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Sample records for regulates transport activity

  1. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Thornell, Ian M.; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4), Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs) including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2), electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2), and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE), as well as a borate transporter (BTR1). These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO−3 either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO−3 transporter contributes to a cell's ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s) (e.g., Na+ or Cl−). In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both well-known and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family. PMID:26124722

  2. Substrate regulation of ascorbate transport activity in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na(+)-dependent L-ascorbate transporter located in the plasma membrane. The present experiments examined the effects of deprivation and supplementation of extracellular L-ascorbate on the activity of this transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-(14C)ascorbate for 1 min at 37 degrees C. We observed that the apparent maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) increased rapidly (less than 1 h) when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. In contrast, there was no change in the apparent affinity of the transport system for L-(14C)ascorbate. The increase in Vmax was reversed by addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The effects of external ascorbate on ascorbate transport activity were specific in that preincubation of cultures with L-ascorbate did not affect uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(3H(G))glucose. We conclude that the astroglial ascorbate transport system is modulated by changes in substrate availability. Regulation of transport activity may play a role in intracellular ascorbate homeostasis by compensating for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in external ascorbate levels.

  3. NEURONAL ACTIVITY REGULATES GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER DYNAMICS IN DEVELOPING ASTROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Benediktsson, A.M.; Marrs, G.S.; Tu, J.C.; Worley, P.F.; Rothstein, J.D.; Bergles, D.E.; Dailey, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate transporters maintain a low ambient level of glutamate in the CNS and shape the activation of glutamate receptors at synapses. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and localization of transporters near sites of glutamate release are poorly understood. Here we examined the subcellular distribution and dynamic remodeling of the predominant glutamate transporter GLT-1 (EAAT2) in developing hippocampal astrocytes. Immunolabeling revealed that endogenous GLT-1 is concentrated into discrete clusters along branches of developing astrocytes that were apposed preferentially to synapsin-1 positive synapses. GFP-GLT-1 fusion proteins expressed in astrocytes also formed distinct clusters that lined the edges of astrocyte processes, as well as the tips of filopodia and spine-like structures. Time-lapse 3D confocal imaging in tissue slices revealed that GFP-GLT-1 clusters were dynamically remodeled on a timescale of minutes. Some transporter clusters moved within developing astrocyte branches as filopodia extended and retracted, while others maintained stable positions at the tips of spine-like structures. Blockade of neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin reduced both the density and perisynaptic localization of GLT-1 clusters. Conversely, enhancement of neuronal activity increased the size of GLT-1 clusters and their proximity to synapses. Together, these findings indicate that neuronal activity influences both the organization of glutamate transporters in developing astrocyte membranes and their position relative to synapses. PMID:22052455

  4. IRIP, a New Ischemia/Reperfusion-Inducible Protein That Participates in the Regulation of Transporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Prokopenko, Olga; Wong, Lawrence; Inouye, Masayori; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2005-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of a new ischemia/reperfusion-inducible protein (IRIP), which belongs to the SUA5/YrdC/YciO protein family. IRIP cDNA was isolated in a differential display analysis of an ischemia/reperfusion-treated kidney RNA sample. Mouse IRIP mRNA was expressed in all tissues tested, the highest level being in the testis, secretory, and endocrine organs. Besides ischemia/reperfusion, endotoxemia also activated the expression of IRIP in the liver, lung, and spleen. The transporter regulator RS1 was identified as an IRIP-interacting protein in yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction between IRIP and RS1 was further confirmed in coimmunoprecipitation assays. A possible role of IRIP in regulating transporter activity was subsequently investigated. IRIP overexpression inhibited endogenous 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) uptake activity in HeLa cells. The activities of exogenous organic cation transporters (OCT2 and OCT3), organic anion transporter (OAT1), and monoamine transporters were also inhibited by IRIP. Conversely, inhibition of IRIP expression by small interfering RNA or antisense RNA increased MPP+ uptake. We measured transport kinetics of OCT2-mediated uptake and demonstrated that IRIP overexpression significantly decreased Vmax but did not affect Km. On the basis of these results, we propose that IRIP regulates the activity of a variety of transporters under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:16024787

  5. Allosteric Regulation of Transport Activity by Heterotrimerization of Arabidopsis Ammonium Transporter Complexes in Vivo[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lixing; Gu, Riliang; Xuan, Yuanhu; Smith-Valle, Erika; Loqué, Dominique; Frommer, Wolf B.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium acquisition by plant roots is mediated by AMMONIUM TRANSPORTERs (AMTs), ubiquitous membrane proteins with essential roles in nitrogen nutrition in all organisms. In microbial and plant cells, ammonium transport activity is controlled by ammonium-triggered feedback inhibition to prevent cellular ammonium toxicity. Data from heterologous expression in yeast indicate that oligomerization of plant AMTs is critical for allosteric regulation of transport activity, in which the conserved cytosolic C terminus functions as a trans-activator. Employing the coexpressed transporters AMT1;1 and AMT1;3 from Arabidopsis thaliana as a model, we show here that these two isoforms form functional homo- and heterotrimers in yeast and plant roots and that AMT1;3 carrying a phosphomimic residue in its C terminus regulates both homo- and heterotrimers in a dominant-negative fashion in vivo. 15NH4+ influx studies further indicate that allosteric inhibition represses ammonium transport activity in roots of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing a phosphomimic mutant together with functional AMT1;3 or AMT1;1. Our study demonstrates in planta a regulatory role in transport activity of heterooligomerization of transporter isoforms, which may enhance their versatility for signal exchange in response to environmental triggers. PMID:23463773

  6. An intrinsic adenylate kinase activity regulates gating of the ABC transporter CFTR.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph; Welsh, Michael J

    2003-12-26

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. Like other ABC transporters, it can hydrolyze ATP. Yet while ATP hydrolysis influences channel gating, it has long seemed puzzling that CFTR would require this reaction because anions flow passively through CFTR. Moreover, no other ion channel is known to require the large energy of ATP hydrolysis to gate. We found that CFTR also has adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP <=> ADP + ADP) that regulates gating. When functioning as an adenylate kinase, CFTR showed positive cooperativity for ATP suggesting its two nucleotide binding domains may dimerize. Thus, channel activity could be regulated by two different enzymatic reactions, ATPase and adenylate kinase, that share a common ATP binding site in the second nucleotide binding domain. At physiologic nucleotide concentrations, adenylate kinase activity, rather than ATPase activity may control gating, and therefore involve little energy consumption. PMID:14697202

  7. Glucose transporter 2 expression is down regulated following P2X7 activation in enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Bourzac, Jean-François; L'Ériger, Karine; Larrivée, Jean-François; Arguin, Guillaume; Bilodeau, Maude S; Stankova, Jana; Gendron, Fernand-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    With the diabetes epidemic affecting the world population, there is an increasing demand for means to regulate glycemia. Dietary glucose is first absorbed by the intestine before entering the blood stream. Thus, the regulation of glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) could represent a way to regulate glycemia. Among the molecules involved in glycemia homeostasis, extracellular ATP, a paracrine signaling molecule, was reported to induce insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells by activating P2Y and P2X receptors. In rat's jejunum, P2X7 expression was previously immunolocalized to the apex of villi, where it has been suspected to play a role in apoptosis. However, using an antibody recognizing the receptor extracellular domain and thus most of the P2X7 isoforms, we showed that expression of this receptor is apparent in the top two-thirds of villi. These data suggest a different role for this receptor in IECs. Using the non-cancerous IEC-6 cells and differentiated Caco-2 cells, glucose transport was reduced by more than 30% following P2X7 stimulation. This effect on glucose transport was not due to P2X7-induced cell apoptosis, but rather was the consequence of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2)'s internalization. The signaling pathway leading to P2X7-dependent Glut2 internalization involved the calcium-independent activation of phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1), PKCδ, and PKD1. Although the complete mechanism regulating Glut2 internalization following P2X7 activation is not fully understood, modulation of P2X7 receptor activation could represent an interesting approach to regulate intestinal glucose absorption. PMID:22566162

  8. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  9. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin−/− neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin−/− phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca2+ sensor, we demonstrate that snapin–dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting. PMID:26108535

  10. Cationic Amino Acid Transporter-2 Regulates Immunity by Modulating Arginase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Robert W.; Pesce, John T.; Ramalingam, Thirumalai; Wilson, Mark S.; White, Sandy; Cheever, Allen W.; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Li, Lili; Ellies, Lesley G.; Wynn, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    Cationic amino acid transporters (CAT) are important regulators of NOS2 and ARG1 activity because they regulate L-arginine availability. However, their role in the development of Th1/Th2 effector functions following infection has not been investigated. Here we dissect the function of CAT2 by studying two infectious disease models characterized by the development of polarized Th1 or Th2-type responses. We show that CAT2−/− mice are significantly more susceptible to the Th1-inducing pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Although T. gondii infected CAT2−/− mice developed stronger IFN-γ responses, nitric oxide (NO) production was significantly impaired, which contributed to their enhanced susceptibility. In contrast, CAT2−/− mice infected with the Th2-inducing pathogen Schistosoma mansoni displayed no change in susceptibility to infection, although they succumbed to schistosomiasis at an accelerated rate. Granuloma formation and fibrosis, pathological features regulated by Th2 cytokines, were also exacerbated even though their Th2 response was reduced. Finally, while IL-13 blockade was highly efficacious in wild-type mice, the development of fibrosis in CAT2−/− mice was largely IL-13-independent. Instead, the exacerbated pathology was associated with increased arginase activity in fibroblasts and alternatively activated macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, by controlling NOS2 and arginase activity, CAT2 functions as a potent regulator of immunity. PMID:18369473

  11. Regulation of the creatine transporter by AMP-activated protein kinase in kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Thali, Ramon F.; Smolak, Christy; Gong, Fan; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Wallimann, Theo; Scholz, Roland; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates several transport proteins, potentially coupling transport activity to cellular stress and energy levels. The creatine transporter (CRT; SLC6A8) mediates creatine uptake into several cell types, including kidney epithelial cells, where it has been proposed that CRT is important for reclamation of filtered creatine, a process critical for total body creatine homeostasis. Creatine and phosphocreatine provide an intracellular, high-energy phosphate-buffering system essential for maintaining ATP supply in tissues with high energy demands. To test our hypothesis that CRT is regulated by AMPK in the kidney, we examined CRT and AMPK distribution in the kidney and the regulation of CRT by AMPK in cells. By immunofluorescence staining, we detected CRT at the apical pole in a polarized mouse S3 proximal tubule cell line and in native rat kidney proximal tubules, a distribution overlapping with AMPK. Two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEV) measurements of Na+-dependent creatine uptake into CRT-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that AMPK inhibited CRT via a reduction in its Michaelis-Menten Vmax parameter. [14C]creatine uptake and apical surface biotinylation measurements in polarized S3 cells demonstrated parallel reductions in creatine influx and CRT apical membrane expression after AMPK activation with the AMP-mimetic compound 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside. In oocyte TEV experiments, rapamycin and the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl 5′-monophosphate (ZMP) inhibited CRT currents, but there was no additive inhibition of CRT by ZMP, suggesting that AMPK may inhibit CRT indirectly via the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. We conclude that AMPK inhibits apical membrane CRT expression in kidney proximal tubule cells, which could be important in reducing cellular energy expenditure and unnecessary creatine reabsorption under conditions of local

  12. Neuronal Activity and CaMKII Regulate Kinesin-Mediated Transport of Synaptic AMPARs

    PubMed Central

    Hoerndli, Frédéric J.; Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E.; Kallarackal, Angy; Brockie, Penelope J.; Thacker, Colin; Madsen, David M.; Maricq, Andres V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission is critically dependent on maintaining an optimal number of postsynaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at each synapse of a given neuron. Here, we show that presynaptic activity, postsynaptic potential, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), and UNC-43, the C. elegans homolog of CaMKII, control synaptic strength by regulating motor-driven AMPAR transport. Genetic mutations in unc-43, or spatially and temporally restricted inactivation of UNC-43/CaMKII, revealed its essential roles in the transport of AMPARs from the cell body, and in the insertion and removal of synaptic AMPARs. We found that an essential target of UNC-43/CaMKII is kinesin light chain, and that mouse CaMKII rescued unc-43 mutants suggesting conservation of function. Transient expression of UNC-43/CaMKII in adults rescued the transport defects, while optogenetic stimulation of select synapses revealed CaMKII’s role in activity-dependent plasticity. Our results demonstrate unanticipated, fundamentally important roles for UNC-43/CaMKII in the regulation of synaptic strength. PMID:25843407

  13. KIF5B transports BNIP-2 to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng; Chew, Li Li; Zhang, Ziwang; Ren, Hao; Wang, Feiya; Cong, Xiaoxia; Zheng, Liling; Luo, Yan; Ouyang, Hongwei; Low, Boon Chuan; Zhou, Yi Ting

    2015-01-01

    The Cdo-p38MAPK (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating skeletal myogenesis. During myogenic differentiation, the cell surface receptor Cdo bridges scaffold proteins BNIP-2 and JLP and activates p38MAPK, but the spatial-temporal regulation of this process is largely unknown. We here report that KIF5B, the heavy chain of kinesin-1 motor, is a novel interacting partner of BNIP-2. Coimmunoprecipitation and far-Western study revealed that BNIP-2 directly interacted with the motor and tail domains of KIF5B via its BCH domain. By using a range of organelle markers and live microscopy, we determined the endosomal localization of BNIP-2 and revealed the microtubule-dependent anterograde transport of BNIP-2 in C2C12 cells. The anterograde transport of BNIP-2 was disrupted by a dominant-negative mutant of KIF5B. In addition, knockdown of KIF5B causes aberrant aggregation of BNIP-2, confirming that KIF5B is critical for the anterograde transport of BNIP-2 in cells. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments further showed that KIF5B modulates p38MAPK activity and in turn promotes myogenic differentiation. Of importance, the KIF5B-dependent anterograde transport of BNIP-2 is critical for its promyogenic effects. Our data reveal a novel role of KIF5B in the spatial regulation of Cdo–BNIP-2–p38MAPK signaling and disclose a previously unappreciated linkage between the intracellular transporting system and myogenesis regulation. PMID:25378581

  14. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  15. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  16. Structural basis for the metal-selective activation of the manganese transport regulator of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, Joseph I; Griner, Sarah L; Helmann, John D; Brennan, Richard G; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2006-03-21

    The manganese transport regulator (MntR) of Bacillus subtilis is activated by Mn(2+) to repress transcription of genes encoding transporters involved in the uptake of manganese. MntR is also strongly activated by cadmium, both in vivo and in vitro, but it is poorly activated by other metal cations, including calcium and zinc. The previously published MntR.Mn(2+) structure revealed a binuclear complex of manganese ions with a metal-metal separation of 3.3 A (herein designated the AB conformer). Analysis of four additional crystal forms of MntR.Mn(2+) reveals that the AB conformer is only observed in monoclinic crystals at 100 K, suggesting that this conformation may be stabilized by crystal packing forces. In contrast, monoclinic crystals analyzed at room temperature (at either pH 6.5 or pH 8.5), and a second hexagonal crystal form (analyzed at 100 K), all reveal the shift of one manganese ion by 2.5 A, thereby leading to a newly identified conformation (the AC conformer) with an internuclear distance of 4.4 A. Significantly, the cadmium and calcium complexes of MntR also contain binuclear complexes with a 4.4 A internuclear separation. In contrast, the zinc complex of MntR contains only one metal ion per subunit, in the A site. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms the stoichiometry of Mn(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) binding to MntR. We propose that the specificity of MntR activation is tied to productive binding of metal ions at two sites; the A site appears to act as a selectivity filter, determining whether the B or C site will be occupied and thereby fully activate MntR. PMID:16533030

  17. Extracellular microvesicles from astrocytes contain functional glutamate transporters: regulation by protein kinase C and cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Romain-Daniel; Meylan, Patrick; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transport through astrocytic excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAAT)-1 and EAAT-2 is paramount for neural homeostasis. EAAT-1 has been reported in secreted extracellular microvesicles (eMV, such as exosomes) and because the protein kinase C (PKC) family controls the sub-cellular distribution of EAATs, we have explored whether PKCs drive EAATs into eMV. Using rat primary astrocytes, confocal immunofluorescence and ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient we here report that PKC activation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) reorganizes EAAT-1 distribution and reduces functional [3H]-aspartate reuptake. Western-blots show that EAAT-1 is present in eMV from astrocyte conditioned medium, together with NaK ATPase and glutamine synthetase all being further increased after PMA treatment. However, nanoparticle tracking analysis reveals that PKC activation did not change particle concentration. Functional analysis indicates that eMV have the capacity to reuptake [3H]-aspartate. In vivo, we demonstrate that spinal astrocytic reaction induced by peripheral nerve lesion (spared nerve injury, SNI) is associated with a phosphorylation of PKC δ together with a shift of EAAT distribution ipsilaterally. Ex vivo, spinal explants from SNI rats release eMV with an increased content of NaK ATPase, EAAT-1 and EAAT-2. These data indicate PKC and cell activation as important regulators of EAAT-1 incorporation in eMV, and raise the possibility that microvesicular EAAT-1 may exert extracellular functions. Beyond a putative role in neuropathic pain, this phenomenon may be important for understanding neural homeostasis and a wide range of neurological diseases associated with astrocytic reaction as well as non-neurological diseases linked to eMV release. PMID:24368897

  18. Activation of Big Grain1 significantly improves grain size by regulating auxin transport in rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linchuan; Tong, Hongning; Xiao, Yunhua; Che, Ronghui; Xu, Fan; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chengzhen; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Jiayang; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-01-01

    Grain size is one of the key factors determining grain yield. However, it remains largely unknown how grain size is regulated by developmental signals. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a dominant mutant big grain1 (Bg1-D) that shows an extra-large grain phenotype from our rice T-DNA insertion population. Overexpression of BG1 leads to significantly increased grain size, and the severe lines exhibit obviously perturbed gravitropism. In addition, the mutant has increased sensitivities to both auxin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, whereas knockdown of BG1 results in decreased sensitivities and smaller grains. Moreover, BG1 is specifically induced by auxin treatment, preferentially expresses in the vascular tissue of culms and young panicles, and encodes a novel membrane-localized protein, strongly suggesting its role in regulating auxin transport. Consistent with this finding, the mutant has increased auxin basipetal transport and altered auxin distribution, whereas the knockdown plants have decreased auxin transport. Manipulation of BG1 in both rice and Arabidopsis can enhance plant biomass, seed weight, and yield. Taking these data together, we identify a novel positive regulator of auxin response and transport in a crop plant and demonstrate its role in regulating grain size, thus illuminating a new strategy to improve plant productivity. PMID:26283354

  19. Activation of Big Grain1 significantly improves grain size by regulating auxin transport in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linchuan; Tong, Hongning; Xiao, Yunhua; Che, Ronghui; Xu, Fan; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chengzhen; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Jiayang; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-09-01

    Grain size is one of the key factors determining grain yield. However, it remains largely unknown how grain size is regulated by developmental signals. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a dominant mutant big grain1 (Bg1-D) that shows an extra-large grain phenotype from our rice T-DNA insertion population. Overexpression of BG1 leads to significantly increased grain size, and the severe lines exhibit obviously perturbed gravitropism. In addition, the mutant has increased sensitivities to both auxin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, whereas knockdown of BG1 results in decreased sensitivities and smaller grains. Moreover, BG1 is specifically induced by auxin treatment, preferentially expresses in the vascular tissue of culms and young panicles, and encodes a novel membrane-localized protein, strongly suggesting its role in regulating auxin transport. Consistent with this finding, the mutant has increased auxin basipetal transport and altered auxin distribution, whereas the knockdown plants have decreased auxin transport. Manipulation of BG1 in both rice and Arabidopsis can enhance plant biomass, seed weight, and yield. Taking these data together, we identify a novel positive regulator of auxin response and transport in a crop plant and demonstrate its role in regulating grain size, thus illuminating a new strategy to improve plant productivity. PMID:26283354

  20. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26677078

  1. Regulation of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by diesel exhaust particle extract.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  2. Regulation of Human Hepatic Drug Transporter Activity and Expression by Diesel Exhaust Particle Extract

    PubMed Central

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  3. Interdomain regulation of the ATPase activity of the ABC transporter haemolysin B from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Sven; Poschmann, Gereon; Kanonenberg, Kerstin; Stühler, Kai; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2016-08-15

    Type 1 secretion systems (T1SS) transport a wide range of substrates across both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and are composed of an outer membrane protein, a membrane fusion protein and an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter. The ABC transporter HlyB (haemolysin B) is part of a T1SS catalysing the export of the toxin HlyA in E. coli HlyB consists of the canonical transmembrane and nucleotide-binding domains. Additionally, HlyB contains an N-terminal CLD (C39-peptidase-like domain) that interacts with the transport substrate, but its functional relevance is still not precisely defined. In the present paper, we describe the purification and biochemical characterization of detergent-solubilized HlyB in the presence of its transport substrate. Our results exhibit a positive co-operativity in ATP hydrolysis. We characterized further the influence of the CLD on kinetic parameters by using an HlyB variant lacking the CLD (HlyB∆CLD). The biochemical parameters of HlyB∆CLD revealed an increased basal maximum velocity but no change in substrate-binding affinity in comparison with full-length HlyB. We also assigned a distinct interaction of the CLD and a transport substrate (HlyA1), leading to an inhibition of HlyB hydrolytic activity at low HlyA1 concentrations. At higher HlyA1 concentrations, we observed a stimulation of the hydrolytic activities of both HlyB and HlyB∆CLD, which was completely independent of the interaction of HlyA1 with the CLD. Notably, all observed effects on ATPase activity, which were also analysed in detail by mass spectrometry, were independent of the HlyA1 secretion signal. These results assign an interdomain regulatory role for the CLD modulating the hydrolytic activity of HlyB. PMID:27279651

  4. The yeast Arf GTPase-activating protein Age1 is regulated by phospholipase D for post-Golgi vesicular transport.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Jeremy J R; Poon, Pak P; Lewis, Stephen M; Auger, Andréanne; Wong, Tania A; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2011-02-18

    Vesicular transport shuttles cargo among intracellular compartments. Several stages of vesicular transport are mediated by the small GTPase Arf, which is controlled in a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis by Arf guanine-nucleotide exchange factors and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), respectively. In budding yeast the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair facilitates post-Golgi transport. We have found the AGE1 gene, encoding another ArfGAP, can in high gene-copy number alleviate the temperature sensitivity of cells carrying mutations affecting the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Moreover, increased AGE1 gene dosage compensates for the complete absence of the otherwise essential Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Increased dosage of SFH2, encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, also allows cell growth in the absence of the Age2 + Gcs1 pair, but good growth in this situation requires Age1. The ability of Age1 to overcome the need for Age2 + Gcs1 depends on phospholipase D activity that regulates lipid composition. We show by direct assessment of Age1 ArfGAP activity that Age1 is regulated by lipid composition and can provide ArfGAP function for post-Golgi transport. PMID:21135091

  5. The Yeast Arf GTPase-activating Protein Age1 Is Regulated by Phospholipase D for Post-Golgi Vesicular Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jeremy J. R.; Poon, Pak P.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Auger, Andréanne; Wong, Tania A.; Singer, Richard A.; Johnston, Gerald C.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular transport shuttles cargo among intracellular compartments. Several stages of vesicular transport are mediated by the small GTPase Arf, which is controlled in a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis by Arf guanine-nucleotide exchange factors and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), respectively. In budding yeast the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair facilitates post-Golgi transport. We have found the AGE1 gene, encoding another ArfGAP, can in high gene-copy number alleviate the temperature sensitivity of cells carrying mutations affecting the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Moreover, increased AGE1 gene dosage compensates for the complete absence of the otherwise essential Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Increased dosage of SFH2, encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, also allows cell growth in the absence of the Age2 + Gcs1 pair, but good growth in this situation requires Age1. The ability of Age1 to overcome the need for Age2 + Gcs1 depends on phospholipase D activity that regulates lipid composition. We show by direct assessment of Age1 ArfGAP activity that Age1 is regulated by lipid composition and can provide ArfGAP function for post-Golgi transport. PMID:21135091

  6. Regulation of Monoamine Transporters: Role of Transporter Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

    2010-01-01

    Presynaptic biogenic amine transporters mediate reuptake of released amines from the synapse, thus regulating serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine neurotransmission. Medications utilized in the treatment of depression, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and other psychiatric disorders possess high affinity for amine transporters. In addition, amine transporters are targets for psychostimulants. Altered expression of biogenic amine transporters has long been implicated in several psychiatric and degenerative disorders. Therefore, appropriate regulation and maintenance of biogenic amine transporter activity is critical for the maintenance of normal amine homoeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that cellular protein kinases and phosphatases regulate amine transporter expression, activity, trafficking and degradation. Amine transporters are phosphoproteins that undergo dynamic control under the influence of various kinase and phosphatase activities. This review presents a brief overview of the role of amine transporter phosphorylation in the regulation of amine transport in the normal and diseased brain. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which phosphorylation events affect amine transporter activity is essential for understanding the contribution of transporter phosphorylation to the regulation of monoamine neurotransmission and for identifying potential new targets for the treatment of various brain diseases. PMID:20951731

  7. ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Regulate the Concentrative Adenosine Transporter CNT2 following Activation by A1 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duflot, Sylvie; Riera, Bárbara; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Casadó, Vicent; Norman, Robert I.; Casado, F. Javier; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a novel mechanism of regulation of the high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter (CNT2) via the activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1R). This regulation is mediated by the activation of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. The high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter CNT2 and A1R are coexpressed in the basolateral domain of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and are colocalized in the rat hepatoma cell line FAO. The transient increase in CNT2-mediated transport activity triggered by (−)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine is fully inhibited by KATP channel blockers and mimicked by a KATP channel opener. A1R agonist activation of CNT2 occurs in both hepatocytes and FAO cells, which express Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, SUR2A, and SUR2B mRNA channel subunits. With the available antibodies against Kir6.X, SUR2A, and SUR2B, it is shown that all of these proteins colocalize with CNT2 and A1R in defined plasma membrane domains of FAO cells. The extent of the purinergic modulation of CNT2 is affected by the glucose concentration, a finding which indicates that glycemia and glucose metabolism may affect this cross-regulation among A1R, CNT2, and KATP channels. These results also suggest that the activation of KATP channels under metabolic stress can be mediated by the activation of A1R. Cell protection under these circumstances may be achieved by potentiation of the uptake of adenosine and its further metabolization to ATP. Mediation of purinergic responses and a connection between the intracellular energy status and the need for an exogenous adenosine supply are novel roles for KATP channels. PMID:15024061

  8. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta-Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Griffin, Lewis D; Kittler, Josef T

    2016-07-01

    The astrocytic GLT-1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live-cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT-1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP-time lapse imaging, we show that GLT-1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity-dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT-1 is more stable than diffuse GLT-1 and that glutamate increases GLT-1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT-1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT-1b more so. GLT-1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT-1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT-1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252-1264. PMID:27189737

  9. Water transport activity of the plasma membrane aquaporin PM28A is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, I; Karlsson, M; Shukla, V K; Chrispeels, M J; Larsson, C; Kjellbom, P

    1998-01-01

    PM28A is a major intrinsic protein of the spinach leaf plasma membrane and the major phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation of PM28A is dependent in vivo on the apoplastic water potential and in vitro on submicromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Here, we demonstrate that PM28A is an aquaporin and that its water channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation. Wild-type and mutant forms of PM28A, in which putative phosphorylation sites had been knocked out, were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the resulting increase in osmotic water permeability was measured in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of protein kinases (K252a) or of an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (okadaic acid). The results indicate that the water channel activity of PM28A is regulated by phosphorylation of two serine residues, Ser-115 in the first cytoplasmic loop and Ser-274 in the C-terminal region. Labeling of spinach leaves with 32P-orthophosphate and subsequent sequencing of PM28A-derived peptides demonstrated that Ser-274 is phosphorylated in vivo, whereas phosphorylation of Ser-115, a residue conserved among all plant plasma membrane aquaporins, could not be demonstrated. This identifies Ser-274 of PM28A as the amino acid residue being phosphorylated in vivo in response to increasing apoplastic water potential and dephosphorylated in response to decreasing water potential. Taken together, our results suggest an active role for PM28A in maintaining cellular water balance. PMID:9501117

  10. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  11. Arabidopsis ROCK1 transports UDP-GlcNAc/UDP-GalNAc and regulates ER protein quality control and cytokinin activity

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Michael C. E.; Bartrina, Isabel; Ashikov, Angel; Weber, Henriette; Spíchal, Lukáš; Strnad, Miroslav; Strasser, Richard; Bakker, Hans; Schmülling, Thomas; Werner, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    The formation of glycoconjugates depends on nucleotide sugars, which serve as donor substrates for glycosyltransferases in the lumen of Golgi vesicles and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Import of nucleotide sugars from the cytosol is an important prerequisite for these reactions and is mediated by nucleotide sugar transporters. Here, we report the identification of REPRESSOR OF CYTOKININ DEFICIENCY 1 (ROCK1, At5g65000) as an ER-localized facilitator of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) transport in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutant alleles of ROCK1 suppress phenotypes inferred by a reduced concentration of the plant hormone cytokinin. This suppression is caused by the loss of activity of cytokinin-degrading enzymes, cytokinin oxidases/dehydrogenases (CKXs). Cytokinin plays an essential role in regulating shoot apical meristem (SAM) activity and shoot architecture. We show that rock1 enhances SAM activity and organ formation rate, demonstrating an important role of ROCK1 in regulating the cytokinin signal in the meristematic cells through modulating activity of CKX proteins. Intriguingly, genetic and molecular analysis indicated that N-glycosylation of CKX1 was not affected by the lack of ROCK1-mediated supply of UDP-GlcNAc. In contrast, we show that CKX1 stability is regulated in a proteasome-dependent manner and that ROCK1 regulates the CKX1 level. The increased unfolded protein response in rock1 plants and suppression of phenotypes caused by the defective brassinosteroid receptor bri1-9 strongly suggest that the ROCK1 activity is an important part of the ER quality control system, which determines the fate of aberrant proteins in the secretory pathway. PMID:25535363

  12. [The regulation of the activation in BCR signaling by ZIP9 transporter].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masanari; Enomoto, Shuichi; Hiromura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is the essential trace element and important for all living organisms. Zinc functions not only as a nutritional factor, but also as a second messenger. However, the effects of intracellular zinc on the B cell-receptor (BCR) signaling pathway are not poorly understood. Here, we indicate that the ZIP9 induces increase in intracellular zinc level and plays an important role in the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in response to BCR activation. In DT40 cells, the enhancement of Akt and Erk phosphorylation requires intracellular zinc. To clarify this event, we used chicken Zip9-knockout DT40 (cZip9KO) cells. The levels of Akt and Erk phosphorylation significantly decreased in cZip9KO cells treated with zinc pyrithione (ZnPy), and overexpressing the human Zip9 gene restored these biochemical events. Moreover, we found that the increase in intracellular zinc level depends on the expression of ZIP9. Additionally, intracellular zinc was localized at the Golgi, even if it was treated with ZnPy in cZip9KO cells. We concluded that ZIP9 regulates cytosolic zinc level, resulting in the enhancement of Akt and Erk phosphorylation. Our observations provide new mechanistic insights into the BCR signaling pathway underlying the regulation of intracellular zinc level by ZIP9 in response to the BCR activation. PMID:24989471

  13. IGF-I regulates redox status in breast cancer cells by activating the amino acid transport molecule xC−

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuzhe; Yee, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate cell growth in part by increasing amino acid uptake. xCT (SLC7A11) encodes the functional subunit of the cell surface transport system xC− which mediates cystine uptake, a pivotal step in glutathione synthesis and cellular redox control. In this study, we show that IGF-I regulates cystine uptake and cellular redox status by activating the expression and function of xCT in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cells by a mechanism that relies on the IGF receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Breast cancer cell proliferation mediated by IGF-I was suppressed by attenuating xCT expression or blocking xCT activity with the pharmacological inhibitor sulfasalazine (SASP). Notably, SASP sensitized breast cancer cells to inhibitors of the IGF-I receptor in a manner reversed by the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Thus, IGF-I promoted the proliferation of ER+ breast cancer cells by regulating xC− transporter function to protect cancer cells from ROS in an IRS-1 dependent manner. Our findings suggest that inhibiting xC− transporter function may synergize with modalities that target the IGF-I receptor to heighten their therapeutic effects. PMID:24686172

  14. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT

    PubMed Central

    Fishwick, Katherine J.; Rylett, R. Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  15. Insulin Regulates the Activity of the High-Affinity Choline Transporter CHT.

