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Sample records for regulates surfactant phospholipid

  1. Regulation of lung surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goss, Victoria; Hunt, Alan N; Postle, Anthony D

    2013-02-01

    The alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cell is highly specialised for the synthesis and storage, in intracellular lamellar bodies, of phospholipid destined for secretion as pulmonary surfactant into the alveolus. Regulation of the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism has been extensively characterised at both molecular and functional levels, but understanding of surfactant phospholipid metabolism in vivo in either healthy or, especially, diseased lungs is still relatively poorly understood. This review will integrate recent advances in the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid metabolism with metabolic studies in vivo in both experimental animals and human subjects. It will highlight developments in the application of stable isotope-labelled precursor substrates and mass spectrometry to probe lung phospholipid metabolism in terms of individual molecular lipid species and identify areas where a more comprehensive metabolic model would have considerable potential for direct application to disease states. PMID:23200861

  2. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is composed of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23026158

  3. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  4. Fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant protein C in spread phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex, secreted into the fluid lining of lungs prevents alveolar collapse at low lung volumes. Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C), an acylated, hydrophobic, alpha-helical peptide, enhances the surface activity of pulmonary surfactant lipids. Fluorescein-labeled SP-C (F-SP-C) (3, 6, 12 wt%) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and DPPC:dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) [DPPC:DPPG 7:3 mol/mol] in spread monolayers was studied by epifluorescence microscopy. Mass spectometry of F-SP-C indicated that the protein is partially deacylated and labeled with 1 mol fluorescein/1 mol protein. The protein partitioned into the fluid, or liquid expanded, phase. Increasing amounts of F-SP-C in DPPC or DPPC:DPPG monolayers decreased the size and total amounts of the condensed phase at all surface pressures. Calcium (1.6 mM) increased the amount of the condensed phase in monolayers of DPPC:DPPG but not of DPPC alone, and such monolayers were also perturbed by F-SP-C. The study indicates that SP-C perturbs the packing of neutral and anionic phospholipid monolayers even when the latter systems are condensed by calcium, indicating that interactions between SP-C and the lipids are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:8804608

  5. Effects of smoke inhalation on surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung.

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, M.; Moores, H. K.; Scott, J. E.; Janigan, D. T.; Hajela, R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on the pulmonary surfactant system were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of polyurethane foam. At 8 or 12 hours after exposure, surfactants were isolated separately from lung lavage (extracellular surfactant) and residual lung tissue (intracellular surfactant) for phospholipid analysis. Calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) was measured on a microsomal fraction prepared from the tissue homogenate. Smoke inhalation produced a twofold increase in extracellular surfactant total phospholipid. While there was no change in the total phospholipid or phosphatidylcholine (PC) content of the intracellular surfactant, smoke inhalation significantly decreased the disaturated species of PC (DSPC). The specific activity of PLA2 was reduced by more than 50% in both groups of exposed mice. Smoke inhalation appears to result in selective depletion of the DSPC of intracellular surfactant and PLA2 involved in its synthesis. This depletion may be compensated for by increased secretion or slower breakdown of the material present in the extracellular compartment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1987765

  6. Membrane-surfactant interactions. The role of surfactant in mitochondrial complex III-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles.

    PubMed

    Valpuesta, J M; Arrondo, J L; Barbero, M C; Pons, M; Goñi, F M

    1986-05-15

    Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) was purified from beef heart mitochondria in the form of protein-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles (about 1:80:100 molar ratio). Detergent may be totally removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the resulting lipoprotein complexes retain full enzyme activity. In order to understand the role of surfactant in the mixed micelles, and the interaction of Triton X-100 with integral membrane proteins and phospholipid bilayers, both the protein-lipid-surfactant mixed micelles and the detergent-free lipoprotein system were examined from the point of view of particle size and ultrastructure, enzyme activity, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, 31P NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NMR and IR spectroscopic studies show that surfactant withdrawal induces a profound change in phospholipid architecture, from a micellar to a lamellar-like phase. However, electron microscopic observations fail to reveal the existence of lipid bilayers in the absence of detergent. We suggest that, under these conditions, the lipid:protein molar ratio (80:1) is too low to permit the formation of lipid bilayer planes, but the relative orientation and mobility of phospholipids with respect to proteins is similar to that of the lamellar phase. Protein conformational changes are also detected as a consequence of surfactant removal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates an increase of peptide beta-structure in the absence of Triton X-100; changes in the amide II/amide I intensity ratio are also detected, although the precise meaning of these observations is unclear. Tryptophanyl fluorescence quenching by acrylamide shows that a significant fraction of the Trp residues sensing the quencher become less readily available to it in the absence of surfactant. The temperature dependence of enzyme activity (expressed in the form of Arrhenius plots) is also different in the presence and absence of detergent. The

  7. Pulmonary surfactant phospholipids modulate priming of rabbit alveolar macrophages for oxidative responses.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, H; Giridhar, G; Myrvik, Q N; Kucera, L

    1992-04-01

    We investigated the effect of individual phospholipids contained in pulmonary surfactant (PS) on the macrophage-activating factor (MAF)-induced priming of rabbit alveolar macrophages (AMs) for oxidative responses elicited by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan (Op-Zym). AMs were incubated with MAF with or without phospholipids for 18 h. After incubation, oxidative responses were elicited with PMA (0.5 micrograms/ml) or Op-Zym (250 micrograms/ml) and monitored by chemiluminescence (CL) assays. The data indicate that natural surfactant inhibited MAF-induced priming of rabbit AMs for PMA- or Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses. Artificial surfactant inhibited PMA-elicited CL responses but enhanced Op-Zym-elicited CL responses. Individual phospholipids differed in modulative activities. Dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) inhibited MAF-induced priming when the oxidative responses were elicited with PMA. Whereas DPPG inhibited Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DOPC primed AMs for increased Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses. DOPC did not affect the binding of phorbol dibutyrate to AMs, which suggests that reduced cell binding of phorbol ester was not responsible for the inhibition of PMA-elicited oxidative responses in AMs treated with DOPC. Similarly, DPPC, DOPC, and DPPG did not affect the number of zymosan particles phagocytosed by AMs compared to the control, which suggested that enhanced or reduced Op-Zym-elicited oxidative responses by phospholipids were not due to altered phagocytic activity of AMs. In conclusion, our data indicate that individual surfactant phospholipid differently modulates priming of AMs for oxidative responses, and the effect of individual phospholipids does not account for the effect of complete PS on priming of AMs. PMID:1564401

  8. Membrane-surfactant interactions. The role of surfactant in mitochondrial complex III-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Valpuesta, J.M.; Arrondo, J.L.; Barbero, M.C.; Pons, M.; Goni, F.M.

    1986-05-15

    Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) was purified from beef heart mitochondria in the form of protein-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles (about 1:80:100 molar ratio). Detergent may be totally removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the resulting lipoprotein complexes retain full enzyme activity. In order to understand the role of surfactant in the mixed micelles, and the interaction of Triton X-100 with integral membrane proteins and phospholipid bilayers, both the protein-lipid-surfactant mixed micelles and the detergent-free lipoprotein system were examined from the point of view of particle size and ultrastructure, enzyme activity, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, 31P NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NMR and IR spectroscopic studies show that surfactant withdrawal induces a profound change in phospholipid architecture, from a micellar to a lamellar-like phase. However, electron microscopic observations fail to reveal the existence of lipid bilayers in the absence of detergent. We suggest that, under these conditions, the lipid:protein molar ratio (80:1) is too low to permit the formation of lipid bilayer planes, but the relative orientation and mobility of phospholipids with respect to proteins is similar to that of the lamellar phase. Protein conformational changes are also detected as a consequence of surfactant removal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates an increase of peptide beta-structure in the absence of Triton X-100; changes in the amide II/amide I intensity ratio are also detected, although the precise meaning of these observations is unclear.

  9. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is not the major surfactant phospholipid species in all mammals.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carol J; Postle, Anthony D; Orgeig, Sandra; Possmayer, Fred; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Panda, Amiya K; Jürgens, Klaus D; Milsom, William K; Nag, Kaushik; Daniels, Christopher B

    2005-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, lowers the surface tension in terminal air spaces and is crucial for lung function. Within an animal species, surfactant composition can be influenced by development, disease, respiratory rate, and/or body temperature. Here, we analyzed the composition of surfactant in three heterothermic mammals (dunnart, bat, squirrel), displaying different torpor patterns, to determine: 1) whether increases in surfactant cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipid (PL) saturation occur during long-term torpor in squirrels, as in bats and dunnarts; 2) whether surfactant proteins change during torpor; and 3) whether PL molecular species (molsp) composition is altered. In addition, we analyzed the molsp composition of a further nine mammals (including placental/marsupial and hetero-/homeothermic contrasts) to determine whether phylogeny or thermal behavior determines molsp composition in mammals. We discovered that like bats and dunnarts, surfactant Chol increases during torpor in squirrels. However, changes in PL saturation during torpor may not be universal. Torpor was accompanied by a decrease in surfactant protein A in dunnarts and squirrels, but not in bats, whereas surfactant protein B did not change in any species. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)16:0/16:0 is highly variable between mammals and is not the major PL in the wombat, dunnart, shrew, or Tasmanian devil. An inverse relationship exists between PC16:0/16:0 and two of the major fluidizing components, PC16:0/16:1 and PC16:0/14:0. The PL molsp profile of an animal species is not determined by phylogeny or thermal behavior. We conclude that there is no single PL molsp composition that functions optimally in all mammals; rather, surfactant from each animal is unique and tailored to the biology of that animal. PMID:16037124

  10. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Guanosine Tetraphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Merlie, John P.; Pizer, Lewis I.

    1973-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis has been reported to be subject to stringent control in Escherichia coli. We present evidence that demonstrates a strict correlation between guanosine tetraphosphate accumulation and inhibition of phospholipid synthesis. In vivo experiments designed to examine the pattern of phospholipid labeling with 32P-inorganic phosphate and 32P-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate suggest that regulation must occur at the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase step. Assay of phospholipid synthesis by cell-free extracts and semipurified preparations revealed that guanosine tetraphosphate inhibits at least two enzymes specific for the biosynthetic pathway, sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase as well as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatidyl transferase. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the stringent control of lipid synthesis as well as regulation of steady-state levels of phospholipid in growing cells. Images PMID:4583220

  11. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  12. The interfacial interactions of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles with surfactants and phospholipids revealed through the fluorescent response.

    PubMed

    Bochkova, Olga D; Mustafina, Asiya R; Mukhametshina, Alsu R; Burilov, Vladimir A; Skripacheva, Viktoriya V; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Konovalov, Alexander I; Soloveva, Svetlana E; Antipin, Igor S

    2012-04-01

    The quenching effect of dyes (phenol red and bromothymol blue) on Tb(III)-centered luminescence enables to sense the aggregation of cationic and anionic surfactants near the silica surface of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles (SN) in aqueous solutions. The Tb-centered luminescence of non-decorated SNs is diminished by the inner filter effect of both dyes. The decoration of the silica surface by cationic surfactants induces the quenching through the energy transfer between silica coated Tb(III) complexes and dye anions inserted into surfactant aggregates. Thus the distribution of surfactants aggregates at the silica/water interface and in the bulk of solution greatly affects dynamic quenching efficiency. The displacement of dye anions from the interfacial surfactant adlayer by anionic surfactants and phospholipids is accompanied by the "off-on" switching of Tb(III)-centered luminescence. PMID:22209651

  13. Pulmonary Surfactant Model Systems Catch the Specific Interaction of an Amphiphilic Peptide with Anionic Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sannamu; Shibata, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial behavior was studied in pulmonary surfactant model systems containing an amphiphilic α-helical peptide (Hel 13-5), which consists of 13 hydrophobic and five hydrophilic amino acid residues. Fully saturated phospholipids of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were utilized to understand specific interactions between anionic DPPG and cationic Hel 13-5 for pulmonary functions. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms of DPPG/Hel 13-5 and DPPC/DPPG (4:1, mol/mol)/Hel 13-5 preparations were measured to obtain basic information on the phase behavior under compression and expansion processes. The interaction leads to a variation in squeeze-out surface pressures against a mole fraction of Hel 13-5, where Hel 13-5 is eliminated from the surface on compression. The phase behavior was visualized by means of Brewster angle microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. At low surface pressures, the formation of differently ordered domains in size and shape is induced by electrostatic interactions. The domains independently grow upon compression to high surface pressures, especially in the DPPG/Hel 13-5 system. Under the further compression process, protrusion masses are formed in AFM images in the vicinity of squeeze-out pressures. The protrusion masses, which are attributed to the squeezed-out Hel 13-5, grow larger in lateral size with increasing DPPG content in phospholipid compositions. During subsequent expansion up to 35 mN m−1, the protrusions retain their height and lateral diameter for the DPPG/Hel 13-5 system, whereas the protrusions become smaller for the DPPC/Hel 13-5 and DPPC/DPPG/Hel 13-5 systems due to a reentrance of the ejected Hel 13-5 into the surface. In this work we detected for the first time, to our knowledge, a remarkably large hysteresis loop for cyclic ΔV-A isotherms of the binary DPPG/Hel 13-5 preparation. This exciting phenomenon

  14. Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) Specifically Interacts with Phospholipid Transfer Protein StarD10 to Facilitate Surfactant Phospholipid Trafficking in Alveolar Type II Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sui; Ikegami, Machiko; Moon, Changsuk; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Shannon, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of proteins and phospholipids, plays an important role in facilitating gas exchange by maintaining alveolar stability. Saturated phosphatidylcholine (SatPC), the major component of surfactant, is synthesized both de novo and by the remodeling of unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) by lyso-PC acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1). After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum, SatPC is routed to lamellar bodies (LBs) for storage prior to secretion. The mechanism by which SatPC is transported to LB is not understood. The specificity of LPCAT1 for lyso-PC as an acyl acceptor suggests that formation of SatPC via LPCAT1 reacylation is a final step in SatPC synthesis prior to transport. We hypothesized that LPCAT1 forms a transient complex with SatPC and specific phospholipid transport protein(s) to initiate trafficking of SatPC from the endoplasmic reticulum to the LB. Herein we have assessed the ability of different StarD proteins to interact with LPCAT1. We found that LPCAT1 interacts with StarD10, that this interaction is direct, and that amino acids 79–271 of LPCAT1 and the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain of START domain-containing protein 10 (StarD10) are sufficient for this interaction. The role of StarD10 in trafficking of phospholipid to LB was confirmed by the observation that knockdown of StarD10 significantly reduced transport of phospholipid to LB. LPCAT1 also interacted with one isoform of StarD7 but showed no interaction with StarD2/PC transfer protein. PMID:26048993

  15. Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) Specifically Interacts with Phospholipid Transfer Protein StarD10 to Facilitate Surfactant Phospholipid Trafficking in Alveolar Type II Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sui; Ikegami, Machiko; Moon, Changsuk; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Shannon, John M

    2015-07-24

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of proteins and phospholipids, plays an important role in facilitating gas exchange by maintaining alveolar stability. Saturated phosphatidylcholine (SatPC), the major component of surfactant, is synthesized both de novo and by the remodeling of unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) by lyso-PC acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1). After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum, SatPC is routed to lamellar bodies (LBs) for storage prior to secretion. The mechanism by which SatPC is transported to LB is not understood. The specificity of LPCAT1 for lyso-PC as an acyl acceptor suggests that formation of SatPC via LPCAT1 reacylation is a final step in SatPC synthesis prior to transport. We hypothesized that LPCAT1 forms a transient complex with SatPC and specific phospholipid transport protein(s) to initiate trafficking of SatPC from the endoplasmic reticulum to the LB. Herein we have assessed the ability of different StarD proteins to interact with LPCAT1. We found that LPCAT1 interacts with StarD10, that this interaction is direct, and that amino acids 79-271 of LPCAT1 and the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain of START domain-containing protein 10 (StarD10) are sufficient for this interaction. The role of StarD10 in trafficking of phospholipid to LB was confirmed by the observation that knockdown of StarD10 significantly reduced transport of phospholipid to LB. LPCAT1 also interacted with one isoform of StarD7 but showed no interaction with StarD2/PC transfer protein. PMID:26048993

  16. Skeletal Muscle Phospholipid Metabolism Regulates Insulin Sensitivity and Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Funai, Katsuhiko; Lodhi, Irfan J; Spears, Larry D; Yin, Li; Song, Haowei; Klein, Samuel; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is an early defect in the development of type 2 diabetes. Lipid overload induces insulin resistance in muscle and alters the composition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle phospholipid metabolism regulates systemic glucose metabolism, we perturbed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase 1 (CEPT1), the terminal enzyme in the Kennedy pathway of phospholipid synthesis. In C2C12 cells, CEPT1 knockdown altered SR phospholipid composition and calcium flux. In mice, diet-induced obesity, which decreases insulin sensitivity, increased muscle CEPT1 expression. In high-fat diet-fed mice with skeletal muscle-specific knockout of CEPT1, systemic and muscle-based approaches demonstrated increased muscle insulin sensitivity. In CEPT1-deficient muscles, an altered SR phospholipid milieu decreased sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase-dependent calcium uptake, activating calcium-signaling pathways known to improve insulin sensitivity. Altered muscle SR calcium handling also rendered these mice exercise intolerant. In obese humans, surgery-induced weight loss increased insulin sensitivity and decreased skeletal muscle CEPT1 protein. In obese humans spanning a spectrum of metabolic health, muscle CEPT1 mRNA was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that high-fat feeding and obesity induce CEPT1, which remodels the SR to preserve contractile function at the expense of insulin sensitivity. PMID:26512026

  17. Time resolved studies of interfacial reactions of ozone with pulmonary phospholipid surfactants using field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W; Goddard, William A; Heath, James R; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-07-29

    Field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS) comprises a soft ionization method to sample ions from the surface of microliter droplets. A pulsed electric field stretches neutral droplets until they develop dual Taylor cones, emitting streams of positively and negatively charged submicrometer droplets in opposite directions, with the desired polarity being directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This methodology is employed to study the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) at the air-liquid interface in negative ion mode using FIDI mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate unique characteristics of the heterogeneous reactions at the air-liquid interface. We observe the hydroxyhydroperoxide and the secondary ozonide as major products of POPG ozonolysis in the FIDI-MS spectra. These products are metastable and difficult to observe in the bulk phase, using standard electrospray ionization (ESI) for mass spectrometric analysis. We also present studies of the heterogeneous ozonolysis of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids at the air-liquid interface. A mixture of the saturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and unsaturated POPG is investigated in negative ion mode using FIDI-MS while a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) surfactant is studied in positive ion mode. In both cases FIDI-MS shows the saturated and unsaturated pulmonary surfactants form a mixed interfacial layer. Only the unsaturated phospholipid reacts with ozone, forming products that are more hydrophilic than the saturated phospholipid. With extensive ozonolysis only the saturated phospholipid remains at the droplet surface. Combining these experimental observations with the results of computational analysis provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a surfactant layer system when

  18. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116 regulates pulmonary surfactant pool size.

    PubMed

    Bridges, James P; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Mueller, Matthias; Kinzel, Bernd; Sato, Atsuyasu; Xu, Yan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Ikegami, Machiko

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant levels within the alveoli are tightly regulated to maintain lung volumes and promote efficient gas exchange across the air/blood barrier. Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in surfactant are associated with severe lung diseases in children and adults. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control surfactant metabolism have been studied intensively, the critical molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous surfactant levels within the alveolus have not been identified and constitute a fundamental knowledge gap in the field. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR116, in the murine lung is developmentally regulated, reaching maximal levels 1 day after birth, and is highly expressed on the apical surface of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells. To define the physiological role of GPR116 in vivo, mice with a targeted mutation of the Gpr116 locus, Gpr116(Δexon17), were generated. Gpr116(Δexon17) mice developed a profound accumulation of alveolar surfactant phospholipids at 4 weeks of age (12-fold) that was further increased at 20 weeks of age (30-fold). Surfactant accumulation in Gpr116(Δexon17) mice was associated with increased saturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis at 4 weeks and the presence of enlarged, lipid-laden macrophages, neutrophilia, and alveolar destruction at 20 weeks. mRNA microarray analyses indicated that P2RY2, a purinergic receptor known to mediate surfactant secretion, was induced in Gpr116(Δexon17) type II cells. Collectively, these data support the concept that GPR116 functions as a molecular sensor of alveolar surfactant lipid pool sizes by regulating surfactant secretion. PMID:23590306

  19. A non-aggregating Surfactant Protein C mutant is misdirected to early endosomes and disrupts phospholipid recycling

    PubMed Central

    Beers, Michael F.; Hawkins, Arie; Maguire, Jean Ann; Kotorashvili, Adam; Zhao, Ming; Newitt, Jennifer L.; Ding, Wenge; Russo, Scott; Guttentag, Susan; Gonzales, Linda; Mulugeta, Surafel

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease in both children and adults has been linked to mutations in the lung-specific Surfactant protein C gene (SFTPC). Among these, the missense mutation (isoleucine to threonine at codon 73 = hSP-CI73T) accounts for ~30% of all described SFTPC mutations. We reported previously that unlike the BRICHOS misfolding SFTPC mutants, expression of hSP-CI73T induces lung remodeling and alveolar lipoproteinosis without a substantial ER stress response or ER-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. We show here that, in contrast to its wild type counterpart that is directly routed to lysosomal-like organelles for processing, SP-CI73T is misdirected to the plasma membrane and subsequently internalized to the endocytic pathway via early endosomes, leading to the accumulation of abnormally processed proSP-C isoforms. Functionally, cells expressing hSP-CI73T demonstrated both impaired uptake and degradation of surfactant phospholipid, thus providing a molecular mechanism for the observed lipid accumulation in patients expressing hSP-CI73T through the disruption of normal phospholipid recycling. Our data provide evidence for a novel cellular mechanism for conformational protein associated diseases, and suggest a paradigm for mistargeted proteins involved in the disruption of the endosomal/lysosomal sorting machinery. PMID:21707890

  20. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  1. Effects of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures on rheology of gum tragacanth - possible application for surfactant action on mucus gel simulants.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of specialised biomaterials consisting of clove oil- phospholipid mixtures as possible substitute surfactants in diseases of altered mucus viscosity by studying their effect on the viscosity of mucus gel simulants in vitro. Test surfactants consisting of phospholipid-clove oil mixtures in the ratio of 1 part of oil to 9 parts of phospholipid were prepared. The phospholipids used were dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and binary mixtures of PC: PE and PC: PG in the ratio of 2 parts of PC to 3 parts of PE or PG. The effects of the phospholipid-clove oil mixtures on the viscosity of mucus gel simulant (MGS: a polymeric gel consisting predominantly of gum tragacanth and simulating respiratory mucus), was studied by application of steady shear rates ranging from 0.512 to 51.2/s in a concentric cylinder viscometer at 37 degrees C. The change in MGS viscosity, after incubation with surfactants, was found to have a non-Newtonian character and to follow the power law model with R2 values >0.8. The addition of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity when compared with the effect of the phospholipid alone at low shear rates in case of PC, PG and PCPG. The combination of PC : PG with clove oil caused ratios of change in MGS viscosity < 1 i.e., caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity. PC: PG with clove oil was capable of lowering MGS viscosity and should be further researched as possible therapies for diseases of altered mucus rheology. PMID:11202146

  2. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. )

    1992-07-01

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Investigation of the adsorption of PEG1500-12-acyloxystearate surfactants onto phospholipid bilayers: an ellipsometry and cryo-TEM study.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Mauro; von Corswant, Christian; Söderman, Olle

    2007-12-15

    In this article we present a study of a new class of surfactants denoted as PEG1500-12-acyloxystearates, which have potential use as pharmaceutical solubilizers. These amphiphilic molecules present interesting properties with regard to cell damage effects. PEG1500-12-acyloxystearates with C(14) to C(16) acyloxy chains cause little or no damage to red blood and intestinal cells, whereas the surfactants with shorter chains, from C(8) to C(12), induce measurable damage. To start unraveling the reason why there is this rather marked dependence of the cell damage effect on surfactant chain length, we have carried out systematic studies of adsorption properties of the surfactants onto phospholipid bilayers by means of ellipsometry. The rate of incorporation of the surfactants in the lipid membrane decreases with increasing length of the acyloxy chain. Cryo-TEM images strengthen the ellipsometry results by showing that the dissolution of the phospholipid bilayer is slower for the surfactants of the series having longer chains. PMID:17766340

  4. Nanoparticle self-assembly in mixtures of phospholipids with styrene/maleic acid copolymers or fluorinated surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carolyn; Arenas, Rodrigo Cuevas; Frotscher, Erik; Keller, Sandro

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and synthetic membranes and membrane proteins. Considerable efforts are currently underway to replace conventional detergents by milder alternatives such as styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers and fluorinated surfactants. However, these compounds and their nanosized assemblies remain poorly understood as regards their interactions with lipid membranes, particularly, the thermodynamics of membrane partitioning and solubilisation. Using 19F and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, static and dynamic light scattering, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have systematically investigated the aggregational state of a zwitterionic bilayer-forming phospholipid upon exposure to an SMA polymer with a styrene/maleic acid ratio of 3 : 1 or to a fluorinated octyl phosphocholine derivative called F6OPC. The lipid interactions of SMA(3 : 1) and F6OPC can be thermodynamically conceptualised within the framework of a three-stage model that treats bilayer vesicles, discoidal or micellar nanostructures, and the aqueous solution as distinct pseudophases. The exceptional solubilising power of SMA(3 : 1) is reflected in very low membrane-saturating and solubilising polymer/lipid molar ratios of 0.10 and 0.15, respectively. Although F6OPC saturates bilayers at an even lower molar ratio of 0.031, this nondetergent does not solubilise lipids even at >1000-fold molar excess, thus highlighting fundamental differences between these two types of mild membrane-mimetic systems. We rationalise these findings in terms of a new classification of surfactants based on bilayer-to-micelle transfer free energies and discuss practical implications for membrane-protein research.Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and

  5. Nanoparticle self-assembly in mixtures of phospholipids with styrene/maleic acid copolymers or fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Carolyn; Arenas, Rodrigo Cuevas; Frotscher, Erik; Keller, Sandro

    2015-12-28

    Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and synthetic membranes and membrane proteins. Considerable efforts are currently underway to replace conventional detergents by milder alternatives such as styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers and fluorinated surfactants. However, these compounds and their nanosized assemblies remain poorly understood as regards their interactions with lipid membranes, particularly, the thermodynamics of membrane partitioning and solubilisation. Using (19)F and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, static and dynamic light scattering, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have systematically investigated the aggregational state of a zwitterionic bilayer-forming phospholipid upon exposure to an SMA polymer with a styrene/maleic acid ratio of 3 : 1 or to a fluorinated octyl phosphocholine derivative called F(6)OPC. The lipid interactions of SMA(3 : 1) and F(6)OPC can be thermodynamically conceptualised within the framework of a three-stage model that treats bilayer vesicles, discoidal or micellar nanostructures, and the aqueous solution as distinct pseudophases. The exceptional solubilising power of SMA(3 : 1) is reflected in very low membrane-saturating and solubilising polymer/lipid molar ratios of 0.10 and 0.15, respectively. Although F(6)OPC saturates bilayers at an even lower molar ratio of 0.031, this nondetergent does not solubilise lipids even at >1000-fold molar excess, thus highlighting fundamental differences between these two types of mild membrane-mimetic systems. We rationalise these findings in terms of a new classification of surfactants based on bilayer-to-micelle transfer free energies and discuss practical implications for membrane-protein research. PMID:26599076

  6. Regulation of surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2007-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms of surfactant delivery to the air/liquid interface in the lung, which is crucial to lower the surface tension, have been studied for more than two decades. Lung surfactant is synthesized in the alveolar type II cells. Its delivery to the cell surface is preceded by surfactant component synthesis, packaging into specialized organelles termed lamellar bodies, delivery to the apical plasma membrane and fusion. Secreted surfactant undergoes reuptake, intracellular processing, and finally resecretion of recycled material. This review focuses on the mechanisms of delivery of surfactant components to and their secretion from lamellar bodies. Lamellar bodies-independent secretion is also considered. Signal transduction pathways involved in regulation of these processes are discussed as well as disorders associated with their malfunction. PMID:17496061

  7. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  8. The N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant lipopeptide SP-C has intrinsic propensity to interact with and perturb phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Plasencia, Ines; Rivas, Luis; Keough, Kevin M W; Marsh, Derek; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, 13-residue peptides with sequences corresponding to the native N-terminal segment of pulmonary SP-C (surfactant protein C) have been synthesized and their interaction with phospholipid bilayers characterized. The peptides are soluble in aqueous media but associate spontaneously with bilayers composed of either zwitterionic (phosphatidylcholine) or anionic (phosphatidylglycerol) phospholipids. The peptides show higher affinity for anionic than for zwitterionic membranes. Interaction of the peptides with both zwitterionic and anionic membranes promotes phospholipid vesicle aggregation, and leakage of the aqueous content of the vesicles. The lipid-peptide interaction includes a significant hydrophobic component for both zwitterionic and anionic membranes, although the interaction with phosphatidylglycerol bilayers is also electrostatic in nature. The effects of the SP-C N-terminal peptides on the membrane structure are mediated by significant perturbations of the packing order and mobility of phospholipid acyl chain segments deep in the bilayer, as detected by differential scanning calorimetry and spin-label ESR. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of SP-C, even in the absence of acylation, possesses an intrinsic propensity to interact with and perturb phospholipid bilayers, thereby potentially facilitating SP-C promoting bilayer-monolayer transitions at the alveolar spaces. PMID:14514353

  9. Effect of calcium on phospholipid interaction with pulmonary surfactant protein C.

    PubMed Central

    Dico, A S; Taneva, S; Morrow, M R; Keough, K M

    1997-01-01

    Porcine pulmonary surfactant-associated protein SP-C was incorporated into bilayers of chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG-d62) and chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC-d62) and into bilayers containing 70 mol% dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 30 mol% DPPG-d62 or 70 mol% DPPC-d62 and 30 mol% dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG). The effect of SP-C on the phase behavior, lipid chain order, and dynamics in these bilayers was examined by using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance. SP-C was found to have a similar effect on the chain order and phase behavior of DPPC-d62 and DPPG-d62 in bilayers with a single lipid component. In gel phase DPPC/DPPG (7:3) bilayers with one or the other lipid component chain-perdeuterated, SP-C was found to affect first spectral moment more strongly for DPPG-d62 than for DPPC-d62. This may indicate that SP-C induced a nonrandom lateral distribution in the mixed lipid bilayer. SP-C was also found to influence motions responsible for deuteron transverse relaxation in both the gel and liquid crystalline phases. The presence of 5 mM Ca2+ in the aqueous phase substantially altered the effect of SP-C on transverse relaxation in the bilayer. PMID:9370454

  10. Surface properties and sensitivity to protein-inhibition of a recombinant apoprotein C-based phospholipid mixture in vitro--comparison to natural surfactant.

    PubMed

    Seeger, W; Thede, C; Günther, A; Grube, C

    1991-01-01

    Surfactant alterations due to protein leakage are implicated in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the present study, surface properties of a palmitic acid containing phospholipid mixture (DPPC: PG: PA/68.5:22.5:9) supplemented with 2% recombinant human surfactant apoprotein C (PLM-Crec) were compared to those of the lipids alone (PLM) and to those of calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE). Experiments were performed in a Wilhelmy balance and in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Adsorption facilities and dynamic surface tension-lowering properties of the surfactants alone, their sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of fibrinogen (fbg), and their capacity to restore surface properties of fbg-inhibited CLSE were investigated. PLM revealed limited surface activity, was very sensitive to inhibition by fbg and had moderate effect on the surface properties of fbg-inhibited CLSE. In contrast, PLM-Crec and CLSE revealed similar excellent adsorption kinetics and dynamic surface tension lowering properties. Higher percentage of SP-C within the synthetic mixture (up to 10%) or additional admixture of human purified or recombinant SP-A (up to 10%) did not further improve these surface properties. However, PLM-Crec was markedly more sensitive to inactivation by fbg than CLSE. The surface activity of fbg-inhibited CLSE was fully restored by additional admixture of CLSE or PLM-Crec in both the Wilhelmy and the bubble system, with slight superiority of the natural surfactant extract. We conclude that the surface properties of PLM-Crec are clearly superior to those of the apoprotein-free lipid mixture and are similar to those of the natural surfactant extract CLSE. PLM-Crec is markedly more sensitive to inhibition by fibrinogen than CLSE, but possesses nearly equivalent efficacy in restoring the surface properties of fbg-inhibited CLSE as compared to the natural material. PMID:1991155

  11. Regulation of pulmonary surfactant synthesis in fetal rat type II alveolar epithelial cells by microRNA-26a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Qun; Zhang, Pan; Yang, Yang; Qiu, Jie; Kan, Qin; Liang, Hong-Lu; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Xiao-Guang

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a unique developmentally regulated, phospholipid-rich lipoprotein, is synthesized by the type II epithelial cells (AECII) of the pulmonary alveolus, where it is stored in organelles termed lamellar bodies. The synthesis of pulmonary surfactant is under multifactorial control and is regulated by a number of hormones and factors, including glucocorticoids, prolactin, insulin, growth factors, estrogens, androgens, thyroid hormones, and catecholamines acting through beta-adrenergic receptors, and cAMP. While there is increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of almost every cellular and physiological process, the potential role of miRNAs in the regulation of pulmonary surfactant synthesis remains unknown. miRNA-26a (miR-26a) has been predicted to target SMAD1, one of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor downstream signaling proteins that plays a key role in differentiation of lung epithelial cells during lung development. In this study, we explored the regulation role of miR-26a in the synthesis of pulmonary surfactant. An adenoviral miR-26a overexpression vector was constructed and introduced into primary cultured fetal AECII. GFP fluorescence was observed to determinate the transfection efficiency and miR-26a levels were measured by RT-PCR. MTT was performed to analyze AECII viability. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the mRNA and protein level of SMAD1 and surfactant-associated proteins. The results showed that miR-26a in fetal AECII was overexpressed after the transfection, and that the overexpression of miR-26a inhibited pulmonary surfactant synthesis in AECII. There was no significant change in cell proliferation. Our results further showed that overexpression of miR-26a reduced the SMAD1 expression both in mRNA and protein level in fetal AECII. These findings indicate that miR-26a regulates surfactant synthesis in fetal AECII through SMAD1. PMID:24395810

  12. Interaction of surfactant protein A with peroxiredoxin 6 regulates phospholipase A2 activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-Zheng; Manevich, Yefim; Baldwin, James L; Dodia, Chandra; Yu, Kevin; Feinstein, Sheldon I; Fisher, Aron B

    2006-03-17

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is a "moonlighting" protein with both GSH peroxidase and phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activities. This protein is responsible for degradation of internalized dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, the major phospholipid component of lung surfactant. The PLA(2) activity is inhibited by surfactant protein A (SP-A). We postulate that SP-A regulates the PLA(2) activity of Prdx6 through direct protein-protein interaction. Recombinant human Prdx6 and SP-A isolated from human alveolar proteinosis fluid were studied. Measurement of kinetic constants at pH 4.0 (maximal PLA(2) activity) showed K(m)0.35 mm and V(max) 138 nmol/min/mg of protein. SP-A inhibited PLA(2) activity non-competitively with K(i) 10 mug/ml and was Ca(2+) -independent. Activity at pH 7.4 was approximately 50% less, and inhibition by SP-A was partially dependent on Ca(2+). Interaction of SP-A and Prdx6 at pH 7.4 was shown by Prdx6-mediated inhibition of SP-A binding to agarose beads, a pull-down assay using His-tagged Prdx6 and Ni(2) -chelating beads, co-immunoprecipitation from lung epithelial cells and from a binary mixture of the two proteins, binding after treatment with a trifunctional cross-linker, and size-exclusion chromatography. Analysis by static light scattering and surface plasmon resonance showed calcium-independent SP-A binding to Prdx6 at pH 4.0 and partial Ca(2+) dependence of binding at pH 7.4. These results indicate a direct interaction between SP-A and Prdx6, which provides a mechanism for regulation of the PLA(2) activity of Prdx6 by SP-A. PMID:16330552

  13. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  14. An Unrecognized Function of Cholesterol: Regulating the Mechanism Controlling Membrane Phospholipid Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Arashiki, Nobuto; Saito, Masaki; Koshino, Ichiro; Kamata, Kotoe; Hale, John; Mohandas, Narla; Manno, Sumie; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2016-06-28

    An asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the membrane bilayer is inseparable from physiological functions, including shape preservation and survival of erythrocytes, and by implication other cells. Aminophospholipids, notably phosphatidylserine (PS), are confined to the inner leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane lipid bilayer by the ATP-dependent flippase enzyme, ATP11C, counteracting the activity of an ATP-independent scramblase. Phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1), a single-transmembrane protein, was previously reported to possess scrambling activity in erythrocytes. However, its function was cast in doubt by the retention of scramblase activity in erythrocytes of knockout mice lacking this protein. We show that in the human erythrocyte PLSCR1 is the predominant scramblase and by reconstitution into liposomes that its activity resides in the transmembrane domain. At or below physiological intracellular calcium concentrations, total suppression of flippase activity nevertheless leaves the membrane asymmetry undisturbed. When liposomes or erythrocytes are depleted of cholesterol (a reversible process in the case of erythrocytes), PS quickly appears at the outer surface, implying that cholesterol acts in the cell as a powerful scramblase inhibitor. Thus, our results bring to light a previously unsuspected function of cholesterol in regulating phospholipid scrambling. PMID:27267274

  15. Allosteric regulation of G protein-coupled receptor activity by phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Masureel, Matthieu; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kobilka, Brian K; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are emerging as key regulators of membrane protein structure and activity. These effects can be attributed either to the modification of bilayer properties (thickness, curvature and surface tension) or to the binding of specific lipids to the protein surface. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the effects of phospholipids on receptor structure and activity remain poorly understood. Here we reconstituted purified β2-adrenergic receptor (β2R) in high-density lipoparticles to systematically characterize the effect of biologically relevant phospholipids on receptor activity. We observed that the lipid headgroup type affected ligand binding (agonist and antagonist) and receptor activation. Specifically, phosphatidylgycerol markedly favored agonist binding and facilitated receptor activation, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine favored antagonist binding and stabilized the inactive state of the receptor. We then showed that these effects could be recapitulated with detergent-solubilized lipids, demonstrating that the functional modulation occurred in the absence of a bilayer. Our data suggest that phospholipids act as direct allosteric modulators of GPCR activity. PMID:26571351

  16. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  17. Post-translational regulation of P2X receptor channels: modulation by phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Louis-Philippe; Ase, Ariel R.; Séguéla, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptor channels mediate fast excitatory signaling by ATP and play major roles in sensory transduction, neuro-immune communication and inflammatory response. P2X receptors constitute a gene family of calcium-permeable ATP-gated cation channels therefore the regulation of P2X signaling is critical for both membrane potential and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Phosphoinositides (PIPn) are anionic signaling phospholipids that act as functional regulators of many types of ion channels. Direct PIPn binding was demonstrated for several ligand- or voltage-gated ion channels, however no generic motif emerged to accurately predict lipid-protein binding sites. This review presents what is currently known about the modulation of the different P2X subtypes by phospholipids and about critical determinants underlying their sensitivity to PIPn levels in the plasma membrane. All functional mammalian P2X subtypes tested, with the notable exception of P2X5, have been shown to be positively modulated by PIPn, i.e., homomeric P2X1, P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, as well as heteromeric P2X1/5 and P2X2/3 receptors. Based on various results reported on the aforementioned subtypes including mutagenesis of the prototypical PIPn-sensitive P2X4 and PIPn-insensitive P2X5 receptor subtypes, an increasing amount of functional, biochemical and structural evidence converges on the modulatory role of a short polybasic domain located in the proximal C-terminus of P2X subunits. This linear motif, semi-conserved in the P2X family, seems necessary and sufficient for encoding direct modulation of ATP-gated channels by PIPn. Furthermore, the physiological impact of the regulation of ionotropic purinergic responses by phospholipids on pain pathways was recently revealed in the context of native crosstalks between phospholipase C (PLC)-linked metabotropic receptors and P2X receptor channels in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons and microglia. PMID:24324400

  18. MicroRNA-206 regulates surfactant secretion by targeting VAMP-2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Honghao; Guo, Yujie; Mishra, Amarjit; Gou, Deming; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Liu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant secretion is a highly regulated process. Our previous studies have shown that VAMP-2 is essential for surfactant secretion. In the present study we investigated the role of miR-206 in surfactant secretion through VAMP-2. VAMP-2 was confirmed to be a target of miR-206 by 3'-untranslational region (3'-UTR) luciferase assay. Mutations in the predicated miR-206 binding sites reduced the binding of miR-206 to the 3'-UTR of VAMP-2. miR-206 decreased the expression of VAMP-2 protein and decreased the lung surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells. In conclusion, miR-206 regulates lung surfactant secretion by limiting the availability of VAMP-2 protein. PMID:25481410

  19. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  20. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport.

    PubMed

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. PMID:25898003

  1. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

    PubMed

    Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Mishra, Amarjit; Su, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Ayalew, Sahlu; Hartson, Steven D; Liu, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+) into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+) release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+) mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion. PMID:20169059

  2. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  3. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Xu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation to air breathing at birth requires the precise orchestration of cellular processes to initiate fluid clearance, enhance pulmonary blood flow, and to synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant needed to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic programs regulating the synthesis of the surfactant proteins and lipids required for the production and function of pulmonary surfactant are highly conserved across vertebrates, and include proteins that regulate the synthesis and packaging of pulmonary surfactant proteins and lipids. Surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C) are small, uniquely hydrophobic proteins that play important roles in the stability and spreading of surfactant lipids in the alveolus. Deletion or mutations in SP-B and -C cause acute and chronic lung disease in neonates and infants. SP-B and -C are synthesized and packaged with surfactant phospholipids in lamellar bodies. Normal lamellar body formation requires SP-B and a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of ATP-dependent membrane-associated transport proteins, ABCA3. Mutations in ABCA3 cause fatal respiratory disease in newborns and severe chronic lung disease in infancy. Expression of SP-B, -C, and ABCA3 are coregulated during late gestation by transcriptional programs influenced by thyroid transcription factor-1 and forkhead box a2, transcription factors that regulate both differentiation of the respiratory epithelium and transcription of genes required for perinatal adaptation to air breathing. PMID:15985750

  4. Keeping lung surfactant where it belongs: protein regulation of two-dimensional viscosity.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2005-07-01

    Lung surfactant causes the surface tension, gamma, in the alveoli to drop to nearly zero on exhalation; in the upper airways gamma is approximately 30 mN/m and constant. Hence, a surface tension gradient exists between alveoli and airways that should lead to surfactant flow out of the alveoli and elimination of the surface tension gradient. However, the lung surfactant specific protein SP-C enhances the resistance to surfactant flow by regulating the ratio of solid to fluid phase in the monolayer, leading to a jamming transition at which the monolayer transforms from fluidlike to solidlike. The accompanying three orders of magnitude increase in surface viscosity helps minimize surfactant flow to the airways and likely stabilizes the alveoli against collapse. PMID:15833995

  5. Genetic regulations of the biosynthesis of microbial surfactants: an overview.

    PubMed

    Das, Palashpriya; Mukherjee, Soumen; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2008-01-01

    molecular genetics and gene regulation mechanisms behind the biosynthesis of various microbial surfactants of commercial importance. PMID:21412355

  6. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  7. Genetic Disorders of Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Susan E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Nogee, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and the phospholipid transporter, ABCA3, are associated with respiratory distress and interstitial lung disease in the pediatric population. Expression of these proteins is regulated developmentally, increasing with gestational age, and is critical for pulmonary surfactant function at birth. Pulmonary surfactant is a unique mixture of lipids and proteins that reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface, preventing collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. SP-B and ABCA3 are required for the normal organization and packaging of surfactant phospholipids into specialized secretory organelles, known as lamellar bodies, while both SP-B and SP-C are important for adsorption of secreted surfactant phospholipids to the alveolar surface. In general, mutations in the SP-B gene SFTPB are associated with fatal respiratory distress in the neonatal period, and mutations in the SP-C gene SFTPC are more commonly associated with interstitial lung disease in older infants, children, and adults. Mutations in the ABCA3 gene are associated with both phenotypes. Despite this general classification, there is considerable overlap in the clinical and histologic characteristics of these genetic disorders. In this review, similarities and differences in the presentation of these disorders with an emphasis on their histochemical and ultrastructural features will be described, along with a brief discussion of surfactant metabolism. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of lung disease caused by mutations in these genes will also be discussed. PMID:19220077

  8. Divergent sequence tunes ligand sensitivity in phospholipid-regulated hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish; Lauer, Janelle L; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-07-12

    The members of the NR5A subfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) are important regulators of pluripotency, lipid and glucose homeostasis, and steroidogenesis. Liver receptor homologue 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1; NR5A1) have therapeutic potential for the treatment of metabolic and neoplastic disease; however, a poor understanding of their ligand regulation has hampered the pursuit of these proteins as pharmaceutical targets. In this study, we dissect how sequence variation among LRH-1 orthologs affects phospholipid (PL) binding and regulation. Both human LRH-1 (hLRH-1) and mouse LRH-1 (mLRH-1) respond to newly discovered medium chain PL agonists to modulate lipid and glucose homeostasis. These PLs activate hLRH-1 by altering receptor dynamics in a newly identified alternate activation function region. Mouse and Drosophila orthologs contain divergent sequences in this region potentially altering PL-driven activation. Structural evidence suggests that these sequence differences in mLRH-1 and Drosophila FTZ-f1 (dmFTZ-f1) confer at least partial ligand independence, making them poor models for hLRH-1 studies; however, the mechanisms of ligand independence remain untested. We show using structural and biochemical methods that the recent evolutionary divergence of the mLRH-1 stabilizes the active conformation in the absence of ligand, yet does not abrogate PL-dependent activation. We also show by mass spectrometry and biochemical assays that FTZ-f1 is incapable of PL binding. This work provides a structural mechanism for the differential tuning of PL sensitivity in NR5A orthologs and supports the use of mice as viable therapeutic models for LRH-1-dependent diseases. PMID:23737522

  9. Regulation of high molecular weight bovine brain neutral protease by phospholipids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, V; Sheikh, A M; Chauhan, A; Spivack, W D; Fenko, M D; Malik, M N

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the heat stable, glycosylated high molecular weight bovine brain neutral protease (HMW protease) is differentially regulated by phospholipids. While phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA) had only marginal stimulatory effect (40-75%) on the activity of HMW protease, lysophoshatidylcholine (lysoPC) and lysophosphatidic acid (lysoPA) activated the enzyme by more than two-fold. Both lysoPC and lysoPA exhibited concentration-dependent saturation kinetics for the activation of HMW protease. Surprisingly, phosphoinositides (phosphatidylinositol, PI; phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, PIP; and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, PIP2) modulated the activity of protease differently: activation of the enzyme was higher with PIP (90%) as compared to PI (21%), whereas PIP2 inhibited the enzyme (16%). The inhibition of the protease by PIP2 was concentration-dependent. During receptor-coupled cell activation, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) converts PC and PA to lysoPC and lysoPA, respectively; PI is converted to PIP2 by successive enzymatic phosphorylation by PI 4-kinase and PIP 5-kinase; and phospholipase C (PLC) degrades PIP2 to diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Therefore, the data suggest that HMW protease may be coupled to cell signal transduction where PLA2, PI 4-kinase, PIP 5-kinase and PLC are involved. PMID:16010981

  10. Phospholipid Scramblase-1-Induced Lipid Reorganization Regulates Compensatory Endocytosis in Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Stéphane; Ceridono, Mara; Momboisse, Fanny; Houy, Sébastien; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Heintz, Dimitri; Calco, Valérie; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Espinoza, Flor A.; Sims, Peter J.; Bailly, Yannick; Bader, Marie-France; Gasman, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells and neurons is accompanied by the redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the extracellular space, leading to a disruption of plasma membrane asymmetry. How and why outward translocation of PS occurs during secretion are currently unknown. Immunogold labeling on plasma membrane sheets coupled with hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrate that PS translocation occurs at the vicinity of the secretory granule fusion sites. We found that altering the function of the phospholipid scramblase-1 (PLSCR-1) by expressing a PLSCR-1 calcium-insensitive mutant or by using chromaffin cells from PLSCR-1−/− mice prevents outward translocation of PS in cells stimulated for exocytosis. Remarkably, whereas transmitter release was not affected, secretory granule membrane recapture after exocytosis was impaired, indicating that PLSCR-1 is required for compensatory endocytosis but not for exocytosis. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of specific lipid reorganization and calcium-dependent PLSCR-1 activity in neuroendocrine compensatory endocytosis. PMID:23426682

  11. The mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin is involved in the regulation of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mürke, Eik; Stoll, Steffan; Lendeckel, Uwe; Reinhold, Dirk; Schild, Lorenz

    2016-08-01

    Challenge of the immune system with antigens induces a cascade of processes including activation of naïve T cells, induction of proliferation, differentiation into effector cells and finally contraction via apoptosis. To meet the dynamic requirements of an adequate immune response, T cells must metabolically adapt to actual situations by switching between catabolic and anabolic metabolism. In this context mitochondria are hubs of metabolic regulation. The phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is crucial for the structural and functional integrity and, thus, the metabolism of mitochondria. The aim of this study was to verify a possible interrelationship between T cell proliferation and CL composition. For this purpose, we adjusted the proliferation of peripheral human T cells from volunteers by stimulation with different concentrations of the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), inhibition with Cyclosporin A (CsA) and exposure of cells to different free fatty acids and subsequently analysed the composition of CL by LC/MS/MS spectroscopy. All of the treatments had significant effects on CL composition. Correlation analysis of the proliferation rate and CL composition revealed that only the amount of incorporated palmitoleic acid and the content of tetralinoleoyl-CL are significantly associated with the proliferation rate. This observation is strongly suggestive of a regulatory function of these particular CL components/species in the process of T cell proliferation. As CL is crucially involved in mitochondrial function one can speculate that changes in CL composition contribute to vital mitochondria-dependent adaptations of energy metabolism in T cells during immune response. PMID:27163692

  12. Regulation by guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate of phospholipid methylation during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, S; García Gil, M; Mato, J M

    1980-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, the chemoattractant cyclic AMP activates the enzyme guanylate cyclase, giving a brief up to 10-fold increase in the intracellular cyclic GMP content. The addition of physiological cyclic GMP concentrations to a homogenate of D. discoideum cells markedly increased the incorporation of the 3H-labeled methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H]methionine into mono- and dimethylated phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Lipid methylation was inhibited by S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, which inhibits transmethylation. When whole cells prelabeled with L-[methyl-3H]methionine were exposed to cyclic AMP, a rapid transient increase in the amount of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine was observed. The time course of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine formation agrees with its being mediated by the intracellular increase in cyclic GMP originating during chemotactic stimulation. Addition of the 8-Br derivative of cyclic GMP to whole cells also increased the levels of labeled phosphatidylcholine. It is therefore likely that cyclic GMP contributes to chemotaxis by regulating membrane function via phospholipid methylation. PMID:6261233

  13. Calcium- and calmodulin-regulated breakdown of phospholipid by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Paliyath, G.; Thompson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin in the regulation of phospholipid breakdown by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons has been obtained by following the formation of radiolabeled degradation products from (U-/sup 14/C)phosphatidylcholine. Three membrane-associated enzymes were found to mediate the breakdown of (U-/sup 14/C) phosphatidylcholine, viz. phospholipase D phosphatidic acid phosphatase and lipolytic acyl hydrolase. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase were both stimulated by physiological levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/, whereas lipolytic acyl hydrolase proved to be insensitive to Ca/sup 2 +/. Phospholipase D was unaffected by calmodulin, but the activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was additionally stimulated by nanomolar levels of calmodulin in the presence of 15 micromolar free Ca/sup 2 +/. Calmidazolium, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity at IC/sub 50/ values ranging from 10 to 15 micromolar. Thus, the Ca/sup 2 +/-induced stimulation of phosphatidic acid phosphatase appears to be mediated through calmodulin, whereas the effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on phospholipase D is independent of calmodulin. The role of Ca/sup 2 +/ as a second messenger in the initiation of membrane lipid degradation is discussed.

