flagellar basal bodies but had fewer and disoriented flagellar hooks and filaments. Consistently, Western blots showed that the levels of flagellar hook (FlgE) and filament (FlaB) proteins were substantially decreased in the flgJBb mutant. Further studies disclosed that the decreases of FlgE and FlaB in the mutant occurred at the posttranscriptional level. Microscopic observation and swarm plate assay showed that the motility of the flgJBb mutant was partially deficient. The altered phenotypes were completely restored when the mutant was complemented. Collectively, these results indicate that FlgJBb is involved in the assembly of the flagellar hook and filament but not the flagellar rod in B. burgdorferi. The observed phenotype is different from that of flgJ mutants in the enteric bacteria. PMID:22155773

  1. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06585.001 PMID:26295568

  2. Externally refuelled optical filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, Maik; Mills, Matthew S.; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Cheng, Weibo; Moloney, Jerome V.; Kolesik, Miroslav; Polynkin, Pavel; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2014-04-01

    Plasma channels produced in air through femtosecond laser filamentation hold great promise for a number of applications, including remote sensing, attosecond physics and spectroscopy, channelling microwaves and lightning protection. In such settings, extended filaments are desirable, yet their longitudinal span is limited by dissipative processes. Although various techniques aiming to prolong this process have been explored, the substantial extension of optical filaments remains a challenge. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the natural range of a plasma column can be enhanced by at least an order of magnitude when the filament is prudently accompanied by an auxiliary beam. In this arrangement, the secondary low-intensity `dressing' beam propagates linearly and acts as a distributed energy reservoir, continuously refuelling the optical filament. Our approach offers an efficient and viable route towards the generation of extended light strings in air without inducing premature wave collapse or an undesirable beam break-up into multiple filaments.

  3. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID

  4. Sequential Myosin Phosphorylation Activates Tarantula Thick Filament via a Disorder-Order Transition

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D.; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscle and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscle, which is regulated by Ca2+ via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca2+4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectories analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridges network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif made up by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural change. However, phosphorylation of free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH inter-domain folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head, facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID:26038232

  5. Regulation of biofilm formation and cellular buoyancy through modulating intracellular cyclic di-GMP levels in engineered cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Marco; Waters, Christopher M; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-02-01

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric (3'→5') GMP (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in the transition between motile and sessile lifestyles in bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation, cellular aggregation or flocculation, and cellular buoyancy are under the control of c-di-GMP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) and Fremyella diplosiphon. Synechocystis is a unicellular cyanobacterium and displays lower levels of c-di-GMP; F. diplosiphon is filamentous and displays higher intracellular c-di-GMP levels. We transformed Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon with a plasmid for constitutive expression of genes encoding diguanylate cylase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) proteins from Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, respectively. These engineered strains allowed us to modulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels. Biofilm formation and cellular deposition were induced in the DGC-expressing Synechocystis strain which exhibited high intracellular levels of c-di-GMP; whereas strains expressing PDE in Synechocystis and F. diplosiphon to drive low intracellular levels of c-di-GMP exhibited enhanced cellular buoyancy. In addition, the PDE-expressing F. diplosiphon strain showed elevated chlorophyll levels. These results imply roles for coordinating c-di-GMP homeostasis in regulating native cyanobacterial phenotypes. Engineering exogenous DGC or PDE proteins to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP levels represents an effective tool for uncovering cryptic phenotypes or modulating phenotypes in cyanobacteria for practical applications in biotechnology applicable in photobioreactors and in green biotechnologies, such as energy-efficient harvesting of cellular biomass or the treatment of metal-containing wastewaters. PMID:26192200

  6. Trainable Gene Regulation Networks with Applications to Drosophila Pattern Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2000-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. For details the reader is referred to the papers introduced below. It will then introduce a new gene regulation network model which can describe promoter-level substructure in gene regulation. As described in chapter 2, gene regulation may be thought of as a combination of cis-acting regulation by the extended promoter of a gene (including all regulatory sequences) by way of the transcription complex, and of trans-acting regulation by the transcription factor products of other genes. If we simplify the cis-action by using a phenomenological model which can be tuned to data, such as a unit or other small portion of an artificial neural network, then the full transacting interaction between multiple genes during development can be modelled as a larger network which can again be tuned or trained to data. The larger network will in general need to have recurrent (feedback) connections since at least some real gene regulation networks do. This is the basic modeling approach taken, which describes how a set of recurrent neural networks can be used as a modeling language for multiple developmental processes including gene regulation within a single cell, cell-cell communication, and cell division. Such network models have been called "gene circuits", "gene regulation networks", or "genetic regulatory networks", sometimes without distinguishing the models from the actual modeled systems.

  7. Epicardial GATA factors regulate early coronary vascular plexus formation

    PubMed Central

    Kolander, Kurt D.; Holtz, Mary L.; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Misra, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    During early development, GATA factors have been shown to be important for key events of coronary vasculogenesis, including formation of the epicardium. Myocardial GATA factors are required for coronary vascular (CV) formation; however, the role of epicardial localized GATAs in this process has not been addressed. The current study was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which the epicardium controls coronary vasculogenesis, focusing on the role of epicardial GATAs in establishing the endothelial plexus during early coronary vasculogenesis. To address the role of epicardial GATAs, we ablated GATA4 and GATA6 transcription factors specifically from the mouse epicardium and found that the number of endothelial cells in the sub-epicardium was drastically reduced, and concomitant coronary vascular plexus formation was significantly compromised. Here we present evidence for a novel role for epicardial GATA factors in controlling plexus formation by recruiting endothelial cells to the sub-epicardium. PMID:24380800

  8. Vimentin filament organization and stress sensing depend on its single cysteine residue and zinc binding

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Oeste, Clara L.; Martínez, Alma E.; Carrasco, M. Jesús; Garzón, Beatriz; Cañada, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    The vimentin filament network plays a key role in cell architecture and signalling, as well as in epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Vimentin C328 is targeted by various oxidative modifications, but its role in vimentin organization is not known. Here we show that C328 is essential for vimentin network reorganization in response to oxidants and electrophiles, and is required for optimal vimentin performance in network expansion, lysosomal distribution and aggresome formation. C328 may fulfil these roles through interaction with zinc. In vitro, micromolar zinc protects vimentin from iodoacetamide modification and elicits vimentin polymerization into optically detectable structures; in cells, zinc closely associates with vimentin and its depletion causes reversible filament disassembly. Finally, zinc transport-deficient human fibroblasts show increased vimentin solubility and susceptibility to disruption, which are restored by zinc supplementation. These results unveil a critical role of C328 in vimentin organization and open new perspectives for the regulation of intermediate filaments by zinc. PMID:26031447

  9. Arabidopsis VILLIN5, an Actin Filament Bundling and Severing Protein, Is Necessary for Normal Pollen Tube Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Qu, Xiaolu; Bao, Chanchan; Khurana, Parul; Wang, Qiannan; Xie, Yurong; Zheng, Yiyan; Chen, Naizhi; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J.; Huang, Shanjin

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic actin cytoskeleton is essential for pollen germination and tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and turnover of the actin cytoskeleton in pollen remain poorly understood. Villin plays a key role in the formation of higher-order structures from actin filaments and in the regulation of actin dynamics in eukaryotic cells. It belongs to the villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily of actin binding proteins and is composed of six gelsolin-homology domains at its core and a villin headpiece domain at its C terminus. Recently, several villin family members from plants have been shown to sever, cap, and bundle actin filaments in vitro. Here, we characterized a villin isovariant, Arabidopsis thaliana VILLIN5 (VLN5), that is highly and preferentially expressed in pollen. VLN5 loss-of-function retarded pollen tube growth and sensitized actin filaments in pollen grains and tubes to latrunculin B. In vitro biochemical analyses revealed that VLN5 is a typical member of the villin family and retains a full suite of activities, including barbed-end capping, filament bundling, and calcium-dependent severing. The severing activity was confirmed with time-lapse evanescent wave microscopy of individual actin filaments in vitro. We propose that VLN5 is a major regulator of actin filament stability and turnover that functions in concert with oscillatory calcium gradients in pollen and therefore plays an integral role in pollen germination and tube growth. PMID:20807879

  10. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  11. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25975455

  12. Optical Filaments and Gas Dynamics in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeak, Jeremy

    Until now, the propagation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses leading to optical filamentation in air has only been investigated in the frame of a dynamic balance between linear diffraction, Kerr self-focusing and plasma defocusing. This has led to the development of different theories surrounding the generation and persistence of optical filaments propagating over many Rayleigh lengths in air. These theories include wave-guiding model, moving focus model, dynamic spatial replenishment model and conical wave model. However, these models fail to capture the gas dynamics that arise from optical filaments interacting with air. In this work, we demonstrate that initial conditions are critical to the formation of optical filaments through the use of an aerodynamic window. Filament characteristics in air, such as spectral broadening, electrical conductivity and fluorescence, are measured and presented. Using these as diagnostic tools, we also show that the optical filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses can be enhanced at high repetition rates because of the thermal response of air, resulting from the interaction of each laser pulse with the modified atmospheric density distribution left behind by the preceding pulse. This is explained by the sudden deposition of energy by a filament in the air which generates a cylindrical shock wave, leaving behind a column of rarefied air. This low-density region persists for an extended period and can materially affect the propagation dynamics of an ensuing pulse that follows before the low-density region has relaxed sufficiently to ambient conditions. By further increasing the repetition rate, the onset of ionization is shifted downstream and the spectral continuum displays a stronger broadening on both sides of the original pulse spectrum. This gas dynamic interaction regime of filamentation can be utilized to enhance the length and spectral width of filaments for remote sensing and long range laser-induced high voltage

  13. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  14. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  15. 20 CFR 632.3 - Format for these regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Indian programs under title II-B of the Act are set forth in 20 CFR part 632. This part in conjunction... 632.3 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Introduction § 632.3 Format for these...

  16. Filamentation of plasma in the auroral region by an ion-ion instability - A process for the formation of bidimensional potential structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottez, F.; Chanteur, G.; Roux, A.

    1992-07-01

    The nonlinear behavior of electrostatic ion waves generated by an ion beam flowing through a thermal ion and electron background in a strongly magnetized plasma is investigated by means of a 2D, explicit, electrostatic particle code. To follow the nonlinear evolution of these ion waves, a long-lasting simulation is run with a large simulation grid: 128 x 512 lambda(d). Beam ions are shown to generate oblique waves. The nonlinear beatings between these oblique waves produce purely transverse waves, which leads to a strong modulation of the density and of the electric potential in a direction transverse to the magnetic field. The transverse scale of these essentially field-aligned filaments is 10 rho(i), where rho(i) is the ion Larmor radius of beam ions. Within these filaments, relatively stable field-aligned density and potential structures develop. Unlike the potential structures that develop in a two-component plasma with downgoing electrons, these structures move upward.

  17. Structural constraints regulating triple helix formation by A-tracts.

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Gräslund, A

    2000-12-15

    The study concerns the propensity of triple helix formation by different DNA oligonucleotides containing long A-tracts with and without flanking GxC base pairs in order to probe the role of length of the A-tract and the flanking sequences. From nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of imino proton spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples composed of potential triplex forming strand sequences in correct stoichiometries, we have concluded that 8-mer A-tracts flanked by GxC base pairs exert significant steric hindrance to triple helix formation. When as much as 50 mM Mg2+ was added, no triple helix formation was observed in these samples. In contrast, open-ended 8-mer A-tracts formed triplex with the corresponding two T8 strands under relatively mild ionic conditions (100 mM Na+). Moreover, the shorter the length of the A-tract, the less is the hindrance to form a triple helix. PMID:11152277

  18. Soil formate regulates the fungal nitrous oxide emission pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, W K; Farrell, R E; Siciliano, S D

    2008-11-01

    Fungal activity is a major driver in the global nitrogen cycle, and mounting evidence suggests that fungal denitrification activity contributes significantly to soil emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O). The metabolic pathway and oxygen requirement for fungal denitrification are different from those for bacterial denitrification. We hypothesized that the soil N(2)O emission from fungi is formate and O(2) dependent and that land use and landforms could influence the proportion of N(2)O coming from fungi. Using substrate-induced respiration inhibition under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in combination with (15)N gas analysis, we found that formate and hypoxia (versus anaerobiosis) were essential for the fungal reduction of (15)N-labeled nitrate to (15)N(2)O. As much as 65% of soil-emitted N(2)O was attributable to fungi; however, this was found only in soils from water-accumulating landforms. From these results, we hypothesize that plant root exudates could affect N(2)O production from fungi via the proposed formate-dependent pathway. PMID:18791019

  19. [Inhibitory activity of hydrosols prepared from 18 Japanese herbs of weak aromatic flavor against filamentous formation and growth of Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Leaf hydrosols prepared from 18 weakly aromatic Japanese herbs used traditionally were tested on the filamentation-inhibitory activity of Candida albicans. These hydrosols were divided into two classes, A and B. The inhibitory activity of 13 hydrosols belonging to class A was markedly altered depending on the drying process of the parent herbs. On the other hand, the remaining 5 hydrosols belonging to class B showed no significant change on the composition and inhibitory activity upon drying. The change of the bioactivity was correlated with the change and concentration of the respective major constituents. Especially strong bioactivity shown by hydrosols of dried Houttuynia cordata and fresh Prunus pendula was ascribed to n-capric acid and cyanide, respectively. Eight hydrosols exhibited weak or moderate activity against the growth of C. albicans. PMID:22467129

  20. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for F2 rapid acceleration and have some relation with the largest solar storm. The comparison between the successful and failed filament eruptions suggests that the confining magnetic field plays an important role in the preconditions for an eruption.

  1. Lighting the universe with filaments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom

    2007-09-14

    The first stars in the universe form when chemically pristine gas heats as it falls into dark-matter potential wells, cools radiatively because of the formation of molecular hydrogen, and becomes self-gravitating. Using supercomputer simulations, we demonstrated that the stars' properties depend critically on the currently unknown nature of the dark matter. If the dark-matter particles have intrinsic velocities that wipe out small-scale structure, then the first stars form in filaments with lengths on the order of the free-streaming scale, which can be approximately 10(20) meters (approximately 3 kiloparsecs, corresponding to a baryonic mass of approximately 10(7) solar masses) for realistic "warm dark matter" candidates. Fragmentation of the filaments forms stars with a range of masses, which may explain the observed peculiar element abundance pattern of extremely metal-poor stars, whereas coalescence of fragments and stars during the filament's ultimate collapse may seed the supermassive black holes that lurk in the centers of most massive galaxies. PMID:17872439

  2. Differently patterned airflows induced by 1-kHz femtosecond laser filaments in a cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liang, Hong; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Wei, Yingxia; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-11-01

    Airflow induced by femtosecond laser (800 nm/1 kHz/25 fs) filamentation with different lengths was investigated in a laboratory cloud chamber. Various filament lengths were generated by adjusting laser energy and lens focal length. It was found that airflow patterns are closely related to filament intensity and length. Intense and long filaments are beneficial in updraft generation with large vortices above the filament, while intense and short filaments tend to promote the formation of well-contacted vortices below the filament. Differently patterned airflows induced elliptical snow piles with different masses. We simulated airflow in a cloud chamber numerically taking laser filaments as heat sources. The mechanisms of differently patterned airflow and snow formation induced by filaments were discussed.

  3. Actin remodeling by Nck regulates endothelial lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Sankar P; Barhoumi, Rola; Rivera, Gonzalo M

    2015-09-01

    Multiple angiogenic cues modulate phosphotyrosine signaling to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Despite its functional and clinical importance, how vascular cells integrate phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling to elicit cytoskeletal changes required for endothelial morphogenesis remains poorly understood. The family of Nck adaptors couples phosphotyrosine signals with actin dynamics and therefore is well positioned to orchestrate cellular processes required in vascular formation and remodeling. Culture of endothelial cells in three-dimensional collagen matrices in the presence of VEGF stimulation was combined with molecular genetics, optical imaging, and biochemistry to show that Nck-dependent actin remodeling promotes endothelial cell elongation and proper organization of VE-cadherin intercellular junctions. Major morphogenetic defects caused by abrogation of Nck signaling included loss of endothelial apical-basal polarity and impaired lumenization. Time-lapse imaging using a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies, and GST pull-down assays showed that Nck determines spatiotemporal patterns of Cdc42/aPKC activation during endothelial morphogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Nck acts as an important hub integrating angiogenic cues with cytoskeletal changes that enable endothelial apical-basal polarization and lumen formation. These findings point to Nck as an emergent target for effective antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26157164

  4. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase p85beta regulates invadopodium formation

    PubMed Central

    Cariaga-Martínez, Ariel E.; Cortés, Isabel; García, Esther; Pérez-García, Vicente; Pajares, María J.; Idoate, Miguel A.; Redondo-Muñóz, Javier; Antón, Inés M.; Carrera, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acquisition of invasiveness is characteristic of tumor progression. Numerous genetic changes are associated with metastasis, but the mechanism by which a cell becomes invasive remains unclear. Expression of p85β, a regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase, markedly increases in advanced carcinoma, but its mode of action is unknown. We postulated that p85β might facilitate cell invasion. We show that p85β localized at cell adhesions in complex with focal adhesion kinase and enhanced stability and maturation of cell adhesions. In addition, p85β induced development at cell adhesions of an F-actin core that extended several microns into the cell z-axis resembling the skeleton of invadopodia. p85β lead to F-actin polymerization at cell adhesions by recruiting active Cdc42/Rac at these structures. In accordance with p85β function in invadopodium-like formation, p85β levels increased in metastatic melanoma and p85β depletion reduced invadopodium formation and invasion. These results show that p85β enhances invasion by inducing cell adhesion development into invadopodia-like structures explaining the metastatic potential of tumors with increased p85β levels. PMID:25217619

  5. Actin remodeling by Nck regulates endothelial lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Sankar P.; Barhoumi, Rola; Rivera, Gonzalo M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple angiogenic cues modulate phosphotyrosine signaling to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Despite its functional and clinical importance, how vascular cells integrate phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling to elicit cytoskeletal changes required for endothelial morphogenesis remains poorly understood. The family of Nck adaptors couples phosphotyrosine signals with actin dynamics and therefore is well positioned to orchestrate cellular processes required in vascular formation and remodeling. Culture of endothelial cells in three-dimensional collagen matrices in the presence of VEGF stimulation was combined with molecular genetics, optical imaging, and biochemistry to show that Nck-dependent actin remodeling promotes endothelial cell elongation and proper organization of VE-cadherin intercellular junctions. Major morphogenetic defects caused by abrogation of Nck signaling included loss of endothelial apical-basal polarity and impaired lumenization. Time-lapse imaging using a Förster resonance energy transfer biosensor, immunostaining with phospho-specific antibodies, and GST pull-down assays showed that Nck determines spatiotemporal patterns of Cdc42/aPKC activation during endothelial morphogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Nck acts as an important hub integrating angiogenic cues with cytoskeletal changes that enable endothelial apical-basal polarization and lumen formation. These findings point to Nck as an emergent target for effective antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26157164

  6. Phosphorylation of K+ channels at single residues regulates memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K+ channel function. Phosphorylation of K+ channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies of vertebrates and invertebrates, the contribution to memory of single phosphorylation sites on K+ channels has never been reported. We have used gene targeting in mice to inactivate protein kinase A substrate residues in the fast-inactivating subunit Kv4.2 (T38A mutants), and in the small-conductance Ca2+-activated subunit SK1 (S105A mutants). Both manipulations perturbed a specific form of memory, leaving others intact. T38A mutants had enhanced spatial memory for at least 4 wk after training, whereas performance in three tests of fear memory was unaffected. S105A mutants were impaired in passive avoidance memory, sparing fear, and spatial memory. Together with recent findings that excitability governs the participation of neurons in a memory circuit, this result suggests that the memory type supported by neurons may depend critically on the phosphorylation of specific K+ channels at single residues. PMID:26980786

  7. 20 CFR 626.2 - Format of the Job Training Partnership Act regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., including complaint processing and compliance reviews, will be governed by the provisions of 29 CFR part 34... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Format of the Job Training Partnership Act... LABOR INTRODUCTION TO THE REGULATIONS UNDER THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT § 626.2 Format of the...