    PubMed

    Fishwick, Katherine J; Rylett, R Jane

    2015-01-01

    Studies in humans and animal models show that neuronal insulin resistance increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and that insulin treatment may promote memory function. Cholinergic neurons play a critical role in cognitive and attentional processing and their dysfunction early in AD pathology may promote the progression of AD pathology. Synthesis and release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is closely linked to the activity of the high-affinity choline transporter protein (CHT), but the impact of insulin receptor signaling and neuronal insulin resistance on these aspects of cholinergic function are unknown. In this study, we used differentiated SH-SY5Y cells stably-expressing CHT proteins to study the effect of insulin signaling on CHT activity and function. We find that choline uptake activity measured after acute addition of 20 nM insulin is significantly lower in cells that were grown for 24 h in media containing insulin compared to cells grown in the absence of insulin. This coincides with loss of ability to increase phospho-Protein Kinase B (PKB)/Akt levels in response to acute insulin stimulation in the chronic insulin-treated cells. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in cells significantly lowers phospho-PKB/Akt levels and decreases choline uptake activity. We show total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) imaging of the dynamic movement of CHT proteins in live cells in response to depolarization and drug treatments. These data show that acute exposure of depolarized cells to insulin is coupled to transiently increased levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface, and that this is attenuated by chronic insulin exposure. Moreover, prolonged inhibition of PI3-kinase results in enhanced levels of CHT proteins at the cell surface by decreasing their rate of internalization. PMID:26161852

  16. Ctr9, a Protein in the Transcription Complex Paf1, Regulates Dopamine Transporter Activity at the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    De Gois, Stéphanie; Slama, Patrick; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Erdozain, Amaia M.; Louis, Franck; Bouvrais-Veret, Caroline; Daviet, Laurent; Giros, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a major regulator of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. The DA transporter (DAT) is the key protein that regulates the spatial and temporal activity of DA release into the synaptic cleft via the rapid reuptake of DA into presynaptic termini. Several lines of evidence have suggested that transporter-interacting proteins may play a role in DAT function and regulation. Here, we identified the tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein Ctr9 as a novel DAT binding partner using a yeast two-hybrid system. We showed that Ctr9 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and forms a stable complex with DAT in vivo via GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays. In mammalian cells co-expressing both proteins, Ctr9 partially colocalizes with DAT at the plasma membrane. This interaction between DAT and Ctr9 results in a dramatic enhancement of DAT-mediated DA uptake due to an increased number of DAT transporters at the plasma membrane. We determined that the binding of Ctr9 to DAT requires residues YKF in the first half of the DAT C terminus. In addition, we characterized Ctr9, providing new insight into this protein. Using three-dimensional modeling, we identified three novel tetratricopeptide repeat domains in the Ctr9 sequence, and based on deletion mutation experiments, we demonstrated the role of the SH2 domain of Ctr9 in nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that Ctr9 localization is not restricted to the nucleus, as previously described for the transcription complex Paf1. Taken together, our data provide evidence that Ctr9 modulates DAT function by regulating its trafficking. PMID:26048990

  17. Strategies for optimization of mineral nutrient transport in plants: multilevel regulation of nutrient-dependent dynamics of root architecture and transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Aibara, Izumi; Miwa, Kyoko

    2014-12-01

    How do sessile plants cope with irregularities in soil nutrient availability? The uptake of essential minerals from the soil influences plant growth and development. However, most environments do not provide sufficient nutrients; rather nutrient distribution in the soil can be uneven and change temporally according to environmental factors. To maintain mineral nutrient homeostasis in their tissues, plants have evolved sophisticated systems for coping with spatial and temporal variability in soil nutrient concentrations. Among these are mechanisms for modulating root system architecture in response to nutrient availability. This review discusses recent advances in knowledge of the two important strategies for optimizing nutrient uptake and translocation in plants: root architecture modification and transporter expression control in response to nutrient availability. Recent studies have determined (i) nutrient-specific root patterns; (ii) their physiological consequences; and (iii) the molecular mechanisms underlying these modulation systems that operate to facilitate efficient nutrient acquisition. Another mechanism employed by plants in nutrient-heterogeneous soils involves modification of nutrient transport activities in a nutrient concentration-dependent manner. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the diverse functions of transporters for specific nutrients; it is now clear that the expression and activities of nutrient transporters are finely regulated in multiple steps at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels for adaptation to a wide range of nutrient conditions. PMID:25378690

  18. Regulating the Membrane Transport Activity and Death of Cells via Electroosmotic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Hui, Tsz Hin; Kwan, Kin Wah; Chun Yip, Timothy Tak; Fong, Hong Wai; Ngan, Kai Cheong; Yu, Miao; Yao, Shuhuai; Wan Ngan, Alfonso Hin; Lin, Yuan

    2016-06-21

    Although the volume of living cells has been known to heavily influence their behavior and fate, a method allowing us to control the cell size in a programmable manner is still lacking. Here, we develop a technique in which precise changes in the cellular volume can be conveniently introduced by varying the voltage applied across a Nafion membrane that separates the culture medium from a reservoir. It is found that, unlike sudden osmotic shocks, active ion transport across the membrane of leukemia K562 cells will not be triggered by a gradual change in the extracellular osmolarity. Furthermore, when subjected to the same applied voltage, different lung and nasopharyngeal epithelial cancer cells will undergo larger volumetric changes and have a 5-10% higher death rate compared to their normal counterparts. We show that such distinct response is largely caused by the overexpression of aquaporin-4 in tumor cells, with knockout of this water channel protein resulting in a markedly reduced change in the cellular volume. Finally, by taking into account the exchange of water/ion molecules across the Nafion film and the cell membrane, a theoretical model is also proposed to describe the voltage-induced size changes of cells, which explain our experimental observations very well. PMID:27332135

  19. Real-time, Spatially Resolved Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Activity And Regulation Using the Fluorescent Substrate, ASP+

    PubMed Central

    Oz, M.; Libby, T.; Kivell, B.; Jaligam, V.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Shippenberg, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) mediates clearance of serotonin from the synapse, thereby, regulating extracellular serotonin concentrations. Radioligand uptake techniques are typically used to assess SERT function in tissue and heterologous expression systems. The need for sufficient protein in samples, however, requires use of homogenate preparations, potentially masking effects limited to specific cell populations. 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+) is a fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate that has been used for real-time monitoring of dopamine and norepinephrine transporter function in single cells. The present live cell imaging studies examine the utility of ASP+ for quantifying hSERT function in HEK-293 and neuroblastoma cells. We show rapid membrane binding and intracellular ASP+ accumulation in hSERT expressing cells. Accumulation is saturable; dependent on temperature and the presence of sodium and chloride in the media, and attenuated by serotonin. Acute or prolonged exposure of cells to serotonin re-uptake inhibitors produces a concentration-dependent decrease in accumulation. Similar effects are produced by PKC activation whereas p38MAPK activation increases ASP+ accumulation. These data demonstrate the validity of ASP+ as a probe for monitoring SERT function in living cells. Alterations in SERT binding and uptake can be quantified in the same cell and use of a within cell design permits analysis of time-related alterations in SERT function. PMID:20524964

  20. Abundance of amino acid transporters involved in mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we demonstrated that the insulinand amino acid-induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated that members of the System A transporter (SNAT2), the System N transporter (SNAT3), the Sy...

  1. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP<==> ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  2. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  3. Interferon-gamma regulates nucleoside transport systems in macrophages through signal transduction and activator of transduction factor 1 (STAT1)-dependent and -independent signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio; García-Manteiga, José; Serra, Maria; Guillén-Gómez, Elena; Casado, F Javier; MacLeod, Carol; Modolell, Manuel; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Celada, Antonio

    2003-11-01

    The expressions of CNT and ENT (concentrative and equilibrative nucleoside transporters) in macrophages are differentially regulated by IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). This cytokine controls gene expression through STAT1-dependent and/or -independent pathways (where STAT1 stands for signal transduction and activator of transcription 1). In the present study, the role of STAT1 in the response of nucleoside transporters to IFN-gamma was studied using macrophages from STAT1 knockout mice. IFN-gamma triggered an inhibition of ENT1-related nucleoside transport activity through STAT1-dependent mechanisms. Such inhibition of macrophage growth and ENT1 activity by IFN-gamma is required for DNA synthesis. Interestingly, IFN-gamma led to an induction of the CNT1- and CNT2-related nucleoside transport activities independent of STAT1, thus ensuring the supply of extracellular nucleosides for the STAT1-independent RNA synthesis. IFN-gamma up-regulated CNT2 mRNA and CNT1 protein levels and down-regulated ENT1 mRNA in both wild-type and STAT1 knockout macrophages. This is consistent with a STAT1-independent, long-term-mediated, probably transcription-dependent, regulation of nucleoside transporter genes. Moreover, STAT1-dependent post-transcriptional mechanisms are implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity. Although nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of ENT1 activity in B-cells at a post-transcriptional level, our results show that STAT1-dependent induction of nitric oxide by IFN-gamma is not implicated in the regulation of ENT1 activity in macrophages. Our results indicate that both STAT1-dependent and -independent pathways are involved in the regulation of nucleoside transporters by IFN-gamma in macrophages. PMID:12868960

  4. The Structural Basis for the Metal Selective Activation of the Manganese Transport Regulator of Bacillus subtilis†,§

    PubMed Central

    Kliegman, Joseph I.; Griner, Sarah L.; Helmann, John D.; Brennan, Richard G.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The manganese transport regulator (MntR) of Bacillus subtilis is activated by Mn2+ to repress transcription of genes encoding transporters involved in the uptake of manganese. MntR is also strongly activated by cadmium, both in vivo and in vitro, but it is poorly activated by other metal cations, including calcium and zinc. The previously published MntR•Mn2+ structure revealed a binuclear complex of manganese ions with a metal-metal separation of 3.3 Å (herein designated the AB conformer). Analysis of four additional crystal forms of MntR•Mn2+ reveals that the AB conformer is only observed in monoclinic crystals at 100 K, suggesting that this conformation may be stabilized by crystal packing forces. In contrast, monoclinic crystals analyzed at room temperature (at either pH 6.5 or 8.5), and a second hexagonal crystal form (analyzed at 100 K), all reveal the shift of one manganese ion by 2.5 Å thereby leading to a newly identified conformation (the AC conformer) with an internuclear distance of 4.4 Å. Significantly, the cadmium and calcium complexes of MntR also contain binuclear complexes with a 4.4 Å internuclear separation. In contrast, the zinc complex of MntR contains only one metal ion per subunit, in the A site. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms the stoichiometry of Mn2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ binding to MntR. We propose that the specificity of MntR activation is tied to productive binding of metal ions at two sites; the A site appears to act as a selectivity filter, determining whether the B or C site will be occupied and thereby fully activate MntR. PMID:16533030

  5. SGK1 regulation of epithelial sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Pearce, David

    2003-01-01

    Epithelial ion transport is regulated in vertebrates by a variety of hormonal and non-hormonal factors, including mineralocorticoids, insulin, and osmotic shock. SGK1 has been established as an important convergence point for multiple regulators of Na+transport. Unlike most serine-threonine kinases, SGK1 is under dual control: protein levels are controlled through effects on its gene transcription, while its activity is dependent on phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activity. Aldosterone is the most notable regulator of SGK1 protein level in ion transporting epithelia, while insulin and other activators of the of PI3K are key regulators of its activity. Activated SGK1 regulates a variety of ion transporters, the best characterized of which is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). The apical targeting of ENaC is controlled by the ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4-2, and SGK1 acts, at least in part, through phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Nedd4-2. This effect of SGK1 requires physical associations of Nedd4-2 with both SGK1 and ENaC. Moreover, direct physical association between SGK1 and ENaC may also be implicated in the formation of a tertiary complex. Osmotic shock is likely the most important non-hormonal regulator of SGK1 expression, and surprisingly, SGK1 expression can be induced by hypotonic or hypertonic stress in a cell-type dependent fashion. The SGK family represents an ancient arm of the serine-threonine kinase family, present in all eukaryotes that have been examined, including yeast. SGK1 appears to have been implicated in membrane trafficking and possibly in the control of ion transport and cell volume in early single cell eukaryotes. In metazoan epithelia, it seems likely that SGK1 was adapted to the regulation of ion transport in response to hormonal and osmotic signals. PMID:12649598

  6. Regulation of auxin transport during gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashotte, A.; Brady, S.; Kirpalani, N.; Buer, C.; Muday, G.

    Plants respond to changes in the gravity vector by differential growth across the gravity-stimulated organ. The plant hormone auxin, which is normally basipetally transported, changes in direction and auxin redistribution has been suggested to drive this differential growth or gravitropism. The mechanisms by which auxin transport directionality changes in response to a change in gravity vector are largely unknown. Using the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, we have been exploring several regulatory mechanisms that may control auxin transport. Mutations that alter protein phosphorylation suggest that auxin transport in arabidopsis roots may be controlled via phosphorylation and this signal may facilitate gravitropic bending. The protein kinase mutant pinoid (pid9) has reduced auxin transport; whereas the protein phosphatase mutant, rcn1, has elevated transport, suggesting reciprocal regulation of auxin transport by reversible protein phosphorylation. In both of these mutants, the auxin transport defects are accompanied by gravitropic defects, linking phosphorylation signaling to gravity-induced changes in auxin transport. Additionally, auxin transport may be regulated during gravity response by changes in an endogenous auxin efflux inhibitor. Flavonoids, such as quercetin and kaempferol, have been implicated in regulation of auxin transport in vivo and in vitro. Mutants that make no flavonoids have reduced root gravitropic bending. Furthermore, changes in auxin-induced gene expression and flavonoid accumulation patterns have been observed during gravity stimulation. Current studies are examining whether there are spatial and temporal changes in flavonoid accumulation that precede gravitropic bending and whether the absence of these changes are the cause of the altered gravity response in plants with mutations that block flavonoid synthesis. These results support the idea that auxin transport may be regulated during gravity response by several mechanisms including

  7. Safflower extracts functionally regulate monoamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Zheng, Xiang-Wei; Gai, Yue; Chu, Wen-Jing; Qin, Guo-Wei; Guo, Li-He

    2009-07-01

    Safflower (HH), the dry flower of Carthamus tinctorius L., has long been used to empirically treat neuropsychological disorders such as stroke and major depression in traditional Chinese medicine, and recently been proven effective for regulating levels of dopamine and serotonin in new-born rat brain. The present study assessed whether HH would be bioactive for functionally regulating monoamine transporters using in vitro drug-screening cell lines. Our current results showed that all solvent-extracted HH fractions, in different degrees, markedly increased both dopamine uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing dopamine transporter (DAT) and norepinephrine uptake by CHO cells expressing norepinephrine transporter (NET), and also showed that chloroform (HC), ethyl acetate (HE), and n-butyl alcohol extract strikingly depressed serotonin uptake by CHO cells expressing serotonin transporter (SERT); wherein, the potencies of ethanol extract, HC, HE, and aqueous extract to up-regulate dopamine/norepinephrine uptake and potency of HE to inhibit serotonin uptake were relatively stronger. Further investigation revealed that the enhancement of dopamine/norepinephrine uptake by HC and HE was dependent of DAT/NET activity, and the HE-induced inhibition of serotonin uptake was typical of competition. Thus, HH extracts are novel monoamine transporter modulators functioning as DAT/NET activators and/or SERT inhibitors, and would likely improve neuropsychological disorders through regulating monoamine-transporter activity. PMID:19527825

  8. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Amélie; Herrmann, Harald; Davidson, Michael W.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form a dense and dynamic network that is functionally associated with microtubules and actin filaments. We used the GFP-tagged vimentin mutant Y117L to study vimentin-cytoskeletal interactions and transport of vimentin filament precursors. This mutant preserves vimentin interaction with other components of the cytoskeleton, but its assembly is blocked at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. ULFs are easy to track, and they allow a reliable and quantifiable analysis of movement. Our results show that in cultured human vimentin-negative SW13 cells, 2% of vimentin-ULFs move along microtubules bidirectionally, while the majority are stationary and tightly associated with actin filaments. Rapid motor-dependent transport of ULFs along microtubules is enhanced ≥5-fold by depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin B. The microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin ULFs is further regulated by Rho-kinase (ROCK) and p21-activated kinase (PAK): ROCK inhibits ULF transport, while PAK stimulates it. Both kinases act on microtubule transport independently of their effects on actin cytoskeleton. Our study demonstrates the importance of the actin cytoskeleton to restrict IF transport and reveals a new role for PAK and ROCK in the regulation of IF precursor transport.—Robert, A., Herrmann, H., Davidson, M. W., and Gelfand, V. I. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases. PMID:24652946

  9. Carnitine transporter OCTN2 and carnitine uptake in bovine kidney cells is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a central regulator of fatty acid catabolism, has recently been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of the gene encoding the carnitine transporter novel organic cation transporter 2 (OCTN2) in cattle. Whether PPARβ/δ, another PPAR subtype, which has partially overlapping functions as PPARα and is known to share a large set of common target genes with PPARα, also regulates OCTN2 and carnitine transport in cattle is currently unknown. To close this gap of knowledge, we studied the effect of the PPARβ/δ activator GW0742 on mRNA and protein levels of OCTN2 and carnitine uptake in the presence and absence of the PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK3787 in the bovine Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cell line. Findings Treatment of MDBK cells with GW0742 caused a strong increase in the mRNA level of the known bovine PPARβ/δ target gene CPT1A in MDBK cells indicating activation of PPARβ/δ. The mRNA and protein level of OCTN2 was clearly elevated in MDBK cells treated with GW0742, but the stimulatory effect of GW0742 on mRNA and protein level of OCTN2 was completely blocked by GSK3787. In addition, GW0742 increased Na+-dependent carnitine uptake, which is mediated by OCTN2, into MDBK cells, whereas treatment of cells with the PPARβ/δ antagonist completely abolished the stimulatory effect of GW0742 on carnitine uptake. Conclusions The present study shows for the first time that gene expression of the carnitine transporter OCTN2 and carnitine transport are regulated by PPARβ/δ in bovine cells. These novel findings extend the knowledge about the molecular regulation of the OCTN2 gene and carnitine transport in cattle and indicate that regulation of OCTN2 gene expression and carnitine transport is not restricted to the PPARα subtype. PMID:24716857

  10. Further evidence for a two-step model of glucose-transport regulation. Inositol phosphate-oligosaccharides regulate glucose-carrier activity.

    PubMed Central

    Obermaier-Kusser, B; Mühlbacher, C; Mushack, J; Seffer, E; Ermel, B; Machicao, F; Schmidt, F; Häring, H U

    1989-01-01

    The insulin effect on glucose uptake is not sufficiently explained by a simple glucose-carrier translocation model. Recent studies rather suggest a two-step model of carrier translocation and carrier activation. We used several pharmacological tools to characterize the proposed model further. We found that inositol phosphate (IP)-oligosaccharides isolated from the drug Actovegin, as well as the alkaloid vinblastine, show a partial insulin-like effect on glucose-transport activity of fat-cells (3-O-methylglucose uptake, expressed as % of equilibrium value per 4 s: basal 5.8%, insulin 59%, IP-oligosaccharides 30%, vinblastine 29%) without inducing carrier translocation. On the other hand, two newly developed anti-diabetic compounds (alpha-activated carbonic acids, BM 130795 and BM 13907) induced carrier translocation to the same extent as insulin and phorbol esters [cytochalasin-B-binding sites in plasma membranes: basal 5 pmol/mg of protein, insulin 13 pmol/mg of protein, TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) 11.8 pmol/mg of protein, BM 130795 10.8 pmol/mg of protein], but produce also only 40-50% of the insulin effect on glucose-transport activity (basal 5.8%, insulin 59%, TPA 23%, BM 130795 35%). Almost the full insulin effect was mimicked by a combination of phorbol esters and IP-oligosaccharides (basal 7%, insulin 50%, IP-oligosaccharides 30%, TPA 23%, IP-oligosaccharides + TPA 45%). None of these substances stimulated insulin-receptor kinase in vitro or in vivo, suggesting a post-kinase site of action. The data confirm the following aspects of the proposed model: (1) carrier translocation and carrier activation are two independently regulated processes; (2) the full insulin effect is mimicked only by a simultaneous stimulation of carrier translocation and intrinsic carrier activity, suggesting that insulin acts through a synergism of both mechanisms; (3) IP-oligosaccharides might be involved in the transmission of a stimulatory signal on carrier activity

  11. Cytoskeletal Network Morphology Regulates Intracellular Transport Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ando, David; Korabel, Nickolay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-10-20

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable timescales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that redirect cargo back to the nucleus caused large variations in network transport. Filament polarity was more important than filament orientation in reducing average transit times, and transport properties were optimized in networks with intermediate motor on and off rates. Our results provide important insights into the functional constraints on intracellular transport under which cells have evolved cytoskeletal structures, and have potential applications for enhancing reactions in biomimetic systems through rational transport network design. PMID:26488648

  12. Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Interleukin-1β Expression and Glial Glutamate Transporter Function in Rodents with Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Maixner, Dylan W.; Yan, Xisheng; Gao, Mei; Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation and dysfunctional glial glutamate transporters (GTs) in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) are implicated in the genesis of neuropathic pain. We determined if adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the SDH regulates these processes in rodents with neuropathic pain. Methods Hind paw withdrawal responses to radiant heat and mechanical stimuli were used to assess nociceptive behaviors. Spinal markers related to neuroinflammation and glial GTs were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were manipulated pharmacologically and genetically. Regulation of glial GTs was determined by measuring protein expression and activities of glial GTs. Results AMPK activities were reduced in the SDH of rats (n = 5) with thermal hyperalgesia induced by nerve injury, which were accompanied with the activation of astrocytes, increased production of interleukin-1beta and activities of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, and suppressed protein expression of glial glutamate transporter-1. Thermal hyperalgesia was reversed by spinal activation of AMPK in neuropathic rats (n = 10), and induced by inhibiting spinal AMPK in naïve rats (n = 7 to 8). Spinal AMPKα knockdown (n = 6) and AMPKα1 conditional knockout (n = 6) induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. These genetic alterations mimicked the changes of molecular markers induced by nerve injury. Pharmacological activation of AMPK enhanced glial GT activity in mice with neuropathic pain (n = 8) and attenuated glial glutamate transporter-1 internalization induced by interleukin-1β (n = 4). Conclusion These findings suggest enhancing spinal AMPK activities could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25710409

  13. A phosphotyrosine switch regulates organic cation transporters

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, Jason A.; Ong, Su Sien; Gibson, Alice A.; Hu, Shuiying; Du, Guoqing; Lin, Wenwei; Li, Lie; Bharill, Shashank; Ness, Rachel A.; Stecula, Adrian; Offer, Steven M.; Diasio, Robert B.; Nies, Anne T.; Schwab, Matthias; Cavaletti, Guido; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Sali, Andrej; Chen, Taosheng; Baker, Sharyn D.; Sparreboom, Alex; Pabla, Navjotsingh

    2016-01-01

    Membrane transporters are key determinants of therapeutic outcomes. They regulate systemic and cellular drug levels influencing efficacy as well as toxicities. Here we report a unique phosphorylation-dependent interaction between drug transporters and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which has uncovered widespread phosphotyrosine-mediated regulation of drug transporters. We initially found that organic cation transporters (OCTs), uptake carriers of metformin and oxaliplatin, were inhibited by several clinically used TKIs. Mechanistic studies showed that these TKIs inhibit the Src family kinase Yes1, which was found to be essential for OCT2 tyrosine phosphorylation and function. Yes1 inhibition in vivo diminished OCT2 activity, significantly mitigating oxaliplatin-induced acute sensory neuropathy. Along with OCT2, other SLC-family drug transporters are potentially part of an extensive ‘transporter-phosphoproteome' with unique susceptibility to TKIs. On the basis of these findings we propose that TKIs, an important and rapidly expanding class of therapeutics, can functionally modulate pharmacologically important proteins by inhibiting protein kinases essential for their post-translational regulation. PMID:26979622

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)–dependent and –independent pathways regulate hypoxic inhibition of transepithelial Na+ transport across human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, CD; Smolenski, RT; Harhun, MI; Patel, HK; Ahmed, SG; Wanisch, K; Yáñez-Muñoz, RJ; Baines, DL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pulmonary transepithelial Na+ transport is reduced by hypoxia, but in the airway the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the role of AMPK and ROS in the hypoxic regulation of apical amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and basolateral Na+K+ ATPase activity. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH H441 human airway epithelial cells were used to examine the effects of hypoxia on Na+ transport, AMP : ATP ratio and AMPK activity. Lentiviral constructs were used to modify cellular AMPK abundance and activity; pharmacological agents were used to modify cellular ROS. KEY RESULTS AMPK was activated by exposure to 3% or 0.2% O2 for 60 min in cells grown in submerged culture or when fluid (0.1 mL·cm−2) was added to the apical surface of cells grown at the air–liquid interface. Only 0.2% O2 activated AMPK in cells grown at the air–liquid interface. AMPK activation was associated with elevation of cellular AMP : ATP ratio and activity of the upstream kinase LKB1. Hypoxia inhibited basolateral ouabain-sensitive Isc (Iouabain) and apical amiloride-sensitive Na+ conductance (GNa+). Modification of AMPK activity prevented the effect of hypoxia on Iouabain (Na+K+ ATPase) but not apical GNa+. Scavenging of superoxide and inhibition of NADPH oxidase prevented the effect of hypoxia on apical GNa+ (epithelial Na+ channels). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Hypoxia activates AMPK-dependent and -independent pathways in airway epithelial cells. Importantly, these pathways differentially regulate apical Na+ channels and basolateral Na+K+ ATPase activity to decrease transepithelial Na+ transport. Luminal fluid potentiated the effect of hypoxia and activated AMPK, which could have important consequences in lung disease conditions. PMID:22509822