  14. Dietary fatty acid composition and the homeostatic regulation of mitochondrial phospholipid classes in red muscle of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Kraffe, Edouard; Le Grand, Fabienne; Marty, Yanic; Bureau, Dominique P; Guderley, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary lipid quality markedly affects fatty acid (FA) composition of mitochondrial membranes from rainbow trout red muscle (Oncorhynchus mykiss), mitochondrial processes are relatively unchanged. As certain classes of phospholipids interact more intimately with membrane proteins than others, we examined whether specific phospholipid classes from these muscle mitochondria were more affected by dietary FA composition than others. To test this hypothesis, we fed trout with two diets differing only in their FA composition: Diet 1 had higher levels of 18:1n-9 and 18:2n-6 than Diet 2, while 22:6n-3 and 22:5n-6 were virtually absent from Diet 1 and high in Diet 2. After 5 months, trout fed Diet 2 had higher proportions of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and less phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in mitochondrial membranes than those fed Diet 1. The FA composition of PC, PE and cardiolipin (CL) showed clear evidence of regulated incorporation of dietary FA. For trout fed Diet 2, 22:6n-3 was the most abundant FA in PC, PE and CL. The n-6 FA were consistently higher in all phospholipid classes of trout fed Diet 1, with shorter n-6 FA being favoured in CL than in PC and PE. Despite these marked changes in individual FA levels with diet, general characteristics such as total polyunsaturated FA, total monounsaturated FA and total saturated FA were conserved in PE and CL, confirming differential regulation of the FA composition of PC, PE and CL. The regulated changes of phospholipid classes presumably maintain critical membrane characteristics despite varying nutritional quality. We postulate that these changes aim to protect mitochondrial function. PMID:25418791

  15. The phospholipid flippase ATP8B1 mediates apical localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed

    van der Mark, Vincent A; de Jonge, Hugo R; Chang, Jung-Chin; Ho-Mok, Kam S; Duijst, Suzanne; Vidović, Dragana; Carlon, Marianne S; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Paulusma, Coen C

    2016-09-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1. Apart from severe cholestatic liver disease, many PFIC1 patients develop extrahepatic symptoms characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as pulmonary infection, sweat gland dysfunction and failure to thrive. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel essential for epithelial fluid transport. Previously it was shown that CFTR transcript levels were strongly reduced in livers of PFIC1 patients. Here we have investigated the hypothesis that ATP8B1 is important for proper CFTR expression and function. We analyzed CFTR expression in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines and assessed CFTR function by measuring short-circuit currents across transwell-grown ATP8B1-depleted intestinal T84 cells and by a genetically-encoded fluorescent chloride sensor. In addition, we studied CFTR surface expression upon induction of CFTR transcription. We show that CFTR protein levels are strongly reduced in the apical membrane of human ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines, a phenotype that coincided with reduced CFTR activity. Apical membrane insertion upon induction of ectopically-expressed CFTR was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We conclude that ATP8B1 is essential for correct apical localization of CFTR in human intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cells, and that impaired CFTR localization underlies some of the extrahepatic phenotypes observed in ATP8B1 deficiency. PMID:27301931

  16. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  17. Metabolomics annotates ABHD3 as a physiologic regulator of medium-chain phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jonathan Z.; Cisar, Justin S.; Milliken, David; Niessen, Sherry; Wang, Chu; Trauger, Sunia A.; Siuzdak, Gary; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    All organisms, including humans, possess a huge number of uncharacterized enzymes. Here, we describe a general cell-based screen for enzyme substrate discovery by untargeted metabolomics and its application to identify α/β-hydrolase domain-containing 3 (ABHD3) as a lipase that selectively cleaves medium-chain and oxidatively-truncated phospholipids. Abhd3−/− mice possess elevated myristoyl (C14)-phospholipids, including the bioactive lipid C14-lysophosphatidylcholine, confirming the physiological relevance of our substrate assignments. PMID:21926997

  18. Pulmonary Surfactant: An Immunological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chroneos, Zissis C.; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Shepherd, Virginia L.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has two crucial roles in respiratory function; first, as a biophysical entity it reduces surface tension at the air water interface, facilitating gas exchange and alveolar stability during breathing, and, second, as an innate component of the lung's immune system it helps maintain sterility and balance immune reactions in the distal airways. Pulmonary surfactant consists of 90% lipids and 10% protein. There are four surfactant proteins named SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D; their distinct interactions with surfactant phospholipids are necessary for the ultra-structural organization, stability, metabolism, and lowering of surface tension. In addition, SP-A and SP-D bind pathogens, inflict damage to microbial membranes, and regulate microbial phagocytosis and activation or deactivation of inflammatory responses by alveolar macrophages. SP-A and SP-D, also known as pulmonary collectins, mediate microbial phagocytosis via SP-A and SP-D receptors and the coordinated induction of other innate receptors. Several receptors (SP-R210, CD91/calreticulin, SIRPα, and toll-like receptors) mediate the immunological functions of SP-A and SP-D. However, accumulating evidence indicate that SP-B and SP-C and one or more lipid constituents of surfactant share similar immuno-regulatory properties as SP-A and SP-D. The present review discusses current knowledge on the interaction of surfactant with lung innate host defense. PMID:20054141

  19. [The ocular surfactant system and its relevance in the dry eye].

    PubMed

    Schicht, M; Posa, A; Paulsen, F; Bräuer, L

    2010-11-01

    The amphiphilic surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) are tightly bound to phospholipids. These proteins play important roles in maintaining the surface tension-lowering properties of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) are hydrophilic and are thought to have a role in recycling surfactant and, especially, in improving host defense in the lung. Moreover, SP-A supports the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and during surfactant subtype assembly and inhibits the secretion of lamellar bodies into the alveolar space. During recent years surfactant proteins have also been detected at locations outside the lung such as the lacrimal apparatus. In this review, the latest information regarding SP function and regulation in the human lacrimal system, the tear film and the ocular surface is summarised with regard to dry eye, rheological and antimicrobial properties of the tear film, tear outflow, certain disease states and possible therapeutic perspectives. PMID:21077020

  20. Vesicles from pH-regulated reversible gemini amino-acid surfactants as nanocapsules for delivery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Qiao, Weihong; Li, Zongshi

    2016-10-01

    Reversible transition from micelles to vesicles by regulating pH were realized by gemini amino-acid surfactants N,N'-dialkyl-N,N'-diacetate ethylenediamine. Measurement results of ζ-potential at different pH and DLS at varying solvents revealed that the protonation between H(+) and double NCH2COO(-) groups (generating NH(+)CH2COO(-)), expressed as pKa1 and pKa2, is the key driving force to control the aggregation behaviors of gemini surfactant molecule. Effect of pH on the bilayer structure was studied in detail by using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy of hydrophobic pyrene and Coumarin 153 (C153) respectively and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from C153 to Rhodamine 6G (R6G). Various pH-regulated and pH-reversible self-assemblies were obtained in one surfactant system. Vitamin D3 was encapsulated in vesicle bilayers to form nano-VD3-capsules as VD3 supplement agent for health care products. By using the electrostatic attraction between Ca(2+) and double -COO(-) groups, nano-VD3-capsules with Ca(2+) coated outermost layers were prepared as a formulation for VD3 and calcium co-supplement agent. DLS and TEM were performed to check stability and morphology of the nano-capsules. It is concluded that the pH-regulated gemini amino-acid surfactants can be used to construct colloidal systems for delivering hydrophobic drugs or nutritions without lipids at human physiological pH level. PMID:27419647

  1. LPS impairs phospholipid synthesis by triggering beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP)-mediated polyubiquitination and degradation of the surfactant enzyme acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase I (LPCAT1).

    PubMed

    Zou, Chunbin; Butler, Phillip L; Coon, Tiffany A; Smith, Rebecca M; Hammen, Gary; Zhao, Yutong; Chen, Bill B; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2011-01-28

    Acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) is a relatively newly described and yet indispensable enzyme needed for generation of the bioactive surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPtdCho). Here, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes LPCAT1 degradation using the Skp1-Cullin-F-box ubiquitin E3 ligase component, β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP), that polyubiquitinates LPCAT1, thereby targeting the enzyme for proteasomal degradation. LPCAT1 was identified as a phosphoenzyme as Ser(178) within a phosphodegron was identified as a putative molecular recognition site for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylation that recruits β-TrCP docking within the enzyme. β-TrCP ubiquitinates LPCAT1 at an acceptor site (Lys(221)), as substitution of Lys(221) with Arg abrogated LPCAT1 polyubiquitination. LPS profoundly reduced immunoreactive LPCAT1 levels and impaired lung surfactant mechanics, effects that were overcome by siRNA to β-TrCP and GSK-3β or LPCAT1 gene transfer, respectively. Thus, LPS appears to destabilize the LPCAT1 protein by GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation within a canonical phosphodegron for β-TrCP docking and site-specific ubiquitination. LPCAT1 is the first lipogenic substrate for β-TrCP, and the results suggest that modulation of the GSK-3β-SCFβ(TrCP) E3 ligase effector pathway might be a unique strategy to optimize dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine levels in sepsis. PMID:21068446

  2. The kinase c-Src and the phosphatase TC45 coordinately regulate c-Fos tyrosine phosphorylation and c-Fos phospholipid synthesis activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, G O; Velazquez, F N; Caputto, B L

    2012-07-12

    Our previous work showed that in T98G cells, a human glioblastoma multiforme-derived cell line, the association of c-Fos to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and consequently, the capacity of c-Fos to activate phospholipid synthesis, is regulated by the phosphorylation state of tyrosine (tyr) residues #10 and #30 of c-Fos. The small amount of c-Fos present in quiescent cells is tyr-phosphorylated, is dissociated from the ER membranes and does not activate phospholipid synthesis. However, on induction of the cell to re-enter growth, c-Fos expression is rapidly induced, it is found dephosphorylated, associated to ER membranes and activating phospholipid synthesis (Portal et al., 2007). Herein, using in vivo and in vitro experimental strategies, we show that the kinase c-Src is capable of phosphorylating tyr residues of c-Fos whereas the phosphatase TC45 T-cell protein-tyr phosphatase (TC-PTP) dephosphorylates them, thus enabling c-Fos/ER association and activation of phospholipid synthesis. Results also suggest that the regulation of the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of c-Fos occurs at the TC-PTP level: induction of cells to re-enter growth promotes the translocation of TC45 from a nuclear to a cytoplasmic location concomitant with its activation. Activated TC45 in its turn promotes dephosphorylation of pre-formed c-Fos, enabling cells to rapidly activate phospholipid synthesis to respond to its growth demands. PMID:22105363

  3. Surfactant lipids regulate LPS-induced interleukin-8 production in A549 lung epithelial cells by inhibiting translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Wondwossen; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A.; Parton, Joan; Jones, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to providing mechanical stability, growing evidence suggests that surfactant lipid components can modulate inflammatory responses in the lung. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory action of surfactant lipids. This study investigates the effect of the lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and the major surfactant phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene and protein expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells using immunoassay and PCR techniques. To examine potential mechanisms of the surfactant lipid effects, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, and membrane lipid raft domains were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and DPPC, at physiological concentrations, significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-8 expression in A549 cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. The surfactant preparations did not affect the cell surface expression of TLR4 or the binding of LPS to the cells. However, LPS treatment induced translocation of TLR4 into membrane lipid raft microdomains, and this translocation was inhibited by incubation of the cells with the surfactant lipid. This study provides important mechanistic details of the immune-modulating action of pulmonary surfactant lipids. PMID:19648651

  4. Phospholipid Scramblases

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of phospholipid types between the two leaflets of a membrane bilayer is a controlled feature of membrane structure. One of the two membrane catalytic activities governing this distribution randomizes the composition of the two leaflets—the phospholipid scramblases. Two proteins (Xkr8 and TMEM16F) required for the activation of these activities have been identified. One of these proteins (TMEM16F) is quite clearly a scramblase itself and provides insight into the mechanism by which transbilayer phospholipid movement is facilitated. PMID:26843813

  5. Gene regulation of lipid and phospholipid metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Keshuai; Østensen, Mari-Ann; Attramadal, Kari; Winge, Per; Sparstad, Torfinn; Bones, Atle M; Vadstein, Olav; Kjørsvik, Elin; Olsen, Yngvar

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of essentiality of dietary phospholipid (PL) for larval fish is not clear. The main objective of the present study was to determine if the PL requirement of Atlantic cod larvae was due to any genetic impairment caused by functional immaturity. Cod larvae were sampled at 1, 3, 8, 13, 17, 18, 30, 42 and 60 days post hatch (dph) for transcriptome analysis using a recently developed microarray. The fatty acid profile and gene expression levels of cod larvae at 17 dph were compared after feeding differently enriched rotifers, which contained different DHA levels in PL. No significant differences (p<0.05) were found for the two rotifer diets in the overall gene expression level of cod larvae, their growth and survival, and their DHA levels in total lipid and PL fraction. The fatty acid data suggested that dietary EPA was elongated to DPA by cod larvae, and a threshold DHA level in PL to maintain membrane fluidity and other functions may exist. There appeared to be no major effect of development on the expression of key genes of PL biosynthesis suggesting no genetic constrain in early developmental stages. Our overall data suggested that besides the possible limited de novo PC synthesis ability in the intestine, other metabolic constraints should also be considered, especially the possible low input of bile PC as a result of immature liver. Further studies are needed to elucidate the gene expression level and enzyme activity in the PL biosynthesis pathways for specific tissue or cells. PMID:26310360

  6. Dynamic phospholipid interaction of β2e subunit regulates the gating of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Il; Park, Yongsoo; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2015-01-01

    High voltage-activated Ca2+ (CaV) channels are protein complexes containing pore-forming α1 and auxiliary β and α2δ subunits. The subcellular localization and membrane interactions of the β subunits play a crucial role in regulating CaV channel inactivation and its lipid sensitivity. Here, we investigated the effects of membrane phosphoinositide (PI) turnover on CaV2.2 channel function. The β2 isoform β2e associates with the membrane through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Using chimeric β subunits and liposome-binding assays, we determined that interaction between the N-terminal 23 amino acids of β2e and anionic phospholipids was sufficient for β2e membrane targeting. Binding of the β2e subunit N terminus to liposomes was significantly increased by inclusion of 1% phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in the liposomes, suggesting that, in addition to phosphatidylserine, PIs are responsible for β2e targeting to the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the β2e subunit slowed CaV2.2 current inactivation. When membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and PIP2 were depleted by rapamycin-induced translocation of pseudojanin to the membrane, however, channel opening was decreased and fast inactivation of CaV2.2(β2e) currents was enhanced. Activation of the M1 muscarinic receptor elicited transient and reversible translocation of β2e subunits from membrane to cytosol, but not that of β2a or β3, resulting in fast inactivation of CaV2.2 channels with β2e. These results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit, which is mediated by nonspecific electrostatic insertion, is dynamically regulated by receptor stimulation, and that the reversible association of β2e with membrane PIs results in functional changes in CaV channel gating. The phospholipid–protein interaction observed here provides structural insight into mechanisms of membrane–protein association and the role of phospholipids in ion channel regulation. PMID

  7. Microfluidic shear stress-regulated surfactant secretion in alveolar epithelial type II cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mahto, Sanjeev Kumar; Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Greenblum, Ayala; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the role of flow-induced shear stress on the mechanisms regulating surfactant secretion in type II alveolar epithelial cells (ATII) using microfluidic models. Following flow stimulation spanning a range of wall shear stress (WSS) magnitudes, monolayers of ATII (MLE-12 and A549) cells were examined for surfactant secretion by evaluating essential steps of the process, including relative changes in the number of fusion events of lamellar bodies (LBs) with the plasma membrane (PM) and intracellular redistribution of LBs. F-actin cytoskeleton and calcium levels were analyzed in A549 cells subjected to WSS spanning 4-20 dyn/cm(2). Results reveal an enhancement in LB fusion events with the PM in MLE-12 cells upon flow stimulation, whereas A549 cells exhibit no foreseeable changes in the monitored number of fusion events for WSS levels ranging up to a threshold of ∼8 dyn/cm(2); above this threshold, we witness instead a decrease in LB fusion events in A549 cells. However, patterns of LB redistribution suggest that WSS can potentially serve as a stimulus for A549 cells to trigger the intracellular transport of LBs toward the cell periphery. This observation is accompanied by a fragmentation of F-actin, indicating that disorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton might act as a limiting factor for LB fusion events. Moreover, we note a rise in cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) levels following stimulation of A549 cells with WSS magnitudes ranging near or above the experimental threshold. Overall, WSS stimulation can influence key components of molecular machinery for regulated surfactant secretion in ATII cells in vitro. PMID:24487389

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates expression of surfactant protein in alveolar type II cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Ahmad, Aftab; Kewley, Emily; Mason, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Alveolar type II (ATII) cells cultured at an air-liquid (A/L) interface maintain differentiation, but they lose these properties when they are submerged. Others showed that an oxygen tension gradient develops in the culture medium as ATII cells consume oxygen. Therefore, we wondered whether hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling could explain differences in the phenotypes of ATII cells cultured under A/L interface or submerged conditions. ATII cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured on inserts coated with a mixture of rat-tail collagen and Matrigel, in medium including 5% rat serum and 10 ng/ml keratinocyte growth factor, with their apical surfaces either exposed to air or submerged. The A/L interface condition maintained the expression of surfactant proteins, whereas that expression was down-regulated under the submerged condition, and the effect was rapid and reversible. Under submerged conditions, there was an increase in HIF1α and HIF2α in nuclear extracts, mRNA levels of HIF inducible genes, vascular endothelial growth factor, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), and the protein level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme-1. The expression of surfactant proteins was suppressed and GLUT1 mRNA levels were induced when cells were cultured with 1 mM dimethyloxalyl glycine. The expression of surfactant proteins was restored under submerged conditions with supplemented 60% oxygen. HIF signaling and oxygen tension at the surface of cells appears to be important in regulating the phenotype of rat ATII cells. PMID:21454802

  9. A Surfactant-Induced Functional Modulation of a Global Virulence Regulator from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Anindya; Jana, Biswanath; Polley, Soumitra; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Triton X-100 (TX-100), a useful non-ionic surfactant, reduced the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus significantly. Many S. aureus proteins were expressed in the presence of TX-100. SarA, one of the TX-100-induced proteins, acts as a global virulence regulator in S. aureus. To understand the effects of TX-100 on the structure, and function of SarA, a recombinant S. aureus SarA (rSarA) and its derivative (C9W) have been investigated in the presence of varying concentrations of this surfactant using various probes. Our data have revealed that both rSarA and C9W bind to the cognate DNA with nearly similar affinity in the absence of TX-100. Interestingly, their DNA binding activities have been significantly increased in the presence of pre-micellar concentration of TX-100. The increase of TX-100 concentrations to micellar or post-micellar concentration did not greatly enhance their activities further. TX-100 molecules have altered the secondary and tertiary structures of both proteins to some extents. Size of the rSarA-TX-100 complex appears to be intermediate to those of rSarA and TX-100. Additional analyses show a relatively moderate interaction between C9W and TX-100. Binding of TX-100 to C9W has, however, occurred by a cooperative pathway particularly at micellar and higher concentrations of this surfactant. Taken together, TX-100-induced structural alteration of rSarA and C9W might be responsible for their increased DNA binding activity. As TX-100 has stabilized the somewhat weaker SarA-DNA complex effectively, it could be used to study its structure in the future. PMID:26989900

  10. A Surfactant-Induced Functional Modulation of a Global Virulence Regulator from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sukhendu; Mahapa, Avisek; Biswas, Anindya; Jana, Biswanath; Polley, Soumitra; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Triton X-100 (TX-100), a useful non-ionic surfactant, reduced the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus significantly. Many S. aureus proteins were expressed in the presence of TX-100. SarA, one of the TX-100-induced proteins, acts as a global virulence regulator in S. aureus. To understand the effects of TX-100 on the structure, and function of SarA, a recombinant S. aureus SarA (rSarA) and its derivative (C9W) have been investigated in the presence of varying concentrations of this surfactant using various probes. Our data have revealed that both rSarA and C9W bind to the cognate DNA with nearly similar affinity in the absence of TX-100. Interestingly, their DNA binding activities have been significantly increased in the presence of pre-micellar concentration of TX-100. The increase of TX-100 concentrations to micellar or post-micellar concentration did not greatly enhance their activities further. TX-100 molecules have altered the secondary and tertiary structures of both proteins to some extents. Size of the rSarA-TX-100 complex appears to be intermediate to those of rSarA and TX-100. Additional analyses show a relatively moderate interaction between C9W and TX-100. Binding of TX-100 to C9W has, however, occurred by a cooperative pathway particularly at micellar and higher concentrations of this surfactant. Taken together, TX-100-induced structural alteration of rSarA and C9W might be responsible for their increased DNA binding activity. As TX-100 has stabilized the somewhat weaker SarA-DNA complex effectively, it could be used to study its structure in the future. PMID:26989900

  11. Regulation of gene expression through a transcriptional repressor that senses acyl-chain length in membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Harald F; Schopf, Florian H; Schleifer, Hannes; Knittelfelder, Oskar L; Pieber, Bartholomäus; Rechberger, Gerald N; Wolinski, Heimo; Gaspar, Maria L; Kappe, C Oliver; Stadlmann, Johannes; Mechtler, Karl; Zenz, Alexandra; Lohner, Karl; Tehlivets, Oksana; Henry, Susan A; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2014-06-23

    Membrane phospholipids typically contain fatty acids (FAs) of 16 and 18 carbon atoms. This particular chain length is evolutionarily highly conserved and presumably provides maximum stability and dynamic properties to biological membranes in response to nutritional or environmental cues. Here, we show that the relative proportion of C16 versus C18 FAs is regulated by the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of FA de novo synthesis. Acc1 activity is attenuated by AMPK/Snf1-dependent phosphorylation, which is required to maintain an appropriate acyl-chain length distribution. Moreover, we find that the transcriptional repressor Opi1 preferentially binds to C16 over C18 phosphatidic acid (PA) species: thus, C16-chain containing PA sequesters Opi1 more effectively to the ER, enabling AMPK/Snf1 control of PA acyl-chain length to determine the degree of derepression of Opi1 target genes. These findings reveal an unexpected regulatory link between the major energy-sensing kinase, membrane lipid composition, and transcription. PMID:24960695

  12. Characterization of sorbitan surfactant-based vesicles at the molecular scale using NMR: Effect of acyl chain length vs. phospholipid composition.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keita; Iwai, Hideka; Kamei, Toshiyuki; Kato, Ayako; Murata, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hidemi; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We focused on the characterization of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface of the membrane of vesicles prepared with various sorbitan surfactants using two evaluation methods: Laurdan fluorescence intensity (GP(340) value) and NMR analysis (half linewidth). Laurdan fluorescence intensity analysis, used to evaluate the hydrophobicity of the interior of the vesicular membrane, indicated a similarity between Span vesicles and liposomes in terms of hydrophobicity, while NMR analysis, used to assess the mobility of lipid molecules, indicated a large difference between Span vesicles and liposomes in terms of molecular mobility at the interface. These results suggest that the physicochemical properties of Span vesicles and liposomes are roughly similar at the "meso-scale" but not completely similar at the "molecular scale." PMID:27062214

  13. Roles of Sterol Derivatives in Regulating the Properties of Phospholipid Bilayer Systems.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tham Thi; Suga, Keishi; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Liposomes are considered an ideal biomimetic environment and are potential functional carriers for important molecules such as steroids and sterols. With respect to the regulation of self-assembly via sterol insertion, several pathways such as the sterol biosynthesis pathway are affected by the physicochemical properties of the membranes. However, the behavior of steroid or sterol molecules (except cholesterol (Chl)) in the self-assembled membranes has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, to analyze the fundamental behavior of steroid molecules in fluid membranes, Chl, lanosterol, and ergosterol were used as representative sterols in order to clarify how they regulate the physicochemical properties of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes. Membrane properties such as surface membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, surface membrane polarity, inner membrane polarity, and inner membrane fluidity were investigated using fluorescent probes, including 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylamino) naphthalene, 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene, and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. The results indicated that each sterol derivative could regulate the membrane properties in different ways. Specifically, Chl successfully increased the packing of the DOPC/Chl membrane proportional to its concentration, and lanosterol and ergosterol showed lower efficiencies in ordering the membrane in hydrophobic regions. Given the different binding positions of the probes in the membranes, the differences in membrane properties reflected the relationship between sterol derivatives and their locations in the membrane. PMID:27158923

  14. Subcellular localization of yeast Sec14 homologues and their involvement in regulation of phospholipid turnover.

    PubMed

    Schnabl, Martina; Oskolkova, Olga V; Holic, Roman; Brezná, Barbara; Pichler, Harald; Zágorsek, Milos; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Paltauf, Fritz; Daum, Günther; Griac, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Sec14p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in protein secretion and regulation of lipid synthesis and turnover in vivo, but acts as a phosphatidylinositol-phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in vitro. In this work, the five homologues of Sec14p, Sfh1p-Sfh5p, were subjected to biochemical and cell biological analysis to get a better view of their physiological role. We show that overexpression of SFH2 and SFH4 suppressed the sec14 growth defect in a more and SFH1 in a less efficient way, whereas overexpression of SFH3 and SFH5 did not complement sec14. Using C-terminal yEGFP fusions, Sfh2p, Sfh4p and Sfh5p are mainly localized to the cytosol and microsomes similar to Sec14p. Sfh1p was detected in the nucleus and Sfh3p in lipid particles and in microsomes. In contrast to Sec14p, which inhibits phospholipase D1 (Pld1p), overproduction of Sfh2p and Sfh4p resulted in the activation of Pld1p-mediated phosphatidylcholine turnover. Interestingly, Sec14p and the two homologues Sfh2p and Sfh4p downregulate phospholipase B1 (Plb1p)-mediated turnover of phosphatidylcholine in vivo. In summary, Sfh2p and Sfh4p are the Sec14p homologues with the most pronounced functional similarity to Sec14p, whereas the other Sfh proteins appear to be functionally less related to Sec14p. PMID:12869188

  15. Genetic Evidence for Phospholipid-Mediated Regulation of the Rab GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Kuno, Takayoshi; Kita, Ayako; Nabata, Toshiya; Uno, Satoshi; Sugiura, Reiko

    2006-01-01

    We have previously identified mutant alleles of genes encoding two Rab proteins, Ypt3 and Ryh1, through a genetic screen using the immunosuppressant drug FK506 in fission yeast. In the same screen, we isolated gdi1-i11, a mutant allele of the essential gdi1+ gene encoding Rab GDP-dissociation inhibitor. In gdi1-i11, a conserved Gly267 was substituted by Asp. The Gdi1G267D protein failed to extract Rabs from membrane and Rabs were depleted from the cytosolic fraction in the gdi1-i11 mutant cells. Consistently, the Gdi1G267D protein was found mostly in the membrane fraction, whereas wild-type Gdi1 was found in both the cytosolic and the membrane fraction. Notably, overexpression of spo20+, encoding a phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, rescued gdi1-i11 mutation, but not ypt3-i5 or ryh1-i6. The gdi1-i11 and spo20-KC104 mutations are synthetically lethal, and the wild-type Gdi1 failed to extract Rabs from the membrane in the spo20-KC104 mutant. The phosphatidylinositol-transfer activity of Spo20 is dispensable for the suppression of the gdi1-i11 mutation, suggesting that the phosphatidylcholine-transfer activity is important for the suppression. Furthermore, knockout of the pct1+ gene encoding a choline phosphate cytidyltransferase rescued the gdi1-i11 mutation. Together, our findings suggest that Spo20 modulates Gdi1 function via regulation of phospholipid metabolism of the membranes. PMID:16980382

  16. Differential Regulation of Proton-Sensitive Ion Channels by Phospholipids: A Comparative Study between ASICs and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Hae-Jin; Yu, Soo-Young; Kim, Dong-Il; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Protons are released in pain-generating pathological conditions such as inflammation, ischemic stroke, infection, and cancer. During normal synaptic activities, protons are thought to play a role in neurotransmission processes. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are typical proton sensors in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In addition to ASICs, capsaicin- and heat-activated transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels can also mediate proton-mediated pain signaling. In spite of their importance in perception of pH fluctuations, the regulatory mechanisms of these proton-sensitive ion channels still need to be further investigated. Here, we compared regulation of ASICs and TRPV1 by membrane phosphoinositides, which are general cofactors of many receptors and ion channels. We observed that ASICs do not require membrane phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) or phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) for their function. However, TRPV1 currents were inhibited by simultaneous breakdown of PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. By using a novel chimeric protein, CF-PTEN, that can specifically dephosphorylate at the D3 position of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3), we also observed that neither ASICs nor TRPV1 activities were altered by depletion of PI(3,4,5)P3 in intact cells. Finally, we compared the effects of arachidonic acid (AA) on two proton-sensitive ion channels. We observed that AA potentiates the currents of both ASICs and TRPV1, but that they have different recovery aspects. In conclusion, ASICs and TRPV1 have different sensitivities toward membrane phospholipids, such as PI(4)P, PI(4,5)P2, and AA, although they have common roles as proton sensors. Further investigation about the complementary roles and respective contributions of ASICs and TRPV1 in proton-mediated signaling is necessary. PMID:25781982

  17. Regulation of translation by upstream translation initiation codons of surfactant protein A1 splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Silveyra, Patricia; Lin, Zhenwu; Thomas, Neal; Vaid, Mudit

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), a molecule with roles in lung innate immunity and surfactant-related functions, is encoded by two genes in humans: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The mRNAs from these genes differ in their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR) due to differential splicing. The 5′-UTR variant ACD′ is exclusively found in transcripts of SP-A1, but not in those of SP-A2. Its unique exon C contains two upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) that may affect SP-A1 translation efficiency. The first uAUG (u1) is in frame with the primary start codon (p), but the second one (u2) is not. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of uAUGs on SP-A1 expression. We employed RT-qPCR to determine the presence of exon C-containing SP-A1 transcripts in human RNA samples. We also used in vitro techniques including mutagenesis, reporter assays, and toeprinting analysis, as well as in silico analyses to determine the role of uAUGs. Exon C-containing mRNA is present in most human lung tissue samples and its expression can, under certain conditions, be regulated by factors such as dexamethasone or endotoxin. Mutating uAUGs resulted in increased luciferase activity. The mature protein size was not affected by the uAUGs, as shown by a combination of toeprint and in silico analysis for Kozak sequence, secondary structure, and signal peptide and in vitro translation in the presence of microsomes. In conclusion, alternative splicing may introduce uAUGs in SP-A1 transcripts, which in turn negatively affect SP-A1 translation, possibly affecting SP-A1/SP-A2 ratio, with potential for clinical implication. PMID:25326576

  18. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. PMID:25416794

  19. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose surfactants both in droplets and mixed in excipients significantly reduced the contact angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets. PMID:26837184

  20. Purifying selection drives the evolution of surfactant protein C (SP-C) independently of body temperature regulation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Potter, Sally; Orgeig, Sandra; Donnellan, Stephen; Daniels, Christopher B

    2007-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant system of heterothermic mammals must be capable of dealing with the effect of low body temperatures on the physical state of the lipid components. We have shown previously that there is a modest increase in surfactant cholesterol during periods of torpor, however these changes do not fully explain the capacity of surfactant to function under the wide range of physical conditions imposed by torpor. Here we examine indirectly the role of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in adapting to variable body temperatures by testing for the presence of positive (adaptive) selection during evolutionary transitions between heterothermy and homeothermy. We sequenced SP-C from genomic DNA of 32 mammalian species from groups of closely related heterothermic and homeothermic species (contrasts). We used phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood estimates of rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions and fully Bayesian inference of these sequences to determine whether the mode of body temperature regulation exerts a selection pressure driving the molecular adaptation of SP-C. The protein sequence of SP-C is highly conserved with synonymous or highly conservative amino acid substitutions being predominant. The evolution of SP-C among mammals is characterised by high codon usage bias and high rates of transition/transversion. The only contrast to show evidence of positive selection was that of the bears (Ursus americanus and U. maritimus). The significance of this result is unclear. We show that SP-C is under strong evolutionary constraints, driven by purifying selection, presumably to maintain protein function despite variation in the mode of body temperature regulation. PMID:20483290

  1. Regulation of pulmonary surfactant secretion in the developing lizard, Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Orgeig, Sandra; Daniels, Christopher B

    2002-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixture of lipids and proteins that is secreted by alveolar type II cells in the lungs of all air-breathing vertebrates. Pulmonary surfactant functions to reduce the surface tension in the lungs and, therefore, reduce the work of breathing. In mammals, the embryonic maturation of the surfactant system is controlled by a host of factors, including glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones and autonomic neurotransmitters. We have used a co-culture system of embryonic type II cells and lung fibroblasts to investigate the ability of dexamethasone, tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), adrenaline and carbamylcholine (carbachol) to stimulate the cellular secretion of phosphatidylcholine in the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) at day 55 (approx. 92%) of incubation and following hatching. Adrenaline stimulated surfactant secretion both before and after hatching, whereas carbachol stimulated secretion only at day 55. Glucocorticoids and triiodothyronine together stimulated secretion at day 55 but did not after hatching. Therefore, adrenaline, carbachol, dexamethasone and T(3), are all involved in the development of the surfactant system in the bearded dragon. However, the efficacy of the hormones is attenuated during the developmental process. These differences probably relate to the changes in the cellular environment during development and the specific biology of the bearded dragon. PMID:12443912

  2. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B mRNA stability involves the 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helen W; Bi, Weizhen; Jenkins, Gaye N; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2008-04-01

    Expression of pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that acts to reduce alveolar surface tension, is developmentally regulated and restricted to lung alveolar type II cells. The hydrophobic protein surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is essential in surfactant function, and insufficient levels of SP-B result in severe respiratory dysfunction. Glucocorticoids accelerate fetal lung maturity and surfactant synthesis both experimentally and clinically. Glucocorticoids act transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally to increase steady-state levels of human SP-B mRNA; however, the mechanism(s) by which glucocorticoids act post-transcriptionally is unknown. We hypothesized that glucocorticoids act post-transcriptionally to increase SP-B mRNA stability via sequence-specific mRNA-protein interactions. We found that glucocorticoids increase SP-B mRNA stability in isolated human type II cells and in nonpulmonary cells, but do not alter mouse SP-B mRNA stability in a mouse type II cell line. Deletion analysis of an artificially-expressed SP-B mRNA indicates that the SP-B mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR) is necessary for stabilization, and the region involved can be restricted to a 126-nucleotide-long region near the SP-B coding sequence. RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that cytosolic proteins bind to this region in the absence or presence of glucocorticoids. The formation of mRNA:protein complexes is not seen in other regions of the SP-B mRNA 3'-UTR. These results indicate that a specific 126-nucleotide region of human SP-B 3'-UTR is necessary for increased SP-B mRNA stability by glucocorticoids by a mechanism that is not lung cell specific and may involve mRNA-protein interactions. PMID:18006875

  3. Formation of oil-in-water emulsions from natural emulsifiers using spontaneous emulsification: sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-18

    This study examined the possibility of producing oil-in-water emulsions using a natural surfactant (sunflower phospholipids) and a low-energy method (spontaneous emulsification). Spontaneous emulsification was carried out by titrating an organic phase (oil and phospholipid) into an aqueous phase with continuous stirring. The influence of phospholipid composition, surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), initial phospholipids location, storage time, phospholipid type, and preparation method was tested. The initial droplet size depended on the nature of the phospholipid used, which was attributed to differences in phospholipid composition. Droplet size decreased with increasing SOR and was smallest when the phospholipid was fully dissolved in the organic phase rather than the aqueous phase. The droplets formed using spontaneous emulsification were relatively large (d > 10 μm), and so the emulsions were unstable to gravitational separation. At low SORs (0.1 and 0.5), emulsions produced with phospholipids had a smaller particle diameter than those produced with a synthetic surfactant (Tween 80), but at a higher SOR (1.0), this trend was reversed. High-energy methods (microfluidization and sonication) formed significantly smaller droplets (d < 10 μm) than spontaneous emulsification. The results from this study show that low-energy methods could be utilized with natural surfactants for applications for which fine droplets are not essential. PMID:26528859

  4. Phospholipid transport via mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yasushi; Sesaki, Hiromi; Endo, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, complex membrane structures called organelles are highly developed to exert specialized functions. Mitochondria are one of such organelles consisting of the outer and inner membranes with characteristic protein and phospholipid compositions. Maintaining proper phospholipid compositions of the membranes is crucial for mitochondrial integrity, thereby contributing to normal cell activities. Since cellular locations for phospholipid synthesis are restricted to specific compartments such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and the mitochondrial inner membrane, newly synthesized phospholipids have to be transported and distributed properly from the ER or mitochondria to other cellular membranes. Although understanding of molecular mechanisms of phospholipid transport are much behind those of protein transport, recent studies using yeast as a model system began to provide intriguing insights into phospholipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria as well as between the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes. In this review, we summarize the latest findings of phospholipid transport via mitochondria and discuss the implicated molecular mechanisms. PMID:24954234

  5. A role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ling; Wang, Miao; Martin, Ola J; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Han, Xianlin; Kelly, Daniel P

    2014-01-24

    The energy demands of the adult mammalian heart are met largely by ATP generated via oxidation of fatty acids in a high capacity mitochondrial system. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1)-α and -β serve as inducible transcriptional coregulators of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. Whether PGC-1 plays a role in the regulation of mitochondrial structure is unknown. In this study, mice with combined deficiency of PGC-1α and PGC-1β (PGC-1αβ(-/-)) in adult heart were analyzed. PGC-1αβ(-/-) hearts exhibited a distinctive mitochondrial cristae-stacking abnormality suggestive of a phospholipid abnormality as has been described in humans with genetic defects in cardiolipin (CL) synthesis (Barth syndrome). A subset of molecular species, containing n-3 polyunsaturated species in the CL, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine profiles, was reduced in PGC-1αβ-deficient hearts. Gene expression profiling of PGC-1αβ(-/-) hearts revealed reduced expression of the gene encoding CDP-diacylglycerol synthase 1 (Cds1), an enzyme that catalyzes the proximal step in CL biosynthesis. Cds1 gene promoter-reporter cotransfection experiments and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that PGC-1α coregulates estrogen-related receptors to activate the transcription of the Cds1 gene. We conclude that the PGC-1/estrogen-related receptor axis coordinately regulates metabolic and membrane structural programs relevant to the maintenance of high capacity mitochondrial function in heart. PMID:24337569

  6. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  7. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  8. Proteomic analysis reveals down-regulation of surfactant protein B in murine type II pneumocytes infected with influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Kebaabetswe, Lemme P.; Haick, Anoria K.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Matzke, Melissa M.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Miura, Tanya A.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of type II alveolar epithelial (ATII) cells by influenza A viruses (IAV) correlates with severe respiratory disease in humans and mice. To understand pathogenic mechanisms during IAV infection of ATII cells, murine ATII cells were cultured to maintain a differentiated phenotype, infected with IAV-PR8, which causes severe lung pathology in mice, and proteomics analyses were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PR8 infection increased levels of proteins involved in interferon signaling, antigen presentation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Proteins involved in mitochondrial membrane permeability, energy metabolism, and chromatin formation had reduced levels in PR8-infected cells. Phenotypic markers of ATII cells in vivo were identified, confirming the differentiation status of the cultures. Surfactant protein B had decreased levels in PR8-infected cells, which was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Analysis of ATII cell protein profiles will elucidate cellular processes in IAV pathogenesis, which may provide insight into potential therapies to modulate disease severity. PMID:25965799

  9. Surfactant protein B deficiency: insights into surfactant function through clinical surfactant protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M W

    2001-01-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) deficiency is a disorder of surfactant function with complete or transient absence of SP-B in term neonates. SP-B, 1 of 4 described surfactant-associated proteins, plays a key role in surfactant metabolism, particularly in intracellular packaging of surfactant components, formation of tubular myelin, and the presentation of the surfactant phospholipid monolayer to the air-fluid interface within the alveolus. Neonates with clinical SP-B deficiency best demonstrate the key role of SP-B in surfactant function. "Classic" deficiency results in severe respiratory failure in term infants and death unless lung transplantation is performed. Because the initial description of complete deficiency secondary to a homozygous frameshift mutation in codon 121 of the SP-B cDNA, partial deficiencies with differing genetic backgrounds and less severe clinical courses have been reported. These partial deficiency states may provide a clearer picture of genotype/phenotype relationships in SP-B function and surfactant metabolism. SP-B deficiency or dysfunction may be more common than once thought and may play a significant role in neonatal lung disease. PMID:11202476

  10. Glucocorticoids regulate surfactant protein synthesis in a pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, M.A.; Gazdar, A.F.; Clark, J.C.; Pilot-Matias, T.J.; Wert, S.E.; Hull, W.M.; Whitsett, J.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Synthesis of pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C was demonstrated in a cell line derived from a human adenocarcinoma of the lung. The cells contained numerous lamellar inclusion bodies and formed organized groups of cells containing well-developed junctional complexes and apical microvillous membranes. Synthesis of SP-A was detected in the cells by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and by immunoprecipitation of (35S)methionine-labeled protein. SP-A was identified as an Mr 31,000-36,000 polypeptide containing asparagine-linked carbohydrate. Northern blot analysis detected SP-A mRNA of 2.2 kb. Dexamethasone (1-10 nM) enhanced the relative abundance of SP-A mRNA. Despite stimulation of SP-A mRNA, intracellular SP-A content was unaltered or inhibited by dexamethasone. SP-B and SP-C mRNAs and synthesis of the SP-B and SP-C precursors were markedly induced by dexamethasone. ProSP-B was synthesized and secreted primarily as an Mr 42,000-46,000 polypeptide. Proteolysis of the proSP-B resulted in the generation of endoglycosidase F-sensitive Mr = 19,000-21,000 and 25,000-27,000 peptides, which were detected both intra- and extracellularly. SP-C proprotein of Mr = 22,000 and smaller SP-C fragments were detected intracellularly but were not detected in the media. Mature forms of SP-B (Mr = 8,000) and SP-C (Mr = 4,000) were not detected. Glucocorticoids directly enhance the relative synthesis and mRNA of the surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C. Discrepancies among SP-A mRNA, its de novo synthesis, and cell content suggest that glucocorticoid may alter both pre- and posttranslational factors modulating SP-A expression.

  11. Functional Anatomy of Phospholipid Binding And Regulation of Phosphoinositide Homeostasis By Proteins of the Sec14 Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, G.; Ortlund, E.A.; Tyeryar, K.R.; Mousley, C.J.; Ile, K.E.; Garrett, T.A.; Ren, J.; Woolls, M.J.; Raetz, C.R.H.; Redinbo, M.R.; Bankaitis, V.A.

    2009-05-27

    Sec14, the major yeast phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein, regulates essential interfaces between lipid metabolism and membrane trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). How Sec14 does so remains unclear. We report that Sec14 binds PtdIns and PtdCho at distinct (but overlapping) sites, and both PtdIns- and PtdCho-binding activities are essential Sec14 activities. We further show both activities must reside within the same molecule to reconstitute a functional Sec14 and for effective Sec14-mediated regulation of phosphoinositide homeostasis in vivo. This regulation is uncoupled from PtdIns-transfer activity and argues for an interfacial presentation mode for Sec14-mediated potentiation of PtdIns kinases. Such a regulatory role for Sec14 is a primary counter to action of the Kes1 sterol-binding protein that antagonizes PtdIns 4-OH kinase activity in vivo. Collectively, these findings outline functional mechanisms for the Sec14 superfamily and reveal additional layers of complexity for regulating phosphoinositide homeostasis in eukaryotes.

  12. Induction of intranuclear membranes by overproduction of Opi1p and Scs2p, regulators for yeast phospholipid biosynthesis, suggests a mechanism for Opi1p nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Miki; Oshima, Ayaka; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Kagiwada, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is suppressed by the Opi1p negative regulator. Opi1p enters into the nucleoplasm from the nuclear membrane to suppress the gene expression under repressing conditions. The binding of Opi1p to the nuclear membrane requires an integral membrane protein, Scs2p and phosphatidic acid (PA). Although it is demonstrated that the association of Opi1p with membranes is affected by PA levels, how Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p is unknown. Here, we found that fluorescently labelled Opi1p accumulated on a perinuclear region in an Scs2p-dependent manner. Electron microscopic analyses indicated that the perinuclear region consists of intranuclear membranes, which may be formed by the invagination of the nuclear membrane due to the accumulation of Opi1p and Scs2p in a restricted area. As expected, localization of Opi1p and Scs2p in the intranuclear membranes was detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Biochemical analysis showed that Opi1p recovered in the membrane fraction was detergent insoluble while Scs2p was soluble, implying that Opi1p behaves differently from Scs2p in the fraction. We hypothesize that Opi1p dissociates from Scs2p after targeting to the nuclear membrane, making it possible to be released from the membrane quickly when PA levels decrease. PMID:26590299

  13. Developmental regulation of chicken surfactant protein A and its localization in lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Skjødt, Karsten; Hansen, Søren; Haagsman, Henk P; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2016-08-01

    Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) is a collagenous C-type lectin (collectin) that plays an important role in the early stage of the host immune response. In chicken, SP-A (cSP-A) is expressed as a 26 kDa glycosylated protein in the lung. Using immunohistochemistry, cSP-A protein was detected mainly in the lung lining fluid covering the parabronchial epithelia. Specific cSP-A producing epithelial cells, resembling mammalian type II cells, were identified in the parabronchi. Gene expression of cSP-A markedly increased from embryonic day 14 onwards until the time of hatch, comparable to the SP-A homologue chicken lung lectin, while mannan binding lectin and collectins CL-L1 and CL-K1 only showed slightly changed expression during development. cSP-A protein could be detected as early as ED 18 in lung tissue using Western blotting, and expression increased steadily until day 28 post-hatch. Our observations are a first step towards understanding the role of this protein in vivo. PMID:26976230

  14. Autophagy regulates hyperoxia-induced intracellular accumulation of surfactant protein C in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Shuang; Yuan, Li-Jie; Wu, Hong-Min; Jiang, Hong; Zhao, Shi-Meng; Luo, Gang; Xue, Xin-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) deficiency is a risk factor for hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia in newborn infants. However, the role of SP-C deficiency in the process is unclear. Here, using neonatal rat BPD model and MLE-12, mouse alveolar epithelial type II cell, we examined the changes of SP-C levels during hyperoxia. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and ELISA analysis showed SP-C accumulation in alveolar epithelial type II cells. Electron microscopy further demonstrated the accumulation of lamellar bodies and the co-localization of lamellar bodies with autophagosomes in the cytoplasm of alveolar epithelial type II cells. The inhibition of autophagy with 3-Methyladenine and knockdown of Atg7 abolished hyperoxia-induced SP-C accumulation in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, inhibition of JNK signaling with SP600125 suppressed hyperoxia-induced Atg7 expression and SP-C accumulation. These findings suggest that hyperoxia triggers autophagy via JNK signaling-mediated Atg7 expression, which promotes the accumulation of SP-C within alveolar epithelial type II cells. Our data provide a potential approach for hyperoxic lung injury therapy by targeted pharmacological inhibition of autophagic pathway. PMID:26122393

  15. Lysophospholipid generation and phosphatidylglycerol depletion in phospholipase A(2)-mediated surfactant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hite, R Duncan; Seeds, Michael C; Safta, Anca M; Jacinto, Randolph B; Gyves, Julianna I; Bass, David A; Waite, B Moseley

    2005-04-01

    Pulmonary surfactant's complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins reduces the work of breathing by lowering alveolar surface tension during respiration. One mechanism of surfactant damage appears to be the hydrolysis of phospholipid by phospholipases activated in the inflamed lung. Humans have several candidate secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) enzymes in lung cells and infiltrating leukocytes that could damage extracellular surfactant. We considered two mechanisms of surfactant disruption by five human sPLA(2)s, including generation of lysophospholipids and the depletion of specific phospholipids. All five sPLA(2)s studied ultimately caused surfactant dysfunction. Each enzyme exhibited a different pattern of hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids. Phosphatidylcholine, the major phospholipid in surfactant and the greatest potential source for generation of lysophospholipids, was susceptible to hydrolysis by group IB, group V, and group X sPLA(2)s, but not group IIA or IID. Group IIA hydrolyzed both phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol, whereas group IID was active against only phosphatidylglycerol. Thus, with groups IB and X, the generation of lysophospholipids corresponded with surfactant dysfunction. However, hydrolysis of and depletion of phosphatidylglycerol had a greater correlation with surfactant dysfunction for groups IIA and IID. Surfactant dysfunction caused by group V sPLA(2) is less clear and may be the combined result of both mechanisms. PMID:15516491

  16. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14 P75L mutant. The ttd14 P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14 P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  17. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Alexander C; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14P75L mutant. The ttd14P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  18. Surfactant and its role in the pathobiology of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Jennifer R; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex surface-active substance comprised of key phospholipids and proteins that has many essential functions. Surfactant's unique composition is integrally related to its surface-active properties, its critical role in host defense, and emerging immunomodulatory activities ascribed to surfactant lipids. Together these effector functions provide for lung stability and protection from a barrage of potentially virulent infectious pathogens. PMID:21945366

  19. Cholesterol-mediated surfactant dysfunction is mitigated by surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Hiansen, Joshua Qua; Keating, Eleonora; Aspros, Alex; Yao, Li-Juan; Bosma, Karen J; Yamashita, Cory M; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-03-01

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce surface tension at the alveolar surface is impaired in various lung diseases. Recent animal studies indicate that elevated levels of cholesterol within surfactant may contribute to its inhibition. It was hypothesized that elevated cholesterol levels within surfactant inhibit human surfactant biophysical function and that these effects can be reversed by surfactant protein A (SP-A). The initial experiment examined the function of surfactant from mechanically ventilated trauma patients in the presence and absence of a cholesterol sequestering agent, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. The results demonstrated improved surface activity when cholesterol was sequestered in vitro using a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). These results were explored further by reconstitution of surfactant with various concentrations of cholesterol with and without SP-A, and testing of the functionality of these samples in vitro with the CBS and in vivo using surfactant depleted rats. Overall, the results consistently demonstrated that surfactant function was inhibited by levels of cholesterol of 10% (w/w phospholipid) but this inhibition was mitigated by the presence of SP-A. It is concluded that cholesterol-induced surfactant inhibition can actively contribute to physiological impairment of the lungs in mechanically ventilated patients and that SP-A levels may be important to maintain surfactant function in the presence of high cholesterol within surfactant. PMID:25522687

  20. Phospholipid decoration of microcapsules containing perfluorooctyl bromide used as ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Díaz-López, Raquel; Tsapis, Nicolas; Libong, Danielle; Chaminade, Pierre; Connan, Carole; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Berti, Romain; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Nicolas, Valérie; Fattal, Elias

    2009-03-01

    We present here an easy method to modify the surface chemistry of polymeric microcapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). Capsules were obtained by a solvent emulsification-evaporation process with phospholipids incorporated in the organic phase before emulsification. Several phospholipids were reviewed: fluorescent, pegylated and biotinylated phospholipids. The influence of phospholipid concentration on microcapsule size and morphology was evaluated. Only a fraction of the phospholipids is associated to microcapsules, the rest being dissolved with the surfactant in the aqueous phase. Microscopy shows that phospholipids are present within the shell and that the core/shell structure is preserved up to 0.5 mg fluorescent phospholipids, up to about 0.25 mg pegylated phospholipids or biotinylated phospholipids (for 100 mg of polymer, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)). HPLC allows quantifying phospholipids associated to capsules: they correspond to 10% of pegylated phospholipids introduced in the organic phase. The presence of pegylated lipids at the surface of capsules was confirmed by X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS). The pegylation did not modify the echographic signal arising from capsules. Finally biotinylated microcapsules incubated with neutravidin tend to aggregate, which confirms the presence of biotin at the surface. These results are encouraging and future work will consist of nanocapsule surface modification for molecular imaging. PMID:19097640

  1. Conditional deletion of Abca3 in alveolar type II cells alters surfactant homeostasis in newborn and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Valérie; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Clark, Jean; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Stahlman, Mildred T.; Weaver, Timothy E.; Hunt, Alan N.; Postle, Anthony D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lipid transport protein required for synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. Abca3 was conditionally deleted in respiratory epithelial cells (Abca3Δ/Δ) in vivo. The majority of mice in which Abca3 was deleted in alveolar type II cells died shortly after birth from respiratory distress related to surfactant deficiency. Approximately 30% of the Abca3Δ/Δ mice survived after birth. Surviving Abca3Δ/Δ mice developed emphysema in the absence of significant pulmonary inflammation. Staining of lung tissue and mRNA isolated from alveolar type II cells demonstrated that ∼50% of alveolar type II cells lacked ABCA3. Phospholipid content and composition were altered in lung tissue, lamellar bodies, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice. In adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice, cells lacking ABCA3 had decreased expression of mRNAs associated with lipid synthesis and transport. FOXA2 and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein-α, transcription factors known to regulate genes regulating lung lipid metabolism, were markedly decreased in cells lacking ABCA3. Deletion of Abca3 disrupted surfactant lipid synthesis in a cell-autonomous manner. Compensatory surfactant synthesis was initiated in ABCA3-sufficient type II cells, indicating that surfactant homeostasis is a highly regulated process that includes sensing and coregulation among alveolar type II cells. PMID:20190032

  2. Looking Beyond Structure: Membrane Phospholipids of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heden, Timothy D; Neufer, P Darrell; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria are highly dynamic and are capable of tremendous expansion to meet cellular energetic demands. Such proliferation in mitochondrial mass requires a synchronized supply of enzymes and structural phospholipids. While transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial enzymes has been extensively studied, there is limited information on how mitochondrial membrane lipids are generated in skeletal muscle. Herein we describe how each class of phospholipids that constitute mitochondrial membranes are synthesized and/or imported, and summarize genetic evidence indicating that membrane phospholipid composition represents a significant modulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. We also discuss how skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids may mediate the effect of diet and exercise on oxidative metabolism. PMID:27370525

  3. Aerosol delivery of synthetic lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome due to lack of lung surfactant. If this approach fails, the next step is often intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV) and intratracheal instillation of clinical lung surfactant. Objective. To investigate whether aerosol delivery of advanced synthetic lung surfactant, consisting of peptide mimics of surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and synthetic lipids, during nCPAP improves lung function in surfactant-deficient rabbits. Methods. Experimental synthetic lung surfactants were produced by formulating 3% Super Mini-B peptide (SMB surfactant), a highly surface active SP-B mimic, and a combination of 1.5% SMB and 1.5% of the SP-C mimic SP-Css ion-lock 1 (BC surfactant), with a synthetic lipid mixture. After testing aerosol generation using a vibrating membrane nebulizer and aerosol conditioning (particle size, surfactant composition and surface activity), we investigated the effects of aerosol delivery of synthetic SMB and BC surfactant preparations on oxygenation and lung compliance in saline-lavaged, surfactant-deficient rabbits, supported with either nCPAP or MV. Results. Particle size distribution of the surfactant aerosols was within the 1–3 µm distribution range and surfactant activity was not affected by aerosolization. At a dose equivalent to clinical surfactant therapy in premature infants (100 mg/kg), aerosol delivery of both synthetic surfactant preparations led to a quick and clinically relevant improvement in oxygenation and lung compliance in the rabbits. Lung function recovered to a greater extent in rabbits supported with MV than with nCPAP. BC surfactant outperformed SMB surfactant in improving lung function and was associated with higher phospholipid values in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; these findings were irrespective of the type of ventilatory support

  4. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes. PMID:25333871

  5. Development of the pulmonary surfactant system in two oviparous vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Orgeig, S; Lopatko, O V; Daniels, C B

    2000-02-01

    In birds and oviparous reptiles, hatching is often a lengthy and exhausting process, which commences with pipping followed by lung clearance and pulmonary ventilation. We examined the composition of pulmonary surfactant in the developing lungs of the chicken, Gallus gallus, and of the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps. Lung tissue was collected from chicken embryos at days 14, 16, 18 (prepipped), and 20 (postpipped) of incubation and from 1 day and 3 wk posthatch and adult animals. In chickens, surfactant protein A mRNA was detected using Northern blot analysis in lung tissue at all stages sampled, appearing relatively earlier in development compared with placental mammals. Chickens were lavaged at days 16, 18, and 20 of incubation and 1 day posthatch, whereas bearded dragons were lavaged at day 55, days 57-60 (postpipped), and days 58-61 (posthatched). In both species, total phospholipid (PL) from the lavage increased throughout incubation. Disaturated PL (DSP) was not measurable before 16 days of incubation in the chick embryo nor before 55 days in bearded dragons. However, the percentage of DSP/PL increased markedly throughout late development in both species. Because cholesterol (Chol) remained unchanged, the Chol/PL and Chol/DSP ratios decreased in both species. Thus the Chol and PL components are differentially regulated. The lizard surfactant system develops and matures over a relatively shorter time than that of birds and mammals. This probably reflects the highly precocial nature of hatchling reptiles. PMID:10666151

  6. An overview of pulmonary surfactant in the neonate: genetics, metabolism, and the role of surfactant in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nkadi, Paul O; Merritt, T Allen; Pillers, De-Ann M

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids (PL) and proteins (SP) that reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the alveolus. It is made up of about 70-80% PL, mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 10% SP-A, B, C and D, and 10% neutral lipids, mainly cholesterol. Surfactant is synthesized, assembled, transported and secreted into the alveolus where it is degraded and then recycled. Metabolism of surfactant is slower in newborns, especially preterm, than in adults. Defective pulmonary surfactant metabolism results in respiratory distress with attendant morbidity and mortality. This occurs due to accelerated breakdown by oxidation, proteolytic degradation, inhibition or inherited defects of surfactant metabolism. Prenatal corticosteroids, surfactant replacement, whole lung lavage and lung transplantation have yielded results in managing some of these defects. Gene therapy could prove valuable in treating inherited defects of surfactant metabolism. PMID:19299177

  7. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Our research for the past two years has involved the study of phosphoinositides and their potential role in regulating plant growth and development. Our initial goal was to document the sequence of events involved in inositol phospholipid metabolism in response to external stimuli. Our working hypothesis was that phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) was in the plasma membrane of plants cells and would be hydrolyzed by phospholipase C to yield the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacyglycerol (DAG) and that IP/sub 3/ would mobilize intracellular calcium as has been shown for animal cells. Our results with both carrot suspension culture cells and sunflower hypocotyl indicate that this paradigm is not the primary mechanism of signal transduction in these systems. We have observed very rapid, within 5 sec, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase which resulted in an increase in PIP/sub 2/. However, there was no evidence for activation of phospholipase C. In addition, we have shown that PIP and PIP/sub 2/ can activate the plasma membrane ATPase. The results of these studies are described briefly in the paragraphs below. Inositol phospholipids are localized in distinct membrane fractions. If PIP and PIP/sub 2/ play a role in the transduction of external signals, they should be present in the plasma membrane. We used the fusogenic carrot suspension culture cells as a model system to study the distribution of inositol phospholipids in various membrane fractions and organelles. Cells were labeled 12 to 18 h with myo(2-/sup 3/H) inositol and the membranes were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The plasma membrane was enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/ compared to the intracellular membranes.