  8. 20 CFR 626.2 - Format of the Job Training Partnership Act regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., including complaint processing and compliance reviews, will be governed by the provisions of 29 CFR part 34... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Format of the Job Training Partnership Act... LABOR INTRODUCTION TO THE REGULATIONS UNDER THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT § 626.2 Format of the...

  9. Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning: A Model and Seven Principles of Good Feedback Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David J.; Macfarlane-Dick, Debra

    2006-01-01

    The research on formative assessment and feedback is reinterpreted to show how these processes can help students take control of their own learning, i.e. become self-regulated learners. This reformulation is used to identify seven principles of good feedback practice that support self-regulation. A key argument is that students are already…

  10. 12 CFR 749.5 - Format for records required by other NCUA regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format for records required by other NCUA regulations. 749.5 Section 749.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS RECORDS PRESERVATION PROGRAM AND APPENDICES-RECORD RETENTION GUIDELINES; CATASTROPHIC...

  11. The kinetics underlying the velocity of smooth muscle myosin filament sliding on actin filaments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Brian D; Brizendine, Richard K; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2014-07-25

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ~0.63 μm long and contain ~176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment- limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment- limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation. PMID:24907276

  12. The Kinetics Underlying the Velocity of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filament Sliding on Actin Filaments in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ∼0.63 μm long and contain ∼176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment-limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment-limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation. PMID:24907276

  13. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  14. Regulation of midbody formation and function by mitotic kinases.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo; Capalbo, Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Cytokinesis is the final phase of cell division and safeguards the correct distribution of genomic and cytoplasmic materials between the two nascent daughter cells. The final separation, or abscission, of the daughter cells depends on the proper assembly of an organelle at the intercellular bridge, the midbody, which acts as a platform for the recruitment and organisation of various proteins involved in both the control and execution of the abscission process. Recent studies have led to the identification of the mechanisms, signalling pathways and molecules that control the two tightly linked processes of midbody formation and abscission. Here we review our current knowledge of the role that mitotic kinases play in these processes and offer our perspectives on the potential future challenges that await researchers in the field. PMID:26802517

  15. Arabidopsis Microtubule-Destabilizing Protein 25 Functions in Pollen Tube Growth by Severing Actin Filaments[W

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tao; Liu, Xiaomin; Li, Jiejie; Sun, Jingbo; Song, Leina; Mao, Tonglin

    2014-01-01

    The formation of distinct actin filament arrays in the subapical region of pollen tubes is crucial for pollen tube growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the organization and dynamics of the actin filaments in this region remain to be determined. This study shows that Arabidopsis thaliana MICROTUBULE-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN25 (MDP25) has the actin filament–severing activity of an actin binding protein. This protein negatively regulated pollen tube growth by modulating the organization and dynamics of actin filaments in the subapical region of pollen tubes. MDP25 loss of function resulted in enhanced pollen tube elongation and inefficient fertilization. MDP25 bound directly to actin filaments and severed individual actin filaments, in a manner that was dramatically enhanced by Ca2+, in vitro. Analysis of a mutant that bears a point mutation at the Ca2+ binding sites demonstrated that the subcellular localization of MDP25 was determined by cytosolic Ca2+ level in the subapical region of pollen tubes, where MDP25 was disassociated from the plasma membrane and moved into the cytosol. Time-lapse analysis showed that the F-actin-severing frequency significantly decreased and a high density of actin filaments was observed in the subapical region of mdp25-1 pollen tubes. This study reveals a mechanism whereby calcium enhances the actin filament–severing activity of MDP25 in the subapical region of pollen tubes to modulate pollen tube growth. PMID:24424096

  16. Tilt Angles of Quiescent Filaments and Filaments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Kuzanyan, K. M.; Vasil'yeva, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    We carry out study of tilt angles of solar filaments using the data from the two observatories: Meudon Observatory and Kislovodsk Mountain Astronomical Station for the century-long period 1919-2014. We developed special software for digitization of the filaments structures on Hα synoptic maps. The filaments were vectorized in semi-automatic mode. The tilt angles of filaments with respect to the equator (τ) were analyzed. Approximately 2/3 of the filaments have positive angles τ >0, which is defined as when the eastern end of the filaments are closer to the poles than the western ones. We have separated tilts for the filaments which are close to the active region structures and those of quiescent filaments. We found that long quiescent filaments mainly have negative tilts. The filaments which are close to active regions mainly have positive tilt angles.

  17. Retrograde Flow and Myosin II Activity within the Leading Cell Edge Deliver F-Actin to the Lamella to Seed the Formation of Graded Polarity Actomyosin II Filament Bundles in Migrating Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tom W.; Vaughan, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    In migrating fibroblasts actomyosin II bundles are graded polarity (GP) bundles, a distinct organization to stress fibers. GP bundles are important for powering cell migration, yet have an unknown mechanism of formation. Electron microscopy and the fate of photobleached marks show actin filaments undergoing retrograde flow in filopodia, and the lamellipodium are structurally and dynamically linked with stationary GP bundles within the lamella. An individual filopodium initially protrudes, but then becomes separated from the tip of the lamellipodium and seeds the formation of a new GP bundle within the lamella. In individual live cells expressing both GFP-myosin II and RFP-actin, myosin II puncta localize to the base of an individual filopodium an average 28 s before the filopodium seeds the formation of a new GP bundle. Associated myosin II is stationary with respect to the substratum in new GP bundles. Inhibition of myosin II motor activity in live cells blocks appearance of new GP bundles in the lamella, without inhibition of cell protrusion in the same timescale. We conclude retrograde F-actin flow and myosin II activity within the leading cell edge delivers F-actin to the lamella to seed the formation of new GP bundles. PMID:18799629

  18. SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang Tongjiang; Gan Weiqun

    2012-09-10

    Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  19. Solar Magnetized "Tornadoes:" Relation to Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Wang, Tongjiang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2012-09-01

    Solar magnetized "tornadoes," a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar "tornadoes" (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

  20. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  1. Regulation of germ layer formation by pluripotency factors during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The classical pluripotency factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and Nanog are required for the maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal of embryonic stem (ES) cells and can reprogram terminally differentiated cells into a pluripotent state. Alteration in the levels of these factors in ES cells will cause differentiation into different lineages, suggesting that they are critical determinants of cell fates. These factors show dynamic expression patterns during embryogenesis, in particular in the pluripotent or multipotent cells of an early stage embryo, implying that they are involved in the cell fate decision during early embryonic development. Functions and the underlying molecular mechanisms have been extensively studied for these factors in ES cells under cultured conditions. However, this does not mean that the results also hold true for intact embryos. In the review, I have summarized and discussed the findings on the functions and the underlying mechanisms of the classical pluripotency factors during early embryogenesis, in particular during germ layer formation. PMID:23497659

  2. A tetraspanin regulates septate junction formation in Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasushi; Motoishi, Minako; Furuse, Kyoko; Furuse, Mikio

    2016-03-15

    Septate junctions (SJs) are membrane specializations that restrict the free diffusion of solutes through the paracellular pathway in invertebrate epithelia. In arthropods, two morphologically different types of septate junctions are observed; pleated (pSJs) and smooth (sSJs), which are present in ectodermally and endodermally derived epithelia, respectively. Recent identification of sSJ-specific proteins, Mesh and Ssk, in Drosophila indicates that the molecular compositions of sSJs and pSJs differ. A deficiency screen based on immunolocalization of Mesh identified a tetraspanin family protein, Tsp2A, as a newly discovered protein involved in sSJ formation in Drosophila Tsp2A specifically localizes at sSJs in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. Compromised Tsp2A expression caused by RNAi or the CRISPR/Cas9 system was associated with defects in the ultrastructure of sSJs, changed localization of other sSJ proteins, and impaired barrier function of the midgut. In most Tsp2A mutant cells, Mesh failed to localize to sSJs and was distributed through the cytoplasm. Tsp2A forms a complex with Mesh and Ssk and these proteins are mutually interdependent for their localization. These observations suggest that Tsp2A cooperates with Mesh and Ssk to organize sSJs. PMID:26848177

  3. Surface microcracks signal osteoblasts to regulate alignment and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa J; Case, Eldon D; Irwin, Regina K; Meyer, Sarah E; Pearson, Craig S; McCabe, Laura R

    2014-11-01

    Microcracks are present in bone and can result from fatigue damage due to repeated, cyclically applied stresses. From a mechanical point, microcracks can dissipate strain energy at the advancing tip of a crack to improve overall bone toughness. Physiologically, microcracks are thought to trigger bone remodeling. Here, we examine the effect of microcracks specifically on osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, by comparing cell responses on microcracked versus non-microcracked hydroxyapatite (HA) specimens. Osteoblast attachment was found to be greater on microcracked HA specimens (p<0.05). More importantly, we identified the preferential alignment of osteoblasts in the direction of the microcracks on HA. Cells also displayed a preferential attachment that was 75 to 90 μm away from the microcrack indent. After 21 days of culture, osteoblast maturation was notably enhanced on the HA with microcracks, as indicated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and gene expression. Furthermore, examination of bone deposition by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated preferential mineralization at microcrack indentation sites. Dissolution studies indicate that the microcracks increase calcium release, which could contribute to osteoblast responses. Our findings suggest that microcracks signal osteoblast attachment and bone formation/healing. PMID:25280696

  4. Surface microcracks signal osteoblasts to regulate alignment and bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yutian; Baumann, Melissa J.; Case, Eldon D.; Irwin, Regina K.; Meyer, Sarah E.; Pearson, Craig S.; McCabe, Laura R.

    2014-01-01

    Microcracks are present in bone and can result from fatigue damage due to repeated, cyclically applied stresses. From a mechanical point, microcracks can dissipate strain energy at the advancing tip of a crack to improve overall bone toughness. Physiologically, microcracks are thought to trigger bone remodeling. Here, we examine the effect of microcracks specifically on osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, by comparing cell responses on microcracked versus non-microcracked hydroxyapatite (HA) specimens. Osteoblast attachment was found to be greater on microcracked HA specimens (p<0.05). More importantly, we identified the preferential alignment of osteoblasts in the direction of the microcracks on HA. Cells also displayed a preferential attachment that was 75 to 90 μm away from the microcrack indent. After 21 days of culture, osteoblast maturation was notably enhanced on the HA with microcracks, as indicated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and gene expression. Furthermore, examination of bone deposition by confocal laser scanning microscope indicated preferential mineralization at microcrack indentation sites. Dissolution studies indicate that the microcracks increase calcium release, which could contribute to osteoblast responses. Our findings suggest that microcracks signal osteoblast attachment and bone formation/healing. PMID:25280696

  5. Arabidopsis NAP1 Regulates the Formation of Autophagosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengwei; Richardson, Christine; Hawes, Chris; Hussey, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    The SCAR/WAVE complex is required for ARP2/3-mediated actin nucleation, and these complexes are highly conserved in plants and animals [1, 2]. Proteins from the SCAR/WAVE complex have been found to be membrane associated in plants [3]. Using fluorescent protein fusions, we have found that NAP1 [4], a component of the SCAR/WAVE complex, locates to vesicles or puncta that appear upon applied pressure. These NAP1 vesicles can be endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated, can co-align with the cytoskeleton, and fuse to each other homotypically. More interestingly, the majority co-localizes with the autophagosome marker ATG8, and anti-NAP1 identifies autophagosomes in immuno-TEM. Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is enhanced under certain stress conditions such as nitrogen starvation and salt stress. We show that fewer autophagosomes are generated in the NAP1 knockout mutant during starvation stress. The nap1 mutant (and KO mutants of other components of the SCAR/WAVE and ARP2/3 complexes) is more susceptible to nitrogen starvation and is less salt tolerant, indicating defective autophagy. In conclusion, our data show that NAP1 has another function in plant cells, and that is as a regulator of autophagy. PMID:27451899

  6. Thermodynamic model of heterochromatin formation through epigenetic regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Peter J.; Koslover, Elena F.; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2015-02-01

    Gene regulation in eukaryotes requires the segregation of silenced genomic regions into densely packed heterochromatin, leaving the active genes in euchromatin regions more accessible. We introduce a model that connects the presence of epigenetically inherited histone marks, methylation at histone 3 lysine-9, to the physical compaction of chromatin fibers via the binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). Our model demonstrates some of the key physical features that are necessary to explain experimental observations. In particular, we demonstrate that strong cooperative interactions among the HP1 proteins are necessary to see the phase segregation of heterochromatin and euchromatin regions. We also explore how the cell can use the concentration of HP1 to control condensation and under what circumstances there is a threshold of methylation over which the fibers will compact. Finally, we consider how different potential in vivo fiber structures as well as the flexibility of the histone 3 tail can affect the bridging of HP1. Many of the observations that we make about the HP1 system are guided by general thermodynamics principles and thus could play a role in other DNA organizational processes such as the binding of linker histones.

  7. Dscam-Mediated Cell Recognition Regulates Neural Circuit Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Daisuke; Millard, S. Sean; Wojtowicz, Woj M.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    The Dscam family of immunoglobulin cell surface proteins mediates recognition events between neurons that play an essential role in the establishment of neural circuits. The Drosophila Dscam1 locus encodes tens of thousands of cell surface proteins via alternative splicing. These isoforms exhibit exquisite isoform-specific binding in vitro that mediates homophilic repulsion in vivo. These properties provide the molecular basis for self-avoidance, an essential developmental mechanism that allows axonal and dendritic processes to uniformly cover their synaptic fields. In a mechanistically similar fashion, homophilic repulsion mediated by Drosophila Dscam2 prevents processes from the same class of cells from occupying overlapping synaptic fields through a process called tiling. Genetic studies in the mouse visual system support the view that vertebrate DSCAM also promotes both self-avoidance and tiling. By contrast, DSCAM and DSCAM-L promote layer-specific targeting in the chick visual system, presumably through promoting homophilic adhesion. The fly and mouse studies underscore the importance of homophilic repulsion in regulating neural circuit assembly, whereas the chick studies suggest that DSCA Mproteins may mediate a variety of different recognition events during wiring in a context-dependent fashion. PMID:18837673

  8. Thermodynamic model of heterochromatin formation through epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Peter J; Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2015-02-18

    Gene regulation in eukaryotes requires the segregation of silenced genomic regions into densely packed heterochromatin, leaving the active genes in euchromatin regions more accessible. We introduce a model that connects the presence of epigenetically inherited histone marks, methylation at histone 3 lysine-9, to the physical compaction of chromatin fibers via the binding of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). Our model demonstrates some of the key physical features that are necessary to explain experimental observations. In particular, we demonstrate that strong cooperative interactions among the HP1 proteins are necessary to see the phase segregation of heterochromatin and euchromatin regions. We also explore how the cell can use the concentration of HP1 to control condensation and under what circumstances there is a threshold of methylation over which the fibers will compact. Finally, we consider how different potential in vivo fiber structures as well as the flexibility of the histone 3 tail can affect the bridging of HP1. Many of the observations that we make about the HP1 system are guided by general thermodynamics principles and thus could play a role in other DNA organizational processes such as the binding of linker histones. PMID:25563699

  9. SNAP-23 regulates phagosome formation and maturation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Chiye; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Arai, Seisuke; Wada, Yoh; Sun-Wada, Ge-Hong; Wada, Ikuo; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka

    2012-12-01

    Synaptosomal associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP-23), a plasma membrane-localized soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE), has been implicated in phagocytosis by macrophages. For elucidation of its precise role in this process, a macrophage line overexpressing monomeric Venus-tagged SNAP-23 was established. These cells showed enhanced Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Detailed analyses of each process of phagocytosis revealed a marked increase in the production of reactive oxygen species within phagosomes. Also, enhanced accumulation of a lysotropic dye, as well as augmented quenching of a pH-sensitive fluorophore were observed. Analyses of isolated phagosomes indicated the critical role of SNAP-23 in the functional recruitment of the NADPH oxidase complex and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase to phagosomes. The data from the overexpression experiments were confirmed by SNAP-23 knockdown, which demonstrated a significant delay in phagosome maturation and a reduction in uptake activity. Finally, for analyzing whether phagosomal SNAP-23 entails a structural change in the protein, an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe was constructed, in which the distance within a TagGFP2-TagRFP was altered upon close approximation of the N-termini of its two SNARE motifs. FRET efficiency on phagosomes was markedly enhanced only when VAMP7, a lysosomal SNARE, was coexpressed. Taken together, our results strongly suggest the involvement of SNAP-23 in both phagosome formation and maturation in macrophages, presumably by mediating SNARE-based membrane traffic. PMID:23087210

  10. Subunit positioning and stator filament stiffness in regulation and power transmission in the V1 motor of the Manduca sexta V-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Muench, Stephen P; Scheres, Sjors H W; Huss, Markus; Phillips, Clair; Vitavska, Olga; Wieczorek, Helmut; Trinick, John; Harrison, Michael A

    2014-01-23

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) is an ATP-driven proton pump essential to the function of eukaryotic cells. Its cytoplasmic V1 domain is an ATPase, normally coupled to membrane-bound proton pump Vo via a rotary mechanism. How these asymmetric motors are coupled remains poorly understood. Low energy status can trigger release of V1 from the membrane and curtail ATP hydrolysis. To investigate the molecular basis for these processes, we have carried out cryo-electron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of deactivated V1 from Manduca sexta. In the resulting model, three peripheral stalks that are parts of the mechanical stator of the V-ATPase are clearly resolved as unsupported filaments in the same conformations as in the holoenzyme. They are likely therefore to have inherent stiffness consistent with a role as flexible rods in buffering elastic power transmission between the domains of the V-ATPase. Inactivated V1 adopted a homogeneous resting state with one open active site adjacent to the stator filament normally linked to the H subunit. Although present at 1:1 stoichiometry with V1, both recombinant subunit C reconstituted with V1 and its endogenous subunit H were poorly resolved in three-dimensional reconstructions, suggesting structural heterogeneity in the region at the base of V1 that could indicate positional variability. If the position of H can vary, existing mechanistic models of deactivation in which it binds to and locks the axle of the V-ATPase rotary motor would need to be re-evaluated. PMID:24075871