  15. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  16. Demonstration of phosphoryl group transfer indicates that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibits adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J

    2012-10-19

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl(-) channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP <==> 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the (32)P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  17. Demonstration of Phosphoryl Group Transfer Indicates That the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Exhibits Adenylate Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a membrane-spanning adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. ABC transporters and other nuclear and cytoplasmic ABC proteins have ATPase activity that is coupled to their biological function. Recent studies with CFTR and two nonmembrane-bound ABC proteins, the DNA repair enzyme Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, challenge the model that the function of all ABC proteins depends solely on their associated ATPase activity. Patch clamp studies indicated that in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), CFTR Cl− channel function is coupled to adenylate kinase activity (ATP+AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Work with Rad50 and SMC showed that these enzymes catalyze both ATPase and adenylate kinase reactions. However, despite the supportive electrophysiological results with CFTR, there are no biochemical data demonstrating intrinsic adenylate kinase activity of a membrane-bound ABC transporter. We developed a biochemical assay for adenylate kinase activity, in which the radioactive γ-phosphate of a nucleotide triphosphate could transfer to a photoactivatable AMP analog. UV irradiation could then trap the 32P on the adenylate kinase. With this assay, we discovered phosphoryl group transfer that labeled CFTR, thereby demonstrating its adenylate kinase activity. Our results also suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for adenylate kinase activity. These biochemical data complement earlier biophysical studies of CFTR and indicate that the ABC transporter CFTR can function as an adenylate kinase. PMID:22948143

  18. Ion transport proteins anchor and regulate the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Denker, Sheryl P; Barber, Diane L

    2002-04-01

    Structurally diverse ion transport proteins anchor the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane by binding directly to linker proteins of the ankyrin and protein 4.1 families. Cytoskeletal anchoring regulates cell shape and restricts the activity of ion transport proteins to specialised membrane domains. New directions are being forged by recent findings that localised anchoring by ion transport proteins regulates the ordered assembly of actin filaments and the actin-dependent processes of cell adhesion and motility. PMID:11891121

  19. Regulation of Mitochondrial Transport in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei-Yao; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are cellular power plants that supply ATP to power various biological activities essential for neuronal growth, survival, and function. Due to unique morphological features, neurons face exceptional challenges to maintain ATP and Ca2+ homeostasis. Neurons require specialized mechanisms distributing mitochondria to distal areas where energy and Ca2+ buffering are in high demand, such as synapses and axonal branches. These distal compartments also undergo development- and activity-dependent remodeling, thereby altering mitochondrial trafficking and distribution. Mitochondria move bi-directionally, pause briefly, and move again, frequently changing direction. In mature neurons, only one-third of axonal mitochondria are motile. Stationary mitochondria serve as local energy sources and buffer intracellular Ca2+. The balance between motile and stationary mitochondria responds quickly to changes in axonal and synaptic physiology. Furthermore, neurons are postmitotic cells surviving for the lifetime of the organism; thus, mitochondria need to be removed when they become aged or dysfunction. Mitochondria also alter their motility under stress conditions or when their integrity is impaired. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial transport is essential to meet altered metabolic requirements and to remove aged and damaged mitochondria or replenish healthy ones to distal terminals. Defects in mitochondrial transport and altered distribution are implicated in the pathogenesis of several major neurological disorders. Thus, research into the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial motility is an important emerging frontier in neurobiology. This short review provides an updated overview on motor-adaptor machineries that drive and regulate mitochondrial transport and docking receptors that anchor axonal mitochondria in response to the changes in synaptic activity, metabolic requirement, and altered mitochondrial integrity. The review focuses on microtubule (MT

  20. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    PubMed

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  1. Proton-assisted amino acid transporters are conserved regulators of proliferation and amino acid-dependent mTORC1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Heublein, S; Kazi, S; Ögmundsdóttir, M H; Attwood, E V; Kala, S; Boyd, C A R; Wilson, C; Goberdhan, D C I

    2011-01-01

    The PI3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and downstream mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling cascades promote normal growth and are frequently hyperactivated in tumour cells. mTORC1 is also regulated by local nutrients, particularly amino acids, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Unexpectedly, members of the proton-assisted amino acid transporter (PAT or SLC36) family emerged from in vivo genetic screens in Drosophila as transporters with uniquely potent effects on mTORC1-mediated growth. Here we show the two human PATs that are widely expressed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines, PAT1 and PAT4, behave similarly to fly PATs when expressed in Drosophila. siRNA knockdown reveals that these molecules are required for activation of mTORC1 targets and for proliferation in human MCF-7 breast cancer and HEK-293 embryonic kidney cell lines. Furthermore, activation of mTORC1 in starved HEK-293 cells stimulated by amino acids requires PAT1 and PAT4, and is elevated in PAT1-overexpressing cells. Importantly, in HEK-293 cells, PAT1 is highly concentrated in intracellular compartments, including endosomes, where mTOR shuttles upon amino acid stimulation. Our data are therefore consistent with a model in which PATs modulate mTORC1's activity not by transporting amino acids into the cell, but by modulating the intracellular response to amino acids. PMID:20498635

  2. Up-regulation of hypertonicity-activated myo-inositol transporter SMIT1 by the cell volume-sensitive protein kinase SGK1.

    PubMed

    Klaus, F; Palmada, M; Lindner, R; Laufer, J; Jeyaraj, S; Lang, F; Boehmer, C

    2008-03-15

    Mechanisms of regulatory cell volume increase following cell shrinkage include accumulation of organic osmolytes such as betaine, taurine, sorbitol, glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) and myo-inositol. Myo-inositol is taken up by the sodium-myo-inositol-transporter SMIT1 (SLC5A3) expressed in a wide variety of cell types. Hypertonicity induces the transcription of the SMIT1 gene upon binding of the transcription factor tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) to tonicity responsive enhancers (TonE) in the SMIT1 promoter region. However, little is known about post-translational regulation of the carrier protein. In this study we show that SMIT1 is modulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, a protein genomically up-regulated by hypertonicity. As demonstrated by two-electrode voltage-clamp in the Xenopus oocyte expression system, SMIT1-mediated myo-inositol-induced currents are up-regulated by coexpression of wild type SGK1 and constitutively active (S422D)SGK1 but not by inactive (K127N)SGK1. The increase in SMIT1 activity is due to an elevated cell surface expression of the carrier while its kinetic properties remain unaffected. According to the decay of SMIT1 activity in the presence of brefeldin A, SGK1 stabilizes the SMIT1 protein in the plasma membrane. The SGK isoforms SGK2, SGK3 and the closely related protein kinase B (PKB) are similarly capable of activating SMIT1 activity. SMIT1-mediated currents are decreased by coexpression of the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, an effect counteracted by additional coexpression of SGK1. In conclusion, the present observations disclose SGK isoforms and protein kinase B as novel regulators of SMIT1 activity. PMID:18202099

  3. Cholesterol-lowering activity of sesamin is associated with down-regulation on genes of sterol transporters involved in cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yin Tong; Chen, Jingnan; Jiao, Rui; Peng, Cheng; Zuo, Yuanyuan; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaobo; Ma, Ka Ying; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-03-25

    Sesame seed is rich in sesamin. The present study was to (i) investigate the plasma cholesterol-lowering activity of dietary sesamin and (ii) examine the interaction of dietary sesamin with the gene expression of sterol transporters, enzymes, receptors, and proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism. Thirty hamsters were divided into three groups fed the control diet (CON) or one of two experimental diets containing 0.2% (SL) and 0.5% (SH) sesamin, respectively, for 6 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels in hamsters given the CON, SL, and SH diets were 6.62 ± 0.40, 5.32 ± 0.40, and 5.00 ± 0.44 mmol/L, respectively, indicating dietary sesamin could reduce plasma TC in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the excretion of total fecal neutral sterols was dose-dependently increased with the amounts of sesamin in diets (CON, 2.65 ± 0.57; SL, 4.30 ± 0.65; and SH, 5.84 ± 1.27 μmol/day). Addition of sesamin into diets was associated with down-regulation of mRNA of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 protein (NPC1L1), acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), microsomal triacylglycerol transport protein (MTP), and ATP-binding cassette transporters subfamily G members 5 and 8 (ABCG5 and ABCG8). Results also showed that dietary sesamin could up-regulate hepatic cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), whereas it down-regulated hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and liver X receptor alpha (LXRα). It was concluded that the cholesterol-lowering activity of sesamin was mediated by promoting the fecal excretion of sterols and modulating the genes involved in cholesterol absorption and metabolism. PMID:25745846

  4. Nedd4-2 but not Nedd4-1 is critical for protein kinase C-regulated ubiquitination, expression, and transport activity of human organic anion transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Wang, Haoxun; Zhang, Qiang; You, Guofeng

    2016-05-01

    Human organic anion transporter 1 (hOAT1) expressed at the membrane of the kidney proximal tubule cells mediates the body disposition of a diverse array of clinically important drugs, including anti-HIV therapeutics, antitumor drugs, antibiotics, antihypertensives, and antiinflammatories. Therefore, understanding the regulation of hOAT1 will provide significant insights into kidney function and dysfunction. We previously established that hOAT1 transport activity is inhibited by activation of protein kinase C (PKC) through accelerating hOAT1 internalization from cell surface into intracellular endosomes and subsequent degradation. We further established that PKC-induced hOAT1 ubiquitination is an important step preceding hOAT1 internalization. In the current study, we identified two closely related E3 ubiquitin ligases, neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4-1 and 4-2 (Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2), as important regulators for hOAT1: overexpression of Nedd4-1 or Nedd4-2 enhanced hOAT1 ubiquitination, reduced the hOAT1 amount at the cell surface, and suppressed hOAT1 transport activity. In further exploring the relationship among PKC, Nedd4-1, and Nedd4-2, we discovered that PKC-dependent changes in hOAT1 ubiquitination, expression, and transport activity were significantly blocked in cells transfected with the ligase-dead mutant of Nedd4-2 (Nedd4-2/C821A) or with Nedd4-2-specific siRNA to knockdown endogenous Nedd4-2 but not in cells transfected with the ligase-dead mutant of Nedd4-1 (Nedd4-1/C867S) or with Nedd4-1-specific siRNA to knockdown endogenous Nedd4-1. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration that both Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2 are important regulators for hOAT1 ubiquitination, expression, and function. Yet they play distinct roles, as Nedd4-2 but not Nedd4-1 is a critical mediator for PKC-regulated hOAT1 ubiquitination, expression, and transport activity. PMID:26823285

  5. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. PMID:25982429

  6. A Drosophila ABC transporter regulates lifespan.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Lu-Bo, Ying; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-12-01

    MRP4 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 4) is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that are essential for many cellular processes requiring the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Although MRP4 has been implicated as a detoxification protein by transport of structurally diverse endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including antivirus and anticancer drugs, that usually induce oxidative stress in cells, its in vivo biological function remains unknown. In this study, we investigate the biological functions of a Drosophila homolog of human MRP4, dMRP4. We show that dMRP4 expression is elevated in response to oxidative stress (paraquat, hydrogen peroxide and hyperoxia) in Drosophila. Flies lacking dMRP4 have a shortened lifespan under both oxidative and normal conditions. Overexpression of dMRP4, on the other hand, is sufficient to increase oxidative stress resistance and extend lifespan. By genetic manipulations, we demonstrate that dMRP4 is required for JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase) activation during paraquat challenge and for basal transcription of some JNK target genes under normal condition. We show that impaired JNK signaling is an important cause for major defects associated with dMRP4 mutations, suggesting that dMRP4 regulates lifespan by modulating the expression of a set of genes related to both oxidative resistance and aging, at least in part, through JNK signaling. PMID:25474322

  7. Human B lymphoblastoid cells contain distinct patterns of cathepsin activity in endocytic compartments and regulate MHC class II transport in a cathepsin S-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lautwein, Alfred; Kraus, Marianne; Reich, Michael; Burster, Timo; Brandenburg, J; Overkleeft, Herman S; Schwarz, Gerold; Kammer, Winfried; Weber, Ekkehard; Kalbacher, Hubert; Nordheim, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    Endocytic proteolysis represents a major functional component of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-presentation machinery. Although transport and assembly of class II molecules in the endocytic compartment are well characterized, we lack information about the pattern of endocytic protease activity along this pathway. Here, we used chemical tools that visualize endocytic proteases in an activity-dependent manner in combination with subcellular fractionation to dissect the subcellular distribution of the major cathepsins (Cat) CatS, CatB, CatH, CatD, CatC, and CatZ as well as the asparagine-specific endoprotease (AEP) in human B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLC). Endocytic proteases were distributed in two distinct patterns: CatB and CatZ were most prominent in early and late endosomes but absent from lysosomes, and CatH, CatS, CatD, CatC, and AEP distributed between late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting that CatB and CatZ might be involved in the initial proteolytic attack on a given antigen. The entire spectrum of protease activity colocalized with human leukocyte antigen-DM and the C-terminal and N-terminal processing of invariant chain (Ii) in late endosomes. CatS was active in all endocytic compartments. Surprisingly and in contrast with results from dendritic cells, inhibition of CatS activity by leucine-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-phenol prevented N-terminal processing of Ii but did not alter the subcellular trafficking or surface delivery of class II complexes, as deferred from pulse-chase analysis in combination with subcellular fractionation and biotinylation of cell-surface protein. Thus, BLC contain distinct activity patterns of proteases in endocytic compartments and regulate the intracellular transport and surface-delivery of class II in a CatS-independent manner. PMID:14966190

  8. MacB ABC transporter is a dimer whose ATPase activity and macrolide-binding capacity are regulated by the membrane fusion protein MacA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Barrera, Nelson P; Frankish, Helen M; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Robinson, Carol V; Borges-Walmsley, M Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  9. MacB ABC Transporter Is a Dimer Whose ATPase Activity and Macrolide-binding Capacity Are Regulated by the Membrane Fusion Protein MacA*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong Ting; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Frankish, Helen M.; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Robinson, Carol V.; Borges-Walmsley, M. Inês; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize specialized machinery to translocate drugs and protein toxins across the inner and outer membranes, consisting of a tripartite complex composed of an inner membrane secondary or primary active transporter (IMP), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane channel. We have investigated the assembly and function of the MacAB/TolC system that confers resistance to macrolides in Escherichia coli. The membrane fusion protein MacA not only stabilizes the tripartite assembly by interacting with both the inner membrane protein MacB and the outer membrane protein TolC, but also has a role in regulating the function of MacB, apparently increasing its affinity for both erythromycin and ATP. Analysis of the kinetic behavior of ATP hydrolysis indicated that MacA promotes and stabilizes the ATP-binding form of the MacB transporter. For the first time, we have established unambiguously the dimeric nature of a noncanonic ABC transporter, MacB that has an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain, by means of nondissociating mass spectrometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and atomic force microscopy. Structural studies of ABC transporters indicate that ATP is bound between a pair of nucleotide binding domains to stabilize a conformation in which the substrate-binding site is outward-facing. Consequently, our data suggest that in the presence of ATP the same conformation of MacB is promoted and stabilized by MacA. Thus, MacA would facilitate the delivery of drugs by MacB to TolC by enhancing the binding of drugs to it and inducing a conformation of MacB that is primed and competent for binding TolC. Our structural studies are an important first step in understanding how the tripartite complex is assembled. PMID:18955484

  10. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca2+ in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca2+ channels, K+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, and Na+/H+ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes. PMID:26784222

  11. Dietary and developmental regulation of intestinal sugar transport.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, R P

    2001-01-01

    The Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter SGLT1 and the facilitated fructose transporter GLUT5 absorb sugars from the intestinal lumen across the brush-border membrane into the cells. The activity of these transport systems is known to be regulated primarily by diet and development. The cloning of these transporters has led to a surge of studies on cellular mechanisms regulating intestinal sugar transport. However, the small intestine can be a difficult organ to study, because its cells are continuously differentiating along the villus, and because the function of absorptive cells depends on both their state of maturity and their location along the villus axis. In this review, I describe the typical patterns of regulation of transport activity by dietary carbohydrate, Na(+) and fibre, how these patterns are influenced by circadian rhythms, and how they vary in different species and during development. I then describe the molecular mechanisms underlying these regulatory patterns. The expression of these transporters is tightly linked to the villus architecture; hence, I also review the regulatory processes occurring along the crypt-villus axis. Regulation of glucose transport by diet may involve increased transcription of SGLT1 mainly in crypt cells. As cells migrate to the villus, the mRNA is degraded, and transporter proteins are then inserted into the membrane, leading to increases in glucose transport about a day after an increase in carbohydrate levels. In the SGLT1 model, transport activity in villus cells cannot be modulated by diet. In contrast, GLUT5 regulation by the diet seems to involve de novo synthesis of GLUT5 mRNA synthesis and protein in cells lining the villus, leading to increases in fructose transport a few hours after consumption of diets containing fructose. In the GLUT5 model, transport activity can be reprogrammed in mature enterocytes lining the villus column. Innovative experimental approaches are needed to increase our understanding of sugar

  12. Regulation of Axonal Transport by Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Katherine L; Greensmith, Linda; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular transport of organelles, proteins, lipids, and RNA along the axon is essential for neuronal function and survival. This process, called axonal transport, is mediated by two classes of ATP-dependent motors, kinesins, and cytoplasmic dynein, which carry their cargoes along microtubule tracks. Protein kinases regulate axonal transport through direct phosphorylation of motors, adapter proteins, and cargoes, and indirectly through modification of the microtubule network. The misregulation of axonal transport by protein kinases has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several nervous system disorders. Here, we review the role of protein kinases acting directly on axonal transport and discuss how their deregulation affects neuronal function, paving the way for the exploitation of these enzymes as novel drug targets. PMID:26410600

  13. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  14. Bile Acid-regulated Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-α (PPARα) Activity Underlies Circadian Expression of Intestinal Peptide Absorption Transporter PepT1/Slc15a1*

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:25016014

  15. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-01

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:25016014

  16. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  17. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  18. Xenobiotic, Bile Acid, and Cholesterol Transporters: Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    factors that influence transporter expression and function, including transcriptional activation and post-translational modifications as well as subcellular trafficking. Sex differences, ontogeny, and pharmacological and toxicological regulation of transporters are also addressed. Transporters are important transmembrane proteins that mediate the cellular entry and exit of a wide range of substrates throughout the body and thereby play important roles in human physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and toxicology. PMID:20103563

  19. 77 FR 53873 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV (DTR 4500.9R). These business rules will encompass Transportation Service... CONTACT: Mr. Jim Teague, United States Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508 Scott Drive, Scott Air...

  20. Sediment transport in two mediterranean regulated rivers.

    PubMed

    Lobera, G; Batalla, R J; Vericat, D; López-Tarazón, J A; Tena, A

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean climate is characterized by highly irregular rainfall patterns with marked differences between wet and dry seasons which lead to highly variable hydrological fluvial regimes. As a result, and in order to ensure water availability and reduce its temporal variability, a high number of large dams were built during the 20th century (more than 3500 located in Mediterranean rivers). Dams modify the flow regime but also interrupt the continuity of sediment transfer along the river network, thereby changing its functioning as an ecosystem. Within this context, the present paper aims to assess the suspended sediment loads and dynamics of two climatically contrasting Mediterranean regulated rivers (i.e. the Ésera and Siurana) during a 2-yr period. Key findings indicate that floods were responsible for 92% of the total suspended sediment load in the River Siurana, while this percentage falls to 70% for the Ésera, indicating the importance of baseflows on sediment transport in this river. This fact is related to the high sediment availability, with the Ésera acting as a non-supply-limited catchment due to the high productivity of the sources (i.e. badlands). In contrast, the Siurana can be considered a supply-limited system due to its low geomorphic activity and reduced sediment availability, with suspended sediment concentration remaining low even for high magnitude flood events. Reservoirs in both rivers reduce sediment load up to 90%, although total runoff is only reduced in the case of the River Ésera. A remarkable fact is the change of the hydrological character of the River Ésera downstream for the dam, shifting from a humid mountainous river regime to a quasi-invariable pattern, whereas the Siurana experiences the opposite effect, changing from a flashy Mediterranean river to a more constant flow regime below the dam. PMID:26372613

  1. Energetics of active transport processes.

    PubMed

    Essig, A; Caplan, S R

    1968-12-01

    Discussions of active transport usually assume stoichiometry between the rate of transport J(+) and the metabolic rate J(r). However, the observation of a linear relationship between J(+) and J(r) does not imply a stoichiometric relationship, i.e., complete coupling. Since coupling may possibly be incomplete, we examine systems of an arbitrary degree of coupling q, regarding stoichiometry as a limiting case. We consider a sodium pump, with J(+) and J(r) linear functions of the electrochemical potential difference, -X(+), and the chemical affinity of the metabolic driving reaction, A. The affinity is well defined even for various complex reaction pathways. Incorporation of a series barrier and a parallel leak does not affect the linearity of the composite observable system. The affinity of some region of the metabolic chain may be maintained constant, either by large pools of reactants or by regulation. If so, this affinity can be evaluated by two independent methods. Sodium transport is conveniently characterized by the open-circuit potential (Deltapsi)(I=0) and the natural limits, level flow (J(+))(X+=0), and static head X(0) (+) = (X(+))(J+=0). With high degrees of coupling -X(0) (+)/F approaches the electromotive force E(Na) (Ussing); -X(0) (+)/F cannot be identified with ((RT/F) ln f)(X+=0), where f is the flux ratio. The efficiency eta = -J(+)X(+)/J(r)A is of significance only when appreciable energy is being converted from one form to another. When either J(+) or -X(+) is small eta is low; the significant parameters are then the efficacies epsilon(J+) = J(+)/J(r)A and epsilon(X+) = -X(+)/J(r)A, respectively maximal at level flow and static head. Leak increases both J(+) and epsilon(J+) for isotonic saline reabsorption, but diminishes -X(0) (+) and epsilon(Xfemale symbol). Electrical resistance reflects both passive parameters and metabolism. Various fundamental relations are preserved despite coupling of passive ion and water flows. PMID:5713453

  2. The SLC6 transporters: perspectives on structure, functions, regulation, and models for transporter dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, Gary; Krämer, Reinhard; Blakely, Randy D.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    The human SLC6 family is composed of approximately 20 structurally related symporters (co-transporters) that use the transmembrane electrochemical gradient to actively import their substrates into cells. Approximately half of the substrates of these transporters are amino acids, with others transporting biogenic amines and/or closely related compounds, such as nutrients and compatible osmolytes. In this short review, five leaders in the field discuss a number of currently important research themes that involve SLC6 transporters, highlighting the integrative role they play across a wide spectrum of different functions. The first essay, by Gary Rudnick, describes the molecular mechanism of their coupled transport which is being progressively better understood based on new crystal structures, functional studies, and modeling. Next, the question of multiple levels of transporter regulation is discussed by Reinhard Krämer, in the context of osmoregulation and stress response by the related bacterial betaine transporter BetP. The role of selected members of the human SLC6 family that function as nutrient amino acid transporters is then reviewed by François Verrey. He discusses how some of these transporters mediate the active uptake of (essential) amino acids into epithelial cells of the gut and the kidney tubule to support systemic amino acid requirements, whereas others are expressed in specific cells to support their specialized metabolism and/or growth. The most extensively studied members of the human SLC6 family are neurotransmitter reuptake transporters, many of which are important drug targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Randy Blakely discusses the role of posttranscriptional modifications of these proteins in regulating transporter subcellular localization and activity state. Finally, Dennis Murphy reviews how natural gene variants and mouse genetic models display consistent behavioral alterations that relate to altered extracellular

  3. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  4. Kinase-dependent Regulation of Monoamine Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of neurotransmission by the monoamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for normal nervous system function. Precise temporal and spatial control of this signaling in mediated in large part by the actions of monoamine transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT, respectively). These transporters act to recapture their respective neurotransmitters after release, and disruption of clearance and reuptake has significant effects on physiology and behavior and has been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To ensure adequate and dynamic control of these transporters, multiple modes of control have evolved to regulate their activity and trafficking. Central to many of these modes of control are the actions of protein kinases, whose actions can be direct or indirectly mediated by kinase-modulated protein interactions. Here, we summarize the current state of our understanding of how protein kinases regulate monoamine transporters through changes in activity, trafficking, phosphorylation state, and interacting partners. We highlight genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence for kinase-linked control of DAT, NET, and SERT and, where applicable, provide evidence for endogenous activators of these pathways. We hope our discussion can lead to a more nuanced and integrated understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters are controlled and may contribute to disorders that feature perturbed monoamine signaling, with an ultimate goal of developing better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27591044

  5. 75 FR 16445 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... for the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) in the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV.... Jim Teague, United States Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508 Scott Drive, Scott Air Force Base,...

  6. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases

    PubMed Central

    Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-01-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport, allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, polar auxin transport is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell-to-cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the ‘non-genomic’ regulation of auxin transport, putting an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some Receptor-Like Kinases (RLK) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in polar auxin transport, noticing that there are likely RLKs involved in coordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  7. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  8. Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Photoinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Thomas; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja Krieger

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms and isolated photosystems are of interest for technical applications. In nature, photosynthetic electron transport has to work efficiently in contrasting environments such as shade and full sunlight at noon. Photosynthetic electron transport is regulated on many levels, starting with the energy transfer processes in antenna and ending with how reducing power is ultimately partitioned. This review starts by explaining how light energy can be dissipated or distributed by the various mechanisms of non-photochemical quenching, including thermal dissipation and state transitions, and how these processes influence photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII). Furthermore, we will highlight the importance of the various alternative electron transport pathways, including the use of oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor and cyclic flow around photosystem I (PSI), the latter which seem particularly relevant to preventing photoinhibition of photosystem I. The control of excitation pressure in combination with the partitioning of reducing power influences the light-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in PSII and in PSI, which may be a very important consideration to any artificial photosynthetic system or technical device using photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24678670

  9. Regulation of inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasome biology is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas in immunology. Over the past 10 years, inflammasomes have been recognized for their roles in the host defense against invading pathogens and in the development of cancer, auto-inflammatory, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Assembly of an inflammasome complex requires cytosolic sensing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or danger-associated molecular patterns by a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat receptor (NLR) or absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-like receptors (ALR). NLRs and ALRs engage caspase-1, in most cases requiring the adapter protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), to catalyze proteolytic cleavage of pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 and drive pyroptosis. Recent studies indicate that caspase-8, caspase-11, IL-1R-associated kinases (IRAK), and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases contribute to inflammasome functions. In addition, post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, deubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation control almost every aspect of inflammasome activities. Genetic studies indicate that mutations in NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2 are linked with the development of auto-inflammatory diseases, enterocolitis, and cancer. Overall, these findings transform our understanding of the basic biology and clinical relevance of inflammasomes. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest development of inflammasome research and discuss how inflammasome activities govern health and disease. PMID:25879280

  10. Regulation of inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Man, Si Ming; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome biology is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas in immunology. Over the past 10 years, inflammasomes have been recognized for their roles in the host defense against invading pathogens and in the development of cancer, autoinflammatory, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Assembly of an inflammasome complex requires cytosolic sensing of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or danger-associated molecular patterns by a nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat receptor (NLR) or absent in melanoma 2-like receptor (ALR). NLRs and ALRs engage caspase-1, in most cases requiring the adapter protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), to catalyze proteolytic cleavage of pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 and drive pyroptosis. Recent studies indicate that caspase-8, caspase-11, IL-1R–associated kinases (IRAK), and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases contribute to inflammasome functions. In addition, post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, deubiquitination, phosphorylation, and degradation, control almost every aspect of inflammasome activities. Genetic studies indicate that mutations in NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4, and AIM2 are linked to the development of autoinflammatory diseases, enterocolitis, and cancer. Overall, these findings transform our understanding of the basic biology and clinical relevance of inflammasomes. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest development of inflammasome research and discuss how inflammasome activities govern health and disease. PMID:25879280

  11. Endocrine regulation of ion transport in the avian lower intestine.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Gary; Elbrønd, Vibeke S; Arnason, Sighvatur S; Skadhauge, Erik

    2006-05-15

    The lower intestine (colon and coprodeum) of the domestic fowl maintains a very active, transporting epithelium, with a microvillus brush border, columnar epithelial cells, and a variety of transport systems. The colon of normal or high salt-acclimated hens expresses sodium-linked glucose and amino acid cotransporters, while the coprodeum is relatively inactive. Following acclimation to low salt diets, however, both colon and coprodeum shift to a pattern of high expression of electrogenic sodium channels, and the colonic cotransporter activity is simultaneously downregulated. These changes in the transport patterns seem to be regulated, at least in part, by aldosterone. Our recent work with this tissue has focused on whether aldosterone alone can account for the low salt pattern of transport. Other work has looked at the changes in morphology and in proportions of cell types that occur during chronic acclimation to high or low salt diets, and on a cAMP-activated chloride secretion pathway. Recent findings suggesting effects of other hormones on lower intestinal transport are also presented. PMID:16494879

  12. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  13. 78 FR 18325 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), DoD. ACTION: Announcement. SUMMARY: On September 4, 2012 (77 FR 53873-53874), the Department of Defense published a notice titled Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV. DoD has...