  8. [Stress-resistance and the condition of surfactant system and water balance in the lung of suspended rats].

    PubMed

    Bryndina, I G; Vasilieva, N N; Baranov, V M

    2013-01-01

    White male rats with the body mass of 180-220 grams were distributed into the open-field active (presumably stress-resistant) and open-field inactive (presumably stress vulnerable) groups for a 10-day experimental suspension with the purpose to evaluate the surfactant activity in bronchoalveolar lavages, total phospholipids and their fractions, and water balance in the lung. In modeled microgravity, augmented blood filling of the rat's lung increases the alveolar phospholipid content and alters the phospholipid fractional composition in the pulmonary surfactant. Ten-day suspension raises pulmonary surfactant activity to a greater extent in stress-resistant animals rather than in their stress vulnerable peers. PMID:24032163

  9. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  10. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. PMID:21439262

  11. Lung surfactants and different contributions to thin film stability.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Bhamla, M Saad; Kao, Peter; Fuller, Gerald G; Vermant, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The surfactant lining the walls of the alveoli in the lungs increases pulmonary compliance and prevents collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. In premature born infants, surfactant deficiency causes problems, and lung surfactant replacements are instilled to facilitate breathing. These pulmonary surfactants, which form complex structured fluid-fluid interfaces, need to spread with great efficiency and once in the alveolus they have to form a thin stable film. In the present work, we investigate the mechanisms affecting the stability of surfactant-laden thin films during spreading, using drainage flows from a hemispherical dome. Three commercial lung surfactant replacements Survanta, Curosurf and Infasurf, along with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), are used. The surface of the dome can be covered with human alveolar epithelial cells and experiments are conducted at the physiological temperature. Drainage is slowed down due to the presence of all the different lung surfactant replacements and therefore the thin films show enhanced stability. However, a scaling analysis combined with visualization experiments demonstrates that different mechanisms are involved. For Curosurf and Infasurf, Marangoni stresses are essential to impart stability and interfacial shear rheology does not play a role, in agreement with what is observed for simple surfactants. Survanta, which was historically the first natural surfactant used, is rheologically active. For DPPC the dilatational properties play a role. Understanding these different modes of stabilization for natural surfactants can benefit the design of effective synthetic surfactant replacements for treating infant and adult respiratory disorders. PMID:26307946

  12. Adsorption of surfactant lipids by single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse lung upon pharyngeal aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kapralov, Alexander A; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E; Kisin, Elena R; Kotchey, Gregg P; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2012-05-22

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells, and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids: phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (∼108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted "coating" whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B, and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  13. Sequences of a hairpin structure in the 3'-untranslated region mediate regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein B mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helen W; Payne, David E; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2012-05-15

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension requires adequate expression of surfactant protein B (SP-B). Dexamethasone (DEX, 10(-7) M) increases human SP-B mRNA stability by a mechanism that requires a 126-nt-long segment (the 7.6S region) of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). The objective of this study was to identify sequences in the 7.6S region that mediate regulation of SP-B mRNA stability. The 7.6S region was found to be sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilization of mRNA. Sequential substitution mutagenesis of the 7.6S region indicates that a 90-nt region is required for DEX-mediated stabilization and maintenance of intrinsic stability. In this region, one 30-nt-long element (002), predicted to form a stem-loop structure, is sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilization of mRNA and intrinsic mRNA stability. Cytosolic proteins specifically bind element 002, and binding activity is unaffected whether proteins are isolated from cells incubated in the absence or presence of DEX. While loop sequences of element 002 have no role in regulation of SP-B mRNA stability, the proximal stem sequences are required for DEX-mediated stabilization and specific binding of proteins. Mutation of the sequences that comprise the proximal or distal arm of the stem negates the destabilizing activity of element 002 on intrinsic SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that cytosolic proteins bind a single hairpin structure that mediates intrinsic and hormonal regulation of SP-B mRNA stability via mechanisms that involve sequences of the stems of the hairpin structure. PMID:22367784

  14. Surfactants in the Management of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is primarily due to decreased production of pulmonary surfactant, and it is associated with significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. Exogenous pulmonary surfactant therapy is currently the treatment of choice for RDS, as it demonstrates the best clinical and economic outcomes. Studies confirm the benefits of surfactant therapy to include reductions in mortality, pneumothorax, and pulmonary interstitial emphysema, as well as improvements in oxygenation and an increased rate of survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Phospholipids (PL) and surfactant-associated proteins (SP) play key roles in the physiological activity of surfactant. Different types of natural and synthetic surfactant preparations are currently available. To date, natural surfactants demonstrate superior outcomes compared to the synthetic surfactants, at least during the acute phase of RDS. This disparity is often attributed to biochemical differences including the presence of surfactant-associated proteins in natural products that are not found in the currently available synthetic surfactants. Comparative trials of the natural surfactants strive to establish the precise differences in clinical outcomes among the different preparations. As new surfactants become available, it is important to evaluate them relative to the known benefits of the previously existing surfactants. In order to elucidate the role of surfactant therapy in the management of RDS, it is important to review surfactant biochemistry, pharmacology, and outcomes from randomized clinical trials. PMID:23118650

  15. Nonionic surfactant vesicles for delivery of RNAi therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Paecharoenchai, Orapan; Teng, Lesheng; Yung, Bryant C; Teng, Lirong; Opanasopit, Praneet; Lee, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    RNAi is a promising potential therapeutic approach for many diseases. A major barrier to its clinical translation is the lack of efficient delivery systems for siRNA. Among nonviral vectors, nonionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) have shown a great deal of promise in terms of their efficacy and toxicity profiles. Nonionic surfactants have been shown to be a superior alternative to phospholipids in several studies. There is a large selection of surfactants with various properties that have been incorporated into niosomes. Therefore, there is great potential for innovation in terms of nisome composition. This article summarizes recent advancements in niosome technology for the delivery of siRNA. PMID:24156490

  16. Regulation of Membrane Proteins by Dietary Lipids: Effects of Cholesterol and Docosahexaenoic Acid Acyl Chain-Containing Phospholipids on Rhodopsin Stability and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael P.; Mitchell, Drake C.

    2008-01-01

    Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into vesicles consisting of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine or 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl phosphatidylcholine with and without 30 mol % cholesterol. Rhodopsin stability was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal unfolding transition temperature (Tm) of rhodopsin was scan rate-dependent, demonstrating the presence of a rate-limited component of denaturation. The activation energy of this kinetically controlled process (Ea) was determined from DSC thermograms by four separate methods. Both Tm and Ea varied with bilayer composition. Cholesterol increased the Tm both the presence and absence of docosahexaenoic acid acyl chains (DHA). In contrast, cholesterol lowered Ea in the absence of DHA, but raised Ea in the presence of 20 mol % DHA-containing phospholipid. The relative acyl chain packing order was determined from measurements of diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy decay. The Tm for thermal unfolding was inversely related to acyl chain packing order. Rhodopsin kinetic stability (Ea) was reduced in highly ordered or disordered membranes. Maximal kinetic stability was found within the range of acyl chain order found in native bovine rod outer segment disk membranes. The results demonstrate that membrane composition has distinct effects on the thermal versus kinetic stabilities of membrane proteins, and suggests that a balance between membrane constituents with opposite effects on acyl chain packing, such as DHA and cholesterol, may be required for maximum protein stability. PMID:18424497

  17. Detergent solubilization of phospholipid vesicle. Effect of electric charge.

    PubMed Central

    Urbaneja, M A; Alonso, A; Gonzalez-Mañas, J M; Goñi, F M; Partearroyo, M A; Tribout, M; Paredes, S

    1990-01-01

    In order to explore the effect of electric charge on detergent solubilization of phospholipid bilayers, the interaction of nine electrically charged surfactants with neutral or electrically charged liposomes has been examined. The detergents belonged to the alkyl pyridinium, alkyl trimethylammonium or alkyl sulphate families. Large unilamellar liposomes formed by egg phosphatidylcholine plus or minus stearylamine or dicetyl phosphate were used. Solubilization was assessed as a decrease in light-scattering of the liposome suspensions. The results suggest that electrostatic forces do not play a significant role in the formation of mixed micelles and that hydrophobic interactions are by far the main forces involved in solubilization. In addition, from the study of thirty different liposome-surfactant systems, we have derived a series of empirical rules that may be useful in predicting the behaviour of untested surfactants: (i) the detergent concentration producing the onset of solubilization (Don) decreases as the alkyl chain length increases; the decrease follows a semi-logarithmic pattern in the case of alkyl pyridinium compounds; (ii) for surfactants with critical micellar concentrations (cmc) less than 6 x 10(-3) M, Don. is independent of the nature of the detergent and the bilayer composition; for detergents having cmc greater than 6 x 10(-3) M, Don. increases linearly with the cmc; and (iii) Don. varies linearly with the surfactant concentration that produces maximum solubilization. PMID:2400390

  18. ATF4-dependent transcription is a key mechanism in VEGF up-regulation by oxidized phospholipids: critical role of oxidized sn-2 residues in activation of unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Oskolkova, Olga V.; Afonyushkin, Taras; Leitner, Alexander; von Schlieffen, Elena; Gargalovic, Peter S.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Binder, Bernd R.

    2008-01-01

    We have shown previously that oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs), known to accumulate in atherosclerotic vessels, stimulate angiogenesis via induction of autocrine mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We now address the pathways mediating up-regulation of VEGF in human endothelial cells treated with OxPLs. Analysis of structure-function relationship using individual species of OxPLs demonstrated a close relation between induction of VEGF and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Inducers of UPR up-regulated VEGF, whereas inhibition of UPR by chemical chaperones or knock-down of cochaperone HTJ-1 inhibited elevation of VEGF mRNA induced by OxPLs. OxPLs induced protein expression of activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4), an important effector of UPR. Expression levels of VEGF in OxPL-treated cells strongly correlated with induction of the ATF4 target genes ATF3 and TRB3. Knocking down ATF4 was paralleled by loss of VEGF induction by OxPLs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that OxPLs stimulated binding of ATF4 to a regulatory site in the VEGFA gene. Taken together, these data characterize UPR and more specifically its ATF4 branch as an important mechanism mediating up-regulation of VEGF by OxPLs, and allow hypothesizing that the UPR cascade might play a role in pathologic angiogenesis in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:18451308

  19. Sequential effects of irradiation on the pulmonary surfactant system. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.L.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Penney, D.P.; Siemann, D.W.; Rubin, P.

    1982-05-01

    This study examines the effect of irradiation on lung surfactant synthesis and secretion in mice. Animals were irradiated with 650, 1300, or 1950 rad and morphological and biochemical indices of surfactant system function were followed for 18 weeks. No changes were seen at 650 rad; the results at 1300 and 1950 rad were virtually identical. Increased amounts of alveolar surfactant phospholipid were measureable by 24 hours. This persisted for four weeks and returned to normal by 18 weeks. Tissue surfactant phospholipid was initially reduced, returned to normal by four weeks and was increased at 18 weeks. At 18 weeks there was increased incorporation of surfactant precursor and increased production of alveolar surfactant. These biochemical changes were reflected in morphologic alterations showing release of lamellar body contents into alveoli in the first week and an increase in lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes by 18 weeks. Elevated tissue protein levels and morphologic evidence of increased collagen formation were also found at 18 weeks. These findings indicate effects of irradiation on the pulmonary surfactant system and have important implications for the pathogenesis and potential therapy of radiation pneumonitis.

  20. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control. PMID:26212235

  1. Inhibition by calmodulin of calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Albert, K A; Wu, W C; Nairn, A C; Greengard, P

    1984-01-01

    Calmodulin was previously found to inhibit the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of an endogenous substrate, called the 87-kilodalton protein, in a crude extract prepared from rat brain synaptosomal cytosol. We investigated the mechanism of this inhibition, using Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase and the 87-kilodalton protein, both of which had been purified to homogeneity from bovine brain. Rabbit brain calmodulin and some other Ca2+-binding proteins inhibited the phosphorylation of the 87-kilodalton protein by this kinase in the purified system. Calmodulin also inhibited the Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of H1 histone, synapsin I, and the delta subunit of the acetylcholine receptor, with use of purified components. These results suggest that calmodulin may be a physiological regulator of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase. Images PMID:6233611

  2. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  3. Guanine-nucleotide and hormone regulation of polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C activity of rat liver plasma membranes. Bivalent-cation and phospholipid requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S J; Exton, J H

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the GTP analogue guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) on the polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C (PLC) of rat liver was examined by using exogenous [3H]phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. GTP[S] stimulated the membrane-bound PLC up to 20-fold, with a half-maximal effect at approx. 100 nM. Stimulation was also observed with guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate, but not with adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, and was inhibited by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate. Membrane-bound PLC was entirely Ca2+-dependent, and GTP[S] produced both a decrease in the Ca2+ requirement and an increase in activity at saturating [Ca2+]. The stimulatory action of GTP[S] required millimolar Mg2+. [8-arginine]Vasopressin (100 nM) stimulated the PLC activity approx. 2-fold in the presence of 10 nM-GTP[S], but had no effect in the absence of GTP[S] or at 1 microM-GTP[S]. The hydrolysis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 by membrane-bound PLC was increased when the substrate was mixed with phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine or various combinations of these with phosphatidylserine. With PtdIns(4,5)P2, alone or mixed with phosphatidylcholine, GTP[S] evoked little or no stimulation of the PLC activity. However, maximal stimulation by GTP[S] was observed in the presence of a 2-fold molar excess of phosphatidylserine or various combinations of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Hydrolysis of [3H]phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate by membrane-bound PLC was also increased by GTP[S]. However, [3H]phosphatidylinositol was a poor substrate, and its hydrolysis was barely affected by GTP[S]. Cytosolic PtdIns(4,5)P2-PLC exhibited a Ca2+-dependence similar to that of the membrane-bound activity, but was unaffected by GTP[S]. It is concluded that rat liver plasma membranes possess a Ca2+-dependent polyphosphoinositide PLC that is activated by hormones and GTP analogues, depending on the Mg2+ concentration and phospholipid environment. It is

  4. Functional significance and control of release of pulmonary surfactant in the lizard lung.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S

    1995-10-01

    The amount of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs of the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) increases with increasing body temperature. This increase coincides with a decrease in lung compliance. The relationship between surfactant and lung compliance and the principal stimuli for surfactant release and composition (temperature, ventilatory pattern, and autonomic neurotransmitters) were investigated. We chose to investigate ventilatory pattern (which causes mechanical deformation of the type II cells) and adrenergic agents, because they are the major stimuli for surfactant release in mammals. To examine the effects of body temperature and ventilatory pattern, isolated lungs were ventilated at either 18 or 37 degrees C at different ventilatory regimens. An isolated perfused lung preparation at 27 degrees C was used to analyze the effects of autonomic neurotransmitters. Ventilatory pattern did not affect surfactant release, composition, or lung compliance at either 18 or 37 degrees C. An increase in temperature increased phospholipid reuptake and disproportionately increased cholesterol degradation/uptake. Epinephrine and acetylcholine stimulated phospholipid but not cholesterol release. Removal of surfactant caused a decrease in compliance, regardless of the experimental temperature. Temperature appears to be the principal determinant of lung compliance in the bearded dragon, acting directly to increase the tone of the smooth muscle. Increasing the ambient temperature may result in greater surfactant turnover by increasing cholesterol reuptake/degradation directly and by increasing circulating epinephrine, thereby indirectly increasing phospholipid secretion. We suggest that changing ventilatory pattern may be inadequate as a mechanism for maintaining surfactant homeostasis, given the discontinuous, highly variable reptilian breathing pattern. PMID:7485601

  5. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Sherman, Mark A; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Gordon, Larry M

    2007-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and four surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). Its major function in the lung alveolus is to reduce surface tension at the air-water interface in the terminal airways by the formation of a surface-active film enriched in surfactant lipids, hence preventing cellular collapse during respiration. Surfactant therapy using bovine or porcine lung surfactant extracts, which contain only polar lipids and native SP-B and SP-C, has dramatically improved the therapeutic outcomes of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). One important goal of surfactant researchers is to replace animal-derived therapies with fully synthetic preparations based on SP-B and SP-C, produced by recombinant technology or peptide synthesis, and reconstituted with selected synthetic lipids. Here, we review recent research developments with peptide analogues of SP-B and SP-C, designed using either the known primary sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the native proteins or, alternatively, the known 3D structures of closely homologous proteins. Such SP-B and SP-C mimics offer the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of the respective native proteins, and may allow the design of optimized surfactant formulations for specific pulmonary diseases (e.g., acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). These synthetic surfactant preparations may also be a cost-saving therapeutic approach, with better quality control than may be obtained with animal-based treatments. PMID:17575474

  6. Pulmonary surfactant: no mere paint on the alveolar wall.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, T E

    1996-12-01

    The gas-liquid interface within the alveolus is completely lined with a complex mixture of lipids and unique proteins termed pulmonary surfactant, which both reduces surface tension and permits it to vary directly with the radius of curvature. In this way it minimizes the work of breathing and permits alveoli of different sizes to exist in equilibrium. However, surfactant does far more in that it also controls fluid balance in the lung and appears to play a key role in host defence. Either a deficiency in surfactant or an aberrant surfactant results in atelectasis and oedema. The surfactant system is very dynamic: alveolar surfactant phosphatidylcholine, the principal component, having a half life of only a few hours, with as much as 85% being recycled. Although distortion of the alveolar type II cell is now accepted as the principal stimulus for release, much remains to be discovered of modulating factors and intracellular signalling in the control of surfactant homeostasis. Likewise, many questions remain concerning the control of synthesis of the surfactant phospholipids, neutral lipids and proteins and their assembly into the tubular myelin form of alveolar surfactant, the refining of the monolayer with breathing, the control of re-uptake of different components into the type II cells and the roles of the proteins. PMID:9441113

  7. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  8. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins strongly induce negative curvature.

    PubMed

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W; Rananavare, Shankar B; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  9. Beneficial effects of synthetic KL₄ surfactant in experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, A; Alvarez, L; Santos, M; López-Sánchez, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L; Varela, A; Segal, R; Casals, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratracheal administration of a new synthetic surfactant that includes the cationic, hydrophobic 21-residue peptide KLLLLKLLLLKLLLLKLLLLK (KL₄), might be effective in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. Single left lung transplantation was performed in Landrace pigs 22 h post-harvest. KL₄ surfactant at a dose of 25 mg total phospholipid·kg body weight⁻¹ (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹) was instilled at 37°C to the donor left lung (n = 8) prior to explantation. Saline (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹; 37°C) was instilled into the donor left lung of the untreated group (n = 6). Lung function in recipients was measured during 2 h of reperfusion. Recipient left lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided native cytometric, inflammatory marker and surfactant data. KL(4) surfactant treatment recovered oxygen levels in the recipient blood (mean ± sd arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction 424 ± 60 versus 263 ± 101 mmHg in untreated group; p=0.01) and normalised alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. Surfactant biophysical function was also recovered in KL₄ surfactant-treated lungs. This was associated with decreased C-reactive protein levels in BAL, and recovery of surfactant protein A content, normalised protein/phospholipid ratios, and lower levels of both lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in large surfactant aggregates. These findings suggest an important protective role for KL₄ surfactant treatment in lung transplantation. PMID:20650990

  10. Role of lymphatics in removal of sheep lung surfactant lipid.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, M M; O'Brodovich, H M; Young, S L

    1983-04-01

    To study the role of lung lymphatics in the removal of surfactant lipid from the sheep lung, we injected [1-14C]palmitate intravenously into six animals previously fitted with a cannula draining the caudal mediastinal lymph node. Lung lymph was collected for 100 h after injection of radiolabel. We obtained alveolar lavage material through a tracheostomy in four other animals after intravenous injection of [9,10-3H]palmitate. We measured radioactivity at several time points in lipid extracts from lymph, lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Alveolar lavage disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) specific activity peaked at about 40 h and was reduced to 30% of this value by 82 h. About 2% of the injected radiolabel was incorporated into lung tissue lipids. Only 4% of the level of labeling achieved in lung tissue lipids was found in lung lymph lipid during 100 h of lymph collection. Sixty-three percent of radiolabel in lymph lipid was recovered in phospholipids, and 29% of phospholipid radiolabel was found in DSPC. The distribution of phosphorus and palmitate radiolabel in lung lymph phospholipid did not closely resemble that of surfactant lipid. No rise in lung lymph DSPC specific activity was observed following the peak in lavage specific activity. If surfactant lipid is removed from the alveolar compartment without extensive recycling, then we conclude that the lung lymphatics do not play a major role in the clearance of surfactant lipid from the alveolar surface. PMID:6687883

  11. pH-Regulated surface property and pH-reversible micelle transition of a tertiary amine-based gemini surfactant in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongsheng; Xue, Miao; Wang, Baogang; Huang, Zhiyu

    2015-12-21

    A series of tertiary amide-based gemini surfactants, 2,2'-(1,4-phenylenebis(oxy))bis(N-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)alkylamide), abbreviated as Cm-A-Cm (m = 8; 10; 12; 14), were synthesized. The surface property and aggregation behaviors of the Cm-A-Cm aqueous solutions were studied in detail. The Cm-A-Cm exhibited high and pH-regulated surface activity at the air/water interface; i.e., the critical micelle concentration was 5.6 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) at pH = 2.50 when m = 14 and was further regulated to 1.8 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) by altering the pH to 6.50. When the pH was tuned from 2.0 to 12.0, the appearance of the C12-A-C12 aqueous solution (35 mM) underwent 5 states: transparent water-like solution, viscous fluid, gel-like fluid, turbid liquid and dispersion system with white precipitate. The results of rheology, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering characterization revealed that the transition from water-like to viscous or gel-like liquid was actually due to aggregate microstructure transition from spherical to worm-like micelles. This transition was completely reversible between pH = 2.50 and 6.81, tuned by adding HCl and NaOH solutions for at least 4 cycles. Similar micellar transitions regulated by pH were also found for m = 8 and 10, whereas only worm-like micelles were formed for m = 14 at both acidic and nearly neutral conditions. Finally, a reasonable mechanism of aggregate behavior transition was proposed from the viewpoint of the molecular states, molecular structures, and the intra- and inter-molecular interactions. PMID:26411356

  12. Purification, characterization and substrate specificity of rabbit lung phospholipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsao, F H; Tian, Q; Strickland, M S

    1992-05-01

    Three phospholipid transfer proteins, namely proteins I, II and III, were purified from the rabbit lung cytosolic fraction. The molecular masses of phospholipid transfer proteins I, II and III are 32 kilodaltons (kDa), 22 kDa and 32 kDa, respectively; their isoelectric point values are 6.5, 7.0 and 6.8, respectively. Phospholipid transfer proteins I and III transferred phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) from donor unilamellar liposomes to acceptor multilamellar liposomes; protein II transferred PC but not PI. All the three phospholipid transfer proteins transferred phosphatidylethanolamine poorly and showed no tendency to transfer triolein. The transfer of [14C]PC from unilamellar liposomes to multilamellar liposomes facilitated by each protein was affected differently by the presence of acidic phospholipids in the PC unilamellar liposomes. In an equal molar ratio of acidic phospholipid and PC, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) reduced the activities of proteins I and III by 70% (P = 0.0004 and 0.0032, respectively) whereas PI and phosphatidylserine (PS) had an insignificant effect. In contrast, the protein II activity was stimulated 2-3-times more by either PG (P = 0.0024), PI (P = 0.0006) or PS (P = 0.0038). In addition, protein II transferred dioleoylPC (DOPC) about 2-times more effectively than dipalmitoylPC (DPPC) (P = 0.0002), whereas proteins I and III transferred DPPC 20-40% more effectively than DOPC but this was statistically insignificant. The markedly different substrate specificities of the three lung phospholipid transfer proteins suggest that these proteins may play an important role in sorting intracellular membrane phospholipids, possibly including lung surfactant phospholipids. PMID:1596521

  13. 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 13(S)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid regulation of protein kinase C-alpha in melanoma cells: role of receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Khan, W A; Hannun, Y A; Timar, J; Taylor, J D; Lundy, S; Butovich, I; Honn, K V

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes are essential components of cell signaling. In this study, we investigated the regulation of PKC-alpha in murine B16 amelanotic melanoma (B16a) cells by the monohydroxy fatty acids 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [12(S)-HETE] and 13(S)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid [13(S)-HODE]. 12(S)-HETE induced a translocation of PKC-alpha to the plasma membrane and focal adhesion plaques, leading to enhanced adhesion of B16a cells to the matrix protein fibronectin. However, 13(S)-HODE inhibited these 12(S)-HETE effects on PKC-alpha. A receptor-mediated mechanism of action for 12(S)-HETE and 13(S)-HODE is supported by the following findings. First, 12(S)-HETE triggered a rapid increase in cellular levels of diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate in B16a cells. 13(S)-HODE blocked the 12(S)-HETE-induced bursts of both second messengers. Second, the 12(S)-HETE-increased adhesion of B16a cells to fibronectin was sensitive to inhibition by a phospholipase C inhibitor and pertussis toxin. Finally, a high-affinity binding site (Kd = 1 nM) for 12(S)-HETE was detected in B16a cells, and binding of 12(S)-HETE to B16a cells was effectively inhibited by 13(S)-HODE (IC50 = 4 nM). In summary, our data provide evidence that regulation of PKC-alpha by 12(S)-HETE and 13(S)-HODE may be through a guanine nucleotide-binding protein-linked receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568126

  14. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant in rat lungs after inhalation of nanomaterials: Fullerenes, nickel oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Chikara; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Ogami, Akira; Oyabu, Takako; Nishi, Ken-ichiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Todoroki, Motoi; Morimoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Isamu; Myojo, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The health risks of inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials in the workplace are a major concern in recent years, and hazard assessments of these materials are being conducted. The pulmonary surfactant of lung alveoli is the first biological entity to have contact with airborne nanomaterials in inhaled air. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the pulmonary surfactant components of rat lungs after a 4-week inhalation exposure to three different nanomaterials: fullerenes, nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), with similar levels of average aerosol concentration (0.13-0.37 mg/m(3)). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the rat lungs stored after previous inhalation studies was analyzed, focusing on total protein and the surfactant components, such as phospholipids and surfactant-specific SP-D (surfactant protein D) and the BALF surface tension, which is affected by SP-B and SP-C. Compared with a control group, significant changes in the BALF surface tension and the concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D were observed in rats exposed to NiO nanoparticles, but not in those exposed to fullerenes. Surface tension and the levels of surfactant phospholipids and proteins were also significantly different in rats exposed to MWCNTs. The concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D and BALF surface tension were correlated significantly with the polymorphonuclear neutrophil counts in the BALF. These results suggest that pulmonary surfactant components can be used as measures of lung inflammation. PMID:25950198

  15. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-02-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (∼334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexation of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  16. Encapsulation of ω-3 fatty acids in nanoemulsion-based delivery systems fabricated from natural emulsifiers: Sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2016-07-15

    Nanoemulsions have considerable potential for encapsulating and delivering ω-3 fatty acids, but they are typically fabricated from synthetic surfactants. This study shows that fish oil-in-water nanoemulsions can be formed from sunflower phospholipids, which have advantages for food applications because they have low allergenicity and do not come from genetically modified organisms. Nanoemulsions containing small droplets (d<150 nm) could be produced using microfluidization, by optimizing phospholipid type and concentration, with the smallest droplets being formed at high phosphatidylcholine levels and at surfactant-to-oil ratios exceeding unity. The physical stability of the nanoemulsions was mainly attributed to electrostatic repulsion, with droplet aggregation occurring at low pH values (low charge magnitude) and at high ionic strengths (electrostatic screening). These results suggest that sunflower phospholipids may be a viable natural emulsifier to deliver ω-3 fatty acids into food and beverage products. PMID:26948622

  17. Effect of long-term simulated weightlessness on surfactant and water balance in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Bryndina, I G; Vasilieva, N N; Krivonogova, Yu A; Baranov, V M

    2013-07-01

    Weightlessness produces adaptive and maladaptive changes in the respiratory system. We assessed the effects of 30-day antiorthostatic hanging as a model of microgravity on the water balance in the lungs and surface activity and phospholipid composition of pulmonary surfactant in C57Bl/6 mice. Long-term antiorthostatic hanging increased water content in the lungs and reduced surface-active properties of the surfactant. This was accompanied by an increase in the content of alveolar phospholipids and changes in their fractional composition (increase in the relative content of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine). PMID:24137589

  18. A retrospective: Use of Escherichia coli as a vehicle to study phospholipid synthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Dowhan, William

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of individual phospholipids and their synthesis began in the 1920’s first in plants and then mammals, it was not until the early 1960’s that Eugene Kennedy using Escherichia coli initiated studies of bacterial phospholipid metabolism. With the base of information already available from studies of mammalian tissue, the basic blueprint of phospholipid biosynthesis in E. coli was worked out by the late 1960’s. In 1970’s and 1980’s most of the enzymes responsible for phospholipid biosynthesis were purified and many of the genes encoding these enzymes were identified. By the late 1990’s conditional and null mutants were available along with clones of the genes for every step of phospholipid biosynthesis. Most of these genes had been sequenced before the complete E. coli genome sequence was available. Strains of E. coli were developed in which phospholipid composition could be changed in a systematic manner while maintaining cell viability. Null mutants, strains in which phospholipid metabolism was artificially regulated, and strains synthesizing foreign lipids not found in E. coli have been used to this day to define specific roles for individual phospholipid. This review will trace the findings that have led to the development of E. coli as an excellent model system to study mechanisms underlying the synthesis and function of phospholipids that are widely applicable to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. PMID:22925633

  19. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Maayan P; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-12-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γ(e)) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γ(e) is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γ(e) therefore represents a range rather than a single value of surface tension. Between the upper and lower ends of this range, rates of collapse for spread and adsorbed films decrease substantially. Changes during adsorption across this narrow region of coexistence between the two- and three-dimensional structures at least partially explain how alveolar films of pulmonary surfactant become resistant to collapse. PMID:26583569

  20. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood. PMID:2646416

  1. Overcoming inactivation of the lung surfactant by serum proteins: a potential role for fluorocarbons?

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2015-08-14

    In many pulmonary conditions serum proteins interfere with the normal adsorption of components of the lung surfactant to the surface of the alveoli, resulting in lung surfactant inactivation, with potentially serious untoward consequences. Here, we review the strategies that have recently been designed in order to counteract the biophysical mechanisms of inactivation of the surfactant. One approach includes protein analogues or peptides that mimic the native proteins responsible for innate resistance to inactivation. Another perspective uses water-soluble additives, such as electrolytes and hydrophilic polymers that are prone to enhance adsorption of phospholipids. An alternative, more recent approach consists of using fluorocarbons, that is, highly hydrophobic inert compounds that were investigated for partial liquid ventilation, that modify interfacial properties and can act as carriers of exogenous lung surfactant. The latter approach that allows fluidisation of phospholipid monolayers while maintaining capacity to reach near-zero surface tension definitely warrants further investigation. PMID:26110877

  2. Oxysterols trigger ABCA1-mediated basolateral surfactant efflux.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mathur, Satya N; Zhou, Jiming; Field, F Jeffrey; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2004-08-01

    Surfactant is an apically-secreted surface-active material containing primarily disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPtdCho) that is released from alveolar epithelia into the alveolus. Surfactant deficiency is an important aspect of inflammatory lung disease and may result from extravasation of serum lipoproteins into the alveolus. We investigated whether one bioactive component of modified lipoproteins, oxysterols, might reduce surfactant PtdCho availability by altering its trafficking. The oxysterol, 22-hydroxycholesterol (22HC), in combination with its obligate partner, 9 cis-retinoic acid (RA), decreased surfactant PtdCho levels, in part, by stimulating basolateral phospholipid export in murine lung epithelia. 22HC/RA stimulated basolateral PtdCho efflux in cells via transcriptional activation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) gene. This effect was mediated by a DR-4 locus within the ABCA1 promoter. ABCA1 knockdown studies using ABCA1 siRNA or the ABCA1 inhibitor, glyburide, selectively attenuated 22HC/RA-driven basolateral PtdCho efflux. 22HC/RA significantly increased export of PtdCho molecular species containing saturated (16:0) fatty-acyl species typical of DSPtdCho. Overexpression of ABCA1 mimicked 22HC/RA effects by increasing cellular PtdCho efflux, whereas mutagenesis of ABCA1 at Trp590 attenuated PtdCho release. The results indicate the existence of an oxysterol-activated basolateral exit pathway for surfactant that might impact the availability of phospholipid destined for apical secretion. PMID:15039140

  3. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed. PMID:25561100

  4. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  5. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  6. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  7. Speckle patterns during the spreading of lung surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Martínez-Muñoz, Diana M.; Ferreira, Marcia Zotti Justo; Shin Nishitani, Wagner; Almeida, Alexandre Barros; Alencar, Adriano M.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a very important product in the medical treatment of the syndrome of insufficiency respiratory in neonates. The synthesis of this surfactant in labs need to optimize the rate of spreading in the alveolar interstitial liquid obtaining a monolayer of the phospholipids membrane base capable to maintains several of the dynamical properties of the respiratory system during breathing. The recover of theses mechanical properties has to be archived using the minimal quantities of product and with the optimal proteins composition (SP-B in special). In this paper we show our results of obtaining and process speckle pattern images of the spreading of phospholipids membrane composed the matrix of this product (DPPC) when physiologic interstitial liquid are presented.

  8. Dictyostelium uses ether-linked inositol phospholipids for intracellular signalling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Jonathan; Kay, Robert R; Kielkowska, Anna; Niewczas, Izabella; Fets, Louise; Oxley, David; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2014-01-01

    Inositol phospholipids are critical regulators of membrane biology throughout eukaryotes. The general principle by which they perform these roles is conserved across species and involves binding of differentially phosphorylated inositol head groups to specific protein domains. This interaction serves to both recruit and regulate the activity of several different classes of protein which act on membrane surfaces. In mammalian cells, these phosphorylated inositol head groups are predominantly borne by a C38:4 diacylglycerol backbone. We show here that the inositol phospholipids of Dictyostelium are different, being highly enriched in an unusual C34:1e lipid backbone, 1-hexadecyl-2-(11Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-myo-inositol), in which the sn-1 position contains an ether-linked C16:0 chain; they are thus plasmanylinositols. These plasmanylinositols respond acutely to stimulation of cells with chemoattractants, and their levels are regulated by PIPKs, PI3Ks and PTEN. In mammals and now in Dictyostelium, the hydrocarbon chains of inositol phospholipids are a highly selected subset of those available to other phospholipids, suggesting that different molecular selectors are at play in these organisms but serve a common, evolutionarily conserved purpose. PMID:25180230

  9. The Impact of Organic Surfactants and Coatings in Regulating Heterogeneous N2O5 Reaction Kinetics on Nascent Marine Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, O. S.; Campbell, N.; Schill, S.; Pöhlker, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 on aerosol particles impacts both the lifetime of nitrogen oxides, and the production rate of chlorine radicals following the activation of particulate chloride to nitryl chloride in both coastal and continental regions. The extent to which N2O5 reactivity impacts oxidant loadings depends on the heterogeneous reaction rate, which is directly influenced by aerosol chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state. In the marine environment, the chemical composition of aerosol particles produced via wave induced bubble bursting mechanisms varies greatly and is influenced by the composition of the sea surface microlayer . Here, we present direct measurements of N2O5 reaction kinetics determined using model sea-spray particles generated in a novel Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), capable of generating accurate mimics of ambient sea spray particles, in a lab environment. Here, a synthetic sea salt ocean was sequentially doped with organic molecules chosen to mimic organic species present in natural sea water over the course of a phytoplankton bloom in the open ocean. These included sterol, galactose, lippolysaccharide, BSA protein, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DPPA). These observations permit discussion of the role of marine organics in regulating heterogeneous reaction kinetics, as well a re-evaluation of potential organic lab proxies for marine organics.

  10. Transient exposure of pulmonary surfactant to hyaluronan promotes structural and compositional transformations into a highly active state.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Cruz, Antonio; Richter, Ralf P; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2013-10-11

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that lowers surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface, stabilizing the lungs against physical forces tending to collapse alveoli. Dysfunction of surfactant is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome where naturally occurring surfactant-inhibitory agents such as serum, meconium, or cholesterol reach the lung. We analyzed the effect of hyaluronan (HA) on the structure and surface behavior of pulmonary surfactant to understand the mechanism for HA-promoted surfactant protection in the presence of inhibitory agents. In particular, we found that HA affects structural properties such as the aggregation state of surfactant membranes and the size, distribution, and order/packing of phase-segregated lipid domains. These effects do not require a direct interaction between surfactant complexes and HA and are accompanied by a compositional reorganization of large surfactant complexes that become enriched with saturated phospholipid species. HA-exposed surfactant reaches very high efficiency in terms of rapid and spontaneous adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-liquid interface and shows significantly improved resistance to inactivation by serum or cholesterol. We propose that physical effects pertaining to the formation of a meshwork of interpenetrating HA polymer chains are responsible for the changes in surfactant structure and composition that enhance surfactant function and, thus, resistance to inactivation. The higher resistance of HA-exposed surfactant to inactivation persists even after removal of the polymer, suggesting that transient exposure of surfactant to polymers like HA could be a promising strategy for the production of more efficient therapeutic surfactant preparations. PMID:23983120

  11. CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 regulates fetal lung growth and maturation in utero by potentiating endogenous bombesin-like peptides.

    PubMed Central

    King, K A; Hua, J; Torday, J S; Drazen, J M; Graham, S A; Shipp, M A; Sunday, M E

    1993-01-01

    Bombesin-like peptides (BLPs) are mitogens for bronchial epithelial cells and small cell lung carcinomas, and increase fetal lung growth and maturation in utero and in organ cultures. BLPs are hydrolyzed by the enzyme CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (CD10/NEP) which is expressed in bronchial epithelium and functions to inhibit BLP-mediated growth of small cell lung carcinomas. To determine whether CD10/NEP regulates peptide-mediated lung development, we administered a specific CD10/NEP inhibitor, SCH32615, to fetal mice in utero from gestational days e15-17. Fetal lung tissues were evaluated on e18 for: (a) growth using [3H]thymidine incorporation into nuclear DNA; and (b) maturation using: [3H]-choline incorporation into surfactant phospholipids, electron microscopy for type II pneumocytes, and Northern blot analyses for surfactant apoproteins A, B, and C. Inhibition of CD10/NEP stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA (70% above baseline, P < 0.005), [3H]choline incorporation into surfactant phospholipids (38% above baseline, P < 0.005), increased numbers of type II pneumocytes (36% above baseline, P = 0.07), and fivefold higher surfactant protein A transcripts (P < 0.05). CD10/NEP-mediated effects were completely blocked by the specific bombesin receptor antagonist, [D-Phe12, Leu14]bombesin. These observations suggest that CD10/NEP regulates fetal lung growth and maturation mediated by endogenous BLPs. Images PMID:8486767

  12. Adsorption of Surfactant Lipids by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Mouse Lung upon Pharyngeal Aspiration: Role in Uptake by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Alexander A.; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E.; Kisin, Elena R.; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J.; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids – phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (~108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted “coating” whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2α plays a critical role in the formation of alveoli and surfactant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yadi; Kempen, Marjon Buscop-van; Munck, Anne Boerema-de; Swagemakers, Sigrid; Driegen, Siska; Mahavadi, Poornima; Meijer, Dies; van Ijcken, Wilfred; van der Spek, Peter; Grosveld, Frank; Günther, Andreas; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert J

    2012-02-01

    Alveolarization of the developing lung is an important step toward the switch from intrauterine life to breathing oxygen-rich air after birth. The distal airways structurally change to minimize the gas exchange path, and Type II pneumocytes increase the production of surfactants, which are required to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveolus. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (Hif2α) is an oxygen-regulated transcription factor expressed in endothelial and Type II cells, and its expression increases toward the end of gestation. We investigated the role of Hif2α in Type II cells by conditionally expressing an oxygen-insensitive mutant of Hif2α in airway epithelial cells during development. Newborn mice expressing the mutant Hif2α were born alive but quickly succumbed to respiratory distress. Subsequent analysis of the lungs revealed dilated alveoli covered with enlarged, aberrant Type II cells and a diminished number of Type I cells. The Type II cells accumulated glycogen in part by increased glucose uptake via the up-regulation of the glucose transporter 1. Furthermore, the cells lacked two crucial enzymes involved in the metabolism of glycogen into surfactant lipids, lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase and ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 3. We conclude that Hif2α is a key regulator in alveolar maturation and the production of phospholipids by Type II cells. PMID:22298531

  14. KL4 Peptide Induces Reversible Collapse Structures on Multiple Length Scales in Model Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Michael Henderson, J.; Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Notter, Robert H.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of KL4, a 21-residue amphipathic peptide approximating the overall ratio of positively charged to hydrophobic amino acids in surfactant protein B (SP-B), on the structure and collapse of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol monolayers. As reported in prior work on model lung surfactant phospholipid films containing SP-B and SP-B peptides, our experiments show that KL4 improves surfactant film reversibility during repetitive interfacial cycling in association with the formation of reversible collapse structures on multiple length scales. Emphasis is on exploring a general mechanistic connection between peptide-induced nano- and microscale reversible collapse structures (silos and folds). PMID:22208194

  15. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  16. Autonomic control of the pulmonary surfactant system and lung compliance in the lizard.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Andrew, L K; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S; Roberts, C T

    1997-01-01

    An increase in body temperature in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps, is accompanied by an increase in the amount of pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of proteins and lipids, with the latter consisting predominantly of phospholipid and cholesterol. This increase may result from a temperature-induced change in autonomic input to the lungs, as perfusing the isolated lungs of P. vitticeps with either acetylcholine or adrenaline increases surfactant phospholipid release. However, whether acetylcholine acts via intrapulmonary sympathetic ganglia or directly on alveolar Type II cells is unknown. Moreover, the relative importance of circulating catecholamines and pulmonary sympathetic nerves on the control of the surfactant system is also obscure. Here, we describe the mechanism of the modulation of the surfactant system and the effect of this modulation on lung compliance. The role of acetylcholine was determined by perfusing isolated lungs with acetylcholine, acetylcholine and the ganglionic antagonist hexamethonium, or acetylcholine, hexamethonium, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Perfusing with acetylcholine significantly increased phospholipid release but did not affect cholesterol release. While histological examination of the lung revealed the presence of a large autonomic ganglion at the apex, blocking sympathetic ganglia with hexamethonium did not prevent the acetylcholine-mediated increase in phospholipid. However, the increase was inhibited by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine, which indicates that acetylcholine acts on muscarinic receptors to stimulate phospholipid release. By increasing pulmonary smooth muscle tone, acetylcholine decreased opening pressure and increased static inflation pressures. Plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline increased with increasing temperature and were accompanied by a greater surfactant content in the lungs. While surfactant content was also higher in animals that exercised, plasma levels of adrenaline

  17. Diarmed (adamantyl/alkyl) surfactants from nitrilotriacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Trillo, Juan V; Vázquez Tato, José; Jover, Aida; de Frutos, Santiago; Soto, Victor H; Galantini, Luciano; Meijide, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The compounds presented here constitute a clear example of molecular biomimetics as their design is inspired on the structure and properties of natural phospholipids. Thus novel double-armed surfactants have been obtained in which nitrilotriacetic acid plays the role of glycerol in phospholipids. The hydrophobic arms are linked to the head group through amide bonds (which is also the case of sphingomyelin): (R1NHCOCH2)(R2NHCOCH2)NCH2CO2H (R1 being CH3(CH2)11, CH3(CH2)17, CH3(CH2)7CHCH(CH2)8, and adamantyl, and R2=adamantyl). The dependence of the surface tension with concentration shows the typical profile of surfactants since a breaking point, which corresponds to the critical aggregation concentration (cac), is observed in all cases. The cac of these diarmed derivatives are about 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those of classical monoalkyl derivatives used as reference compounds. In contrast to conventional surfactants, reversed trends in cac values and molecular areas at the solution-air interface have been observed. This anomalous behavior is tied to the structure of the surfactants and suggests that long and flexible alkyl chains should self-coil previous to the aggregation or adsorption phenomena. Above cac all compounds form large aggregates, globular in shape, which tend to associate forming giant aggregates. PMID:25465758

  18. Interactions of Amelogenin with Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, towards the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. Though in DLS studies we cannot exclude the possibility of fusion of liposomes as the result of amelogenin addition, NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong FRET from Trp in rP172 to DNS–bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  19. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  20. Pulmonary surfactants and their role in pathophysiology of lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant is an agent that decreases the surface tension between two media. The surface tension between gaseous-aqueous interphase in the lungs is decreased by the presence of a thin layer of fluid known as pulmonary surfactant. The pulmonary surfactant is produced by the alveolar type-II (AT-II) cells of the lungs. It is essential for efficient exchange of gases and for maintaining the structural integrity of alveoli. Surfactant is a secretory product, composed of lipids and proteins. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol are the major lipid constituents and SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D are four types of surfactant associated proteins. The lipid and protein components are synthesized separately and are packaged into the lamellar bodies in the AT-II cells. Lamellar bodies are the main organelle for the synthesis and metabolism of surfactants. The synthesis, secretion and recycling of the surfactant lipids and proteins is regulated by complex genetic and metabolic mechanisms. The lipid-protein interaction is very important for the structural organization of surfactant monolayer and its functioning. Alterations in surfactant homeostasis or biophysical properties can result in surfactant insufficiency which may be responsible for diseases like respiratory distress syndrome, lung proteinosis, interstitial lung diseases and chronic lung diseases. The biochemical, physiological, developmental and clinical aspects of pulmonary surfactant are presented in this article to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. PMID:23441475

  1. Surfactant Lipidomics in Healthy Children and Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, Gerhard; Rauch, Daniela; Stückler, Ferdinand; Schmitz, Gerd; Zarbock, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Lipids account for the majority of pulmonary surfactant, which is essential for normal breathing. We asked if interstitial lung diseases (ILD) in children may disrupt alveolar surfactant and give clues for disease categorization. Methods Comprehensive lipidomics profiles of broncho-alveolar lavage fluid were generated in 115 children by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Two reference populations were compared to a broad range of children with ILD. Results Class and species composition in healthy children did not differ from that in children with ILD related to diffuse developmental disorders, chronic tachypnoe of infancy, ILD related to lung vessels and the heart, and ILD related to reactive lymphoid lesions. As groups, ILDs related to the alveolar surfactant region, ILD related to unclear respiratory distress syndrome in the mature neonate, or in part ILD related to growth abnormalities reflecting deficient alveolarisation, had significant alterations of some surfactant specific phospholipids. Additionally, lipids derived from inflammatory processes were identified and differentiated. In children with ABCA3-deficiency from two ILD causing mutations saturated and monounsaturated phosphatidylcholine species with 30 and 32 carbons and almost all phosphatidylglycerol species were severely reduced. In other alveolar disorders lipidomic profiles may be of less diagnostic value, but nevertheless may substantiate lack of significant involvement of mechanisms related to surfactant lipid metabolism. Conclusions Lipidomic profiling may identify specific forms of ILD in children with surfactant alterations and characterized the molecular species pattern likely to be transported by ABCA3 in vivo. PMID:25692779

  2. Pulmonary surfactant inhibits LPS-induced nitric oxide production by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miles, P R; Bowman, L; Rao, K M; Baatz, J E; Huffman, L

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were 1) to report that pulmonary surfactant inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (. NO) production by rat alveolar macrophages, 2) to study possible mechanisms for this effect, and 3) to determine which surfactant component(s) is responsible. NO produced by the cells in response to LPS is due to an inducible. NO synthase (iNOS). Surfactant inhibits LPS-induced. NO formation in a concentration-dependent manner;. NO production is inhibited by approximately 50 and approximately 75% at surfactant levels of 100 and 200 microg phospholipid/ml, respectively. The inhibition is not due to surfactant interference with the interaction of LPS with the cells or to disruption of the formation of iNOS mRNA. Also, surfactant does not seem to reduce. NO formation by directly affecting iNOS activity or by acting as an antioxidant or radical scavenger. However, in the presence of surfactant, there is an approximately 80% reduction in the amount of LPS-induced iNOS protein in the cells. LPS-induced. NO production is inhibited by Survanta, a surfactant preparation used in replacement therapy, as well as by natural surfactant. NO formation is not affected by the major lipid components of surfactant or by two surfactant-associated proteins, surfactant protein (SP) A or SP-C. However, the hydrophobic SP-B inhibits. NO formation in a concentration-dependent manner;. NO production is inhibited by approximately 50 and approximately 90% at SP-B levels of 1-2 and 10 microgram/ml, respectively. These results show that lung surfactant inhibits LPS-induced. NO production by alveolar macrophages, that the effect is due to a reduction in iNOS protein levels, and that the surfactant component responsible for the reduction is SP-B. PMID:9887071

  3. Towards unravelling surfactant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Panda, Satyananda

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant transport arises in many natural or industrial settings. Examples include lipid tear layers in the eye, pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, or industrial coating flows. Flows driven by the surface tension gradient which arises as a consequence of surfactant concentration inhomogeneity, also known as Marangoni-driven flows, have attracted the attention of fluid dynamists for several decades and has led to the development of sophisticated models and the undeniable advancement of the understanding of such flows. Yet, experimental confirmation of these models has been hampered by the difficulty in reliably and accurately measuring the surfactant concentration and its temporal evolution. In this contribution, we propose a methodology which may help shed some light on surfactant transport at the surface of thin liquid films. The surface stress induced by surfactant concentration induces a flow at the free surface which is visible and measurable. In the context of thin film flows for which the lubrication approximation hold, we demonstrate how the knowledge of this free surface flow field provides sufficient information to reconstruct the surfactant tension field. From the surface tension and an assumed equation of state, the local surfactant concentration can also be calculated and other transport parameters such as the surfactant surface diffusivity indirectly inferred. In this contribution, the proposed methodology is tested with synthetic data generated by the forward solution of the governing partial differential equations in order to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm and highlight numerical challenges.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  5. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications. PMID:25742123

  6. Phospholipid Metabolism in Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Short, Steven A.; White, David C.; Aleem, M. I. H.