  11. AMPK Signaling in the Dorsal Hippocampus Negatively Regulates Contextual Fear Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Luo, Yixiao; Sun, Jia; Ding, Zengbo; Liu, Jianfeng; Yan, Wei; Jian, Min; Xue, Yanxue; Shi, Jie; Wang, Ji-Shi; Lu, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Both the formation of long-term memory (LTM) and dendritic spine growth that serves as a physical basis for the long-term storage of information require de novo protein synthesis. Memory formation also critically depends on transcription. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a transcriptional regulator that has emerged as a major energy sensor that maintains cellular energy homeostasis. However, still unknown is its role in memory formation. In the present study, we found that AMPK is primarily expressed in neurons in the hippocampus, and then we demonstrated a time-dependent decrease in AMPK activity and increase in mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity after contextual fear conditioning in the CA1 but not CA3 area of the dorsal hippocampus. Using pharmacological methods and adenovirus gene transfer to bidirectionally regulate AMPK activity, we found that increasing AMPK activity in the CA1 impaired the formation of long-term fear memory, and decreasing AMPK activity enhanced fear memory formation. These findings were associated with changes in the phosphorylation of AMPK and p70s6 kinase (p70s6k) and expression of BDNF and membrane GluR1 and GluR2 in the CA1. Furthermore, the prior administration of an mTORC1 inhibitor blocked the enhancing effect of AMPK inhibition on fear memory formation, suggesting that this negative regulation of contextual fear memory by AMPK in the CA1 depends on the mTORC1 signaling pathway. Finally, we found that AMPK activity regulated hippocampal spine growth associated with memory formation. In summary, our results indicate that AMPK is a key negative regulator of plasticity and fear memory formation. PMID:26647974

  12. The Serine Protease EspC from Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Regulates Pore Formation and Cytotoxicity Mediated by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Guignot, Julie; Segura, Audrey; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are specialized macromolecular machines critical for bacterial virulence, and allowing the injection of bacterial effectors into host cells. The T3SS-dependent injection process requires the prior insertion of a protein complex, the translocon, into host cell membranes consisting of two-T3SS hydrophobic proteins, associated with pore-forming activity. In all described T3SS to date, a hydrophilic protein connects one hydrophobic component to the T3SS needle, presumably insuring the continuum between the hollow needle and the translocon. In the case of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), the hydrophilic component EspA polymerizes into a filament connecting the T3SS needle to the translocon composed of the EspB and EspD hydrophobic proteins. Here, we identify EspA and EspD as targets of EspC, a serine protease autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE). We found that in vitro, EspC preferentially targets EspA associated with EspD, but was less efficient at proteolyzing EspA alone. Consistently, we found that EspC did not regulate EspA filaments at the surface of primed bacteria that was devoid of EspD, but controlled the levels of EspD and EspA secreted in vitro or upon cell contact. While still proficient for T3SS-mediated injection of bacterial effectors and cytoskeletal reorganization, an espC mutant showed increased levels of cell-associated EspA and EspD, as well as increased pore formation activity associated with cytotoxicity. EspP from enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) also targeted translocator components and its activity was interchangeable with that of EspC, suggesting a common and important function of these SPATEs. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of T3SS-mediated pore formation and cytotoxicity control during EPEC/EHEC infection. PMID:26132339

  13. Star-forming filaments in warm dark matter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Theuns, Tom; Springel, Volker

    2015-06-01

    We performed a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of the formation of a Milky Way-like galaxy in a warm dark matter (WDM) cosmology. Smooth and dense filaments, several comoving mega parsec long, form generically above z ˜ 2 in this model. Atomic line cooling allows gas in the centres of these filaments to cool to the base of the cooling function, resulting in a very striking pattern of extended Lyman-limit systems (LLSs). Observations of the correlation function of LLSs might hence provide useful limits on the nature of the dark matter. We argue that the self-shielding of filaments may lead to a thermal instability resulting in star formation. We implement a sub-grid model for this, and find that filaments rather than haloes dominate star formation until z ˜ 6, although this depends on how stars form in WDM. Reionization decreases the gas density in filaments, and the more usual star formation in haloes dominates below z ˜ 6, although star formation in filaments continues until z = 2. 15 per cent of the stars of the z = 0 galaxy formed in filaments. At higher redshift, these stars give galaxies a stringy appearance, which, if observed, might be a strong indication that the dark matter is warm.

  14. Regulation of formation of volatile compounds of tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves by single light wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiumin; Chen, Yiyong; Mei, Xin; Katsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of plant growth and development by light wavelength has been extensively studied. Less attention has been paid to effect of light wavelength on formation of plant metabolites. The objective of this study was to investigate whether formation of volatiles in preharvest and postharvest tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves can be regulated by light wavelength. In the present study, in contrast to the natural light or dark treatment, blue light (470 nm) and red light (660 nm) significantly increased most endogenous volatiles including volatile fatty acid derivatives (VFADs), volatile phenylpropanoids/benzenoids (VPBs), and volatile terpenes (VTs) in the preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, blue and red lights significantly up-regulated the expression levels of 9/13-lipoxygenases involved in VFADs formation, phenylalanine ammonialyase involved in VPBs formation, and terpene synthases involved in VTs formation. Single light wavelength had less remarkable influences on formation of volatiles in the postharvest leaves compared with the preharvest leaves. These results suggest that blue and red lights can be promising technology for remodeling the aroma of preharvest tea leaves. Furthermore, our study provided evidence that light wavelength can activate the expression of key genes involved in formation of plant volatiles for the first time. PMID:26567525

  15. The alternative splicing factor Nova2 regulates vascular development and lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Giampietro, Costanza; Deflorian, Gianluca; Gallo, Stefania; Di Matteo, Anna; Pradella, Davide; Bonomi, Serena; Belloni, Elisa; Nyqvist, Daniel; Quaranta, Valeria; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Pisati, Federica; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Fredrickx, Evelien; Taveggia, Carla; Wyatt, Chris D R; Irimia, Manuel; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Dejana, Elisabetta; Ghigna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Vascular lumen formation is a fundamental step during angiogenesis; yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that neural and vascular systems share common anatomical, functional and molecular similarities. Here we show that the organization of endothelial lumen is controlled at the post-transcriptional level by the alternative splicing (AS) regulator Nova2, which was previously considered to be neural cell-specific. Nova2 is expressed during angiogenesis and its depletion disrupts vascular lumen formation in vivo. Similarly, Nova2 depletion in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) impairs the apical distribution and the downstream signalling of the Par polarity complex, resulting in altered EC polarity, a process required for vascular lumen formation. These defects are linked to AS changes of Nova2 target exons affecting the Par complex and its regulators. Collectively, our results reveal that Nova2 functions as an AS regulator in angiogenesis and is a novel member of the 'angioneurins' family. PMID:26446569

  16. Evolution of filament barbs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.

    We present a selected few cases in which the sense of chirality of filament barbs changed within periods as short as hours. We investigate in detail a quiescent filament on 2003 September 10 and 11. Of its four barbs displaying such changes, only one overlays a small polarity inversion line inside the EUV filament channel (EFC). No magnetic elements with magnitude above the noise level were detected at the endpoints of all barbs. In particular, a pair of barbs first approached toward, and then departed from, each other in Halpha , with the barb endpoints migrating as far as ˜ 10 arcsec. We conclude that the evolution of the barbs was driven by flux emergence and cancellation of small bipolar units at the EFC border.

  17. PPM1D controls nucleolar formation by up-regulating phosphorylation of nucleophosmin.

    PubMed

    Kozakai, Yuuki; Kamada, Rui; Furuta, Junya; Kiyota, Yuhei; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    An increase of nucleolar number and size has made nucleoli essential markers for cytology and tumour development. However, the underlying basis for their structural integrity and abundance remains unclear. Protein phosphatase PPM1D was found to be up-regulated in different carcinomas including breast cancers. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation via inducing an increased phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein NPM. We show that PPM1D overexpression induces an increase in the nucleolar number regardless of p53 status. We also demonstrated that specific sequential phosphorylation of NPM is important for nucleolar formation and that PPM1D is a novel upstream regulator of this phosphorylation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern nucleoli formation by demonstrating that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation by regulating NPM phosphorylation status through a novel signalling pathway, PPM1D-CDC25C-CDK1-PLK1. PMID:27619510

  18. Techniques for jar formation of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weighall, M. J.

    The market for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries is growing steadily and will be given a further boost as the market for 36-V batteries for the 42-V PowerNet develops over the next few years. The manufacture of VRLA batteries poses, however, a number of complex technical problems that are not experienced in the manufacture of conventional flooded batteries. For the large-scale manufacture of automotive batteries or other small VRLA batteries of 100 Ah or less, jar formation rather than plate formation and dry charge would seem to be a logical and economically sound decision. For this to be successful, however, a number of key issues need to be reviewed, starting with a detailed consideration of battery design. This paper reviews issues associated with the jar formation of VRLA batteries. Guidance is given concerning filling techniques (gravity or vacuum fill), the formation process, charging techniques, and formation algorithms. Battery design and separator optimisation is discussed. The properties of the separator, e.g. wicking rate, fibre composition, surface area and compression, may have a critical impact on acid filling and jar formation, and may partially determine the filling and formation conditions to be used. The control of temperature during formation is particularly important. Formation algorithms and temperature data are presented. Attention is drawn to the possible loss of plate-group compression during the formation process, and how this may be avoided.

  19. The Onecut Transcription Factor HNF-6 Regulates in Motor Neurons the Formation of the Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Audouard, Emilie; Schakman, Olivier; René, Frédérique; Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Huber, Andrea B.; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Gailly, Philippe; Clotman, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The neuromuscular junctions are the specialized synapses whereby spinal motor neurons control the contraction of skeletal muscles. The formation of the neuromuscular junctions is controlled by a complex interplay of multiple mechanisms coordinately activated in motor nerve terminals and in their target myotubes. However, the transcriptional regulators that control in motor neurons the genetic programs involved in neuromuscular junction development remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the Onecut transcription factor HNF-6 regulates in motor neurons the formation of the neuromuscular junctions. Indeed, adult Hnf6 mutant mice exhibit hindlimb muscle weakness and abnormal locomotion. This results from defects of hindlimb neuromuscular junctions characterized by an abnormal morphology and defective localization of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin at the motor nerve terminals. These defects are consequences of altered and delayed formation of the neuromuscular junctions in newborn mutant animals. Furthermore, we show that the expression level of numerous regulators of neuromuscular junction formation, namely agrin, neuregulin-2 and TGF-ß receptor II, is downregulated in the spinal motor neurons of Hnf6 mutant newborn animals. Finally, altered formation of neuromuscular junction-like structures in a co-culture model of wildtype myotubes with mutant embryonic spinal cord slices is rescued by recombinant agrin and neuregulin, indicating that depletion in these factors contributes to defective neuromuscular junction development in the absence of HNF-6. Thus, HNF-6 controls in spinal motor neurons a genetic program that coordinates the formation of hindlimb neuromuscular junctions. PMID:23227180

  20. Comparative macromolecular composition of filaments and rods of a Bacillus megaterium thermoconditional morphological mutant.

    PubMed

    Yan, L P; Hitchins, A D

    1980-10-01

    Filaments of a thermosensitive Bacillus megaterium mutant showed an altered macromolecular composition compared with salt-cured mutant cells and parental cells. Filaments contained more peptidoglycan, polyglucose, poly-beta-hydroxy-butyrate, and deoxyribonucleic acid per unit of protein. The ribonucleic acid-to-protein ratio of filaments was similar to that of rods or salt-cured cells. Filament formation seemed to be due to defective protein or ribonucleic acid metabolism. PMID:6158510

  1. Kinematics of Filaments in Serpens and Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhabal, Arnab; Mundy, Lee G.; Rizzo, Maxime; Storm, Shaye; Teuben, Peter J.; Chen, Che-Yu; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2016-01-01

    Following up on the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), we observed specific filaments in the Serpens and Perseus clouds using H13CO+, H13CN, and HNC J=1-0 transitions at 7" angular resolution and 0.16 km/s spectral resolution. The isotopologues containing 13C are optically thin; hence they trace the high column density regions of dense gas (ncrit ~ 105 cm-3) better than their more abundant 12C counterparts which were observed previously (Lee et al. 2014). The HNC lines show significant self-absorption features from overlying lower density gas along many lines of sight. Many of the filaments showed velocity gradients perpendicular to the long axis of filaments in H13CO+ and H13CN emission, thereby supporting the model by Chen and Ostriker (2014) in which filaments form in the dense layer created by colliding turbulent cells. The signature velocity gradient occurs because the filaments are primarily accreting material in a 2-D flow within the dense layer.

  2. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  3. Aerogel-supported filament

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

    1995-05-16

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

  4. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  5. Nebulin binding impedes mutant desmin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Laura K.; Gillis, David C.; Sharma, Sarika; Ambrus, Andy; Herrmann, Harald; Conover, Gloria M.

    2013-01-01

    Desmin intermediate filaments (DIFs) form an intricate meshwork that organizes myofibers within striated muscle cells. The mechanisms that regulate the association of desmin to sarcomeres and their role in desminopathy are incompletely understood. Here we compare the effect nebulin binding has on the assembly kinetics of desmin and three desminopathy-causing mutant desmin variants carrying mutations in the head, rod, or tail domains of desmin (S46F, E245D, and T453I). These mutants were chosen because the mutated residues are located within the nebulin-binding regions of desmin. We discovered that, although nebulin M160–164 bound to both desmin tetrameric complexes and mature filaments, all three mutants exhibited significantly delayed filament assembly kinetics when bound to nebulin. Correspondingly, all three mutants displayed enhanced binding affinities and capacities for nebulin relative to wild-type desmin. Electron micrographs showed that nebulin associates with elongated normal and mutant DIFs assembled in vitro. Moreover, we measured significantly delayed dynamics for the mutant desmin E245D relative to wild-type desmin in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in live-cell imaging experiments. We propose a mechanism by which mutant desmin slows desmin remodeling in myocytes by retaining nebulin near the Z-discs. On the basis of these data, we suggest that for some filament-forming desmin mutants, the molecular etiology of desminopathy results from subtle deficiencies in their association with nebulin, a major actin-binding filament protein of striated muscle. PMID:23615443

  6. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 expression in baboon endometrial stromal cells: regulation by filamentous actin and requirement for de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J J; Jaffe, R C; Fazleabas, A T

    1999-02-01

    Stromal fibroblasts in the primate endometrium undergo dramatic morphological and biochemical changes in response to pregnancy. This transformation is characterized by the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1). Stromal cells from the baboon endometrium of nonpregnant animals were cultured and subsequently treated with cytochalasin D to disrupt actin filaments. In response to cytochalasin D treatment, cells contracted and became rounded as early as 10 min after the initiation of treatment. When cytochalasin D was removed, cells reverted back to their original fibroblastic shape within 1 h. After cells were treated with cytochalasin D for 5 h, addition of (Bu)2cAMP and/or hormones (estradiol, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and relaxin) resulted in the expression of IGFBP-1 messenger RNA and protein within 24 h. Cells with an intact cytoskeleton did not express detectable levels of IGFBP-1 in response to hormones and/or (Bu)2cAMP. Furthermore, the addition of cycloheximide inhibited expression of IGFBP-1 in cytochalasin D-treated cells. Stromal cells were also isolated from early pregnant and simulated pregnant animals. Within 48 h, cells from both the pregnant and simulated pregnant animals produced IGFBP-1 in response to hormones and/or (Bu)2cAMP. In these studies, IGFBP-1 expression was also inhibited by cycloheximide. These studies suggest that induction of IGFBP-1 requires an intermediary protein and that alterations in the cytoskeleton may be involved. PMID:9927334

  7. Lens tilting effect on filamentation and filament-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, Y.; Sun, Q.; Daigle, J.-F.; Azarm, A.; Bernhardt, J.; Chin, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    In filament-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, we experimentally found that if the lens used for the creation and localization of filament is tilted, the signal to noise ratio of spectral measurement increases. Further study shows that with lens tilting, astigmatism occurs and the filament is split into shorter parts. In turn the shortening of filament reduces the generation of white light which is the major 'noise' source of the spectra.

  8. CO gas kinematics and excitation in a filamentary IRDC: Filament-filament interaction and accretion processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Serra, Izaskun; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Tan, Jonathan C.; Henshaw, Jonathan D.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Hernandez, Audra K.

    2013-07-01

    Some theories of molecular cloud formation propose that molecular clouds form in highly dynamical environments characterized by the interaction of converging gas flows or cloud-cloud collisions. The determination of the dynamics and physical conditions of the molecular gas in clouds at the early stages of their evolution is thus essential to establish the dynamical imprints of such collisions, and to infer the physical processes involved in their formation. We present large-scale (~1.7pc x 3.4 pc) multi-transition 13CO and C18O on-the-fly maps carried out with the IRAM 30m and JCMT telescopes toward the Infrared-Dark Cloud G035.39-00.33. This cloud shows a very filamentary structure and relatively little star formation activity, suggestive of its youth, and where evidence for a flow-flow collision has recently been reported. Consistent with previous studies, the 13CO and C18O line maps toward G035.39-00.33 reveal that the molecular gas in this cloud is distributed in three different filaments separated in velocity space by ~3 kms-1 (Filaments 1, 2 and 3). The massive dense cores in this IRDC are preferentially found at the intersecting regions between Filaments 1 and 3, where most of the CO gas is accumulated. The analysis of the 13CO and C18O lines show that the three filaments have a similar kinematic structure with relatively smooth velocity gradients (of ~0.4-0.8 kms-1pc-1) that seem to converge onto core H6, the most massive core in the region located in the center of the IRDC. Several possible scenarios are proposed to explain this velocity gradient, including rotation, global gas accretion along the filaments and large-scale turbulence motions with a steep turbulent power spetrum. The 13CO and C18O gas motions are supersonic across G035.39-00.33 with the line emission showing broader linewidths toward the edges of the IRDC. This may indicate energy dissipation at the densest regions in the IRDC as a consequence of the filament-filament interaction. The

  9. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also. PMID:16207912

  10. Setting Formative Assessments in Real-World Contexts to Facilitate Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Hui Yong

    2015-01-01

    Some writers (Black and Wiliam in "Phi Delta Kappan" 80(2):139-148, 1998; Clark 2012; Panadero and Jonsson in "Educational Research Review" 9:129-144, 2013) have hypothesized a link between formative assessments (FA) and self-regulated learning (SRL). FA give students an opportunity to play an active role in their learning…

  11. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  12. Plasma membrane H+-ATPase regulation is required for auxin gradient formation preceding phototropic growth

    PubMed Central

    Hohm, Tim; Demarsy, Emilie; Quan, Clément; Allenbach Petrolati, Laure; Preuten, Tobias; Vernoux, Teva; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Phototropism is a growth response allowing plants to align their photosynthetic organs toward incoming light and thereby to optimize photosynthetic activity. Formation of a lateral gradient of the phytohormone auxin is a key step to trigger asymmetric growth of the shoot leading to phototropic reorientation. To identify important regulators of auxin gradient formation, we developed an auxin flux model that enabled us to test in silico the impact of different morphological and biophysical parameters on gradient formation, including the contribution of the extracellular space (cell wall) or apoplast. Our model indicates that cell size, cell distributions, and apoplast thickness are all important factors affecting gradient formation. Among all tested variables, regulation of apoplastic pH was the most important to enable the formation of a lateral auxin gradient. To test this prediction, we interfered with the activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPases that are required to control apoplastic pH. Our results show that H+-ATPases are indeed important for the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient and phototropism. Moreover, we show that during phototropism, H+-ATPase activity is regulated by the phototropin photoreceptors, providing a mechanism by which light influences apoplastic pH. PMID:25261457

  13. Up-regulation of glycolytic metabolism is required for HIF1α-driven bone formation.

    PubMed

    Regan, Jenna N; Lim, Joohyun; Shi, Yu; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Shohet, Ralph V; Long, Fanxin

    2014-06-10

    The bone marrow environment is among the most hypoxic in the body, but how hypoxia affects bone formation is not known. Because low oxygen tension stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIFα) proteins, we have investigated the effect of expressing a stabilized form of HIF1α in osteoblast precursors. Brief stabilization of HIF1α in SP7-positive cells in postnatal mice dramatically stimulated cancellous bone formation via marked expansion of the osteoblast population. Remarkably, concomitant deletion of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in the mouse did not diminish bone accrual caused by HIF1α stabilization. Thus, HIF1α-driven bone formation is independent of VEGFA up-regulation and increased angiogenesis. On the other hand, HIF1α stabilization stimulated glycolysis in bone through up-regulation of key glycolytic enzymes including pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1). Pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 completely reversed HIF1α-driven bone formation in vivo. Thus, HIF1α stimulates osteoblast formation through direct activation of glycolysis, and alterations in cellular metabolism may be a broadly applicable mechanism for regulating cell differentiation. PMID:24912186

  14. Focal Adhesion Kinase regulates cell-cell contact formation in epithelial cells via modulation of Rho

    SciTech Connect

    Playford, Martin P.; Vadali, Kavita; Cai Xinming; Burridge, Keith; Schaller, Michael D.