  14. LEAFY and Polar Auxin Transport Coordinately Regulate Arabidopsis Flower Development

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Wu, Miin-Feng; Winter, Cara M.; Wagner, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The plant specific transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) plays a pivotal role in the developmental switch to floral meristem identity in Arabidopsis. Our recent study revealed that LFY additionally acts downstream of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR5/MONOPTEROS to promote flower primordium initiation. LFY also promotes initiation of the floral organ and floral organ identity. To further investigate the interplay between LFY and auxin during flower development, we examined the phenotypic consequence of disrupting polar auxin transport in lfy mutants by genetic means. Plants with compromised LFY activity exhibit increased sensitivity to disruption of polar auxin transport. Compromised polar auxin transport activity in the lfy mutant background resulted in formation of fewer floral organs, abnormal gynoecium development, and fused sepals. In agreement with these observations, expression of the auxin response reporter DR5rev::GFP as well as of the direct LFY target CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 were altered in lfy mutant flowers. We also uncovered reduced expression of ETTIN, a regulator of gynoecium development and a direct LFY target. Our results suggest that LFY and polar auxin transport coordinately modulate flower development by regulating genes required for elaboration of the floral organs. PMID:27135503

  15. Regulation and roles of bicarbonate transporters in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gorbatenko, Andrej; Olesen, Christina W.; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Pedersen, Stine F.

    2014-01-01

    A unifying feature of solid tumors is a markedly altered pH profile compared to normal tissues. This reflects that solid tumors, despite completely different origins, often share several phenotypic properties with implications for intra- and extracellular pH. These include: a metabolic shift in most cancer cells toward more acid-producing pathways, reflecting both oncogenic signaling and the development of hypoxia in poorly perfused regions of the tumors; the poorly perfused and often highly dense tumor microenvironment, reducing the diffusive flux of acid equivalents compared to that in normal tissues; and the markedly altered regulation of the expression and activity of pH-regulatory transport proteins in cancer cells. While some of these properties of tumors have been well described in recent years, the great majority of the research in this clinically important area has focused on proton transport, in particular via the Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (SLC9A1, NHE1) and various H+ ATPases. We have, however, recently demonstrated that at least under some conditions, including in vitro models of HER2 positive breast cancer, and measurements obtained directly in freshly dissected human mammary carcinomas, bicarbonate transporters such as the electroneutral Na+, HCO−3 cotransporter (SLC4A7, NBCn1), are upregulated and play central roles in pH regulation. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge regarding the regulation and roles of bicarbonate transporters in cancer. Furthermore, we present new analyses of publicly available expression data demonstrating widely altered expression levels of SLC4- and SLC26 family transporters in breast-, lung-, and colon cancer patients, and we hypothesize that bicarbonate transporter dysregulation may have both diagnostic and therapeutic potential in cancer treatment. PMID:24795638

  16. Substrate-dependent regulation of ascorbate transport in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na{sup +}-dependent L-ascorbate transporter in the plasma membrane. The present study examined the effects of ascorbate deprivation and supplementation on the activity of the transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-({sup 14}C)ascorbate for 1 minute at 37C. They observed that the maximal uptake rate, V{sub max}, rapidly (<3 hours) increased when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. There was no change in the apparent affinity (K{sub m}) of the transport system for ascorbate. V{sub max} returned to normal following addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The authors conclude that astrocytes adapt ascorbate transport rates to changes in substrate availability. Furthermore, the data suggest that the transport system located in the astroglial plasma membrane regulates intracellular ascorbate concentration, because changes in transport rate may compensate for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in extracellular ascorbate levels.

  17. Molecular regulation of osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors that are primarily responsible for the degradation of mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis and repair. In various skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy, tumor metastases and Paget's disease, bone resorption by osteoclasts exceeds bone formation by osteoblasts leading to decreased bone mass, skeletal fragility and bone fracture. The overall rate of osteoclastic bone resorption is regulated either at the level of differentiation of osteoclasts from their monocytic/macrophage precursor pool or through the regulation of key functional proteins whose specific activities in the mature osteoclast control its attachment, migration and resorption. Thus, reducing osteoclast numbers and/or decreasing the bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts are two common therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hyper-resorptive skeletal diseases. In this review, several of the key functional players involved in the regulation of osteoclast activity will be discussed. PMID:16951988

  18. Regulation of polar auxin transport by protein and lipid kinases.

    PubMed

    Armengot, Laia; Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Jaillais, Yvon

    2016-07-01

    The directional transport of auxin, known as polar auxin transport (PAT), allows asymmetric distribution of this hormone in different cells and tissues. This system creates local auxin maxima, minima, and gradients that are instrumental in both organ initiation and shape determination. As such, PAT is crucial for all aspects of plant development but also for environmental interaction, notably in shaping plant architecture to its environment. Cell to cell auxin transport is mediated by a network of auxin carriers that are regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Here we review our current knowledge on some aspects of the 'non-genomic' regulation of auxin transport, placing an emphasis on how phosphorylation by protein and lipid kinases controls the polarity, intracellular trafficking, stability, and activity of auxin carriers. We describe the role of several AGC kinases, including PINOID, D6PK, and the blue light photoreceptor phot1, in phosphorylating auxin carriers from the PIN and ABCB families. We also highlight the function of some receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and two-component histidine kinase receptors in PAT, noting that there are probably RLKs involved in co-ordinating auxin distribution yet to be discovered. In addition, we describe the emerging role of phospholipid phosphorylation in polarity establishment and intracellular trafficking of PIN proteins. We outline these various phosphorylation mechanisms in the context of primary and lateral root development, leaf cell shape acquisition, as well as root gravitropism and shoot phototropism. PMID:27242371

  19. An active matter analysis of intracellular Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Tens of thousands of fluorescence-based trajectories at nm resolution have been analyzed, regarding active transport along microtubules in living cells. The following picture emerges. Directed motion to pre-determined locations is certainly an attractive idea, but cannot be pre-programmed as to do so would sacrifice adaptability. The polarity of microtubules is inadequate to identify these directions in cells, and no other mechanism is currently known. We conclude that molecular motors carry cargo through disordered intracellular microtubule networks in a statistical way, with loud cellular ``noise'' both in directionality and speed. Programmed random walks describe how local 1D active transport traverses crowded cellular space efficiently, rapidly, minimizing the energy waste that would result from redundant activity. The mechanism of statistical regulation is not yet understood, however.

  20. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  1. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jerry; Tomlinson, Ian; Warnement, Michael; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana; Piston, David; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, we implement a novel, single molecule approach to define the localization and mobility of the brain's major target of widely prescribed antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT labeled with single quantum dot (Qdot) revealed unsuspected features of transporter mobility with cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (often referred to as ``lipid rafts'') and cytoskeleton network linked to transporter activation. We document two pools of surface SERT proteins defined by their lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion in the plasma membrane and a second that displays significantly restricted mobility and localizes to cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Diffusion model prediction and instantaneous velocity analysis indicated that stimuli that act through p38 MAPK-dependent signaling pathways to activate SERT trigger rapid SERT movements within membrane microdomains. Cytoskeleton disruption showed that SERT lateral mobility behaves a membrane raft-constrained, cytoskeleton-associated manner. Our results identify an unsuspected aspect of neurotransmitter transporter regulation that we propose reflects the dissociation of inhibitory, SERT-associated cytoskeletal anchors.

  2. Phosphatase regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Kozicky, Lisa K; Sly, Laura M

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play critical roles in tissue homeostasis and the immune response to invading pathogens or tumor cells. A hallmark of macrophages is their "plasticity," that is, their ability to respond to cues in their local microenvironment and adapt their activation state or phenotype to mount an appropriate response. During the inflammatory response, macrophages may be required to mount a profound anti-bacterial or anti-tumor response, an anti-inflammatory response, an anti-parasitic response, or a wound healing response. To do so, macrophages express cell surface receptors for growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, as well pathogen and danger associated molecular patterns. Downstream of these cell surface receptors, cell signalling cascades are activated and deactivated by reversible and competing activities of lipid and protein kinases and phosphatases. While kinases drive the activation of cell signalling pathways critical for macrophage activation, the strength and duration of the signalling is regulated by phosphatases. Hence, gene knockout mouse models have revealed critical roles for lipid and protein phosphatases in macrophage activation. Herein, we describe our current understanding and the key roles of specific cellular phosphatases in the regulation of the quality of macrophage polarization as well as the quantity of cytokines produced by activated macrophages. PMID:26216598

  3. Regulated traffic of anion transporters in mammalian Brunner's glands: a role for water and fluid transport

    PubMed Central

    Collaco, Anne M.; Jakab, Robert L.; Hoekstra, Nadia E.; Mitchell, Kisha A.; Brooks, Amos

    2013-01-01

    The Brunner's glands of the proximal duodenum exert barrier functions through secretion of glycoproteins and antimicrobial peptides. However, ion transporter localization, function, and regulation in the glands are less clear. Mapping the subcellular distribution of transporters is an important step toward elucidating trafficking mechanisms of fluid transport in the gland. The present study examined 1) changes in the distribution of intestinal anion transporters and the aquaporin 5 (AQP5) water channel in rat Brunner's glands following second messenger activation and 2) anion transporter distribution in Brunner's glands from healthy and disease-affected human tissues. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), AQP5, sodium-potassium-coupled chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1), sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), and the proton pump vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) were localized to distinct membrane domains and in endosomes at steady state. Carbachol and cAMP redistributed CFTR to the apical membrane. cAMP-dependent recruitment of CFTR to the apical membrane was accompanied by recruitment of AQP5 that was reversed by a PKA inhibitor. cAMP also induced apical trafficking of V-ATPase and redistribution of NKCC1 and NBCe1 to the basolateral membranes. The steady-state distribution of AQP5, CFTR, NBCe1, NKCC1, and V-ATPase in human Brunner's glands from healthy controls, cystic fibrosis, and celiac disease resembled that of rat; however, the distribution profiles were markedly attenuated in the disease-affected duodenum. These data support functional transport of chloride, bicarbonate, water, and protons by second messenger-regulated traffic in mammalian Brunner's glands under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:23744739

  4. 75 FR 51392 - Federal Management Regulation; Transportation Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... 1] RIN 3090-AJ03 Federal Management Regulation; Transportation Management AGENCY: Office of... Administration (GSA) is amending the Federal Management Regulation (FMR) by updating its coverage on transportation management. This final rule updates definitions and corrects mailing and Web site addresses....

  5. A Unified View of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gating: Combining the Allosterism of a Ligand-gated Channel with the Enzymatic Activity of an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Kevin L.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique ion channel in that its gating is coupled to an intrinsic enzymatic activity (ATP hydrolysis). This enzymatic activity derives from the evolutionary origin of CFTR as an ATP-binding cassette transporter. CFTR gating is distinct from that of a typical ligand-gated channel because its ligand (ATP) is usually consumed during the gating cycle. However, recent findings indicate that CFTR gating exhibits allosteric properties that are common to conventional ligand-gated channels (e.g. unliganded openings and constitutive mutations). Here, we provide a unified view of CFTR gating that combines the allosterism of a ligand-gated channel with its unique enzymatic activity. PMID:21296873

  6. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  7. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  8. Phosphorylation at S384 regulates the activity of the TaALMT1 malate transporter that underlies aluminum resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we examined the role of protein phosphorylation & dephosphorylation in the transport properties of the wheat root malate efflux transporter underlying Al resistance, TaALMT1. Preincubation of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing TaALMT1 with protein kinase inhibitors (K252a and staurospo...

  9. Novel Mechanism of Impaired Function of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 in Human Hepatocytes: Post-Translational Regulation of OATP1B3 by Protein Kinase C Activation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Farasyn, Taleah; Köck, Kathleen; Meng, Xiaojie; Pahwa, Sonia; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3 is a membrane transport protein that mediates hepatic uptake of many drugs and endogenous compounds. Currently, determination of OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro is focused primarily on direct substrate inhibition. Indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity is under-appreciated. OATP1B3 has putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. Studies were designed to determine the effect of PKC activation on OATP1B3-mediated transport in human hepatocytes using cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), a specific OATP1B3 substrate, as the probe. A PKC activator, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), did not directly inhibit [3H]CCK-8 accumulation in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). However, pretreatment with PMA for as little as 10 minutes rapidly decreased [3H]CCK-8 accumulation. Treatment with a PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) I prior to PMA treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of PMA, indicating PKC activation is essential for downregulating OATP1B3 activity. PMA pretreatment did not affect OATP1B3 mRNA or total protein levels. To determine the mechanism(s) underlying the indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity upon PKC activation, adenoviral vectors expressing FLAG-Myc-tagged OATP1B3 (Ad-OATP1B3) were transduced into human hepatocytes; surface expression and phosphorylation of OATP1B3 were determined by biotinylation and by an anti–phosphor-Ser/Thr/Tyr antibody, respectively. PMA pretreatment markedly increased OATP1B3 phosphorylation without affecting surface or total OATP1B3 protein levels. In conclusion, PKC activation rapidly decreases OATP1B3 transport activity by post-translational regulation of OATP1B3. These studies elucidate a novel indirect inhibitory mechanism affecting hepatic uptake mediated by OATP1B3, and provide new insights into predicting OATP-mediated drug interactions between OATP substrates and kinase modulator drugs/endogenous compounds. PMID:25200870

  10. Physiology, structure, and regulation of the cloned organic anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    SRIMAROENG, C.; PERRY, J. L.; PRITCHARD, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    1. The transport of negatively charged drugs, xenobiotics, and metabolites by epithelial tissues, particularly the kidney, plays critical roles in controlling their distribution, concentration, and retention in the body. Thus, organic anion transporters (OATs) impact both their therapeutic efficacy and potential toxicity. 2. This review summarizes current knowledge of the properties and functional roles of the cloned OATs, the relationships between transporter structure and function, and those factors that determine the efficacy of transport. Such factors include plasma protein binding of substrates, genetic polymorphisms among the transporters, and regulation of transporter expression. 3. Clearly, much progress has been made in the decade since the first OAT was cloned. However, unresolved questions remain. Several of these issues — drug–drug interactions, functional characterization of newly cloned OATs, tissue differences in expression and function, and details of the nature and consequences of transporter regulation at genomic and intracellular sites — are discussed in the concluding Perspectives section. PMID:18668434

  11. Reprint of "Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis".

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-06-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator – the γ-TuRC complex – and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. PMID:26196321

  12. HDAC6 Regulates Mitochondrial Transport in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sigeng; Owens, Geoffrey C.; Makarenkova, Helen; Edelman, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tubulin is a major substrate of the cytoplasmic class II histone deacetylase HDAC6. Inhibition of HDAC6 results in higher levels of acetylated tubulin and enhanced binding of the motor protein kinesin-1 to tubulin, which promotes transport of cargoes along microtubules. Microtubule-dependent intracellular trafficking may therefore be regulated by modulating the activity of HDAC6. We have shown previously that the neuromodulator serotonin increases mitochondrial movement in hippocampal neurons via the Akt-GSK3β signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate a role for HDAC6 in this signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that the presence of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, dramatically enhanced mitochondrial movement in hippocampal neurons, whereas niltubacin, an inactive tubacin analog, had no effect. Compared to control cultures, higher levels of acetylated tubulin were found in neurons treated with tubacin, and more kinesin-1 was associated with mitochondria isolated from these neurons. Inhibition of GSK3β decreased cytoplasmic deacetylase activity and increased tubulin acetylation, whereas blockade of Akt, which phosphorylates and down-regulates GSK3β, increased cytoplasmic deacetylase activity and decreased tubulin acetylation. Concordantly, the administration of 5-HT, 8-OH-DPAT (a specific 5-HT1A receptor agonist), or fluoxetine (a 5-HT reuptake inhibitor) increased tubulin acetylation. GSK3β was found to co-localize with HDAC6 in hippocampal neurons, and inhibition of GSK3β resulted in decreased binding of antibody to phosphoserine-22, a potential GSK3β phosphorylation site in HDAC6. GSK3β may therefore regulate HDAC6 activity by phosphorylation. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that HDAC6 plays an important role in the modulation of mitochondrial transport. The link between HDAC6 and GSK3β, established here, has important implications for our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. In particular

  13. SNAT2 and LAT1 transporter abundance is developmentally regulated in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we demonstrated that the insulin and amino acid–induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), is developmentally regulated in neonatal pigs. Recent studies have indicated an important role of the System A transporters (SNAT2 and SLC1A5) and the L transporter...

  14. Prostaglandin signaling regulates ciliogenesis by modulating intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Daqing; Ni, Terri T.; Sun, Jianjian; Wan, Haiyan; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Yu, Guangju; Fleming, Jonathan; Chiang, Chin; Li, Wenyan; Papierniak, Anna; Cheepala, Satish; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P.C.; Zhou, Bin; Drummond, Iain A.; Schuetz, John D.; Malicki, Jarema; Zhong, Tao P.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that mediate signal transduction in a variety of tissues. Despite their importance, the signaling cascades that regulate cilia formation remain incompletely understood. Here we report that prostaglandin signaling affects ciliogenesis by regulating anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT). Zebrafish leakytail (lkt) mutants display ciliogenesis defects, and lkt locus encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC4). We show that Lkt/ABCC4 localizes to the cell membrane and exports prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a function that is abrogated by the Lkt/ABCC4T804M mutant. PGE2 synthesis enzyme Cyclooxygenase-1 and its receptor, EP4, which localizes to the cilium and activates cAMP-mediated signaling cascade, are required for cilia formation and elongation. Importantly, PGE2 signaling increases anterograde but not retrograde velocity of IFT and promotes ciliogenesis in mammalian cells. These findings lead us to propose that Lkt/ABCC4-mediated PGE2 signaling acts through a ciliary G-protein-coupled receptor, EP4, to upregulate cAMP synthesis and increase anterograde IFT, thereby promoting ciliogenesis. PMID:25173977

  15. Harmonization - Two Years' of Transportation Regulation Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation issued modifications to the Hazardous Materials Regulations in October, 2004 as part of an ongoing effort to 'harmonize' U.S. regulations with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The harmonization effort had several predictable effects on low level radioactive materials shipment that were anticipated even prior to their implementation. However, after two years' experience with the new regulations, transporters have identified several effects on transportation which were not entirely apparent when the regulations were first implemented. This paper presents several case studies in the transportation of low level radioactive materials since the harmonization rules took effect. In each case, an analysis of the challenge posed by the regulatory revision is provided. In some cases, more than one strategy for compliance was considered, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. In several cases, regulatory interpretations were sought and obtained, and these are presented to clarify the legitimacy of the compliance approach. The presentation of interpretations will be accompanied by reports of clarifying discussions with the U.S. DOT about the interpretation and scope of the regulatory change. Specific transportation issues raised by the revised hazardous materials regulations are reviewed, including: The new definition of radioactive material in accordance with isotope-specific concentration and total activity limits. The new hazardous materials regulations (HMR) created a new definition for radioactive material. A case study is presented for soils contaminated with low levels of Th-230. These soils had been being shipped for years as exempt material under the old 2,000 pCi/g concentration limit. Under the new HMR, these same soils were radioactive material. Further, in rail-car quantities their activity exceeded an A2 value, so shipment of the material in gondolas appeared to require an IP-2 package

  16. Complex regulation of nucleoside transporter expression in epithelial and immune system cells.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Anglada, M; Casado, F J; Valdés, R; Mata, J; García-Manteiga, J; Molina, M

    2001-01-01

    Nucleoside transporters have a variety of functions in the cell, such as the provision of substrates for nucleic acid synthesis and the modulation of purine receptors by determining agonist availability. They also transport a wide range of nucleoside-derived antiviral and anticancer drugs. Most mammalian cells co-express several nucleoside transporter isoforms at the plasma membrane, which are differentially regulated. This paper reviews studies on nucleoside transporter regulation, which has been extensively characterized in the laboratory in several model systems: the hepatocyte, an epithelial cell type, and immune system cells, in particular B cells, which are non-polarized and highly specialized. The hepatocyte co-expresses at least two Na+-dependent nucleoside transporters, CNT1 and CNT2, which are up-regulated during cell proliferation but may undergo selective loss in certain experimental models of hepatocarcinomas. This feature is consistent with evidence that CNT expression also depends on the differentiation status of the hepatocyte. Moreover, substrate availability also modulates CNT expression in epithelial cells, as reported for hepatocytes and jejunum epithelia from rats fed nucleotide-deprived diets. In human B cell lines, CNT and ENT transporters are co-expressed but differentially regulated after B cell activation triggered by cytokines or phorbol esters, as described for murine bone marrow macrophages induced either to activate or to proliferate. The complex regulation of the expression and activity of nucleoside transporters hints at their relevance in cell physiology. PMID:11396615

  17. New hazmat transportation regulations for air

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, L.J.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation focuses on the eighth edition of UN recommendations on the transport of hazardous materials. The 1995--1996 edition of the ICAO technical instructions are evaluated. The author discusses the different classes of hazardous materials, focusing on flammability, combustibility, and the properties of self-reactive substances.

  18. 76 FR 22878 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... payment of Nontemporary Storage (NTS) invoices in the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV (DTR... transaction and payment system for all NTS Transportation Service Providers (TSP). Implementation of electronic payments for NTS at all Military Services and Coast Guard installations is the goal of the...

  19. Regulation of ABC Transporter Function Via Phosphorylation by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Stolarczyk, Elzbieta I.; Reiling, Cassandra J.; Paumi, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are multispanning membrane proteins that utilize ATP to move a broad range of substrates across cellular membranes. ABC transporters are involved in a number of human disorders and diseases [1]. Overexpression of a subset of the transporters has been closely linked to multidrug resistance in both bacteria and viruses and in cancer. A poorly understood and important aspect of ABC transporter biology is the role of phosphorylation as a mechanism to regulate transporter function. In this review, we summarize the current literature addressing the role of phosphorylation in regulating ABC transporter function. A comprehensive list of all the phosphorylation sites that have been identified for the human ABC transporters is presented, and we discuss the role of individual kinases in regulating transporter function. We address the potential pitfalls and difficulties associated with identifying phosphorylation sites and the corresponding kinase(s), and we discuss novel techniques that may circumvent these problems. We conclude by providing a brief perspective on studying ABC transporter phosphorylation. PMID:21118091

  20. In or out? Regulating nuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Hood, J K; Silver, P A

    1999-04-01

    The compartmentalization of proteins within the nucleus or cytoplasm of a eukaryotic cell offers opportunity for regulation of cell cycle progression and signalling pathways. Nuclear localization of proteins is determined by their ability to interact with specific nuclear import and export factors. In the past year, substrate phosphorylation has emerged as a common mechanism for controlling this interaction. PMID:10209150

  1. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Vuorenpää, Anne; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jørgensen, Trine N; Gether, Ulrik

    2016-09-01

    The high affinity transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, play a key role in controlling monoaminergic neurotransmission. It is believed that the transporters (DAT, NET and SERT, respectively) are subject to tight regulation by the cellular signaling machinery to maintain monoaminergic homeostasis. Kinases constitute a pivotal role in cellular signaling, however, the regulation of monoamine transporters by the entire ensemble of kinases is unknown. Here, we perform a whole human kinome RNA interference screen to identify novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated in monoamine transporter regulation, such as Protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), were validated with a new set of siRNAs in a secondary screen. In this screen we assessed both changes in uptake and surface expression leading to selection of 11 kinases for further evaluation in HEK 293 cells transiently expressing DAT, SERT or NET. Subsequently, three kinases; salt inducible kinase 3 (SIK3), cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PKA C-α) and protein kinase X-linked (PrKX); were selected for additional exploration in catecholaminergic CATH.a differentiated cells (CAD) and rat chromocytoma (PC12) cells. Whereas SIK3 likely transcriptionally regulated expression of the three transfected transporters, depletion of PKA C-α was shown to decrease SERT function. Depletion of PrKX caused decreased surface expression and function of DAT without changing protein levels, suggesting that PrKX stabilizes the transporter at the cell surface. Summarized, our data provide novel insight into kinome regulation of the monoamine transporters and

  2. Ankyrin-based Cellular Pathways for Cardiac Ion Channel and Transporter Targeting and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Shane R.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The coordinate activities of ion channels and transporters regulate myocyte membrane excitability and normal cardiac function. Dysfunction in cardiac ion channel and transporter function may result in cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. While the past fifteen years have linked defects in ion channel biophysical properties with human disease, more recent findings illustrate that ion channel and transporter localization within cardiomyocytes is equally critical for normal membrane excitability and tissue function. Ankyrins are a family of multifunctional adapter proteins required for the expression, membrane localization, and regulation of select cardiac ion channels and transporters. Notably, loss of ankyrin expression in mice, and ankyrin loss-of-function in humans is now associated with defects in myocyte excitability and cardiac physiology. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of ankyrin polypeptides in cardiac physiology, as well as review other recently identified pathways required for the membrane expression and regulation of key cardiac ion channels and transporters. PMID:20934528

  3. Mechanisms and regulation of renal magnesium transport.

    PubMed

    Houillier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium's most important role is in the release of chemical energy. Although most magnesium is stored outside of the extracellular fluid compartment, the regulated value is blood magnesium concentration. Cellular magnesium and bone magnesium do not play a major role in the defense of blood magnesium concentration; the major role is played by the kidney, where the renal tubule matches the urinary magnesium excretion and the net entry of magnesium into the extracellular fluid. In the kidney, magnesium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Magnesium absorption is mainly paracellular in the proximal tubule and in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, whereas it is transcellular in the distal convoluted tubule. Several hormones and extracellular magnesium itself alter the distal tubular handling of magnesium, but the hormone(s) regulating extracellular magnesium concentration remains unknown. PMID:24512082

  4. Flavonoids act as negative regulators of auxin transport in vivo in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Brown, D E; Rashotte, A M; Murphy, A S; Normanly, J; Tague, B W; Peer, W A; Taiz, L; Muday, G K

    2001-06-01

    Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth and development. A number of synthetic compounds have been shown to block the process of auxin transport by inhibition of the auxin efflux carrier complex. These synthetic auxin transport inhibitors may act by mimicking endogenous molecules. Flavonoids, a class of secondary plant metabolic compounds, have been suggested to be auxin transport inhibitors based on their in vitro activity. The hypothesis that flavonoids regulate auxin transport in vivo was tested in Arabidopsis by comparing wild-type (WT) and transparent testa (tt4) plants with a mutation in the gene encoding the first enzyme in flavonoid biosynthesis, chalcone synthase. In a comparison between tt4 and WT plants, phenotypic differences were observed, including three times as many secondary inflorescence stems, reduced plant height, decreased stem diameter, and increased secondary root development. Growth of WT Arabidopsis plants on naringenin, a biosynthetic precursor to those flavonoids with auxin transport inhibitor activity in vitro, leads to a reduction in root growth and gravitropism, similar to the effects of synthetic auxin transport inhibitors. Analyses of auxin transport in the inflorescence and hypocotyl of independent tt4 alleles indicate that auxin transport is elevated in plants with a tt4 mutation. In hypocotyls of tt4, this elevated transport is reversed when flavonoids are synthesized by growth of plants on the flavonoid precursor, naringenin. These results are consistent with a role for flavonoids as endogenous regulators of auxin transport. PMID:11402184

  5. Flavonoids act as negative regulators of auxin transport in vivo in arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. E.; Rashotte, A. M.; Murphy, A. S.; Normanly, J.; Tague, B. W.; Peer, W. A.; Taiz, L.; Muday, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Polar transport of the plant hormone auxin controls many aspects of plant growth and development. A number of synthetic compounds have been shown to block the process of auxin transport by inhibition of the auxin efflux carrier complex. These synthetic auxin transport inhibitors may act by mimicking endogenous molecules. Flavonoids, a class of secondary plant metabolic compounds, have been suggested to be auxin transport inhibitors based on their in vitro activity. The hypothesis that flavonoids regulate auxin transport in vivo was tested in Arabidopsis by comparing wild-type (WT) and transparent testa (tt4) plants with a mutation in the gene encoding the first enzyme in flavonoid biosynthesis, chalcone synthase. In a comparison between tt4 and WT plants, phenotypic differences were observed, including three times as many secondary inflorescence stems, reduced plant height, decreased stem diameter, and increased secondary root development. Growth of WT Arabidopsis plants on naringenin, a biosynthetic precursor to those flavonoids with auxin transport inhibitor activity in vitro, leads to a reduction in root growth and gravitropism, similar to the effects of synthetic auxin transport inhibitors. Analyses of auxin transport in the inflorescence and hypocotyl of independent tt4 alleles indicate that auxin transport is elevated in plants with a tt4 mutation. In hypocotyls of tt4, this elevated transport is reversed when flavonoids are synthesized by growth of plants on the flavonoid precursor, naringenin. These results are consistent with a role for flavonoids as endogenous regulators of auxin transport.