    1969-01-01

    The lipid composition of the chemoautotroph Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans has been examined. Fatty acids represent 2% of the dry weight of the cells and 86% of the total are extractable with organic solvents. About 25% of the total fatty acids are associated with diacyl phospholipids. Polar carotenoids, the benzoquinone coenzyme Q-8, and most of the fatty acids are present in the neutral lipids. The phospholipids have been identified as phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine (42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (23%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20%), cardiolipin (13%), phosphatidyl choline (1.5%), and phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine (1%) by chromatography of the diacyl lipids, by chromatography in four systems of the glycerol phosphate esters derived from the lipids by mild alkaline methanolysis, and by chromatographic identification of the products of acid hydrolysis of the esters. No trace of phosphatidylserine (PS), glycerolphosphorylserine, or serine could be detected in the lipid extract or in derivatives of that extract. This casts some doubt on the postulated involvement of PS in iron metabolism. After growth in the presence of 14C and 32P, there was essentially no difference in the turnover of either isotope in the glycerolphosphate ester derived from each lipid in cells grown at pH 1.5 or 3.5. Images PMID:5802599

  7. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  8. Pulmonary surfactant surface tension influences alveolar capillary shape and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Machiko; Weaver, Timothy E; Grant, Shawn N; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Alveolar capillaries are located in close proximity to the alveolar epithelium and beneath the surfactant film. We hypothesized that the shape of alveolar capillaries and accompanying oxygenation are influenced by surfactant surface tension in the alveolus. To prove our hypothesis, surfactant surface tension was regulated by conditional expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B in Sftpb(-/-) mice, thereby inhibiting surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in vivo within 24 hours after depletion of Sftpb. Minimum surface tension of isolated surfactant was increased and oxygen saturation was significantly reduced after 2 days of SP-B deficiency in association with deformation of alveolar capillaries. Intravascularly injected 3.2-mum-diameter microbeads through jugular vein were retained within narrowed pulmonary capillaries after reduction of SP-B. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated that the capillary protrusion typical of the normal alveolar-capillary unit was reduced in size, consistent with altered pulmonary blood flow. Pulmonary hypertension and intrapulmonary shunting are commonly associated with surfactant deficiency and dysfunction in neonates and adults with respiratory distress syndromes. Increased surfactant surface tension caused by reduction in SP-B induced narrowing of alveolar capillaries and oxygen desaturation, demonstrating an important role of surface tension-lowering properties of surfactant in the regulation of pulmonary vascular perfusion. PMID:19202005

  9. Novel dithranol phospholipid microemulsion for topical application: development, characterization and percutaneous absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Raza, Kaisar; Negi, Poonam; Takyar, Shweta; Shukla, Anshuman; Amarji, Basant; Katare, O P

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a novel dithranol-containing phospholipid microemulsion systems for enhanced skin permeation and retention. Based on the solubility of dithranol, the selected oils were isopropyl myristate (IPM) and tocopherol acetate (TA), and the surfactants were Tween 80 (T80) and Tween 20 (T20). The ratios of cosurfactants comprising of phospholipids and ethanol (1 : 10) and surfactant to co-surfactant (1 : 1 and 2.75 : 1) were fixed for the phase diagram construction. Selected microemulsions were evaluated for globule size, zeta potential, viscosity, refractive index, per cent transmittance, stability (freeze thaw and centrifugation), ex vivo skin permeation and retention. The microemulsion systems composed of IPM and T80 with mean particle diameter of 72.8 nm showed maximum skin permeation (82.23%), skin permeation flux (0.281 mg/cm²/h) along with skin retention (8.31%) vis-à-vis systems containing TA and T20. The results suggest that the developed novel lecithinized microemulsion systems have a promising potential for the improved topical delivery of dithranol. PMID:21395406

  10. Influence of parenteral nutrition on phospholipid metabolism in posttraumatic rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, S; Gasser, H; Redl, H; Strohmaier, W; Schlag, G

    1986-01-01

    In the current investigation, we studied two groups of rats--one group supplied exogenous phospholipid precursors (carbohydrate plus fat emulsion group) and the other given only calories (carbohydrate group)--to evaluate the effects on surfactant composition by normocaloric alimentation, using a hypovolemic-traumatic shock model. The total phospholipid (PHL) contents of lung tissue were similar in both groups. However, we found differences in the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine fraction (DPPC--the most important component of surfactant material) in both lung tissue and lavage fluid. With lipid emulsion, there was an increased fraction of saturated lecithins (mainly DPPC) both in lung tissue and lavage fluid, similar to former studies with hypocaloric alimentation. In this model, those findings suggest that the PHL pattern does not depend on the quantity of caloric supply, but, rather, on the infusion composition. The enhanced DPPC content is further reflected in improved surfactant status: lipid in parenteral nutrition (PN) may exert a direct salutary effect on lung mechanics. PMID:3099005

  11. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients*

    PubMed Central

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-01-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  12. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  13. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  14. Effects of analogues of ethanolamine and choline on phospholipid metabolism in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Åkesson, Björn

    1977-01-01

    1. Analogues of ethanolamine and choline were incubated with different labelled precursors of phospholipids and isolated hepatocytes and the effects on phospholipid synthesis were studied. 2. 2-Aminopropan-1-ol and 2-aminobutan-1-ol were the most efficient inhibitors of [14C]ethanolamine incorporation into phospholipids, whereas the incorporation of [3H]choline was inhibited most extensively by NN-diethylethanolamine and NN-dimethylethanolamine. 3. When the analogues were incubated with [3H]glycerol and hepatocytes, the appearance of 3H in unnatural phospholipids indicated that they were incorporated, at least in part, via CDP-derivatives. The distribution of [3H]glycerol among molecular species of phospholipids containing 2-aminopropan-1-ol and 1-aminopropan-2-ol was the same as in phosphatidylethanolamine. In other phospholipid analogues the distribution of 3H was more similar to that in phosphatidylcholine. 4. NN-Diethylethanolamine stimulated both the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine and the incorporation of [Me-14C]methionine into phospholipids. Other N-alkyl- or NN-dialkyl-ethanolamines also stimulated [14C]methionine incorporation, but inhibited the conversion of phosphatidylethanolamine into phosphatidylcholine. This indicates that phosphatidyl-NN-diethylethanolamine is a poor methyl acceptor, in contrast with other N-alkylated phosphatidylethanolamines. 5. These results on the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in intact cells are discussed with respect to the possible control points. They also provide guidelines for future experiments on the manipulation of phospholipid polar-headgroup composition in primary cultures of hepatocytes. PMID:606244

  15. Advances in reactive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Guyot, A

    2004-05-20

    The study of reactive surfactants and their applications in the synthesis of latexes for waterborne coatings has been recently boosted by two successive European programmes, involving all together eight academic and five industrial laboratories. The most significant results were obtained using surfactants derived from maleic and related anhydrides, or both nonionic and anionic reactive polymeric surfactants. Such surfactants are able to improve the stability of styrenic and acrylic latexes vs. various constraints, such as electrolyte addition, freeze-thawing tests or extraction with alcohol or acetone. The properties of films used in waterborne coatings are also improved in case of water exposure (less water uptake, dimensional stability), as well as improved weatherability, and blocking properties. Formulations for woodstain varnishes, metal coating of printing inks, based on the use of simple polymerizable surfactants, are now in the market. PMID:15072924

  16. Phospholipid composition of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Joseph, L; Stephens, R; Horrocks, L A

    1992-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the phospholipid compositions of cultured human endothelial cells are reported here. No significant differences were found between the phospholipid compositions of cells from human artery, saphenous and umbilical vein. However, due to the small sample sizes, relatively large standard deviations for some of the phospholipid classes were observed. A representative composition of endothelial cells is: phosphatidylcholine 36.6%, choline plasmalogen 3.7%, phosphatidylethanolamine 10.2%, ethanolamine plasmalogen 7.6%, sphingomyelin 10.8%, phosphatidylserine 7.1%, lysophosphatidylcholine 7.5%, phosphatidylinositol 3.1%, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 3.6%, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 1.8%, phosphatidic acid 1.9%, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 1.5%, and cardiolipin 1.9%. The cells possess high choline plasmalogen and lysophosphatidylethanolamine contents. The other phospholipids are within the normal biological ranges expected. Phospholipids were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantified by lipid phosphorus assay. PMID:1315902

  17. Extensive exchange of rat liver microsomal phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Zilversmit, D B; Hughes, M E

    1977-08-15

    Liver microsomal fractions were prepared from rats injected with a single dose of choline [14C]methylchloride or with single or multiple doses of 32Pi. Exchangeability of microsomal phospholipids was determined by incubation with an excess of mitochondria and phospholipid exchange proteins derived from beef heart, beef liver or rat liver. Labeled phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were found to act as a single pool and were 85--95% exchangeable in 1--2h. High latencies of mannose-6-phosphate phosphohydrolase activities and impermeability of microsomes to EDTA proved that phospholipid exchange proteins did not have access to the intracisternal space. If microsomal membranes are largely composed of phospholipid bilayers, the experiments suggest that one or more of the phospholipid classes in microsomal membranes undergo rapid translocation between the inner and outer portions of the bilayer. PMID:889827

  18. Patterning and characterization of model phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Calzzani, Fernando A., Jr.; Taguenang, Jean M.; Sileshi, Redahegn K.; Sharma, Anup

    2008-08-01

    Phospholipid, which is a building block of biological membranes, plays an important role in compartmentalization of cellular reaction environment and control of the physicochemical conditions inside the reaction environment. Phospholipid bilayer membrane has been proposed as a natural biocompatible platform for attaching biological molecules like proteins for biosensing related application. Due to the enormous potential applications of biomimetic model biomembranes, various techniques for depositions and patterning of these membranes onto solid supports and their possible biotechnological applications have been reported by different groups. In this work, patterning of phospholipid thin-films is accomplished by interferometric lithography as well as using lithographic masks in liquid phase. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Atomic Force microscopy are used to characterize the model phospholipid membrane and the patterning technique. We describe an easy and reproducible technique for direct patterning of azo-dye (NBD)-labeled phospholipid (phosphatidylcholine) in aqueous medium using a low-intensity 488 nm Ar+ laser and various kinds of lithographic masks.

  19. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein. PMID:26928591

  20. Self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of stabilized ellagic acid–phospholipid complex with improved dissolution and permeability

    PubMed Central

    Avachat, Amelia M.; Patel, Vijay G.

    2014-01-01

    Ellagic acid (EA), a plant polyphenol known for its wide-range of health benefits has limited use due to its low oral bioavailability. In this study, a new self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS), based on the phospholipid complex technique, was developed to improve the oral bioavailability of ellagic acid. Ellagic acid–phospholipid complex was prepared by an anti-solvent method and characterized. Enhanced lipophilicity after the formation of ellagic acid–phospholipid complex was verified through solubility studies. Preliminary screening was carried out to select oil, surfactant and co-surfactant. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the area of nanoemulsification. Formulations were optimized on the basis of globule size, cloud point and robustness to dilution. The optimized SNEDDS of ellagic acid–phospholipid complex showed mean globule size of 106 ± 0.198 nm and cloud point at 83–85 °C. The in vitro drug release from SNEDDS was found to be higher compared to EA suspension and complex, while ex vivo studies showed increased permeation from SNEDDS compared to EA suspension. Moreover, SNEDDS overcome the food effect which was shown by EA suspension. Thus, SNEDDS were found to be influential in improving the release performance of EA, indicating their potential to improve the oral bioavailability of EA. PMID:26106276

  1. Phase transitions in hydrophobe/phospholipid mixtures: hints at connections between pheromones and anaesthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Borsacchi, Silvia; Geppi, Marco; Macchi, Sara; Ninham, Barry W; Fratini, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Moira; Baglioni, Piero; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

    2016-06-01

    The phase behavior of a mixture of a typical insect pheromone (olean) and a phospholipid (DOPC)/water dispersion is extensively explored through SAXS, NMR and DSC experiments. The results mimic those obtained with anaesthetics in phospholipid/water systems. They also mimic the behavior and microstructure of ternary mixtures of a membrane mimetic, bilayer-forming double chained surfactants, oils and water. Taken together with recent models for conduction of the nervous impulse, all hint at lipid involvement and the underlying unity in mechanisms of pheromone, anaesthetic and hydrophobic drugs, where a local phase change in the lipid membrane architecture may be at least partly involved in the transmission of the signal. PMID:27210443

  2. Role of surfactant in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed that demonstrates how the mesothelial cell in the normal peritoneum and comparable serosal cavities secretes surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) as a means of protecting itself and the membrane it forms with its neighbors. It is shown how SAPL, if adsorbed (reversibly bound) to mesothelium, can impart excellent lubricity, antiwear and release (antistick) properties, while impeding surgical adhesion formation. More-speculative benefits include acting as a deterrent to fibrosis and as a barrier to both protein leakage and pathogen invasion by spanning cell junctions. Such spanning would also "pin down" cell corners, impeding peeling as the first step in exfoliation encountered in prolonged continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The molecular mechanism underlying each of these possible functions is adsorption. Morphological and hydrophobicity studies are discussed as validation for such an adsorbed lining and how it can be fortified by administering exogenous SAPL. Any role for SAPL in ultrafiltration is much more controversial. However, a surfactant lining can explain the very high permeability of the membrane to lipid-soluble drugs, implying that it is a barrier to water-soluble solutes. The clinical and animal evidence is conflicting but would seem to be best explained by a role for the barrier in promoting semipermeability, and hence the osmotic driving force for water transmission. Thus, adsorption of exogenous SAPL in CAPD patients with low ultrafiltration seems to restore this barrier function. The future direction for surfactant in CAPD would seem to rest with the physical chemists in producing formulations that optimize adsorption, probably involving a compromise between water solubility and surface activity of the phospholipids selected. It might even warrant using the interdialytic interval for readsorbing SAPL without the problem of dilution by a large volume of dialysate. PMID:11117241

  3. Surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, in respiratory fungal infections: their role in the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Carreto-Binaghi, Laura Elena; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex fluid that comprises phospholipids and four proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D) with different biological functions. SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D are essential for the lungs' surface tension function and for the organization, stability and metabolism of lung parenchyma. SP-A and SP-D, which are also known as pulmonary collectins, have an important function in the host's lung immune response; they act as opsonins for different pathogens via a C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain and enhance the attachment to phagocytic cells or show their own microbicidal activity by increasing the cellular membrane permeability. Interactions between the pulmonary collectins and bacteria or viruses have been extensively studied, but this is not the same for fungal pathogens. SP-A and SP-D bind glucan and mannose residues from fungal cell wall, but there is still a lack of information on their binding to other fungal carbohydrate residues. In addition, both their relation with immune cells for the clearance of these pathogens and the role of surfactant proteins' regulation during respiratory fungal infections remain unknown. Here we highlight the relevant findings associated with SP-A and SP-D in those respiratory mycoses where the fungal infective propagules reach the lungs by the airways. PMID:27250970

  4. Arabidopsis ACBP6 is an acyl-CoA-binding protein associated with phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin-Fang; Xiao, Shi

    2008-01-01

    In our recent paper in Plant Physiology, we showed that the Arabidopsis thaliana 10-kD acyl-CoA-binding protein, ACBP6, is subcellularly localized to the cytosol and that the overexpression of ACBP6 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced freezing tolerance. ACBP6-conferred freezing tolerance was independent of induced cold-regulated (COLD-RESPONSIVE) gene expression, but was correlated to an enhanced expression of phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ). Lipid analyses on cold-acclimated freezing-treated ACBP6-overexpressors revealed a decline in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and an elevation of phosphatidic acid (PA) in comparison to wild type. Furthermore, the His-tagged ACBP6 recombinant protein was observed using in vitro filter-binding assays to bind PC, but not PA or lysophosphatidylcholine. Taken together, our results implicate roles for ACBP6 in phospholipid metabolism that is related to gene regulation and PC-binding/transfer. This represents the first report demonstrating the in vitro binding of an ACBP to a phospholipid. The effect of ACBP6 on PLDδ expression is reminiscent of yeast 10-kD ACBP function in the regulation of genes associated with stress responses, fatty acid synthesis and phospholipid synthesis. However, the yeast ACBP regulates the expression of genes involved in phospholipid synthesis by donation of acyl-CoA esters and its binding to phospholipids remains to be demonstrated. PMID:19704440

  5. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  6. Effects of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants on the size and dynamics of phosphatidylcholine bilayers with saturated and unsaturated chains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu

    2015-07-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants of different sizes were simulated with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Regardless of the phospholipid type, larger surfactants at higher concentrations more significantly insert into the bilayer and increase the bilayer-surface size, in agreement with experiments and previous simulations. Insertion of surfactants only slightly decreases the bilayer thickness, as also observed in experiments. Although the surfactant insertion and its effect on the bilayer size and thickness are similar in different types of bilayers, the volume fractions of surfactants in the bilayer are higher for DMPC bilayers than for POPC and DOPC bilayers. In particular, ionic surfactants with four hydrocarbons yield their volume fractions of 4.6% and 8.7%, respectively, in POPC and DMPC bilayers, in quantitative agreement with experimental values of ∼5% and ∼10%. Also, the inserted surfactants increase the lateral diffusivity of the bilayer, which depends on the bilayer type. These findings indicate that although the surfactant insertion does not depend on the bilayer type, the effects of surfactants on the volume fraction and bilayer dynamics occur more significantly in the DMPC bilayer because of the smaller area per lipid and shorter saturated tails, which helps explain the experimental observations regarding different volume fractions of surfactants in POPC and DMPC bilayers. PMID:26055631

  7. Mitochondrial phospholipids: role in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential components of eukaryotic cells and are involved in a diverse set of cellular processes that include ATP production, cellular signalling, apoptosis and cell growth. These organelles are thought to have originated from a symbiotic relationship between prokaryotic cells in an effort to provide a bioenergetic jump and thus, the greater complexity observed in eukaryotes (Lane and Martin 2010). Mitochondrial processes are required not only for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, but also allow cell to cell and tissue to tissue communication (Nunnari and Suomalainen 2012). Mitochondrial phospholipids are important components of this system. Phospholipids make up the characteristic outer and inner membranes that give mitochondria their shape. In addition, these membranes house sterols, sphingolipids and a wide variety of proteins. It is the phospholipids that also give rise to other characteristic mitochondrial structures such as cristae (formed from the invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the matrix (area within cristae) and the intermembrane space (IMS) which separates the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Phospholipids are the building blocks that make up these structures. However, the phospholipid composition of the OMM and IMM is unique in each membrane. Mitochondria are able to synthesize some of the phospholipids it requires, but the majority of cellular lipid biosynthesis takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in conjunction with the Golgi apparatus (Fagone and Jackowski 2009). In this review, we will focus on the role that mitochondrial phospholipids play in specific cellular functions and discuss their biosynthesis, metabolism and transport as well as the differences between the OMM and IMM phospholipid composition. Finally, we will focus on the human diseases that result from disturbances to mitochondrial phospholipids and the current research being performed to help

  8. [Drug-induced alteration of the alveolar content of pulmonary surfactant ].

    PubMed

    Alcindor, L G

    1982-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipoprotein made up mostly of tensio-active phospholipids. It is synthesized by type II pneumocytes and accumulates as lamellar bodies before being excreted into pulmonary alveoli where it fills intercellular spaces and results in a liquid film (about 1 micron thick) covering the alveolar wall. Surfactant turnover occurs through the action of phospholipases from the alveolus or pneumocytes. Level of alveolar surfactant dependents on the ratio of synthesis and degradation of its principal constituent, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine. Many substances are known to be able of alter this ratio. Among these, synthetic glucocorticosteroids appear to be the most active in increasing alveolar surfactant. The multiple possible sites of action of these steroids explain their relative efficacy in the prevention of respiratory distress in humans. Studies in progress should increase the number and the quality of drugs available for this purpose. PMID:6896976

  9. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  10. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B (SP-B) mRNA stability is independent of activated glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Tillis, Ceá C; Huang, Helen W; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2011-06-01

    Adequate expression of surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is critical in the function of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension. Expression of SP-B mRNA is restricted to specific lung-airway epithelial cells, and human SP-B mRNA stability is increased in the presence of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX). Although the mechanism of SP-B mRNA stabilization by DEX is unknown, studies suggest involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We developed a dual-cistronic plasmid-based expression assay in which steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA, determined by Northern analysis, reproducibly reflect changes in SP-B mRNA stability. Using this assay, we found that steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA increased greater than twofold in transfected human-airway epithelial cells (A549) incubated with DEX (10(-7) M). DEX-mediated changes in SP-B mRNA levels required the presence of the SP-B mRNA 3'-untranslated region but did not require ongoing protein synthesis. The effect of DEX on SP-B mRNA levels was dose dependent, with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. DEX increased levels of SP-B mRNA in cells lacking GR, and the presence of the GR antagonist RU486 did not interfere with the effect of DEX. Surprisingly, other steroid hormones (progesterone, estradiol, and vitamin D; 10(-7) M) significantly increased SP-B mRNA levels, suggesting a common pathway of steroid hormone action on SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that the effect of DEX to increase SP-B mRNA stability is independent of activated GR and suggests that the mechanism is mediated by posttranscriptional or nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids. PMID:21398497

  11. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. PMID:26869216

  12. Waterflooding employing amphoteric surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Stournas, S.

    1980-08-05

    Process for the recovery of oil from a subterranean oil reservoir involving the injection into the reservoir of an aqueous solution of an amphoteric surfactant having an inner quaternary ammonium group linked to a terminal sulfonate or carboxylate group is described. The amphoteric surfactants may be employed in relatively low concentrations within the range of 0.0005 to 0.1% by weight and injected in a slug of at least 0.5 pv. The apparatus may be applied in situations in which the reservoir waters and/or the waters employed in formulating the surfactant solution contain relatively high amounts of divalent metal ions. Specifically described amphoteric surfactants include hydrocarby dialkyl or dihydroxyalkyl ammonium alkane sulfonates and carboxylates in which the hydrocarbyl group contains from 8 to 26 carbon atoms. 29 claims.

  13. Epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP Signaling Regulates Multiple Biological Processes during Perinatal Lung Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, James P.; Schehr, Angelica; Wang, Yanhua; Huo, Liya; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout postnatal life. Defects in the surfactant system are associated with common pulmonary disorders including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults. Lipogenesis is essential for the synthesis of pulmonary surfactant by type II epithelial cells lining the alveoli. This study sought to identify the role of pulmonary epithelial SREBP, a transcriptional regulator of cellular lipid homeostasis, during a critical time period of perinatal lung maturation in the mouse. Genome wide mRNA expression profiling of lung tissue from transgenic mice with epithelial-specific deletions of Scap (ScapΔ/Δ, resulting in inactivation of SREBP signaling) or Insig1 and Insig2 (Insig1/2Δ/Δ, resulting in activation of SREBP signaling) was assessed. Differentially expressed genes responding to SREBP perturbations were identified and subjected to functional enrichment analysis, pathway mapping and literature mining to predict upstream regulators and transcriptional networks regulating surfactant lipid homeostasis. Through comprehensive data analysis and integration, time dependent effects of epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP deletion and defined SCAP/INSIG/SREBP-associated genes, bioprocesses and downstream pathways were identified. SREBP signaling influences epithelial development, cell death and cell proliferation at E17.5, while primarily influencing surfactant physiology, lipid/sterol synthesis, and phospholipid transport after birth. SREBP signaling integrated with the Wnt/β-catenin and glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathways during perinatal lung maturation. SREBP regulates perinatal lung lipogenesis and maturation through multiple mechanisms by interactions with distinct sets of regulatory partners. PMID:24806461

  14. Localization of Anionic Phospholipids in Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Piercen M.; Crooks, John A.; Leidl, Mathias; Yoon, Earl J.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid with a characteristically large curvature and is of growing interest for two primary reasons: (i) it binds to and regulates many peripheral membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria, and (ii) it is distributed asymmetrically in rod-shaped cells and is concentrated at the poles and division septum. Despite the growing number of studies of CL, its function in bacteria remains unknown. 10-N-Nonyl acridine orange (NAO) is widely used to image CL in bacteria and mitochondria, as its interaction with CL is reported to produce a characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission. Using a suite of biophysical techniques, we quantitatively studied the interaction of NAO with anionic phospholipids under physiologically relevant conditions. We found that NAO is promiscuous in its binding and has photophysical properties that are largely insensitive to the structure of diverse anionic phospholipids to which it binds. Being unable to rely solely on NAO to characterize the localization of CL in Escherichia coli cells, we instead used quantitative fluorescence microscopy, mass spectrometry, and mutants deficient in specific classes of anionic phospholipids. We found CL and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) concentrated in the polar regions of E. coli cell membranes; depletion of CL by genetic approaches increased the concentration of PG at the poles. Previous studies suggested that some CL-binding proteins also have a high affinity for PG and display a pattern of cellular localization that is not influenced by depletion of CL. Framed within the context of these previous experiments, our results suggest that PG may play an essential role in bacterial physiology by maintaining the anionic character of polar membranes. PMID:25002539

  15. A ToF-SIMS study of the lateral organization of lipids and proteins in pulmonary surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Keating, Eleonora; Waring, Alan J; Walther, Frans J; Possmayer, Fred; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Petersen, Nils O

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex lipid-protein mixture whose main function is to reduce the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of alveoli to minimize the work of breathing. The exact mechanism by which surfactant monolayers and multilayers are formed and how they lower surface tension to very low values during lateral compression remains uncertain. We used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to study the lateral organization of lipids and peptide in surfactant preparations ranging in complexity. We show that we can successfully determine the location of phospholipids, cholesterol and a peptide in surfactant Langmuir-Blodgett films and we can determine the effect of cholesterol and peptide addition. A thorough understanding of the lateral organization of PS interfacial films will aid in our understanding of the role of each component as well as different lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions. This may further our understanding of pulmonary surfactant function. PMID:21110942

  16. [Pharmacological agents and transport nanosystems based on plant phospholipids].

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, N V; Prosorovskiy, V N; Ignatov, D V; Druzilovskaya, O S; Kudinov, V A; Kasatkina, E O; Tikhonova, E G; Ipatova, O M

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of plant phosphatidylcholine (PC)-based pharmacological agents has been developed under academician A.I. Archakov leadership at the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry (IBMC). For their production a unique technology allowing to obtain dry lyophilized phospholipid nanoparticles of 30 nm was elaborated. The successful practical application of PC nanoparticles as a drug agent may be illustrated by Phosphogliv (oral and injection formulations). Being developed at IBMC for the treatment of liver diseases, including viral hepatitis, Phosphogliv (currently marketed by the "Pharmstandard" company) is approved for clinical application in 2000, and is widely used in medical practice. Based on the developed and scaled in IBMC technology of prerparation of ultra small size phospholipid nanoparticles without the use of detergents/surfactants and stabilizers another drug preparation, Phospholipovit, exhibiting pronounced hypolipidemic properties has been obtained. Recently completed preclinical studies have shown that PC nanoparticles of 20-30 nm activate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and in this context it is more active than well known foreign preparation Essentiale. Phospholipovit is now at the stage of clinical trials (phase 1 completed). PC was also used as a basis for the development of a transport nanosystem with a particles size of 20-25 nm in diameter and incorporation of various drug substances from various therapeutic groups. Using several drugs substances as an example, increased bioavailability and specific activity were demonstrated for the formulations equipped with such transport nanosystem. Formulations equipped with the transport nanosystems have been developed for such pharmacological agents as doxorubicin, rifampin, budesonide, chlorin E6, prednisone, and others. PMID:25978388

  17. [Phospholipids metabolism disorders in acute stroke].

    PubMed

    Solovieva, E Yu; Farrahova, K I; Karneev, A N; Chipova, D T

    2016-01-01

    The disturbances of cerebral circulation results in the violation of phospholipid metabolism. Activation of lipid peroxidation and protein kinase C and release of intracellular calcium leads to disruption of the homeostasis of phosphatidylcholine. The use of cytidine-5-diphosphocholine, which is used as an intermediate compound in the biosynthesis of phospholipids of the cell membrane, helps to stabilize cell membranes, and reduce the formation of free radicals. PMID:27045147

  18. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  19. Toxic effects of cadmium on the developing rat lung. II. Glycogen and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Daston, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    Maternal exposure to Cd reduces lung weight and alters pulmonary surfactant accumulation in the fetus. This may lead to respiratory distress and death postnatally. In this study, the effects of maternal Cd administration on additional biochemical parameters of the fetal lung were investigated. Pregnant rats were given sc injections of 8 mg/kg CdCl/sub 2/ on d 12-15 of gestation and sacrificed throughout late gestation. Fetal lungs were examined for protein, DNA, and glycogen. Incorporation of choline into total and disaturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured in fetal lung slices. The DNA content of the treated lungs was reduced, but the protein/DNA ratio was not altered. Thus the reduced lung weight was due to hypoplasia, not hypotrophy. Incorporation of choline into pulmonary sphingomyelin was not altered by the treatment. Choline incorporation into both total and disaturated phosphatidylcholine, the most important surfactant component, was reduced on the final days of gestation. Glycogen was reduced in both absolute quantity and cellular concentration in lungs of treated fetuses. Glucose derived from glycogen is a major metabolic substrate in the fetal lung and probably contributes greatly to phospholipid synthesis. The reduction in glucose concentration in lungs of treated fetuses may be a factor in the diminished synthesis of pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylcholine before birth. Prenatal Cd exposure causes pulmonary hypoplasia; reduces the amount of glycogen present in the fetal lung; and diminishes the rate of synthesis of pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylcholine.

  20. Spectral Monitoring of Surfactant Clearance during Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Robin J.; Kemp, Sarah J.; Goldstraw, Peter; Tetley, Teresa D.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we report on the noninvasive identification of spectral markers of alveolar type II (ATII) cell differentiation in vitro using Raman microspectroscopy. ATII cells are progenitor cells for alveolar type I (ATI) cells in vivo, and spontaneously differentiate toward an ATI-like phenotype in culture. We analyzed undifferentiated and differentiated primary human ATII cells, and correlated Raman spectral changes to cellular changes in morphology and marker protein synthesis (surfactant protein C, alkaline phosphatase, caveolin-1). Undifferentiated ATII cells demonstrated spectra with strong phospholipid vibrations, arising from alveolar surfactant stored within cytoplasmic lamellar bodies (Lbs). Differentiated ATI-like cells yielded spectra with significantly less lipid content. Factor analysis revealed a phospholipid-dominated spectral component as the main discriminator between the ATII and ATI-like phenotypes. Spectral modeling of the data revealed a significant decrease in the spectral contribution of cellular lipids—specifically phosphatidyl choline, the main constituent of surfactant, as ATII cells differentiate. These observations were consistent with the clearance of surfactant from Lbs as ATII cells differentiate, and were further supported by cytochemical staining for Lbs. These results demonstrate the first spectral characterization of primary human ATII cells, and provide insight into the biochemical properties of alveolar surfactant in its unperturbed cellular environment. PMID:18820234

  1. Exposure of the hydrophobic components of porcine lung surfactant to oxidant stress alters surface tension properties.

    PubMed Central

    Gilliard, N; Heldt, G P; Loredo, J; Gasser, H; Redl, H; Merritt, T A; Spragg, R G

    1994-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that oxidation of lung surfactant results in loss of surface tension lowering function. Porcine lung surfactant was exposed to conditions known to cause lipid peroxidation (0.2 mM FeCl2 + 0.1 mM H2O2 or 5 microM CuCl2). Lipid peroxidation was verified by detection of conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, fluorescent products, hydroxy alkenals, and loss of unsaturated fatty acids. Exposed samples had significantly diminished surface tension lowering ability in vitro as measured in a bubble surfactometer. Samples exposed to FeCl2 + H2O2 had significantly diminished surface tension lowering ability in vivo as indicated by their reduced ability to improve lung compliance of surfactant-deficient fetal rabbits. Oxidation of phospholipid mixtures with surface tension lowering activity and containing unsaturated acyl groups resulted in partial loss of activity as determined in vitro. These results suggest that the effect of oxidants on lung surfactant function is due, in part, to effects on the phospholipid components and that acute pulmonary inflammation accompanied by oxygen radical production may result in surfactant lipid peroxidation and loss of surface tension lowering function. PMID:8200999

  2. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  3. Phospholipids and fatty acids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Sud, I J; Feingold, D S

    1975-01-01

    The phospholipids and fatty acids of two strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae of different penicillin susceptibilities were examined. The phospholipids, which comprise about 8% of the dry weight of the cells, consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine (70%) and phosphatidylglycerol (20%); small amounts of phosphatidylcholine and traces of cardiolipin were also present. Growing and stationary-phase cells were similar in content and composition of phospholipids except for phosphatidylcholine, which increased two- to fivefold in the stationary-phase cells. The fatty acids of the phospholipids were characterized by two major acids, palmitic and a C16:1, with myristic and a C18:1 acid present in smaller amounts. The fatty acids present in purified phospholipid fractions varied considerably in relative proportions from fraction to fraction. No significant difference in the composition of phospholipids from the two strains was evident. Large amounts of beta-hydroxy lauric acid were detected only after saponification of the organisms. Differences in the lipid composition between the gonococcus and other gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:810478

  4. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveolus, thereby maintaining lung volumes during the respiratory cycle. In premature newborn infants, the lack of surfactant causes atelectasis and respiratory failure, characteristic of respiratory of distress syndrome. Surfactant is comprised of lipids and associated proteins that are required for surfactant function. Surfactant proteins B and C and a lamellar body associated transport protein, ABCA3 play critical roles in surfactant synthesis and function. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins cause lethal respiratory distress in newborn infants. This review discusses the clinical and pathological findings associated with these inherited disorders of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:16798578

  5. Fluoroalkylated polyethylene glycol as potential surfactant for perfluorocarbon emulsion.

    PubMed

    Peng, C A; Hsu, Y C

    2001-11-01

    So far, perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions have been manufactured based mainly on two surfactants, Pluronic F-68 and egg yolk phospholipids (EYP) for clinical use. However, they have been documented to induce inflammatory or allergic responses when PFC emulsions were injected into human bloodstream. The cause of these side effects is associated with the phagocytosis of emulsified PFC microparticles by cells such as macrophages. In order to lessen the side effects, it is logic to develop surfactants, which are more phagocytosis-resistant and biocompatible. In this study, a perfluoroalkylated polyethylene glycol (R(F)-PEG) surfactant was synthesized by reacting perfluorooctanoyl chloride (C7F15COCl) with PEG of molecular weigh 8000. Both R(F)-PEG 8000 and EYP were used to make PFC emulsions separately by an ultrasonic homogenizer. Individual PFC emulsions were then incubated with mouse macrophage J774A.1 cells to examine the degree of phagocytosis. From microscopic observation of cell morphology, our results showed that the process of phagocytosis was retarded to a large extend using the R(F)-PEG surfactant. We also harnessed 19F-NMR to quantitatively detect the amount of PFC emulsions phagocytosed by J774A.1 cells. 19F-NMR result was consistent with the qualitative microscopic observation aforementioned. PMID:11795633

  6. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  7. Impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on surfactant function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Hales, C.A.; Thompson, B.T.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F. )

    1989-12-01

    Plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), increase up to one thousand-fold as a result of trauma or inflammation. CRP binds to phosphorylcholine (PC) in a calcium-ion dependent manner. The structural homology between PC and the major phospholipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), led to the present study in which we examined if CRP levels might be increased in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and subsequently interfere with surfactant function. Our results showed that CRP levels in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) was increased in patients with ARDS (97.8 +/- 84.2 micrograms/mg total protein vs. 4.04 +/- 2.2 micrograms/mg total protein in normals). Our results show that CRP binds to liposomes containing DPPC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). As a result of this interaction, CRP inhibits the surface activity of a PG-DPPC mixture when tested with a Wilhelmy surfactometer or with the Enhorning pulsating bubble apparatus. Furthermore, the surface activity of a clinically used surfactant replacement, Surfactant TA (2 mg/ml), was also severely impaired by CRP in a dose-dependent manner (doses used ranging from 24.5 to 1,175 micrograms/ml). In contrast, human serum albumin (HSA) at 500 and 900 micrograms/ml had no inhibitory effect on Surfactant TA surface activity. These results suggest that CRP, although not an initiating insult in ARDS, may contribute to the subsequent abnormalities of surfactant function and thus the pathogenesis of the pulmonary dysfunction seen in ARDS.

  8. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Hruz, Paul W

    2016-08-12

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  9. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  10. Crystallographic Identification and Functional Characterization of Phospholipids as Ligands for the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Choi, Mihwa; Cavey, Greg; Daugherty, Jennifer; Suino, Kelly; Kovach, Amanda; Bingham, Nathan C.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Xu, H.Eric

    2010-11-10

    The orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) regulates the differentiation and function of endocrine glands. Although SF-1 is constitutively active in cell-based assays, it is not known whether this transcriptional activity is modulated by ligands. Here, we describe the 1.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of the SF-1 ligand binding domain in complex with an LXXLL motif from a coregulator protein. The structure reveals the presence of a phospholipid ligand in a surprisingly large pocket ({approx}1600 {angstrom}{sup 3}), with the receptor adopting the canonical active conformation. The bound phospholipid is readily exchanged and modulates SF-1 interactions with coactivators. Mutations designed to reduce the size of the SF-1 pocket or to disrupt hydrogen bonds with the phospholipid abolish SF-1/coactivator interactions and significantly reduce SF-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide evidence that SF-1 is regulated by endogenous ligands and suggest an unexpected relationship between phospholipids and endocrine development and function.

  11. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  12. Surfactant Proteins in Smoking-Related Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Papiris, Spyridon; Papadaki, Georgia; Manali, Effrosyni D; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a highly surface-active mixture of proteins and lipids that is synthesized and secreted in the alveoli by type II epithelial cells and is found in the fluid lining the alveolar surface. The protein part of surfactant constitutes two hydrophilic proteins (SP-A and SP-D) that regulate surfactant metabolism and have immunologic functions, and two hydrophobic proteins (SP-B and SP-C), which play a direct role in the organization of the surfactant structure in the interphase and in the stabilization of the lipid layers during the respiratory cycle. Several studies have shown that cigarette smoke seems to affect, in several ways, both surfactant homeostasis and function. The alterations in surfactants' biophysical properties caused by cigarette smoking, contribute to the development of several smoking related lung diseases. In this review we provide information on biochemical and physiological aspects of the pulmonary surfactant and on its possible association with the development of two major chronic diseases of the lung known to be related to smoking, i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Additional information on the possible role of surfactant protein alterations and/or dysfunction in the combination of these two conditions, recently described as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are also provided. PMID:26420367

  13. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  14. Effect of mycolic acid on surface activity of binary surfactant lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2008-12-15

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis lies in close physical proximity to alveolar surfactant. Cell walls of the mycobacteria contain loosely bound, detachable surface-active lipids. In this study, the effect of mycolic acid (MA), the most abundant mycobacterial cell wall lipid, on the surface activity of phospholipid mixtures from lung surfactant was investigated using Langmuir monolayers and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the presence of mycolic acid, all the surfactant lipid mixtures attained high minimum surface tensions (between 20 and 40 mN/m) and decreased surface compressibility moduli <50 mN/m. AFM images showed that the smooth surface topography of surfactant lipid monolayers was altered with addition of MA. Aggregates with diverse heights of at least two layer thicknesses were found in the presence of mycolic acid. Mycolic acids could aggregate within surfactant lipid monolayers and result in disturbed monolayer surface activity. The extent of the effect of mycolic acid depended on the initial state of the monolayer, with fluid films of DPPC-POPC and DPPC-CHOL being least affected. The results imply inhibitory effects of mycolic acid toward lung surfactant lipids and could be a mechanism of lung surfactant dysfunction in pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:18848703

  15. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  16. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  17. Genetic variation in Surfactant Protein-A2 (SP-A2) leads to differential binding to Mycoplasma pneumoniae membranes and regulation of host responses

    PubMed Central

    Ledford, Julie G.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Addison, Kenneth J.; Wang, Ying; Nikam, Vinayak; Degan, Simone; Kandasamy, Pitachaimani; Tanyaratsrisakul, Sasipa; Fischer, Bernard M.; Kraft, Monica; Hollingsworth, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) is an extracellular pathogen that colonizes mucosal surfaces of the respiratory tract and is associated with asthma exacerbations. Previous reports demonstrate that surfactant protein-A (SP-A) binds live Mp and mycoplasma membranes (MMF) with high affinity. Humans express a repertoire of single amino acid genetic variants of SP-A that may be associated with lung disease, and our findings demonstrate that allelic differences in SP-A2 (Gln223Lys) affect the binding to MMF. We show that SP-A−/− mice are more susceptible to MMF exposure and have significant increases in mucin production and neutrophil recruitment. Novel humanized-SP-A2 transgenic mice harboring the hSP-A2 223K allele exhibit reduced neutrophil influx and mucin production in the lungs, when challenged with MMF, compared to SP-A−/− mice. Conversely, mice expressing hSP-A2 223Q have increased neutrophil influx and mucin production that is similar to SP-A−/− mice. Using tracheal epithelial cell cultures, we show that enhanced mucin production to MMF occurs in the absence of SP-A, and is not dependent upon neutrophil recruitment. Increased phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evident in the lungs of MMF-challenged mice when SP-A was absent. Pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR prior to MMF challenge dramatically reduced mucin production in SP-A−/− mice. These findings suggest a protective role for SP-A in limiting MMF-stimulated mucin production that occurs through interference with EGFR mediated signaling. The SP-A interaction with the EGFR signaling pathway appears to occur in an allele specific manner that may have important implications for SP-A polymorphisms in human diseases. PMID:25957169

  18. Changes in surfactant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after hemithorax irradiation in patients with mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, M.; Maasilta, P.; Kivisaari, L.; Mattson, K. )

    1990-04-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the surfactant system of the lung is affected shortly after irradiation. It is unclear, however, whether surfactant plays a role in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. In the present study surfactant components (saturated phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein A, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol) and other phospholipids of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were studied in four patients with pleural mesothelioma before and during hemithorax irradiation (70 Gy) as well as zero, 1, 2, 3, and 4 months following irradiation. The concentrations of these same components and of soluble proteins were also estimated in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) using urea as a marker of dilution. After radiotherapy, the concentrations of the surfactant components in ELF decreased to 12 to 55% of the control values before radiation, whereas the concentration of sphingomyelin in ELF increased ninefold. There were small changes in the other phospholipids. The concentration of soluble protein in ELF increased sevenfold. The minimum surface activity of crude BAL increased from 12 +/- 4 to 32 +/- 6 mN/m, and that of the sediment fraction of BAL increased from 7 +/- 4 to 22 +/- 6 mN/m, p less than 0.001. The protein-rich supernatant fraction of BAL from irradiated lung had a inhibitory effect on normal surfactant. There were significant correlations between the increasing severity of the radiologic changes on the one hand and, on the other, the saturated phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin ratio (p less than 0.001), the concentrations of soluble protein (p less than 0.001), and the concentrations of the surfactant components (p less than 0.02-0.001) in ELF.

  19. Biophysical activity of animal-derived exogenous surfactants mixed with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Kolomaznik, M; Calkovska, A; Herting, E; Stichtenoth, G

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous pulmonary surfactant is a potential delivery system for topical medications via the conducting airways. Due to the sensitivity to inactivation of surfactant, mutual interaction with the shipped drug should be evaluated. Little is known about the interactions between surfactant and antimicrobial drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether biophysical properties of animal-derived surfactants are modified by the bactericidal antibiotic rifampicin. An intracellular activity and a broad antimicrobiotic spectrum toward Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria make rifampicin an interesting substance against pulmonary infections. Curosurf® (porcine surfactant from minced lungs) and Survanta® (bovine surfactant extract) were diluted to 2.5-5.0 mg/ml of phospholipids in 0.9 % NaCl and rifampicin (RIF) was added at 1, 5, and 10 % (w/w). Minimum (γ(min)) and maximum (γ(max)) surface tension of a cyclically compressed bubble in the mixture was assessed with a pulsating bubble surfactometer. After 5 min, γ(min) of Survanta at a concentration of 3 mg/ml was significantly increased after addition of 5 and 10 % RIF (both p < 0.001). At 1 % RIF, the γ(min) of Survanta was ≈10 mN/m and this value was not significantly different to that of Survanta alone. The γ(min) of Curosurf at 3 mg/ml was increased with 10 % RIF (p < 0.001), but not with 1 and 5 %. At 5 mg/ml Survanta was inhibited by 10 % RIF (p < 0.05), while γ(min) of Curosurf was low (<5 mN/m) in all mixtures. In conclusion, Curosurf and Survanta interfere with RIF in a concentration-dependent manner. At the appropriate phospholipid concentration, especially porcine-derived surfactant is able to retain good surface activity when mixed with antibiotics. PMID:25252905

  20. Transcriptional responses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Ute; Rohde, Kyle H.; Wang, Zhengdong; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.; Russell, David G.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses microarray analyses to examine gene expression profiles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induced by exposure in vitro to bovine lung surfactant preparations that vary in apoprotein content: (i) whole lung surfactant (WLS) containing the complete mix of endogenous lipids and surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -B, -C, and -D; (ii) extracted lung surfactant (CLSE) containing lipids plus SP-B and -C; (iii) column-purified surfactant lipids (PPL) containing no apoproteins, and (iv) purified human SP-A. Exposure to WLS evoked a multitude of transcriptional responses in Mtb, with 52 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated at 30 min exposure, plus 146 genes up-regulated and 27 genes down-regulated at 2 h. Notably, WLS rapidly induced several membrane-associated lipases that presumptively act on surfactant lipids as substrates, and a large number of genes involved in the synthesis of phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM), a cell wall component known to be important in macrophage interactions and Mtb virulence. Exposure of Mtb to CLSE, PPL, or purified SP-A caused a substantially weaker transcriptional response (≤20 genes were induced) suggesting that interactions among multiple lipid-protein components of WLS may contribute to its effects on Mtb transcription. PMID:19272305

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  2. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  3. Release and formation of surface-localized ionic clusters (SLICs) into phospholipid rafts from colloidal solutions during coalescence.

    PubMed

    Lestage, David J; Urban, Marek W

    2005-03-15

    Stimuli-responsive behavior of phospholipids in the presence of ionic surfactants utilized in synthesis of MMA/nBA colloidal particles was investigated. Utilizing 1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (MHPC) phospholipid, and sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) surfactant as dispersing media in H(2)O, narrow unimodal particle size distributions of methyl methacrylate (MMA)/n-butyl acrylate (nBA) copolymers were synthesized. The particle diameters were 154 nm when a SDOSS/MHPC mixture was used and 161 nm using MHPC as the only surface-stabilizing species. When such colloidal dispersions are exposed to 1.7, 3.3, and 6.7 mM aqueous CaCl(2) and KCl electrolyte solutions, surface-localized ionic clusters are generated at the film-air interface that may serve as lipid rafts composed of crystalline phases of MHPC deposited on poly(MMA)/nBA films. These studies illustrate that it is possible to control release and morphology developments of surface phospholipid rafts on artificial surfaces. PMID:15752001

  4. Surfactant protein C-deficient mice are susceptible to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Witt, Teah L; Senft, Albert P; Baatz, John E; Folger, Dusti; Maxfield, Melissa D; Akinbi, Henry T; Newton, Danforth A; Prows, Daniel R; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2009-07-01

    Patients with mutations in the pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene develop interstitial lung disease and pulmonary exacerbations associated with viral infections including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pulmonary infection with RSV caused more severe interstitial thickening, air space consolidation, and goblet cell hyperplasia in SP-C-deficient (Sftpc(-/-)) mice compared with SP-C replete mice. The RSV-induced pathology resolved more slowly in Sftpc(-/-) mice with lung inflammation persistent up to 30 days postinfection. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage counts were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Sftpc(-/-) mice. Viral titers and viral F and G protein mRNA were significantly increased in both Sftpc(-/-) and heterozygous Sftpc(+/-) mice compared with controls. Expression of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) mRNA was increased in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice relative to Sftpc(+/+) mice before and after RSV infection. Consistent with the increased TLR3 expression, BAL inflammatory cells were increased in the Sftpc(-/-) mice after exposure to a TLR3-specific ligand, poly(I:C). Preparations of purified SP-C and synthetic phospholipids blocked poly(I:C)-induced TLR3 signaling in vitro. SP-C deficiency increases the severity of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation through regulation of TLR3 signaling. PMID:19304906

  5. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  6. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila Cigana

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:24578708

  7. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  8. Phospholipids accumulation in mucolipidosis IV cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bargal, R; Bach, G

    1988-01-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from mucolipidosis IV patients accumulated phospholipids when compared to normal controls or cells from other genotypes. The major stored compounds were identified as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and to a larger extent lysophosphatidylcholine and lysobisphosphatidic acid. Pulse chase experiments of 32P-labelled phospholipids showed increased retention of these compounds in the mucolipidosis IV lines throughout the pulse and chase periods. Phospholipase A1, A2, C, D and lysophospholipase showed normal activity in the mucolipidosis IV lines and thus the metabolic cause for this storage remains to be identified. PMID:3139925

  9. Phospholipid exchange reactions within the liver cell

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, W. C.; Dawson, R. M. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isolated rat liver mitochondria do not synthesize labelled phosphatidylcholine from CDP-[14C]choline or any phospholipid other than phosphatidic acid from [32P]phosphate. The minimal labelling of phosphatidylcholine and other phosphoglycerides can be attributed to microsomal contamination. However, when mitochondria and microsomes are incubated together with [32P]phosphate, the phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine of the reisolated mitochondria become labelled, suggesting a transfer of phospholipids between the two fractions. 2. When liver microsomes or mitochondria containing labelled phosphatidylcholine are independently incubated with the opposite un-labelled fraction, there is a substantial and rapid exchange of the phospholipid between the two membranes. Exchange of phosphatidylinositol also occurs rapidly, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid exchange only slowly. There is no corresponding transfer of marker enzymes. The transfer of phosphatidylcholine does not occur at 0°, and there is no requirement for added substrate, ATP or Mg2+, but the omission of a heat-labile supernatant fraction markedly decreases the exchange. 3. After intravenous injection of [32P]phosphate, short-period labelling experiments of the individual phospholipids of rat liver microsomes and mitochondria in vivo give no evidence for a similar exchange process. However, the incubation of isolated microsomes and mitochondria with [32P]phosphate also fails on reisolation of the fractions to demonstrate a precursor–product relationship between the individual phospholipids of the two membranes. 4. The intraperitoneal injection of [32P]phosphate results in a far greater proportion of the dose entering the liver than does intravenous administration. After intraperitoneal administration of [32P]phosphate the specific radioactivities of the individual phospholipids are in the order microsomes > outer mitochondrial membrane > inner

  10. On the molecular mechanism of flippase- and scramblase-mediated phospholipid transport.

    PubMed

    Montigny, Cédric; Lyons, Joseph; Champeil, Philippe; Nissen, Poul; Lenoir, Guillaume

    2016-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases are key regulators of transbilayer lipid asymmetry in eukaryotic cell membranes, critical to many trafficking and signaling pathways. P4-ATPases, in particular, are responsible for the uphill transport of phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane, as well as membranes of the late secretory/endocytic pathways, thereby establishing transbilayer asymmetry. Recent studies combining cell biology and biochemical approaches have improved our understanding of the path taken by lipids through P4-ATPases. Additionally, identification of several protein families catalyzing phospholipid 'scrambling', i.e. disruption of phospholipid asymmetry through energy-independent bi-directional phospholipid transport, as well as the recent report of the structure of such a scramblase, opens the way to a deeper characterization of their mechanism of action. Here, we discuss the molecular nature of the mechanism by which lipids may 'flip' across membranes, with an emphasis on active lipid transport catalyzed by P4-ATPases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26747647

  11. Calcium dependency of arachidonic acid incorporation into cellular phospholipids of different cell types.

    PubMed

    Daniele, J J; Fidelio, G D; Bianco, I D

    1999-07-01

    Ca2+ -independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is involved in the incorporation of arachidonic acid (AA) into resting macrophages by the generation of the lysophospholipid acceptor. The role of iPLA2 in AA remodeling in different cells was evaluated by studying the Ca2+ dependency of AA uptake from the medium, the incorporation into cellular phospholipids, and the effect of the iPLA2 inhibitor bromoenol lactone on these events. Uptake and esterification of AA into phospholipids were not affected by Ca2+ depletion in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and rat fibroblasts. The uptake was Ca2+ independent in chick embryo glial cells, but the incorporation into phospholipids was partially dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Both events were fully dependent on extra and intracellular Ca2+ in human platelets. In human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, the kinetics of incorporation in several isospecies of phospholipids was not affected by the absence of Ca2+ at short times (<30 min). The involvement of iPLA2 in the incorporation of AA from the medium was confirmed by the selective inhibition of this enzyme with bromoenol lactone, which reduced < or =50% of the incorporation of AA into phospholipids of human neutrophils. These data provide evidence that suggests iPLA2 plays a major role in regulating AA turnover in different cell types. PMID:10480488

  12. Protein and phospholipid methylation during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum and its relationship to calcium movements.