    2008-10-15

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and survival. Recent studies have also implicated FAK in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Here, evidence is presented showing that siRNA-mediated suppression of FAK levels in NBT-II cells and expression of dominant negative mutants of FAK caused loss of epithelial cell morphology and inhibited the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Rac and Rho have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cell adhesions and can be regulated by FAK signaling. Expression of active Rac or Rho in NBT-II cells disrupted formation of cell-cell contacts, thus promoting a phenotype similar to FAK-depleted cells. The loss of intercellular contacts in FAK-depleted cells is prevented upon expression of a dominant negative Rho mutant, but not a dominant negative Rac mutant. Inhibition of FAK decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and elevated the level of GTP-bound Rho. This suggests that FAK regulates cell-cell contact formation by regulation of Rho.

  15. Essential Roles and Regulation of the Legionella pneumophila Collagen-Like Adhesin during Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mallegol, Julia; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Low, Donald E.; Terebeznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644) is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s) of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS). In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface. PMID:23029523

  16. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Mallegol, Julia; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Low, Donald E; Terebeznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644) is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s) of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS). In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface. PMID:23029523

  17. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  18. Platelet receptor interplay regulates collagen-induced thrombus formation in flowing human blood.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Munnix, Imke C A; Smethurst, Peter A; Deckmyn, Hans; Lindhout, Theo; Ouwehand, Willem H; Farndale, Richard W; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-02-15

    The platelet glycoproteins (GPs) Ib, integrin alpha(2)beta(1), and GPVI are considered central to thrombus formation. Recently, their relative importance has been re-evaluated based on data from murine knockout models. To examine their relationship during human thrombus formation on collagen type I fibers at high shear (1000 s(-1)), we tested a novel antibody against GPVI, an immunoglobulin single-chain variable fragment, 10B12, together with specific antagonists for GPIb alpha (12G1 Fab(2)) and alpha(2)beta(1) (6F1 mAb or GFOGER-GPP peptide). GPVI was found to be crucial for aggregate formation, Ca(2+) signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, but not for primary adhesion, even with more than 97% receptor blockade. Inhibiting alpha(2)beta(1) revealed its involvement in regulating Ca(2+) signaling, PS exposure, and aggregate size. Both GPIb alpha and alpha(2)beta(1) contributed to primary adhesion, showing overlapping function. The coinhibition of receptors revealed synergism in thrombus formation: the coinhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors with collagen receptors further decreased adhesion and aggregation, and, crucially, the complete eradication of thrombus formation required the coinhibition of GPVI with either GPIb alpha or alpha(2)beta(1). In summary, human platelet deposition on collagen depends on the concerted interplay of several receptors: GPIb in synergy with alpha(2)beta(1) mediating primary adhesion, reinforced by activation through GPVI, which further regulates the thrombus formation. PMID:14563646

  19. Rho GTPases have diverse effects on the organization of the actin filament system.

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus; Fransson, Asa; Saras, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The Rho GTPases are related to the Ras proto-oncogenes and consist of 22 family members. These proteins have important roles in regulating the organization of the actin filament system, and thereby the morphogenesis of vertebrate cells as well as their ability to migrate. In an effort to compare the effects of all members of the Rho GTPase family, active Rho GTPases were transfected into porcine aortic endothelial cells and the effects on the actin filament system were monitored. Cdc42, TCL (TC10-like), Rac1-Rac3 and RhoG induced the formation of lamellipodia, whereas Cdc42, Rac1 and Rac2 also induced the formation of thick bundles of actin filaments. In contrast, transfection with TC10 or Chp resulted in the formation of focal adhesion-like structures, whereas Wrch-1 induced long and thin filopodia. Transfection with RhoA, RhoB or RhoC induced the assembly of stress fibres, whereas Rnd1-Rnd3 resulted in the loss of stress fibres, but this effect was associated with the formation of actin- and ezrin-containing dorsal microvilli. Cells expressing RhoD and Rif had extremely long and flexible filopodia. None of the RhoBTB or Miro GTPases had any major influence on the organization of the actin filament system; instead, RhoBTB1 and RhoBTB2 were present in vesicular structures, and Miro-1 and Miro-2 were present in mitochondria. Collectively, the data obtained in this study to some extent confirm earlier observations, but also allow the identification of previously undetected roles of the different members of the Rho GTPases. PMID:14521508

  20. The transcription factor p8 regulates autophagy during diapause embryo formation in Artemia parthenogenetica.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Yang, Fan; Jia, Wen-Huan; Yu, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process by which cytoplasmic components, including macromolecules and organelles, are degraded by lysosome. Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and target of rapamycin (TOR) play key roles in the regulation of autophagy. However, the regulation of autophagy in quiescent cells remains unclear, despite the fact that autophagy is known to be critical for normal development, regeneration, and degenerative diseases. Here, crustacean Artemia parthenogenetica was used as a model system because they produced and released encysted embryos that enter a state of obligate dormancy in cell quiescence to withstand various environmental threats. We observed that autophagy was increased before diapause stage but dropped to extremely low level in diapause cysts in Artemia. Western blot analyses indicated that the regulation of autophagy was AMPK/TOR independent during diapause embryo formation. Importantly, the level of p8 (Ar-p8), a stress-inducible transcription cofactor, was elevated at the stage just before diapause and was absent in encysted embryos, indicating that Ar-p8 may regulate autophagy. The results of Ar-p8 knockdown revealed that Ar-p8 regulated autophagy during diapause formation in Artemia. Moreover, we observed that activating transcription factors 4 and 6 (ATF4 and ATF6) responded to Ar-p8-regulated autophagy, indicating that autophagy targeted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during diapause formation in Artemia. Additionally, AMPK/TOR-independent autophagy was validated in human gastric cancer MKN45 cells overexpressing Ar-p8. The findings presented here may provide insights into the role of p8 in regulating autophagy in quiescent cells. PMID:27125785

  1. Programmable smart electron emission controller for hot filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaxer, Eli

    2011-02-01

    In electron ionization source, electrons are produced through thermionic emission by heating a wire filament, accelerating the electrons by high voltage, and ionizing the analyzed molecules. In such a system, one important parameter is the filament emission current that determines the ionization rate; therefore, one needs to regulate this current. On the one hand, fast responses control is needed to keep the emission current constant, but on the other hand, we need to protect the filament from damage that occurs by large filaments current transients and overheating. To control our filament current and emission current, we developed a digital circuit based on a digital signal processing controller that has several modes of operation. We used a smart algorithm that has a fast response to a small signal and a slow response to a large signal. In addition, we have several protective measures that prevent the current from reaching unsafe values.

  2. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  3. NF-κB RelB Negatively Regulates Osteoblast Differentiation and Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhenqiang; Li, Yanyun; Yin, Xiaoxiang; Dong, Yufeng; Xing, Lianping; Boyce, Brendan F.

    2013-01-01

    RelA-mediated NF-κB canonical signaling promotes mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) proliferation, but inhibits differentiation of mature osteoblasts (OBs) and thus negatively regulates bone formation. Previous studies suggest that NF-κB RelB may also negatively regulate bone formation through non-canonical signaling, but they involved a complex knockout mouse model and the molecular mechanisms involved were not investigated. Here, we report that RelB−/− mice develop age-related increased trabecular bone mass associated with increased bone formation. RelB−/− bone marrow stromal cells expanded faster in vitro and have enhanced OB differentiation associated with increased expression of the osteoblastogenic transcription factor, Runx2. In addition, RelB directly targeted the Runx2 promoter to inhibit its activation. Importantly, RelB−/− bone-derived MPCs formed bone more rapidly than wild-type cells after they were injected into a murine tibial bone defect model. Our findings indicate that RelB negatively regulates bone mass as mice age and limits bone formation in healing bone defects, suggesting that inhibition of RelB could reduce age-related bone loss and enhance bone repair. PMID:24115294

  4. Sprouty2 regulates endochondral bone formation by modulation of RTK and BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Joo, Adriane; Long, Roger; Cheng, Zhiqiang; Alexander, Courtney; Chang, Wenhan; Klein, Ophir D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal development is regulated by the coordinated activity of signaling molecules that are both produced locally by cartilage and bone cells and also circulate systemically. During embryonic development and postnatal bone remodeling, receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily members play critical roles in the proliferation, survival, and differentiation of chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and other bone cells. Recently, several molecules that regulate RTK signaling have been identified, including the four members of the Sprouty (Spry) family (Spry1-4). We report that Spry2 plays an important role in regulation of endochondral bone formation. Mice in which the Spry2 gene has been deleted have defective chondrogenesis and endochondral bone formation, with a postnatal decrease in skeletal size and trabecular bone mass. In these constitutive Spry2 mutants, both chondrocytes and osteoblasts undergo increased cell proliferation and impaired terminal differentiation. Tissue-specific Spry2 deletion by either osteoblast- (Col1-Cre) or chondrocyte- (Col2-Cre) specific drivers led to decreased relative bone mass, demonstrating the critical role of Spry2 in both cell types. Molecular analyses of signaling pathways in Spry2(-/-) mice revealed an unexpected upregulation of BMP signaling and decrease in RTK signaling. These results identify Spry2 as a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation that modulates signaling in both osteoblast and chondrocyte lineages. PMID:27130872

  5. Regulation of germinal center, B-cell memory, and plasma cell formation by histone modifiers.

    PubMed

    Good-Jacobson, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of antibody production and B-cell memory formation and function is core to finding new treatments for B-cell-derived cancers, antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, and immunodeficiencies. Progression from a small number of antigen-specific B-cells to the production of a large number of antibody-secreting cells is tightly regulated. Although much progress has been made in revealing the transcriptional regulation of B-cell differentiation that occurs during humoral immune responses, there are still many questions that remain unanswered. Recent work on the expression and roles of histone modifiers in lymphocytes has begun to shed light on this additional level of regulation. This review will discuss the recent advancements in understanding how humoral immune responses, in particular germinal centers and memory cells, are modulated by histone modifiers. PMID:25477884

  6. Regional orientation of actin filaments in the pericanalicular cytoplasm of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishii, M; Washioka, H; Tonosaki, A; Toyota, T

    1991-12-01

    To elucidate how actin filaments participate in bile formation, polarity of actin filaments in the pericanalicular cytoplasm was determined with myosin subfragment 1 by transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections and deep-etching replicas. Densely concentrated actin filaments were identified around the bile canaliculi in the forms of microvillous core filaments, pericanalicular web filaments, and filaments on the junctional complex. They bound subfragment 1 to form double-helical strands on the deep-etching replica or typical arrowheads on the ultrathin section. All microvillous core filaments showed their arrowheads pointing basally, suggesting the molecular growth occurring at their apical ends. In contrast, filaments of the pericanalicular web, running in parallel to the cell surface, showed unfixed polarities as indicated by their arrowheads. Furthermore, neighboring filament pairs often showed opposite polarities, an alignment necessary for filament sliding. The junctional complex had filaments with arrowheads pointed mostly at the cell center with a small number in opposite direction. In addition, a group of sporadic filaments appeared to be installed to link to both the canalicular membrane and coated vesicles. Such regionally specialized actin filaments are considered inclusively to form a cytoskeletal system that is in charge of (a) maintenance of length of the microvilli, (b) contraction of the canalicular walls, and (c) translocation of coated vesicles in the pericanalicular cytoplasm. PMID:1955131

  7. An Observational Detection of the Bridge Effect of Void Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-12-01

    The bridge effect of void filaments is a phrase coined by Park & Lee to explain the correlations found in a numerical experiment between the luminosity of the void galaxies and the degree of straightness of their host filaments. Their numerical finding implies that a straight void filament provides a narrow channel for the efficient transportation of gas and matter particles from the surroundings into void galaxies. Analyzing the Sloan void catalog constructed by Pan et al., we identify the filamentary structures in void regions and determine the specific size of each void filament as a measure of its straightness. To avoid possible spurious signals caused by Malmquist bias, we consider only those void filaments whose redshifts are in the range 0≤slant z≤slant 0.02 and find a clear tendency that the void galaxies located in the straighter filaments are on average more luminous, which is in qualitative agreement with the numerical prediction. It is also shown that the strength of correlation increases with the number of member galaxies in the void filaments, which can be understood physically on the grounds that the more stretched filaments can connect the dense surroundings even to galaxies located deep in the central parts of the voids. This observational evidence may provide a key clue to the puzzling issue of why the void galaxies have higher specific star formation rates and bluer colors than their wall counterparts.

  8. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials. PMID:25730393

  9. Burkholderia cenocepacia ShvR-regulated genes that influence colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nguyen, David T; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that primarily infects cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Previously, we reported that ShvR, a LysR regulator, influences colony morphology, virulence, and biofilm formation and regulates the expression of an adjacent 24-kb genomic region encoding 24 genes. In this study, we report the functional characterization of selected genes in this region. A Tn5 mutant with shiny colony morphology was identified with a polar mutation in BCAS0208, predicted to encode an acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. Mutagenesis of BCAS0208 and complementation analyses revealed that BCAS0208 is required for rough colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence on alfalfa seedlings. It was not possible to complement with BCAS0208 containing a mutation in the catalytic site. BCAS0201, encoding a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidoreductase, and BCAS0207, encoding a putative citrate synthase, do not influence colony morphology but are required for optimum levels of biofilm formation and virulence. Both BCAS0208 and BCAS0201 contribute to pellicle formation, although individual mutations in each of these genes had no appreciable effect on pellicle formation. A mutant with a polar insertion in BCAS0208 was significantly less virulent in a rat model of chronic lung infection as well as in the alfalfa model. Genes in this region were shown to influence utilization of branched-chain fatty acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, l-arabinose, and branched-chain amino acids. Together, our data show that the ShvR-regulated genes BCAS0208 to BCAS0201 are required for the rough colony morphotype, biofilm and pellicle formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. PMID:21690240

  10. Cofilin Oligomer Formation Occurs In Vivo and Is Regulated by Cofilin Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Pankaj; Pandey, Dharmendra; Brünnert, Daniela; Hammer, Elke; Zygmunt, Marek; Siess, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background ADF/cofilin proteins are key regulators of actin dynamics. Their function is inhibited by LIMK-mediated phosphorylation at Ser-3. Previous in vitro studies have shown that dependent on its concentration, cofilin either depolymerizes F-actin (at low cofilin concentrations) or promotes actin polymerization (at high cofilin concentrations). Methodology/Principal Findings We found that after in vivo cross-linking with different probes, a cofilin oligomer (65 kDa) could be detected in platelets and endothelial cells. The cofilin oligomer did not contain actin. Notably, ADF that only depolymerizes F-actin was present mainly in monomeric form. Furthermore, we found that formation of the cofilin oligomer is regulated by Ser-3 cofilin phosphorylation. Cofilin but not phosphorylated cofilin was present in the endogenous cofilin oligomer. In vitro, formation of cofilin oligomers was drastically reduced after phosphorylation by LIMK2. In endothelial cells, LIMK-mediated cofilin phosphorylation after thrombin-stimulation of EGFP- or DsRed2-tagged cofilin transfected cells reduced cofilin aggregate formation, whereas inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation after Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) treatment of endothelial cells promoted formation of cofilin aggregates. In platelets, cofilin dephosphorylation after thrombin-stimulation and Y27632 treatment led to an increased formation of the cofilin oligomer. Conclusion/Significance Based on our results, we propose that an equilibrium exists between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of cofilin in intact cells that is regulated by cofilin phosphorylation. Cofilin phosphorylation at Ser-3 may induce conformational changes on the protein-protein interacting surface of the cofilin oligomer, thereby preventing and/or disrupting cofilin oligomer formation. Cofilin oligomerization might explain the dual action of cofilin on actin dynamics in vivo. PMID:23951242

  11. IQGAP1 controls tight junction formation through differential regulation of claudin recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Tanos, Barbara E.; Perez Bay, Andres E.; Salvarezza, Susana; Vivanco, Igor; Mellinghoff, Ingo; Osman, Mahasin; Sacks, David B.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein previously implicated in adherens junction formation. However, its role in the establishment or maintenance of tight junctions (TJs) has not been explored. We hypothesized that IQGAP1 could regulate TJ formation by modulating the expression and/or localization of junctional proteins, and we systematically tested this hypothesis in the model Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. We find that IQGAP1 silencing enhances a transient increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) observed during the early stages of TJ formation (Cereijido et al., 1978). Quantitative microscopy and biochemical experiments suggest that this effect of IQGAP1 on TJ assembly is accounted for by reduced expression and TJ recruitment of claudin 2, and increased TJ recruitment of claudin 4. Furthermore, we show that IQGAP1 also regulates TJ formation through its interactor CDC42, because IQGAP1 knockdown increases the activity of the CDC42 effector JNK and dominant-negative CDC42 prevents the increase in TER caused by IQGAP1 silencing. Hence, we provide evidence that IQGAP1 modulates TJ formation by a twofold mechanism: (1) controlling the expression and recruitment of claudin 2 and recruitment of claudin 4 to the TJ, and (2) transient inhibition of the CDC42–JNK pathway. PMID:25588839

  12. Plethora of transitions during breakup of liquid filaments

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Thete, Sumeet Suresh; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Hutchings, Ian M.; Hinch, John; Lister, John R.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2015-01-01

    Thinning and breakup of liquid filaments are central to dripping of leaky faucets, inkjet drop formation, and raindrop fragmentation. As the filament radius decreases, curvature and capillary pressure, both inversely proportional to radius, increase and fluid is expelled with increasing velocity from the neck. As the neck radius vanishes, the governing equations become singular and the filament breaks. In slightly viscous liquids, thinning initially occurs in an inertial regime where inertial and capillary forces balance. By contrast, in highly viscous liquids, initial thinning occurs in a viscous regime where viscous and capillary forces balance. As the filament thins, viscous forces in the former case and inertial forces in the latter become important, and theory shows that the filament approaches breakup in the final inertial–viscous regime where all three forces balance. However, previous simulations and experiments reveal that transition from an initial to the final regime either occurs at a value of filament radius well below that predicted by theory or is not observed. Here, we perform new simulations and experiments, and show that a thinning filament unexpectedly passes through a number of intermediate transient regimes, thereby delaying onset of the inertial–viscous regime. The new findings have practical implications regarding formation of undesirable satellite droplets and also raise the question as to whether similar dynamical transitions arise in other free-surface flows such as coalescence that also exhibit singularities. PMID:25825761

  13. Regulation of the activity of Escherichia coli quinolinate synthase by reversible disulfide-bond formation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Allison H; Booker, Squire J