  6. Macrophages require different nucleoside transport systems for proliferation and activation.

    PubMed

    Soler, C; García-Manteiga, J; Valdés, R; Xaus, J; Comalada, M; Casado, F J; Pastor-Anglada, M; Celada, A; Felipe, A

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms involved in macrophage proliferation and activation, we studied the regulation of the nucleoside transport systems. In murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, the nucleosides required for DNA and RNA synthesis are recruited from the extracellular medium. M-CSF induced macrophage proliferation and DNA and RNA synthesis, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) led to activation, blocked proliferation, and induced only RNA synthesis. Macrophages express at least the concentrative systems N1 and N2 (CNT2 and CNT1 genes, respectively) and the equilibrative systems es and ei (ENT1 and ENT2 genes, respectively). Incubation with M-CSF only up-regulated the equilibrative system es. Inhibition of this transport system blocked M-CSF-dependent proliferation. Treatment with IFN-gamma only induced the concentrative N1 and N2 systems. IFN-gamma also down-regulated the increased expression of the es equilibrative system induced by M-CSF. Thus, macrophage proliferation and activation require selective regulation of nucleoside transporters and may respond to specific requirements for DNA and RNA synthesis. This report also shows that the nucleoside transporters are critical for macrophage proliferation and activation. PMID:11532978

  7. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (I sc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on I sc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport - up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors - is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  8. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  9. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D-mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A

    2007-07-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  10. Regulation of secretory transport by protein kinase D–mediated phosphorylation of the ceramide transfer protein

    PubMed Central

    Fugmann, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; Schöffler, Patrik; Schmid, Simone; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) has been identified as a crucial regulator of secretory transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recruitment and activation of PKD at the TGN is mediated by the lipid diacylglycerol, a pool of which is generated by sphingomyelin synthase from ceramide and phosphatidylcholine. The nonvesicular transfer of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is mediated by the lipid transfer protein CERT (ceramide transport). In this study, we identify CERT as a novel in vivo PKD substrate. Phosphorylation on serine 132 by PKD decreases the affinity of CERT toward its lipid target phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate at Golgi membranes and reduces ceramide transfer activity, identifying PKD as a regulator of lipid homeostasis. We also show that CERT, in turn, is critical for PKD activation and PKD-dependent protein cargo transport to the plasma membrane. Thus, the interdependence of PKD and CERT is key to the maintenance of Golgi membrane integrity and secretory transport. PMID:17591919

  11. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  13. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  14. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  15. The Relevance of JAK2 in the Regulation of Cellular Transport.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, Mentor; Konjufca, Vjollca; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Dërmaku-Sopjani, Miribane

    2016-01-01

    Janus kinase-2 (JAK2) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase signaling molecule that mediates the effects of various hormones and cytokines, including interferon, erythropoietin, leptin, and growth hormone. It also fosters tumor growth and modifies the activity of several nutrient transporters. JAK2 contributes to the regulation of the cell volume, protectS cells during energy depletion, proliferation, and aids the survival of tumor cells. Recently, JAK2 was identified as a powerful regulator of transport processes across the plasma membrane. Either directly or indirectly JAK2 may stimulate or inhibit transporter proteins, including ion channels, carriers and Na(+)/K(+) pumps. As a powerful regulator of transport mechanisms across the cell membrane, JAK2 regulates a wide variety of potassium, calcium, sodium and chloride ion channels, multiple Na+-coupled cellular carriers including EAAT1-4, NaPi-IIa, SGLT1, BoaT1, PepT1-2, CreaT1, SMIT1, and BGT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These cellular transport regulations contribute to various physiological and pathophysiological processes and thus exerting JAK2-sensitive effects. Future investigations will be important to determine whether JAK2 regulates cell-surface expression of other transporters and further elucidate underlying mechanisms governing JAK2 actions. PMID:26639094

  16. Role of the transporter regulator protein (RS1) in the modulation of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs) in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Fernández-Calotti, Paula; Veyhl-Wichmann, Mayke; Diepold, Maximilian; Pinilla-Macua, Itziar; Pérez-Torras, Sandra; Kipp, Helmut; Koepsell, Hermann; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal

    2012-07-01

    SLC28 genes encode three plasma membrane transporter proteins, human concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT)1, CNT2, and CNT3, all of which are implicated in the uptake of natural nucleosides and a variety of nucleoside analogs used in the chemotherapy of cancer and viral and inflammatory diseases. Mechanisms determining their trafficking toward the plasma membrane are not well known, although this might eventually become a target for therapeutic intervention. The transporter regulator RS1, which was initially identified as a short-term, post-transcriptional regulator of the high-affinity, Na(+)-coupled, glucose transporter sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1, was evaluated in this study as a candidate for coordinate regulation of membrane insertion of human CNT-type proteins. With a combination of studies with mammalian cells, Xenopus laevis oocytes, and RS1-null mice, evidence that RS1 down-regulates the localization and activity at the plasma membrane of the three members of this protein family (CNT1, CNT2, and CNT3) is provided, which indicates the biochemical basis for coordinate regulation of nucleoside uptake ability in epithelia and probably in other RS1-expressing cell types. PMID:22492015

  17. Endocrine and Metabolic Regulation of Renal Drug Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Yacovino, Lindsay L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    Renal xenobiotic transporters are important determinants of urinary secretion and reabsorption of chemicals. In addition to glomerular filtration, these processes are key to the overall renal clearance of a diverse array of drugs and toxins. Alterations in kidney transporter levels and function can influence the efficacy and toxicity of chemicals. Studies in experimental animals have revealed distinct patterns of renal transporter expression in response to sex hormones, pregnancy, and growth hormone. Likewise, a number of disease states including diabetes, obesity, and cholestasis alter the expression of kidney transporters. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the major xenobiotic transporters expressed in the kidneys and an understanding of metabolic conditions and hormonal factors that regulate their expression and function. PMID:22933250

  18. Transcriptional and post-translational regulation of mouse cation transport regulator homolog 1.

    PubMed

    Oh-Hashi, Kentaro; Nomura, Yuki; Shimada, Kiyo; Koga, Hisashi; Hirata, Yoko; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi

    2013-08-01

    Recently, cation transport regulator homolog 1 (Chac1) has been identified as a novel pro-apoptotic factor in cells under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Of the three major ER stress sensors, it is suggested that ATF4 participates in the transcriptional regulation of Chac1 gene expression. The precise characterization of the Chac1 promoter, however, has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we detected the induction of Chac1 mRNA expression using DNA array analysis and RT-PCR of thapsigargin (Tg)-inducible genes in Neuro2a cells. Chac1 mRNA expression was also induced immediately following treatment with tunicamycin (Tm) and brefeldin A. Characterization of the mouse Chac1 promoter activity using a luciferase reporter assay revealed that the CREB/ATF element and amino acid response element in the mouse Chac1 promoter are functional and respond to Tm stimulation and ATF4 overexpression. Mutations in either element in the Chac1 promoter did not inhibit the responsiveness of this promoter to Tm and ATF4; however, mutations in both of these elements dramatically decreased the basal activity and response to ER stress stimuli. In addition to the transcriptional regulation, we found that Chac1 protein expression was only detected in the presence of MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, even though mouse Chac1 gene was transiently overexpressed in Neuro2a cells. Taken together, we are the first to demonstrate the transcriptional and post-translational regulation of Chac1 expression in a neuronal cell line. PMID:23615711

  19. Regulation of ABC efflux transporters at blood-brain barrier in health and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; Miller, David S; Pasinelli, Piera; Trotti, Davide

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in providing protection to the central nervous system from exposure to circulating chemicals is maintained by tight junctions between endothelial cells and by a broad range of transporter proteins that regulate exchange between CNS and blood. The most important transporters that restrict the permeability of large number of toxins as well as therapeutic agents are the ABC transporters. Among them, P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 are the utmost studied. These efflux transporters are neuroprotective, limiting the brain entry of neurotoxins; however, they could also restrict the entry of many therapeutics and contribute to CNS pharmacoresistance. Characterization of several regulatory pathways that govern expression and activity of ABC efflux transporters in the endothelium of brain capillaries have led to an emerging consensus that these processes are complex and contain several cellular and molecular elements. Alterations in ABC efflux transporters expression and/or activity occur in several neurological diseases. Here, we review the signaling pathways that regulate expression and transport activity of P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 as well as how their expression/activity changes in neurological diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26187753

  20. 75 FR 70217 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Register April 1, 2010 (75 FR 16445-16446). The interim response and disposition of comments can be viewed on the USTRANSCOM Web site (under misc) at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/misc.cfm . Additional... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States...

  1. 76 FR 66281 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Federal Register Notice (FRN), Docket ID: DOD-2010- OS-0034, published April 1, 2010 (75 FR 16445-16446) and subsequently revised April 5, 2011 (76 FR 18737). We have taken industry recommendations into... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States...

  2. pH-Regulated Nonelectrogenic Anion Transport by Phenylthiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Howe, Ethan N W; Busschaert, Nathalie; Wu, Xin; Berry, Stuart N; Ho, Junming; Light, Mark E; Czech, Dawid D; Klein, Harry A; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Gale, Philip A

    2016-07-01

    Gated ion transport across biological membranes is an intrinsic process regulated by protein channels. Synthetic anion carriers (anionophores) have potential applications in biological research; however, previously reported examples are mostly nonspecific, capable of mediating both electrogenic and electroneutral (nonelectrogenic) transport processes. Here we show the transmembrane Cl(-) transport studies of synthetic phenylthiosemicarbazones mimicking the function of acid-sensing (proton-gated) ion channels. These anionophores have remarkable pH-switchable transport properties with up to 640-fold increase in transport efficacy on going from pH 7.2 to 4.0. This "gated" process is triggered by protonation of the imino nitrogen and concomitant conformational change of the anion-binding thiourea moiety from anti to syn. By using a combination of two cationophore-coupled transport assays, with either monensin or valinomycin, we have elucidated the fundamental transport mechanism of phenylthiosemicarbazones which is shown to be nonelectrogenic, inseparable H(+)/Cl(-) cotransport. This study demonstrates the first examples of pH-switchable nonelectrogenic anion transporters. PMID:27299473

  3. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

  4. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a 'sea' of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  5. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  6. Regulation of hormone-sensitive renal phosphate transport.

    PubMed

    Gattineni, Jyothsna; Friedman, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate is essential for growth and maintenance of the skeleton and for generating high-energy phosphate compounds. Evolutionary adaptation to high dietary phosphorous in humans and other terrestrial vertebrates involves regulated mechanisms assuring the efficient renal elimination of excess phosphate. These mechanisms prominently include PTH, FGF23, and Vitamin D, which directly and indirectly regulate phosphate transport. Disordered phosphate homeostasis is associated with pathologies ranging from kidney stones to kidney failure. Chronic kidney disease results in hyperphosphatemia, an elevated calcium×phosphate product with considerable morbidity and mortality, mostly associated with adverse cardiovascular events. This chapter highlights recent findings and insights regarding the hormonal regulation of renal phosphate transport along with imbalances of phosphate balance due to acquired or inherited diseases states. PMID:25817872

  7. Protein kinase C-dependent regulation of human hepatic drug transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Mayati, Abdullah; Le Vee, Marc; Moreau, Amélie; Jouan, Elodie; Bucher, Simon; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-12-15

    Hepatic drug transporters are now recognized as major actors of hepatobiliary elimination of drugs. Characterization of their regulatory pathways is therefore an important issue. In this context, the present study was designed to analyze the potential regulation of human hepatic transporter expression by protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Treatment by the reference PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for 48h was shown to decrease mRNA expression of various sinusoidal transporters, including OATP1B1, OATP2B1, NTCP, OCT1 and MRP3, but to increase that of OATP1B3, whereas mRNA expression of canalicular transporters was transiently enhanced (MDR1), decreased (BSEP and MRP2) or unchanged (BCRP) in human hepatoma HepaRG cells. The profile of hepatic transporter mRNA expression changes in PMA-treated HepaRG cells was correlated to that found in PMA-exposed primary human hepatocytes and was similarly observed in response to the PKC-activating marketed drug ingenol mebutate. It was associated with concomitant repression of OATP1B1 and OATP2B1 protein expression and reduction of OATP, OCT1, NTCP and MRP2 activity. The use of chemical PKC inhibitors further suggested a contribution of novel PKCs isoforms to PMA-mediated regulations of transporter mRNA expression. PMA was finally shown to cause epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HepaRG cells and exposure to various additional EMT inducers, i.e., hepatocyte growth factor, tumor growth factor-β1 or the HNF4α inhibitor BI6015, led to transporter expression alterations highly correlated to those triggered by PMA. Taken together, these data highlight PKC-dependent regulation of human hepatic drug transporter expression, which may be closely linked to EMT triggered by PKC activation. PMID:26462574

  8. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Debra F.; Cheung, Cecilia Y.

    2014-01-01

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport. PMID:25186112

  9. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume: mathematical model based on intramembranous transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Anderson, Debra F; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2014-11-15

    Experimentation in late-gestation fetal sheep has suggested that regulation of amniotic fluid (AF) volume occurs primarily by modulating the rate of intramembranous transport of water and solutes across the amnion into underlying fetal blood vessels. In order to gain insight into intramembranous transport mechanisms, we developed a computer model that allows simulation of experimentally measured changes in AF volume and composition over time. The model included fetal urine excretion and lung liquid secretion as inflows into the amniotic compartment plus fetal swallowing and intramembranous absorption as outflows. By using experimental flows and solute concentrations for urine, lung liquid, and swallowed fluid in combination with the passive and active transport mechanisms of the intramembranous pathway, we simulated AF responses to basal conditions, intra-amniotic fluid infusions, fetal intravascular infusions, urine replacement, and tracheoesophageal occlusion. The experimental data are consistent with four intramembranous transport mechanisms acting in concert: 1) an active unidirectional bulk transport of AF with all dissolved solutes out of AF into fetal blood presumably by vesicles; 2) passive bidirectional diffusion of solutes, such as sodium and chloride, between fetal blood and AF; 3) passive bidirectional water movement between AF and fetal blood; and 4) unidirectional transport of lactate into the AF. Further, only unidirectional bulk transport is dynamically regulated. The simulations also identified areas for future study: 1) identifying intramembranous stimulators and inhibitors, 2) determining the semipermeability characteristics of the intramembranous pathway, and 3) characterizing the vesicles that are the primary mediators of intramembranous transport. PMID:25186112

  10. Regulation of ABC transporters blood-brain barrier: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Miller, David S

    2015-01-01

    The brain capillary endothelial cells that constitute the blood-brain barrier express multiple ABC transport proteins on the luminal, blood-facing, plasma membrane. These transporters function as ATP-driven efflux pumps for xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites. High expression of these ABC transporters at the barrier is a major obstacle to the delivery of therapeutics, including chemotherapeutics, to the CNS. Here, I review the signals that alter ABC transporter expression and transport function with an emphasis on P-glycoprotein, Mrp2, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), the efflux transporters for which we have the most detailed picture of regulation. Recent work shows that transporter protein expression can be upregulated in response to inflammatory and oxidative stress, therapeutic drugs, diet, and persistent environmental pollutants; as a consequence, drug delivery to the brain is reduced (potentially bad and ugly). In contrast, basal transport activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP can be reduced through complex signaling pathways that involve events in and on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Targeting these signaling events provides opportunities to rapidly and reversibly increase brain accumulation of drugs that are substrates for the transporters (potentially good). The clinical usefulness of targeting signaling to reduce efflux transporter activity and improve drug delivery to the CNS remains to be established. PMID:25640266

  11. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Joshua L; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D F; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M; Wright, Ernest M; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state. PMID:27325773

  12. Spatiotemporal Regulation of Nuclear Transport Machinery and Microtubule Organization

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Naoyuki; Sato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Spindle microtubules capture and segregate chromosomes and, therefore, their assembly is an essential event in mitosis. To carry out their mission, many key players for microtubule formation need to be strictly orchestrated. Particularly, proteins that assemble the spindle need to be translocated at appropriate sites during mitosis. A small GTPase (hydrolase enzyme of guanosine triphosphate), Ran, controls this translocation. Ran plays many roles in many cellular events: nucleocytoplasmic shuttling through the nuclear envelope, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and reorganization of the nuclear envelope at the mitotic exit. Although these events are seemingly distinct, recent studies demonstrate that the mechanisms underlying these phenomena are substantially the same as explained by molecular interplay of the master regulator Ran, the transport factor importin, and its cargo proteins. Our review focuses on how the transport machinery regulates mitotic progression of cells. We summarize translocation mechanisms governed by Ran and its regulatory proteins, and particularly focus on Ran-GTP targets in fission yeast that promote spindle formation. We also discuss the coordination of the spatial and temporal regulation of proteins from the viewpoint of transport machinery. We propose that the transport machinery is an essential key that couples the spatial and temporal events in cells. PMID:26308057

  13. Regulation of amino acid transport in Escherichia coli by transcription termination factor rho.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Oxender, D L

    1977-01-01

    Amino acid transport rates and amino acid binding proteins were examined in a strain containing the rho-120 mutation (formerly SuA), which has been shown to lower the rho-dependent, ribonucleic acid-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity to 9% of the rho activity in the isogenic wild-type strain. Tryptophan and proline transport, which occur by membrane-bound systems, were not altered. On the other hand, arginine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine transport were variably increased by a factor of 1.4 to 5.0. Kinetics of leucine transport showed that the LIV (leucine, isoleucine, and valine)-I (binding protein-associated) transport system is increased 8.5-fold, whereas the LIV-II (membrane-bound) system is increased 1.5-fold in the rho mutant under leucine-limited growth conditions. The leucine binding protein is increased fourfold under the same growth conditions. The difference in leucine transport in these strains was greatest during leucine-limited growth; growth on complex media repressed both strains to the same transport activity. We propose that rho-dependent transcriptional termination is important for leucine-specific repression of branched-chain amino acid transport, although rho-independent regulation, presumably by a corepressor-aporepressor-type mechanism, must also occur. PMID:324970

  14. Compendium of federal and state radioactive materials transportation laws and regulations: Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB) is an on-line information service containing detailed information on legislation and regulations regarding the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The system is dedicated to serving the legislative and regulatory information needs of the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies; state, tribal, and local governments; the hazardous materials transportation industry; and interested members of the general public. In addition to the on-line information service, quarterly and annual Legal Developments Reports are produced using information from the TLDB. These reports summarize important changes in federal and state legislation, regulations, administrative agency rulings, and judicial decisions over the reporting period. Information on significant legal developments at the tribal and local levels is also included on an as-available basis. Battelle's Office of Transportation Systems and Planning (OTSP) will also perform customized searches of the TLDB and produce formatted printouts in response to specific information requests.

  15. Late endosomal membranes rich in lysobisphosphatidic acid regulate cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Beuchat, M H; Lindsay, M; Frias, S; Palmiter, R D; Sakuraba, H; Parton, R G; Gruenberg, J

    1999-06-01

    The fate of free cholesterol released after endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins remains obscure. Here we report that late endosomes have a pivotal role in intracellular cholesterol transport. We find that in the genetic disease Niemann-Pick type C (NPC), and in drug-treated cells that mimic NPC, cholesterol accumulates in late endosomes and sorting of the lysosomal enzyme receptor is impaired. Our results show that the characteristic network of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membranes contained within multivesicular late endosomes regulates cholesterol transport, presumably by acting as a collection and distribution device. The results also suggest that similar endosomal defects accompany the anti-phospholipid syndrome and NPC. PMID:10559883

  16. Regulation of drug transporter expression by oncostatin M in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2011-08-01

    The cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) is a member of the interleukin (IL)-6 family, known to down-regulate expression of drug metabolizing cytochromes P-450 in human hepatocytes. The present study was designed to determine whether OSM may also impair expression of sinusoidal and canalicular drug transporters, which constitute important determinants of drug hepatic clearance. Exposure of primary human hepatocytes to OSM down-regulated mRNA levels of major sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) influx transporters, including sodium-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, OATP2B1, organic cation transporter 1 and organic anion transporter 2. OSM also repressed mRNA expressions of ATP binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2/ABCC2 and breast cancer resistance protein/ABCG2, without however impairing those of multidrug resistance gene 1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1, MRP3/ABCC3, MRP4/ABCC4 and bile salt export pump/ABCB11. The cytokine concomitantly reduced NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1 and ABCG2 protein expression and NTCP and OATP transport activities. OSM effects towards transporters were found to be dose-dependent and highly correlated with those of IL-6, but not with those of other inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α or interferon-γ. In addition, OSM-mediated repression of some transporters such as NTCP, OATP1B1 and OATP2B1, was counteracted by knocking-down expression of the type II OSM receptor subunits through siRNA transfection. This OSM-mediated down-regulation of drug SLC transporters and ABCG2 in human hepatocytes may contribute to alterations of pharmacokinetics in patients suffering from diseases associated with increased production of OSM. PMID:21570956

  17. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  18. Active water transport in unicellular algae: where, why, and how.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Doblin, Martina A

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of active water transport (net transport against a free energy gradient) in photosynthetic organisms has been debated for several decades. Here, active water transport is considered in terms of its roles, where it is found, and the mechanisms by which it could occur. First there is a brief consideration of the possibility of active water transport into plant xylem in the generation of root pressure and the refilling of embolized xylem elements, and from an unsaturated atmosphere into terrestrial organisms living in habitats with limited availability of liquid water. There is then a more detailed consideration of volume and osmotic regulation in wall-less freshwater unicells, and the possibility of generation of buoyancy in marine phytoplankton such as large-celled diatoms. Calculations show that active water transport is a plausible mechanism to assist cells in upwards vertical movements, requires less energy than synthesis of low-density organic solutes, and potentially on a par with excluding certain ions from the vacuole. PMID:25205578

  19. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16-64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen) produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76-163) annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29-104), Barcelona 37 (24-56), Paris 37 (18-64) and Basel 5 (3-9). An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris) resulted in 19 (3-42) deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3-21) in Prague, 6 (4-9) in Basel, 3 (2-6) in Copenhagen and 3 (2-4) in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  20. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J.; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S.; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16–64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen) produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76–163) annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29–104), Barcelona 37 (24–56), Paris 37 (18–64) and Basel 5 (3–9). An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris) resulted in 19 (3–42) deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3–21) in Prague, 6 (4–9) in Basel, 3 (2–6) in Copenhagen and 3 (2–4) in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  1. Intracellular Cl- as a signaling ion that potently regulates Na+/HCO3- transporters.

    PubMed

    Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Son, Aran; Hong, Jeong Hee; Yamazaki, Osamu; Ohana, Ehud; Kurtz, Ira; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2015-01-20

    Cl(-) is a major anion in mammalian cells involved in transport processes that determines the intracellular activity of many ions and plasma membrane potential. Surprisingly, a role of intracellular Cl(-) (Cl(-) in) as a signaling ion has not been previously evaluated. Here we report that Cl(-) in functions as a regulator of cellular Na(+) and HCO3 (-) concentrations and transepithelial transport through modulating the activity of several electrogenic Na(+)-HCO3 (-) transporters. We describe the molecular mechanism(s) of this regulation by physiological Cl(-) in concentrations highlighting the role of GXXXP motifs in Cl(-) sensing. Regulation of the ubiquitous Na(+)-HCO3(-) co-transport (NBC)e1-B is mediated by two GXXXP-containing sites; regulation of NBCe2-C is dependent on a single GXXXP motif; and regulation of NBCe1-A depends on a cryptic GXXXP motif. In the basal state NBCe1-B is inhibited by high Cl(-) in interacting at a low affinity GXXXP-containing site. IP3 receptor binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) activation of NBCe1-B unmasks a second high affinity Cl(-) in interacting GXXXP-dependent site. By contrast, NBCe2-C, which does not interact with IRBIT, has a single high affinity N-terminal GXXP-containing Cl(-) in interacting site. NBCe1-A is unaffected by Cl(-) in between 5 and 140 mM. However, deletion of NBCe1-A residues 29-41 unmasks a cryptic GXXXP-containing site homologous with the NBCe1-B low affinity site that is involved in inhibition of NBCe1-A by Cl(-) in. These findings reveal a cellular Cl(-) in sensing mechanism that plays an important role in the regulation of Na(+) and HCO3 (-) transport, with critical implications for the role of Cl(-) in cellular ion homeostasis and epithelial fluid and electrolyte secretion. PMID:25561556

  2. Regulation of renal amino acid transporters during metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moret, Caroline; Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Jiang, Jean X; Verrey, Francois; Wagner, Carsten A

    2007-02-01

    The kidney plays a major role in acid-base homeostasis by adapting the excretion of acid equivalents to dietary intake and metabolism. Urinary acid excretion is mediated by the secretion of protons and titratable acids, particularly ammonia. NH(3) is synthesized in proximal tubule cells from glutamine taken up via specific amino acid transporters. We tested whether kidney amino acid transporters are regulated in mice in which metabolic acidosis was induced with NH(4)Cl. Blood gas and urine analysis confirmed metabolic acidosis. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to quantify the mRNAs of 16 amino acid transporters. The mRNA of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was quantified as positive control for the regulation and that of GAPDH, as internal standard. In acidosis, the mRNA of kidney system N amino acid transporter SNAT3 (SLC38A3/SN1) showed a strong induction similar to that of PEPCK, whereas all other tested mRNAs encoding glutamine or glutamate transporters were unchanged or reduced in abundance. At the protein level, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increased abundance of SNAT3 and reduced expression of the basolateral cationic amino acid/neutral amino acid exchanger subunit y(+)-LAT1 (SLC7A7). SNAT3 was localized to the basolateral membrane of the late proximal tubule S3 segment in control animals, whereas its expression was extended to the earlier S2 segment of the proximal tubule during acidosis. Our results suggest that the selective regulation of SNAT3 and y(+)LAT1 expression may serve a major role in the renal adaptation to acid secretion and thus for systemic acid-base balance. PMID:17003226

  3. Collecting Duct Principal Cell Transport Processes and Their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Rama; Trimpert, Christiane; Kashlan, Ossama B.; Deen, Peter M.T.; Kohan, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    The principal cell of the kidney collecting duct is one of the most highly regulated epithelial cell types in vertebrates. The effects of hormonal, autocrine, and paracrine factors to regulate principal cell transport processes are central to the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the face of wide variations in food and water intake. In marked contrast with the epithelial cells lining the proximal tubule, the collecting duct is electrically tight, and ion and osmotic gradients can be very high. The central role of principal cells in salt and water transport is reflected by their defining transporters—the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), the renal outer medullary K+ channel, and the aquaporin 2 (AQP2) water channel. The coordinated regulation of ENaC by aldosterone, and AQP2 by arginine vasopressin (AVP) in principal cells is essential for the control of plasma Na+ and K+ concentrations, extracellular fluid volume, and BP. In addition to these essential hormones, additional neuronal, physical, and chemical factors influence Na+, K+, and water homeostasis. Notably, a variety of secreted paracrine and autocrine agents such as bradykinin, ATP, endothelin, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 counterbalance and limit the natriferic effects of aldosterone and the water-retaining effects of AVP. Considerable recent progress has improved our understanding of the transporters, receptors, second messengers, and signaling events that mediate principal cell responses to changing environments in health and disease. This review primarily addresses the structure and function of the key transporters and the complex interplay of regulatory factors that modulate principal cell ion and water transport. PMID:24875192

  4. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial ion transport in the mammalian intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, C L; McKay, D M

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is critical in controlling epithelial ion transport and hence water movements for gut hydration. Here we review the mechanism of cholinergic control of epithelial ion transport across the mammalian intestine. The cholinergic nervous system affects basal ion flux and can evoke increased active ion transport events. Most studies rely on measuring increases in short-circuit current (ISC = active ion transport) evoked by adding ACh or cholinomimetics to intestinal tissue mounted in Ussing chambers. Despite subtle species and gut regional differences, most data indicate that, under normal circumstances, the effect of ACh on intestinal ion transport is mainly an increase in Cl- secretion due to interaction with epithelial M3 muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) and, to a lesser extent, neuronal M1 mAChRs; however, AChR pharmacology has been plagued by a lack of good receptor subtype-selective compounds. Mice lacking M3 mAChRs display intact cholinergically-mediated intestinal ion transport, suggesting a possible compensatory mechanism. Inflamed tissues often display perturbations in the enteric cholinergic system and reduced intestinal ion transport responses to cholinomimetics. The mechanism(s) underlying this hyporesponsiveness are not fully defined. Inflammation-evoked loss of mAChR-mediated control of epithelial ion transport in the mouse reveals a role for neuronal nicotinic AChRs, representing a hitherto unappreciated braking system to limit ACh-evoked Cl- secretion. We suggest that: i) pharmacological analyses should be supported by the use of more selective compounds and supplemented with molecular biology techniques targeting specific ACh receptors and signalling molecules, and ii) assessment of ion transport in normal tissue must be complemented with investigations of tissues from patients or animals with intestinal disease to reveal control mechanisms that may go undetected by focusing on healthy tissue only. PMID:16981004

  5. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX ); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. )

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  6. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  7. Modeling Regulation of Zinc Uptake via ZIP Transporters in Yeast and Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Juliane; Chavarría-Krauser, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and plant roots (Arabidopsis thaliana) zinc enters the cells via influx transporters of the ZIP family. Since zinc is both essential for cell function and toxic at high concentrations, tight regulation is essential for cell viability. We provide new insight into the underlying mechanisms, starting from a general model based on ordinary differential equations and adapting it to the specific cases of yeast and plant root cells. In yeast, zinc is transported by the transporters ZRT1 and ZRT2, which are both regulated by the zinc-responsive transcription factor ZAP1. Using biological data, parameters were estimated and analyzed, confirming the different affinities of ZRT1 and ZRT2 reported in the literature. Furthermore, our model suggests that the positive feedback in ZAP1 production has a stabilizing function at high influx rates. In plant roots, various ZIP transporters play a role in zinc uptake. Their regulation is largely unknown, but bZIP transcription factors are thought to be involved. We set up three putative models based on: an activator only, an activator with dimerization and an activator-inhibitor pair. These were fitted to measurements and analyzed. Simulations show that the activator-inhibitor model outperforms the other two in providing robust and stable homeostasis at reasonable parameter ranges. PMID:22715365

  8. A Thermodynamic Description of Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjelstrup, S.; Rubi, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.