    PubMed Central

    Mato, J M; Marín-Cao, D

    1979-01-01

    Suspensions of cyclic AMP sensitive cells of Dictyostelium discoideum responded to a cyclic AMP pulse with increased methylation of a protein of molecular weight about 120,000 and increased phospholipid demethylation. Protein methylation reached its peak 15-30 sec after cyclic AMP addition. Phospholipid demethylation reached its maximum within 2 min and basal levels were recovered in 3 min. S-Adenosyl-L-methionine is probably the methyl donor. In vitro addition of 0.25 mM and 25 microM S-adenosyl-L-methionine to sonicated D. discoideum cells inhibited ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake by 70% and 25%, respectively. Based on these lines of evidence we propose that protein and phospholipid methylation are involved in D. discoideum chemotaxis probably by regulation of intracellular Ca2+ movements. PMID:230497

  13. Potential commercial applications of microbial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Banat, I M; Makkar, R S; Cameotra, S S

    2000-05-01

    Surfactants are surface-active compounds capable of reducing surface and interfacial tension at the interfaces between liquids, solids and gases, thereby allowing them to mix or disperse readily as emulsions in water or other liquids. The enormous market demand for surfactants is currently met by numerous synthetic, mainly petroleum-based, chemical surfactants. These compounds are usually toxic to the environment and non-biodegradable. They may bio-accumulate and their production, processes and by-products can be environmentally hazardous. Tightening environmental regulations and increasing awareness for the need to protect the ecosystem have effectively resulted in an increasing interest in biosurfactants as possible alternatives to chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic compounds of microbial origin with considerable potential in commercial applications within various industries. They have advantages over their chemical counterparts in biodegradability and effectiveness at extreme temperature or pH and in having lower toxicity. Biosurfactants are beginning to acquire a status as potential performance-effective molecules in various fields. At present biosurfactants are mainly used in studies on enhanced oil recovery and hydrocarbon bioremediation. The solubilization and emulsification of toxic chemicals by biosurfactants have also been reported. Biosurfactants also have potential applications in agriculture, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, detergents, personal care products, food processing, textile manufacturing, laundry supplies, metal treatment and processing, pulp and paper processing and paint industries. Their uses and potential commercial applications in these fields are reviewed. PMID:10855707

  14. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  15. Phospholipid association with the bovine cardiac mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R E; Montgomery, R I; Spach, P I; Cunningham, C C

    1985-01-01

    The association of different phospholipids with a lipid-depleted oligomycin-sensitive ATPase from bovine cardiac mitochondria [Serrano, Kanner & Racker (1976) J. Biol. Chem. 251, 2453-2461] has been examined using three approaches. First, reconstitution of the ATPase with different synthetic diacyl phospholipids resulted in a 2-10-fold stimulation of ATPase specific activity depending upon the particular phospholipid employed. The phospholipid headgroup region displayed the following order of ATPase reactivation potential: dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol greater than dioleoylphosphatidic acid greater than dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, the ATPase showed higher levels of specific activity when reconstituted with dioleoyl phospholipid derivatives compared with dimyristoyl derivatives. Second, examination of the phospholipid remaining associated with the lipid-depleted ATPase upon purification showed that phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol were present. No relative enrichment of any of these phospholipids (compared with their distribution in submitochondrial particles) was noted. Therefore, no preferential association between the ATPase and any one phospholipid could be found in the mitochondrial ATPase. Third, the sodium cholate-mediated phospholipid exchange procedure was employed for studying the phospholipid requirements of the ATPase. Replacement of about 50% of the mitochondrial phospholipid remaining with the lipid-depleted ATPase could be achieved utilizing either synthetic phosphatidic acid or phosphatidylcholine. Examination of the displaced mitochondrial phospholipid showed that phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol were replaced with equal facility. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3156584

  16. PLA2-responsive and SPIO-loaded phospholipid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Yan, Lesan; Chiorazzo, Michael; Delikatny, E. James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cheng, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    A PLA2-responsive and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-loaded phospholipid micelle was developed. The release of phospholipid-conjugated dye from these micelles was triggered due to phospholipid degradation by phospholipase A2. High relaxivity of the encapsulated SPIO could enable non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26139589

  17. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data. PMID:3176021

  18. Interaction of phospholipid with silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anju, K. N.; Mahesh, S.; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar

    2014-01-01

    Development of a simple method for incorporating phospholipids onto the surfaces of anisotropic silver nanorods as a stepping-stone for creating responsive and multifunctional nanocomposites. 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC)-silver nanorod composites were prepared by immobilizing liposomes onto the surface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) capped silver nanorods. Here we report the role of phospholipids to control the self assembly of silver nanorods into agglomerate architectures ranging from open "end-to-end" networks to densely packed "side-to-side" arrays. The tuning of electrostatic interactions within the phospholipid layers is governed to lipid silver nanorod assembly and also about the organization of phospholipid layers themselves around nanorod surfaces. The initial studies on passive lipid functionalized nanorods could serve as the groundwork for introducing active components into these systems to make more switchable or reconfigurable nanocomposite material. Changing the surface species on silver nanorods from CTAB to DSPC is reflected in ξ- potential measurements. The surface morphology is studied using SEM and TEM. The optical studies are carried out using UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  19. Feruloyl Dioleoyglycerol Antioxidant Capacity in Phospholipid Vesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl dioleoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molecule was incorporated into single-lamellar vesicles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at ...

  20. Glucocorticoids and beta-adrenergic-receptor agonists: their combined effect on fetal rabbit lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, L; Enhorning, G

    1985-08-15

    In a previous study on pregnant rabbits (Am J Obstet Gynecol 1983; 147:437) we found that a prolonged infusion of the beta 2-adrenergic-receptor agonist terbutaline would first cause a release of fetal pulmonary surfactant, so that more was available in the airways. However, the airway fluid then contained less surfactant, indicating a depletion of stores. Since terbutaline is often used in high doses as a tocolytic agent, surfactant depletion could be a serious side effect. With further studies on rabbits, we wanted to test the hypothesis that with an accelerated surfactant synthesis, achieved with glucocorticoids, the increased release, evoked with the terbutaline, would never cause a depletion of the surfactant stores. Our results supported this hypothesis. Betamethasone, administered to the pregnant doe on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh days of gestation, 0.1 mg/kg, increased compliance of the fetal lungs, and more phospholipid phosphorus could be lavaged from the airways. These effects were further increased when, following steroid administration, the doe was infused with terbutaline. Depletion of the surfactant stores was never seen when betamethasone was given prior to the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist. PMID:3839627

  1. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class. PMID:23094088

  2. Effects of surfactant/budesonide therapy on oxidative modifications in the lung in experimental meconium-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Tomcikova Mikusiakova, L; Kosutova, P; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious condition, which can be treated with exogenous surfactant and mechanical ventilation. However, meconium-induced inflammation, lung edema and oxidative damage may inactivate delivered surfactant and thereby reduce effectiveness of the therapy. As we presumed that addition of anti-inflammatory agent into the surfactant may alleviate inflammation and enhance efficiency of the therapy, this study was performed to evaluate effects of surfactant therapy enriched with budesonide versus surfactant-only therapy on markers of oxidative stress in experimental model of MAS. Meconium suspension (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was instilled into the trachea of young rabbits, whereas one group of animals received saline instead of meconium (C group, n = 6). In meconium-instilled animals, respiratory failure developed within 30 min. Then, meconium-instilled animals were divided into 3 groups according to therapy (n = 6 each): with surfactant therapy (M + S group), with surfactant + budesonide therapy (M + S + B), and without therapy (M group). Surfactant therapy consisted of two bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) with diluted surfactant (Curosurf, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted surfactant (100 mg phospholipids/kg), which was in M + S + B group enriched with budesonide (Pulmicort, 0.5 mg/ml). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 hours. At the end of experiment, blood sample was taken for differential white blood cell (WBC) count. After euthanizing animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and cell differential in BAL was determined. Oxidative damage, i.e. oxidation of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and conjugated dienes) and proteins (dityrosine and lysine-lipoperoxidation products) was estimated in lung homogenate and isolated mitochondria. Total antioxidant capacity was evaluated in lung homogenate and plasma. Meconium instillation increased transmigration of neutrophils and production of free

  3. Surfactant studies for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, G.C.

    1990-12-20

    Objectives of this project include: select economical/practical surfactants for use in coal liquefaction; screen surfactants for the proposed work through simple laboratory screening tests; and check the survivability of the selected surfactants at 350{degrees}C and 2000 psi using a 1-hour residence time for the thermal treatment in a stirred autoclave. Surfactant screening studies have shown the lignin sulfonate salt being the best candidate studied. Based upon the findings from the screening studies and practical considerations (e.g., potential cost, thermal survivability and recycling recovery), two surfactant choices in the anionic and nonionic categories were tested further in the autoclave reactor and engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to engineering experiments at JPL. The goal of the autoclave work was to determine the effects of surfactants on coal liquefaction performance and to test surfactant survivability. A eight of (8) autoclave experiments using 100 grams of as-received coal were performed. Two commercial surfactant choices were evaluated. They were: Sodium Lignin Sulfonate (LS) as a colloidal (heterogenous) surfactant of anionic type; and Triton X-100 (TRI) (trade name of a polyoxyethylated tert-octyphenol) as a liquid (homogenous) surfactant of nonionic type. Two additional reference tests were performed. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Antiinflammatory Effect of N-Acetylcysteine Combined with Exogenous Surfactant in Meconium-Induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Mikusiakova, L Tomcikova; Kosutova, P; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) can be treated by exogenous surfactant (S). However, aspirated meconium initiates local inflammation and oxidation which may inactivate surfactant and reduce its action. This experimental study estimated whether combined use of surfactant and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can enhance effectiveness of therapy. Meconium-instilled rabbits were non-treated (M), treated with monotherapies (M + S, M + NAC), combined therapy (M + S + NAC), or received saline instead of meconium (controls, C). Surfactant therapy consisted of two lung lavages (BAL) with diluted Curosurf (5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted Curosurf (100 mg phospholipids/kg). N-acetylcysteine (Acc Injekt, 10 mg/kg) was given intravenously in M + S + NAC group 10 min after surfactant therapy. Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Then, differential white cell count in the blood (WBC) was determined. Left lung was saline-lavaged and differential cell count in BAL was determined. In right lung tissue, wet/dry weight ratio, oxidation markers (TBARS, 3NT) and interleukines (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, and TNFα) using ELISA and RT-PCR were estimated. Combined S + NAC therapy significantly decreased W/D ratio, TBARS, 3NT, and IL, whereas the effect of monotherapies (either S or NAC) was less obvious. In conclusion, addition of NAC to surfactant treatment may enhance the therapeutic outcome in MAS. PMID:27283193

  5. Surfactants and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Seely, S

    1977-01-01

    In previous publications (1,2) the hypothesis was put forward that atheroma is caused by some pathogen or metabolic fault which impairs the transportability of cholesterol in the plasma. The lipoproteins containing the faulty metabolites are assumed to be incapable of traversing the capillary endothelium and continue to circulate uselessly in the blood stream, possibly giving rise to hypercholesterolaemia, until captured by lipophages which, if they can successfully complete their journey, void them into the gall bladder. The present paper takes the argument a step further by pointing out that the types of substances most likely to cause the described impairment are surfactants. A surfactant finding its way into the plasma could separate cholesterol from its carrier protein and itself become its carrier. The complex would still be kept in suspension in the plasma, but unable to cross biological barriers like the capillary endothelium. An important argument in favour of the hypothesis is that it can offer an explanation of the long-standing medical mystery of the connection between atheroma and the hardness or softness of the water supply. Infant deaths from coronary occlusion present a similar enigma. The paper points out that surfactants can conceivably find their way into infants' feeding bottles. PMID:593183

  6. [Surfactant and water balance of lung in intracerebral hemorrhage at conditions of capsaicin blockade of vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Urakova, M A; Bryndina, I G

    2015-03-01

    It is known that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is accompanied by the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema and insufficiency of surfactant function. The present study was undertaken for evaluation of the role of vagal afferents in the mechanisms of ICH effects on pulmonary surfactant and water balance of the lung. We explored the surface activity and biochemical composition of surfactant, as well as blood supply, total, intravascular and extravascular fluid content in lung after ICH, simulated by intraventricular administration of autologous blood against the background of bilateral blockade of capsaicin-sensitive vagal affere its. The blockade was caused by the capsaicin application (50 mcmol) on the cervical part of the nerves. Intracerebralhemorrhage was accompanied by the decrease of surfactant activity which appeared by the enhancement of minimal, maximal and static surface tension of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), the reduction of total phospholipids including their main fraction phosphatidylcholine, the increase of lysophosphatidyicholine content and hyperhydration of the lung. The level of total proteins in BAL elevated, confirmed the enhanced permeability of the alveolar-blood barrier. The exhaustion of neuropeptides in capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents led to the partial restoration of surface active properties of lung, normalization of phospholipids and protein contents and water balance parameters. The obtained results suggest that capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents play a pivotal role in the disturbances of surfactant function and water balance of the lung after ICH. PMID:26016324

  7. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  8. Marine by-product phospholipids as booster of medicinal compounds.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koretaro; Inoue, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Marine phospholipids are defined as phospholipids containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid that would be more effective than fish oil, which is mostly composed of triacylglycerol, in exerting health benefits. Marine phospholipids would boost the effect of both the health-beneficial hydrophilic and the hydrophobic compounds such as cell differentiators, anticancer compounds, and antiobesity compounds. When marine phospholipids are served as liposomal drinks, they would be more effective than adding into solid foods or feeds. As long as the liposome bilayer is basically composed of marine phospholipids, they would promote the encapsulated functional compounds. And this is the principal advantage of choosing marine phospholipids as liposomal membrane. Bioconversion of marine phospholipid would also be advantageous in delivering DHA into the desired tissue. For example, lysophosphatidylserine obtained through phospholipase D-mediated transphosphatidylation and phospholipase A₁ or sn-1 positional specific lipase-mediated partial hydrolysis seemed to be the most effective chemical form in delivering DHA into brain. PMID:22361179

  9. Surfactant chemical technology works for environmental jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.T. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on surface active agents that have been employed in mining and mineral processing operations for many years. They are beginning to find increasing use as tools to deal with pressing environmental problems in the industry. Surface active agents are attracting particular attention from mining operators as environmental regulations as well as safety and health standards continue to tighten. These surfactants comprise a variety of products that have different end uses. They promote foaming, wetting, emulsification and crystal growth modification, among other functions. And they are generally environmentally friendly and non-toxic. Among the major environmental issues facing mine operators are effluent control, dust and fume suppression, acid drainage control and soil reclamation and remediation. Surfactants have already been put to work in each of these areas.

  10. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  11. Lung surfactant dysfunction in tuberculosis: effect of mycobacterial tubercular lipids on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine surface activity.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2005-11-10

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside in the alveoli and are in close proximity with the alveolar surfactant. Mycolic acid in its free form and as cord factor, constitute the major lipids of the mycobacterial cell wall. They can detach from the bacteria easily and are known to be moderately surface active. We hypothesize that these surface-active mycobacterial cell wall lipids could interact with the pulmonary surfactant and result in lung surfactant dysfunction. In this study, the major phospholipid of the lung surfactant, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and binary mixtures of DPPC:phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in 9:1 and 7:3 ratios were modelled as lung surfactant monolayers and the inhibitory potential of mycolic acid and cord factor on the surface activity of DPPC and DPPC:PG mixtures was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. The mycobacterial lipids caused common profile changes in all the isotherms: increase in minimum surface tension, compressibility and percentage area change required for change in surface tension from 30 to 10 mN/m. Higher minimum surface tension values were achieved in the presence of mycolic acid (18.2+/-0.7 mN/m) and cord factor (13.28+/-1.2 mN/m) as compared to 0 mN/m, achieved by pure DPPC film. Similarly higher values of compressibility (0.375+/-0.005 m/mN for mycolic acid:DPPC and 0.197+/-0.003 m/mN for cord factor:DPPC monolayers) were obtained in presence of mycolic acid and cord factor. Thus, mycolic acid and cord factor were said to be inhibitory towards lung surfactant phospholipids. Higher surface tension and compressibility values in presence of tubercular lipids are suggestive of an unstable and fluid surfactant film, which will fail to achieve low surface tensions and can contribute to alveolar collapse in patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. In conclusion a biophysical inhibition of lung surfactant may play a role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and may serve as a target for

  12. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  13. Adsorption of ruthenium red to phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Voelker, D; Smejtek, P

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the distribution of the hexavalent ruthenium red cation (RuR) between water and phospholipid membranes, have shown the critical importance of membrane negative surface charge for RuR binding, and determined the association constant of RuR for different phospholipid bilayers. The studies were performed with liposomes made of mixtures of zwitterionic L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (PC), and one of the negatively charged phospholipids: L-alpha-phosphatidylserine (PS), L-alpha-phosphatidylinositol (PI), or L-alpha-phosphatidylglycerol (PG). Lipid composition of PC:PX membranes was 1:0, 19:1, 9:1, and 4:1. Liposomes were processed using freeze-and-thaw treatment, and their size distribution was characterized by light scattering and electron microscopy. Experimental distribution isotherms of RuR obtained by ultracentrifugation and spectrophotometry can be reproduced with the Langmuir-Stern-Grahame model, assuming that RuR behaves in the diffuse double layer as an ion with effective valency < 6. In terms of this model, PC-PS, PC-PI, and PC-PG membranes were found to be electrostatically equivalent and the intrinsic association constants of RuR were obtained. RuR has highest affinity to PS-containing membranes; its association constant for PC-PI and PC-PG membranes is about 5 times smaller than that for PC-PS membranes. From the comparison of RuR binding to mixed negatively charged phospholipid membranes and RuR binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), we conclude that the low-affinity RuR binding sites may indeed be associated with the lipid bilayer of SR. PMID:8789099

  14. Interaction of nonionic surfactant AEO9 with ionic surfactants*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-guo; Yin, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The interaction in two mixtures of a nonionic surfactant AEO9 (C12H25O(CH2CH2O)9H) and different ionic surfactants was investigated. The two mixtures were AEO9/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and AEO9/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at molar fraction of AEO9, α AEO9=0.5. The surface properties of the surfactants, critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (γ CMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γ max) and minimum area per molecule at the air/solution interface (A min) were determined for both individual surfactants and their mixtures. The significant deviations from ideal behavior (attractive interactions) of the nonionic/ionic surfactant mixtures were determined. Mixtures of both AEO9/SDS and AEO9/CTAB exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction efficiency and mixed micelle formation, but neither exhibited synergism in surface tension reduction effectiveness. PMID:15909351

  15. Bolaamphiphiles Promote Phospholipid Translocation Across Vesicle Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Christopher C.; DiVittorio, Kristy M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles (molecules with two hydrophilic end-groups connected by a hydrophobic linker) were prepared by a modular synthetic method and evaluated for their abilities to affect the dynamics of a surrounding bilayer membrane. The goal was to determine if the bolaamphiphiles promote the translocation of phospholipids across vesicle membranes. The bolaamphiphiles were incorporated at low levels (up to 5 mol%) in vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Inward translocation assays were performed using fluorescent, NBD-labeled phospholipid probes with phosphocholine (PC) or phosphoglycerol (PG) head-groups. The membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles promote the translocation of both phospholipid probes in the order PG > PC, while shorter bolaamphiphiles (structures that must adopt a U-shape and keep both end-groups in the same leaflet of the membrane), and regular amphiphiles with one hydrophilic end-group, are inactive. These results are an exception to the rule-of-thumb that membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles are inherently membrane stabilizing molecules that inhibit all types of membrane transport. PMID:16834395

  16. Membrane-derived phospholipids control synaptic neurotransmission and plasticity.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron. PMID:25996636

  17. Novel Approaches to Surfactant Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy has been the mainstay of treatment for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome for more than twenty years. For the most part, surfactant is administered intratracheally, followed by mechanical ventilation. In recent years, the growing interest in noninvasive ventilation has led to novel approaches of administration. This paper will review these techniques and the associated clinical evidence. PMID:23243504

  18. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  19. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  20. NATURAL SURFACTANTS IN PAPER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to introduce new types of surfactants based on renewable materials (sugar surfactants) for use in ink removal from recycled paper. By applying green chemistry approaches we not only will solve an important industry and environmental problem but...

  1. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  2. Stimuli-responsive surfactant/phospholipid stabilized colloidal dispersions and their film formation.

    PubMed

    Lestage, David J; Yu, Min; Urban, Marek W

    2005-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and n-butyl acrylate (nBA) were copolymerized into stable colloidal particles in the presence of micelle forming sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) and liposome forming 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) in aqueous media that serve as thermodynamically stable loci for lipophilic monomers and nanostructured templates. These studies show for the first time that hollow colloidal particles may coalesce to form polymeric films and the combination of SDOSS and DLPC dispersing agents provides a stimuli-responsive environment during film formation through which individual surface stabilizing components can be driven to the film-air (F-A) or film-substrate (F-S) interface. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) of p-MMA/nBA colloidal dispersions revealed preferential and enhanced mobility of SDOSS and DLPC lipid rafts to the F-A and F-S interfaces in response to thermal, ionic, and enzymatic stimuli. PMID:15877379

  3. Surface-active phospholipid: a Pandora's box of clinical applications. Part II. Barrier and lubricating properties.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2002-01-01

    In Part I, it was described how their configuration renders phospholipid molecules surface active and capable of acting at interfaces in addition to the liquid-air interface to which conventional theory has hitherto confined the study of 'surfactant' in the lung. Surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) appears no different to comparable surfactants studied in the physical sciences for the highly desirable properties that their adsorption (reversible binding) can impart to solid surfaces. In Part II, these properties are considered in sites where there is no air. Highly desirable properties include boundary lubrication (lubricity), release (antistick) and the ability of the strongly adsorbed and strongly cohesive SAPL linings to act as barriers against abrasion, corrosion and, possibly, against invasion by microorganisms. As the 'sealant', it could be the true barrier rather than the cells providing its mechanical support. Evidence is reviewed for SAPL providing the gastric mucosal barrier to acid in the stomach and preventing the digestion of Helicobacter pylori until that barrier is broken by bile in the duodenum, where H. pylori cause ulcers. The concept that SAPL provides effortless sliding of many tissues, including pleura, pericardium and peritoneum is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the load-bearing joints, where a deficiency has been associated with osteoarthritis. The ability of the same SAPL lining to perform multiple roles is discussed in relation to the peritoneum, where it could provide the lubricant/release agent preventing surgical adhesions, while imparting semipermeability to 'the membrane' vital for peritoneal dialysis. In each site, the prophylactic use of exogenous SAPL is discussed for its potential clinical applications. PMID:12036223

  4. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  5. Computer simulations of lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-10-01

    Lung surfactant lines the gas-exchange interface in the lungs and reduces the surface tension, which is necessary for breathing. Lung surfactant consists mainly of lipids with a small amount of proteins and forms a monolayer at the air-water interface connected to bilayer reservoirs. Lung surfactant function involves transfer of material between the monolayer and bilayers during the breathing cycle. Lipids and proteins are organized laterally in the monolayer; selected species are possibly preferentially transferred to bilayers. The complex 3D structure of lung surfactant and the exact roles of lipid organization and proteins remain important goals for research. We review recent simulation studies on the properties of lipid monolayers, monolayers with phase coexistence, monolayer-bilayer transformations, lipid-protein interactions, and effects of nanoparticles on lung surfactant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26922885

  6. Guidelines for the use of protein domains in acidic phospholipid imaging

    PubMed Central

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2015-01-01

    Acidic phospholipids are minor membrane lipids but critically important for signaling events. The main acidic phospholipids are phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs also known as phosphoinositides), phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA). Acidic phospholipids are precursors of second messengers of key signaling cascades or are second messengers themselves. They regulate the localization and activation of many proteins, and are involved in virtually all membrane trafficking events. As such, it is crucial to understand the subcellular localization and dynamics of each of these lipids within the cell. Over the years, several techniques have emerged in either fixed or live cells to analyze the subcellular localization and dynamics of acidic phospholipids. In this chapter, we review one of them: the use of genetically encoded biosensors that are based on the expression of specific lipid binding domains (LBDs) fused to fluorescent proteins. We discuss how to design such sensors, including the criteria for selecting the lipid binding domains of interest and to validate them. We also emphasize the care that must be taken during data analysis as well as the main limitations and advantages of this approach. PMID:26552684

  7. [Effect of betamethasone on the lipid composition of pulmonary surfactant, ependymal cells and lung tissue after surgical procedures on the thorax of dogs].

    PubMed

    Ledwozyw, A; Jabłonka, S; Kadziołka, W; Komar, E

    1986-01-01

    The lipid composition of pulmonary surfactant, ependymal cells and pulmonary tissue after surgery on the thorax in dogs was determined. 24 hrs after removal of one lung, in the other one there occurred changes in the quantity of respective classes of phospholipids of the pulmonary surfactant, manifesting themselves by a considerable drop in the amount of phosphatidylcholine (by 25%), phosphatidylethylamine (by 47%), phosphatidylglycerol (by 98%) and phosphatidylcholine: sphingomyelin ratio (by 63%), as well as by a rise in the amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (by 83%), phosphatidylserine (by 54%) and sphingomyelin (by 25%). In dogs receiving betamethasone in the post-operative period the changes were less intense: the amount of phosphatidylcholine decreased by 15%, phosphatidylethanolamine by 29%, phosphatidylglycerol by 94% and phosphatidylcholine: sphingomyelin ratio by 63%. The amount of lysophosphatidylcholine increased by 26.7%, phosphatidylserine by 29.1% and sphingomyelin by 22.2%. Similar changes were observed in the phospholipids of lining cells, while changes in the composition of phospholipids of pulmonary tissue in most cases appeared insignificant. Insignificant, too, were changes in the composition of neutral lipids of the tissular fractions examined. The described changes in dogs not receiving betamethasone correspond to those found in man in the course of acute respiratory insufficiency syndrome. Betamethasone was found to exert a protective effect on the phospholipids of pulmonary surfactant, soothing the biochemical changes brought about by surgical removal of one lung. PMID:3325943

  8. Structural model for an AxxxG-mediated dimer of surfactant-associated protein C.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Visvaldas; Gilson, Michael K; Luy, Burkhard

    2004-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and is required for normal pulmonary function. One of the important components of the surfactant besides phospholipids is surfactant-associated protein C (SP-C). SP-C shows complex oligomerization behavior and a transition to beta-amyloid-like fibril structures, which are not yet fully understood. Besides this nonspecific oligomerization, MS and chemical cross-linking data combined with CD spectra provide evidence of a specific, mainly alpha-helical, dimer at low to neutral pH. Furthermore, resistance to CNBr cleavage and dual NMR resonances of porcine and human recombinant SP-C with Met32 replaced by isoleucine point to a dimerization site located at the C-terminus of the hydrophobic alpha-helix of SP-C, where a strictly conserved heptapeptide sequence is found. Computational docking of two SP-C helices, described here, reveals a dimer with a helix-helix interface that strikingly resembles that of glycophorin A and is mediated by an AxxxG motif similar to the experimentally determined GxxxG pattern of glycophorin A. It is highly likely that mature SP-C adopts such a dimeric structure in the lamellar bilayer systems found in the surfactant. Dimerization has been shown in previous studies to have a role in sorting and trafficking of SP-C and may also be important to the surfactant function of this protein. PMID:15153098

  9. Surfactant induced autophobing.

    PubMed

    Bera, B; Duits, M H G; Cohen Stuart, M A; van den Ende, D; Mugele, F

    2016-05-18

    Surfactant adsorption in a three-phase system and its influence on wetting properties are relevant in various applications. Here, we report a hitherto not observed phenomenon, namely the retraction of an aqueous drop on hydrophilic solid substrates (which we refer to as 'autophobing') in ambient oil containing water-insoluble fatty acids, caused by the deposition of these fatty acids from the ambient oil onto the solid substrate. AFM measurements confirm that the surfactant is deposited on the solid by the moving contact line. This leads to a more hydrophobic substrate, the retraction of the contact line and a concomitant increase in the contact angle. The deposition process is enabled by the formation of a reaction product between deprotonated fatty acids and Ca(2+) ions at the oil/water interface. We investigate how the transition to a new equilibrium depends on the concentrations of the fatty acids, the aqueous solute, the chain lengths of the fatty acid, and the types of alkane solvent and silica or mica substrates. This phenomenon is observed on both substrates and for all explored combinations of fatty acids and solvents and thus appears to be generic. In order to capture the evolution of the contact angle, we develop a theoretical model in which the rate of adsorption at the oil-water interface governs the overall kinetics of autophobing, and transfer to the solid is determined by a mass flux balance (similar to a Langmuir Blodgett transfer). PMID:27102975

  10. A method for the modulation of membrane fluidity: homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of phospholipids and phospholipids and phospholipid-water model biomembranes.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, D; Quinn, P J

    1976-01-01

    The fatty acids associated with phospholipids of cell membranes, and particularly their degree of unsaturation, contribute to the fluidity of their structure and hance determine many of their biological properties. We describe a technique for modulating membrane fluidity which consists of hydrogenating the unsaturated double bonds of membrane phospholipids. This has been accomplished using a homogeneous catalyst. The process has been applied to phospholipids in organic solvents, to phospholipids dispersed as multibilayers in aqueous systems, and also to sonicated preparations of phospholipids arranged as single bilayer vesicles. Preliminary experiments have also been performed with biological membranes. These results indicate that the process of homogeneous catalysis for the modulation of lipid fluidity of biological cell membranes may have considerable future biological and biochemical application. PMID:1069280

  11. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products. PMID:27181392

  12. Phospholipid-Dextran with a Single Coupling Point: a Useful Amphiphile for Functionalization of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Andrew P.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Welsher, Kevin; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Prencipe, Giuseppe; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials hold much promise for biological applications, but they require appropriate functionalization to provide biocompatibility in biological environments. For non-covalent functionalization with biocompatible polymers, the polymer must also remain attached to the nanomaterial after removal of its excess to mimic the high dilution conditions of administration in vivo. Reported here are the synthesis and utilization singly-substituted conjugates of dextran and a phospholipid (Dextran-DSPE) as stable coatings for nanomaterials. Suspensions of single walled carbon nanotubes were found not only to be stable to phosphate buffered saline (PBS), serum, and a variety of pH’s after excess polymer removal, but also provide brighter photoluminescence than carbon nanotubes suspended by poly(ethylene glycol)-DSPE. In addition, both gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) were found to maintain their dispersion and characteristic optical absorbance after transfer into Dextran-DSPE, and were obtained in much better yield than similar suspensions with PEG-phospholipid and commonly used thiol-PEG. These suspensions were also stable to PBS, serum, and a variety of pH’s after removal of excess polymer. Dextran-DSPE thus shows great promise as a general surfactant material for the functionalization of a variety of nanomaterials, which could facilitate future biological applications. PMID:19061329

  13. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.A.; Snyder, J.M.; Stenzel, W.; Saito, K.; Warshaw, J.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

  14. Effect of clay nanoparticles on model lung surfactant: a potential marker of hazard from nanoaerosol inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kondej, Dorota; Sosnowski, Tomasz R

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates influence of different aluminosillicate nanoparticles (NPs) which are found in air in selected workplaces on the properties of the phospholipid (DPPC) monolayer at air-saline interface considered as ex vivo model of the lung surfactant (LS). The measurements were done under physiological-like conditions (deformable liquid interface at 37 °C) for NP concentrations matching the calculated lung doses after exposure in the working environment. Measured surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms and compressibility curves demonstrated NP-induced changes in the structure and mechanical properties of the lipid monolayer. It was shown that hydrophilic nanomaterials (halloysite and bentonite) induced concentration-dependent impairment of DPPC's ability of attaining high surface pressures on interfacial compression, suggesting a possibility of reduction of physiological function of natural LS. Hydrophobic montmorillonites affected DPPC monolayer in the opposite way; however, they significantly changed the mechanical properties of the air-liquid interface during compression. The results support the hypothesis of possible reduction or even degradation of the natural function of the lung surfactant induced by particle-phospholipid interactions after inhalation of nanoclays. Presented data do not only supplement the earlier results obtained with another LS model (animal-derived surfactant in oscillating bubble experiments) but also offer an explanation of physicochemical mechanisms responsible for detrimental effects which arise after deposition of inhaled nanomaterials on the surface of the respiratory system. PMID:26527341

  15. Lipid bilayer elasticity measurements in giant liposomes in contact with a solubilizing surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Perzynski, Régine; Lesieur, Sylviane; Cabuil, Valérie

    2008-05-01

    A new method to probe the modification of the elasticity of phospholipid bilayers is presented. The purpose here concerns the action of a solubilizing surfactant on a vesicle bilayer. This method is based on the measure of the under-field elongation of giant magnetic-fluid-loaded liposomes. The addition of the nonionic surfactant octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (OG) to vesicles at sublytic levels increases the elasticity of the membrane, as shown by the value of the bending modulus K(b), which decreases. K(b) measured around 20 kT for a pure 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer indeed reaches a few kT in the case of the mixed OG-DOPC bilayer. The purpose and interest of this study are to allow the determination of the membrane bending modulus before and after the addition of OG on the same magnetic liposome. Moreover, the experimental conditions used in this work allow the control of lipid and surfactant molar fractions in the mixed aggregates. Then, optical microscopy observation can be performed on samples in well-defined regions of the OG-phospholipid state diagram. PMID:18363418

  16. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  17. PHOSPHOLIPIDS IN VEGETATIVE CELLS AND SPORES OF BACILLUS POLYMYXA1

    PubMed Central

    Matches, Jack R.; Walker, Homer W.; Ayres, John C.

    1964-01-01

    Matches, Jack R. (Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames), Homer W. Walker, and John C. Ayres. Phospholipids in vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus polymyxa. J. Bacteriol. 87:16–23. 1964.—The same types of phospholipids were recovered from both vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus polymyxa 1A39. Nitrogen-containing phospholipids were identified as phosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysophosphatidyl serine, and lysolecithin. Acidic phosphatides containing no nitrogen were identified as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidyl glycerol, and a fraction appearing to be bis (phosphatidic) acid. The major phosphatide fraction in both cells and spores was phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Smaller amounts of phosphatidyl glycerol and bis (phosphatidic) acid were present; the other acidic phospholipid components were present only in trace amounts. Heat resistance of the spore as compared to the vegetative cell could not be attributed to a specific phospholipid, since no difference in the type of phospholipids present was observed. PMID:14102851

  18. Structural insight into the TRIAP1/PRELI-like domain family of mitochondrial phospholipid transfer complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miliara, Xeni; Garnett, James A; Tatsuta, Takashi; Abid Ali, Ferdos; Baldie, Heather; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Simpson, Peter; Yague, Ernesto; Langer, Thomas; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial membrane is important for its architecture and proper function. Mitochondria depend on a tightly regulated supply of phospholipid via intra-mitochondrial synthesis and by direct import from the endoplasmic reticulum. The Ups1/PRELI-like family together with its mitochondrial chaperones (TRIAP1/Mdm35) represent a unique heterodimeric lipid transfer system that is evolutionary conserved from yeast to man. Work presented here provides new atomic resolution insight into the function of a human member of this system. Crystal structures of free TRIAP1 and the TRIAP1–SLMO1 complex reveal how the PRELI domain is chaperoned during import into the intermembrane mitochondrial space. The structural resemblance of PRELI-like domain of SLMO1 with that of mammalian phoshatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) suggest that they share similar lipid transfer mechanisms, in which access to a buried phospholipid-binding cavity is regulated by conformationally adaptable loops. PMID:26071602

  19. Structural insight into the TRIAP1/PRELI-like domain family of mitochondrial phospholipid transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Miliara, Xeni; Garnett, James A; Tatsuta, Takashi; Abid Ali, Ferdos; Baldie, Heather; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Simpson, Peter; Yague, Ernesto; Langer, Thomas; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial membrane is important for its architecture and proper function. Mitochondria depend on a tightly regulated supply of phospholipid via intra-mitochondrial synthesis and by direct import from the endoplasmic reticulum. The Ups1/PRELI-like family together with its mitochondrial chaperones (TRIAP1/Mdm35) represent a unique heterodimeric lipid transfer system that is evolutionary conserved from yeast to man. Work presented here provides new atomic resolution insight into the function of a human member of this system. Crystal structures of free TRIAP1 and the TRIAP1-SLMO1 complex reveal how the PRELI domain is chaperoned during import into the intermembrane mitochondrial space. The structural resemblance of PRELI-like domain of SLMO1 with that of mammalian phoshatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) suggest that they share similar lipid transfer mechanisms, in which access to a buried phospholipid-binding cavity is regulated by conformationally adaptable loops. PMID:26071602

  20. Critical assessment of phospholipid measurement in amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Badham, L P; Worth, H G

    1975-09-01

    We assessed several methods of inorganic phosphate assay for their suitability in estimating phospholipids in digested extracts of amniotic fluids. The extraction and digestion procedures used for phospholipids from amniotic fluid were also examined critically. The effect of contamination by blood or obstetric cream has been examined. Accordingly, we suggest a method for measuring total phospholipids in amniotic fluids, and results of it are compared with the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio measurement in some clinical situations. PMID:1157310

  1. Biochemistry of platelet-activating factor: A unique class of biologically active phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F. )

    1989-01-01

    This brief overview describes the chemical features of this unique bioactive phospholipid that possesses biologic properties identical to platelet-activating factor (PAF) and an antihypertensive polar renal lipid (APRL). The current understanding of PAF metabolism and its regulation are emphasized, particularly in the context of explaining the enzymatic source of PAF in physiologic vs pharmacologic processes. Also included are brief accounts of the biologic properties, structural-functional relationships, antagonists, receptors and mode of action of PAF.

  2. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  3. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  4. Drug induced `softening' in phospholipid monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay; Bhattacharya, Dhananjay

    2015-06-01

    Compressibility measurements on Langmuir monolayers of the phospholipid Dimystoryl Phospatidylcholine (DMPC) in pristine form and in the presence of the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Piroxicam at 0.025 drug/lipid (D/L) molecular ratio at different temperatures, show that the monolayer exhibits large increase (and subsequent decrease) in compressibility due to the drug in the vicinity of the Liquid Expanded - Liquid Condensed (LE-LC) phase transition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lipid monolayer in presence of drug molecules show a disordering of the tail tilt, which is consistent with the above result.

  5. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  6. Stimuli-responsive surface crystallization of phospholipids from bimodal colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Lestage, David J; Schleis, Daniel J; Urban, Marek W

    2004-08-17

    These studies focus on the effect of phospholipids in the presence of ionic surfactants on the behavior of poly(methylmethactrylate/n-butyl acrylate) (p-MMA/nBA) colloidal particles during film formation. With the presence of two surfactants, it is possible to obtain particles that exhibit two distinct particle sizes. The presence of hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC) and sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS), which stabilize these bimodal colloidal dispersions, has a significant effect on the mobility of individual components during coalescence. Specifically, the presence of HSPC inhibits migration of SDOSS to the film-air (F-A) interface. Furthermore, the presence of electrolyte species such as aqueous CaCl2 has a very pronounced effect on film formation. When the Ca2+/HSPC ratio is 0.1/1.0, SDOSS is released to the F-A interface during coalescence. At 2.0/1.0 Ca2+/HSPC, HSPC diffuses to the F-A interface and crystalline domains consisting of HSPC are formed. This stimuli-responsive behavior is confirmed using IRIR imaging that ultimately exhibits different surface morphologies. These studies illustrate for the first time that it is possible to control the release of two different surface-active species during coalescence that form crystalline domains. PMID:15301484

  7. The aminosterol antibiotic squalamine permeabilizes large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Selinsky, B S; Zhou, Z; Fojtik, K G; Jones, S R; Dollahon, N R; Shinnar, A E

    1998-03-13

    The ability of the shark antimicrobial aminosterol squalamine to induce the leakage of polar fluorescent dyes from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) has been measured. Micromolar squalamine causes leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from vesicles prepared from the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), and cardiolipin. Binding analyses based on the leakage data show that squalamine has its highest affinity to phosphatidylglycerol membranes, followed by phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin membranes. Squalamine will also induce the leakage of CF from phosphatidylcholine (PC) LUVs at low phospholipid concentrations. At high phospholipid concentrations, the leakage of CF from PC LUVs deviates from a simple dose-response relationship, and it appears that some of the squalamine can no longer cause leakage. Fluorescent dye leakage generated by squalamine is graded, suggesting the formation of a discrete membrane pore rather than a generalized disruption of vesicular membranes. By using fluorescently labeled dextrans of different molecular weight, material with molecular weight /=10,000 is retained. Negative stain electron microscopy of squalamine-treated LUVs shows that squalamine decreases the average vesicular size in a concentration-dependent manner. Squalamine decreases the size of vesicles containing anionic phospholipid at a lower squalamine/lipid molar ratio than pure PC LUVs. In a centrifugation assay, squalamine solubilizes phospholipid, but only at significantly higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios than required for either dye leakage or vesicle size reduction. Squalamine solubilizes PC at lower squalamine/phospholipid ratios than PG. We suggest that squalamine complexes with phospholipid to form a discrete structure within the bilayers of LUVs, resulting in the transient leakage of small encapsulated molecules. At higher

  8. Phospholipid/aromatic thiol hybrid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Mingming; Ferguson, Matthew; Zhan, Wei

    2015-05-12

    Gold-supported hybrid bilayers comprising phospholipids and alkanethiols have been found to be highly useful in biomembrane mimicking as well as biosensing ever since their introduction by Plant in 1993 (Plant, A. L. Langmuir 1993, 9, 2764-2767). Generalizing the mechanism (i.e., hydrophobic/hydrophobic interaction) that primarily drives bilayer formation, we report here that such a bilayer structure can also be successfully obtained when aromatic thiols are employed in place of alkanethiols. Four aromatic thiols were studied here (thiophenol, 2-naphthalene thiol, biphenyl-4-thiol, and diphenylenevinylene methanethiol), all affording reliable bilayer formation when 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes were incubated with self-assembled monolayers of these thiols. Characterization of the resultant structures, using cyclic voltammetry, impedance analysis, and atomic force microscopy, confirms the bilayer formation. Significant differences in electrochemical blocking and mechanical characteristics of these new bilayers were identified in comparison to their alkanethiol counterparts. Taking advantage of these new features, we present a new scheme for the straightforward biorecognition of a lipolytic enzyme (phospholipase A2) using these phospholipid/aromatic thiol bilayers. PMID:25896646

  9. Surfactant-enhanced aquifier remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surfactants can be used to rapidly remove NAPL from contaminated aquifers. They are effective for virtually any organic contaminant. Use in LNAPL contaminated sites requires adequate hydraulic conductivity and control of flow using either hydraulic or physical methods. The presence of DNAPL requires consideration of vertical mobility; a competent confining layer (aquitard) is required if additional aquifers are present at greater depths. Surfactant processes, whether based upon mobilization or solubilization, can be effective at mass removal, but cannot be expected to provide resortation to drinking water standards. The fraction of mass removal, and the cost of remediation using surfactants are dependent upon a sites hydrogeology. Both minimization of cost and maximization of NAPL removal requires detailed characterization of sites contaminant distribution and hydrogeology. Assessment of the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation is dependent upon a detailed site characterization.

  10. Protein recovery from surfactant precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu Ian; Stuckey, David C

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of lysozyme from an aqueous solution containing precipitated lysozyme-AOT complexes formed by the direct addition of sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) to a lysozyme solution was studied using both solvents, and a counterionic surfactant. Ethanol,methanol and solvent mixtures dissolved the surfactant precipitate and recovered lysozyme as a solid. Recovery efficiency and protein stability varied with the type of solvent used. An entirely different method of recovery was also evaluated using a counterionic surfactant: tri-octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) which bound to AOT releasing lysozyme into solution.Complete recovery (100%) of lysozyme was achieved at a molar ratio of 2:1(TOMAC:AOT), and the original protein activity was maintained in the final aqueous phase.The recovered lysozyme retained its secondary structure as observed in circular dichroism(CD) spectra. Specific activity studies show that counterionic surfactant extraction does not alter the biological activity of the enzyme. PMID:22235487

  11. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression. PMID:15694461

  12. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  13. New ATP-binding cassette A3 mutation causing surfactant metabolism dysfunction pulmonary type 3.

    PubMed

    Piersigilli, Fiammetta; Peca, Donatella; Campi, Francesca; Corsello, Mirta; Landolfo, Francesca; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) may occur in term and near-term infants because of mutations in surfactant-related genes. ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3), a phospholipid carrier specifically expressed in the alveolar epithelium, is the most frequently involved protein. We report the case of a couple of late-preterm fraternal twin infants of opposite sex carrying the same compound heterozygous ABCA3 mutations, one of which has never been previously reported, with different disease severity, suggesting variable penetrance or sex-related differences. ABCA3 deficiency should be considered in term or near-term babies who develop unexplained RDS. PMID:26508177

  14. Trans Fatty Acid Derived Phospholipids Show Increased Membrane Cholesterol and Reduced Receptor Activation as Compared to Their Cis Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shui-Lin; Mitchell, Drake C.; Litman, Burton J.

    2005-01-01

    The consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) is linked to the elevation of LDL cholesterol and is considered to be a major health risk factor for coronary heart disease. Despite several decades of extensive research on this subject, the underlying mechanism of how TFA modulates serum cholesterol levels remains elusive. In this study, we examined the molecular interaction of TFA-derived phospholipid with cholesterol and the membrane receptor rhodopsin in model membranes. Rhodopsin is a prototypical member of the G-protein coupled receptor family. It has a well-characterized structure and function and serves as a model membrane receptor in this study. Phospholipid–cholesterol affinity was quantified by measuring cholesterol partition coefficients. Phospholipid–receptor interactions were probed by measuring the level of rhodopsin activation. Our study shows that phospholipid derived from TFA had a higher membrane cholesterol affinity than their cis analogues. TFA phospholipid membranes also exhibited a higher acyl chain packing order, which was indicated by the lower acyl chain packing free volume as determined by DPH fluorescence and the higher transition temperature for rhodopsin thermal denaturation. The level of rhodopsin activation was diminished in TFA phospholipids. Since membrane cholesterol level and membrane receptors are involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis, the combination of higher cholesterol content and reduced receptor activation associated with the presence of TFA–phospholipid could be factors contributing to the elevation of LDL cholesterol. PMID:15766276

  15. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  16. Rapid Lateral Diffusion of Phospholipids in Rabbit Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Scandella, Carl J.; Devaux, Philippe; McConnell, Harden M.

    1972-01-01

    Phospholipid spin labels incorporated in the sarcoplasmic reticulum from rabbit-skeletal muscle undergo rapid lateral diffusion within the plane of the membrane. The diffusion constant, D, is 6×10-8 cm2/sec at 37°. With this diffusion constant, a phospholipid molecule can diffuse a distance of the order of 5000 nm in 1 sec. PMID:4506073

  17. Different oxidized phospholipid molecules unequally affect bilayer packing.

    PubMed

    Megli, Francesco M; Russo, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more detailed knowledge about the effect of the presence of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules in phospholipid bilayers. After chromatographic and mass spectrometry analysis, the previously used product of the Fenton reaction with unsaturated lecithins proved to consist of a plethora of oxidatively modified lecithins, useless either for the detailed study of the effects brought about in the bilayer or as the source of defined oxidized phospholipid molecules. The latter, particularly 2-(omega-carboxyacyl)- and 2-(n-hydroperoxyacyl)-lecithins, can be more conveniently prepared by chemical or enzymatic synthesis rather than by chemical or physical oxidation. The effect of those molecules and of commercially available 12-hydroxy-stearic and dodecanedioic acid was studied in planar supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) by use of EPR spectrometry. The SPBs also contained 2-(5-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin as the spin probe, and the EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of bilayer disordering, was measured as a function of the molar percentage of oxidized lipid. Most oxidized lipid molecules examined in this study were able to induce bilayer disordering, while hydroperoxyl group-bearing acyl chains appeared to be much less effective. It is concluded that the effects of different oxidized phospholipids on phospholipid bilayer structure cannot be generalized, as happens with batch-oxidized phospholipids, and that the use of defined oxidized phospholipid molecular species for membrane oxidative stress guarantees a more reliable and detailed response. PMID:18054893

  18. Surfactant-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Bricha, Meriame; Belmamouni, Younes; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Ferreira, José M F; El Mabrouk, Khalil

    2012-10-01

    Rod-like hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (n-HAp) with a highly ordered nanostructure were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis from calcium chloride, and phosphoric acid, as calcium and phosphorus sources, respectively. Various surfactant families such as cationic (CTAB), anionic (SDS) and nonionic (Triton X-100) were used as regulators of the nucleation and crystal growth. The synthesized nanopowders were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrograph (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The rod-like morphology was obtained regardless of the surfactant used during the hydrothermal treatment, but the aspect ratio of the crystals was found to be surfactant dependent. The mechanism of crystal growth as well-oriented nanostructure is discussed. PMID:23421176

  19. Interaction of enterocyte FABPs with phospholipid membranes: clues for specific physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Franchini, Gisela R; Guerbi, María Ximena; Storch, Judith; Córsico, Betina

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP and LFABP, respectively) are cytosolic soluble proteins with the capacity to bind and transport hydrophobic ligands between different sub-cellular compartments. Their functions are still not clear but they are supposed to be involved in lipid trafficking and metabolism, cell growth, and regulation of several other processes, like cell differentiation. Here we investigated the interaction of these proteins with different models of phospholipid membrane vesicles in order to achieve further insight into their specificity within the enterocyte. A combination of biophysical and biochemical techniques allowed us to determine affinities of these proteins to membranes, the way phospholipid composition and vesicle size and curvature modulate such interaction, as well as the effect of protein binding on the integrity of the membrane structure. We demonstrate here that, besides their apparently opposite ligand transfer mechanisms, both LFABP and IFABP are able to interact with phospholipid membranes, but the factors that modulate such interactions are different for each protein, further implying different roles for IFABP and LFABP in the intracellular context. These results contribute to the proposed central role of intestinal FABPs in the lipid traffic within enterocytes as well as in the regulation of more complex cellular processes. PMID:21539932

  20. Dynamics of surfactant release in alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Thomas; Ortmayr, Jörg; Friedrich, Franz; Völkl, Harald; Dietl, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, secreted via exocytosis of lamellar bodies (LB) by alveolar type II (AT II) cells, maintains low alveolar surface tension and is therefore essential for normal lung function. Here we describe real-time monitoring of exocytotic activity in these cells by visualizing and quantifying LB fusion with the plasma membrane (PM). Two approaches were used. First, fluorescence of LysoTracker Green DND-26 (LTG) in LB disappeared when the dye was released after exocytosis. Second, phospholipid staining by FM 1–43 resulted in bright fluorescence when this dye entered the LB through the fusion pore. Both processes were restricted to and colocalized with LB and occurred simultaneously. In AT II cells, FM 1–43 offered the unique advantage to independently define the moment and cellular location of single exocytotic events as well as the amount of material released, and to monitor its extracellular fate. Furthermore, both dyes could be used in combination with fura-2. The results indicate considerable diversity in the dynamics of LB exocytosis. In the majority of cells stimulated with ATP and isoproterenol, the first fusion of LB coincided with the rise of [Ca2+]i, but subsequent response of other LB in the same cell considerably outlasted this signal. In other cells, however, the onset of exocytosis was delayed by several minutes. After LB fusion, release of surfactant from LB into an aqueous solution was slow. In summary, stimulated exocytosis in AT II cells occurs at a much slower rate than in most other secretory cells but is still a more dynamic process than predicted from conventional measurements of surfactant released into cell supernatants. PMID:9465058

  1. Effects of the lung surfactant protein B construct Mini-B on lipid bilayer order and topography

    PubMed Central

    Palleboina, Dharamaraju; Waring, Alan J.; Notter, Robert H.; Booth, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic lung surfactant protein, SP-B, is essential for survival. Cycling of lung volume during respiration requires a surface-active lipid–protein layer at the alveolar air–water interface. SP-B may contribute to surfactant layer maintenance and renewal by facilitating contact and transfer between the surface layer and bilayer reservoirs of surfactant material. However, only small effects of SP-B on phospholipid orientational order in model systems have been reported. In this study, N-terminal (SP-B8–25) and C-terminal (SP-B63–78) helices of SP-B, either linked as Mini-B or unlinked but present in equal amounts, were incorporated into either model phospholipid mixtures or into bovine lipid extract surfactant in the form of vesicle dispersions or mechanically oriented bilayer samples. Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used to characterize effects of these peptides on phospholipid chain orientational order, headgroup orientation, and the response of lipid–peptide mixtures to mechanical orientation by mica plates. Only small effects on chain orientational order or headgroup orientation, in either vesicle or mechanically oriented samples, were seen. In mechanically constrained samples, however, Mini-B and its component helices did have specific effects on the propensity of lipid–peptide mixtures to form unoriented bilayer populations which do not exchange with the oriented fraction on the timescale of the NMR experiment. Modification of local bilayer orientation, even in the presence of mechanical constraint, may be relevant to the transfer of material from bilayer reservoirs to a flat surface-active layer, a process that likely requires contact facilitated by the formation of highly curved protrusions. PMID:22903196

  2. The impact of phospholipids and phospholipid removal on bioanalytical method performance.

    PubMed

    Carmical, Jennifer; Brown, Stacy

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are a component of cellmembranes, biological fluids and tissues. These compounds are problematic for the bioanalytical chemist, especially when PLs are not the analytes of interest. PL interference with bioanalysis highly impacts reverse-phase chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometric detection. Phospholipids are strongly retained on hydrophobic columns, and can cause significant ionization suppression in the mass spectrometer, as they outcompete analyte molecules for ionization. Strategies for improving analyte detection in the presence of PLs are reviewed, including in-analysis modifications and sample preparation strategies. Removal of interfering PLs prior to analysis seems to be most effective atmoderating thematrix effects fromthese endogenous cellular components, and has the potential to simplify chromatography and improve column lifetime. Products targeted at PL removal for sample pre-treatment, as well as products that combine multiplemodes of sample preparation (i.e. Hybrid SPE), show significant promise inmediating the effect on PL interference in bioanalysis. PMID:26773720

  3. Influence of the surfactant nature on the calcium carbonate synthesis in water-in-oil emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2009-02-01

    Calcium carbonate has been precipitated from water-in-oil emulsions consisting of n-hexane/nonionic surfactant (Brij 30) and its mixture with cationic (DTAB) or anionic surfactant (SDS) to which calcium chloride and sodium carbonate were added. It was found that the surfactant kind and its amount can regulate the size, form and morphology of the precipitated particles. In case of nonionic surfactant the water/surfactant ratio is the most important parameter that allows to obtain small and regular calcium carbonate crystals. Addition of the DTAB results in different morphology of particles having the same crystal form, whereas addition of SDS changes the kind of emulsion from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. Moreover, light transmittance and backscattering light measurements have been used as a method to study the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in emulsion systems.