    2008-08-19

    Quinolinate synthase (NadA) catalyzes a unique condensation reaction between dihydroxyacetone phosphate and iminoaspartate, yielding inorganic phosphate, 2 mol of water, and quinolinic acid, a central intermediate in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and its derivatives. The enzyme from Escherichia coli contains a C (291)XXC (294)XXC (297) motif in its primary structure. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that only Cys297 serves as a ligand to a [4Fe-4S] cluster that is required for turnover. In this report, we show that the two remaining cysteines, Cys291 and Cys294, undergo reversible disulfide-bond formation, which regulates the activity of the enzyme. This mode of redox regulation of NadA appears physiologically relevant, since disulfide-bond formation and reduction are effected by oxidized and reduced forms of E. coli thioredoxin. A midpoint potential of -264 +/- 1.77 mV is approximated for the redox couple. PMID:18651751

  14. The human language-associated gene SRPX2 regulates synapse formation and vocalization in mice.

    PubMed

    Sia, G M; Clem, R L; Huganir, R L

    2013-11-22

    Synapse formation in the developing brain depends on the coordinated activity of synaptogenic proteins, some of which have been implicated in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we show that the sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) gene encodes a protein that promotes synaptogenesis in the cerebral cortex. In humans, SRPX2 is an epilepsy- and language-associated gene that is a target of the foxhead box protein P2 (FoxP2) transcription factor. We also show that FoxP2 modulates synapse formation through regulating SRPX2 levels and that SRPX2 reduction impairs development of ultrasonic vocalization in mice. Our results suggest FoxP2 modulates the development of neural circuits through regulating synaptogenesis and that SRPX2 is a synaptogenic factor that plays a role in the pathogenesis of language disorders. PMID:24179158

  15. Protein kinase LKB1 regulates polarized dendrite formation of adult hippocampal newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; She, Liang; Chang, Xing-ya; Yang, Rong-rong; Wang, Liang; Ji, Hong-bin; Jiao, Jian-wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the rodent hippocampus are important for memory formation and mood regulation, but the cellular mechanism underlying their polarized development, a process critical for their incorporation into functional circuits, remains unknown. We found that deletion of the serine-threonine protein kinase LKB1 or overexpression of dominant-negative LKB1 reduced the polarized initiation of the primary dendrite from the soma and disrupted its oriented growth toward the molecular layer. This abnormality correlated with the dispersion of Golgi apparatus that normally accumulated at the base and within the initial segment of the primary dendrite, and was mimicked by disrupting Golgi organization via altering the expression of Golgi structural proteins GM130 or GRASP65. Thus, besides its known function in axon formation in embryonic pyramidal neurons, LKB1 plays an additional role in regulating polarized dendrite morphogenesis in adult-born granule cells in the hippocampus. PMID:24367100

  16. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Lehman, William

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1) tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2) low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation. PMID:26798831

  17. tal1 Regulates the formation of intercellular junctions and the maintenance of identity in the endocardium.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Jennifer A; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Garavito-Aguilar, Zayra V; Yelon, Deborah

    2013-11-15

    The endocardium forms the inner lining of the heart tube, where it enables blood flow and also interacts with the myocardium during the formation of valves and trabeculae. Although a number of studies have identified regulators in the morphogenesis of the myocardium, relatively little is known about the molecules that control endocardial morphogenesis. Prior work has implicated the bHLH transcription factor Tal1 in endocardial tube formation: in zebrafish embryos lacking Tal1, endocardial cells form a disorganized mass within the ventricle and do not populate the atrium. Through blastomere transplantation, we find that tal1 plays a cell-autonomous role in regulating endocardial extension, suggesting that Tal1 activity influences the behavior of individual endocardial cells. The defects in endocardial behavior in tal1-deficient embryos originate during the earliest steps of endocardial morphogenesis: tal1-deficient endocardial cells fail to generate a cohesive monolayer at the midline and instead pack tightly together into a multi-layered aggregate. Moreover, the tight junction protein ZO-1 is mislocalized in the tal1-deficient endocardium, indicating a defect in intercellular junction formation. In addition, we find that the tal1-deficient endocardium fails to maintain its identity; over time, a progressively increasing number of tal1-deficient endocardial cells initiate myocardial gene expression. However, the onset of defects in intercellular junction formation precedes the onset of ectopic myocardial gene expression in the tal1-deficient endocardium. We therefore propose a model in which Tal1 has distinct roles in regulating the formation of endocardial intercellular junctions and maintaining endocardial identity. PMID:24075907

  18. tal1 regulates the formation of intercellular junctions and the maintenance of identity in the endocardium

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Bloomekatz, Joshua; Garavito-Aguilar, Zayra V.; Yelon, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The endocardium forms the inner lining of the heart tube, where it enables blood flow and also interacts with the myocardium during the formation of valves and trabeculae. Although a number of studies have identified regulators of the morphogenesis of the myocardium, relatively little is known about the molecules that control endocardial morphogenesis. Prior work has implicated the bHLH transcription factor Tal1 in endocardial tube formation: in zebrafish embryos lacking Tal1, endocardial cells form a disorganized mass within the ventricle and do not populate the atrium. Through blastomere transplantation, we find that tal1 plays a cell-autonomous role in regulating endocardial extension, suggesting that Tal1 activity influences the behavior of individual endocardial cells. The defects in endocardial behavior in tal1-deficient embryos originate during the earliest steps of endocardial morphogenesis: tal1-deficient endocardial cells fail to generate a cohesive monolayer at the midline and instead pack tightly together into a multi-layered aggregate. Moreover, the tight junction protein ZO-1 is mislocalized in the tal1-deficient endocardium, indicating a defect in intercellular junction formation. In addition, we find that the tal1-deficient endocardium fails to maintain its identity; over time, a progressively increasing number of tal1-deficient endocardial cells initiate myocardial gene expression. However, the onset of defects in intercellular junction formation precedes the onset of ectopic myocardial gene expression in the tal1-deficient endocardium. We therefore propose a model in which Tal1 has distinct roles in regulating the formation of endocardial intercellular junctions and maintaining endocardial identity. PMID:24075907

  19. Regulation of lamellipodia formation and cell invasion by CLIP-170 in invasive human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuo; Takahashi, Kazuhide

    2008-04-01

    Lamellipodia formation necessary for cell invasion is regulated by Rac1. We report here that lamellipodia formation and three-dimensional invasion were significantly promoted by HGF and serum, respectively, in invasive human breast cancer cells. Rac1 formed a complex with CLIP-170, IQGAP1, and kinesin in serum-starved cells, and stimulation of the cells with HGF and serum caused the partial release of IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1-CLIP-170 complex. The HGF-induced release of the proteins and promotion of lamellipodia formation were inhibited by an inhibitor of PI3K. Moreover, downregulation of CLIP-170 by siRNA released IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1 and promoted lamellipodia formation and invasion, independent of HGF and serum. The results suggest that promotion of lamellipodia formation and invasion by HGF or serum requires PI3K-dependent release of IQGAP1 and kinesin from Rac1-CLIP-170 complex and that CLIP-170 prevents cells from the extracellular stimulus-independent lamellipodia formation and invasion by tethering IQGAP1 and kinesin to Rac1. PMID:18237546

  20. The alternative splicing factor Nova2 regulates vascular development and lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, Costanza; Deflorian, Gianluca; Gallo, Stefania; Di Matteo, Anna; Pradella, Davide; Bonomi, Serena; Belloni, Elisa; Nyqvist, Daniel; Quaranta, Valeria; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bertalot, Giovanni; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Pisati, Federica; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Fredrickx, Evelien; Taveggia, Carla; Wyatt, Chris D. R.; Irimia, Manuel; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Dejana, Elisabetta; Ghigna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Vascular lumen formation is a fundamental step during angiogenesis; yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that neural and vascular systems share common anatomical, functional and molecular similarities. Here we show that the organization of endothelial lumen is controlled at the post-transcriptional level by the alternative splicing (AS) regulator Nova2, which was previously considered to be neural cell-specific. Nova2 is expressed during angiogenesis and its depletion disrupts vascular lumen formation in vivo. Similarly, Nova2 depletion in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) impairs the apical distribution and the downstream signalling of the Par polarity complex, resulting in altered EC polarity, a process required for vascular lumen formation. These defects are linked to AS changes of Nova2 target exons affecting the Par complex and its regulators. Collectively, our results reveal that Nova2 functions as an AS regulator in angiogenesis and is a novel member of the ‘angioneurins' family. PMID:26446569

  1. Riemerella anatipestifer lacks luxS, but can uptake exogenous autoinducer-2 to regulate biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangan; Liu, Lei; Fan, Guobo; Zhang, Yuxi; Xu, Da; Zuo, Jiakun; Wang, Shaohui; Wang, Xiaolan; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2015-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer (RA) causes major economic losses to the duck industry. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a quorum-sensing signal that regulates bacterial physiology. The luxS and pfs genes are required for AI-2 synthesis in many bacterial species. pfs encodes Pfs, which functions upstream of LuxS in the biosynthesis of AI-2. In this study, we investigated the AI-2 activity of RA using an AI-2 bioassay, which showed that RA does not produce AI-2. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the RA genome has a pfs, but not a luxS, homologue. To investigate the function of RA pfs, an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) pfs mutant was constructed, which was subsequently transformed with a recombinant plasmid carrying RA pfs. An AI-2 bioassay demonstrated that RA pfs restored AI-2 production to the APEC pfs mutant, suggesting that RA pfs functions in AI-2 synthesis. Furthermore, we found that RA utilizes exogenous AI-2 to regulate biofilm formation. RA biofilm formation decreased significantly upon addition of exogenous AI-2. Real-time quantitative PCR results showed that expression of 13 genes related to RA biofilm formation decreased significantly when exogenous AI-2 was added to the RA culture media. These findings will benefit future studies on AI-2 regulation in RA. PMID:26117600

  2. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  3. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  4. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Multiphase Galactic Disks with Star Formation Feedback. I. Regulation of Star Formation Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2013-10-01

    The energy and momentum feedback from young stars has a profound impact on the interstellar medium (ISM), including heating and driving turbulence in the neutral gas that fuels future star formation. Recent theory has argued that this leads to a quasi-equilibrium self-regulated state, and for outer atomic-dominated disks results in the surface density of star formation ΣSFR varying approximately linearly with the weight of the ISM (or midplane turbulent + thermal pressure). We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations to test the theoretical predictions for thermal, turbulent, and vertical dynamical equilibrium, and the implied functional dependence of ΣSFR on local disk properties. Our models demonstrate that all equilibria are established rapidly, and that the expected proportionalities between mean thermal and turbulent pressures and ΣSFR apply. For outer disk regions, this results in ΣSFR ∝ Σ&sqrt;{ρsd}, where Σ is the total gas surface density and ρsd is the midplane density of the stellar disk (plus dark matter). This scaling law arises because ρsd sets the vertical dynamical time in our models (and outer disk regions generally). The coefficient in the star formation law varies inversely with the specific energy and momentum yield from massive stars. We find proportions of warm and cold atomic gas, turbulent-to-thermal pressure, and mean velocity dispersions that are consistent with solar-neighborhood and other outer disk observations. This study confirms the conclusions of a previous set of simulations, which incorporated the same physics treatment but was restricted to radial-vertical slices through the ISM.

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF MULTIPHASE GALACTIC DISKS WITH STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK. I. REGULATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: eco@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-10-10

    The energy and momentum feedback from young stars has a profound impact on the interstellar medium (ISM), including heating and driving turbulence in the neutral gas that fuels future star formation. Recent theory has argued that this leads to a quasi-equilibrium self-regulated state, and for outer atomic-dominated disks results in the surface density of star formation Σ{sub SFR} varying approximately linearly with the weight of the ISM (or midplane turbulent + thermal pressure). We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations to test the theoretical predictions for thermal, turbulent, and vertical dynamical equilibrium, and the implied functional dependence of Σ{sub SFR} on local disk properties. Our models demonstrate that all equilibria are established rapidly, and that the expected proportionalities between mean thermal and turbulent pressures and Σ{sub SFR} apply. For outer disk regions, this results in Σ{sub SFR}∝Σ√(ρ{sub sd}), where Σ is the total gas surface density and ρ{sub sd} is the midplane density of the stellar disk (plus dark matter). This scaling law arises because ρ{sub sd} sets the vertical dynamical time in our models (and outer disk regions generally). The coefficient in the star formation law varies inversely with the specific energy and momentum yield from massive stars. We find proportions of warm and cold atomic gas, turbulent-to-thermal pressure, and mean velocity dispersions that are consistent with solar-neighborhood and other outer disk observations. This study confirms the conclusions of a previous set of simulations, which incorporated the same physics treatment but was restricted to radial-vertical slices through the ISM.

  6. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extracellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multicellular behavior. PMID:26377849

  7. Formation of spacing pattern and morphogenesis of chick feather buds is regulated by cytoskeletal structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Young; Cho, Sung-Won; Song, Wu-Chul; Lee, Min-Jung; Cai, Jinglei; Ohk, Seung-Ho; Song, Hee-Kyung; Degan, Alexander; Jung, Han-Sung

    2005-06-01

    Chick feather buds develop sequentially in a hexagonal array. Each feather bud develops with anterior posterior polarity, which is thought to develop in response to signals derived from specialized regions of mesenchymal condensation and epithelial thickening. These developmental processes are performed by cellular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation and migration, which occur during chick feather bud development. In order to understand the mechanisms regulating the formation of mesenchymal condensation and their role in feather bud development, we explanted chick dorsal skin at stage HH29+ with cytochalasin D, which inhibits cytoskeletal formation. We show that the aggregation of mesenchymal cells can be prevented by cytochalasin D treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. Subsequently, cytochalasin D disrupts the spacing pattern and inhibits feather bud axis formation as well. In addition, expression patterns of Bmp-4 and Msx-2, key molecules for early feather bud development, were disturbed by cytochalasin D treatment. Our results fully indicate that both the cytoskeletal structure and cell activity via gene regulation are of fundamental importance in mesenchymal condensation leading to proper morphogenesis of feather bud and spacing pattern formation. PMID:16026546

  8. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of G-Protein Cycle during Nodule Formation in Soybean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein complexes comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits and their regulatory RGS (Regulator of G-protein Signaling) protein are conserved in all eukaryotes. We have shown that the specific Gβ and Gγ proteins of a soybean (Glycine max) heterotrimeric G-protein complex are involved in regulation of nodulation. We now demonstrate the role of Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1)-mediated phosphorylation in regulation of the G-protein cycle during nodulation in soybean. We also show that during nodulation, the G-protein cycle is regulated by the activity of RGS proteins. Lower or higher expression of RGS proteins results in fewer or more nodules, respectively. NFR1 interacts with RGS proteins and phosphorylates them. Analysis of phosphorylated RGS protein identifies specific amino acids that, when phosphorylated, result in significantly higher GTPase accelerating activity. These data point to phosphorylation-based regulation of G-protein signaling during nodule development. We propose that active NFR1 receptors phosphorylate and activate RGS proteins, which help maintain the Gα proteins in their inactive, trimeric conformation, resulting in successful nodule development. Alternatively, RGS proteins might also have a direct role in regulating nodulation because overexpression of their phospho-mimic version leads to partial restoration of nodule formation in nod49 mutants. PMID:26498905

  9. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling regulates motility and biofilm formation in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Federico; Ha, Dae-Gon; O'Toole, George A.; Hozbor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The signalling molecule bis-(3′–5′)-cyclic-dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of diverse cellular functions, including motility, biofilm formation, cell cycle progression and virulence, in bacteria. Multiple diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-domain-containing proteins (GGDEF and EAL/HD-GYP, respectively) modulate the levels of the second messenger c-di-GMP to transmit signals and obtain such specific cellular responses. In the genus Bordetella this c-di-GMP network is poorly studied. In this work, we evaluated the expression of two phenotypes in Bordetella bronchiseptica regulated by c-di-GMP, biofilm formation and motility, under the influence of ectopic expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins with EAL or GGDEF domains that regulates the c-di-GMP level. In agreement with previous reports for other bacteria, we observed that B. bronchiseptica is able to form biofilm and reduce its motility only when GGDEF domain protein is expressed. Moreover we identify a GGDEF domain protein (BB3576) with diguanylate cyclase activity that participates in motility and biofilm regulation in B. bronchiseptica. These results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the presence of c-di-GMP regulatory signalling in B. bronchiseptica. PMID:23475948

  10. Notch1-Dll4 signaling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct “leader” phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here, we use single cell gene expression analysis and computational modeling to show that leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signaling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signaling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration. PMID:25766473

  11. Load Regulates Bone Formation and Sclerostin Expression through a TGFβ-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Daniel; Alliston, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Bone continually adapts to meet changing physical and biological demands. Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes cooperate to integrate these physical and biochemical cues to maintain bone homeostasis. Although TGFβ acts on all three of these cell types to maintain bone homeostasis, the extent to which it participates in the adaptation of bone to mechanical load is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the TGFβ pathway in load-induced bone formation and the regulation of Sclerostin, a mechanosensitive antagonist of bone anabolism. We found that mechanical load rapidly represses the net activity of the TGFβ pathway in osteocytes, resulting in reduced phosphorylation and activity of key downstream effectors, Smad2 and Smad3. Loss of TGFβ sensitivity compromises the anabolic response of bone to mechanical load, demonstrating that the mechanosensitive regulation of TGFβ signaling is essential for load-induced bone formation. Furthermore, sensitivity to TGFβ is required for the mechanosensitive regulation of Sclerostin, which is induced by TGFβ in a Smad3-dependent manner. Together, our results show that physical cues maintain bone homeostasis through the TGFβ pathway to regulate Sclerostin expression and the deposition of new bone. PMID:23308287

  12. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields. PMID:24669822

  13. A study of short wave instability on vortex filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong Yun

    1996-12-01

    The numerical stability and accuracy of the vortex method are studied. The effect of the ordinary differential equations (ODE) solver and of the time step on the numerical stability is analyzed. Various ODE solvers are compared and a best performer is chosen. A new constraint on the time step based on numerical stability is proposed and verified in numerical simulations. It is shown through numerical examples that empirical rules for selecting the spatial discretization obtained in simple test problems may not be extended to more general problems. The thin tube vortex filament method is applied to the problem of Widnall`s instability on vortex rings. Numerical results different from previous calculations are presented and the source of the discrepancies is explained. The long time behavior of the unstable mode on thin vortex rings is simulated and analyzed. The short wave instability on vortex filaments is investigated both theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the short wave instability always occurs on co-rotating vortex filaments of fixed core structure. Furthermore when they are close to each other, vortex filaments produce short wave unstable modes which lead to wild stretching and folding. However, when the inter-filament distance is large in comparison with the core size of the filaments, unstable modes are bounded by a small fraction of the core size and the vortex filaments do not create hairpins nor wild stretching. These findings may explain the smooth behavior of the superfluid vortices. The formation of hairpin structures on numerical vortex filaments is investigated. It is shown that the formation of hairpin structures is independent of the ODE solver, of the time step and of other numerical parameters. The hairpin structures are primarily caused by short wave instability on co-rotating vortex filaments.