    We present a solution to problems that were raised in the 1960s: How can the vectorial ion flux couple to the scalar energy of the reaction of ATP to ADP and P, to give active transport of the ion; i.e. transport against its chemical potential? And, is it possible, on thermodynamic grounds to obtain non-linear flux force relations for this transport? Using non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) on the stochastic (mesoscopic) level, we explain how the second law of thermodynamics gives a basis for the description of active transport of Ca2+ by the Ca-ATPase. Coupling takes place at the surface, because the symmetry of the fluxes changes here. The theory gives the energy dissipated as heat during transport and reaction. Experiments are defined to determine coupling coefficients. We propose that the coefficients for coupling between chemical reaction, ion flux and heat flux are named thermogenesis coefficients. They are all probably significant. We discuss that the complete set of coefficients can explain slippage in molecular pumps as well as thermogenesis that is triggered by a temperature jump.

  9. Increased synthesis of folate transporters regulates folate transport in conditions of ethanol exposure and folate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Shilpa; More, Deepti; Rahat, Beenish; Khanduja, Krishan Lal; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption and dietary folate inadequacy are the main contributors leading to folate deficiency (FD). The present study was planned to study regulation of folate transport in conditions of FD and ethanol exposure in human embryonic kidney cell line. Also, the reversible nature of effects mediated by ethanol exposure and FD was determined by folate repletion and ethanol removal. For ethanol treatment, HEK293 cells were grown in medium containing 100 mM ethanol, and after treatment, one group of cells was shifted on medium that was free from ethanol. For FD treatment, cells were grown in folate-deficient medium followed by shifting of one group of cells on folate containing medium. FD as well as ethanol exposure resulted in an increase in folate uptake which was due to an increase in expression of folate transporters, i.e., reduced folate carrier, proton-coupled folate transporter, and folate receptor, both at the mRNA and protein level. The effects mediated by ethanol exposure and FD were reversible on removal of treatment. Promoter region methylation of folate transporters remained unaffected after FD and ethanol exposure. As far as transcription rate of folate transporters is concerned, an increase in rate of synthesis was observed in both ethanol exposure and FD conditions. Additionally, mRNA life of folate transporters was observed to be reduced by FD. An increased expression of folate transporters under ethanol exposure and FD conditions can be attributed to enhanced rate of synthesis of folate transporters. PMID:26433955

  10. Mechanisms of proximal tubule sodium transport regulation that link extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A

    2010-04-01

    One-hundred years ago, Starling articulated the interdependence of renal control of circulating blood volume and effective cardiac performance. During the past 25 years, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interdependence of blood pressure (BP), extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) have begun to be revealed. These variables all converge on regulation of renal proximal tubule (PT) sodium transport. The PT reabsorbs two-thirds of the filtered Na(+) and volume at baseline. This fraction is decreased when BP or perfusion pressure is increased, during a high-salt diet (elevated ECFV), and during inhibition of the production of ANG II; conversely, this fraction is increased by ANG II, SNS activation, and a low-salt diet. These variables all regulate the distribution of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and the Na(+)-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi2), along the apical microvilli of the PT. Natriuretic stimuli provoke the dynamic redistribution of these transporters along with associated regulators, molecular motors, and cytoskeleton-associated proteins to the base of the microvilli. The lipid raft-associated NHE3 remains at the base, and the nonraft-associated NaPi2 is endocytosed, culminating in decreased Na(+) transport and increased PT flow rate. Antinatriuretic stimuli return the same transporters and regulators to the body of the microvilli associated with an increase in transport activity and decrease in PT flow rate. In summary, ECFV and BP homeostasis are, at least in part, maintained by continuous and acute redistribution of transporter complexes up and down the PT microvilli, which affect regulation of PT sodium reabsorption in response to fluctuations in ECFV, BP, SNS, and RAS. PMID:20106993

  11. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 in the regulation of renal and extrarenal potassium transport.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Vallon, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Serum- and glucocorticoid inducible-kinase 1 (SGK1) is an early gene transcriptionally upregulated by cell stress such as cell shrinkage and hypoxia and several hormones including gluco- and mineralocorticoids. It is activated by insulin and growth factors. SGK1 is a powerful regulator of a wide variety of channels and transporters. The present review describes the role of SGK1 in the regulation of potassium (K(+)) channels, K(+) transporters and K(+) homeostasis. SGK1-regulated K(+) channels include renal outer medullary K+ channel, Kv1.3, Kv1.5, KCNE1/KCNQ1, KCNQ4 and, via regulation of calcium (Ca(2+)) entry, Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels. SGK1-sensitive transporters include sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 and sodium/potassium-adenosine triphosphatase. SGK1-dependent regulation of K(+) channels and K(+) transport contributes to the stimulation of renal K(+) excretion following high K(+) intake, to insulin-induced cellular K(+) uptake and hypokalemia, to inhibition of insulin release by glucocorticoids, to stimulation of mast cell degranulation and gastric acid secretion, and to cardiac repolarization. Thus, SGK1 has a profound effect on K(+) homeostasis and on a multitude of K(+)-sensitive cellular functions. PMID:22038256

  12. 78 FR 75672 - New Jersey Regulations on Transportation of Regulated Medical Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ...), ``Morrisville, PA Requirements for Transportation of `Dangerous Waste,' '' 66 FR 37260-61 (July 17, 2001... of regulated medical waste as a Division 6.2 hazardous material. PD-23(RF), 66 FR at 37260- 61; PD-29... inviting interested persons to comment on the Institute's application. 77 FR 39567. The only comment...

  13. COPI-mediated retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER regulates EGFR nuclear transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying-Nai; Wang, Hongmei; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Lee, Heng-Huan; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} ARF1 activation is involved in the EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Assembly of {gamma}-COP coatomer mediates EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. {yields} Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking regulates nuclear transport of EGFR. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that cell surface receptors, such as the entire epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, have been shown to localize in the nucleus. A retrograde route from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is postulated to be involved in the EGFR trafficking to the nucleus; however, the molecular mechanism in this proposed model remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-embedded vesicular trafficking is involved in the nuclear transport of EGFR. Confocal immunofluorescence reveals that in response to EGF, a portion of EGFR redistributes to the Golgi and the ER, where its NH{sub 2}-terminus resides within the lumen of Golgi/ER and COOH-terminus is exposed to the cytoplasm. Blockage of the Golgi-to-ER retrograde trafficking by brefeldin A or dominant mutants of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor, which both resulted in the disassembly of the coat protein complex I (COPI) coat to the Golgi, inhibit EGFR transport to the ER and the nucleus. We further find that EGF-dependent nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi to the ER involving an association of EGFR with {gamma}-COP, one of the subunits of the COPI coatomer. Our findings experimentally provide a comprehensive pathway that nuclear transport of EGFR is regulated by COPI-mediated vesicular trafficking from the Golgi to the ER, and may serve as a general mechanism in regulating the nuclear transport of other cell surface receptors.

  14. Aphid amino acid transporter regulates glutamine supply to intracellular bacterial symbionts.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Feng, Honglin; Baker, James D; Bavan, Selvan; Luetje, Charles W; Wilson, Alex C C

    2014-01-01

    Endosymbiotic associations have played a major role in evolution. However, the molecular basis for the biochemical interdependence of these associations remains poorly understood. The aphid-Buchnera endosymbiosis provides a powerful system to elucidate how these symbioses are regulated. In aphids, the supply of essential amino acids depends on an ancient nutritional symbiotic association with the gamma-proteobacterium Buchnera aphidicola. Buchnera cells are densely packed in specialized aphid bacteriocyte cells. Here we confirm that five putative amino acid transporters are highly expressed and/or highly enriched in Acyrthosiphon pisum bacteriocyte tissues. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, two bacteriocyte amino acid transporters displayed significant levels of glutamine uptake, with transporter ACYPI001018, LOC100159667 (named here as Acyrthosiphon pisum glutamine transporter 1, ApGLNT1) functioning as the most active glutamine transporter. Transporter ApGLNT1 has narrow substrate selectivity, with high glutamine and low arginine transport capacity. Notably, ApGLNT1 has high binding affinity for arginine, and arginine acts as a competitive inhibitor for glutamine transport. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that ApGLNT1 is localized predominantly to the bacteriocyte plasma membrane, a location consistent with the transport of glutamine from A. pisum hemolymph to the bacteriocyte cytoplasm. On the basis of functional transport data and localization, we propose a substrate feedback inhibition model in which the accumulation of the essential amino acid arginine in A. pisum hemolymph reduces the transport of the precursor glutamine into bacteriocytes, thereby regulating amino acid biosynthesis in the bacteriocyte. Structural similarities in the arrangement of hosts and symbionts across endosymbiotic systems suggest that substrate feedback inhibition may be mechanistically important in other endosymbioses. PMID:24367072

  15. 75 FR 24434 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Transportation in Conjunction With Official Travel and Relocation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Transportation in Conjunction With Official Travel and Relocation AGENCY... final rule amends the Federal Travel Regulation (FTR), by adding new terms and definitions for ``Official travel'' and ``Transit system''; clarifies reimbursement for transportation at an official...

  16. Characterization and regulation of adenosine transport in T84 intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mun, E C; Tally, K J; Matthews, J B

    1998-02-01

    Adenosine release from mucosal sources during inflammation and ischemia activates intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Previous data suggest that A2b receptor-mediated Cl- secretory responses may be dampened by epithelial cell nucleoside scavenging. The present study utilizes isotopic flux analysis and nucleoside analog binding assays to directly characterize the nucleoside transport system of cultured T84 human intestinal epithelial cells and to explore whether adenosine transport is regulated by secretory agonists, metabolic inhibition, or phorbol ester. Uptake of adenosine across the apical membrane displayed characteristics of simple diffusion. Kinetic analysis of basolateral uptake revealed a Na(+)-independent, nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI)-sensitive facilitated-diffusion system with low affinity but high capacity for adenosine. NBTI binding studies indicated a single population of high-affinity binding sites basolaterally. Neither forskolin, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine, nor metabolic inhibition significantly altered adenosine transport. However, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly reduced both adenosine transport and the number of specific NBTI binding sites, suggesting that transporter number may be decreased through activation of protein kinase C. This basolateral facilitated adenosine transporter may serve a conventional function in nucleoside salvage and a novel function as a regulator of adenosine-dependent Cl- secretory responses and hence diarrheal disorders. PMID:9486178

  17. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriani, E.; Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, Ph; Lima, R.; Sarazin, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator-prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  18. Activity-dependent regulation of astrocyte GAT levels during synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, Allie K.; Stork, Tobias; Freeman, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic uptake of GABA through GABA transporters (GATs) is an important mechanism regulating excitatory/inhibitory balance in the nervous system, however mechanisms by which astrocytes regulate GAT levels are undefined. Here we show at mid-pupal stages the Drosophila CNS neuropil is devoid of astrocyte membranes and synapses. Astrocyte membranes subsequently infiltrate the neuropil coordinate with synaptogenesis and a strocyte ablation reduces synapse numbers by half, indicating that Drosophila astrocytes are pro-synaptogenic. Shortly after synapses form in earnest, the GABA transporter, GAT, is up-regulated in astrocytes. Ablation or silencing of GABAergic neurons or disruption of metabotropic GABA receptor (GABABR1/2) signaling in astrocytes leads to decreased astrocytic GAT levels. Interestingly, developmental depletion of astrocytic GABABR1/2 signaling suppresses mechanosensory-induced seizure activity in mutants with hyperexcitable neurons. These data reveal astrocytes actively modulate GAT expression via metabotropic GABA receptor signaling, and highlight the importance of precise regulation of astrocytic GAT in modulation of seizure activity. PMID:25151265

  19. Protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation and functional regulation of dopamine transporters in striatal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, R A; Huff, R A; Uhl, G R; Kuhar, M J

    1997-06-13

    Dopamine transporters (DATs) are members of a family of Na+- and Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporters responsible for the rapid clearance of dopamine from synaptic clefts. The predicted primary sequence of DAT contains numerous consensus phosphorylation sites. In this report we demonstrate that DATs undergo endogenous phosphorylation in striatal synaptosomes that is regulated by activators of protein kinase C. Rat striatal synaptosomes were metabolically labeled with [32P]orthophosphate, and solubilized homogenates were subjected to immunoprecipitation with an antiserum specific for DAT. Basal phosphorylation occurred in the absence of exogenous treatments, and the phosphorylation level was rapidly increased when synaptosomes were treated with the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid or calyculin. Treatment of synaptosomes with the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) also increased the level of phosphate incorporation. This occurred within 10 min and was dosedependent between 0.1 and 1 microM PMA. DAT phosphorylation was also significantly increased by two other protein kinase C activators, (-)-indolactam V and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. The inactive phorbol ester 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate at 10 microM was without effect, and PMA-induced phosphorylation was blocked by treatment of synaptosomes with the protein kinase C inhibitors staurosporine and bisindoylmaleimide. These results indicate that DATs undergo rapid in vivo phosphorylation in response to protein kinase C activation and that a robust mechanism exists in synaptosomes for DAT dephosphorylation. Dopamine transport activity in synaptosomes was reduced by all treatments that promoted DAT phosphorylation, with comparable dose, time, and inhibitor characteristics. The change in transport activity was produced by a reduction in Vmax with no significant effect on the Km for dopamine. These results suggest that synaptosomal dopamine transport activity is regulated by

  20. Human dopamine transporter gene: differential regulation of 18-kb haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Xiong, Nian; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Nuomin; Qing, Hong; Lin, Zhicheng

    2013-01-01

    Aim Since previous functional studies of short haplotypes and polymorphic sites of SLC6A3 have shown variant-dependent and drug-sensitive promoter activity, this study aimed to understand whether a large SLC6A3 regulatory region, containing these small haplotypes and polymorphic sites, can display haplotype-dependent promoter activity in a drug-sensitive and pathway-related manner. Materials & methods By creating and using a single copy number luciferase-reporter vector, we examined regulation of two different SLC6A3 haplotypes (A and B) of the 5′ 18-kb promoter and two known downstream regulatory variable number tandem repeats by 17 drugs in four different cellular models. Results The two regulatory haplotypes displayed up to 3.2-fold difference in promoter activity. The regulations were drug selective (37.5% of the drugs showed effects), and both haplotype and cell type dependent. Pathway analysis revealed at least 13 main signaling hubs targeting SLC6A3, including histone deacetylation, AKT, PKC and CK2 α-chains. Conclusion SLC6A3 may be regulated via either its promoter or the variable number tandem repeats independently by specific signaling pathways and in a haplotype-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have developed the first pathway map for SLC6A3 regulation. These findings provide a framework for understanding complex and variant-dependent regulations of SLC6A3. PMID:24024899

  1. SLC6 Transporters: Structure, Function, Regulation, Disease Association and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Pramod Akula; Foster, James; Carvelli, Lucia; Henry, L. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The SLC6 family of secondary active transporters are integral membrane solute carrier proteins characterized by the Na+-dependent translocation of small amino acid or amino acid-like substrates. SLC6 transporters, which include the serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, GABA, taurine, creatine, as well as amino acid transporters, are associated with a number of human diseases and disorders making this family a critical target for therapeutic development. In addition, several members of this family are directly involved in the action of drugs of abuse such as cocaine, amphetamines, and ecstasy. Recent advances providing structural insight into this family have vastly accelerated our ability to study these proteins and their involvement in complex biological processes. PMID:23506866

  2. Inflammatory Regulation of ATP Binding Cassette Efflux Transporter Expression and Function in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Christopher J.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux transporters, including multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mdr1), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrps) extrude chemicals from the brain. Although ABC transporters are critical for blood-brain barrier integrity, less attention has been placed on the regulation of these proteins in brain parenchymal cells such as microglia. Prior studies demonstrate that inflammation after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment alters transporter expression in the livers of mice. Here, we sought to determine the effects of inflammation on the expression and function of transporters in microglia. To test this, the expression and function of ABC efflux transport proteins were quantified in mouse BV-2 microglial cells in response to activation with LPS. Intracellular retention of fluorescent rhodamine 123, Hoechst 33342, and calcein acetoxymethyl ester was increased in LPS-treated microglia, suggesting that the functions of Mdr1, Bcrp, and Mrps were decreased, respectively. LPS reduced Mdr1, Bcrp, and Mrp4 mRNA and protein expression between 40 and 70%. Conversely, LPS increased expression of Mrp1 and Mrp5 mRNA and protein. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed reduced Bcrp and Mrp4 and elevated Mrp1 and Mrp5 protein in activated microglia. Pharmacological inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional signaling attenuated down-regulation of Mdr1a mRNA and potentiated up-regulation of Mrp5 mRNA in LPS-treated cells. Together, these data suggest that LPS stimulates microglia and impairs efflux of prototypical ABC transporter substrates by altering mRNA and protein expression, in part through NF-κB signaling. Decreased transporter efflux function in microglia may lead to the retention of toxic chemicals and aberrant cell-cell communication during neuroinflammation. PMID:22942241

  3. Regulation of nitrate transport in citrus rootstocks depending on nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Miguel; Camañes, Gemma; Flors, Víctor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Previously, we reported that in Citrus plants, nitrate influx through the plasmalemma of roots cells follows a biphasic pattern, suggesting the existence of at least two different uptake systems, a high and low affinity transport system (HATS and LATS, respectively). Here, we describe a novel inducible high affinity transport system (iHATS). This new nitrate transport system has a high capacity to uptake nitrate in two different Citrus rootstocks (Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange). The iHATS was saturable, showing higher affinity than constitutive high affinity transport system (cHATS) to the substrate NO(3) (-). The V(max) for this saturable component iHATS was higher than cHATS, reaching similar values in both rootstocks.Additionally, we studied the regulation of root NO(3) (-) uptake mediated by both HATS (iHATS and cHATS) and LATS. In both rootstocks, cHATS is constitutive and independent of N-status. Concerning the regulation of iHATS, this system is upregulated by NO(3) (-) and down-regulated by the N status and by NO(3) (-) itself when plants are exposed to it for a longer period of time. LATS in Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange rootstocks is repressed by the N-status.The use of various metabolic uncouplers or inhibitors indicated that NO(3) (-) net uptake mediated by iHATS and LATS was an active transport system in both rootstocks. PMID:19516998

  4. Proline transport across the intestinal microvillus membrane may be regulated by membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, D C; Gibbs, D J; Meddings, J B

    1992-03-23

    There is now abundant evidence that integral membrane protein function may be modulated by the physical properties of membrane lipids. The intestinal brush border membrane represents a membrane system highly specialized for nutrient absorption and, thus, provides an opportunity to study the interaction between integral membrane transport proteins and their lipid environment. We have previously demonstrated that alterations in this environment may modulate the function of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter in terms of its affinity for glucose. In this communication we report that membrane lipid-protein interactions are distinctly different for the proline transport proteins. Maximal transport rates for L-proline by either the neutral brush border or imino transport systems are reduced 10-fold when the surrounding membrane environment is made more fluid over the physiological range that exists along the crypt-villus axis. Furthermore, in microvillus membrane vesicles prepared from enterocytes isolated from along the crypt-villus axis a similar gradient exists in the functional activity of these transport systems. This would imply that either the functional activity of these transporters are regulated by membrane physical properties or that the synthesis and insertion of these proteins is coordinated in concert with membrane physical properties as the enterocyte migrates up the crypt-villus axis. PMID:1567897

  5. Iodide transport and its regulation in the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the autoregulatory mechanism of iodide induced suppression of subsequently determined iodide transport activity in the thyroid gland. Two model systems were developed to identify the putative, transport-related, iodine-containing, inhibitory factor responsible for autoregulation. The first system was a maternal and fetal rabbit thyroid tissue slice preparation in which iodide pretreatment inhibited the maternal /sup 125/I-T/M ratio by 30% and had no significant effect on fetal iodide transport. In the second system, the role of protein synthesis in the autoregulatory phenomenon was studied. Cat thyroid slices pretreated with0.1 mM cycloheximide for 60 min prior to preexposure to excess iodide demonstrated a significant reduction in the degree of iodide included autoregulation. In both of these systems iodide induced suppression of cAMP accumulation remained intact. These findings suggest (1) fetal rabbit thyroid lacks the autoregulatory mechanism of iodide transport and (2) protein synthesis is involved in the mechanism of thyroid autoregulation of iodide transport.

  6. Induction events and short-term regulation of electron transport in chloroplasts: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport at different levels of structural and functional organization of photosynthetic apparatus provides efficient performance of oxygenic photosynthesis in plants. This review begins with a brief overview of the chloroplast electron transport chain. Then two noninvasive biophysical methods (measurements of slow induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence and EPR signals of oxidized P700 centers) are exemplified to illustrate the possibility of monitoring induction events in chloroplasts in vivo and in situ. Induction events in chloroplasts are considered and briefly discussed in the context of short-term mechanisms of the following regulatory processes: (i) pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport; (ii) the light-induced activation of the Calvin-Benson cycle; (iii) optimization of electron transport due to fitting alternative pathways of electron flow and partitioning light energy between photosystems I and II; and (iv) the light-induced remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus and thylakoid membranes. PMID:25680580

  7. GSK-3 regulates transport of kinesin-1 driven cargos in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidel, Christina; Weaver, Carole; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Shubeita, George T.; CenterNonlinear Dynamics, Department of Physics, University of Texas At Austin Collaboration; Hhmi, Department of Cellular; Molecular Medicine, Univ. Of California Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    The Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) has been linked to many aspects of the development of Alzheimer's disease and was proposed to play a role in the transport of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by kinesin-1 motors. Using Drosophila embryos and larvae with altered GSK-3 expression, we characterize motor transport of cargos including APP and lipid droplets using DIC microscopy, high-resolution video tracking, fluorescence, and in vivo stall force measurements with optical tweezers. By comparing cargo velocities and run lengths we find that GSK-3 is a required negative regulator of in vivo transport. Stall force measurements on lipid droplets reveal that enhanced transport under conditions of reduced GSK-3 is a result of a larger number of active motors hauling the cargo. Our findings have implications on the use of GSK-3 inhibitors in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Regulation of potassium transport in plants under hostile conditions: implications for abiotic and biotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Sergey; Pottosin, Igor

    2014-07-01

    Intracellular potassium homeostasis is a prerequisite for the optimal operation of plant metabolic machinery and plant's overall performance. It is controlled by K(+) uptake, efflux and intracellular and long-distance relocation, mediated by a large number of K(+) -selective and non-selective channels and transporters located at both plasma and vacuolar membranes. All abiotic and biotic stresses result in a significant disturbance to intracellular potassium homeostasis. In this work, we discuss molecular mechanisms and messengers mediating potassium transport and homeostasis focusing on four major environmental stresses: salinity, drought, flooding and biotic factors. We argue that cytosolic K(+) content may be considered as one of the 'master switches' enabling plant transition from the normal metabolism to 'hibernated state' during first hours after the stress exposure and then to a recovery phase. We show that all these stresses trigger substantial disturbance to K(+) homeostasis and provoke a feedback control on K(+) channels and transporters expression and post-translational regulation of their activity, optimizing K(+) absorption and usage, and, at the extreme end, assisting the programmed cell death. We discuss specific modes of regulation of the activity of K(+) channels and transporters by membrane voltage, intracellular Ca(2+) , reactive oxygen species, polyamines, phytohormones and gasotransmitters, and link this regulation with plant-adaptive responses to hostile environments. PMID:24506225

  9. Regulation of nuclear transport in proliferating and quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Feldherr, C M; Akin, D

    1993-03-01

    Previously, we compared signal-mediated nuclear transport in proliferating and quiescent BALB/c 3T3 cells and found that both the relative rate of nuclear uptake and the functional size of the transport channels were significantly greater in proliferating cells. In this study, the possible causes of these permeability differences were investigated. To determine if the decrease in transport capacity in quiescent cells was due to a reduction in the availability of soluble cytoplasmic factors (i.e., ATP or receptors for nuclear location sequences), or changes in the properties of the pores themselves, proliferating and quiescent cells were fused, and nuclear import of nucleoplasmin-coated gold (NP-gold) particles was assayed in the heterokaryons 50-60 min later. Significant differences in nuclear uptake were maintained following fusion, even though the two nuclei shared a common cytoplasm, consistent with the view that permeability is regulated at the level of the pores. Cell shape also influenced signal-mediated nuclear import. This was demonstrated by studying transport in rounded and flattened cells attached to different-size palladium domains that were deposited on a nonadhesive substrate. Based on analysis of the nuclear uptake rates of large (110-270 A in diameter) and small (50-80 A in diameter) coated gold particles, it was determined that the functional size of the pores was significantly greater in flattened cells. The effect of growth factors on recovery of nuclear transport capacity following serum depletion was also analyzed. Partial recovery was achieved by treating cells with physiological concentrations of EGF, IGF-1, or PDGF; however, complete recovery required both EGF and IGF-1. PMID:8453991

  10. Regulation of the glutamine transporter SN1 by extracellular pH and intracellular sodium ions

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, Angelika; Albers, Alexandra; Setiawan, Iwan; Edwards, Robert H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Lang, Florian; Wagner, Carsten A; Bröer, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The glutamine transporter SN1 has recently been identified as one of the major glutamine transporters in hepatocytes and brain astrocytes. It appears to be the molecular correlate of system N amino acid transport. Two different transport mechanisms have been proposed for this transporter. These are an electroneutral mechanism, in which glutamine uptake is coupled to an exchange of 1Na+ and 1H+, or an electrogenic mechanism coupled to the exchange of 2Na+ against 1H+. This study was performed to solve these discrepancies and to investigate the reversibility of the transporter. When SN1 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, glutamine uptake was accompanied by a cotransport of 2–3 Na+ ions as determined by 22Na+ fluxes. However, at the same time a rapid release of intracellular Na+ was observed indicating an active exchange of Na+ ions. The driving force of the proton electrochemical gradient was equivalent to that of the sodium electrochemical gradient. Acidification of the extracellular medium caused the transporter to run in reverse and to release glutamine. Determination of accumulation ratios at different driving forces were in agreement with an electroneutral 1Na+-glutamine cotransport-1H+ antiport. Inward currents that were observed during glutamine uptake were much smaller than expected for a stoichiometric cotransport of charges. A slippage mode in the transporter mechanism and pH-regulated endogenous oocyte cation channels are likely to contribute to the observed currents. PMID:11850497

  11. Regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure: role of chloride transport in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Christian A; Schroeder, Björn C; Ehmke, Heimo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that primary changes in vascular resistance can cause sustained changes in arterial blood pressure. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about Cl(-) homeostasis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Within vascular smooth muscle cells, Cl(-) is accumulated above the electrochemical equilibrium, causing Cl(-) efflux, membrane depolarization, and increased contractile force when Cl(-) channels are opened. At least two different transport mechanisms contribute to raise [Cl(-)] i in vascular smooth muscle cells, anion exchange, and cation-chloride cotransport. Recent work suggests that TMEM16A-associated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents mediate Cl(-) efflux in vascular smooth muscle cells leading to vasoconstriction. Additional proteins associated with Cl(-) flux in vascular smooth muscle are bestrophins, which modulate vasomotion, the volume-activated LRRC8, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Cl(-) transporters and Cl(-) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) significantly contribute to the physiological regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. PMID:25588975