  4. The miR-200 family and its targets regulate type II cell differentiation in human fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Benlhabib, Houda; Guo, Wei; Pierce, Brianne M; Mendelson, Carole R

    2015-09-11

    Type II cell differentiation and expression of the major surfactant protein, SP-A, in mid-gestation human fetal lung (HFL) are induced by cAMP and inhibited by TGF-β. cAMP induction of SP-A promoter activity is mediated by increased phosphorylation and DNA binding of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1/Nkx2.1), a master regulator of lung development. To further define mechanisms for developmental induction of surfactant synthesis in HFL, herein, we investigated the potential roles of microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs). To identify and characterize differentially regulated miRNAs in mid-gestation HFL explants during type II pneumocyte differentiation in culture, we performed miRNA microarray of RNA from epithelial cells isolated from mid-gestation HFL explants before and after culture with or without Bt2cAMP. Interestingly, the miR-200 family was significantly up-regulated during type II cell differentiation; miR-200 induction was inversely correlated with expression of known targets, transcription factors ZEB1/2 and TGF-β2. miR-200 antagonists inhibited TTF-1 and surfactant proteins and up-regulated TGF-β2 and ZEB1 expression in type II cells. Overexpression of ZEB1 in type II cells decreased DNA binding of endogenous TTF-1, blocked cAMP stimulation of surfactant proteins, and inhibited miR-200 expression, whereas cAMP markedly inhibited ZEB1/2 and TGF-β. Importantly, overexpression of ZEB1 or miR-200 antagonists in HFL type II cells also inhibited LPCAT1 and ABCA3, enzymes involved in surfactant phospholipid synthesis and trafficking, and blocked lamellar body biogenesis. Our findings suggest that the miR-200 family and ZEB1, which exist in a double-negative feedback loop regulated by TGF-β, serve important roles in the developmental regulation of type II cell differentiation and function in HFL. PMID:26203191

  5. Phospholipid monolayers between fluid and solid states.

    PubMed Central

    Helm, C A; Möhwald, H; Kjaer, K; Als-Nielsen, J

    1987-01-01

    Monolayers of the phospholipid dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid on the surface of water have been studied by a combination of the new techniques of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence microscopy with classical surface pressure data. The pressure vs. area isotherm changes slope at the surface pressures pi c and pi s. The optical technique demonstrates that between pi c and pi s the fluid phase coexists with a denser "gel" phase. Electron diffraction data have shown that the gel phase has bond orientational order over tens of micrometers. However, the x-ray data demonstrate that positional correlations extend only over tens of angstroms. Thus, the gel phase is not crystalline. Above pi s a solid phase is formed with a positional correlation range that is eight times longer for the chemically purest films. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3651557

  6. Simulations of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Kaznessis, Yiannis N; Kim, Sangtae; Larson, Ronald G

    2002-04-01

    Results of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol monolayers at the air/water interface are presented. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is zwitterionic and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol is anionic at physiological pH. NaCl and CaCl2 water subphases are simulated. The simulations are carried out at different surface densities, and a simulation cell geometry is chosen that greatly facilitates the investigation of phospholipid monolayer properties. Ensemble average monolayer properties calculated from simulation are in agreement with experimental measurements. The dependence of the properties of the monolayers on the surface density, the type of the headgroup, and the ionic environment are explained in terms of atomistically detailed pair distribution functions and electron density profiles, demonstrating the strength of simulations in investigating complex, multicomponent systems of biological importance. PMID:11916834

  7. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  8. A model of flow and surfactant transport in an oscillatory alveolus partially filled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Grotberg, James B.

    2005-03-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways, and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. By assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension and small surfactant activity, we combine semianalytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant transport equations. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants, however, induces a nontrivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) particularly depend on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I :E ratio) and the sorption parameter K. For an insoluble surfactant, a single vortex is formed when the I :E ratio is either smaller or larger than 1:1, but the recirculations have opposite directions in the two cases. A soluble surfactant can lead to more complex flow patterns such as three vortices or saddle-point flow structures. The estimated unsteady velocity is 10-3cm/s, and the corresponding Péclet number for transporting respiratory gas is O(1). For a cell-cell signaling molecule such as surfactant-associated protein-A for regulating surfactant secretion, the Péclet number could be O(10) or higher. Convection is either comparable to or more dominant than diffusion in these processes. The estimated steady velocity ranges from 10-6to10-4cm /s, depending on I :E and K, and the corresponding steady Péclet number is between 10-8/Dm and 10-6/Dm (Dm is the molecular diffusivity with units of cm2/s). Therefore, for Dm⩽10-8cm2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  9. Macrophages interaction with pulmonary surfactant using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Minette; Telesford, Dana Marie; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Alveolar pulmonary surfactant, composed mostly of phospholipids, is essential for maintenance of normal lung function. However, increased production of lung surfactant can lead to many pulmonary inflammatory disorders. Alveolar macrophages are responsible for the degradation of the surfactant and exhibit increased lipid uptake in inflamated lungs. Owing to their limited clearance capability, excessive accumulation of surfactant may impair their phagocytic function. In this study, the interaction of the macrophages with different lipid components was studied using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy, a nonlinear vibrational technique which combines spectroscopy and microscopy, allows noninvasive characterization and imaging of chemical species without preparation or labeling. A monolayer of THP-1 macrophages and palmitic acid-d31 on phosphate buffer solution was transferred to a coverslip using the Langmuir-Blodgett method and then imaged using CARS by mapping the CH2 stretch signal of the lipid membrane of the macrophage and C-D stretch signal from palmitic acid-d31. Preliminary results showed CARS images of the macrophage on the solid substrate and thermal degradation of the sample due to long exposure to high laser power. A contrast image is expected to be observed by mapping the CH2 and C-D signals, which can show the lipid interaction and phagocytosis of the macrophage.

  10. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta®, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload. PMID:23781287

  11. Phospholipids at the Interface: Current Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Roman; Watson, Richard L.; Norton, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipids are one of the major structural elements of biological membranes. Due to their amphiphilic character, they can adopt various molecular assemblies when dispersed in water, such as bilayer vesicles or micelles, which give them unique interfacial properties and render them very attractive in terms of foam or emulsion stabilization. This article aims at reviewing the properties of phospholipids at the air/water and oil/water interfaces, as well as the recent advances in using these natural components as stabilizers, alone or in combination with other compounds such as proteins. A discussion regarding the challenges and opportunities offered by phospholipids-stabilized structure concludes the review. PMID:23736688

  12. Static and Dynamic Microscopy of the Chemical Stability and Aggregation State of Silver Nanowires in Components of Murine Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Ioannis G; Botelho, Danielle; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D; Shaffer, Milo S P; Gow, Andrew; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E

    2015-07-01

    The increase of production volumes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and of consumer products incorporating them may lead to increased health risks from occupational and public exposures. There is currently limited information about the putative toxicity of AgNWs upon inhalation and incomplete understanding of the properties that control their bioreactivity. The lung lining fluid (LLF), which contains phospholipids and surfactant proteins, represents a first contact site with the respiratory system. In this work, the impact of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Curosurf, and murine LLF on the stability of AgNWs was examined. Both the phospholipid and protein components of the LLF modified the dissolution kinetics of AgNWs, due to the formation of a lipid corona or aggregation of the AgNWs. Moreover, the hydrophilic proteins, but neither the hydrophobic surfactant proteins nor the phospholipids, induced agglomeration of the AgNWs. Finally, the generation of a secondary population of nanosilver was observed and attributed to the reduction of Ag(+) ions by the surface capping of the AgNWs. Our findings highlight that combinations of spatially resolved dynamic and static techniques are required to develop a holistic understanding of which parameters govern AgNW behavior at the point of exposure and to accurately predict their risks on human health and the environment. PMID:26061974

  13. Interaction of soot derived multi-carbon nanoparticles with lung surfactants and their possible internalization inside alveolar cavity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradip; Bohidar, H B

    2010-10-01

    A systematic investigation of interaction of multi-carbon nanoparticles, obtained from soot, with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a clinical pulmonary phospholipid surfactant, sold under trade name "Survanta", was undertaken to establish a model for internalization of these nanoparticles inside alveolar cavity. In vitro experiments were carried out to establish the phospholipid assisted dispersion mechanism of carbon nanoclusters (size approximately 150 nm, zeta potential approximately -15 mV) in water. Results obtained from an array of experimental methods, like dynamic laser light scattering, electrophoresis, UV-absorption spectroscopy, surface tension studies and transmission electron microscopy, revealed that the carbon nanoparticles interacted with DPPC predominantly via hydrophobic interactions. Selective surface adsorption of DPPC molecules on nanoparticle surface was found to be strongly dependent on the concentration of the phospholipid. DPPC, a gemini surfactant, formed a rigid monolayer around the carbon nanocluster even at nanomolar concentration and provided excellent stability to the dispersion. Based on the experimental data it is proposed that the free-energy gain involved in the hydrophobic interactions will facilitate the internalization of these nanoparticles on the inner wall of the alveolar cavity. PMID:21299046

  14. Static and dynamic microscopy of the chemical stability and aggregation state of silver nanowires in components of murine pulmonary surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Botelho, Danielle; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Gow, Andrew; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2016-01-01

    The increase of production volumes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and of consumer products incorporating them, may lead to increased health risks from occupational and public exposures. There is currently limited information about the putative toxicity of AgNWs upon inhalation, and incomplete understanding of the properties that control their bioreactivity. The lung lining fluid (LLF), which contains phospholipids and surfactant proteins, represents a first contact site with the respiratory system. In this work, the impact of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Curosurf® and murine LLF on the stability of AgNWs was examined. Both the phospholipid and protein components of the LLF modified the dissolution kinetics of AgNWs, due to the formation of a lipid corona or aggregation of the AgNWs. Moreover, the hydrophilic, but neither the hydrophobic surfactant proteins nor the phospholipids, induced agglomeration of the AgNWs. Finally, the generation of a secondary population of nano-silver was observed and attributed to the reduction of Ag+ ions by the surface capping of the AgNWs. Our findings highlight that combinations of spatially resolved dynamic and static techniques are required to develop a holistic understanding of which parameters govern AgNW behavior at the point of exposure and to accurately predict their risks on human health and the environment. PMID:26061974

  15. Polymer/surfactant transport in micellar flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Kellerhals, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    For the surfactant formulations used (particular surfactant concentration, surfactant type, cosolvent type, cosolvent concentration, etc.), the results show that surfactant systems containing polymer as a mobility control agent may exhibit adverse polymer transport behavior during flow through porous media. Polymer generally lagged behind the surfactant even though the two species were injected simultaneously in the surfactant slug. This poor polymer transport definitely could have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of a micellar flooding process in the field. Phase studies show that when some surfactant systems containing xanthan gum are mixed with crude oil at various salinities, a polymer-rich, gel-like phase forms. The polymer lag phenomenon in core tests can be related to phase separation due to divalent cations generated in situ as a result of ion exchange with the clays and the surfactant. 18 refs.

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF SURFACTANTS IN TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of a number of anionic, nonionic and cationic surfactants in manipulations associated with toxicity identification evaluations was studied. t was found that toxicity of the surfactants could be removed from aqueous samples via aeration, apparently through sublation. ...

  17. P63 (CKAP4) as an SP-A Receptor: Implications for Surfactant Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Sandra R.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) plays an important role in the clearance of surfactant from the lung alveolar space and in the regulation of surfactant secretion and uptake by type II pneumocytes in culture. Two pathways are important for the endocytosis of surfactant by type II cells and the intact lung, a receptor-mediated clathrin-dependent pathway and a non-clathrin, actin-mediated pathway. The critical role of the clathrin/receptor-mediated pathway in normal mice is supported by the finding that SP-A gene-targeted mice use the actin-dependent pathway to maintain normal clearance of surfactant. Addition of SP-A to the surfactant of the SP-A null mice “rescued” the phenotype, further emphasizing the essential role of the SP-A/receptor-mediated process in surfactant turnover. This review presents an overview of the structure of SP-A and its function in surfactant turnover. The evidence that the interaction of SP-A with type II cells is a receptor-mediated process is presented. A newly identified receptor for SP-A, P63/CKAP4, is described in detail, with elucidation of the specific structural features of this 63 kDa, nonglycosylated, highly coiled, transmembrane protein. The compelling evidence that P63 functions as a receptor for SP-A on type II cells is summarized. Regulation of P63 receptor density on the surface of pneumocytes may be a novel approach for the regulation of surfactant homeostasis by the lung. PMID:20054143

  18. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  19. The effect of hydroxylated fatty acid-containing phospholipids in the remodeling of lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Piotto, Stefano; Trapani, Alfonso; Bianchino, Erminia; Ibarguren, Maitane; López, David J; Busquets, Xavier; Concilio, Simona

    2014-06-01

    The synthetic fatty acid 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2OHOA) is an antitumor drug that regulates membrane lipid composition and structure. An important effect of this drug is the restoration of sphingomyelin (SM) levels in cancer cell membranes, where the SM concentration is lower than in non-tumor cells. It is well known that free fatty acid concentration in cell membranes is lower than 5%, and that fatty acid excess is rapidly incorporated into phospholipids. In a recent work, we have considered the effect of free 2OHOA in model membranes in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phases, by using all-atom molecular dynamics. This study concerns membranes that are modified upon incorporation of 2OHOA into different phospholipids. 2OHOA-containing phospholipids have a permanent effect on lipid membranes, making a Ld membrane surface more compact and less hydrated, whereas the opposite effect is observed in Lo domains. Moreover, the hydroxyl group of fatty acid chains increases the propensity of Ld model membranes to form hexagonal or other non-lamellar structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. PMID:24463068

  20. Annexin V inhibits protein kinase C activity via a mechanism of phospholipid sequestration.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, T; Mira, J P; Feliers, D; Solito, E; Russo-Marie, F; Oudinet, J P

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of annexin V, a Ca2+-dependent phospholipid-binding protein, as a regulator of protein kinase C (PKC) and characterized its mechanism of inhibition. Several mutants obtained by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis were tested in vitro on PKC activity in cytosolic fractions from Jurkat cells and on purified PKCalpha. Annexin V inhibited phosphorylation of annexin II by endogenous PKC and phosphorylation of myelin basic protein by PKCalpha. In both systems, the use of single Ca2+-binding-site mutants of annexin V led to a partial reversal of inhibition, and the Ca2+-binding site located in the first domain of annexin V was found to have the most important role. An increase in the number of mutated Ca2+-binding sites led to a greater loss of inhibition. These results corroborated those showing the progressive loss of binding of these mutants to phospholipid liposomes. In conclusion, we show that PKC inhibition by annexin V is the consequence of a mechanism involving phospholipid sequestration by annexin V, and that the Ca2+-binding site located in domain 1 of annexin V plays a predominant role in this process. In addition, we show that the R122AIK site, which may act analogously to a PKC-inhibitory pseudosubstrate site, is not involved in PKC inhibition, and that a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal tail of annexin V inhibits PKC activity but to a lesser extent than annexin V itself. PMID:9494097

  1. Removal of surfactants from hydrocarbons with alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, R.P.; Poling, D.E.; Stefanidakis, G.

    1984-02-07

    A method is disclosed for removing hydrocarbon-soluble anionic surfactants from gasoline or kerosene boiling range hydrocarbons. The method comprises (a) contacting a hydrocarbon mixture containing surfactants with a lower alcohol which is miscible with the hydrocarbon mixture to extract the surfactants; (b) contacting the mixture with water or caustic solution to extract the lower alcohol and surfactants from the hydrocarbon mixture; (c) separating the water or caustic solution from the hydrocarbons; and (d) removing the hydrocarbons.

  2. Nutritional Properties of Dietary Omega-3-Enriched Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Murru, Elisabetta; Carta, Gianfranca

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids regulate several physiological functions. However, to exert their properties, they have to be present in the diet in an optimal balance. Particular attention has been focused on tissue highly polyunsaturated fatty acids (HPUFAs) n-6/n-3 ratio, influenced by the type and the esterified form of dietary fatty acids. Dietary EPA and DHA when esterified to phospholipids (PLs) are more efficiently incorporated into tissue PLs and seem to possess peculiar properties through specific mechanism(s) of action, such as the capacity to affect endocannabinoid biosynthesis at much lower doses than EPA and DHA in triglyceride form, probably because of the above mentioned higher incorporation into tissue PLs. Downregulation of the endocannabinoid system seems to mediate the positive effects exerted by omega-3-enriched PLs on several parameters of metabolic syndrome. PLs are one of the major dietary forms of EPA and DHA we are exposed to with the everyday diet; therefore, it is not surprising that it guarantees an effective EPA and DHA nutritional activity. Future studies should address whether EPA and DHA in PL form are also more effective than other formulations in ameliorating other pathological conditions where n-3 HPUFAs seem to exert beneficial activities such as cancer and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23984423

  3. Essential phospholipids in fatty liver: a scientific update

    PubMed Central

    Gundermann, Karl-Josef; Gundermann, Simon; Drozdzik, Marek; Mohan Prasad, VG

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although essential phospholipids (EPL) from soybean are often used in membrane-associated disorders and diseases, their high quality of purification and effects on prevalent liver diseases, especially on fatty liver diseases (FLDs) of different origin, are still widely unknown and a matter of continuous active research. The aim of this article is to review, discuss, and summarize the available results of EPL in the treatment of FLD. Methods Database research was carried out on Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, country-specific journals, and follow-up literature citations for relevant hepatogastroenterological articles published between 1988 and 2014. We searched for and reviewed only those papers that indicated minimum extraction amount of 72% (3-sn-phosphatidyl)choline from soybean as being necessary to treat patients with a considerable amount of 1,2-dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine as a key component in EPL. Results EPL has a well-established mode of action, therapeutic effectiveness, and lack of toxicity, which ensures clinically relevant efficacy-to-safety ratio. It influences membrane- dependent cellular functions and shows anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic, anti apoptotic, membrane-protective, and lipid-regulating effects. Due to its positive effects on membrane composition and functions, it accelerates the improvement or normalization of subjective symptoms; pathological, clinical, and biochemical findings; hepatic imaging; and liver histology. It is justified to administer EPL together with other therapeutic measurements in the liver. Conclusion Pharmacological and clinical results confirm the efficacy of EPL in the treatment of FLD. PMID:27217791

  4. Agglutination of lung surfactant with glucan.

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, A J; Brogden, K A; French, A D

    1992-01-01

    Respirable cotton dust, implicated in the pathogenesis of byssinosis, contains a number of bioactive compounds. These include lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tannins, bacterial peptides, byssinosin, iacinilene C, and 1,3-beta-D-glucan. The exact aetiological agent of byssinosis in such dust has not been definitively identified nor has its mechanism of action on lower lung surfaces been determined. In the present study 1,3-beta-D-glucan, Enterobacter agglomerans LPS, and ovine pulmonary surfactant were mixed in varying combinations. After incubation, their characteristics were determined by sucrose density centrifugation, TLC, and carbohydrate analysis. Precipitates were found in mixtures containing surfactant-glucan and surfactant-glucan-LPS, but not in surfactant-LPS. Precipitates were not seen in the surfactant, LPS, and glucan controls. The formation of a precipitate did not increase the density of the surfactant glucan mixture when compared by density gradient centrifugation with the surfactant control. The interaction between surfactant and glucan was analysed by molecular modelling. The energy of a surfactant-glucan complex (60.07 kcal/mol) was calculated to be much lower than the sum of glucan (47.09 kcal/mol) and surfactant (30.98 kcal/mol) when added separately. The results indicate that 1,3-beta-D-glucan does interact with surfactant and this complex may play a part in the pathogenesis of byssinosis by altering lung physiology maintained by pulmonary surfactant. Images PMID:1463675

  5. Surfactants identified in synovial fluid and their ability to act as boundary lubricants.

    PubMed Central

    Hills, B A; Butler, B D

    1984-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography has been used to identify phospholipids extracted from canine synovial fluid, the major component (45%) being phosphatidyl choline (PC). The extracts and their components have been shown to be surface active in reducing the surface tension of water and to be readily adsorbed to hydrophilic solids, whose surfaces then become hydrophobic. These adsorbed monolayers of synovial surfactant were then found to be excellent boundary lubricants in vitro, reducing the coefficient of kinetic friction (mu) in the dry state and under physiological loading by up to 97% for extracts and 99% for PC alone, reaching mu = 0.01. Surface-active phospholipid is put forward as the possible active ingredient in joint lubrication and shown to be consistent with previous biochemical studies to elucidate its identity. The model essentially follows the classical Hardy model for boundary lubrication imparted by surfactants. It is discussed in relation to a new approach in providing artificial lubrication and facilitating tissue release in patients with arthritis. PMID:6476922

  6. Uptake and degradation of natural surfactant by isolated rat granular pneumocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.B.; Chander, A.; Reicherter, J. )

    1987-12-01

    It has been previously shown that isolated granular pneumocytes internalize and degrade dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in synthetic lipid vesicles and reutilize degradation products for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. In this study, the authors evaluated the uptake and degradation of radiolabeled natural surfactant (NS) isolated from lung lavage after perfusing isolated rat lungs with ({sup 3}H)choline. Uptake of NS by isolated granular pneumocytes was increased approximately fourfold compared with synthetic liposomes, suggesting that physical form or a component (e.g., a protein) of NS plays a role in phospholipid uptake by these cells. Uptake was significantly decreased by metabolic inhibitors, indicating an energy requirement for this process. After 2-h incubation, the pattern of radioactivity in cells compared with NS showed a significant decrease in PC and DSPC and increase in free choline, choline phosphate, and CDP-choline. This pattern of metabolism indicates degradation of PC and metabolic reutilization of products. These studies support the hypothesis that alveolar phospholipids are accumulated and reutilized by granular pneumocytes for surfactant synthesis.

  7. Cis-acting sequences from a human surfactant protein gene confer pulmonary-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Korfhagen, T.R.; Glasser, S.W.; Wert, S.E.; Bruno, M.D.; Daugherty, C.C.; McNeish, J.D.; Stock, J.L.; Potter, S.S.; Whitsett, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is produced in late gestation by developing type II epithelial cells lining the alveolar epithelium of the lung. Lack of surfactant at birth is associated with respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a highly hydrophobic peptide isolated from pulmonary tissue that enhances the biophysical activity of surfactant phospholipids. Like surfactant phospholipid, SP-C is produced by epithelial cells in the distal respiratory epithelium, and its expression increases during the latter part of gestation. A chimeric gene containing 3.6 kilobases of the promoter and 5{prime}-flanking sequences of the human SP-C gene was used to express diphtheria toxin A. The SP-C-diphtheria toxin A fusion gene was injected into fertilized mouse eggs to produce transgenic mice. Affected mice developed respiratory failure in the immediate postnatal period. Morphologic analysis of lungs from affected pups showed variable but severe cellular injury confined to pulmonary tissues. Ultrastructural changes consistent with cell death and injury were prominent in the distal respiratory epithelium. Proximal components of the tracheobronchial tree were not severely affected. Transgenic animals were of normal size at birth, and structural abnormalities were not detected in nonpulmonary tissues. Lung-specific diphtheria toxin A expression controlled by the human SP-C gene injured type II epithelial cells and caused extensive necrosis of the distal respiratory epithelium. The absence of type I epithelial cells in the most severely affected transgenic animals supports the concept that developing type II cells serve as precursors to type I epithelial cells.

  8. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  9. Shifts in microbial community structure during in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingwen; Li, Feng; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to reveal the microbial mechanism of in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation (SEBR). Various concentrations of rhamnolipids, Tween 80, and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS) were separately sprayed onto soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for years. Within 90 days, the highest level of degradation (95 %) was observed in the soil treated with rhamnolipids (10 mg/kg), followed by 92 % degradation with Tween 80 (50 mg/kg) and 90 % degradation with SDBS (50 mg/kg). The results of the microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) suggest that bacteria dominated the enhanced PAH biodegradation (94 % of the maximum contribution). The shift of bacterial community structure during the surfactant treatment was analyzed by using the 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing. In the presence of surfactants, the number of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas increased from 2-3 to 15-30 % at the end of the experiment (two to three times of control). Gene prediction with phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) shows that the PAH-degrading genes, such as 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate dioxygenase and PAH dioxygenase large subunit, significantly increased after the surfactant applications (p < 0.05). The findings of this study provide insights into the surfactant-induced shifts of microbial community, as well as critical factors for efficient bioremediation. PMID:27068902

  10. Different modes of interaction of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B in phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, A; Casals, C; Keough, K M; Pérez-Gil, J

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B (SP-B) has been incorporated into vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC) by two different procedures to characterize the dependence of lipid-protein interactions on the method of reconstitution. In method A the protein was dissolved in a small volume of either methanol or 60% (v/v) acetonitrile and injected into an aqueous phase containing phospholipid vesicles. In method B the vesicles were prepared by injection of a mixture of phospholipid and SP-B dissolved in methanol or aqueous acetonitrile. Both methods of reconstitution led to the extensive interaction of SP-B with PC bilayers as demonstrated by co-migration during centrifugation, marked protection against proteolysis, change in the fluorescence emission intensity of SP-B, and protection of SP-B tryptophan fluorescence from quenching by acrylamide. SP-B promoted the rapid adsorption of DPPC on an air/liquid interface irrespective of the method of protein reconstitution. However, the interfacial adsorption activity of SP-B reconstituted by method B remained stable for hours, but that of SP-B prepared by method A decreased with time. Electron microscopy showed that the injection of SP-B into an aqueous phase containing PC or DPPC vesicles (method A) induced a rapid aggregation of vesicles. By contrast, a much longer time was required for detecting vesicle aggregation when the protein was reconstituted by co-injection of SP-B and phospholipids (method B). The presence of 5% (w/w) SP-B in DPPC bilayers prepared by method B broadened the differential scanning calorimetry thermogram and decreased the enthalpy of the transition. In contrast, the injection of SP-B into preformed DPPC vesicles (method A) did not influence the gel-to-liquid phase transition of DPPC bilayers. Taken together, these results indicate that the mode and extent of interaction of SP-B with surfactant phospholipids depends on the conditions of

  11. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  12. p53 attenuates AKT signaling by modulating membrane phospholipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Bloch, Katarzyna; Derua, Rita; Vyas, Rajesh; Harms, Amy; Hankemeier, Thomas; Khan, Niamat Ali; Dehairs, Jonas; Bagadi, Muralidhararao; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Waelkens, Etienne; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is the central component of a complex network of signaling pathways that protect organisms against the propagation of cells carrying oncogenic mutations. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of p53 in membrane phospholipids composition. By repressing the expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, SCD, the enzyme that converts saturated to mono-unsaturated fatty acids, p53 causes a shift in the content of phospholipids with mono-unsaturated acyl chains towards more saturated phospholipid species, particularly of the phosphatidylinositol headgroup class. This shift affects levels of phosphatidylinositol phosphates, attenuates the oncogenic AKT pathway, and contributes to the p53-mediated control of cell survival. These findings expand the p53 network to phospholipid metabolism and uncover a new molecular pathway connecting p53 to AKT signaling. PMID:26061814

  13. Supported phospholipid/alkanethiol biomimetic membranes: insulating properties.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, A L; Gueguetchkeri, M; Yap, W

    1994-01-01

    A novel model lipid bilayer membrane is prepared by the addition of phospholipid vesicles to alkanethiol monolayers on gold. This supported hybrid bilayer membrane is rugged, easily and reproducibly prepared in the absence of organic solvent, and is stable for very long periods of time. We have characterized the insulating characteristics of this membrane by examining the rate of electron transfer and by impedance spectroscopy. Supported hybrid bilayers formed from phospholipids and alkanethiols are pinhole-free and demonstrate measured values of conductivity and resistivity which are within an order of magnitude of that reported for black lipid membranes. Capacitance values suggest a dielectric constant of 2.7 for phospholipid membranes in the absence of organic solvent. The protein toxin, melittin, destroys the insulating capability of the phospholipid layer without significantly altering the bilayer structure. This model membrane will allow the assessment of the effect of lipid membrane perturbants on the insulating properties of natural lipid membranes. PMID:7811924

  14. Measurement of Phospholipids May Improve Diagnostic Accuracy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lorelei; Han, Gang; Zhu, Weiwei; Molina, Ashley D.; Arango, Hector; LaPolla, James P.; Hoffman, Mitchell S.; Sellers, Thomas; Kirby, Tyler; Nicosia, Santo V.; Sutphen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background More than two-thirds of women who undergo surgery for suspected ovarian neoplasm do not have cancer. Our previous results suggest phospholipids as potential biomarkers of ovarian cancer. In this study, we measured the serum levels of multiple phospholipids among women undergoing surgery for suspected ovarian cancer to identify biomarkers that better predict whether an ovarian mass is malignant. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained serum samples preoperatively from women with suspected ovarian cancer enrolled through a prospective, population-based rapid ascertainment system. Samples were analyzed from all women in whom a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) was confirmed and from benign disease cases randomly selected from the remaining (non-EOC) samples. We measured biologically relevant phospholipids using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We applied a powerful statistical and machine learning approach, Hybrid huberized support vector machine (HH-SVM) to prioritize phospholipids to enter the biomarker models, and used cross-validation to obtain conservative estimates of classification error rates. Results The HH-SVM model using the measurements of specific combinations of phospholipids supplements clinical CA125 measurement and improves diagnostic accuracy. Specifically, the measurement of phospholipids improved sensitivity (identification of cases with preoperative CA125 levels below 35) among two types of cases in which CA125 performance is historically poor - early stage cases and those of mucinous histology. Measurement of phospholipids improved the identification of early stage cases from 65% (based on CA125) to 82%, and mucinous cases from 44% to 88%. Conclusions/Significance Levels of specific serum phospholipids differ between women with ovarian cancer and those with benign conditions. If validated by independent studies in the future, these biomarkers may serve as an adjunct at the time of clinical

  15. Effects of gamma irradiation on solid and lyophilised phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensrud, G.; Redford, K.; Smistad, G.; Karlsen, J.

    1999-11-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation (25 kGy) as a sterilisation method for phospholipids (distearoylphosphatidylcholine and distearoylphosphatidylglycerol) were investigated. 31P-NMR revealed minor chemical degradation of the phospholipids but lower dynamic viscosity and pseudoplasticity, lower turbidity, higher diffusion constant, smaller size, more negative zeta potential and changes in the phase transition behaviour of the subsequently produced liposomes were observed. The observed changes could to some extent be explained by the irradiation-induced degradation products (distearoylphosphatidic acid, fatty acids, lysophospholipids).

  16. Self-emulsifying phospholipid pre-concentrates (SEPPs) for improved oral delivery of the anti-cancer genistein: Development, appraisal and ex-vivo intestinal permeation.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Eman M M; Elnaggar, Yosra S R; Galal, Saly; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2016-09-25

    Genistein (GEN), a potent anticancer agent, suffers from scanty oral bioavailability due to poor solubility and extensive metabolism. This work endeavored to enhance GEN solubility and intestinal permeability via fabrication of self-emulsifying phospholipid pre-concentrates (SEPPs) using some bioactive surfactants. Moreover, the potential of surfactant-free SEPP to address GEN obstacles was investigated. SEPPs were prepared from Phosal(®) 53MCT, oil/phosphatidylcholine mixture, alone or with only 30% of different surfactant/co-surfactant mixture (S/CO). In-vitro characterization encompassed globule size analysis, zeta potential (ZP), transmission electron microscopy, and in-vitro release. Ex-vivo intestinal permeation study was performed using non-everted rat intestinal sac technique. Upon aqueous dilution, SEPPs were easily dispersed with spherical globules within a nano-range size (from 165±15 to 425±20nm) and adequate negative ZP (>-30mV). SEPPs demonstrated a significant enhancement in GEN release compared to drug suspension without superior effect due to added S/CO. Permeation study revealed that at least 12.13% free GEN was permeated after 120min from SEPPs compared to only 3.7% from drug suspension. Among different SEPPs, SEPP containing 30% Tween 80/Transcutol HP mixture showed the highest GEN permeation (18.54%). Conclusively, SEPP might be a promising nanocarrier that enhances GEN bioavailability via improving dissolution and inhibition of pre-systemic clearance. PMID:27492016

  17. Evolution, Development, and Function of the Pulmonary Surfactant System in Normal and Perturbed Environments.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; Morrison, Janna L; Daniels, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant lipids and proteins form a surface active film at the air-liquid interface of internal gas exchange organs, including swim bladders and lungs. The system is uniquely positioned to meet both the physical challenges associated with a dynamically changing internal air-liquid interface, and the environmental challenges associated with the foreign pathogens and particles to which the internal surface is exposed. Lungs range from simple, transparent, bag-like units to complex, multilobed, compartmentalized structures. Despite this anatomical variability, the surfactant system is remarkably conserved. Here, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the surfactant system, which likely predates lungs. We describe the evolution of surfactant structure and function in invertebrates and vertebrates. We focus on changes in lipid and protein composition and surfactant function from its antiadhesive and innate immune to its alveolar stability and structural integrity functions. We discuss the biochemical, hormonal, autonomic, and mechanical factors that regulate normal surfactant secretion in mature animals. We present an analysis of the ontogeny of surfactant development among the vertebrates and the contribution of different regulatory mechanisms that control this development. We also discuss environmental (oxygen), hormonal and biochemical (glucocorticoids and glucose) and pollutant (maternal smoking, alcohol, and common "recreational" drugs) effects that impact surfactant development. On the adult surfactant system, we focus on environmental variables including temperature, pressure, and hypoxia that have shaped its evolution and we discuss the resultant biochemical, biophysical, and cellular adaptations. Finally, we discuss the effect of major modern gaseous and particulate pollutants on the lung and surfactant system. PMID:26756637

  18. Hyaluronan and phospholipid association in biolubrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Dėdinaitė, Andra

    2013-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the outstanding lubrication of synovial joints is achieved by a sophisticated hierarchical structure of cartilage combined with synergistic actions of surface-active components present in the synovial fluid. In this work we focus on the association of two components of the synovial fluid, hyaluronan and dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), in bulk solution and at interfaces. We demonstrate that hyaluronan associates with DPPC vesicles and adsorbs to supported DPPC bilayers. The association structures formed at the interface are sufficiently stable to allow sequential adsorption of DPPC and hyaluronan, whereby promoting the formation of thick composite layers of these two components. The lubricating ability of such composite layers was probed by the AFM colloidal probe technique and found to be very favorable with low friction coefficients and high load bearing capacity. With DPPC as the last adsorbed component, a friction coefficient of 0.01 was found up to pressures significantly above what is encountered in healthy synovial joints. Hyaluronan as the last added component increases the friction coefficient to 0.03 and decreases the load bearing capacity somewhat (but still above what is needed in the synovial joint). Our data demonstrate that self-assembly structures formed by hyaluronan and phospholipids at interfaces are efficient aqueous lubricants, and it seems plausible that such self-assembly structures contribute to the exceptional lubrication of synovial joints. PMID:24171653

  19. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  20. Specific RNA binding to ordered phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Tadeusz; Janas, Teresa; Yarus, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We have studied RNA binding to vesicles bounded by ordered and disordered phospholipid membranes. A positive correlation exists between bilayer order and RNA affinity. In particular, structure-dependent RNA binding appears for rafted (liquid-ordered) domains in sphingomyelin-cholesterol-1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine vesicles. Binding to more highly ordered gel phase membranes is stronger, but much less RNA structure-dependent. All modes of RNA-membrane association seem to be electrostatic and headgroup directed. Fluorometry on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes indicates that bound RNA broadens the gel-fluid melting transition, and reduces lipid headgroup order, as detected via fluorometric measurement of intramembrane electric fields. RNA preference for rafted lipid was visualized and confirmed using multiple fluorophores that allow fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy on RNA molecules closely associated with ordered lipid patches within giant vesicles. Accordingly, both RNA structure and membrane order could modulate biological RNA–membrane interactions. PMID:16641318

  1. Enhancement by cytidine of membrane phospholipid synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    G-Coviella, I. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Cytidine, as cytidine 5'-diphosphate choline, is a major precursor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine in cell membranes. In the present study, we examined the relationships between extracellular levels of cytidine, the conversion of [14C]choline to [14C]phosphatidylcholine, and the net syntheses of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by PC12 cells. The rate at which cytidine (as [3H]cytidine) was incorporated into the PC12 cells followed normal Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km = 5 microM; Vmax = 12 x 10(-3) mmol/mg of protein/min) when the cytidine concentrations in the medium were below 50 microM; at higher concentrations, intracellular [3H]cytidine nucleotide levels increased linearly. Once inside the cell, cytidine was converted mainly into cytidine triphosphate. In pulse-chase experiments, addition of cytidine to the medium caused a time- and dose-dependent increase (by up to 30%) in the incorporation of [14C]choline into membrane [14C]-phosphatidylcholine. When the PC12 cells were supplemented with both cytidine and choline for 14 h, small but significant elevations (p less than 0.05) were observed in their absolute contents of membrane phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine, all increasing by 10-15% relative to their levels in cells incubated with choline alone. Exogenous cytidine, acting via cytidine triphosphate, can thus affect the synthesis and levels of cell membrane phospholipids.

  2. Molecular Insights into Phospholipid -- NSAID Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2007-03-01

    Non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. Using all atomistic simulations and two different methodologies, we studied the partitioning behavior of two model NSAIDs (Aspirin and Ibuprofen) as a function of pH and drug loading. The results from two methodologies are consistent in describing the equilibrium drug distribution in the bilayers. Additionally, the heterogeneity in density and polarity of the bilayer in the normal direction along with the fact that NSAIDs are amphiphilic (all of them have a carboxylic acid group and a non-polar part consisting of aromatic moieties), indicate that the diffusion mechanism in the bilayer is far different compared to the same in a bulk medium. This study summarizes the various effects of NSAIDs and their behavior inside the lipid bilayer both as a function of pH and drug concentration.

  3. Effects of phospholipids on renal function.

    PubMed

    Buckalew, V M; Strandhoy, J W; Handa, R K

    1993-01-01

    The effects of two classes of phospholipids (PL) on renal function have been studied. Bolus injections of 1 ng (10 pmol) of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) caused natriuresis and diuresis in rats. Natriuretic activity was eliminated by substituting unsaturated bonds in the 1-acyl group and by removing the choline group on the sn-3 position. Natriuretic activity was not affected by substitution of 1-alkyl for 1-acyl groups. In the dog, LPC was natriuretic when given as a bolus of 3.0 micrograms/kg or as a constant infusion at 5 ng/kg/min. To explore further the effect of alkyl PLs on renal function, a series of studies with platelet activating factor (PAF) was performed. PAF injected directly into the renal artery (IR) in bolus doses of 0.5-10 ng/kg caused renal vasodilation that was blocked by a specific PAF receptor antagonist. This effect was not due to release of vasodilatory eicosanoids, dopamine, or nitric oxide (NO). PAF given IR as a continuous infusion at 2.5 ng/kg/min attenuated the renal vasoconstrictor effects of angiotensin II and norepinephrine but not vasopressin. This effect to attenuate vasoconstriction was blocked by the NO inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine. These studies using picomolar amounts of PL suggest a physiologic role for these compounds in control of renal function. PMID:7508037

  4. Tissue phospholipids (TPL) in avian tuberculosis (AT)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandedkar, A.K.N.; Malhotra, H.C.

    1986-05-01

    AT constitutes one of the major problems in animal husbandry. Chickens (white, leg horn, male, 400-600 g) were infected with Mycobacterium avium maintained on I.U.T. medium to induce clinical AT which was confirmed by histopathological examinations of the affected tissues. Fatty infiltration and tissue enlargement was visible in infected birds. After 4 wks, incorporation of i.v. /sup 32/P (50 uCi/100 g body wt.) in affected tissues was followed for 3,7,9,12 hr intervals. Lipids were extracted and fractionated by silicic acid (SA) column and SA impregnated paper chromatography. When compared with pair-fed controls, in AT slower turnover of TPL in liver, slightly higher in heart and significantly increased turnover of TPL in serum were observed. No appreciable change in total TPL content was noticed in brain, spleen and kidney. Further fractionation of TPL provided better understanding of the metabolism. Increase in lysophosphatidyl-choline (LPC) and -ethanolamine (LPE) content, powerful hemolytic agents, in liver may explain frequent occurrence of anemia in tuberculosis. Also, a concomitant marked increase in the ratio of total saturated/unsaturated fatty acids is observed in serum phosphatidyl choline fraction. This confirms the observation that the membrane phospholipid metabolism is significantly affected in tuberculosis infection.

  5. Lipid metabolizing enzyme activities modulated by phospholipid substrate lateral distribution.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G; Reyes, Juan G; De la Fuente, Milton

    2011-09-01

    Biological membranes contain many domains enriched in phospholipid lipids and there is not yet clear explanation about how these domains can control the activity of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used the surface dilution kinetic theory to derive general equations describing how complex substrate distributions affect the activity of enzymes following either the phospholipid binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules directly bind the phospholipid substrate molecules), or the surface-binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules bind to the membrane before binding the phospholipid substrate). Our results strongly suggest that, if the enzyme follows the phospholipid binding kinetic model, any substrate redistribution would increase the enzyme activity over than observed for a homogeneous distribution of substrate. Besides, enzymes following the surface-binding model would be independent of the substrate distribution. Given that the distribution of substrate in a population of micelles (each of them a lipid domain) should follow a Poisson law, we demonstrate that the general equations give an excellent fit to experimental data of lipases acting on micelles, providing reasonable values for kinetic parameters--without invoking special effects such as cooperative phenomena. Our theory will allow a better understanding of the cellular-metabolism control in membranes, as well as a more simple analysis of the mechanisms of membrane acting enzymes. PMID:21108012

  6. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  7. Surfactant and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Carla; Hohlfeld, Jens M

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of unique proteins and lipids that covers the airway lumen. Surfactant prevents alveolar collapse and maintains airway patency by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Furthermore, it provides a defence against antigen uptake by binding foreign particles and enhancing cellular immune responses. Allergic asthma is associated with chronic airway inflammation and presents with episodes of airway narrowing. The pulmonary inflammation and bronchoconstriction can be triggered by exposure to allergens or pathogens present in the inhaled air. Pulmonary surfactant has the potential to interact with various immune cells which orchestrate allergen- or pathogen-driven episodes of airway inflammation. The complex nature of surfactant allows multiple sites of interaction, but also makes it susceptible to external alterations, which potentially impair its function. This duality of modulating airway physiology and immunology during inflammatory conditions, while at the same time being prone to alterations accompanied by restricted function, has stimulated numerous studies in recent decades, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:23896983

  8. Effect of differences in saturation sensitivity of phospholipid stains on clinical predictivity of L/S ratios.

    PubMed

    Spillman, T; Cotton, D B; Gonik, B

    1985-10-31

    Owing to the importance of the degree of fatty acid side chain saturation in the ability of lecithin molecules to function as surfactant, we assessed the clinical effectiveness of analytical methods which differ with respect to methodologic influences by saturated and unsaturated phospholipids. The lecithin/sphingomyelin ratios, determined with either cupric acetate or phosphomolybdate as the detection reagent, are compared for their abilities to predict respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), transient tachypnea (TTN), or the absence of respiratory difficulty in neonates. A group of 47 amniotic fluids were analyzed from 25 non-problem cases, 13 cases of TTN and 9 cases of RDS. Receiver operating characteristic analysis shows that in our sample population, the measurement of total lecithin for the prediction of neonatal respiratory distress failed to demonstrate an advantage over the measurement of unsaturated lecithin alone. PMID:2414041

  9. Soybean-based surfactants and their applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is an important source of two natural emulsifiers, i.e., soy lecithin and soy proteins. Crude soybean oil (SBO) contains 1 to 3% phospholipids. These phospholipids are extracted during the processing of crude SBO and are used as lecithin. Soy proteins are obtained after extraction of SBO. Ex...

  10. Binding of MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate)-related protein (MRP) to vesicular phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Vergères, G; Ramsden, J J

    1998-01-01

    The myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) protein family has two known members, MARCKS itself and MARCKS-related protein (MRP, also called MacMARCKS or F52). They are essential for brain development and are believed to regulate the structure of the actin cytoskeleton at the plasma membrane. Hence membrane binding is central to their function. MARCKS has been quite extensively characterized; MRP much less so. Despite the fact that MRP is only two thirds the size of MARCKS, it has hitherto been assumed that the two proteins have similar properties. Here we make a detailed study, including the effects of myristoylation, lipid composition, calmodulin and phosphorylation of the binding of MRP to phospholipid vesicles. We show that both the N-terminal myristoyl moiety and the central effector domain mediate binding. MRP behaves like MARCKS in the presence of neutral phospholipids. In contrast to MARCKS, however, the incorporation of 20% of negatively-charged phospholipids only marginally increases the affinity of myristoylated MRP. Co-operativity between the myristoyl moiety and the effector domain of MRP is weak and the protein has a significantly lower affinity for these vesicles compared with MARCKS. Furthermore, calmodulin or phosphorylation of the effector domain by the catalytic subunit of protein kinase C do not significantly decrease the binding of myristoylated MRP to negatively-charged phospholipid vesicles. Our results show that the mechanisms regulating the interactions of MARCKS and MRP with phospholipid vesicles are, at least quantitatively, different. In agreement with cellular studies, we therefore propose that MARCKS and MRP have different subcellular localization and, consequently, different functions. PMID:9461483

  11. Interactions of surfactants with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Heerklotz, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants are surface-active, amphiphilic compounds that are water-soluble in the micro- to millimolar range, and self-assemble to form micelles or other aggregates above a critical concentration. This definition comprises synthetic detergents as well as amphiphilic peptides and lipopeptides, bile salts and many other compounds. This paper reviews the biophysics of the interactions of surfactants with membranes of insoluble, naturally occurring lipids. It discusses structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of membrane-water partitioning, changes in membrane properties induced by surfactants, membrane solubilisation to micelles and other phases formed by lipid-surfactant systems. Each section defines and derives key parameters, mentions experimental methods for their measurement and compiles and discusses published data. Additionally, a brief overview is given of surfactant-like effects in biological systems, technical applications of surfactants that involve membrane interactions, and surfactant-based protocols to study biological membranes. PMID:19079805

  12. An anionic surfactant for EOR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagir, Muhammad; Tan, Isa M.; Mushtaq, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    This work is to investigate the new anionic surfactants for the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) application. Sulfonated anionic surfactant was produced by attaching SO3 to an ethoxylated alcohol to increase the performance of the surfactant. Methallyl chloride and ethoxylated alcohol was reacted followed by the reaction with sodium bisulfite to produce anionic sulfonated surfactant in 80.3 % yield. The sulfonation reaction parameters such as reactants mole ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst amount were optimized. The generation and stability of foam from the synthesized surfactant is also tested and results are reported. The synthesized novel surfactant was further investigated for the effect on the CO2 mobility in porous media and the findings are presented here. This in house developed surfactant has a great potential for CO2- EOR applications.

  13. New insights into water-phospholipid model membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, Jeannine

    2004-05-27

    Modulating the relative humidity (RH) of the ambient gas phase of a phospholipid/water sample for modifying the activity of phospholipid-sorbed water [humidity-controlled osmotic stress methods, J. Chem. Phys. 92 (1990) 4519 and J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 446] has opened a new field of research of paramount importance. New types of phase transitions, occurring at specific values of this activity, have been then disclosed. Hence, it is become recognized that this activity, like the temperature T, is an intensive parameter of the thermodynamical state of these samples. This state can be therefore changed (phase transition) either, by modulating T at a given water activity (a given hydration level), or, by modulating the water activity, at a given T. The underlying mechanisms of these two types of transition differ, especially when they appear as disorderings of fatty chains. In lyotropic transitions, this disordering follows from two thermodynamical laws. First, acting on the activity (the chemical potential) of water external to a phospholipid/water sample, a transbilayer gradient of water chemical potential is created, leading to a transbilayer flux of water (Fick's law). Second, water molecules present within the hydrocarbon region of this phospholipid bilayer interact with phospholipid molecules through their chemical potential (Gibbs-Duhem relation): the conformational state of fatty chains (the thermodynamical state of the phospholipid molecules) changes. This process is slow, as revealed by osmotic stress time-resolved experiments. In thermal chain-melting transitions, the first rapid step is the disordering of fatty chains of a fraction of phospholipid molecules. It occurs a few degrees before the main transition temperature, T(m), during the pretransition and the sub-main transition. The second step, less rapid, is the redistribution of water molecules between the different parts of the sample, as revealed by T-jump time-resolved experiments. Finally, in

  14. Phase behavior and permeability properties of phospholipid bilayers containing a short-chain phospholipid permeability enhancer.

    PubMed

    Risbo, J; Jørgensen, K; Sperotto, M M; Mouritsen, O G

    1997-10-01

    The thermodynamic phase behavior and trans-bilayer permeability properties of multilamellar phospholipid vesicles containing a short-chain DC10PC phospholipid permeability enhancer have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The calorimetric scans of DC14PC lipid bilayer vesicles incorporated with high concentrations of DC10PC demonstrate a distinct influence on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics manifested as a pronounced freezing-point depression and a narrow phase coexistence region. Increasing amounts of DC10PC lead to a progressive lowering of the melting enthalpy, implying a mixing behavior of the DC10PC in the bilayer matrix similar to that of a substitutional impurity. The phase behavior of the DC10PC-DC14PC mixture is supported by fluorescence polarization measurements which, furthermore, in the low-temperature gel phase reveal a non-monotonic concentration-dependent influence on the structural bilayer properties; small concentrations of DC10PC induce a disordering of the acyl chains, whereas higher concentrations lead to an ordering. Irreversible fluorescence quench measurements demonstrate a substantial increase in the trans-bilayer permeability over broad temperature and composition ranges. At temperatures corresponding to the peak positions of the heat capacity, a maximum in the trans-bilayer permeability is observed. The influence of DC10PC on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics and the associated permeability properties is discussed in terms of microscopic effects on the lateral lipid organization and heterogeneity of the bilayer. PMID:9370247

  15. Thermodynamic aspects of cholesterol effect on properties of phospholipid monolayers: Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Małgorzata

    2013-04-01

    Cholesterol is an important component of lipid rafts in mammalian cell membranes. Studies of phospholipid monolayers containing cholesterol provide insight into the role of cholesterol in regulating the properties of animal cells, raft stability, and organization. In this contribution, a study of the characteristics of binary Langmuir monolayers consisting of phospholipids, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), 2-oleoyl-1-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) (DPPG), and cholesterol (Chol), was conducted on the basis of the surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. Analysis of the results obtained provided information on the mean molecular area, the excess Gibbs energy of mixing, and condensation in the monolayer. The mixed monolayers were also deposited onto the mica plates and investigated by the contact angle measurements of water, formamide, and diiodomethane. The contact angles allowed calculating surface free energy of the films from the van Oss et al. approach. It was found that cholesterol determines the molecular packing and ordering of the monolayers closely connected with the kind of phospholipid. This is reflected in the values of surface free energy of the model membranes. From the thermodynamic analysis of phospholipid/cholesterol/liquid interactions, one may draw conclusions about the most favorable composition (stoichiometry) of the binary film which is especially important in view of the lipid rafts formation. PMID:23470025

  16. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  17. Lessons from the biophysics of interfaces: lung surfactant and tear fluid.