  14. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  15. CVD-produced boron filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wawner, F. E.; Debolt, H. E.; Suplinskas, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for producing boron filaments with an average tensile strength of 6.89 GPa has been developed which involves longitudinal splitting of the filament and core (substrate) removal by etching. Splitting is accomplished by a pinch wheel device which continuously splits filaments in lengths of 3.0 m by applying a force to the side of the filament to create a crack which is then propagated along the axis by a gentle sliding action. To facilitate the splitting, a single 10 mil tungsten substrate is used instead of the usual 0.5 mil substrate. A solution of hot 30% hydrogen peroxide is used to remove the core without attacking the boron. An alternative technique is to alter the residual stress by heavily etching the filament. Average strengths in the 4.83-5.52 GPa range have been obtained by etching an 8 mil filament to 4 mil.

  16. Kinetics of thin filament activation probed by fluorescence of N-((2-(Iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-labeled troponin I incorporated into skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle: implications for regulation of muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B; Chalovich, JM

    1999-01-01

    Making use of troponin with fluorescently labeled troponin I subunit (N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-troponin I, IANBD-TnI) that had previously been described in solution studies as a probe for thin filament activation (. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 77:7209-7213), we present a new approach that allows the kinetics of thin filament activation to be studied in skinned muscle fibers. After the exchange of native troponin for fluorescently labeled troponin, the fluorescence intensity is sensitive to both changes in calcium concentration and actin attachment of cross-bridges in their strong binding states (. Biophys. J. 77:000-000). Imposing rapid changes in the fraction of strongly attached cross-bridges, e.g., by switching from isometric contraction to high-speed shortening, causes changes in thin filament activation at fixed Ca(2+) concentrations that can be followed by recording fluorescence intensity. Upon changing to high-speed shortening we observed small (<20%) changes in fluorescence that became faster at higher Ca(2+) concentrations. At all Ca(2+) concentrations, these changes are more than 10-fold faster than force redevelopment subsequent to the period of unloaded shortening. We interpret this as an indication that equilibration among different states of the thin filament is rapid and becomes faster as Ca(2+) is raised. Fast equilibration suggests that the rate constant of force redevelopment is not limited by changes in the activation level of thin filaments induced by the isotonic contraction before force redevelopment. Instead, our modeling shows that, in agreement with our previous proposal for the regulation of muscle contraction, a rapid and Ca(2+)-dependent equilibration among different states of the thin filament can fully account for the Ca(2+) dependence of force redevelopment and the fluorescence changes described in this study. PMID:10545369

  17. Magnetic vortex filament flows

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Manuel; Cabrerizo, Jose L.; Fernandez, Manuel; Romero, Alfonso

    2007-08-15

    We exhibit a variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with a Killing magnetic field in dimension 3. In this context, the solutions of the Lorentz force equation are viewed as Kirchhoff elastic rods and conversely. This provides an amazing connection between two apparently unrelated physical models and, in particular, it ties the classical elastic theory with the Hall effect. Then, these magnetic flows can be regarded as vortex filament flows within the localized induction approximation. The Hasimoto transformation can be used to see the magnetic trajectories as solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation showing the solitonic nature of those.

  18. Inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 enhances endochondral bone formation by increasing chondrocyte survival.

    PubMed

    Eaton, G J; Zhang, Q-S; Diallo, C; Matsuzawa, A; Ichijo, H; Steinbeck, M J; Freeman, T A

    2014-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is the result of chondrocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, death and replacement by bone. The careful timing and progression of this process is important for normal skeletal bone growth and development, as well as fracture repair. Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is activated by reactive oxygen species and other cellular stress events. Activation of ASK1 initiates a signaling cascade known to regulate diverse cellular events including cytokine and growth factor signaling, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation, hypertrophy, survival and apoptosis. ASK1 is highly expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but the role of ASK1 in skeletal tissues has not been investigated. Herein, we report that ASK1 knockout (KO) mice display alterations in normal growth plate morphology, which include a shorter proliferative zone and a lengthened hypertrophic zone. These changes in growth plate dynamics result in accelerated long bone mineralization and an increased formation of trabecular bone, which can be attributed to an increased resistance of terminally differentiated chondrocytes to undergo cell death. Interestingly, under normal cell culture conditions, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from ASK1 KO mice show no differences in either MAPK signaling or osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation when compared with wild-type (WT) MEFs. However, when cultured with stress activators, H2O2 or staurosporine, the KO cells show enhanced survival, an associated decrease in the activation of proteins involved in death signaling pathways and a reduction in markers of terminal differentiation. Furthermore, in both WT mice treated with the ASK1 inhibitor, NQDI-1, and ASK1 KO mice endochondral bone formation was increased in an ectopic ossification model. These findings highlight a previously unrealized role for ASK1 in regulating endochondral bone formation. Inhibition of ASK1 has

  19. Positive Regulation of Neocortical Synapse Formation by the Plexin-D1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Synapse formation is a critical process during neural development and is coordinated by multiple signals. Several lines of evidence implicate the Plexin-D1 receptor in synaptogenesis. Studies have shown that Plexin-D1 signaling is involved in synaptic specificity and synapse formation in spinal cord and striatum. Expression of Plexin-D1 and its principal neural ligand, Sema3E, by neocortical neurons is temporally and spatially regulated, reaching the highest level at the time of synaptogenesis in mice. In this study, we examined the function of Plexin-D1 in synapse formation by primary neocortical neurons in vitro. A novel, automated image analysis method was developed to quantitate synapse formation under baseline conditions and with manipulation of Plexin-D1 levels. shRNA and overexpression manipulations caused opposite changes, with reduction resulting in less synapse formation, an effect distinct from that reported in the striatum. The data indicate that Plexin-D1 operates in a cell context-specific fashion, mediating different synaptogenic outcomes depending upon neuron type. PMID:25976775

  20. Spacecraft Formation Flying Maneuvers Using Linear-Quadratic Regulation with No Radial Axis Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Yedavalli, R. K.; Sparks, Andrew G.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Regarding multiple spacecraft formation flying, the observation has been made that control thrust need only be applied coplanar to the local horizon to achieve complete controllability of a two-satellite (leader-follower) formation. A formulation of orbital dynamics using the state of one satellite relative to another is used. Without the need for thrust along the radial (zenith-nadir) axis of the relative reference frame ' propulsion system simplifications and weight reduction may be accomplished. Several linear-quadratic regulators (LQR) are explored and compared based on performance measures likely to be important to many missions, but not directly optimized in the LQR designs. Maneuver simulations are performed using commercial ODE solvers to propagate the Keplerian dynamics of a controlled satellite relative to an uncontrolled leader. These short maneuver simulations demonstrate the capacity of the controller to perform changes from one formation geometry to another. This work focusses on formations in which the controlled satellite has a relative trajectory which projects onto the local horizon of the uncontrolled satellite as a circle. This formation has potential uses for distributed remote sensing systems.

  1. Predicting Solar Filament Eruptions with HEK Filament Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, A.; Reeves, K.; Schanche, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013) has shown a positive correlation (80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME's). If certain filament properties, such as length, chirality, and tilt, indicate a tendency towards filament eruptions, one may be able to further predict an oncoming CME. Towards this end, we present a novel algorithm based on spatiotemporal analysis that systematically correlates filament eruptions documented in the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) with HEK filaments that have been grouped together using a tracking algorithm developed at Georgia State University (e.g. Kempton et al. 2014). We also find filament tracks that are not correlated with eruptions to form a null data set in a similar fashion. Finally, we compare the metadata from erupting and non-erupting filament tracks to discover which filament properties may present signs of an eruption onset. Through statistical methods such as the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and Random Forest Classifier, we find that a filament that is increasing in length or changing in tilt with respect to the equator may be a useful gauge to predict a filament eruption. However, the average values of length and tilt for both datasets follow similar distributions, leading us to conclude that these parameters do not indicate an eruption event. This work is supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241, and NSF DIBBS grant number ACI-1443061.

  2. Solar Filament Extraction and Characterizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shih, F. Y.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to extract and characterize solar filaments from H-alpha full-disk images produced by Big Bear Solar Observatory. A cascading Hough Transform method is designed to identify solar disk center location and radius. Solar disks are segmented from the background, and unbalanced illumination on the surface of solar disks is removed using polynomial surface fitting. And then a localized adaptive thresholding is employed to extract solar filament candidates. After the removal of small solar filament candidates, the remaining larger candidates are used as the seeds of region growing. The procedure of region growing not only connects broken filaments but also generate complete shape for each filament. Mathematical morphology thinning is adopted to produce the skeleton of each filament, and graph theory is used to prune branches and barbs to get the main skeleton. The length and the location of the main skeleton is characterized. The proposed method can help scientists and researches study the evolution of solar filament, for instance, to detect solar filament eruption. The presented method has already been used by Space Weather Research Lab of New Jersey Institute of Technology (http://swrl.njit.edu) to generate the solar filament online catalog using H-alpha full-disk images of Global H-alpha Network (http://swrl.njit.edu/ghn_web/).

  3. Gravitational infall onto molecular filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian

    2013-06-01

    Two aspects of filamentary molecular cloud evolution are addressed: (1) exploring analytically the role of the environment for the evolution of filaments demonstrates that considering them in isolation (i.e., just addressing the fragmentation stability) will result in unphysical conclusions about the filament's properties. Accretion can also explain the observed decorrelation between FWHM and peak column density. (2) Free-fall accretion onto finite filaments can lead to the characteristic 'fans' of infrared-dark clouds around star-forming regions. The fans may form due to tidal forces mostly arising at the ends of the filaments, consistent with numerical models and earlier analytical studies.

  4. TGF-β/BMP signaling and other molecular events: regulation of osteoblastogenesis and bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Shaifur; Akhtar, Naznin; Jamil, Hossen Mohammad; Banik, Rajat Suvra; Asaduzzaman, Sikder M

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) plays a fundamental role in the regulation of bone organogenesis through the activation of receptor serine/threonine kinases. Perturbations of TGF-β/BMP activity are almost invariably linked to a wide variety of clinical outcomes, i.e., skeletal, extra skeletal anomalies, autoimmune, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Phosphorylation of TGF-β (I/II) or BMP receptors activates intracellular downstream Smads, the transducer of TGF-β/BMP signals. This signaling is modulated by various factors and pathways, including transcription factor Runx2. The signaling network in skeletal development and bone formation is overwhelmingly complex and highly time and space specific. Additive, positive, negative, or synergistic effects are observed when TGF-β/BMP interacts with the pathways of MAPK, Wnt, Hedgehog (Hh), Notch, Akt/mTOR, and miRNA to regulate the effects of BMP-induced signaling in bone dynamics. Accumulating evidence indicates that Runx2 is the key integrator, whereas Hh is a possible modulator, miRNAs are regulators, and β-catenin is a mediator/regulator within the extensive intracellular network. This review focuses on the activation of BMP signaling and interaction with other regulatory components and pathways highlighting the molecular mechanisms regarding TGF-β/BMP function and regulation that could allow understanding the complexity of bone tissue dynamics. PMID:26273537

  5. Midline-derived Shh regulates mesonephric tubule formation through the paraxial mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Akita, Hiroki; Okazawa, Mika; Kishigami, Satoshi; Nakagata, Naomi; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Yamada, Gen

    2014-01-01

    During organogenesis, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) possesses dual functions: Shh emanating from midline structures regulates the positioning of bilateral structures at early stages, whereas organ-specific Shh locally regulates organ morphogenesis at later stages. The mesonephros is a transient embryonic kidney in amniote, whereas it becomes definitive adult kidney in some anamniotes. Thus, elucidating the regulation of mesonephros formation has important implications for our understanding of kidney development and evolution. In Shh knockout (KO) mutant mice, the mesonephros was displaced towards the midline and ectopic mesonephric tubules (MTs) were present in the caudal mesonephros. Mesonephros-specific ablation of Shh in Hoxb7-Cre;Shhflox/− and Sall1CreERT2/+;Shhflox/− mice embryos indicated that Shh expressed in the mesonephros was not required for either the development of the mesonephros or the differentiation of the male reproductive tract. Moreover, stage-specific ablation of Shh in ShhCreERT2/flox mice showed that notochord- and/or floor plate-derived Shh were essential for the regulation of the number and position of MTs. Lineage analysis of hedgehog (Hh)-responsive cells, and analysis of gene expression in Shh KO embryos suggested that Shh regulated nephrogenic gene expression indirectly, possibly through effects on the paraxial mesoderm. These data demonstrate the essential role of midline-derived Shh in local tissue morphogenesis and differentiation. PMID:24370450

  6. Mechanism of regulation of the formate-hydrogenlyase pathway by oxygen, nitrate, and pH: definition of the formate regulon.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, R; Sawers, G; Böck, A

    1991-11-01

    The products of a minimum of 15 genes are required for the synthesis of an active formate-hydrogenlyase (FHL) system in Escherichia coli. All are co-ordinately regulated in response to variations in the oxygen and nitrate concentration and the pH of the culture medium. Formate is obligately required for transcriptional activation of these genes. Analysis of the transcription of one of these genes, hycB linked to the lacZ reporter gene, revealed that oxygen and nitrate repression of transcription could be relieved completely, or partially in the case of nitrate, either by the addition of formate to the medium or by increasing the copy number of the gene encoding the transcriptional activator (fhlA) of this regulon. These studies uncovered a further level of regulation in which the transcription of hycB was reduced in cells grown on glucose. This effect was most clearly seen in aerobically grown cells when formate was added externally. Addition of cAMP overcame this glucose repression, which could be shown to be mediated by the cAMP receptor protein. These results would be consistent with the transport of formate being regulated by catabolite repression. Moreover, the repression of transcription through high pH also could be partially overcome by addition of increasing concentrations of formate to the medium, again being consistent with regulation at the level of formate import and export. Taken together, all these observations indicate that it is the intracellular level of formate that determines the transcription of the genes of the formate regulon by FhlA. This represents a novel positive feedback mechanism in which the activator of a regulon induces its own synthesis in response to increases in the concentration of the catabolic substrate, and this in turn is governed by the relative affinities of FhlA and the three formate dehydrogenase isoenzymes for formate. PMID:1779767

  7. On the universality of interstellar filaments: theory meets simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federrath, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Filaments are ubiquitous in the Universe. Recent observations have revealed that stars and star clusters form preferentially along dense filaments. Understanding the formation and properties of filaments is therefore a crucial step in understanding star formation. Here we perform 3D high-resolution magnetohydrodynamical simulations that follow the evolution of molecular clouds and the formation of filaments and stars. We apply a filament detection algorithm and compare simulations with different combinations of physical ingredients: gravity, turbulence, magnetic fields and jet/outflow feedback. We find that gravity-only simulations produce significantly narrower filament profiles than observed, while simulations that include turbulence produce realistic filament properties. For these turbulence simulations, we find a remarkably universal filament width of 0.10 ± 0.02 pc, which is independent of the star formation history of the clouds. We derive a theoretical model that provides a physical explanation for this characteristic filament width, based on the sonic scale (λsonic) of molecular cloud turbulence. Our derivation provides λsonic as a function of the cloud diameter L, the velocity dispersion σv, the gas sound speed cs, and the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure, plasma β. For typical cloud conditions in the Milky Way spiral arms, we find λsonic = 0.04-0.16 pc, in excellent agreement with the filament width of 0.05-0.15 pc from observations. Consistent with the theoretical model assumptions, we find that the velocity dispersion inside the filaments is subsonic and supersonic outside. We further explain the observed p = 2 scaling of the filament density profile, ρ ∝ r-p with the collision of two planar shocks forming a filament at their intersection.

  8. Interactions between ICAM-5 and β1 integrins regulate neuronal synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lin; Tian, Li; Smirnov, Sergei; Vihinen, Helena; Llano, Olaya; Vick, Kyle; Davis, Ronald L.; Rivera, Claudio; Gahmberg, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) is a dendrite-specific adhesion molecule, which functions in both the immune and nervous systems. ICAM-5 is the only negative regulator that has been identified for maturation of dendritic spines so far. Shedding of the ICAM-5 ectodomain promotes spine maturation and enhances synaptic activity. However, the mechanism by which ICAM-5 regulates spine development remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that ablation of ICAM5 expression resulted in a significant increase in the formation of synaptic contacts and the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents, an indicator of pre-synaptic release probability. Antibodies against ICAM-5 and β1 integrins altered spine maturation. Furthermore, we found that β1 integrins serve as binding partners for ICAM-5. β1 integrins were immunoprecipitated with ICAM-5 from mouse brain and the binding region in ICAM-5 was localized to the two first Ig domains. β1 integrins were juxtaposed to filopodia tips at the early stage of synaptic formation, but as synapses matured, β1 integrins covered the mushroom spines. Loss of β1 integrins from the pre-synaptic sites affected the morphology of the post-synaptic structures. ICAM-5 ectodomain cleavage decreased or increased when the interaction between ICAM-5 and β1 integrins was potentiated or weakened, respectively, using antibodies. These results suggest that the interaction between ICAM-5 and β1 integrins is important in formation of functional synapses. PMID:23015592

  9. Interactions between ICAM-5 and β1 integrins regulate neuronal synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Ning, Lin; Tian, Li; Smirnov, Sergei; Vihinen, Helena; Llano, Olaya; Vick, Kyle; Davis, Ronald L; Rivera, Claudio; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5) is a dendrite-specific adhesion molecule, which functions in both the immune and nervous systems. ICAM-5 is the only negative regulator that has been identified for maturation of dendritic spines so far. Shedding of the ICAM-5 ectodomain promotes spine maturation and enhances synaptic activity. However, the mechanism by which ICAM-5 regulates spine development remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that ablation of ICAM5 expression resulted in a significant increase in the formation of synaptic contacts and the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents, an indicator of pre-synaptic release probability. Antibodies against ICAM-5 and β1 integrins altered spine maturation. Furthermore, we found that β1 integrins serve as binding partners for ICAM-5. β1 integrins were immunoprecipitated with ICAM-5 from mouse brain and the binding region in ICAM-5 was localized to the two first Ig domains. β1 integrins were juxtaposed to filopodia tips at the early stage of synaptic formation, but as synapses matured, β1 integrins covered the mushroom spines. Loss of β1 integrins from the pre-synaptic sites affected the morphology of the post-synaptic structures. ICAM-5 ectodomain cleavage decreased or increased when the interaction between ICAM-5 and β1 integrins was potentiated or weakened, respectively, using antibodies. These results suggest that the interaction between ICAM-5 and β1 integrins is important in formation of functional synapses. PMID:23015592

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Rebecca E.; Nicod, Jérôme; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Maciejowski, John; Cai, Na; Hill, Jennifer; Verstraten, Ruth; Iyer, Vivek; Rust, Alistair G.; Balmus, Gabriel; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Adams, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW)-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%), and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males. PMID:27233670

  11. AHL-type quorum sensing and its regulation on symplasmata formation in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Wu, Suisui; Wang, Jieru; Feng, Yongjun

    2015-05-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19, an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice, is characterized by the formation of multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata, which not only bestow the strong stress-resistance of the bacterium, but also contribute to the specific adaptation in the endophyte-host association. Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), as the important signal molecule in the quorum sensing (QS) system of gram-negative bacteria, were demonstrated to regulate motility, cell-aggregation, and other bacterial behaviors. Here, the production of AHL by P. agglomerans YS19 and its regulation on the symplasmata formation were studied. It was revealed that the production of AHL by YS19 was initiated at the exponential growth stage and from then on, reached the peak values at the stationary growth stage in LB medium. The AHL was identified as N-3-oxooctanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OOHL) by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The AHL synthesis gene pagI and receptor gene pagR in YS19 were cloned and phylogenetic analysis showed that they were high conservative among strains in species of P. agglomerans. It was revealed that AHL promoted the bacterial growth and symplasmata formation of YS19. Meanwhile, the colonization ability and growth-promoting effect of YS19 on the host plant were also enhanced by AHL. These results strongly suggest the pleiotropic effects of the AHL-type QS system in endophytic life of the strain. PMID:25283544