  12. Master and servant: Regulation of auxin transporters by FKBPs and cyclophilins.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Markus; Bailly, Aurélien; Ivanchenko, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Plant development and architecture are greatly influenced by the polar distribution of the essential hormone auxin. The directional influx and efflux of auxin from plant cells depends primarily on AUX1/LAX, PIN, and ABCB/PGP/MDR families of auxin transport proteins. The functional analysis of these proteins has progressed rapidly within the last decade thanks to the establishment of heterologous auxin transport systems. Heterologous co-expression allowed also for the testing of protein-protein interactions involved in the regulation of transporters and identified relationships with members of the FK506-Binding Protein (FKBP) and cyclophilin protein families, which are best known in non-plant systems as cellular receptors for the immunosuppressant drugs, FK506 and cyclosporin A, respectively. Current evidence that such interactions affect membrane trafficking, and potentially the activity of auxin transporters is reviewed. We also propose that FKBPs andcyclophilins might integrate the action of auxin transport inhibitors, such as NPA, on members of the ABCB and PIN family, respectively. Finally, we outline open questions that might be useful for further elucidation of the role of immunophilins as regulators (servants) of auxin transporters (masters). PMID:26940487

  13. Roles of Akt and SGK1 in the Regulation of Renal Tubular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2015-01-01

    A serine/threonine kinase Akt is a key mediator in various signaling pathways including regulation of renal tubular transport. In proximal tubules, Akt mediates insulin signaling via insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and stimulates sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. In insulin resistance, the IRS2 in kidney cortex is exceptionally preserved and may mediate the stimulatory effect of insulin on NBCe1 to cause hypertension in diabetes via sodium retention. Likewise, in distal convoluted tubules and cortical collecting ducts, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation mediates several hormonal signals to enhance sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activities, resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) mediates aldosterone signaling. Insulin can stimulate SGK1 to exert various effects on renal transporters. In renal cortical collecting ducts, SGK1 regulates the expression level of ENaC through inhibition of its degradation. In addition, SGK1 and Akt cooperatively regulate potassium secretion by renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK). Moreover, sodium-proton exchanger 3 (NHE3) in proximal tubules is possibly activated by SGK1. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding of the roles of Akt and SGK1 in the regulation of renal tubular transport. PMID:26491696

  14. Roles of Akt and SGK1 in the Regulation of Renal Tubular Transport.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Masashi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2015-01-01

    A serine/threonine kinase Akt is a key mediator in various signaling pathways including regulation of renal tubular transport. In proximal tubules, Akt mediates insulin signaling via insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and stimulates sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. In insulin resistance, the IRS2 in kidney cortex is exceptionally preserved and may mediate the stimulatory effect of insulin on NBCe1 to cause hypertension in diabetes via sodium retention. Likewise, in distal convoluted tubules and cortical collecting ducts, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation mediates several hormonal signals to enhance sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activities, resulting in increased sodium reabsorption. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) mediates aldosterone signaling. Insulin can stimulate SGK1 to exert various effects on renal transporters. In renal cortical collecting ducts, SGK1 regulates the expression level of ENaC through inhibition of its degradation. In addition, SGK1 and Akt cooperatively regulate potassium secretion by renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK). Moreover, sodium-proton exchanger 3 (NHE3) in proximal tubules is possibly activated by SGK1. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding of the roles of Akt and SGK1 in the regulation of renal tubular transport. PMID:26491696

  15. Regulation of Bile Salt Transport in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Francis R.; Sutherland, Eileen M.; Gonzalez, Manuel

    1982-01-01

    Expansion of the bile salt pool size in rats increases maximum excretory capacity for taurocholate. We examined whether increased bile salt transport is due to recruitment of centrolobular transport units or rather to adaptive changes in the hepatocyte. Daily sodium cholate (100 mg/100 g body wt) was administered orally to rats. This treatment was well tolerated for at least 4 d and produced an 8.2-fold expansion of the bile salt pool. This expanded pool consisted predominently (99%) of cholic and deoxycholic acids. Significantly increased bile salt transport was not observed until 16 h after bile acid loading, and maximum elevations of transport capacity to 2.3-fold of control required ∼2 d. In contrast, maximum sulfobromophthalein excretion rates increased 2.2-fold as early as 4 h and actually fell to 1.5-fold increase at 4 d. We studied the possibility that this adaptive increase in bile salt secretory transport was due to changes in canalicular surface membrane area, lipid composition, or increased number of putative carriers. Canalicular membrane protein recovery and the specific activities of leucine aminopeptidase, Mg++-ATPase and 5′-nucleotidase activities were unaltered by bile salt pool expansion. The content of free and esterified cholesterol and total phospholipids was unchanged in liver surface membrane fractions compared with control values. In contrast, sodium cholate administration selectively increased specific [14C]cholic acid binding sites twofold in liver surface membrane fractions. Increased numbers of [14C]cholic acid receptors (a) was associated with the time-dependent increase in bile salt transport, and (b) was selective for the taurine conjugate of cholate and (c) was reduced by chenodeoxycholate. Changes in bile acid binding sites 16 h following taurocholate and chenodeoxycholate and the lack of change with glycocholate was associated with comparable changes in bile salt transport. In conclusion, selective bile salts increase bile

  16. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2007-12-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) increased Bsep mRNA expression. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  17. Transportation in the Interstitial Space of the Brain Can Be Regulated by Neuronal Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunyan; Lei, Yiming; Han, Hongbin; Zuo, Long; Yan, Junhao; He, Qingyuan; Yuan, Lan; Liu, Huipo; Xu, Ge; Xu, Weiguo

    2015-12-01

    The transportation of substances in the interstitial space (ISS) is crucial for the maintenance of brain homeostasis, however its link to neuronal activity remains unclear. Here, we report a marked reduction in substance transportation in the ISS after neuronal excitation. Using a tracer-based method, water molecules in the interstitial fluid (ISF) could be specifically visualized in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We first observed the flow of ISF in the thalamus and caudate nucleus of a rat. The ISF flow was then modulated using a painful stimulation model. We demonstrated that the flow of ISF slowed significantly following neuronal activity in the thalamus. This reduction in ISF flow continued for hours and was not accompanied by slow diffusion into the ISS. This observation suggests that the transportation of substances into the ISS can be regulated with a selective external stimulation.

  18. Transportation in the Interstitial Space of the Brain Can Be Regulated by Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chunyan; Lei, Yiming; Han, Hongbin; Zuo, Long; Yan, Junhao; He, Qingyuan; Yuan, Lan; Liu, Huipo; Xu, Ge; Xu, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    The transportation of substances in the interstitial space (ISS) is crucial for the maintenance of brain homeostasis, however its link to neuronal activity remains unclear. Here, we report a marked reduction in substance transportation in the ISS after neuronal excitation. Using a tracer-based method, water molecules in the interstitial fluid (ISF) could be specifically visualized in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We first observed the flow of ISF in the thalamus and caudate nucleus of a rat. The ISF flow was then modulated using a painful stimulation model. We demonstrated that the flow of ISF slowed significantly following neuronal activity in the thalamus. This reduction in ISF flow continued for hours and was not accompanied by slow diffusion into the ISS. This observation suggests that the transportation of substances into the ISS can be regulated with a selective external stimulation. PMID:26631412

  19. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  20. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease. PMID:27430889

  1. Osmoregulation in zebrafish: ion transport mechanisms and functional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Ying-Jey; Lin, Chia-Hao; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Fish, like mammals, have to maintain their body fluid ionic and osmotic homeostasis through sophisticated iono-/osmoregulation mechanisms, which are conducted mainly by ionocytes of the gill (the skin in embryonic stages), instead of the renal tubular cells in mammals. Given the advantages in terms of genetic database availability and manipulation, zebrafish is an emerging model for research into regulatory and integrative physiology. At least five types of ionocytes, HR, NaR, NCC, SLC26, and KS cells, have been identified to carry out Na+ uptake/H+ secretion/NH4+ excretion, Ca2+ uptake, Na+/Cl- uptake, K+ secretion, and Cl- uptake/HCO3- secretion, respectively, through distinct sets of transporters. Several hormones, namely isotocin, prolactin, cortisol, stanniocalcin-1, calcitonin, endothelin-1, vitamin D, parathyorid hormone 1, catecholamines, and the renin-angiotensin-system, have been demonstrated to positively or negatively regulate ion transport through specific receptors at different ionocytes stages, at either the transcriptional/translational or posttranslational level. The knowledge obtained using zebrafish answered many long-term contentious or unknown issues in the field of fish iono-/osmoregulation. The homology of ion transport pathways and hormone systems also means that the zebrafish model informs studies on mammals or other animal species, thereby providing insights into related fields. PMID:26600749

  2. Cholinergic synaptic vesicle heterogeneity: evidence for regulation of acetylcholine transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gracz, L.M.; Wang, W.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-07-12

    Crude cholinergic synaptic vesicles from a homogenate of the electric organ of Torpedo californica were centrifuged to equilibrium in an isosmotic sucrose density gradient. The classical VP/sub 1/ synaptic vesicles banding at 1.055 g/mL actively transported (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (AcCh). An organelle banding at about 1.071 g/mL transported even more (/sup 3/H)AcCh. Transport by both organelles was inhibited by the known AcCh storage blockers trans-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183) and nigericin. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the denser organelle was slightly smaller as shown by size-exclusion chromatography. It is concluded that the denser organelle corresponds to the recycling VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicle originally described in intact Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The properties of the receptor for vesamicol were studied by measuring binding of (/sup 3/H)vesamicol, and the amount of SV2 antigen characteristic of secretory vesicles was assayed with a monoclonal antibody directed against it. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the VP/sub 2/ vesicles had a ratio of (/sup 3/H)AcCh transport activity to vesamicol receptor concentration that typically was 4-7-fold higher, whereas the ratio of SV2 antigen concentration to vesamicol receptor concentration was about 2-fold higher. The Hill coefficients ..cap alpha../sub H/ and equilibrium dissociation constants K for vesamicol binding to VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ vesicles were essentially the same. The positive Hill coefficient suggests that the vesamicol receptor exists as a homotropic oligomeric complex. The results demonstrate that VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicles exhibit functional differences in the AcCh transport system, presumably as a result of regulatory phenomena.

  3. Transglutaminase 2 Regulates the GTPase-activating Activity of Bcr*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sun-Ju; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in numerous pathologies including that of neurodegeneration and celiac disease, but the molecular interactions that mediate its diverse activities are largely unknown. Bcr and the closely related Abr negatively regulate the small G-protein Rac: loss of their combined function in vivo results in increased reactivity of innate immune cells. Bcr and Abr are GTPase-activating proteins that catalyze the hydrolysis of the GTP bound to Rac. However, how the Bcr and Abr GTPase-activating activity is regulated is not precisely understood. We here report a novel mechanism of regulation through direct protein-protein interaction with TG2. TG2 bound to the Rac-binding pocket in the GTPase-activating domains of Bcr and Abr, blocked Bcr activity and, through this mechanism, increased levels of active GTP-bound Rac and EGF-stimulated membrane ruffling. TG2 exists in at least two different conformations. Interestingly, experiments using TG2 mutants showed that Bcr exhibits preferential binding to the non-compacted conformation of TG2, in which its catalytic domain is exposed, but transamidation is not needed for the interaction. Thus, TG2 regulates levels of cellular GTP-bound Rac and actin cytoskeletal reorganization through a new mechanism involving direct inhibition of Bcr GTPase-activating activity. PMID:19840940

  4. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  5. Regulation of ROCK activity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-03-01

    Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active conformation by the direct binding of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-loaded Rho. In recent years, a number of ROCK isoform-specific binding partners have been found to modulate the kinase activity through direct interactions with the catalytic domain or via altered cellular localization of the kinases. Thus, these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer. PMID:23204112

  6. 50 CFR 665.964 - Regulated activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulated activities. 665.964 Section 665.964 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Rose Atoll Marine...

  7. 50 CFR 665.964 - Regulated activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulated activities. 665.964 Section 665.964 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Rose Atoll Marine...

  8. Regulation of brain aromatase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roselli, C.E.; Ellinwood, W.E.; Resko, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and regulation of aromatase activity in the adult rat brain with a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed during the conversion of (1 beta-/sup 3/H)androstenedione to estrone. The rate of aromatase activity in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) was linear with time up to 1 h, and with tissue concentrations up to 5 mgeq/200 microliters incubation mixture. The enzyme demonstrated a pH optimum of 7.4 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.04 microns. The greatest amount of aromatase activity was found in amygdala and HPOA from intact male rats. The hippocampus, midbrain tegmentum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and anterior pituitary all contained negligible enzymatic activity. Castration produced a significant decrease in aromatase activity in the HPOA, but not in the amygdala or cerebral cortex. The HPOAs of male rats contained significantly greater aromatase activity than the HPOAs of female rats. In females, this enzyme activity did not change during the estrous cycle or after ovariectomy. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized male and female rats significantly enhanced HPOA aromatase activities to levels approximating those found in HPOA from intact males. Therefore, the results suggest that testosterone, or one of its metabolites, is a major steroidal regulator of HPOA aromatase activity in rats.

  9. Role of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase in Regulation of Raffinose Transport in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿§

    PubMed Central

    Tyx, Robert E.; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking the enzyme dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) show markedly reduced ability to grow on raffinose and stachyose as sole carbon sources. Import of these sugars occurs through the previously characterized raffinose ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport system, encoded by the raf operon, that lacks the necessary ATP-binding protein. In this study, we identified the raffinose ATP-binding protein RafK and showed that it was directly involved in raffinose and stachyose import. RafK carries a C-terminal regulatory domain present in a subset of ATP-binding proteins that has been involved in both direct regulation of transporter activity (inducer exclusion) and transcription of transporter genes. Pneumococci lacking RafK showed a 50- to 80-fold reduction in expression of the raf operon genes aga (alpha-galactosidase) and rafEFG (raffinose substrate binding and permease genes), and both glucose and sucrose inhibited raffinose uptake through inducer exclusion. Like RafK, the presence of DLDH also activated the expression of raf operon genes, as DLDH-negative pneumococci showed a significantly decreased expression of aga and rafEFG, but DLDH did not regulate rafK or the putative regulatory genes rafR and rafS. DLDH also bound directly to RafK both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the possibility that DLDH regulates raffinose transport by a direct interaction with the regulatory domain of the transporter. Finally, although not as attenuated as DLDH-negative bacteria, pneumococci lacking RafK were significantly outcompeted by wild-type bacteria in colonization experiments of murine lung and nasopharynx, indicating a role for raffinose and stachyose transport in vivo. PMID:21602335

  10. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase sgk2 stimulates the transport activity of human organic anion transporters 1 by enhancing the stability of the transporter

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Da; Huang, Haozhe; Toh, May Fern; You, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Human organic anion transporter 1 (hOAT1) belongs to a family of organic anion transporters that play critical roles in the body disposition of clinically important drugs, including anti-viral therapeutics, anti-cancer drugs, antibiotics, antihypertensives, and anti-inflammatories. hOAT1 is abundantly expressed in the kidney and brain. In the current study, we examined the regulation of hOAT1 by serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 2 (sgk2) in the kidney COS-7 cells. We showed that sgk2 stimulated hOAT1 transport activity. Such stimulation mainly resulted from an increased cell surface expression of the transporter, kinetically revealed as an increased maximal transport velocity V max without significant change in substrate-binding affinity K m. We further showed that stimulation of hOAT1 activity by sgk2 was achieved by preventing hOAT1 degradation. Our co-immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that the effect of sgk2 on hOAT1 was through a direct interaction between these two proteins. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that sgk2 stimulates hOAT1 transport activity by enhancing the stability of the transporter. This study provides the insights into sgk2 regulation of hOAT1-mediated transport in normal physiology and disease. PMID:27335683

  11. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase sgk2 stimulates the transport activity of human organic anion transporters 1 by enhancing the stability of the transporter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Huang, Haozhe; Toh, May Fern; You, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Human organic anion transporter 1 (hOAT1) belongs to a family of organic anion transporters that play critical roles in the body disposition of clinically important drugs, including anti-viral therapeutics, anti-cancer drugs, antibiotics, antihypertensives, and anti-inflammatories. hOAT1 is abundantly expressed in the kidney and brain. In the current study, we examined the regulation of hOAT1 by serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 2 (sgk2) in the kidney COS-7 cells. We showed that sgk2 stimulated hOAT1 transport activity. Such stimulation mainly resulted from an increased cell surface expression of the transporter, kinetically revealed as an increased maximal transport velocity V max without significant change in substrate-binding affinity K m. We further showed that stimulation of hOAT1 activity by sgk2 was achieved by preventing hOAT1 degradation. Our co-immunoprecipitation experiment revealed that the effect of sgk2 on hOAT1 was through a direct interaction between these two proteins. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that sgk2 stimulates hOAT1 transport activity by enhancing the stability of the transporter. This study provides the insights into sgk2 regulation of hOAT1-mediated transport in normal physiology and disease. PMID:27335683

  12. Regulation of Sulfate Transport in Filamentous Fungi 1

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Gretchen; Somerfield, Paula; Meyn, Tina; Holby, Marilyn; Babcock, Donald; Bradley, Dorothy; Segel, Irwin H.

    1970-01-01

    Inorganic sulfate enters the mycelia of Aspergillus nidulans, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium notatum by a temperature-, energy-, pH-, ionic strength-, and concentration-dependent transport system (“permease”). Transport is unidirectional. In the presence of excess external sulfate, ATP sulfurylase-negative mutants will accumulate inorganic sulfate intracellularly to a level of about 0.04 m. The intracellular sulfate can be retained against a concentration gradient. Retention is not energy-dependent, nor is there any exchange between intracellular (accumulated) and extracellular sulfate. The sulfate permease is under metabolic control. Sulfur starvation of high methionine-grown mycelia results in about a 1000-fold increase in the specific sulfate transport activity at low external sulfate concentrations. l-Methionine is a metabolic repressor of the sulfate permease, while intracellular sulfate and possibly l-cysteine (or a derivative of l-cysteine) are feedback inhibitors. Sulfate transport follows hyperbolic saturation kinetics with a Michaelis constant (Km) value of 6 × 10−5 to 10−4m and a Vmax (for maximally sulfurstarved mycelia) of about 5 micromoles per gram per minute. Refeeding sulfur-starved mycelia with sulfate or cysteine results in about a 10-fold decrease in the Vmax value with no marked change in the Km. Azide and dinitrophenol also reduce the Vmax. PMID:16657536

  13. Regulating the regulators: modulators of transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Everett, Logan; Hansen, Matthew; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is largely regulated by DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs). However, the TF activity itself is modulated via, among other things, post-translational modifications (PTMs) by specific modification enzymes in response to cellular stimuli. TF-PTMs thus serve as "molecular switchboards" that map upstream signaling events to the downstream transcriptional events. An important long-term goal is to obtain a genome-wide map of "regulatory triplets" consisting of a TF, target gene, and a modulator gene that specifically modulates the regulation of the target gene by the TF. A variety of genome-wide data sets can be exploited by computational methods to obtain a rough map of regulatory triplets, which can guide directed experiments. However, a prerequisite to developing such computational tools is a systematic catalog of known instances of regulatory triplets. We first describe PTM-Switchboard, a recent database that stores triplets of genes such that the ability of one gene (the TF) to regulate a target gene is dependent on one or more PTMs catalyzed by a third gene, the modifying enzyme. We also review current computational approaches to infer regulatory triplets from genome-wide data sets and conclude with a discussion of potential future research. PTM-Switchboard is accessible at http://cagr.pcbi.upenn.edu/PTMswitchboard / PMID:20827600

  14. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further

  15. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  16. Posttranslational Regulation of Organic Anion Transporters by Ubiquitination: Known and Novel.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Wang, Haoxun; You, Guofeng

    2016-09-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs) encoded by solute carrier 22 family are localized in the epithelia of multiple organs, where they mediate the absorption, distribution, and excretion of a diverse array of negatively charged environmental toxins and clinically important drugs. Alterations in the expression and function of OATs play important roles in intra- and interindividual variability of the therapeutic efficacy and the toxicity of many drugs. As a result, the activity of OATs must be under tight regulation so as to carry out their normal functions. The regulation of OAT transport activity in response to various stimuli can occur at several levels such as transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification. Posttranslational regulation is of particular interest, because it usually happens within a very short period of time (minutes to hours) when the body has to deal with rapidly changing amounts of substances as a consequence of variable intake of drugs, fluids, or meals as well as metabolic activity. This review article highlights the recent advances from our laboratory in uncovering several posttranslational mechanisms underlying OAT regulation. These advances offer the promise of identifying targets for novel strategies that will maximize therapeutic efficacy in drug development. PMID:27291023

  17. The Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Regulates Trafficking of Glucose Transporters and Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiuyun; Kenerson, Heidi; Aicher, Lauri; Miyaoka, Robert; Eary, Janet; Bissler, John; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    Human cancers often display an avidity for glucose, a feature that is exploited in clinical staging and response monitoring by using 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography. Determinants of FDG accumulation include tumor blood flow, glucose transport, and glycolytic rate, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. The phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) 1 pathway has been implicated in this process via the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha-dependent expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and glycolytic enzymes. Thus, we predicted that tumors with elevated mTORC1 activity would be accompanied by high FDG uptake. We tested this hypothesis in eight renal angiomyolipomas in which the loss of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1/2 function gave rise to constitutive mTORC1 activation. Surprisingly, these tumors displayed low FDG uptake on positron emission tomography. Exploring the underlying mechanisms in vitro revealed that Tsc2 regulates the membrane localization of the glucose transporter proteins (Glut)1, Glut2, and Glut4, and, therefore, glucose uptake. Down-regulation of cytoplasmic linker protein 170, an mTOR effector, rescued Glut4 trafficking in Tsc2−/− cells, whereas up-regulation of Akt activity in these cells was insufficient to redistribute Glut4 to the plasma membrane. The effect of mTORC1 on glucose uptake was confirmed using a liver-specific Tsc1- deletion mouse model in which FDG uptake was reduced in the livers of mutant mice compared with wild-type controls. Together, these data show that mTORC1 activity is insufficient for increased glycolysis in tumors and that constitutive mTOR activity negatively regulates glucose transporter trafficking. PMID:18511518

  18. Dopamine Transporter Activity Is Modulated by α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brittany; Saha, Kaustuv; Rana, Tanu; Becker, Jonas P; Sambo, Danielle; Davari, Paran; Goodwin, J Shawn; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2015-12-01

    The duration and strength of the dopaminergic signal are regulated by the dopamine transporter (DAT). Drug addiction and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases have all been associated with altered DAT activity. The membrane localization and the activity of DAT are regulated by a number of intracellular proteins. α-Synuclein, a protein partner of DAT, is implicated in neurodegenerative disease and drug addiction. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the interaction between DAT and α-synuclein, the cellular location of this interaction, and the functional consequences of this interaction on the basal, amphetamine-induced DAT-mediated dopamine efflux, and membrane microdomain distribution of the transporter. Here, we found that the majority of DAT·α-synuclein protein complexes are found at the plasma membrane of dopaminergic neurons or mammalian cells and that the amphetamine-mediated increase in DAT activity enhances the association of these proteins at the plasma membrane. Further examination of the interaction of DAT and α-synuclein revealed a transient interaction between these two proteins at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we found DAT-induced membrane depolarization enhances plasma membrane localization of α-synuclein, which in turn increases dopamine efflux and enhances DAT localization in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. PMID:26442590

  19. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  20. The Riboswitch Regulates a Thiamine Pyrophosphate ABC Transporter of the Oral Spirochete Treponema denticola ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Shen, Hongwu; Tu, Youbin; Yu, Aiming; Li, Chunhao

    2011-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a biologically active form of thiamine (vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor in all living systems. Microorganisms either synthesize TPP via de novo biosynthesis pathways or uptake exogenous thiamine from the environment via specific transporters. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola is an important pathogen that is associated with human periodontal diseases. It lacks a de novo TPP biosynthesis pathway and needs exogenous TPP for growth, suggesting that it may obtain exogenous TPP via a thiamine transporter. In this study, we identified a gene cluster that encodes a TPP ABC transporter which consists of a TPP-binding protein (TDE0143), a transmembrane permease (TDE0144), and a cytosolic ATPase (TDE0145). Transcriptional and translational analyses showed that the genes encoding these three proteins are cotranscribed and form an operon (tbpABCTd) that is initiated by a σ70-like promoter. The expression level of this operon is negatively regulated by exogenous TPP and is mediated by a TPP-sensing riboswitch (Tdthi-box). Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that the TDE0143 deletion mutant (T. denticola ΔtbpA) had a decreased ability to transport exogenous TPP, and the mutant failed to grow when exogenous TPP was insufficient. These results taken together indicate that the tbpABCTd operon encodes an ABC transporter that is required for the uptake of exogenous TPP and that the expression of this operon is regulated by a TPP-binding riboswitch via a feedback inhibition mechanism. PMID:21622748

  1. Taxol induced apoptosis regulates amino acid transport in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyuan; Shen, Dejun; Chen, Zujian; Clayton, Sheila; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2007-03-01

    A major outcome from Taxol treatment is induction of tumor cell apoptosis. However, metabolic responses to Taxol-induced apoptosis are poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesize that alterations in specific amino acid transporters may affect the Taxol-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In this case, the activity of the given transporter may serve as a biomarker that could provide a biological assessment of response to drug treatment. We have examined the mechanisms responsible for Taxol-induced neutral amino acid uptake by breast cancer cells, such as MCF-7, BT474, MDAMB231 and T47D. The biochemical and molecular studies include: (1) growth-inhibition (MTT); (2) transport kinetics: (3) substrate-specific inhibition; (4) effect of thiol-modifying agents NEM and NPM; (5) gene expression of amino acid transporters; and (6) apoptotic assays. Our data show that Taxol treatment of MCF-7 cells induced a transient increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of the neutral amino acid transporter B0 at both gene and protein level. This increase was attenuated by blocking the transporter in the presence of high concentrations of the substrate amino acid. Other neutral amino acid transporters such as ATA2 (System A) and ASC were not altered. Amino acid starvation resulted in the expected up-regulation of System A (ATA2) gene, but not for B0 and ASC. B0 was significantly down regulated. Taxol treatment had no significant effect on the uptake of arginine and glutamate as measured by System y(+) and X(-) (GC) respectively. Tunel assays and FACS cell cycle analysis demonstrated that both Taxol- and doxorubicin-induced upregulation of B0 transporter gene with accompanying increase in cell apoptosis, could be reversed partially by blocking the B0 transporter with high concentration of alanine, and/or by inhibiting the caspase pathway. Both Taxol and doxorubicin treatment caused a significant decrease in S-phase of the cell cycle. However, Taxol-induced an increase primarily

  2. 14 CFR 223.21 - Free and reduced-rate transportation authorized by statute or regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Free and reduced-rate transportation authorized by statute or regulation. 223.21 Section 223.21 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS FREE AND REDUCED-RATE TRANSPORTATION International Travel § 223.21 Free...

  3. Regulation of Auxin Transport by Phosphorylation and Flavonoids during Gravitropism in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, Gloria K.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this research includes: 1) Regulation of Axin transport by flavonoids during gravitropism; 2) Phosphorylation control of auxin transport during gravity response; 3) Ethylene regulation of gravitropic curvature; 4) IBA transport and gravitropic response; and 5) Other collaborative projects.

  4. Activation product transport in fusion reactors. [RAPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs.

  5. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers, which is consistent with the trend of human NTCP mRNA expression between men and women. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid increased Bsep mRNA expression. In silico analysis indicates that female-predominant mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression may be due to GH. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  6. Impact of river regulation on potential sediment mobilization and transport in an Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter; Lane, Stuart N.; Bakker, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The upper Rhône basin (upstream of Lake Geneva) has been heavily affected by human activities during the last century. The most evident impacts are related to river regulation, specifically flow impoundement, flow abstraction and channelization. In the last century and mainly since 1960, several large dams have been built along the main tributaries of the Rhône River, resulting in the water storage of a volume equal to 20% of the total annual river flow. The dams are part of hydropower systems which abstract water from streams and transfer it through complex networks (intakes, tunnels and pumping stations) to the reservoirs. Hydropower production leads to regulated flow in the Rhône: mostly an increase of winter flows, a reduction of summer flows, and a decrease of flood peaks. The sediment supply into Lake Geneva has decreased following dam construction (Loizeau & Dominik, 2000) due to the storage of sediment in upstream reservoirs, in rivers with reduced sediment transport capacity due to flow abstraction, and due to the development of sediment mining. Our hypothesis is that streamflow regulation itself has dramatically impacted the sediment transport dynamics of the system. We investigate the impacts of flow regulation on the sediment transport regime, by analysing the effects on potential sediment transport capacity (bedload). By the use of different bedload transport formulae (Meyer-Peter Müller, Wilcock and Crowe), the potential sediment transport capacity is computed at different cross sections within the basin. Potential sediment mobility occurs when the applied bed shear stress exceeds a critical value, τ>τc. The applied bed shear stress is computed as τ=ρghS, with water depth (h) measured from rating curves. We obtain an estimate of the energy slope (S) from the analysis of the river cross section, assuming uniform flow. The critical value of bed shear stress τc is computed using empirical formulae as a function of the grain diameter (ds). To

  7. Src regulates the activity of SIRT2

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, You Hee; Kim, Hangun; Lee, Sung Ho; Jin, Yun-Hye; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Src decreases the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src inhibitor and knockdown of Src increase the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src interacts with and phosphorylates Sirt2. • Src regulate the activity of Sirt2. - Abstract: SIRT2 is a mammalian member of the Sirtuin family of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, leading to the induction of DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal reorganization. The function of SIRT2 is modulated by post-translational modifications; however, the precise molecular signaling mechanism of SIRT2 through interactions with c-Src has not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the potential regulation of SIRT2 function by c-Src. We found that the protein levels of SIRT2 were decreased by c-Src, and subsequently rescued by the addition of a Src specific inhibitor, SU6656, or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Src. The c-Src interacts with and phosphorylates SIRT2 at Tyr104. c-Src also showed the ability to regulate the deacetylation activity of SIRT2. Investigation on the phosphorylation of SIRT2 suggested that this was the method of c-Src-mediated SIRT2 regulation.