    PubMed

    Rantamäki, Antti H; Telenius, Jelena; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Holopainen, Juha M

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the biophysical properties and functions of tear fluid and lung surfactant--two similar fluids covering the epithelium of two distinctive organs. Both fluids form a layer-like structure that essentially comprise of an aqueous layer next to the epithelium and an anterior lipid layer at the air-water interface. The aqueous layers contain soluble proteins and metabolites, and they are responsible for the host defence system and nutrition of the organ. However, many proteins also interact with the lipid layer and are important for the surface-active function of the fluid film. The lipid layer of lung surfactant comprises mainly of phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholines, and only small amounts of non-polar lipids, mainly cholesterol. In contrast, tear fluid lipid layer comprises of a mixture of polar and non-polar lipids. However, the relative proportion and the spectrum of different polar and non-polar lipids seem to be more extensive in tear fluid than in lung surfactant. The differing lipid compositions generate distinctive lipid layer structures. Despite the structural differences, these lipid layers decrease the surface tension of the air-water interface. The structure of the tear film lipid layer also minimises the evaporation of the tear fluid. In lung surfactant surface activity is crucial for the function of the organ, as the lipid layer prevents the collapse of the lung alveoli during the compression-expansion cycle of breathing. Similarly the tear film experiences a compression-expansion cycle during blinking. The dynamics of this cycle have been studied to a lesser extent and are not as clear as those of lung surfactant. The common structure and properties suggest a similar behaviour under rapid compression-expansion for both fluids. PMID:21352946

  18. Review: The intersection of surfactant homeostasis and innate host defense of the lung: lessons from newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    The study of pulmonary surfactant, directed towards prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants, led to the identification of novel proteins/genes that determine the synthesis, packaging, secretion, function, and catabolism of alveolar surfactant. The surfactant proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D, and the surfactant lipid associated transporter, ABCA3, play critical roles in surfactant homeostasis. The study of their structure and function provided insight into a system that integrates the biophysical need to reduce surface tension in the alveoli and the innate host defenses required to maintain pulmonary structure and function after birth. Alveolar homeostasis depends on the intrinsic, multifunctional structures of the surfactant-associated proteins and the shared transcriptional regulatory modules that determine both the expression of genes involved in surfactant production as well as those critical for host defense. Identification of the surfactant proteins and the elucidation of the genetic networks regulating alveolar homeostasis have provided the basis for understanding and diagnosing rare and common pulmonary disorders, including respiratory distress syndrome, inherited disorders of surfactant homeostasis, and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:20351134

  19. Camptothecin-catalyzed phospholipid hydrolysis in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Saetern, Ann Mari; Skar, Merete; Braaten, Asmund; Brandl, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Hydrolysis of phospholipid (PL) within camptothecin (CPT)-containing liposomes was studied systematically, after elevated lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC)-concentrations in pH 5, CPT-containing liposomes (22.1+/-0.9 mol%) relative to control-liposomes (7.3+/-0.5 mol%) occasionally had been observed after four months storage in fridge. Liposomes were prepared by dispersing freeze-dried PL/CPT mixtures in 25 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of varying pH (5.0-7.8) and CPT concentrations (0, 3 and 6 mM). PL-hydrolysis was monitored by HPTLC, quantifying LPC. In an accelerated stability study (60 degrees C), a catalytic effect of CPT on PL-hydrolysis was observed after 40 h, but not up to 30 h of incubation. The pH profile of the hydrolysis indicated a stability optimum at pH 6.0 for the liposomes independent of CPT. The equilibrium point between the more active lactone- and the carboxylate-form of CPT was found to be pH 6.8. As a compromise, pH 6.0 was chosen, assuring >85% CPT to be present in the lactone form. At this pH, both control- and CPT-liposomes showed only minor hydrolysis after autoclaving (121 degrees C, 15 min). Storage at room temperature and in fridge (2 months), as well as accelerated ageing (70 degrees C, 25 h), gave a significant elevation of LPC content in CPT-liposomes relative to control-liposomes. This study demonstrates a catalytic effect of CPT on PL-hydrolysis, the onset of which seems to require a certain threshold level of hydrolytic degradation. PMID:15607259

  20. The Charge Properties of Phospholipid Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Her, Cheng; Filoti, Dana I; McLean, Mark A; Sligar, Stephen G; Alexander Ross, J B; Steele, Harmen; Laue, Thomas M

    2016-09-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are a major, diverse constituent of cell membranes. PL diversity arises from the nature of the fatty acid chains, as well as the headgroup structure. The headgroup charge is thought to contribute to both the strength and specificity of protein-membrane interactions. Because it has been difficult to measure membrane charge, ascertaining the role charge plays in these interactions has been challenging. Presented here are charge measurements on lipid Nanodiscs at 20°C in 100 mM NaCl, 50 mM Tris, at pH 7.4. Values are also reported for measurements made in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature, and in solvents containing other types of cations and anions. Measurements were made for neutral (phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine) and anionic (phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)) PLs containing palmitoyl-oleoyl and dimyristoyl fatty acid chains. In addition, charge measurements were made on Nanodiscs containing an Escherichia coli lipid extract. The data collected reveal that 1) POPE is anionic and not neutral at pH 7.4; 2) high-anionic-content Nanodiscs exhibit polyelectrolyte behavior; 3) 3 mM Ca(2+) neutralizes a constant fraction of the charge, but not a constant amount of charge, for POPS and POPC Nanodiscs; 4) in contrast to some previous work, POPC only interacts weakly with Ca(2+); 5) divalent cations interact with lipids in a lipid- and ion-specific manner for POPA and PIP2 lipids; and 6) the monovalent anion type has little influence on the lipid charge. These results should help eliminate inconsistencies among data obtained using different techniques, membrane systems, and experimental conditions, and they provide foundational data for developing an accurate view of membranes and membrane-protein interactions. PMID:27602726

  1. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christopher Cheng-Hwa; Ma, Sze

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 using phrases: surfactant, respiratory distress syndrome, protein-containing surfactant, protein-free surfactant, natural surfactant, animal-derived surfactant, synthetic surfactant, lucinactant, surfaxin, surfactant protein-B, surfactant protein-C. Natural, or animal-derived, surfactant is currently the surfactant of choice in comparison to protein-free synthetic surfactant. However, it is hoped that the development of protein-containing synthetic surfactant, such as lucinactant, will rival the efficacy of natural surfactants, but without the risks of their possible side effects. Administration techniques have also been developed with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and selective surfactant administration now recommended; multiple surfactant doses have also reported better outcomes. An aerosolised form of surfactant is being trialled in the hope that surfactant can be administered in a non-invasive way. Overall, the advancement, concerning the structure of surfactant and its mode of administration, offers an encouraging future in the management of RDS. PMID:22859930

  2. Temperature-Induced Aggregate Transitions in Mixtures of Cationic Ammonium Gemini Surfactant with Anionic Glutamic Acid Surfactant in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiuling; Tian, Maozhang; Wang, Yilin

    2016-02-01

    The aggregation behaviors of the mixtures of cationic gemini surfactant 1,4-bis(dodecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium bromide)-2,3-butanediol (C12C4(OH)2C12Br2) and anionic amino acid surfactant N-dodecanoylglutamic acid (C12Glu) in aqueous solution of pH = 10.0 have been studied. The mixture forms spherical micelles, vesicles, and wormlike micelles at 25 °C by changing mixing ratios and/or total surfactant concentration. Then these aggregates undergo a series of transitions upon increasing the temperature. Smaller spherical micelles transfer into larger vesicles, vesicles transfer into solid spherical aggregates and then into larger irregular aggregates, and entangled wormlike micelles transfer into branched wormlike micelles. Moreover, the larger irregular aggregates and branched micelles finally lead to precipitation and clouding phenomenon, respectively. All these transitions are thermally reversible, and the transition temperatures can be tuned by varying the mixing ratios and/or total concentration. These temperature-dependent aggregate transitions can be elucidated on the basis of the temperature-induced variations in the dehydration, electrostatic interaction, and hydrogen bonds of the headgroup area and in the hydrophobic interaction between the hydrocarbon chains. The results suggest that the surfactants carrying multiple binding sites will greatly improve the regulation ability and temperature sensitivity. PMID:26750978

  3. Design, synthesis, and film formation of stimuli-responsive colloidal dispersions containing phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestage, David Jackson

    These studies were undertaken to further understand the design of colloidal dispersions containing bio-active phospholipids (PL) as stabilizing agents and their stimuli-responsive behaviors during film formation. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) and n-butyl acrylate (nBA) dispersions were synthesized using anionic surfactants and PL, and the surface-responsiveness of coalesced films was monitored at the film-air (F-A) and film-substrate (F-S) interfaces after exposure to temperature, UV, pH, ionic strength, and enzymatic stimuli. Using spectroscopic molecular-level probes such as attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and internal reflection IR imaging (IRIRI), these studies show that structural features of PL and surfactants significantly affect stimuli-responsiveness of polymeric films. MMA/nBA homopolymer, blend, copolymer, and core-shell particle coalescence studies indicated that controlled permeability is influenced by particle composition and sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS) mobility to the F-A interface is enhanced in response to temperature. Utilization of hydrogenated soybean phosphocholine (HSPC) as a co-surfactant with SDOSS resulted in bimodal p-MMA/nBA colloidal particles, and experiments showed that ionic interactions with HSPC inhibit SDOSS mobility. However, the controlled release of individual species is detected in the presence of Ca2+ ionic strength stimuli. Utilizing 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC), cocklebur-shape particle morphologies were obtained and using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), self-assembled tubules were detected at particle interfaces, but not in the presence of Ca 2+. At altered concentration levels of DCPC, surface localized ionic clusters (SLICs) composed of SDOSS and DCPC form at the F-A and F-S interfaces in response to temperature and ionic strength stimuli. Micelle formation of 1-myristoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (MHPC) stabilizes unimodal p-MMA/nBA colloidal particles

  4. Phosphatidylcholine resynthesis from components of internalized phospholipids in rat granular pneumocytes in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, A.; Reicherter, J.; Fisher, A.B.

    1986-05-01

    Uptake, degradation and reutilization of surfactant phospholipids was investigated by incubating granular pneumocytes in primary culture with 0.2 mM liposomal phosphatidylcholine containing (/sup 3/H-methyl)choline labeled dipalmitoyl PC. Trypsin-resistant cell associated liposome radioactivity in PC declined steadily with time of incubation to 50% of total radioactivity by 140 min. In the water soluble fraction, most of the radioactivity was present in glycerophosphorylcholine which increased steadily to 13% of total cell associated radioactivity. While the proportion of radioactivity in choline remained unchanged, it increased with time in CDP-choline and phosphorylcholine suggesting reutilization of choline for PC resynthesis. In lamellar bodies isolated from these cells, less than 10% of PC label was present in unsaturated PC. In the microsomal fraction the label in unsaturated PC at 21 min was 56% of total PC which increased to 71% by 140 min of incubation with liposomes (slope = 0.19%/min; r = 0.67) suggesting metabolic reutilization of dipalmitoyl PC in this compartment. These observations indicate that granular pneumocytes degrade internalized PC and resynthesize PC de novo from degradation products.

  5. Phospholipids of subcellular organelles isolated from cultured BHK cells.

    PubMed

    Brotherus, J; Renkonen, O

    1977-02-23

    Mitochondrial and nuclei were purified from cultured hamster fibroblasts (BHK21 cells) by centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The phospholipid compositions of the preparations were compared to those of the previously purified plasma membranes, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. The mitochondria had a characteristically high content (approx. 16% of lipid phosphorus) of cardiolipin, which was practically absent from the other purified organelles. The nuclei were enriched in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol (approx. 68% and 5% of lipid phosphorus, respectively). Lysobisphosphatidic acid was almost absent from the mitochondria and nuclei, as well as from the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum, which suggests that this phospholipid is confined to the lysosomes of the BHK cell. The nuclei and the mitochondria contained relatively little sphingomyelin, a characteristic lipid of the plasma membrane. The distributions of the total cellular phospholipid and protein between the various organelles were calculated and compared to the corresponding data estimated for the rat liver. The BHK cell contained relatively more phospholipids in the nucleus and the lysosomes than the liver. All the organelles of the BHK cell contained less protein per phospholipid than the equivalent organelles of the liver. PMID:836856

  6. Ibuprofen-phospholipid solid dispersions: improved dissolution and gastric tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Delwar; Saxena, Vipin; Brausch, James F; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2012-01-17

    Solid dispersions of ibuprofen with various phospholipids were prepared, and the effect of phospholipids on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo gastrointestinal toxicity of ibuprofen was evaluated. Most phospholipids improved the dissolution of ibuprofen; dimyristoylphosphatidyl-glycerol (DMPG) had the greatest effect. At 45 min, the extent of dissolution of ibuprofen from the ibuprofen-DMPG system (weight ratio 9:1) increased about 69% compared to ibuprofen alone; the initial rate of dissolution increased sevenfold. Increasing the DMPG content from 9:1 to 4:1 in this system did not significantly increase the rate and the extent of dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron micrograph indicated a smaller crystallite size of ibuprofen with fairly uniform distribution in the ibuprofen-DMPG solid dispersion. A small amount of carrier phospholipid significantly increases the rate and the extent of dissolution, which may increase the bioavailability of ibuprofen. The number of ulcers >0.5mm in size formed in the gastric mucosa of rats following ibuprofen, DMPG, DMPC and DPPC solid dispersions (ibuprofen and phospholipid weight ratio 4:1) were 8.6 ± 6.2, 3.9 ± 5.3, 5.3 ± 4.9 and 9.1 ± 7.4, respectively. Solid dispersion of ibuprofen with DMPG was significantly less irritating to the gastric mucosa than ibuprofen itself (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Solid dispersion of ibuprofen and DMPG decreases the gastric side effects of ibuprofen. PMID:22101290

  7. Tracing Viable Bacteria in Wadden Sea Sediments Using Phospholipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetters, H.; Sass, H.; Cypionka, H.; Rullkotter, J.

    2001-12-01

    Lipid analysis is a commonly used tool for chemotaxonomical characterization of bacterial strains. In particular, phospholipids - determined as polar lipid fatty acids (PLFA) - have proven to be appropriate biomarkers for viable bacterial cells. In this study the lipid content of different bacterial isolates from an intertidal mudflat (Wadden Sea, NW Germany) was investigated. To identify the phospholipids present in the isolated bacteria, fractionated lipid extracts were studied using HPLC-ESI-MS and -MS-MS. This technique gives information on types of phospholipids and their corresponding fatty acid substituents. It could be shown by cluster analyses that the combined information of phospholipid types and corresponding fatty acids allows a better differentiation of bacterial groups than fatty acid patterns determined after whole cell hydrolysis. Sedimentary microbial communities were studied by an interdisciplinary approach using microbiological as well as geochemical techniques. Characteristic phospholipids were traced in the sediment cores (0-70 cm) in order to estimate the relative contributions of different bacterial groups to the sedimentary microbial communities. Seasonal variations of environmental parameters (temperature, sulfate concentrations, oxygen availability etc.) and their influence on the microbial communities were studied.

  8. Morphological and Physical Analysis of Natural Phospholipids-Based Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Adrien; Francius, Grégory; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Dehghani, Fariba; Tamayol, Ali; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposomes are currently an important part of biological, pharmaceutical, medical and nutritional research, as they are considered to be among the most effective carriers for the introduction of various types of bioactive agents into target cells. Scope of Review In this work, we study the lipid organization and mechanical properties of biomembranes made of marine and plant phospholipids. Membranes based on phospholipids extracted from rapeseed and salmon are studied in the form of liposome and as supported lipid bilayer. Dioleylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are used as references to determine the lipid organization of marine and plant phospholipid based membranes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy measurements are performed to investigate the membranes' topography at the micrometer scale and to determine their mechanical properties. Major Conclusions The mechanical properties of the membranes are correlated to the fatty acid composition, the morphology, the electrophoretic mobility and the membrane fluidity. Thus, soft and homogeneous mechanical properties are evidenced for salmon phospholipids membrane containing various polyunsaturated fatty acids. Besides, phase segregation in rapeseed membrane and more important mechanical properties were emphasized for this type of membranes by contrast to the marine phospholipids based membranes. General Significance This paper provides new information on the nanomechanical and morphological properties of membrane in form of liposome by AFM. The originality of this work is to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanoliposome from the natural sources containing various fatty acids and polar head. PMID:25238543

  9. Identification of a Plasmodium falciparum Phospholipid Transfer Protein*

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, Christiaan; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Ringel, Alessa; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Haldar, Kasturi; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of erythrocytes by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in dramatic modifications to the host cell, including changes to its antigenic and transport properties and the de novo formation of membranous compartments within the erythrocyte cytosol. These parasite-induced structures are implicated in the transport of nutrients, metabolic products, and parasite proteins, as well as in parasite virulence. However, very few of the parasite effector proteins that underlie remodeling of the host erythrocyte are functionally characterized. Using bioinformatic examination and modeling, we have found that the exported P. falciparum protein PFA0210c belongs to the START domain family, members of which mediate transfer of phospholipids, ceramide, or fatty acids between membranes. In vitro phospholipid transfer assays using recombinant PFA0210 confirmed that it can transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin between phospholipid vesicles. Furthermore, assays using HL60 cells containing radiolabeled phospholipids indicated that orthologs of PFA0210c can also transfer phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Biochemical and immunochemical analysis showed that PFA0210c associates with membranes in infected erythrocytes at mature stages of intracellular parasite growth. Localization studies in live parasites revealed that the protein is present in the parasitophorous vacuole during growth and is later recruited to organelles in the parasite. Together these data suggest that PFA0210c plays a role in the formation of the membranous structures and nutrient phospholipid transfer in the malaria-parasitized erythrocyte. PMID:24043620

  10. Crystal Structure of Trimeric Carbohydrate Recognition and Neck Domains of Surfactant Protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Head,J.; Mealy, T.; McCormack, F.; Seaton, B.

    2003-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), one of four proteins associated with pulmonary surfactant, binds with high affinity to alveolar phospholipid membranes, positioning the protein at the first line of defense against inhaled pathogens. SP-A exhibits both calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding, a characteristic of the collectin family, and specific interactions with lipid membrane components. The crystal structure of the trimeric carbohydrate recognition domain and neck domain of SP-A was solved to 2.1-{angstrom} resolution with multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing from samarium. Two metalbinding sites were identified, one in the highly conserved lectin site and the other 8.5 {angstrom} away. The interdomain carbohydrate recognition domain-neck angle is significantly less in SP-A than in the homologous collectins, surfactant protein D, and mannose-binding protein. This conformational difference may endow the SP-A trimer with a more extensive hydrophobic surface capable of binding lipophilic membrane components. The appearance of this surface suggests a putative binding region for membrane-derived SP-A ligands such as phosphatidylcholine and lipid A, the endotoxic lipid component of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that mediates the potentially lethal effects of Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  11. Binding sites for interaction of peroxiredoxin 6 with surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Saikumari Y; Dodia, Chandra; Sorokina, Elena M; Li, Haitao; Feinstein, Sheldon I; Fisher, Aron B

    2016-04-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is a bifunctional enzyme with peroxidase and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities. This protein participates in the degradation and remodeling of internalized dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major phospholipid component of lung surfactant. We have shown previously that the PLA2 activity of Prdx6 is inhibited by the lung surfactant-associated protein called surfactant protein A (SP-A) through direct protein-protein interaction. Docking of SPA and Prdx6 was modeled using the ZDOCK (zlab.bu.edu) program in order to predict molecular sites for binding of the two proteins. The predicted peptide sequences were evaluated for binding to the opposite protein using isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism measurement followed by determination of the effect of the SP-A peptide on the PLA2 activity of Prdx6. The sequences 195EEEAKKLFPK204.in the Prdx6 helix and 83DEELQTELYEIKHQIL99 in SP-A were identified as the sites for hydrophobic interaction and H(+)-bonding between the 2 proteins. Treatment of mouse endothelial cells with the SP-A peptide inhibited their recovery from lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress indicating inhibition of Prdx6 activity by the peptide in the intact cell. PMID:26723227

  12. Ascorbyl palmitate interaction with phospholipid monolayers: electrostatic and rheological preponderancy.

    PubMed

    Mottola, Milagro; Wilke, Natalia; Benedini, Luciano; Oliveira, Rafael Gustavo; Fanani, Maria Laura

    2013-11-01

    Ascorbyl palmitate (ASC16) is an anionic amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest due to its antioxidant properties. We found that ASC16 strongly interacted with model membranes. ASC16 penetrated phospholipid monolayers, with a cutoff near the theoretical surface pressure limit. The presence of a lipid film at the interface favored ASC16 insertion compared with a bare air/water surface. The adsorption and penetration time curves showed a biphasic behavior: the first rapid peak evidenced a fast adsorption of charged ASC16 molecules to the interface that promoted a lowering of surface pH, thus partially neutralizing and compacting the film. The second rise represented an approach to the equilibrium between the ASC16 molecules in the subphase and the surface monolayer, whose kinetics depended on the ionization state of the film. Based on the Langmuir dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine+ASC16 monolayer data, we estimated an ASC16 partition coefficient to dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers of 1.5×10(5) and a ΔGp=-6.7kcal·mol(-1). The rheological properties of the host membrane were determinant for ASC16 penetration kinetics: a fluid membrane, as provided by cholesterol, disrupted the liquid-condensed ASC16-enriched domains and favored ASC16 penetration. Subphase pH conditions affected ASC16 aggregation in bulk: the smaller structures at acidic pHs showed a faster equilibrium with the surface film than large lamellar ones. Our results revealed that the ASC16 interaction with model membranes has a highly complex regulation. The polymorphism in the ASC16 bulk aggregation added complexity to the equilibrium between the surface and subphase form of ASC16, whose understanding may shed light on the pharmacological function of this drug. PMID:23806650

  13. Responding phospholipid membranes--interplay between hydration and permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Sparr, E; Wennerström, H

    2001-01-01

    Osmotic forces are important in regulating a number of physiological membrane processes. The effect of osmotic pressure on lipid phase behavior is of utmost importance for the extracellular lipids in stratum corneum (the outer part of human skin), due to the large gradient in water chemical potential between the water-rich tissue on the inside, and the relative dry environment on the outside of the body. We present a theoretical model for molecular diffusional transport over an oriented stack of two-component lipid bilayers in the presence of a gradient in osmotic pressure. This gradient serves as the driving force for diffusional motion of water. It also causes a gradient in swelling and phase transformations, which profoundly affect the molecular environment and thus the local diffusion properties. This feedback mechanism generates a nonlinear transport behavior, which we illustrate by calculations of the flux of water and solute (nicotine) through the bilayer stack. The calculated water flux shows qualitative agreement with experimental findings for water flux through stratum corneum. We also present a physical basis for the occlusion effect. Phase behavior of binary phospholipid mixtures at varying osmotic pressures is modeled from the known interlamellar forces and the regular solution theory. A first-order phase transformation from a gel to a liquid--crystalline phase can be induced by an increase in the osmotic pressure. In the bilayer stack, a transition can be induced along the gradient. The boundary conditions in water chemical potential can thus act as a switch for the membrane permeability. PMID:11463643

  14. Surfactant assisted growth of MgO films on GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, E. A.; Shelton, T. C.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.; Maria, J.-P.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.; Mita, S.

    2012-08-27

    Thin epitaxial films of <111> oriented MgO on [0001]-oriented GaN were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition using the assistance of a vapor phase surfactant. In both cases, surfactant incorporation enabled layer-by-layer growth and a smooth terminal surface by stabilizing the {l_brace}111{r_brace} rocksalt facet. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly 100 Multiplication-Sign reduction in leakage current density for the surfactant-assisted samples. These data verify numerous predictions regarding the role of H-termination in regulating the habit of rocksalt crystals.

  15. 3,5-Dimethyl-3'-isopropyl-l-thyronine therapy in diabetic pregnancy: stimulation of rabbit fetal lung phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, N; Melmed, S

    1981-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in pregnancy is associated with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome due to impaired synthesis of fetal lung surfactant. Pharmacologic agents that promote fetal lung maturity are diabetogenic and have limited use in the management of diabetic pregnancy for prevention of respiratory distress syndrome. Maternal administration of a thyroid analog 3,5-dimethyl-3'-isopropyl-L-thyronine (DIMIT) results in significant enhancement of fetal lung phospholipid synthesis and accelerated lung maturity. We therefore studied the effects of DIMIT (0.5 mg/kg per d, s.c.) administration to pregnant alloxan-diabetic rabbits on days 25 and 26 of gestation. DIMIT treatment of diabetic maternal rabbits (DD) was associated with reduction of maternal blood glucose (115 +/- 13 vs. 275 +/- 72 mg/dl, P less than 0.05) and fetal glucose (64 +/- 6 vs. 274 +/- 47 mg/dl, P less than 0.001) compared with saline-injected diabetic (D) mothers. Reduction of fetal insulin levels was also associated with maternal DIMIT therapy in diabetic rabbits (56 +/- 5 (D) vs. 24 +/- 4 microunits/ml, P less than 0.001). Maternal diabetes resulted in significant reduction of fetal lung weight (370 +/- 20 vs. 520 +/- 30 mg, P less than 0.005) and lung protein content (6.5 +/- 0.7 vs. 8.7 +/- 0.7 mg/gm, P less than 0.005), which were restored to normal in offspring of DIMIT-treated diabetic rabbits. Maternal DIMIT administration caused significant reduction in fetal lung glycogen content in control (62 +/- 5.8 vs. 25 +/- 5.9 micrograms/mg protein, P less than 0.001) and diabetic (56 +/- 7 vs. 34 +/- 5 micrograms/mg protein, P less than 0.02) offspring. Whereas maternal diabetes was associated with reduction of all major phospholipid species in fetal lung-comprising surfactant, these were restored with DIMIT therapy. The results demonstrate that short-term maternal administration of DIMIT in pregnant diabetic rabbits not only promotes fetal lung phospholipid synthesis, but also appears to

  16. Palmitoylation of Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-C Is Critical for Its Functional Cooperation with SP-B to Sustain Compression/Expansion Dynamics in Cholesterol-Containing Surfactant Films

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Florian; Ospina, Olga L.; Mingarro, Ismael; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Recent data suggest that a functional cooperation between surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C may be required to sustain a proper compression-expansion dynamics in the presence of physiological proportions of cholesterol. SP-C is a dually palmitoylated polypeptide of 4.2 kDa, but the role of acylation in SP-C activity is not completely understood. In this work we have compared the behavior of native palmitoylated SP-C and recombinant nonpalmitoylated versions of SP-C produced in bacteria to get a detailed insight into the importance of the palmitic chains to optimize interfacial performance of cholesterol-containing surfactant films. We found that palmitoylation of SP-C is not essential for the protein to promote rapid interfacial adsorption of phospholipids to equilibrium surface tensions (∼22 mN/m), in the presence or absence of cholesterol. However, palmitoylation of SP-C is critical for cholesterol-containing films to reach surface tensions ≤1 mN/m at the highest compression rates assessed in a captive bubble surfactometer, in the presence of SP-B. Interestingly, the ability of SP-C to facilitate reinsertion of phospholipids during expansion was not impaired to the same extent in the absence of palmitoylation, suggesting the existence of palmitoylation-dependent and -independent functions of the protein. We conclude that palmitoylation is key for the functional cooperation of SP-C with SP-B that enables cholesterol-containing surfactant films to reach very low tensions under compression, which could be particularly important in the design of clinical surfactants destined to replacement therapies in pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:21081071

  17. Surfactant transport on viscous bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Warner, Mark

    2001-11-01

    We model the external delivery of surfactant to pulmonary airways, an integral part of Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT), a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in neonates. We examine the spreading dynamics of insoluble surfactant by Marangoni stresses along the mucus-perciliary liquid bilayers that line the inside of airways. The bilayer is modelled as a thin highly viscous mucus surface film (mucus) overlying a much less viscous perciliary liquid layer (PCL); this is appropriate for small airways. By exploiting this large viscosity constrast, a variant of standard lubrication theory is adopted wherein terms, which would have otherwise been neglected in the lubrication approximation, are promoted in order to model correctly the presence of the mucus. Inclusion of van der Waals forces in the model permit the study of the effect of this mucus 'skin' on the possibility of bilayer rupture, a potential cause of failure of SRT. We find that increasing the viscosity contrast and initial mucus layer thickness delays the onset of rupture, while increasing the relative significance of Marangoni stresses leads to more marked thinning and rapid bilayer rupture [1]. [1] O. K. Matar, R. V. Craster and M. R. Warner, submitted to J. Fluid Mech. (2001).

  18. Hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex as a function of surfactant structure.

    PubMed

    Devínsky, Ferdinand; Pisárcik, Martin; Lacko, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    The present study deals with the determination of hydrodynamic size of DNA/cationic gemini surfactant complex in sodium bromide solution using the dynamic light scattering method. Cationic gemini surfactants with polymethylene spacer of variable length were used for the interaction with DNA. The scattering experiments were performed at constant DNA and sodium bromide concentrations and variable surfactant concentration in the premicellar and micellar regions as a function of surfactant spacer length. It was found that the DNA conformation strongly depends on the polymethylene spacer length as well as on the surfactant concentration relative to the surfactant critical micelle concentration. Gemini surfactant molecules with 4 methylene groups in the spacer were found to be the least efficient DNA compacting agent in the region above the surfactant cmc. Gemini molecules with the shortest spacer length (2 methylene groups) and the longest spacer length (8 methylene groups) investigated showed the most efficient DNA compaction ability. PMID:19592712

  19. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  20. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  1. The role of lamellate phospholipid bilayers in lubrication of joints.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Zenon; Urbaniak, Wiesław; Gadomski, Adam; Yusuf, Kehinde Q; Afara, Isaac O; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of progressive loss of the surface active phospholipids on the characteristics, and hence tribological function of articular cartilage. In accordance to Hill's hypothesis, 3-7 lipid bilayers at pH 7.4 operate as the solid lubricant in the cartilage-cartilage interface during physiological function. These bilayers are known to be depleted during cartilage degeneration. This study models this loss of phospholipid bilayers, studying experimentally both wet and dry cartilage surfaces, measuring surface wettability, and friction coefficient under a constant stress of 1.2 MPa. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient increases gradually with loss of the phospholipid bilayers, and gains in value with decrease in wettability. PMID:23394101

  2. Intestinal interaction of bile acids, phospholipids, dietary fibers, and cholestyramine.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, D; Schneeman, B O

    1986-04-01

    Binding of bile acids and phospholipids to a number of dietary fibers and cholestyramine (CH) within the small intestine was determined. The fibers used were cellulose, wheat bran, oat bran, guar gum (GG), and lignin (LG). GG, LG, and CH bound significant quantities of bile acids. However, only the CH reduced the bile acid concentration within the aqueous phase of the intestinal contents. Significant phospholipid binding was found only with CH. None of the test substances significantly reduced the quantity of solubilized lipid. Multiple regression analysis indicated that the total quantity of bile acids and phospholipids in the aqueous phase of the intestinal contents was a significant predictor of the quantity of lipid solubilized within the contents (r2 = 0.67). The failure of GG and LG to significantly decrease the amount of solubilized lipid suggests that the hypocholesterolemic effect of these fibers is due more to their bile acid binding capacity than to an effect on lipid solubilization. PMID:3008573

  3. Shear-induced morphology in mixed phospholipid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsa, Amir; Young, James; Posada, David; Lopez, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Flow of mixed phospholipid films on liquid surfaces plays a significant role in biological processes ranging from lipid bilayer fluidity and the associated behavior of cellular membranes, to flow on the liquid lining in the lungs. Phospholipid films are also central to the process of two-dimensional protein crystallization below a ligand-bearing film. Here, we study a binary mixture of phospholipids that form an insoluble monolayer on the air-water interface. Brewster angle microscopy reveals that a shearing flow induces a phase separation in the binary film, resulting in the appearance of 10 micron-scale dark domains. Hydrodynamic response of the binary film is quantified at the macro-scale by measurements of the surface shear viscosity, via a deep-channel surface viscometer. Reynolds number was shown to be a state variable, along with surface pressure, controlling the surface shear viscosity of a biotinylated lipid film.

  4. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  5. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  6. The mechanism of acyl specific phospholipid remodeling by tafazzin

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, Michael; Acehan, Devrim; Berno, Bob; Xu, Yang; Valvo, Salvatore; Ren, Mindong; Stokes, David L.; Epand, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid with a characteristic acyl chain composition that depends on the function of tafazzin, a phospholipid-lysophospholipid transacylase, although the enzyme itself lacks acyl specificity. We incubated isolated tafazzin with various mixtures of phospholipids and lysophospholipids, characterized the lipid phase by 31P-NMR, and measured newly formed molecular species by mass spectrometry. Significant transacylation was observed only in non-bilayer lipid aggregates and the substrate specificity was highly sensitive to the lipid phase. In particular, tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin, a prototype molecular species, formed only under conditions that favor the inverted hexagonal phase. In isolated mitochondria, <1 percent of lipids participated in transacylations, suggesting that the action of tafazzin is limited to privileged lipid domains. We propose that tafazzin reacts with non-bilayer type lipid domains that occur in curved or hemifused membrane zones, and that acyl specificity is driven by the packing properties of these domains. PMID:22941046

  7. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  8. Surfactant Therapy of ALI and ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, K; Willson, D; Notter, RH

    2011-01-01

    This article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its utility in mitigating clinical acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Biophysical research has documented that lung surfactant dysfunction can be reversed or mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration, and multiple studies in animals with ALI/ARDS have shown that respiratory function and pulmonary mechanics in vivo can be improved by exogenous surfactant administration. Exogenous surfactant therapy is a routine intervention in neonatal intensive care, and is life-saving in preventing or treating the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) in premature infants. In applications relevant for lung injury-related respiratory failure and ALI/ARDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be beneficial in term infants with pneumonia and meconium aspiration lung injury, and in children up to age 21 with direct pulmonary forms of ALI/ARDS. However, extension of exogenous surfactant therapy to adults with respiratory failure and clinical ALI/ARDS remains a challenge. Coverage here reviews clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS, particularly focusing on its potential advantages in patients with direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes. Also discussed is the rationale for mechanism-based therapies utilizing exogenous surfactant in combination with agents targeting other aspects of the multifaceted pathophysiology of inflammatory lung injury. Additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactant therapy in ALI/ARDS are also described, including the difficulty of effectively delivering surfactants to injured lungs and the existence of activity differences between clinical surfactant drugs. PMID:21742216

  9. Intensification of evaporation processes using surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifullin, V. N.; Sharifullin, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of a group of low molecular surfactants on the evaporation rate during nucleate boiling of water is investigated. It is found that the vaporization rate and heat flux from the heater increase by 4-8% in an electric boiler with surfactants. The analysis of the process based on the model of the phase contact surface restoration made it possible to formulate the mechanism of the effect of considered surfactants.

  10. Neutral Lipid Metabolism Influences Phospholipid Synthesis and Deacylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Gabriel; Scharnewski, Michael; Fulda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of equilibrium in the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids (PL) requires both regulation of the substrate available for PL synthesis (the acyl-CoA pool) and extensive PL turnover and acyl editing. In the present study, we utilize acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) deficient cells, unable to recycle FA derived from lipid deacylation, to evaluate the role of several enzymatic activities in FA trafficking and PL homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The data presented show that phospholipases B are not contributing to constitutive PL deacylation and are therefore unlikely to be involved in PL remodeling. In contrast, the enzymes of neutral lipid (NL) synthesis and mobilization are central mediators of FA trafficking. The phospholipid:DAG acyltransferase (PDAT) Lro1p has a substantial effect on FA release and on PL equilibrium, emerging as an important mediator in PL remodeling. The acyl-CoA dependent biosynthetic activities of NL metabolism are also involved in PL homeostasis through active modulation of the substrate available for PL synthesis. In addition TAG mobilization makes an important contribution, especially in cells from stationary phase, to FA availability. Beyond its well-established role in the formation of a storage pool, NL metabolism could play a crucial role as a mechanism to uncouple the pools of PL and acyl-CoAs from each other and thereby to allow independent regulation of each one. PMID:23139841

  11. NMR analyses of deuterated phospholipids isolated from Pichia angusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massou, S.; Augé, S.; Tropis, M.; Lindley, N. D.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    The phospholipid composition of methylotrophic yeasts grown on deuterated and hydrogenated media has been determined by proton and phosphorus NMR. By using a line narrowing solvent, we could obtain linewidth lower than 2 Hz, and all the resonances could be resolved. Phospholipids were identified on the basis of their chemical shift and by 31P - H correlations (HMQC - HOHAHA gradient enhanced experiments). We have thus analysed qualitatively and quantitatively lipids mixtures directly after chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid composition is deeply modified after growth in deuterated medium were phosphatidyl Inositol (PI) becomes the major lipid, instead of a PC, PS, PI mixture in hydrogenated conditions. La composition en phospholipides de levures méthylotrophes ayant poussé sur des milieux de cultures hydrogénés et deutériés a été déterminée par RMN du proton et du phosphore31. L'utilisation d'un solvant d'affinement a permis d'obtenir des largeurs de raies inférieures à 2Hz et de résoudre toutes les classes de phospholipides. Ils sont ensuite identifiés par leur déplacement chimique et par des corrélations phosphore - proton spécifiques (expériences HMQC-HOHAHA gradients). Cette approche a permis une analyse qualitative et quantitative de mélanges de phospholipides directement après extraction au chloroforme-méthanol. La composition en phospholipides est profondément modifiée lors de la croissance en milieu perdeutérié où l'on observe un lipide majoritaire, le phosphatidyl Inositol (PI), au lieu d'un mélange PC, PS PI en milieu hydrogéné.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Digestive Physiology Using Fluorescent Phospholipid Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Steven A.; Pack, Michael; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Johnson, Iain D.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Dosch, Roland; Mullins, Mary C.; Hendrickson, H. Stewart; Hendrickson, Elizabeth K.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2001-05-01

    Zebrafish are a valuable model for mammalian lipid metabolism; larvae process lipids similarly through the intestine and hepatobiliary system and respond to drugs that block cholesterol synthesis in humans. After ingestion of fluorescently quenched phospholipids, endogenous lipase activity and rapid transport of cleavage products results in intense gall bladder fluorescence. Genetic screening identifies zebrafish mutants, such as fat free, that show normal digestive organ morphology but severely reduced phospholipid and cholesterol processing. Thus, fluorescent lipids provide a sensitive readout of lipid metabolism and are a powerful tool for identifying genes that mediate vertebrate digestive physiology.

  13. Saturated anionic phospholipids enhance transdermal transport by electroporation.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arindam; Zhao, Ya-Li; Hui, Sek Wen

    2002-01-01

    Anionic phospholipids, but not cationic or neutral phospholipids, were found to enhance the transdermal transport of molecules by electroporation. When added as liposomes to the milieus of water-soluble molecules to be delivered through the epidermis of porcine skin by electroporation, these phospholipids enhance, by one to two orders of magnitude, the transdermal flux. Encapsulation of molecules in liposomes is not necessary. Dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS), phosphatidylserine from bovine brain (brain-PS), dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), and dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG) were used to test factors affecting the potency of anionic lipid transport enhancers. DMPS with saturated acyl chains was found to be a much more potent transport enhancer than those with unsaturated acyl chains (DOPS and DOPG). There was no headgroup preference. Saturated DMPS was also more effective in delaying resistance recovery after pulsing, and with a greater affinity in the epidermis after pulsing. Using fluorescent carboxyl fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Dextrans as test water-soluble molecules for transport, and rhodamine-labeled phospholipids to track anionic phospholipids, we found, by conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, that transport of water-soluble molecules was localized in local transport spots or regions (LTRs) created by the electroporation pulses. Anionic phospholipids, especially DMPS, were located at the center of the LTRs and spanned the entire thickness of the stratum corneum (SC). The degree of saturation of anionic phospholipids made no difference in the densities of LTRs created. We deduce that, after being driven into the epidermis by negative electric pulses, saturated anionic phospholipids mix and are retained better by the SC lipids. Anionic lipids prefer loose layers or vesicular rather than multilamellar forms, thereby prolonging the structural recovery of SC lipids to the native multilamellar form. In the

  14. Light and phospholipid driven structural transitions in nematic microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubtsov, A. V.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeliova, D. V.; Kralj, Samo

    2014-10-01

    We studied the UV-irradiation and phospholipid driven bipolar-radial structural transitions within azoxybenzene nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water. It was found that the UV-irradiation induced trans-cis isomerisation of LC molecules could enable structural transitions into radial-type configurations at a critical UV-irradiation time tc. In particular, we show that under appropriate conditions, a value of tc could sensitively fingerprint the concentration of phospholipid molecules present in LC-water dispersions. This demonstrated proof-of-principle mechanism could be exploited for development of sensitive detectors for specific nanoparticles (NPs), where value of tc reveals concentration of NPs.

  15. An albumin-associated PLA2-like activity inactivates surfactant phosphatidylcholine secreted from fetal type II pneumocytes.

    PubMed

    Damas, Jolanta E; Cake, Max H

    2011-12-01

    Type II pneumocytes are responsible for the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, which reduces surface tension in lung alveoli, thus decreasing their tendency to collapse during expiration. For this effect to be sustained, the integrity of the surface-active components of surfactant must be maintained. This study has shown that, when cultured type II pneumocytes are exposed to lipoprotein-free serum (LFS), the level of lyso-phosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC) in the secreted surfactant phospholipids is markedly elevated with a concomitant decline in the level of phosphatidylcholine (PC). This effect is the result of hydrolysis of surfactant PC by a phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))-like activity present within serum. Anion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration chromatography and preparative electrophoresis of human LFS have shown that this PLA(2)-like activity coelutes with albumin and is biochemically distinct from the secretory form of PLA(2). Furthermore, specific inhibitors of PLA(2) such as p-bromophenacyl bromide, aristolochic acid, and palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone do not inhibit this activity of serum. Commercially purified human serum albumin fraction V and recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) are almost as effective as LFS in enhancing the level of lyso-PC in the media. The latter finding implies that rHSA directly generates lyso-PC from secreted PC and suggests that this PLA(2)-like activity may be an intrinsic attribute of albumin. PMID:21908590

  16. FTIR external reflectance studies of lipid monolayers at the air-water interface: Applications to pulmonary surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, Jennifer M.; Dluhy, Richard A.

    1998-06-01

    FTIR external reflectance spectra of monomolecular films of natural products and model mixtures relevant to pulmonary surfactant physiology were collected concurrently with surface measurements directly at the air-water interface. Films studied were calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and its phospholipid fraction (PPL) along with 2:1 DPPC-d62:DPPG and 2:1 DPPC-d62:DOPG containing 0, 1 or 2 wt % of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C (SP-B+C). The CH2 antisymmetric and symmetric stretching bands (~2920 and 2852 cm-1) along with the analogous CD2 stretching bands (~2194 and 2089 cm-1) were analyzed, and band heights, integrated intensities and peak frequency positions were plotted as a function of measured surface pressure. Data suggest that 2:1 DPPC-d62:DPPG+2 wt % SP-B+C is the most ordered and stable of the films and can be compressed to the highest sustainable surface pressure. Data from the model mixtures indicate that the surfactant protein interacts differently with each of the lipid components. Plots of the CH/CD intensity ratios versus surface pressure show an increase in this ratio upon the addition of SP-B+C as the protein apparently orders the CH component (DPPG or DOPG) and slightly disorders the CD component (DPPC-d62).

  17. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona. PMID:26575243

  18. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  19. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    PubMed

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency. PMID:26687805

  20. Role of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) in lung injury in response to acute ozone exposure of SP-A deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Rizwanul; Umstead, Todd M.; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Guo Xiaoxuan; Hawgood, Samuel; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna . E-mail: jfloros@psu.edu

    2007-04-01

    Millions are exposed to ozone levels above recommended limits, impairing lung function, causing epithelial damage and inflammation, and predisposing some individuals to pneumonia, asthma, and other lung conditions. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) plays a role in host defense, the regulation of inflammation, and repair of tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that the lungs of SP-A(-/-) (KO) mice are more susceptible to ozone-induced damage. We compared the effects of ozone on KO and wild type (WT) mice on the C57BL/6 genetic background by exposing them to 2 parts/million of ozone for 3 or 6 h and sacrificing them 0, 4, and 24 h later. Lungs were subject to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or used to measure endpoints of oxidative stress and inflammation. Despite more total protein in BAL of KO mice after a 3 h ozone exposure, WT mice had increased oxidation of protein and had oxidized SP-A dimers. In KO mice there was epithelial damage as assessed by increased LDH activity and there was increased phospholipid content. In WT mice there were more BAL PMNs and elevated macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Changes in MIP-2 and MCP-1 were observed in both KO and WT, however mRNA levels differed. In KO mice MIP-2 mRNA levels changed little with ozone, but in WT levels they were significantly increased. In summary, several aspects of the inflammatory response differ between WT and KO mice. These in vivo findings appear to implicate SP-A in regulating inflammation and limiting epithelial damage in response to ozone exposure.

  1. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D. PMID:25163675

  2. Comparative Phospholipid Profiles of Control and Glaucomatous Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Aribindi, Katyayini; Guerra, Yenifer; Lee, Richard K.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We compared phospholipid (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol) profiles of control and glaucomatous trabecular meshwork (TM) derived from human donors. Methods. Control TM and most primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) TM were collected from cadaver donors. A select subset of POAG surgical TM samples also were collected for analyses. Lipid extraction was performed using a modification of the Bligh and Dyer method, protein concentrations were determined using the Bradford method, and for select samples confirmed with densitometry of PHAST gels. Lipids were identified and subjected to ratiometric quantification using a TSQ quantum Access Max triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with precursor ion scan (PIS) or neutral ion loss scan (NLS), using appropriate class specific lipid standards. Results. The comparative profiles of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphoethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol between control and glaucomatous TM showed several species common between them. A number of unique lipids in all four phospholipid classes also were identified in control TM that were absent in glaucoma TM and vice versa. Conclusions. A number of phospholipids were found to be uniquely present in control but absent in glaucomatous TM and vice versa. Compared to a previous study of control and POAG blood, a number of these phospholipids are absent locally (TM), as well as systemically (in blood). PMID:23557733

  3. Synthetic phospholipids as specific substrates for plasma endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Papillon, Julien P N; Pan, Meihui; Brousseau, Margaret E; Gilchrist, Mark A; Lou, Changgang; Singh, Alok K; Stawicki, Todd; Thompson, James E

    2016-08-01

    We designed and prepared synthetic phospholipids that generate lyso-phosphatidylcholine products with a unique mass for convenient detection by LC-MS in complex biological matrices. We demonstrated that compound 4, formulated either as a Triton X-100 emulsion or incorporated in synthetic HDL particles can serve as a substrate for plasma EL with useful specificity. PMID:27344207

  4. Porphyrin–phospholipid liposomes permeabilized by near-infrared light

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Kevin A.; Shao, Shuai; Hoopes, Matthew I.; Luo, Dandan; Ahsan, Bilal; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Song, Wentao; Huang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Guojian; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Geng, Jumin; Pfeifer, Blaine A.; Scholes, Charles P.; Ortega, Joaquin; Karttunen, Mikko; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic compounds to target tissues is a central challenge in treating disease. Externally controlled drug release systems hold potential to selectively enhance localized delivery. Here we describe liposomes doped with porphyrin–phospholipid that are permeabilized directly by near-infrared light. Molecular dynamics simulations identified a novel light-absorbing monomer esterified from clinically approved components predicted and experimentally demonstrated to give rise to a more stable porphyrin bilayer. Light-induced membrane permeabilization is enabled with liposomal inclusion of 10 molar % porphyrin–phospholipid and occurs in the absence of bulk or nanoscale heating. Liposomes reseal following laser exposure and permeability is modulated by varying porphyrin–phospholipid doping, irradiation intensity or irradiation duration. Porphyrin–phospholipid liposomes demonstrate spatial control of release of entrapped gentamicin and temporal control of release of entrapped fluorophores following intratumoral injection. Following systemic administration, laser irradiation enhances deposition of actively loaded doxorubicin in mouse xenografts, enabling an effective single-treatment antitumour therapy. PMID:24699423

  5. Structural intermediates during α-synuclein fibrillogenesis on phospholipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Comellas, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Zhou, Donghua H.; George, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Synuclein (AS) fibrils are the main protein component of Lewy Bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders. AS forms helices that bind phospholipid membranes with high affinity, but no atomic level data for AS aggregation in the presence of lipids is yet available. Here, we present direct evidence of a conversion from α-helical conformation to β-sheet fibrils in the presence of anionic phospholipid vesicles and direct conversion to β-sheet fibrils in their absence. We have trapped intermediate states throughout the fibril formation pathways to examine the structural changes using solid-state NMR spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The comparison between mature AS fibrils formed in aqueous buffer and those derived in the presence of anionic phospholipids demonstrates no major changes in the overall fibril fold. However, a site-specific comparison of these fibrillar states demonstrates major perturbations in the N-terminal domain with a partial disruption of the long β-strand located in the 40’s and small perturbations in residues located in the “non-β amyloid component” (NAC) domain. Combining all these results, we propose a model for AS fibrillogenesis in the presence of phospholipid vesicles. PMID:22352310

  6. Hexamodal imaging with porphyrin-phospholipid-coated upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rieffel, James; Chen, Feng; Kim, Jeesu; Chen, Guanying; Shao, Wei; Shao, Shuai; Chitgupi, Upendra; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Nickles, Robert J; Prasad, Paras N; Kim, Chulhong; Cai, Weibo; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2015-03-11

    Hexamodal imaging using simple nanoparticles is demonstrated. Porphyrin-phospholipids are used to coat upconversion nanoparticles in order to generate a new biocompatible material. The nanoparticles are characterized in vitro and in vivo for imaging via fluorescence, upconversion, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, Cerenkov luminescence, and photoacoustic tomography. PMID:25640213

  7. Porphyrin-phospholipid liposomes permeabilized by near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin A; Shao, Shuai; Hoopes, Matthew I; Luo, Dandan; Ahsan, Bilal; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Song, Wentao; Huang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Guojian; Pandey, Ravindra K; Geng, Jumin; Pfeifer, Blaine A; Scholes, Charles P; Ortega, Joaquin; Karttunen, Mikko; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic compounds to target tissues is a central challenge in treating disease. Externally controlled drug release systems hold potential to selectively enhance localized delivery. Here we describe liposomes doped with porphyrin-phospholipid that are permeabilized directly by near-infrared light. Molecular dynamics simulations identified a novel light-absorbing monomer esterified from clinically approved components predicted and experimentally demonstrated to give rise to a more stable porphyrin bilayer. Light-induced membrane permeabilization is enabled with liposomal inclusion of 10 molar % porphyrin-phospholipid and occurs in the absence of bulk or nanoscale heating. Liposomes reseal following laser exposure and permeability is modulated by varying porphyrin-phospholipid doping, irradiation intensity or irradiation duration. Porphyrin-phospholipid liposomes demonstrate spatial control of release of entrapped gentamicin and temporal control of release of entrapped fluorophores following intratumoral injection. Following systemic administration, laser irradiation enhances deposition of actively loaded doxorubicin in mouse xenografts, enabling an effective single-treatment antitumour therapy. PMID:24699423

  8. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  10. Lysosomal phospholipids from rat liver after treatment with different drugs.

    PubMed

    Tjiong, H B; Lepthin, J; Debuch, H

    1978-01-01

    Rats were treated with 5 different drugs p-ethoxyacetanilide (I), indometacin (II) and nor-amidopyrine-methanesulfonate (III), O,O'-bis(diethylaminoethyl)hexestrol(IV) and choloroquine (V) for 3 - 4 weeks. Liver cell fractions were isolated by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and the specific activity of acid phosphatase was determined in each. Lysosomal fractions contained widely varying amounts of this marker enzyme, indicating that the concentration of lysosomes within these fractions differed. The amounts and patterns of phospholipids reflected this fact. Since we assumed bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate [(MAG)2-P; synonym:lysobisphosphatidic acid] is a marker lipid for secondary lysosomes, we expected and found significant quantities of this acidic phospholipid only in those lysosomal fractions which were also rich in acid phosphatase activity. 12% of the lysosomal phospholipids from animals receiving the hexestrol derivative (IV), and 19% of those from the chloroquine (V) experiment were present as (MAG)2P. The fatty acid compositions of this lysosomal phospholipid were not the same in all lysosome fractions. The more (MAG)2P present in the lysosomes, the more unsaturated are the fatty acids. Thus, after treatment with chloroquine, more than 90% of the fatty acids from (MAG)2P are unsaturated; C22:6 represents about 70% of the total. PMID:627402

  11. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1575 - Phospholipid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... treatment of disorders involving lipid (fat) metabolism. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phospholipid test system. 862.1575 Section 862.1575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  14. Temperature Control of Phospholipid Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sinensky, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The higher the growth temperature of Escherichia coli cultures the greater is the proportion of saturated fatty acids in the bacterial phospholipids. When fatty acids are exogenously supplied to E. coli, higher growth temperatures will likewise increase the relative incorporation of saturated fatty acids into phospholipids. One of the steps in the utilization of fatty acids for phospholipid biosynthesis is, therefore, temperature-controlled. The temperature effect observed in vivo with mixtures of 3H-oleate and 14C-palmitate is demonstrable in vitro by using mixtures of the coenzyme A derivative of these fatty acids for the acylation of α-glycerol phosphate to lysophosphatidic and phosphatidic acids. In E. coli extracts, the relative rates of transacylation of palmityl and oleyl coenzyme A vary as a function of incubation temperature in a manner which mimics the temperature control observed in vivo. The phosphatidic acid synthesized in vitro shows a striking enrichment of oleate at the β position analogous to the positional specificity observed in phospholipids synthesized in vivo. PMID:4324806

  15. Phospholipid Motional Characteristics in a Dry Biological System 1

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, David A.; de Kruijff, B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of the proton-decoupled 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of fully hydrated Typha latifolia pollen revealed the presence of two main peaks: A broad asymmetrical component of a `bilayer' lineshape and a much narrower symmetrical component originating from phosphorus compounds undergoing rapid isotropic motion. From (a) 31P-NMR experiments on the hydrated total pollen phospholipids, (b) saturation transfer 31P-NMR experiments, and (c) the fraction of lipid phosphate in the pollen, it can be concluded that the great majority of the endogenous phospholipids are arranged in extended bilayers in which the lipid phosphates undergo fast (τc < 10−6 second) long axis rotation. This bilayer arrangement of phospholipids was observed in the pollen down to hydration levels of at least 10.9% moisture content. At the lowest level of pollen hydration examined (5.2%) the 31P-NMR spectrum had a solid state lineshape demonstrating that all the phosphorus-containing compounds (including the phospholipids) were virtually immobile. PMID:16662616

  16. An improved SPE method for fractionation and identification of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Fauland, Alexander; Trötzmüller, Martin; Eberl, Anita; Afiuni-Zadeh, Somaieh; Köfeler, Harald; Guo, Xinghua; Lankmayr, Ernst

    2013-02-01

    This work reports an efficient and universal SPE method developed for separation and identification of phospholipids derived from complex biological samples. For the separation step, sequential combination of silica gel-aminopropyl-silica gel SPE cartridges is applied. This setup enables separation of phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, and sphingomyelin into four fractions according to the polarity of their headgroups. Sample acquisition of the SPE fractions is performed by a high-resolution LC-MS system consisting of a hybrid linear IT Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer coupled to RP-HPLC. The unequivocal advantage of our SPE sample preparation setup is avoidance of analyte peak overlapping in the determination step done by RP-HPLC. Overlapping phospholipid signals would otherwise exert adverse ion suppression effects. An additional benefit of this method is the elimination of polar and nonpolar (e.g. neutral lipids) contaminants from the phospholipid fractions, which highly reduces contamination of the LC-MS system. The method was validated with fermentation samples of organic waste, where 78 distinct phospholipid and sphingomyelin species belonging to six lipid classes were successfully identified. PMID:23349108

  17. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  18. Novel high-throughput detection method to assess bacterial surfactant production.

    PubMed

    Burch, Adrien Y; Shimada, Briana K; Browne, Patrick J; Lindow, Steven E

    2010-08-01

    A novel biosurfactant detection assay was developed for the observation of surfactants on agar plates. By using an airbrush to apply a fine mist of oil droplets, surfactants can be observed instantaneously as halos around biosurfactant-producing colonies. This atomized oil assay can detect a wide range of different synthetic and bacterially produced surfactants. This method could detect much lower concentrations of many surfactants than a commonly used water drop collapse method. It is semiquantitative and therefore has broad applicability for uses such as high-throughput mutagenesis screens of biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains. The atomized oil assay was used to screen for mutants of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that were altered in the production of biosurfactants. Transposon mutants displaying significantly altered surfactant halos were identified and further analyzed. All mutants identified displayed altered swarming motility, as would be expected of surfactant mutants. Additionally, measurements of the transcription of the syringafactin biosynthetic cluster in the mutants, the principal biosurfactant known to be produced by B728a, revealed novel regulators of this pathway. PMID:20562275

  19. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction. PMID:25583659

  20. Oil recovery by fluorochemical surfactant waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, T.W.

    1984-07-17

    The instant invention relates to the recovery of oil from subterranean oil reservoirs involving the injection of an aqueous based liquid containing a fluorochemical surfactant possessing an oleophobic-hydrophobic fluoroaliphatic group, a hydrophilic group and an oleophilic group, optionally in conjugation with a conventional enhanced oil recovery surfactant.

  1. SURFACTANT ENHANCED PHOTO-OXIDATION OF WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initial research projects using the nonionic surfactant Brij-35 established that this surfactant could successfully adsolublize aromatic organic pollutants such as anthracene, naphthalene, benzoic acid, chlorophenol, and benzene onto the surface of TiO2 par...

  2. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  3. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    DOEpatents

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  4. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  5. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  6. Formation of bilayer membrane and niosomes by double-tailed polyglyceryl-type nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Aramaki, Kenji; Yamada, Junya; Tsukijima, Yoshitomo; Maehara, Tetsuya; Aburano, Daisuke; Sakanishi, Yuichi; Kitao, Kyuhei

    2015-10-01

    Vesicles with synthetic nonionic surfactants are called niosomes or NSVs, and these have been the focus of attention as an alternative to phospholipid liposomes as drug carriers. Especially it is demanded to discover novel niosomal systems with polyol-type nonionic surfactants from the viewpoint of environmental aspects. In this paper, a novel series of double-tailed nonionic surfactants, polyglyceryl dialkyl ethers, (C12)2Gn (n = 2.3, 5.4, 9.4, and 13.8), was synthesized, and its aqueous phase behavior and niosome formation were studied. Because of its double-tailed molecular structure, a lamellar liquid crystalline phase was dominant in the binary phase diagrams for different polyglyceryl chain lengths. The single lamellar liquid crystalline phase region was expanded as the polymerization degree in the hydrophilic moiety increased. Small-angle X-ray scattering spectra revealed the lamellar structure for the (C12)2G2.3 was extremely loose. Molecular packing in the lamellar phase was analyzed except for the (C12)2G2.3 system by using a geometrical model of the lamellar phase. The effective cross-sectional area per molecule at the interface increased extensively as dilution for the (C12)2G13.8 system but remained almost unchanged for the (C12)2G5.4 system. From the molecular parameters, water-holding ability in the lamellar phase was evaluated, and the results indicated strong hydration ability of the long polyglyceryl chain. In a dilute region, micron-sized giant niosomes and small niosomes of about 100 nm were formulated by vortex mixing and ultrasonication, respectively. The multilamellar structure of the small niosomes was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol addition in the present surfactant lamellar phase induced the phase transition to the liquid ordered phase, which is the same phenomenon in a phospholipid-cholesterol mixture. The stability of niosomes with/without cholesterol was monitored by the niosome size change. In both cases

  7. Sponge mesoporous silica formation using disordered phospholipid bilayers as template.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Anne; Sartori, Federica; Cangiotti, Michela; Mineva, Tzonka; Di Renzo, Francesco; Ottaviani, M Francesca

    2010-02-18

    Lecithin/dodecylamine/lactose mixtures in ethanol/aqueous media led to the formation of sponge mesoporous silica (SMS) materials by means of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as silica source. SMS materials show a "sponge-mesoporous" porosity with a pore diameter of about 5-6 nm, in accordance to the length of a lecithin bilayer. SMS synthesis was developed to create a new class of powerful biocatalysts able to efficiently encapsulate enzymes by adding a porosity control to the classical sol-gel synthesis and by using phospholipids and lactose as protecting agents for the enzymes. In the present study, the formation of SMS was investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) probes inserted inside phospholipid bilayers. The influence of progressive addition of each component (ethanol, dodecylamine, lactose, TEOS) on phospholipid bilayers was first examined; then, the time evolution of EPR spectra during SMS synthesis was studied. Parameters informative of mobility, structure, order, and polarity around the probes were extracted by computer analysis of the EPR line shape. The results were discussed on the basis of solids characterization by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherm, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results, together with the well-known ability of ethanol to promote membrane hemifusion, suggested that the templating structure is a bicontinuous phospholipid bilayer phase, shaped as a gyroid, resulting of multiple membrane hemifusions induced by the high alcohol content used in SMS synthesis. SMS synthesis was compared to hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) synthesis accomplished by adding TEOS to a dodecylamine/EtOH/water mixture. EPR evidenced the difference between HMS and SMS synthesis; the latter uses an already organized but slowly growing mesophase of phospholipids, never observed before, whereas the former shows a progressive elongation of micelles into wormlike structures. SMS-type materials represent a new

  8. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Moore, R.; Cardaman, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10/sup -6/ M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml) significantly enhanced (P < 100) /sup 32/P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal /sup 22/P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10/sup -7/ M Ca/sup 2 +/ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 ..mu..g/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10/sup -6/ M, /sup 32/P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 /sup +/g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 ..mu..g/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10/sup -6/ M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question.

  9. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  10. Phospholipid transfer from vesicles to high density lipoproteins, catalyzed by human plasma phospholipid transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) catalyzes the mass transfer of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Partial purification of PLTP yielded proteins with apparent M/sub r/ = 59,000 and 40,000 by SDS-PAGE. PLTP activity was measured by transfer of (/sup 14/C)L-..cap alpha..-dipalmitoyl PC from egg-PC vesicles to HDL. Activity was enhanced at low pH (4.5) upon addition of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol while Ca/sup +2/ and Na/sup +/ had no effect. E/sub act/ for facilitated PC transfer was 18.2 +/- 2 kcal/mol. The donor specificity of PLTP was examined using vesicles containing egg-PC plus cholesterol or sphingomyelin. The fluidity of the donor membrane (measured by fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene) correlated strongly with a decrease in PLTP activity. Phosphatidic acid did not affect activity. Increase in vesicle size reduced activity. The acceptor specificity of PLTP was examined using chemically modified HDL. PLTP activity increased up to 1.7-fold with an initial increase in negative charge and then decreased upon extensive modification. A mechanism is proposed where PLTP binds to vesicls and enhances the diffusion of PC into the medium where it is adsorbed by HDL.

  11. Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    deMello, D E; Phelps, D S; Patel, G; Floros, J; Lagunoff, D

    1989-06-01

    Newborn respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) results from a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant has three ultrastructural forms: lamellar bodies, which, when secreted from Type II pneumocytes, transform into tubular myelin; tubular myelin in turn gives rise to the phospholipid monolayer at the air-fluid interface in the alveolus that constitutes functional surfactant. It has been shown previously that the lungs of infants dying from RDS lacked tubular myelin despite the presence of abundant lamellar bodies, whereas the lungs of control infants dying from other causes had both tubular myelin and lamellar bodies. An abnormality in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin in RDS was proposed as a possible explanation for this finding. To evaluate the role of surfactant proteins (SPs) in this conversion, the authors re-examined the lungs of 11 RDS infants and 10 control infants for reactivity with antisera to high and low molecular weight SPs. In control infants, abundant intense staining with antisera to both types of SPs was found, but in the RDS lungs, staining was weaker than that in controls and less intense for high molecular weight compared to low molecular weight SPs. In lungs from patients with RDS, although staining increased with increasing gestational and post-natal ages, the intensity was less than control levels at all ages. The correlation of deficiency of SPs in RDS with lack of tubular myelin suggests that SPs may be involved in the conversion of normal lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and that the deficiency of SPs could explain the persistent respiratory distress in the presence of surfactant phospholipid synthesis. PMID:2757118

  12. A surfactant film spreading regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nikishov, V.I.

    1984-06-01

    Interest has recently increased in the study of the mechanisms whereby oil spills spread over sea and ocean surfaces. In the later stages of this process, when the petroleum film thickness becomes sufficiently small, the main forces determining the growth of its horizontal dimensions are surface tension and viscosity. In this case the flow characteristics do not depend on total quantity of spreading substance nor its surface concentration distribution. However, in the final stages of the spreading process the film becomes so thin that it is necessary to consider the effect of surface concentration distribution of the material on the process. Similar problems occur in the study of the spreading of a surfactant in the case where the total quantity of material is small and the surface tension regime sets in quickly. Therefore, the author examines here the spreading of a film in a regime wherein it is necessary to consider the total quantity of surfactant present, initially located on the surface of a viscous incompressible liquid.

  13. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. PMID:21722913

  14. Controlled synthesis of gold nanostars by using a zwitterionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Casu, Alberto; Cabrini, Elisa; Donà, Alice; Falqui, Andrea; Diaz-Fernandez, Yuri; Milanese, Chiara; Taglietti, Angelo; Pallavicini, Piersandro

    2012-07-23

    By replacing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with the zwitterionic lauryl sulfobetaine (LSB) surfactant in the classical seed-growth synthesis, monocrystalline gold nanostars (m-NS) and pentatwinned gold asymmetric nanostars (a-NS) were obtained instead of nanorods. The main product under all synthetic conditions was a-NS, which have branches with high aspect ratios (AR), thus leading to LSPR absorptions in the 750-1150 nm range. The percentage of m-NS versus a-NS, the aspect ratio of the a-NS branches, and consequently the position of their LSPR absorption can be finely tuned simply by regulating the concentration of reductant, the concentration of surfactant, or the concentration of the "catalytic" Ag(+) cation. The m-NS have instead shorter and larger branches, the AR of which is poorly influenced by synthetic conditions and displays an LSPR positioned around 700 nm. A growth mechanism that involves the direct contact of the sulfate moiety of LSB on the surface of the nano-object is proposed, thereby implying preferential coating of the {111} Au faces with weak interactions. Consistent with this, we also observed the straightforward complete displacement of the LSB surfactant from the surface of the nanostars. This was obtained by the simple addition of thiols in aqueous solution to yield extremely stable coated a-NS and m-NS that are resistant to highly acidic, basic, and in similar to in vivo conditions. PMID:22736477

  15. IDH1 R132H mutation generates a distinct phospholipid metabolite profile in glioma.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Morteza; Hamans, Bob C; Navis, Anna C; van Horssen, Remco; Bathen, Tone F; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Leenders, William P; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with glioma harbor specific mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 that associate with a relatively better prognosis. IDH1-mutated tumors produce the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate. Because IDH1 also regulates several pathways leading to lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that IDH1-mutant tumors have an altered phospholipid metabolite profile that would impinge on tumor pathobiology. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed (31)P-MRS imaging in mouse xenograft models of four human gliomas, one of which harbored the IDH1-R132H mutation. (31)P-MR spectra from the IDH1-mutant tumor displayed a pattern distinct from that of the three IDH1 wild-type tumors, characterized by decreased levels of phosphoethanolamine and increased levels of glycerophosphocholine. This spectral profile was confirmed by ex vivo analysis of tumor extracts, and it was also observed in human surgical biopsies of IDH1-mutated tumors by (31)P high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy. The specificity of this profile for the IDH1-R132H mutation was established by in vitro (31)P-NMR of extracts of cells overexpressing IDH1 or IDH1-R132H. Overall, our results provide evidence that the IDH1-R132H mutation alters phospholipid metabolism in gliomas involving phosphoethanolamine and glycerophosphocholine. These new noninvasive biomarkers can assist in the identification of the mutation and in research toward novel treatments that target aberrant metabolism in IDH1-mutant glioma. PMID:25005896

  16. Direct interaction of a CFTR potentiator and a CFTR corrector with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Debora; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Svensson, Agneta; Moran, Oscar

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators and correctors are new drugs that target the basic CFTR protein defect and are expected to benefit cystic fibrosis patients. To optimize the substances so far proposed for human use, and to minimise unwanted side effects, it is essential to investigate possible interactions between the drugs and cell components. We used small-angle X-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation to analyse the effects of two representative drugs, the potentiator VX-770 (Ivacaftor), approved for human use, and the corrector VX-809 (Lumacaftor), on a model phospholipid membrane. By reconstruction of the electron density profile of unilamellar vesicles treated with VX-770 or VX-809 we found that these drugs penetrate the phospholipid bilayer. VX-809 becomes homogeneously distributed throughout the bilayer whereas VX-770 accumulates predominantly in the internal leaflet, behaviour probably favoured by the asymmetry of the bilayer, because of vesicle curvature. Penetration of the bilayer by these drugs, probably as part of the mechanisms of permeation, causes destabilization of the membrane; this must be taken into account during future drug development. PMID:24771136

  17. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 Modulates FcR-Mediated Phagocytosis in Differentiated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Herate, Cecile; Ramdani, Ghania; Grant, Nancy J.; Marion, Sabrina; Gasman, Stephane; Niedergang, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid Scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) was initially characterized as a type II transmembrane protein involved in bilayer movements of phospholipids across the plasma membrane leading to the cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, but other cellular functions have been ascribed to this protein in signaling processes and in the nucleus. In the present study, expression and functions of PLSCR1 were explored in specialized phagocytic cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of PLSCR1 was found to be markedly increased in monocyte-derived macrophages compared to undifferentiated primary monocytes. Surprisingly, this 3-fold increase in PLSCR1 expression correlated with an apparent modification in the membrane topology of the protein at the cell surface of differentiated macrophages. While depletion of PLSCR1 in the monocytic THP-1 cell-line with specific shRNA did not inhibit the constitutive cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine observed in differentiated macrophages, a net increase in the FcR-mediated phagocytic activity was measured in PLSCR1-depleted THP-1 cells and in bone marrow-derived macrophages from PLSCR1 knock-out mice. Reciprocally, phagocytosis was down-regulated in cells overexpressing PLSCR1. Since endogenous PLSCR1 was recruited both in phagocytic cups and in phagosomes, our results reveal a specific role for induced PLSCR1 expression in the modulation of the phagocytic process in differentiated macrophages. PMID:26745724

  18. Phospholipids in Milk Fat: Composition, Biological and Technological Significance, and Analytical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Contarini, Giovanna; Povolo, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids are quantitatively the most important phospholipids (PLs) in milk. They are located on the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) and in other membranous material of the skim milk phase. They include principally phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine, while sphingomyelin is the dominant species of sphingolipids There is considerable evidence that PLs have beneficial health effects, such as regulation of the inflammatory reactions, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity on some types of cancer, and inhibition of the cholesterol absorption. PLs show good emulsifying properties and can be used as a delivery system for liposoluble constituents. Due to the amphiphilic characteristics of these molecules, their extraction, separation and detection are critical points in the analytical approach. The extraction by using chloroform and methanol, followed by the determination by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with evaporative light scattering (ELSD) or mass detector (MS), are the most applied procedures for the PL evaluation. More recently, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) was also used, but despite it demonstrating high sensitivity, it requires more studies to obtain accurate results. This review is focused on milk fat phospholipids; their composition, biological activity, technological properties, and significance in the structure of milk fat. Different analytical methodologies are also discussed. PMID:23434649

  19. Mammalian phospholipid homeostasis: evidence that membrane curvature elastic stress drives homeoviscous adaptation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dymond, Marcus K

    2016-08-01

    Several theories of phospholipid homeostasis have postulated that cells regulate the molecular composition of their bilayer membranes, such that a common biophysical membrane parameter is under homeostatic control. Two commonly cited theories are the intrinsic curvature hypothesis, which states that cells control membrane curvature elastic stress, and the theory of homeoviscous adaptation, which postulates cells control acyl chain packing order (membrane order). In this paper, we present evidence from data-driven modelling studies that these two theories correlate in vivo. We estimate the curvature elastic stress of mammalian cells to be 4-7 × 10(-12) N, a value high enough to suggest that in mammalian cells the preservation of membrane order arises through a mechanism where membrane curvature elastic stress is controlled. These results emerge from analysing the molecular contribution of individual phospholipids to both membrane order and curvature elastic stress in nearly 500 cellular compositionally diverse lipidomes. Our model suggests that the de novo synthesis of lipids is the dominant mechanism by which cells control curvature elastic stress and hence membrane order in vivo These results also suggest that cells can increase membrane curvature elastic stress disproportionately to membrane order by incorporating polyunsaturated fatty acids into lipids. PMID:27534697

  20. Impact of the New Generation Reconstituted Surfactant CHF5633 on Human CD4+ Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fehrholz, Markus; Glaser, Kirsten; Seidenspinner, Silvia; Ottensmeier, Barbara; Curstedt, Tore; Speer, Christian P.; Kunzmann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural surfactant preparations, commonly isolated from porcine or bovine lungs, are used to treat respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants. Besides biophysical effectiveness, several studies have documented additional immunomodulatory properties. Within the near future, synthetic surfactant preparations may be a promising alternative. CHF5633 is a new generation reconstituted synthetic surfactant preparation with defined composition, containing dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and synthetic analogs of surfactant protein (SP-) B and SP-C. While its biophysical effectiveness has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, possible immunomodulatory abilities are currently unknown. Aim The aim of the current study was to define a potential impact of CHF5633 and its single components on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses in human CD4+ lymphocytes. Methods Purified human CD4+ T cells were activated using anti CD3/CD28 antibodies and exposed to CHF5633, its components, or to the well-known animal-derived surfactant Poractant alfa (Curosurf®). Proliferative response and cell viability were assessed using flow cytometry and a methylthiazolyldiphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. The mRNA expression of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-22, IL-4, and IL-10 was measured by quantitative PCR, while intracellular protein expression was assessed by means of flow cytometry. Results Neither CHF5633 nor any of its phospholipid components with or without SP-B or SP-C analogs had any influence on proliferative ability and viability of CD4+ lymphocytes under the given conditions. IFNγ, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-22, IL-4, and IL-10 mRNA as well as IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 protein levels were unaffected in both non-activated and activated CD4+ lymphocytes after exposure to CHF5633 or its constituents compared to non-exposed controls. However, in comparison to Curosurf®, expression levels of anti-inflammatory IL-4 and IL-10 m

  1. Clinical biological and genetic heterogeneity of the inborn errors of pulmonary surfactant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tredano, M; De Blic, J; Griese, M; Fournet, J C; Elion, J; Bahuau, M

    2001-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a multimolecular complex located at the air-water interface within the alveolus to which a range of physical (surface-active properties) and immune functions has been assigned. This complex consists of a surface-active lipid layer (consisting mainly of phospholipids), and of an aqueous subphase. From discrete surfactant sub-fractions one can isolate strongly hydrophobic surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) as well as collectins SP-A and SP-D, which were shown to have specific structural, metabolic, or immune properties. Inborn or acquired abnormalities of the surfactant, qualitative or quantitative in nature, account for a number of human diseases. Beside hyaline membrane disease of the preterm neonate, a cluster of hereditary or acquired lung diseases has been characterized by periodic acid-Schiff-positive material filling the alveoli. From this heterogeneous nosologic group, at least two discrete entities presently emerge. The first is the SP-B deficiency, in which an essentially proteinaceous material is stored within the alveoli, and which represents an autosomal recessive Mendelian entity linked to the SFTPB gene (MIM 1786640). The disease usually generally entails neonatal respiratory distress with rapid fatal outcome, although partial or transient deficiencies have also been observed. The second is alveolar proteinosis, characterized by the storage of a mixed protein and lipid material, which constitutes a relatively heterogeneous clinical and biological syndrome, especially with regard to age at onset (from the neonate through to adulthood) as well as the severity of associated signs. Murine models, with a targeted mutation of the gene encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (Csfgm) or the beta subunit of its receptor (II3rb1) support the hypothesis of an abnormality of surfactant turnover in which the alveolar macrophage is a key player. Apart from SP-B deficiency, in which a near-consensus diagnostic

  2. Quantification of fatty acids as methyl esters and phospholipids in cheese samples after separation of triacylglycerides and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Simone; Vetter, Walter

    2009-03-23

    Determination of the individual fatty acid composition of neutral- and phospholipids as well as the phospholipid content of dairy food and other foodstuffs are important tasks in life sciences. For these purposes, a method was developed for the separation of lipids (standards of triolein and diacylphosphatidylcholines as well as three cheese samples) by solid-phase extraction using a self-packed column filled with partly deactivated silica. Non-halogenated solvents were used for the elution of the lipid classes. Cyclohexane/ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) served for the elution of neutral lipids, while polar lipids were eluted with three solvents (ethyl acetate/methanol, methanol, and methanol/water) into one fraction. The separated lipid fractions were transesterified and the individual fatty acids were quantified by using gas chromatography coupled to electron ionization mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The recovery rate for standard phosphatidylcholines was approximately 90% and cross-contamination from neutral lipids was negligible. The method was applied to cheese samples. Quantitative amounts of individual fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were <0.002-0.29% of total lipids from camembert, <0.002-0.12% of total lipids from mozzarella, and <0.002-0.18% of total lipids in a goat cream cheese. Differences in the fatty acid pattern of neutral and polar lipids were detected. The quantity of the fatty acids determined in the phospholipid fraction was divided by the factor 0.7 in order to convert the fatty acid content into the phospholipid content of the cheese samples. This factor is based on the contribution of 16:0 to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The resulting DPPC equivalents (DPPC(eq)) were found to be representative for the average contribution of fatty acids to all classes of phospholipids in dairy products. Using this approach, the phospholipid content of lipids from mozzarella, camembert, and goat cream

  3. Persistence of LPS-induced lung inflammation in surfactant protein-C-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Maxfield, Melissa D; Ruetschilling, Teah L; Akinbi, Henry T; Baatz, John E; Kitzmiller, Joseph A; Page, Kristen; Xu, Yan; Bao, Erik L; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein-C (SP-C) gene-targeted mice (Sftpc(-/-)) develop progressive lung inflammation and remodeling. We hypothesized that SP-C deficiency reduces the ability to suppress repetitive inflammatory injury. Sftpc(+/+) and Sftpc(-/-) mice given three doses of bacterial LPS developed airway and airspace inflammation, which was more intense in the Sftpc(-/-) mice at 3 and 5 days after the final dose. Compared with Sftpc(+/+)mice, inflammatory injury persisted in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice 30 days after the final LPS challenge. Sftpc(-/-) mice showed LPS-induced airway goblet cell hyperplasia with increased detection of Sam pointed Ets domain and FoxA3 transcription factors. Sftpc(-/-) type II alveolar epithelial cells had increased cytokine expression after LPS exposure relative to Sftpc(+/+) cells, indicating that type II cell dysfunction contributes to inflammatory sensitivity. Microarray analyses of isolated type II cells identified a pattern of enhanced expression of inflammatory genes consistent with an intrinsic low-level inflammation resulting from SP-C deficiency. SP-C-containing clinical surfactant extract (Survanta) or SP-C/phospholipid vesicles blocked LPS signaling through the LPS receptor (Toll-like receptor [TLR] 4/CD14/MD2) in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, indicating that SP-C blocks LPS-induced cytokine production by a TLR4-dependent mechanism. Phospholipid vesicles alone did not modify the TLR4 response. In vivo deficiency of SP-C leads to inflammation, increased cytokine production by type II cells, and persistent inflammation after repetitive LPS stimulation. PMID:23795648

  4. Sequential treatments of premature lambs with an artificial surfactant and natural surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, M; Jobe, A; Jacobs, H; Jones, S J

    1981-01-01

    To test an artificial surfactant in vivo, six 120-d gestational age lambs were treated at birth with a mixture of a 9:1 M ratio of [14C]dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPC) and phosphatidylglycerol at a dose of 100 mg DPC/kg. Nine other lambs were not treated. The mean PO2 values of the lambs treated with artificial surfactant were 65.7 +/- 11 mm Hg vs. 24.8 +/- 1.6 mm Hg for the untreated lambs (P less than 0.001). All lambs then were treated with 50 mg/natural surfactant lipid per kg, which promptly improved PO2 in all lambs. The PO2 values of those lambs previously treated with artificial surfactant remained greater than 100 mm Hg for 2.5 +/- 0.5 h vs. 0.9 +/- 0.3 h for lambs untreated with artificial surfactant (P less than 0.01). The pH and PCO2 values were not strikingly different between the two groups of lambs. Airway samples taken from lambs treated with artificial surfactant before treatment with natural surfactant had minimal surface tensions of 32 +/- 2.9 dyn/cm, whereas the artificial surfactant reisolated from these samples by centrifugation had minimum surface tension of 0 dyn/cm. The minimum surface tension of artificial surfactant was inhibited by fetal lung fluid from the premature lambs, whereas the minimum surface tension of natural surfactant was much less sensitive to inhibition. Artificial surfactant did not improve the pressure-volume characteristics of unventilated premature lung, whereas natural surfactant did. The change in specific activity of [14C]DPC following treatment with natural surfactant indicated that approximately 50% of the DPC initially administered was no longer associated with the airways. PMID:6790576

  5. Pseudomonas syringae Coordinates Production of a Motility-Enabling Surfactant with Flagellar Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Adrien Y.; Shimada, Briana K.; Mullin, Sean W. A.; Dunlap, Christopher A.; Bowman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Using a sensitive assay, we observed low levels of an unknown surfactant produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that was not detected by traditional methods yet enabled swarming motility in a strain that exhibited deficient production of syringafactin, the main characterized surfactant produced by P. syringae. Random mutagenesis of the syringafactin-deficient strain revealed an acyltransferase with homology to rhlA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that was required for production of this unidentified surfactant, subsequently characterized by mass spectrometry as 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy) alkanoic acid (HAA). Analysis of other mutants with altered surfactant production revealed that HAA is coordinately regulated with the late-stage flagellar gene encoding flagellin; mutations in genes involved in early flagellar assembly abolish or reduce HAA production, while mutations in flagellin or flagellin glycosylation genes increase its production. When colonizing a hydrated porous surface, the bacterium increases production of both flagellin and HAA. P. syringae was defective in porous-paper colonization without functional flagella and was slightly inhibited in this movement when it lacked surfactant production. Loss of HAA production in a syringafactin-deficient strain had no effect on swimming but abolished swarming motility. In contrast, a strain that lacked HAA but retained syringafactin production exhibited broad swarming tendrils, while a syringafactin-producing strain that overproduced HAA exhibited slender swarming tendrils. On the basis of further analysis of mutants altered in HAA production, we discuss its regulation in Pseudomonas syringae. PMID:22194459

  6. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion. PMID:22571236

  7. Analysis of follicular fluid total phospholipids in women undergoing in-vitro fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Fayezi, S; Darabi, M; Darabi, M; Nouri, M; Rahimipour, A; Mehdizadeh, A

    2014-04-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) samples were obtained from 100 patients referred to the University Hospital. A total of 79 subjects underwent IVF and the remaining 21 underwent ICSI. The levels of apoA-I and total phospholipid were measured using turbidometric and colorimetric phosphorus assays, respectively. Correlation analysis showed a significant inverse association of total phospholipid in FF with fertilisation ratio (r = -0.24, p = 0.04). Furthermore, the ratio of phospholipid/apoA-I in patients with a percentage of fertilised oocytes ≤ 50% was significantly higher (> 2.5%, p < 0.05) than in those with higher percentages of fertilised oocytes. The amounts of phospholipid and phospholipid/apoA-I ratio in FF were associated negatively to the percentage of oocyte fertilisation. Therefore, the change in the phospholipid and phospholipid/apoA-I ratio of FF might be regarded as indicators of female fertility. PMID:24476398

  8. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Pinchoff dynamics of surfactant covered viscous threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard

    2001-11-01

    We study the breakup of a viscous thread covered with insoluble surfactant. One-dimensional evolution equations for the interface location, surfactant concentration and axial velocity are derived in the long wavelength approximation. The effect of surfactant is parameterized by its initial concentration, its strength and the Schmidt number, Sc, the ratio of kinematic viscosity to surface diffusion. Numerical solutions suggest that the presence of surfactant, which gives rise to Marangoni stresses, affect drastically the transient dynamics. The effective radius of the satellite formed during breakup decreases with increasing initial concentration and surfactant strength. For Sc > 10, increasing Sc has little effect on satellite effective radius [1]. These numerical solutions also show that the self-similar breakup dynamics of a surfactant-free viscous thread in the vicinity of the pinchoff region [2] are preserved even in the presence of surfactant. [1] R. V. Craster, O. K. Matar and D. T. Papageorgiou, submitted to Phys. Fluids (2001). [2] J. Eggers, Phys. Rev. Lett., 71, 3458 (1993).

  10. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  11. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  12. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  13. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  14. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  15. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  16. Preparation and characterization of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Runliang; Wei, Jingming; Tao, Qi; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping

    2011-08-15

    A series of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized using montmorillonite and three zwitterionic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths at different concentrations [0.2-4.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These ZSMMs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermo-gravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The zwitterionic surfactant could be intercalated into the interlayer spaces of montmorillonites and causing interlayer space-swelling. From XRD measurements, the amount of the surfactants loaded and the basal spacing increased with surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. One endothermic DTG peak occurred at ~390 °C, which was assigned to the decomposition of the zwitterionic surfactant on the organo-montmorillonites from 0.2 to 0.6 CEC. When the surfactant loading was increased, a new endothermic peak appeared at ~340 °C. From the microstructures of these ZSMMs, the mechanism of zwitterionic surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loadings of the zwitterionic surfactant, most of surfactants enter the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and are adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the zwitterionic surfactant exceeds the CEC of montmorillonite, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface-adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants enter the interlayers, whereas the others are attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increases further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants may occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure. PMID:21575956

  17. The role of extrinsic and intrinsic factors in the evolution of the control of pulmonary surfactant maturation during development in the amniotes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Orgeig, Sandra; Daniels, Christopher B

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixture of lipids and proteins that is secreted by alveolar Type II cells. It reduces alveolar surface tension and hence the work of breathing. Despite the tremendous diversity of lung structures amongst the vertebrates, the composition of surfactant is highly conserved. Conserved elements of the surfactant system amongst distantly related species are likely to be crucial factors for successful lung development. Understanding the mechanisms by which the surfactant system becomes operational in animals with dramatically different birthing strategies and in distantly related species will provide important information about the role of the surfactant system in the commencement of air breathing and the processes regulating surfactant maturation and secretion. In mammals, the embryonic maturation of the surfactant system is controlled by a host of factors, including glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones, and autonomic neurotransmitters. Here we review the mechanisms controlling the maturation of surfactant production, including birthing strategy, phylogeny, lung structure, and posthatching environment. Using four species of egg-laying amniote (chicken, dragon lizard, sea turtle, and crocodile) previously described in detail and the large amount of information available for mammals, we examine the hypothesis that the control of surfactant production is dependent on glucocorticoids (dexamethasone [Dex]), thyroid hormones (T3), and autonomic neurotransmitters (epinephrine and carbachol). We also examine whether the overall intrinsic pattern of the control of surfactant maturation is conserved throughout the vertebrate radiation and then how the environment (extrinsic factors) may account for the observed differences in the patterns of development. We also discuss the utility of a coculture system of embryonic Type II cells and fibroblasts to determine the evolutionary pattern behind the control of surfactant and to demonstrate that the surfactant

  18. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  19. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Hongmei; Lin, Qianglu; Baber, Stacy; Naalla, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    We demore » monstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta 2 O 5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses.« less

  20. Precipitation of mixtures of anionic and cationic surfactants; 3: Effect of added nonionic surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, B.J.; Harwell, J.H.; Scamehorn, J.F. . Inst. for Applied Surfactant Research)

    1994-10-15

    The precipitation of an anionic surfactant by a cationic surfactant in the presence of a nonionic surfactant is examined. The precipitation domains for sodium dodecyl sulfate/dodecyl-pyridinium chloride were measured over a wide range of surfactant concentrations as a function of nonylphenol polyethoxylate concentration. Increasing the nonylphenol polyethoxylate concentration decreases the tendency for precipitation to occur. A model for predicting precipitation domains in ternary surfactant mixtures has been developed and verified experimentally. The model allows the nonionic surfactant to affect the precipitation behavior only by lowering the critical micelle concentration of the mixture. Small deviations between theory and experiments along part of the anionic-rich micelle boundary result from adsorption of SDS on the precipitate which gives the microcrystals a negative charge and prevents their growth to a visible size.

  1. Migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to OH(-) stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Atsuji; Sakuma, Yuka; Imai, Masayuki; Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Puff, Nicolas; Angelova, Miglena I

    2016-03-21

    We demonstrate migration of phospholipid vesicles in response to a pH gradient. Upon simple micro-injection of a NaOH solution, the vesicles linearly moved to the tip of the micro-pipette and the migration velocity was proportional to the gradient of OH(-) concentration. Vesicle migration was characteristic of OH(-) ions and no migration was observed for monovalent salts or nonionic sucrose solutions. The migration of vesicles is quantitatively described by the surface tension gradient model where the hydrolysis of the phospholipids by NaOH solution decreases the surface tension of the vesicle. The vesicles move toward a direction where the surface energy decreases. Thus the chemical modification of lipids produces a mechanical force to drive vesicles. PMID:26883729

  2. Hormetic and anti-inflammatory properties of oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Mauerhofer, Christina; Philippova, Maria; Oskolkova, Olga V; Bochkov, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized phospholipids are generally recognized as deleterious factors involved in disease pathogenesis. This review summarizes the data suggesting that under certain biological conditions the opposite is correct, namely that OxPLs can also induce protective effects. Examples that are discussed in the review include upregulation of antioxidant genes, inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways through Nrf2-dependent and -independent mechanisms, antagonism of Toll-like receptors, immuno-modulating and immuno-suppressive action of OxPLs in adaptive immunity and autoimmune disease, activation of PPARs known for their anti-inflammatory action, as well as protective action against lung edema in acute lung inflammation. The data support the notion that oxidation of phospholipids provides a negative feedback preventing damage to host tissues due to uncontrolled inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26948981

  3. Hyperbaric hyperoxia reversibly inhibits erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Craig A.; Clark, James M.; Lambersten, Christian J.; Goodman, David B. P.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hyperbaric hyperoxia on the acylation of membrane phospholipid was studied by measuring the rates of activation of exogenous tritiated oleic acid to acyl thioester and of transesterification of the thioester into membrane phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes obtained 1 h after an exposure of the subjects to a hyperbaric oxygen atmosphere (3.5 h, 100 pct O2, 3 ATA). Exposure to pure oxygen was found to inhibit both the acylation and transesterification reactions by more than 30 percent, with partial recovery detected 24 h later. On the other hand, no rate changes were observed when isolated membranes from the same batches of cells were used in similar experiments. It is suggested that the decrease in the incorporation of tritiated oleic acid after hyperbaric hyperoxia may reflect an early event in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced cellular injury and that it may be a useful index for the assessment of the tolerance of tissues to hyperoxia.

  4. A Cholesterol Recognition Motif in Human Phospholipid Scramblase 1

    PubMed Central

    Posada, Itziar M.D.; Fantini, Jacques; Contreras, F. Xabier; Barrantes, Francisco; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) catalyzes phospholipid transmembrane (flip-flop) motion. This protein is assumed to bind the membrane hydrophobic core through a transmembrane domain (TMD) as well as via covalently bound palmitoyl residues. Here, we explore the possible interaction of the SCR TMD with cholesterol by using a variety of experimental and computational biophysical approaches. Our findings indicate that SCR contains an amino acid segment at the C-terminal region that shows a remarkable affinity for cholesterol, although it lacks the CRAC sequence. Other 3-OH sterols, but not steroids lacking the 3-OH group, also bind this region of the protein. The newly identified cholesterol-binding region is located partly at the C-terminal portion of the TMD and partly in the first amino acid residues in the SCR C-terminal extracellular coil. This finding could be related to the previously described affinity of SCR for cholesterol-rich domains in membranes. PMID:25229146

  5. Light and phospholipid driven structural transitions in nematic microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Dubtsov, A. V. Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeliova, D. V.; Kralj, Samo

    2014-10-13

    We studied the UV-irradiation and phospholipid driven bipolar-radial structural transitions within azoxybenzene nematic liquid crystal (LC) droplets dispersed in water. It was found that the UV-irradiation induced trans-cis isomerisation of LC molecules could enable structural transitions into radial-type configurations at a critical UV-irradiation time t{sub c}. In particular, we show that under appropriate conditions, a value of t{sub c} could sensitively fingerprint the concentration of phospholipid molecules present in LC-water dispersions. This demonstrated proof-of-principle mechanism could be exploited for development of sensitive detectors for specific nanoparticles (NPs), where value of t{sub c} reveals concentration of NPs.

  6. The influence of plant hormones on phospholipid monolayer stability.

    PubMed

    Gzyl-Malchera, Barbara; Filek, Maria; Brezesinski, Gerald; Fischer, Antje

    2007-01-01

    The influence of hormones in water subphase on the stability of monolayers built of phospholipid mixtures extracted from embryogenic (PLE) and nonembryogenic (PLNE) wheat calli was examined. Additionally, experiments on individual lipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA), were performed. DPPC was chosen because it was the main phospholipid present in both calli. Negatively charged DPPA could mimic a negatively charged natural mixture of lipids. As hormones, auxins (IAA and 2,4-D), cytokinins (zeatin and kinetin) and zearalenone were chosen. The time of monolayer stability for PLNE calli was much longer than for PLE calli. Kinetics of monolayer stability of PLNE was similar to DPPA, whereas that of PLE was similar to DPPC. Generally, hormones increased the time after which the monolayer stability was reached and decreased the surface pressure. The greatest effect was observed for auxins (especially IAA), whereas cytokinins affected the monolayer stability to a lesser degree. PMID:17425106

  7. Characterization of surfactant complex mixtures using Raman spectroscopy and signal extraction methods: Application to laundry detergent deformulation.

    PubMed

    Gaubert, Alexandra; Clement, Yohann; Bonhomme, Anne; Burger, Benjamin; Jouan-Rimbaud Bouveresse, Delphine; Rutledge, Douglas; Casabianca, Hervé; Lanteri, Pierre; Bordes, Claire

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the analysis of surfactants in complex mixtures using Raman spectroscopy combined with signal extraction (SE) methods. Surfactants are the most important component in laundry detergents. Both their identification and quantification are required for quality control and regulation purposes. Several synthetic mixtures of four surfactants contained in an Ecolabel laundry detergent were prepared and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. SE methods, Independent Component Analysis and Multivariate Curve Resolution, were then applied to spectral data for surfactant identification and quantification. The influence of several pre-processing treatments (normalization, baseline correction, scatter correction and smoothing) on SE performances were evaluated by experimental design. By using optimal pre-processing strategy, SE methods allowed satisfactorily both identifying and quantifying the four surfactants. When applied to the pre-processed Raman spectrum of the Ecolabel laundry detergent sample, SE models remained robust enough to predict the surfactant concentrations with sufficient precision for deformulation purpose. Comparatively, a supervised modeling technique (PLS regression) was very efficient to quantify the four surfactants in synthetic mixtures but appeared less effective than SE methods when applied to the Raman spectrum of the detergent sample. PLS seemed too sensitive to the other components contained in the laundry detergent while SE methods were more robust. The results obtained demonstrated the interest of SE methods in the context of deformulation. PMID:26995638

  8. Differential Intrahepatic Phospholipid Zonation in Simple Steatosis and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wattacheril, Julia; Seeley, Erin H.; Angel, Peggi; Chen, Heidi; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Lanciault, Christian; M.Caprioli, Richard; Abumrad, Naji; Flynn, Charles Robb

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs frequently in a setting of obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, but the etiology of the disease, particularly the events favoring progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) as opposed to simple steatosis (SS), are not fully understood. Based on known zonation patterns in protein, glucose and lipid metabolism, coupled with evidence that phosphatidylcholine may play a role in NASH pathogenesis, we hypothesized that phospholipid zonation exists in liver and that specific phospholipid abundance and distribution may be associated with histologic disease. A survey of normal hepatic protein expression profiles in the Human Protein Atlas revealed pronounced zonation of enzymes involved in lipid utilization and storage, particularly those facilitating phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism. Immunohistochemistry of obese normal, SS and NASH liver specimens with anti-phosphatidylethanomine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) antibodies showed a progressive decrease in the zonal distribution of this PC biosynthetic enzyme. Phospholipid quantitation by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in hepatic extracts of Class III obese patients with increasing NAFLD severity revealed that most PC species with 32, 34 and 36 carbons as well as total PC abundance was decreased with SS and NASH. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization - imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) imaging revealed strong zonal distributions for 32, 34 and 36 carbon PCs in controls (minimal histologic findings) and SS that was lost in NASH specimens. Specific lipid species such as PC 34∶1 and PC 36∶2 best illustrated this phenomenon. These findings suggest that phospholipid zonation may be associated with the presence of an intrahepatic proinflammatory phenotype and thus have broad implications in the etiopathogenesis of NASH. PMID:23451176

  9. Inhibition of phospholipid methylation by a cytosolic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Chiva, V; Mato, J M

    1984-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol contains a heat-stable factor which inhibits phospholipid methylation by rat liver microsomes. The effect of this factor on lipid methylation was dose- and pH-dependent. This factor has an Mr of approx. 3200 as estimated by gel filtration. It could not be extracted by chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v), and its action was inhibited by incubation with subtilisin. PMID:6712636

  10. Phospholipid biosynthesis in the oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Lund, Eric D; Chu, Fu-Lin E

    2002-05-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a protozoan parasite that causes high mortality in its commercially and ecologically important host, the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. In order to understand the host-parasite relationship in lipid metabolism, the ability of P. marinus to synthesize phospholipids from polar headgroup precursors was investigated. Pulse/chase experiments were conducted using radiolabled serine, choline, ethanolamine and inositol. Timecourse incubations revealed that in vitro cultured P. marinus meronts can utilize the cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol (CDP-DAG) pathway to synthesize phosphatidylinositol (PI) from inositol and phosphatidylserine (PS) from serine. Serine label was also incorporated into phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). Incubations of P. marinus cells with increasing concentrations of radiolabeled serine resulted in more radioactivity recovered in neutral lipids than in polar lipids at the highest substrate concentration tested (344 microM). This suggests that excess serine label was being utilized for fatty acid synthesis and stored as triacylglycerols. Additional incubations were conducted with radiolabeled choline and ethanolamine at concentrations equimolar to the highest serine concentration tested. Ethanolamine label was also incorporated into PE, PS, PC and LPC. Choline label was incorporated into PC. These results suggest the presence of three pathways for de novo synthesis of phospholipids in P. marinus: CDP-choline, CDP-ethanolamine and CDP-DAG. At equivalent substrate concentrations (344 microM) the highest incorporation of labeled substrate into total phospholipids was with serine followed by ethanolamine and choline, respectively. P. marinus phospholipid biosynthetic capabilities appear to be similar to those of Plasmodium and Trypanosoma species. PMID:12034458

  11. Influence of surfactant charge on antimicrobial efficacy of surfactant-stabilized thyme oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-06-01

    Thyme oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80, T80) were prepared as potential antimicrobial delivery systems (pH 4). The nanoemulsions were highly unstable to droplet growth and phase separation, which was attributed to Ostwald ripening due to the relatively high water solubility of thyme oil. Ostwald ripening could be inhibited by incorporating ≥75% of corn oil (a hydrophobic material with a low water solubility) into the nanoemulsion droplets. The electrical characteristics of the droplets in the nanoemulsions were varied by incorporating ionic surfactants with different charges after homogenization: a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The antifungal activity of nanoemulsions containing positive, negative, or neutral thymol droplets was then conducted against four strains of acid-resistant spoilage yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces bailli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis. The antifungal properties of the three surfactants (T80, LAE, SDS) were also tested in the absence of thymol droplets. Both ionic surfactants showed strong antifungal activity in the absence of thymol droplets, but no antimicrobial activity in their presence. This effect was attributed to partitioning of the antimicrobial surfactant molecules between the oil droplet and microbial surfaces, thereby reducing the effective concentration of active surfactants available to act as antimicrobials. This study shows oil droplets may decrease the efficacy of surfactant-based antimicrobials, which has important consequences for formulating effective antimicrobial agents for utilization in emulsion-based food and beverage products. PMID:21520914

  12. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  13. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection Triggers Host Phospholipid Metabolism Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y.; Lau, B.; Smith, S.; Troyan, K.; Barnett Foster, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) specifically recognizes phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) on the outer leaflet of host epithelial cells. EPEC also induces apoptosis in epithelial cells, which results in increased levels of outer leaflet PE and increased bacterial binding. Consequently, it is of interest to investigate whether EPEC infection perturbs host cell phospholipid metabolism and whether the changes play a role in the apoptotic signaling. Our findings indicate that EPEC infection results in a significant increase in the epithelial cell PE level and a corresponding decrease in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) level. PE synthesis via both the de novo pathway and the serine decarboxylation pathway was enhanced, and de novo synthesis of phosphatidylcholine via CDP-choline was reduced. The changes were transitory, and the maximum change was noted after 4 to 5 h of infection. Addition of exogenous PC or CDP-choline to epithelial cells prior to infection abrogated EPEC-induced apoptosis, suggesting that EPEC infection inhibits the CTP-phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase step in PC synthesis, which is reportedly inhibited during nonmicrobially induced apoptosis. On the other hand, incorporation of exogenous PE by the host cells enhanced EPEC-induced apoptosis and necrosis without increasing bacterial adhesion. This is the first report that pathogen-induced apoptosis is associated with significant changes in PE and PC metabolism, and the results suggest that EPEC adhesion to a host membrane phospholipid plays a role in disruption of host phospholipid metabolism. PMID:15557596

  14. Hydrophobic Silica Nanoparticles Induce Gel Phases in Phospholipid Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Davide; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2016-05-17

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) can be incorporated in phospholipid layers to form hybrid organic-inorganic bidimensional mesostructures. Controlling the dynamics in these mesostructures paves the way to high-performance drug-delivery systems. Depending on the different hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of SiNP, recent X-ray reflectivity experiments have demonstrated opposite structural effects. While these are reasonably well understood, less is known about the effects on the dynamics, which in turn determine molecular diffusivity and the possibility of drug release. In this work we characterize the dynamics of a mixed Langmuir layer made of phospholipid and hydrophobic SiNP. We combine X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and epifluorescence discrete Fourier microscopy to cover more than 2 decades of Q-range (0.3-80 μm(-1)). We obtain evidence for the onset of an arrested state characterized by intermittent stress-relaxation rearrangement events, corresponding to a gel dominated by attractive interactions. We compare this with our previous results from phospholipid/hydrophilic SiNP films, which show an arrested glassy phase of repulsive disks. PMID:27133453

  15. Bile salt-phospholipid aggregation at submicellar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Rebekah; Frost, Laura D

    2008-04-01

    The aggregation behavior of the bile salts taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) and sodium cholate (NaC), are followed at concentrations below critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) using the environment sensitive, fluorescent-labeled phospholipid, 2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-C(6)-HPC). A buffer solution containing NBD-C(6)-HPC is titrated with increasing NaC or NaTDC and the fluorescence changes followed. Both bile salts induced fluorescence changes below their critical micelle concentration indicating the presence of a bile salt-phospholipid aggregate. A critical control experiment using 6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino) hexanoic acid (NBD-X) shows that the bile salts are interacting with the longer, C16 hydrocarbon tail, not the NBD probe. The fluorescence curves were fitted to the Hill equation as a model for cooperative aggregation. The cooperativity model provides a minimum estimate for the number of bile salts to give maximal fluorescence. This number was calculated for NaC and NaTDC to have a minimum value of approximately 2. A small aggregation number supports the existence of primary micellar aggregates at submicellar concentrations for bile salt-phospholipid aqueous solutions. PMID:18035524

  16. THE CATION CONTENT OF PHOSPHOLIPIDES FROM SWINE ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Leonard B.

    1958-01-01

    Phospholipides from swine erythrocytes were isolated and separated into four reproducible fractions. One of the fractions seems to be pure phosphatidylserine. The others are almost certainly not single compounds, although the analytical data indicate that they represent mixtures considerably simpler than the parent mixture extracted from the cells. All four fractions contained Na+ and K+, but very little Ca2+. Sodium was the predominant cation in two of the fractions under all conditions although the major intracellular cation was potassium. In the other two fractions the ratio Na/K varied with the extraction procedure largely because the quantity of K+ seemed to depend on the solvent system used. There appear to be reasons to believe that the entire system of phospholipides binds Na+ preferentially. In addition, it was observed that the quantity of Na+ found in the lipide extracts varied when the extrusion of Na+ from the cells was made to vary. Both of these observations are consistent with the possibility that the phospholipides play some part in the extrusion of Na+ from these cells. PMID:13587908

  17. The innate immune response to products of phospholipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Weismann, David; Binder, Christoph J

    2012-10-01

    Lipid peroxidation occurs in the context of many physiological processes but is greatly increased in various pathological situations. A consequence of phospholipid peroxidation is the generation of oxidation-specific epitopes, such as phosphocholine of oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde, which form neo-self determinants on dying cells and oxidized low-density lipoproteins. In this review we discuss evidence demonstrating that pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system recognize oxidation-specific epitopes as endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, allowing the host to identify dangerous biological waste. Oxidation-specific epitopes are important targets of both cellular and soluble pattern recognition receptors, including toll-like and scavenger receptors, C-reactive protein, complement factor H, and innate natural IgM antibodies. This recognition allows the innate immune system to mediate important physiological house keeping functions, for example by promoting the removal of dying cells and oxidized molecules. Once this system is malfunctional or overwhelmed the development of diseases, such as atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration is favored. Understanding the molecular components and mechanisms involved in this process, will help the identification of individuals with increased risk of developing chronic inflammation, and indicate novel points for therapeutic intervention. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxidized phospholipids-their properties and interactions with proteins. PMID:22305963

  18. Ultraviolet radiation alters choline phospholipid metabolism in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLeo, V.; Scheide, S.; Meshulam, J.; Hanson, D.; Cardullo, A.

    1988-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB-290-320 nm) induces inflammation and hyperproliferation in human epidermis. This response is associated with the recovery from irradiated skin of inflammatory mediators derived from membrane phospholipids. We have previously reported that UVB stimulates the production of such mediators by human keratinocytes (HK) in culture. In these studies we examined the effect of UVB on the metabolism of choline containing phospholipids in HK prelabeled with (/sup 3/H) choline. UVB (400-1600J/m2) stimulated a dose dependent release of (/sup 3/H) choline from HK within minutes of irradiation. Examination of media extracts by paper chromatography revealed that the released (/sup 3/H) choline was predominately in the form of glycerophosphorylcholine. Examination of label remaining in membranes of cells after irradiation by acid precipitation and HPLC revealed that the origin of the released (/sup 3/H) choline was the membrane phosphatidylcholine/lysophosphatidylcholine. These data support a concept of UVB stimulation of both a phospholipase A (1 or 2) and a lysophospholipase. These UVB induced alterations of HK membrane phospholipid metabolism likely have profound effects on UVB-induced inflammation and control of cell growth in human skin.

  19. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana C; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia; Schneider, Stefan W; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2016-08-20

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248±94nm to 600±201nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7days in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) solution. Cytotoxicity studies (WST-1 and LDH assays) demonstrated that the hybrid nanofibers have suitable biocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy, also suggested that L929 cells seeded on top of the CH/P hybrid have similar metabolic activity comparatively to the cells seeded on tissue culture plate (control). The release of curcumin, diclofenac and vitamin B12, as model drugs, from Ch/P hybrid nanofibers was investigated, demonstrating their potential utilization as a transdermal drug delivery system. PMID:27286632

  20. Linking Phospholipid flippases to vesicle-mediated protein transport

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Zhou, Xiaoming; Graham, Todd R.

    2013-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are a large family of putative phospholipid translocases (flippases) implicated in the generation of phospholipid asymmetry in biological membranes. P4-ATPases are typically the largest P-type ATPase subgroup found in eukaryotic cells, with five members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six members in Caenorhabditis elegans, 12 members in Arabidopsis thaliani and 14 members in humans. In addition, many of the P4-ATPases require interaction with a noncatalytic subunit from the CDC50 gene family for their transport out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Deficiency of a P4-ATPase (Atp8b1) causes liver disease in humans, and studies in a variety of model systems indicate that P4-ATPases play diverse and essential roles in membrane biogenesis. In addition to their proposed role in establishing and maintaining plasma membrane asymmetry, P4-ATPases are linked to vesicle-mediated protein transport in the exocytic and endocytic pathways. Recent studies have also suggested a role for P4-ATPases in the nonvesicular intracellular trafficking of sterols. Here, we discuss the physiological requirements for yeast P4-ATPases in phospholipid translocase activity, transport vesicle budding and ergosterol metabolism, with an emphasis on Drs2p and its noncatalytic subunit, Cdc50p. PMID:19286470

  1. Reconstitution of rat liver vasopressin receptors into phospholipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, B.; Navarro, J.; Fishman, J.; Fine, R.

    1986-05-01

    Isolation and characterization of the hepatic vasopressin (V1) receptor has been hampered by the loss of vasopressin binding when the receptor is solubilized. An alternative to a soluble binding assay is reconstitution of solubilized receptors into phospholipid vesicles. They report here the initial reconstitution of solubilized vasopressin receptors. Rat liver microsomes were solubilized with 3% 3-((3-cholamido-propyl)dimethyl-ammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) in 20mM HEPES (pH 7.4). The solubilized protein was combined with an equal volume of 7% soybean phospholipids dissolved in 3% CHAPS. This solution was passed over a column of Sephadex G50 equilibrated with 30 mM HEPES, 5mM MgCl/sub 2/ (pH 7.4). Reconstituted vesicles containing the microsomal proteins were recovered in the void volume. Binding of (/sup 3/H)-Vasopressin to the reconstituted vesicles at pH 7.4 was 80% specific, saturable, reversible and required magnesium. Solubilization of microsomes in the presence of glycerol, prebound ligand, phospholipids or magnesium did not improve subsequent binding. This reconstitution procedure will allow examination of signal transduction mechanisms and may be used as a functional assay in isolating the receptor.

  2. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  3. Synaptogenesis: Modulation by Availability of Membrane Phospholipid Precursors.

    PubMed

    Cansev, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    Phospholipids are the main constituents of brain membranes. Formation of new membranes requires that uridine, the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and choline, the three circulating precursors of major phospholipids, interact via the Kennedy pathway. Supplementation of laboratory rodents with uridine, DHA and choline enhances the amount of brain membranes as well as synaptic proteins and increases the number of dendritic spines, the essential cytological precursor of new synapses. Hence, the newly formed membranes are utilized for synaptogenesis which underlies increased synaptic functioning evidenced by enhanced neurotransmission and cognition. In addition, this supplementation ameliorates the degeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) when used in combination with several vitamins and cofactors. Hence, accumulating evidence shows that increasing the availability of phospholipid precursors, vitamins and cofactors to the brain through dietary supplementation enhances the formation of new synapses and provides protection under neurodegenerative conditions. The combination has been tested in clinical trials and a medication has been marketed for early-stage AD patients. PMID:27250850

  4. Proton/hydroxide conductance and permeability through phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Gutknecht, J

    1987-01-01

    Proton/hydroxide (H+/OH-) permeability of phospholipid bilayers is several orders of magnitude higher than alkali or halide ion permeabilities at pH 7. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) of H+/OH- conductance and permeability through planar phospholipid bilayer membranes. Membranes were formed from decane solutions of bacterial phosphatidylethanolamine, diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine, or egg phosphatidylcholine plus cholesterol. At pH 7, H+/OH- conductance (GH/OH) ranged from 2 to 6 nS.cm-2, corresponding to H+/OH- "net" permeabilities of (0.4-1.6) X 10(-5) cm.sec-1. GH/OH was inhibited by serum albumin (fatty acid-free), phloretin, and low pH. GH/OH was increased by chlorodecane, long-chain fatty acids, and voltages greater than 80 mV. Water permeability and GH/OH were not correlated. The results suggest that the H+/OH- charge carrier (i) is primarily anionic, (ii) crosses the membrane via nonpolar pathway(s), and (iii) can be removed from the membrane by "washing" with serum albumin. The simplest explanation is that the phospholipids contain weakly acidic contaminants that act as proton carriers at neutral pH. However, at low pH or in the presence of inhibitors, a "background" GH/OH remains that may be due to other mechanisms. PMID:2819878