  12. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of centromeres: a look at HAC formation.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Jun-ichirou; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal locus required for accurate chromosome segregation. A specific histone H3 variant, CENP-A, assembles at centromeres. CENP-A is required for kinetochore protein assembly and is an epigenetic marker for the maintenance of a functional centromere. Human CENP-A chromatin normally assembles on α-satellite DNA (alphoid DNA), a centromeric repetitive sequence. Using alphoid DNA arrays, human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have been constructed in human HT1080 cells and used to dissect the requirements for CENP-A assembly on DNA sequence. However, centromere formation is not a simple genetic event. In other commonly used human cell lines, such as HeLa and U2OS cells, no functional de novo centromere formation occurs efficiently with the same centromeric alphoid DNA sequences. Recent studies using protein tethering combined with the HAC system and/or genetic manipulation have revealed that epigenetic chromatin regulation mechanisms are also involved in the CENP-A chromatin assembly pathway and subsequent centromere/kinetochore formation. We summarize the DNA sequence requirements for CENP-A assembly and discuss the epigenetic regulation of human centromeres. PMID:25682171

  13. Molecular mechanisms regulating formation, trafficking and processing of annular gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Falk, Matthias M; Bell, Cheryl L; Kells Andrews, Rachael M; Murray, Sandra A

    2016-01-01

    Internalization of gap junction plaques results in the formation of annular gap junction vesicles. The factors that regulate the coordinated internalization of the gap junction plaques to form annular gap junction vesicles, and the subsequent events involved in annular gap junction processing have only relatively recently been investigated in detail. However it is becoming clear that while annular gap junction vesicles have been demonstrated to be degraded by autophagosomal and endo-lysosomal pathways, they undergo a number of additional processing events. Here, we characterize the morphology of the annular gap junction vesicle and review the current knowledge of the processes involved in their formation, fission, fusion, and degradation. In addition, we address the possibility for connexin protein recycling back to the plasma membrane to contribute to gap junction formation and intercellular communication. Information on gap junction plaque removal from the plasma membrane and the subsequent processing of annular gap junction vesicles is critical to our understanding of cell-cell communication as it relates to events regulating development, cell homeostasis, unstable proliferation of cancer cells, wound healing, changes in the ischemic heart, and many other physiological and pathological cellular phenomena. PMID:27230503

  14. Hydrogen sulfide is a novel gasotransmitter with pivotal role in regulating lateral root formation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Jun; Shi, Zhi-Qi; Gan, Li-Jun; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), is a critical neuromodulator in the pathogenesis of various diseases from neurodegenerative diseases to diabetes or heart failure. The crosstalk between NO and H2S has been well established in mammalian physiology. In planta, NO is demonstrated to regulate lateral root formation by acting downstream of auxin. The recent reports revealed that H2S is a novel inducer of lateral root (LR) formation by stimulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes (CCRGs), acting similarly with NO, CO, and IAA. Interestingly, during the initiation of lateral root primordia, IAA is a potent inducer of endogenous H2S and CO, which is produced by L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), respectively. The increasing evidences suggest that H2S-promoted LR growth is dependent on the endogenous production of CO. In addition, our results indicate that the H2S signaling in the regulation of LR formation can be associated to NO and Ca2+. In this addendum, we advanced a proposed schematic model for H2S-mediated signaling pathway of plant LR development. PMID:24832131

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Rebecca E; Nicod, Jérôme; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Maciejowski, John; Cai, Na; Hill, Jennifer; Verstraten, Ruth; Iyer, Vivek; Rust, Alistair G; Balmus, Gabriel; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW)-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%), and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males. PMID:27233670

  16. Chondroitin 6-Sulfation Regulates Perineuronal Net Formation by Controlling the Stability of Aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shinji; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice-like extracellular matrix structures composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). The appearance of PNNs parallels the decline of neural plasticity, and disruption of PNNs reactivates neural plasticity in the adult brain. We previously reported that sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains on CSPGs influenced the formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. However, the mechanism of PNN formation regulated by CS sulfation remains unknown. Here we found that overexpression of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1), which catalyzes 6-sulfation of CS chains, selectively decreased aggrecan, a major CSPG in PNNs, in the aged brain without affecting other PNN components. Both diffuse and PNN-associated aggrecans were reduced by overexpression of C6ST-1. C6ST-1 increased 6-sulfation in both the repeating disaccharide region and linkage region of CS chains. Overexpression of 6-sulfation primarily impaired accumulation of aggrecan in PNNs, whereas condensation of other PNN components was not affected. Finally, we found that increased 6-sulfation accelerated proteolysis of aggrecan by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS) protease. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfation patterns of CS chains on aggrecan influenced the stability of the CSPG, thereby regulating formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. PMID:27057358

  17. Geometric Frustration Selects Morphology in Chiral Filament Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Douglas; Bruss, Isaac; Barone, Justin; Grason, Gregory

    Assemblies of twisted filaments appear in a range of biological contexts, from extracellular filament bundles to amyloid fibrils. Owing to numerous distinctions in molecular structures and interactions underlying these diverse assemblies, a framework to predict and classify the basic mechanisms of structure formation in twisted filament assemblies is still lacking. In this study, we model how the size and shape of self-assembled fibers are controlled by competition between the elastic costs of inter-filament frustration, bending deformation of filaments and bundle surface energy. Exploiting a geometric mapping between inter-filament packing in twisted bundles and packing on positively-curved 2D surfaces, we show that the anisotropy of the bundle cross-section is determined by a single parameter describing the competition between elastic and bending costs. We compare the continuum model's predictions for stability of cylindrical and tape-like twisted morphologies to numerical simulations of cohesive filament bundles and observations of micron-scale amyloid fibers assembled from hydrolyzed protein fragments. Nsf (CAREER) DMR-0955760.

  18. Femtosecond laser filamentation in condensed media with Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dota, Krithika; Pathak, Abhishek; Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Mathur, D.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.

    2012-08-01

    Bessel beams possess a nondiffractive property that makes them suitable for propagating optical energy over long distances. We have utilized an axicon-generated Bessel beam to carry out a systematic study of the physics that governs propagation of intense, femtosecond-long pulses in a transparent crystal (barium fluoride). Filamentation and supercontinuum generation have been studied using axicon lenses of different cone angles. Emission induced by six-photon absorption of 800-nm photons is utilized to visualize the filaments within the crystal. Our results show that higher incident energy, Ein (≥ 600 μJ), is required to generate filaments inside the crystal when an axicon is used, as compared to a spherical lens (6 μJ). Increase in cone angles increases the value of Ein for filament formation. The size of the filaments is found to be independent of whether an axicon or a spherical lens is used. For a given axicon cone angle, variation of the input energy enables us to observe the transition from steady Bessel filamentation to a nonlinear, unbalanced, Bessel regime. Varying the separation distance between the axicon and the crystal enables differences in periodicity (distance between two focusing-refocusing events) in the filaments to be quantified. Supercontinuum generation is also probed as a function of distance of sample from the tip of the axicon and with different incident beam sizes. The input beam diameter is shown to have a distinct effect on axicon-generated white light.

  19. Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) regulates Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Anna D.; Camilli, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary While studying virulence gene regulation in Vibrio cholerae during infection of the host small intestine, we identified VieA as a two-component response regulator that contributes to activating expression of cholera toxin. Here we report that VieA represses transcription of Vibrio exopolysaccharide synthesis (vps) genes involved in biofilm formation by a mechanism independent of its phosphorelay and DNA-binding activities. VieA controls the intracellular concentration of the cyclic nucleotide second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) using an EAL domain that functions as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Two-dimensional thin layer chromatography of nucleotide extracts confirmed that VieA reduces the concentration of c-di-GMP, opposing the action of c-di-GMP synthetase proteins. Expression of unrelated V. cholerae c-di-GMP synthetase or phosphodiesterae proteins also modulated c-di-GMP concentration and vps gene expression. We propose that c-di-GMP synthetase and phosphodiesterase domain-containing proteins contribute to regulating biofilm formation by controlling c-di-GMP concentration. PMID:15255898

  20. Tetraspanin 7 regulates sealing zone formation and the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Haemin; Kim, Min Kyung; Song, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Tetraspanin family proteins regulate morphology, motility, fusion, and signaling in various cell types. We investigated the role of the tetraspanin 7 (Tspan7) isoform in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Tspan7 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis. When Tspan7 expression was reduced in primary precursor cells by siRNA-mediated gene knock-down, the generation of multinuclear osteoclasts was not affected. However, a striking cytoskeletal abnormality was observed: the formation of the podosome belt structure was inhibited and the microtubular network were disrupted by Tspan7 knock-down. Decreases in acetylated microtubules and levels of phosphorylated Src and Pyk2 in Tspan7 knock-down cells supported the involvement of Tspan7 in cytoskeletal rearrangement signaling in osteoclasts. This cytoskeletal defect interfered with sealing zone formation and subsequently the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts on dentin surfaces. Our results suggest that Tspan7 plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization required for the bone-resorbing function of osteoclasts by regulating signaling to Src, Pyk2, and microtubules. PMID:27416754

  1. H-NOX Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolism and Biofilm Formation in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Vance, Russell E.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heme Nitric oxide/OXygen (H-NOX) domains are a family of hemoprotein sensors that are widespread in bacterial genomes, but limited information is available on their function. Legionella pneumophila is the only prokaryote found thus far to encode two H-NOX proteins. This paper presents data supporting a role for one of the Legionella pneumophila H-NOXs in the regulation of biofilm formation. In summary: (i) unmarked deletions in the hnox1 gene do not affect growth rate in liquid culture or replication in permissive macrophages; (ii) theΔhnox1 strain displays a hyper-biofilm phenotype; (iii) the gene adjacent to hnox1 is a GGDEF-EAL protein, lpg1057, and overexpression in Legionella pneumophila of this protein, or the well-studied diguanylate cyclase, vca0956, results in a hyper-biofilm phenotype; (iv) the Lpg1057 protein displays diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro and this activity is inhibited by the Hnox1 protein in the Fe(II)-NO ligation state, but not the Fe(II) unligated state; (v) consistent with the Hnox1 regulation of Lpg1057, unmarked deletions of lpg1057 in theΔhnox1 background results in reversion of the hyper-biofilm phenotype back to wild-type biofilm levels. Taken together, these results suggest a role for hnox1 in regulating c-di-GMP production by lpg1057 and biofilm formation in response to NO. PMID:20572940

  2. Single Filaments to Reveal the Multiple Flavors of Actin.

    PubMed

    Jégou, Antoine; Romet-Lemonne, Guillaume

    2016-05-24

    A number of key cell processes rely on specific assemblies of actin filaments, which are all constructed from nearly identical building blocks: the abundant and extremely conserved actin protein. A central question in the field is to understand how different filament networks can coexist and be regulated. Discoveries in science are often related to technical advances. Here, we focus on the ongoing single filament revolution and discuss how these techniques have greatly contributed to our understanding of actin assembly. In particular, we highlight how they have refined our understanding of the many protein-based regulatory mechanisms that modulate actin assembly. It is now becoming apparent that other factors give filaments a specific identity that determines which proteins will bind to them. We argue that single filament techniques will play an essential role in the coming years as we try to understand the many ways actin filaments can take different flavors and unveil how these flavors modulate the action of regulatory proteins. We discuss different factors known to make actin filaments distinguishable by regulatory proteins and speculate on their possible consequences. PMID:27224479

  3. A nebulin ruler does not dictate thin filament lengths.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Angelica; Nowak, Roberta; Littlefield, Kimberly P; Fowler, Velia M; Littlefield, Ryan S

    2009-03-01

    To generate force, striated muscle requires overlap between uniform-length actin and myosin filaments. The hypothesis that a nebulin ruler mechanism specifies thin filament lengths by targeting where tropomodulin (Tmod) caps the slow-growing, pointed end has not been rigorously tested. Using fluorescent microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we found that nebulin extended 1.01-1.03 mum from the Z-line, but Tmod localized 1.13-1.31 mum from the Z-line, in seven different rabbit skeletal muscles. Because nebulin does not extend to the thin filament pointed ends, it can neither target Tmod capping nor specify thin filament lengths. We found instead a strong correspondence between thin filament lengths and titin isoform sizes for each muscle. Our results suggest the existence of a mechanism whereby nebulin specifies the minimum thin filament length and sarcomere length regulates and coordinates pointed-end dynamics to maintain the relative overlap of the thin and thick filaments during myofibril assembly. PMID:19254544

  4. A Nebulin Ruler Does Not Dictate Thin Filament Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Angelica; Nowak, Roberta; Littlefield, Kimberly P.; Fowler, Velia M.; Littlefield, Ryan S.

    2009-01-01

    To generate force, striated muscle requires overlap between uniform-length actin and myosin filaments. The hypothesis that a nebulin ruler mechanism specifies thin filament lengths by targeting where tropomodulin (Tmod) caps the slow-growing, pointed end has not been rigorously tested. Using fluorescent microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we found that nebulin extended 1.01–1.03 μm from the Z-line, but Tmod localized 1.13–1.31 μm from the Z-line, in seven different rabbit skeletal muscles. Because nebulin does not extend to the thin filament pointed ends, it can neither target Tmod capping nor specify thin filament lengths. We found instead a strong correspondence between thin filament lengths and titin isoform sizes for each muscle. Our results suggest the existence of a mechanism whereby nebulin specifies the minimum thin filament length and sarcomere length regulates and coordinates pointed-end dynamics to maintain the relative overlap of the thin and thick filaments during myofibril assembly. PMID:19254544

  5. Detection of the insulating gap and conductive filament growth direction in resistive memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalon, E.; Karpov, I.; Karpov, V.; Riess, I.; Kalaev, D.; Ritter, D.

    2015-09-01

    Filament growth is a key aspect in the operation of bipolar resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, yet there are conflicting reports in the literature on the direction of growth of conductive filaments in valence change RRAM devices. We report here that an insulating gap between the filament and the semiconductor electrode can be detected by the metal-insulator-semiconductor bipolar transistor structure, and thus provide information on the filament growth direction. Using this technique, we show how voltage polarity and electrode chemistry control the filament growth direction during electro-forming. The experimental results and the nature of a gap between the filament and an electrode are discussed in light of possible models of filament formation.

  6. Detection of the insulating gap and conductive filament growth direction in resistive memories.

    PubMed

    Yalon, E; Karpov, I; Karpov, V; Riess, I; Kalaev, D; Ritter, D

    2015-10-01

    Filament growth is a key aspect in the operation of bipolar resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices, yet there are conflicting reports in the literature on the direction of growth of conductive filaments in valence change RRAM devices. We report here that an insulating gap between the filament and the semiconductor electrode can be detected by the metal-insulator-semiconductor bipolar transistor structure, and thus provide information on the filament growth direction. Using this technique, we show how voltage polarity and electrode chemistry control the filament growth direction during electro-forming. The experimental results and the nature of a gap between the filament and an electrode are discussed in light of possible models of filament formation. PMID:26335720

  7. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogucci, Hironobu; Ishihara, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures that support various biological functions. For the most part, previous studies have investigated the collective dynamics of rodlike biofilaments; however, the shapes of the actual subcellular components are often more elaborate. In this study, we considered an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents the progression from rodlike biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects in two dimensions and observed several types of dynamics, depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, a moving density band that we named a "moving smectic" is introduced here for the first time. By analyzing the trajectories of individual objects and the interactions among them, this study demonstrated how interactions among active biofilaments with complex shapes could produce collective dynamics in a nontrivial manner.

  8. Actin Filament Elongation in Arp2/3-derived Networks is Controlled by Three Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Michelot, Alphée; Grassart, Alexandre; Okreglak, Voytek; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Drubin, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Spatial and temporal control of actin filament barbed end elongation is crucial for force generation by actin networks. In this study, genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry were used to reveal three complementary mechanisms that regulate actin filament barbed end elongation in Arp2/3-derived networks. Aip1 inhibits elongation of aged ADP-actin filaments decorated with cofilin, and together with capping protein (CP), maintains a high level of assembly-competent actin species. We identified Abp1 and Aim3 as two additional proteins that work together to inhibit barbed end elongation. Abp1/Aim3 collaborates with CP to control elongation of newly assembled ATP-actin filaments to organize filament polarity within actin networks. Thus, three distinct mechanisms control filament elongation in different regions of Arp2/3 networks, maintaining pools of assembly-competent actin species while ensuring proper filament polarity and facilitating force production. PMID:23333351

  9. Actin filament elongation in Arp2/3-derived networks is controlled by three distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Michelot, Alphée; Grassart, Alexandre; Okreglak, Voytek; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Drubin, David G

    2013-01-28

    Spatial and temporal control of actin filament barbed end elongation is crucial for force generation by actin networks. In this study, genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry were used to reveal three complementary mechanisms that regulate actin filament barbed end elongation in Arp2/3-derived networks. Aip1 inhibits elongation of aged ADP-actin filaments decorated with cofilin and, together with capping protein (CP), maintains a high level of assembly-competent actin species. We identified Abp1 and Aim3 as two additional proteins that work together to inhibit barbed end elongation. Abp1/Aim3 collaborates with CP to control elongation of newly assembled ATP-actin filaments to organize filament polarity within actin networks. Thus, three distinct mechanisms control filament elongation in different regions of Arp2/3 networks, maintaining pools of assembly-competent actin species while ensuring proper filament polarity and facilitating force production. PMID:23333351

  10. Role of WNT16 in the Regulation of Periosteal Bone Formation in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wergedal, Jon E.; Kesavan, Chandrasekhar; Brommage, Robert; Das, Subhashri

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the role of WNT16 in regulating bone size, an important determinant of bone strength. Mice with targeted disruption of the Wnt16 gene exhibited a 24% reduction in tibia cross-sectional area at 12 weeks of age compared with that of littermate wild-type (WT) mice. Histomorphometric studies revealed that the periosteal bone formation rate and mineral apposition rate were reduced (P < .05) by 55% and 32%, respectively, in Wnt16 knockout (KO) vs WT mice at 12 weeks of age. In contrast, the periosteal tartrate resistant acid phosphatase-labeled surface was increased by 20% in the KO mice. Because mechanical strain is an important physiological regulator of periosteal bone formation (BF), we determined whether mechanical loading–induced periosteal BF is compromised in Wnt16 KO mice. Application of 4800-μe strain to the right tibia using a 4-point bending loading method for 2 weeks (2-Hz frequency, 36 cycles per day, 6 days/wk) produced a significant increase in cross-sectional area (11% above that of the unloaded left tibia, P < .05, n = 6) in the WT but not in the KO mice (−0.2% change). Histomorphometric analyses revealed increases in the periosteal bone formation rate and mineral apposition rate in the loaded bones of WT but not KO mice. Wnt16 KO mice showed significant (20%–70%) reductions in the expression levels of markers of canonical (β-catenin and Axin2) but not noncanonical (Nfatc1 and Tnnt2) WNT signaling in the periosteum at 5 weeks of age. Our findings suggest that WNT16 acting via canonical WNT signaling regulates mechanical strain-induced periosteal BF and bone size. PMID:25521583

  11. RALFL34 regulates formative cell divisions in Arabidopsis pericycle during lateral root initiation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Evan; Vu, Lam Dai; Van den Broeck, Lisa; Lin, Zhefeng; Ramakrishna, Priya; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Slane, Daniel; Beeckman, Tom; Inzé, Dirk; Brady, Siobhan M; Fukaki, Hidehiro; De Smet, Ive

    2016-08-01

    In plants, many signalling molecules, such as phytohormones, miRNAs, transcription factors, and small signalling peptides, drive growth and development. However, very few small signalling peptides have been shown to be necessary for lateral root development. Here, we describe the role of the peptide RALFL34 during early events in lateral root development, and demonstrate its specific importance in orchestrating formative cell divisions in the pericycle. Our results further suggest that this small signalling peptide acts on the transcriptional cascade leading to a new lateral root upstream of GATA23, an important player in lateral root formation. In addition, we describe a role for ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs (ERFs) in regulating RALFL34 expression. Taken together, we put forward RALFL34 as a new, important player in lateral root initiation. PMID:27521602

  12. RALFL34 regulates formative cell divisions in Arabidopsis pericycle during lateral root initiation

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Evan; Vu, Lam Dai; Van den Broeck, Lisa; Lin, Zhefeng; Ramakrishna, Priya; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Gaudinier, Allison; Goh, Tatsuaki; Slane, Daniel; Beeckman, Tom; Inzé, Dirk; Brady, Siobhan M.; Fukaki, Hidehiro; De Smet, Ive

    2016-01-01

    In plants, many signalling molecules, such as phytohormones, miRNAs, transcription factors, and small signalling peptides, drive growth and development. However, very few small signalling peptides have been shown to be necessary for lateral root development. Here, we describe the role of the peptide RALFL34 during early events in lateral root development, and demonstrate its specific importance in orchestrating formative cell divisions in the pericycle. Our results further suggest that this small signalling peptide acts on the transcriptional cascade leading to a new lateral root upstream of GATA23, an important player in lateral root formation. In addition, we describe a role for ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORs (ERFs) in regulating RALFL34 expression. Taken together, we put forward RALFL34 as a new, important player in lateral root initiation. PMID:27521602

  13. Self-regulating galaxy formation. Part 1: HII disk and Lyman alpha pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Assuming a simple but physically based prototype for behavior of interstellar material during formation of a disk galaxy, coupled with the lowest order description of infall, a scenario is developed for self-regulated disk galaxy formation. Radiation pressure, particularly that of Lyman depha (from fluorescence conversion Lyman continuum), is an essential component, maintaining an inflated disk and stopping infall when only a small fraction of the overall perturbation has joined the disk. The resulting galaxies consist of a two dimensional family whose typical scales and surface density are expressable in terms of fundamental constants. The model leads naturally to galaxies with a rich circumgalactic environment and flat rotation curves (but is weak in its analysis of the subsequent evolution of halo material).