  8. Regulation of reduced-folate transporter-1 (RFT-1) in retinal pigment epithelial cells by folate

    PubMed Central

    Naggar, Hany; VanElls, Tracy K.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Reduced-folate transporter-1 (RFT-1), a typical transport protein with twelve membrane-spanning domains, transports reduced-folates, such as N5-methyltetrahydrofolate (MTF), the predominant circulating form of folate. RFT-1 is localized to the RPE apical membrane and transports folate from RPE to photoreceptor cells. We asked whether RFT-1 activity in RPE is altered under high folate conditions. Methods ARPE-19 cells were cultured 24, 48 or 72 h in medium containing either 0.5 nM, 5.0 nM or 2.26 µM MTF and the activity of RFT-1 was assessed by determining the uptake of N5-MTF. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to study RFT-1 gene and protein expression. Results Cells treated for 72 h with 2.26 µM MTF showed a significant (40%) decrease in MTF uptake compared to cells exposed to 0.5 nM or 5 nM MTF. The effect of high concentrations of folate on RFT-1 activity was specific. Kinetic analysis showed that folate-induced attenuation of RFT-1 activity was associated with a decrease in the maximal velocity of the transporter, but no change in the substrate affinity. Steady-state levels of RFT-1 mRNA and protein decreased significantly in the presence of excess folate. Conclusions Excess folate levels folate downregulate RFT-1 in RPE. This study represents the first molecular analysis of the regulation of RFT-1 by folate in RPE and reveals attenuation of the activity and expression of a folate transport protein under conditions of high levels of folate. PMID:15875363

  9. Interleukin-17A Regulates Renal Sodium Transporters and Renal Injury in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Norlander, Allison E; Saleh, Mohamed A; Kamat, Nikhil V; Ko, Benjamin; Gnecco, Juan; Zhu, Linjue; Dale, Bethany L; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Hoover, Robert S; McDonough, Alicia A; Madhur, Meena S

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin II-induced hypertension is associated with an increase in T-cell production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Recently, we reported that IL-17A(-/-) mice exhibit blunted hypertension, preserved natriuresis in response to a saline challenge, and decreased renal sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression after 2 weeks of angiotensin II infusion compared with wild-type mice. In the current study, we performed renal transporter profiling in mice deficient in IL-17A or the related isoform, IL-17F, after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion, the time when the blood pressure reduction in IL-17A(-/-) mice is most prominent. Deficiency of IL-17A abolished the activation of distal tubule transporters, specifically the sodium-chloride cotransporter and the epithelial sodium channel and protected mice from glomerular and tubular injury. In human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells, IL-17A increased sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression through a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1-dependent pathway. In mouse distal convoluted tubule cells, IL-17A increased sodium-chloride cotransporter activity in a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1/Nedd4-2-dependent pathway. In both cell types, acute treatment with IL-17A induced phosphorylation of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 at serine 78, and treatment with a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 inhibitor blocked the effects of IL-17A on sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 and sodium-chloride cotransporter. Interestingly, both HK-2 and mouse distal convoluted tubule 15 cells produce endogenous IL-17A. IL17F had little or no effect on blood pressure or renal sodium transporter abundance. These studies provide a mechanistic link by which IL-17A modulates renal sodium transport and suggest that IL-17A inhibition may improve renal function in hypertension and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27141060

  10. Hypoxia regulates glutamate metabolism and membrane transport in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effect of hypoxia on glutamate metabolism and uptake in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Various key enzymes relevant to glutamate production, metabolism and transport were coordinately regulated by hypoxia. PC12 cells express two glutamate-metabolizing enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as the glutamate-producing enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Exposure to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 6 h or longer increased expression of GS mRNA and protein and enhanced GS enzymatic activity. In contrast, hypoxia caused a significant decrease in expression of PAG mRNA and protein, and also decreased PAG activity. In addition, hypoxia led to an increase in GAD65 and GAD67 protein levels and GAD enzymatic activity. PC12 cells express three Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters; EAAC1, GLT-1 and GLAST. Hypoxia increased EAAC1 and GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on GLAST. Chronic hypoxia significantly enhanced the Na(+)-dependent component of glutamate transport. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased cellular content of glutamate, but increased that of glutamine. Taken together, the hypoxia-induced changes in enzymes related to glutamate metabolism and transport are consistent with a decrease in the extracellular concentration of glutamate. This may have a role in protecting PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate during chronic hypoxia. PMID:11259512

  11. Endocytosis, recycling, and regulated exocytosis of glucose transporter 4.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kevin; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira

    2011-04-19

    Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is responsible for the uptake of glucose into muscle and adipose tissues. Under resting conditions, GLUT4 is dynamically retained through idle cycling among selective intracellular compartments, from whence it undergoes slow recycling to the plasma membrane (PM). This dynamic retention can be released by command from intracellular signals elicited by insulin and other stimuli, which result in 2-10-fold increases in the surface level of GLUT4. Insulin-derived signals promote translocation of GLUT4 to the PM from a specialized compartment termed GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSV). Much effort has been devoted to the characterization of the intracellular compartments and dynamics of GLUT4 cycling and to the signals by which GLUT4 is sorted into, and recruited from, GSV. This review summarizes our understanding of intracellular GLUT4 traffic during its internalization from the membrane, its slow, constitutive recycling, and its regulated exocytosis in response to insulin. In spite of specific differences in GLUT4 dynamic behavior in adipose and muscle cells, the generalities of its endocytic and exocytic itineraries are consistent and an array of regulatory proteins that regulate each vesicular traffic event emerges from these cell systems. PMID:21405107

  12. Transcriptional regulation of a Bacillus subtilis dipeptide transport operon.

    PubMed

    Slack, F J; Mueller, J P; Strauch, M A; Mathiopoulos, C; Sonenshein, A L

    1991-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis dciA operon, which encodes a dipeptide transport system, was induced rapidly by several conditions that caused the cells to enter stationary phase and initiate sporulation. The in vivo start point of transcription was mapped precisely and shown to correspond to a site of transcription initiation in vitro by the major vegetative form of RNA polymerase. Post-exponential expression was prevented by a mutation in the spo0A gene (whose product is a known regulator of early sporulation genes) but was restored in a spo0A abrB double mutant. This implicated AbrB, another known regulator, as a repressor of dciA. In fact, purified AbrB protein bound to a portion of the dciA promoter region, protecting it against DNase I digestion. Expression of dciA in growing cells was also repressed independently by glucose and by a mixture of amino acids; neither of these effects was mediated by AbrB. PMID:1766371

  13. Glutamate Receptor Agonists and Glutamate Transporter Antagonists Regulate Differentiation of Osteoblast Lineage Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjie; Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Hofstetter, Willy

    2016-08-01

    Development and function of osteoblast lineage cells are regulated by a complex microenvironment consisting of the bone extracellular matrix, cells, systemic hormones and cytokines, autocrine and paracrine factors, and mechanical load. Apart from receptors that transduce extracellular signals into the cell, molecular transporters play a crucial role in the cellular response to the microenvironment. Transporter molecules are responsible for cellular uptake of nutritional components, elimination of metabolites, ion transport, and cell-cell communication. In this report, the expression of molecular transporters in osteoblast lineage cells was investigated to assess their roles in cell development and activity. Low-density arrays, covering membrane and vesicular transport molecules, were used to assess gene expression in osteoblasts representing early and late differentiation states. Receptors and transporters for the amino acid glutamate were found to be differentially expressed during osteoblast development. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and the mechanisms of its release, signal transduction, and cellular reabsorption in the synaptic cleft are well understood. Less clear, however, is the control of equivalent processes in peripheral tissues. In primary osteoblasts, inhibition of glutamate transporters with nonselective inhibitors leads to an increase in the concentration of extracellular glutamate. This change was accompanied by a decrease in osteoblast proliferation, stimulation of alkaline phosphatase, and the expression of transcripts encoding osteocalcin. Enzymatic removal of extracellular glutamate abolished these pro-differentiation effects, as did the inhibition of PKC- and Erk1/2-signaling pathways. These findings demonstrate that glutamate signaling promotes differentiation and activation of osteoblast lineage cells. Consequently, the glutamate system may represent a putative therapeutic target to induce an anabolic response

  14. Transport Regulation of Two-Dimensional Receptor-Ligand Association

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Lining; Qian, Jin; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The impact of flow disturbances on platelet adhesion is complex and incompletely understood. At the molecular scale, platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) must associate with the von Willebrand factor A1 domain (VWF-A1) with a rapid on-rate under high hemodynamic forces, as occurs in arterial thrombosis, where various transport mechanisms are at work. Here, we theoretically modeled the coupled transport-reaction process of the two-dimensional (2D) receptor-ligand association kinetics in a biomembrane force probe to explicitly account for the effects of molecular length, confinement stiffness, medium viscosity, surface curvature, and separation distance. We experimentally verified the theoretical approach by visualizing association and dissociation of individual VWF-A1-GPIbα bonds in a real-time thermal fluctuation assay. The apparent on-rate, reciprocal of the average time intervals between sequential bonds, decreased with the increasing gap distance between A1- and GPIbα-bearing surfaces with an 80-nm threshold (beyond which bond formation became prohibitive) identified as the combined contour length of the receptor and ligand molecules. The biomembrane force probe spring constant and diffusivity of the protein-bearing beads also significantly influenced the apparent on-rate, in accordance with the proposed transport mechanisms. The global agreement between the experimental data and the model predictions supports the hypothesis that receptor-ligand association behaves distinctly in the transport- and reaction-limited scenarios. To our knowledge, our results represent the first detailed quantification of physical regulation of the 2D on-rate that allows platelets to sense and respond to local changes in their hemodynamic environment. In addition, they provide an approach for determining the intrinsic kinetic parameters that employs simultaneous experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of bond association in a single assay. The 2D intrinsic forward rate

  15. Transport regulation of two-dimensional receptor-ligand association.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lining; Qian, Jin; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The impact of flow disturbances on platelet adhesion is complex and incompletely understood. At the molecular scale, platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) must associate with the von Willebrand factor A1 domain (VWF-A1) with a rapid on-rate under high hemodynamic forces, as occurs in arterial thrombosis, where various transport mechanisms are at work. Here, we theoretically modeled the coupled transport-reaction process of the two-dimensional (2D) receptor-ligand association kinetics in a biomembrane force probe to explicitly account for the effects of molecular length, confinement stiffness, medium viscosity, surface curvature, and separation distance. We experimentally verified the theoretical approach by visualizing association and dissociation of individual VWF-A1-GPIbα bonds in a real-time thermal fluctuation assay. The apparent on-rate, reciprocal of the average time intervals between sequential bonds, decreased with the increasing gap distance between A1- and GPIbα-bearing surfaces with an 80-nm threshold (beyond which bond formation became prohibitive) identified as the combined contour length of the receptor and ligand molecules. The biomembrane force probe spring constant and diffusivity of the protein-bearing beads also significantly influenced the apparent on-rate, in accordance with the proposed transport mechanisms. The global agreement between the experimental data and the model predictions supports the hypothesis that receptor-ligand association behaves distinctly in the transport- and reaction-limited scenarios. To our knowledge, our results represent the first detailed quantification of physical regulation of the 2D on-rate that allows platelets to sense and respond to local changes in their hemodynamic environment. In addition, they provide an approach for determining the intrinsic kinetic parameters that employs simultaneous experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of bond association in a single assay. The 2D intrinsic forward rate

  16. Evolutionarily divergent, Na+-regulated H+-transporting membrane-bound pyrophosphatases.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Heidi H; Nordbo, Erika; Malinen, Anssi M; Baykov, Alexander A; Lahti, Reijo

    2015-04-15

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatase (mPPases) of various types consume pyrophosphate (PPi) to drive active H+ or Na+ transport across membranes. H+-transporting PPases are divided into phylogenetically distinct K+-independent and K+-dependent subfamilies. In the present study, we describe a group of 46 bacterial proteins and one archaeal protein that are only distantly related to known mPPases (23%-34% sequence identity). Despite this evolutionary divergence, these proteins contain the full set of 12 polar residues that interact with PPi, the nucleophilic water and five cofactor Mg2+ ions found in 'canonical' mPPases. They also contain a specific lysine residue that confers K+ independence on canonical mPPases. Two of the proteins (from Chlorobium limicola and Cellulomonas fimi) were expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to catalyse Mg2+-dependent PPi hydrolysis coupled with electrogenic H+, but not Na+ transport, in inverted membrane vesicles. Unique features of the new H+-PPases include their inhibition by Na+ and inhibition or activation, depending on PPi concentration, by K+ ions. Kinetic analyses of PPi hydrolysis over wide ranges of cofactor (Mg2+) and substrate (Mg2-PPi) concentrations indicated that the alkali cations displace Mg2+ from the enzyme, thereby arresting substrate conversion. These data define the new proteins as a novel subfamily of H+-transporting mPPases that partly retained the Na+ and K+ regulation patterns of their precursor Na+-transporting mPPases. PMID:25662511

  17. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  18. Maltose/Maltodextrin System of Escherichia coli: Transport, Metabolism, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Winfried; Shuman, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The maltose system of Escherichia coli offers an unusually rich set of enzymes, transporters, and regulators as objects of study. This system is responsible for the uptake and metabolism of glucose polymers (maltodextrins), which must be a preferred class of nutrients for E. coli in both mammalian hosts and in the environment. Because the metabolism of glucose polymers must be coordinated with both the anabolic and catabolic uses of glucose and glycogen, an intricate set of regulatory mechanisms controls the expression of mal genes, the activity of the maltose transporter, and the activities of the maltose/maltodextrin catabolic enzymes. The ease of isolating many of the mal gene products has contributed greatly to the understanding of the structures and functions of several classes of proteins. Not only was the outer membrane maltoporin, LamB, or the phage lambda receptor, the first virus receptor to be isolated, but also its three-dimensional structure, together with extensive knowledge of functional sites for ligand binding as well as for phage λ binding, has led to a relatively complete description of this sugar-specific aqueous channel. The periplasmic maltose binding protein (MBP) has been studied with respect to its role in both maltose transport and maltose taxis. Again, the combination of structural and functional information has led to a significant understanding of how this soluble receptor participates in signaling the presence of sugar to the chemosensory apparatus as well as how it participates in sugar transport. The maltose transporter belongs to the ATP binding cassette family, and although its structure is not yet known at atomic resolution, there is some insight into the structures of several functional sites, including those that are involved in interactions with MBP and recognition of substrates and ATP. A particularly astonishing discovery is the direct participation of the transporter in transcriptional control of the mal regulon. The Mal

  19. Translational and post-translational regulation of mouse cation transport regulator homolog 1.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuki; Hirata, Yoko; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Oh-Hashi, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Cation transport regulator homolog 1 (Chac1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducible gene that has a function as a γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase involved in the degradation of glutathione. To characterize the translation and stability of Chac1, we found that the Kozak-like sequence present in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the Chac1 mRNA was responsible for Chac1 translation. In addition, the short form (ΔChac1), which translated from the second ATG codon, was generated in the absence of the 5'UTR. The proteasome pathway predominantly participated in the stability of the Chac1 protein; however, its expression was remarkably up-regulated by co-transfection with ubiquitin genes. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we revealed that ubiquitin molecule was directly conjugated to Chac1, and that mutated Chac1 with all lysine residues replaced by arginine was also ubiquitinated. Finally, we showed that WT Chac1 but not ΔChac1 reduced the intracellular level of glutathione. Taken together, our results suggest that the Chac1 protein expression is regulated in translational and post-translational fashion due to the Kozak-like sequence in the 5'UTR and the ubiquitin-mediated pathways. The bidirectional roles of ubiquitination in regulating Chac1 stabilization might give us a new insight into understanding the homeostasis of glutathione under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27302742

  20. Translational and post-translational regulation of mouse cation transport regulator homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yuki; Hirata, Yoko; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Oh-hashi, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Cation transport regulator homolog 1 (Chac1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducible gene that has a function as a γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase involved in the degradation of glutathione. To characterize the translation and stability of Chac1, we found that the Kozak-like sequence present in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the Chac1 mRNA was responsible for Chac1 translation. In addition, the short form (ΔChac1), which translated from the second ATG codon, was generated in the absence of the 5′UTR. The proteasome pathway predominantly participated in the stability of the Chac1 protein; however, its expression was remarkably up-regulated by co-transfection with ubiquitin genes. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we revealed that ubiquitin molecule was directly conjugated to Chac1, and that mutated Chac1 with all lysine residues replaced by arginine was also ubiquitinated. Finally, we showed that WT Chac1 but not ΔChac1 reduced the intracellular level of glutathione. Taken together, our results suggest that the Chac1 protein expression is regulated in translational and post-translational fashion due to the Kozak-like sequence in the 5′UTR and the ubiquitin-mediated pathways. The bidirectional roles of ubiquitination in regulating Chac1 stabilization might give us a new insight into understanding the homeostasis of glutathione under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27302742

  1. Antioxidant resveratrol restores renal sodium transport regulation in SHR

    PubMed Central

    Javkhedkar, Apurva A; Banday, Anees A

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have shown that in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) renal angiotensin (Ang) II receptor (AT1R) upregulation leads to overstimulation of Na/K-ATPase by Ang II. There are reports that antioxidants can reduce oxidative stress and blood pressure (BP) in SHR, however the effect of these compounds on AT1R function remains to be determined. Therefore, we hypothesized that polyphenol antioxidant resveratrol would mitigate oxidative stress, normalize renal AT1R signaling, and reduce BP in SHR. SHR and wistar-kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with resveratrol for 8 weeks. Untreated SHR exhibited oxidative stress and enhanced renal proximal tubular Ang II-induced G-protein activation and Na/K-ATPase stimulation. Treatment of SHR with resveratrol mitigated oxidative stress, reduced BP, and normalized renal AT1R signaling. In SHR, nuclear expression of transcription factor NF-κB was increased while expression of Nrf2 was reduced. SHR also exhibited a significant decrease in renal antioxidant capacity and activities of phase II antioxidant enzymes. Resveratrol treatment of SHR abolished renal NF-κB activation, restored Nrf2-phase II antioxidant signaling and Ang II-mediated Na/K-ATPase regulation. These data show that in SHR, oxidative stress via activation of NF-κB upregulates AT1R–G-protein signaling resulting in overstimulation Na/K-ATPase which contributes to hypertension. Resveratrol, via Nrf2, activates phase II antioxidant enzymes, mitigates oxidative stress, normalizes AT1R–G-protein signaling and Na/K-ATPase regulation, and decreases BP in SHR. PMID:26603454

  2. Identification and characterization of the zinc-regulated transporters, iron-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) gene family in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) are essential micronutrients for plant growth and development, their deficiency or excess severely impaired physiological and biochemical reactions of plants. Therefore, a tightly controlled zinc and iron uptake and homeostasis network has been evolved in plants. The Zinc-regulated transporters, Iron-regulated transporter-like Proteins (ZIP) are capable of uptaking and transporting divalent metal ion and are suggested to play critical roles in balancing metal uptake and homeostasis, though a detailed analysis of ZIP gene family in maize is still lacking. Results Nine ZIP-coding genes were identified in maize genome. It was revealed that the ZmZIP proteins share a conserved transmembrane domain and a variable region between TM-3 and TM-4. Transiently expression in onion epidermal cells revealed that all ZmZIP proteins were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. The yeast complementation analysis was performed to test the Zn or Fe transporter activity of ZmZIP proteins. Expression analysis showed that the ZmIRT1 transcripts were dramatically induced in response to Zn- and Fe-deficiency, though the expression profiles of other ZmZIP changed variously. The expression patterns of ZmZIP genes were observed in different stages of embryo and endosperm development. The accumulations of ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP6 were increased in the late developmental stages of embryo, while ZmZIP4 was up-regulated during the early development of embryo. In addition, the expression of ZmZIP5 was dramatically induced associated with middle stage development of embryo and endosperm. Conclusions These results suggest that ZmZIP genes encode functional Zn or Fe transporters that may be responsible for the uptake, translocation, detoxification and storage of divalent metal ion in plant cells. The various expression patterns of ZmZIP genes in embryo and endosperm indicates that they may be essential for ion translocation and storage during

  3. Team Regulation, Regulation of Social Activities or Co-Regulation: Different Labels for Effective Regulation of Learning in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is an approach to learning in which learners can actively and collaboratively construct knowledge by means of interaction and joint problem solving. Regulation of learning is especially important in the domain of CSCL. Next to the regulation of task performance, the interaction between learners who…

  4. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. PMID:26139029

  5. The BRCA1 Breast Cancer Suppressor: Regulation of Transport, Dynamics, and Function at Multiple Subcellular Locations

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Beric R.

    2012-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene predispose to a higher risk of breast/ovarian cancer. The BRCA1 tumor suppressor is a 1863 amino acid protein with multiple protein interaction domains that facilitate its roles in regulating DNA repair and maintenance, cell cycle progression, transcription, and cell survival/apoptosis. BRCA1 was first identified as a nuclear phosphoprotein, but has since been shown to contain different transport sequences including nuclear export and nuclear localization signals that enable it to shuttle between specific sites within the nucleus and cytoplasm, including DNA repair foci, centrosomes, and mitochondria. BRCA1 nuclear transport and ubiquitin E3 ligase enzymatic activity are tightly regulated by the BRCA1 dimeric binding partner BARD1 and further modulated by cancer mutations and diverse signaling pathways. This paper will focus on the transport, dynamics, and multiple intracellular destinations of BRCA1 with emphasis on how regulation of these events has impact on, and determines, a broad range of important cellular functions. PMID:24278741

  6. Activities and regulation of peptidoglycan synthases

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Alexander J. F.; Biboy, Jacob; van't Veer, Inge; Breukink, Eefjan; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component in the cell wall of nearly all bacteria, forming a continuous, mesh-like structure, called the sacculus, around the cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from bursting by its turgor. Although PG synthases, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied for 70 years, useful in vitro assays for measuring their activities were established only recently, and these provided the first insights into the regulation of these enzymes. Here, we review the current knowledge on the glycosyltransferase and transpeptidase activities of PG synthases. We provide new data showing that the bifunctional PBP1A and PBP1B from Escherichia coli are active upon reconstitution into the membrane environment of proteoliposomes, and that these enzymes also exhibit DD-carboxypeptidase activity in certain conditions. Both novel features are relevant for their functioning within the cell. We also review recent data on the impact of protein–protein interactions and other factors on the activities of PBPs. As an example, we demonstrate a synergistic effect of multiple protein–protein interactions on the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1B, by its cognate lipoprotein activator LpoB and the essential cell division protein FtsN. PMID:26370943

  7. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  8. Characterisation of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Manganese Transport Regulator Orthologue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianyi; Butler, Catherine A; Khan, Hasnah S G; Dashper, Stuart G; Seers, Christine A; Veith, Paul D; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    PgMntR is a predicted member of the DtxR family of transcriptional repressors responsive to manganese in the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our bioinformatic analyses predicted that PgMntR had divalent metal binding site(s) with elements of both manganous and ferrous ion specificity and that PgMntR has unusual twin C-terminal FeoA domains. We produced recombinant PgMntR and four variants to probe the specificity of metal binding and its impact on protein structure and DNA binding. PgMntR dimerised in the absence of a divalent transition metal cation. PgMntR bound three Mn(II) per monomer with an overall dissociation constant Kd 2.0 x 10(-11) M at pH 7.5. PgMntR also bound two Fe(II) with distinct binding affinities, Kd1 2.5 x 10(-10) M and Kd2 ≤ 6.0 x 10(-8) M at pH 6.8. Two of the metal binding sites may form a binuclear centre with two bound Mn2+ being bridged by Cys108 but this centre provided only one site for Fe2+. Binding of Fe2+ or Mn2+ did not have a marked effect on the PgMntR secondary structure. Apo-PgMntR had a distinct affinity for the promoter region of the gene encoding the only known P. gingivalis manganese transporter, FB2. Mn2+ increased the DNA binding affinity of PgMntR whilst Fe2+ destabilised the protein-DNA complex in vitro. PgMntR did not bind the promoter DNA of the gene encoding the characterised iron transporter FB1. The C-terminal FeoA domain was shown to be essential for PgMntR structure/function, as its removal caused the introduction of an intramolecular disulfide bond and abolished the binding of Mn2+ and DNA. These data indicate that PgMntR is a novel member of the DtxR family that may function as a transcriptional repressor switch to specifically regulate manganese transport and homeostasis in an iron-dependent manner. PMID:27007570

  9. Characterisation of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Manganese Transport Regulator Orthologue

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, Stuart G.; Seers, Christine A.; Veith, Paul D.; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    PgMntR is a predicted member of the DtxR family of transcriptional repressors responsive to manganese in the anaerobic periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our bioinformatic analyses predicted that PgMntR had divalent metal binding site(s) with elements of both manganous and ferrous ion specificity and that PgMntR has unusual twin C-terminal FeoA domains. We produced recombinant PgMntR and four variants to probe the specificity of metal binding and its impact on protein structure and DNA binding. PgMntR dimerised in the absence of a divalent transition metal cation. PgMntR bound three Mn(II) per monomer with an overall dissociation constant Kd 2.0 x 10−11 M at pH 7.5. PgMntR also bound two Fe(II) with distinct binding affinities, Kd1 2.5 x 10−10 M and Kd2 ≤ 6.0 x 10−8 M at pH 6.8. Two of the metal binding sites may form a binuclear centre with two bound Mn2+ being bridged by Cys108 but this centre provided only one site for Fe2+. Binding of Fe2+ or Mn2+ did not have a marked effect on the PgMntR secondary structure. Apo-PgMntR had a distinct affinity for the promoter region of the gene encoding the only known P. gingivalis manganese transporter, FB2. Mn2+ increased the DNA binding affinity of PgMntR whilst Fe2+ destabilised the protein-DNA complex in vitro. PgMntR did not bind the promoter DNA of the gene encoding the characterised iron transporter FB1. The C-terminal FeoA domain was shown to be essential for PgMntR structure/function, as its removal caused the introduction of an intramolecular disulfide bond and abolished the binding of Mn2+ and DNA. These data indicate that PgMntR is a novel member of the DtxR family that may function as a transcriptional repressor switch to specifically regulate manganese transport and homeostasis in an iron-dependent manner. PMID:27007570

  10. Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter-Mediated ATP Release Regulates Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Jessica C.; Corbin, Kathryn L.; Li, Qin; Feranchak, Andrew P.; Nunemaker, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular ATP plays a critical role in regulating insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells. The ATP released from insulin secretory vesicles has been proposed to be a major source of extracellular ATP. Currently, the mechanism by which ATP accumulates into insulin secretory granules remains elusive. In this study, the authors identified the expression of a vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in mouse pancreas, isolated mouse islets, and MIN6 cells, a mouse β cell line. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed that VNUT colocalized extensively with insulin secretory granules. Functional studies showed that suppressing endogenous VNUT expression in β cells by small hairpin RNA knockdown greatly reduced basal- and glucose-induced ATP release. Importantly, knocking down VNUT expression by VNUT small hairpin RNA in MIN6 cells and isolated mouse islets dramatically suppressed basal insulin release and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Moreover, acute pharmacologic blockade of VNUT with Evans blue, a VNUT antagonist, greatly attenuated GSIS in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous ATP treatment effectively reversed the insulin secretion defect induced by both VNUT knockdown and functional inhibition, indicating that VNUT-mediated ATP release is essential for maintaining normal insulin secretion. In contrast to VNUT knockdown, overexpression of VNUT in β cells resulted in excessive ATP release and enhanced basal insulin secretion and GSIS. Elevated insulin secretion induced by VNUT overexpression was reversed by pharmacologic inhibition of P2X but not P2Y purinergic receptors. This study reveals VNUT is expressed in pancreatic β cells and plays an essential and novel role in regulating insulin secretion through vesicular ATP release and extracellular purinergic signaling. PMID:23254199