  14. Electrical coupling regulates layer 1 interneuron microcircuit formation in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Min; He, Xiang-Nan; He, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Lu, Wenlian; Qiu, Zi-Long; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of electrical and chemical synapses among interneurons is essential for interneuron function in the neocortex. However, it remains largely unclear whether electrical coupling between interneurons influences chemical synapse formation and microcircuit assembly during development. Here, we show that electrical and GABAergic chemical connections robustly develop between interneurons in neocortical layer 1 over a similar time course. Electrical coupling promotes action potential generation and synchronous firing between layer 1 interneurons. Furthermore, electrically coupled interneurons exhibit strong GABA-A receptor-mediated synchronous synaptic activity. Disruption of electrical coupling leads to a loss of bidirectional, but not unidirectional, GABAergic connections. Moreover, a reduction in electrical coupling induces an increase in excitatory synaptic inputs to layer 1 interneurons. Together, these findings strongly suggest that electrical coupling between neocortical interneurons plays a critical role in regulating chemical synapse development and precise formation of circuits. PMID:27510304

  15. Regulation of ceramide channel formation and disassembly: Insights on the initiation of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Stiban, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid research has surged in the past two decades and has produced a wide variety of evidence supporting the role of this class of molecules in mediating cellular growth, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. Ceramides are a subgroup of sphingolipids (SLs) that are directly involved in the process of initiation of apoptosis. We, and others, have recently shown that ceramides are capable of the formation of protein-permeable channels in mitochondrial outer membranes under physiological conditions. These pores are indeed good candidates for the pathway of release of pro-apoptotic proteins from the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) into the cytosol to initiate intrinsic apoptosis. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of ceramide channel formation and disassembly, highlighting possible implications on the initiation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:26587005

  16. Electrical coupling regulates layer 1 interneuron microcircuit formation in the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Min; He, Xiang-Nan; He, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Lu, Wenlian; Qiu, Zi-Long; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of electrical and chemical synapses among interneurons is essential for interneuron function in the neocortex. However, it remains largely unclear whether electrical coupling between interneurons influences chemical synapse formation and microcircuit assembly during development. Here, we show that electrical and GABAergic chemical connections robustly develop between interneurons in neocortical layer 1 over a similar time course. Electrical coupling promotes action potential generation and synchronous firing between layer 1 interneurons. Furthermore, electrically coupled interneurons exhibit strong GABA-A receptor-mediated synchronous synaptic activity. Disruption of electrical coupling leads to a loss of bidirectional, but not unidirectional, GABAergic connections. Moreover, a reduction in electrical coupling induces an increase in excitatory synaptic inputs to layer 1 interneurons. Together, these findings strongly suggest that electrical coupling between neocortical interneurons plays a critical role in regulating chemical synapse development and precise formation of circuits. PMID:27510304

  17. Direct dynamin–actin interactions regulate the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changkyu; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Weins, Astrid; Osborn, Teresia; Reiser, Jochen; Pollak, Martin; Hartwig, John; Sever, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin assembles into higher order structures that are thought to promote endocytosis. Dynamin also regulates the actin cytoskeleton through an unknown, GTPase-dependent mechanism. Here, we identify a highly conserved site in dynamin that binds directly to actin filaments and aligns them into bundles. Point mutations in the actin-binding domain cause aberrant membrane ruffling and defective actin stress fibre formation in cells. Short actin filaments promote dynamin assembly into higher order structures, which in turn efficiently release the actin-capping protein (CP) gelsolin from barbed actin ends in vitro, allowing for elongation of actin filaments. Together, our results support a model in which assembled dynamin, generated through interactions with short actin filaments, promotes actin polymerization via displacement of actin-CPs. PMID:20935625

  18. Regulation of neutrophil extracellular trap formation by anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Lapponi, María José; Carestia, Agostina; Landoni, Verónica Inés; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Schattner, Mirta

    2013-06-01

    The formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is a newly described phenomenon that increases the bacteria-killing ability and the inflammatory response of neutrophils. Because NET generation occurs in an inflammatory microenvironment, we examined its regulation by anti-inflammatory drugs. Treatment of neutrophils with dexamethasone had no effect, but acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment prevented NET formation. NETosis was also abrogated by the presence of BAY 11-7082 [(E)-3-[4-methylphenylsulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile] and Ro 106-9920 [6-(phenylsulfinyl)tetrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazine], two structurally unrelated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitors. The decrease in NET formation mediated by ASA, BAY-11-7082, and Ro 106-9920 was correlated with a significant reduction in the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 subunit, indicating that the activation of this transcription factor is a relevant signaling pathway involved in the generation of DNA traps. The inhibitory effect of these drugs was also observed when NET generation was induced under acidic or hyperthermic conditions, two stress signals of the inflammatory microenvironment. In a mouse peritonitis model, while pretreatment of animals with ASA or BAY 11-7082 resulted in a marked suppression of NET formation along with increased bacteremia, dexamethasone had no effect. Our results show that NETs have an important role in the local control of infection and that ASA and NF-κB blockade could be useful therapies to avoid undesired effect of persistent neutrophil activation. PMID:23536315

  19. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-01-01

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglement of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators. PMID:26584670

  20. Cosmic HI: a tracer of the physics regulating galaxy formation over a Hubble time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Benjamin

    2013-10-01

    We propose a rigorous exploration of cosmic HI using state-of-the-art SPH simulations with advanced particle tracking capabilities to confront the rapidly expanding inventory of Lyman-limit system {LLS} and damped Lyman-alpha absorber {DLA} observations extending over a Hubble time. Unlike metals, hydrogen has the advantage of being a simple element understand that ubiquitously traces accretion {pristine and enriched}, star formation, and outflows. We will address two main questions about cosmic HI: 1} Why do the number and mass density of DLAs stay nearly flat over 13 Gyrs of cosmic time, while star formation declines by a factor of 20?, and 2} Is the observed LLS metallicity bimodality an outcome of two distinct physical mechanisms driving galaxy formation? This project will use existing and new state-of-the-art simulations that match observed galaxy properties, process outputs identically to real observations, and distill the fundamental physical mechanisms regulating galaxy formation. Our assembled team includes theorists capable of running simulations and analyzing them, leading experts in the understanding of cosmic hydrogen, and an observer with access to and knowledge of the relevant COS data.

  1. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-11-01

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglement of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators.

  2. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Yin, Wan -Jian; Park, Ji -Sang; Wei, Su -Huai

    2015-11-20

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglementmore » of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators.« less

  3. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Yin, Wan -Jian; Park, Ji -Sang; Wei, Su -Huai

    2015-11-20

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglement of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators.

  4. Self-regulation of charged defect compensation and formation energy pinning in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Yin, Wan-Jian; Park, Ji-Sang; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-01-01

    Current theoretical analyses of defect properties without solving the detailed balance equations often estimate Fermi-level pinning position by omitting free carriers and assume defect concentrations can be always tuned by atomic chemical potentials. This could be misleading in some circumstance. Here we clarify that: (1) Because the Fermi-level pinning is determined not only by defect states but also by free carriers from band-edge states, band-edge states should be treated explicitly in the same footing as the defect states in practice; (2) defect formation energy, thus defect density, could be pinned and independent on atomic chemical potentials due to the entanglement of atomic chemical potentials and Fermi energy, in contrast to the usual expectation that defect formation energy can always be tuned by varying the atomic chemical potentials; and (3) the charged defect compensation behavior, i.e., most of donors are compensated by acceptors or vice versa, is self-regulated when defect formation energies are pinned. The last two phenomena are more dominant in wide-gap semiconductors or when the defect formation energies are small. Using NaCl and CH3NH3PbI3 as examples, we illustrate these unexpected behaviors. Our analysis thus provides new insights that enrich the understanding of the defect physics in semiconductors and insulators. PMID:26584670

  5. Dust-regulated galaxy formation and evolution: a new chemodynamical model with live dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    Interstellar dust plays decisive roles in the conversion of neutral to molecular hydrogen (H2), the thermodynamical evolution of interstellar medium (ISM), and the modification of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. These important roles of dust have not been self-consistently included in previous numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. We have therefore developed a new model by which one can investigate whether and how galaxy formation and evolution can be influenced by dust-related physical processes such as photoelectric heating, H2 formation on dust, and stellar radiation pressure on dust in detail. A novel point of the model is that different dust species in a galaxy are represented by `live dust' particles (i.e. not test particles). Therefore, dust particles in a galaxy not only interact gravitationally with all four components of the galaxy (i.e. dark matter, stars, gas, and dust) but also are grown and destroyed through physical processes of ISM. First, we describe a way to include dust-related physical processes in N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution in detail. Then, we show some preliminary results of dust-regulated galaxy evolution. The preliminary results suggest that the evolution of dust distributions driven by radiation pressure of stars is very important for the evolution of star formation rates, chemical abundances, H2 fractions, and gas distributions in galaxies.

  6. Preserved Filamentous Microbial Biosignatures in the Brick Flat Gossan, Iron Mountain, California.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy J; Sumner, Dawn Y; Alpers, Charles N; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A

    2015-08-01

    A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses. Sinuous

  7. Preserved Filamentous Microbial Biosignatures in the Brick Flat Gossan, Iron Mountain, California

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses

  8. Preserved filamentous microbial biosignatures in the Brick Flat gossan, Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Amy J.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Alpers, Charles N.; Karunatillake, Suniti; Hofmann, Beda A

    2015-01-01

    A variety of actively precipitating mineral environments preserve morphological evidence of microbial biosignatures. One such environment with preserved microbial biosignatures is the oxidized portion of a massive sulfide deposit, or gossan, such as that at Iron Mountain, California. This gossan may serve as a mineralogical analogue to some ancient martian environments due to the presence of oxidized iron and sulfate species, and minerals that only form in acidic aqueous conditions, in both environments. Evaluating the potential biogenicity of cryptic textures in such martian gossans requires an understanding of how microbial textures form biosignatures on Earth. The iron-oxide-dominated composition and morphology of terrestrial, nonbranching filamentous microbial biosignatures may be distinctive of the underlying formation and preservation processes. The Iron Mountain gossan consists primarily of ferric oxide (hematite), hydrous ferric oxide (HFO, predominantly goethite), and jarosite group minerals, categorized into in situ gossan, and remobilized iron deposits. We interpret HFO filaments, found in both gossan types, as HFO-mineralized microbial filaments based in part on (1) the presence of preserved central filament lumina in smooth HFO mineral filaments that are likely molds of microbial filaments, (2) mineral filament formation in actively precipitating iron-oxide environments, (3) high degrees of mineral filament bending consistent with a flexible microbial filament template, and (4) the presence of bare microbial filaments on gossan rocks. Individual HFO filaments are below the resolution of the Mars Curiosity and Mars 2020 rover cameras, but sinuous filaments forming macroscopic matlike textures are resolvable. If present on Mars, available cameras may resolve these features identified as similar to terrestrial HFO filaments and allow subsequent evaluation for their biogenicity by synthesizing geochemical, mineralogical, and morphological analyses. Sinuous

  9. Identification of novel transcription factors regulating secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cassan-Wang, Hua; Goué, Nadia; Saidi, Mohammed N.; Legay, Sylvain; Sivadon, Pierre; Goffner, Deborah; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The presence of lignin in secondary cell walls (SCW) is a major factor preventing hydrolytic enzymes from gaining access to cellulose, thereby limiting the saccharification potential of plant biomass. To understand how lignification is regulated is a prerequisite for selecting plant biomass better adapted to bioethanol production. Because transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling the expression of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, our aim was to identify novel transcription factors (TFs) dictating lignin profiles in the model plant Arabidopsis. To this end, we have developed a post-genomic approach by combining four independent in-house SCW-related transcriptome datasets obtained from (1) the fiber cell wall-deficient wat1 Arabidopsis mutant, (2) Arabidopsis lines over-expressing either the master regulatory activator EgMYB2 or (3) the repressor EgMYB1 and finally (4) Arabidopsis orthologs of Eucalyptus xylem-expressed genes. This allowed us to identify 502 up- or down-regulated TFs. We preferentially selected those present in more than one dataset and further analyzed their in silico expression patterns as an additional selection criteria. This selection process led to 80 candidates. Notably, 16 of them were already proven to regulate SCW formation, thereby validating the overall strategy. Then, we phenotyped 43 corresponding mutant lines focusing on histological observations of xylem and interfascicular fibers. This phenotypic screen revealed six mutant lines exhibiting altered lignification patterns. Two of them [Bel-like HomeoBox6 (blh6) and a zinc finger TF] presented hypolignified SCW. Three others (myb52, myb-like TF, hb5) showed hyperlignified SCW whereas the last one (hb15) showed ectopic lignification. In addition, our meta-analyses highlighted a reservoir of new potential regulators adding to the gene network regulating SCW but also opening new avenues to ultimately improve SCW composition for biofuel production. PMID:23781226

  10. Laser control of filament-induced shock wave in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2014-09-01

    We discovered that tight focusing of Cr:forsterite femtosecond laser radiation in water provides the unique opportunity of long filament generation. The filament becomes a source of numerous spherical shock waves whose radius tends to saturate with the increase of energy. These overlapping waves create a contrast cylindrical shock wave. The laser-induced shock wave parameters such as shape, amplitude and speed can be effectively controlled by varying energy and focusing geometry of the femtosecond pulse. Aberrations added to the optical scheme lead to multiple dotted plasma sources for shock wave formation, spaced along the optical axis. Increasing the laser energy launches filaments at each dot that enhance the length of the entire filament and as a result, the shock impact on the material.

  11. Non-equilibrium States of Active Filament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert A.; Betterton, Meredith D.; Sweezy, Oliver M.; Glaser, Matthew A.

    2014-03-01

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many cellular processes. Among the most important active networks is the mitotic spindle, an assembly of microtubules and crosslinking motor proteins that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, we have developed course-grained models of active networks composed of filaments, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of crosslinking motors, modeled as Hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. We explore the phase diagram and other characteristics of this model in two and three dimensions as a function of filament packing fraction, and of crosslink concentration, velocity, and adsorption and desorption rates. We observe a variety of interesting emergent behaviors including sorting of filaments into polar domains, generation of extensile stress, and superdiffusive transport. DMR-0820579

  12. Rab35 regulates cadherin-mediated adherens junction formation and myoblast fusion

    PubMed Central

    Charrasse, Sophie; Comunale, Franck; De Rossi, Sylvain; Echard, Arnaud; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are homophilic cell–cell adhesion molecules implicated in many fundamental processes, such as morphogenesis, cell growth, and differentiation. They accumulate at cell–cell contact sites and assemble into large macromolecular complexes named adherens junctions (AJs). Cadherin targeting and function are regulated by various cellular processes, many players of which remain to be uncovered. Here we identify the small GTPase Rab35 as a new regulator of cadherin trafficking and stabilization at cell–cell contacts in C2C12 myoblasts and HeLa cells. We find that Rab35 accumulates at cell–cell contacts in a cadherin-dependent manner. Knockdown of Rab35 or expression of a dominant-negative form of Rab35 impaired N- and M-cadherin recruitment to cell–cell contacts, their stabilization at the plasma membrane, and association with p120 catenin and led to their accumulation in transferrin-, clathrin-, and AP-2–positive intracellular vesicles. We also find that Rab35 function is required for PIP5KIγ accumulation at cell–cell contacts and phosphatidyl inositol 4,5-bisphosphate production, which is involved in cadherin stabilization at contact sites. Finally, we show that Rab35 regulates myoblast fusion, a major cellular process under the control of cadherin-dependent signaling. Taken together, these results reveal that Rab35 regulates cadherin-dependent AJ formation and myoblast fusion. PMID:23197472

  13. Sorting nexin 9 negatively regulates invadopodia formation and function in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bendris, Nawal; Stearns, Carrie J S; Reis, Carlos R; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka W; Schmid, Sandra L

    2016-07-15

    The ability of cancer cells to degrade the extracellular matrix and invade interstitial tissues contributes to their metastatic potential. We recently showed that overexpression of sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) leads to increased cell invasion and metastasis in animal models, which correlates with increased SNX9 protein expression in metastases from human mammary cancers. Here, we report that SNX9 expression is reduced relative to neighboring normal tissues in primary breast tumors, and progressively reduced in more aggressive stages of non-small-cell lung cancers. We show that SNX9 is localized at invadopodia where it directly binds the invadopodia marker TKS5 and negatively regulates invadopodia formation and function. SNX9 depletion increases invadopodia number and the local recruitment of MT1-MMP by decreasing its internalization. Together, these effects result in increased localized matrix degradation. We further identify SNX9 as a Src kinase substrate and show that this phosphorylation is important for SNX9 activity in regulating cell invasion, but is dispensable for its function in regulating invadopodia. The diversified changes associated with SNX9 expression in cancer highlight its importance as a central regulator of cancer cell behavior. PMID:27278018

  14. Solid friction between soft filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A. W. C.; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments’ overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes’s drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament’s elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  15. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases l