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Sample records for reinforced plastic laminates

  1. Laminated anisotropic reinforced plastic plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korolev, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Basic technical theories and engineering calculation equations for anisotropic plates and shells made of rigid reinforced plastics, mainly laminated fiberglass, are presented and discussed. Solutions are given for many problems of design of structural plates and shells, including curved sections and tanks, as well as two chapters on selection of the optimum materials, are given. Accounting for interlayer shearing and transverse separation, which are new engineering properties, are discussed. Application of the results obtained to thin three ply plates and shells wth a light elastic filler is presented and discussed.

  2. Development of lightweight reinforced plastic laminates for spacecraft interior applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Lightweight, Kevlar - reinforced laminating systems that are non-burning, generate little smoke in the space shuttle environment, and are physically equivalent to the fiberglass/polyimide system used in the Apollo program for non-structural cabin panels, racks, etc. Resin systems representing five generic classes were screened as matrices for Kevlar 49 reinforced laminates. Of the systems evaluated, the polyimides were the most promising with the phenolics a close second. Skybond 703 was selected as the most promising resin candidate. With the exception of compression strength, all program goals of physical and mechanical properties were exceeded. Several prototype space shuttle mobility and translation handrail segments were manufactured using Kevlar/epoxy and Kevlar-graphite/epoxy. This application shows significant weight savings over the baseline aluminum configuration used previous. The hybrid Kevlar-graphite/epoxy is more suitable from a processing standpoint.

  3. Failure criterion of glass fabric reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haga, O.; Hayashi, N.; Kasuya, K.

    1986-01-01

    Failure criteria are derived for several modes of failure (in unaxial tensile or compressive loading, or biaxial combined tensile-compressive loading) in the case of closely woven plain fabric, coarsely-woven plain fabric, or roving glass cloth reinforcements. The shear strength in the interaction formula is replaced by an equation dealing with tensile or compressive strength in the direction making a 45 degree angle with one of the anisotropic axes, for the uniaxial failure criteria. The interaction formula is useful as the failure criterion in combined tension-compression biaxial failure for the case of closely woven plain fabric laminates, but poor agreement is obtained in the case of coarsely woven fabric laminates.

  4. Strength of anisotropic wood and synthetic materials. [plywood, laminated wood plastics, glass fiber reinforced plastics, polymeric film, and natural wood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazi, Y. K.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using general formulas for determining the strength of different anisotropic materials is considered, and theoretical formulas are applied and confirmed by results of tests on various nonmetallic materials. Data are cited on the strength of wood, plywood, laminated wood plastics, fiber glass-reinforced plastics and directed polymer films.

  5. The use of lamination analysis and the Tsai-Wu stress criterion in ASME standards for fiber reinforced plastic vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Conlisk, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    The ASME publishes two standards on FRP (Fiber Reinforced Plastic) vessels: Section X of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, and RTP-1 (Reinforced Thermoset Plastic Corrosion Resistant Equipment), which concerns low pressure FRP vessels. The paper describes the application of lamination theory and the Tsai-Wu tensor strength criterion to qualifying designs to the two standards. Numerical examples of application of the theory to typical laminates subjected to pure membrane, pure bending, and combined membrane and bending loads are presented.

  6. Modeling the Non-Linear Response of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Using a Combined Damage/Plasticity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Pettermann, Heinz E.

    2008-01-01

    The present work is concerned with modeling the non-linear response of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. Recent experimental data suggests that the non-linearity is not only caused by matrix cracking but also by matrix plasticity due to shear stresses. To capture the effects of those two mechanisms, a model combining a plasticity formulation with continuum damage has been developed to simulate the non-linear response of laminates under plane stress states. The model is used to compare the predicted behavior of various laminate lay-ups to experimental data from the literature by looking at the degradation of axial modulus and Poisson s ratio of the laminates. The influence of residual curing stresses and in-situ effect on the predicted response is also investigated. It is shown that predictions of the combined damage/plasticity model, in general, correlate well with the experimental data. The test data shows that there are two different mechanisms that can have opposite effects on the degradation of the laminate Poisson s ratio which is captured correctly by the damage/plasticity model. Residual curing stresses are found to have a minor influence on the predicted response for the cases considered here. Some open questions remain regarding the prediction of damage onset.

  7. Retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames using glass fiber reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakam, Zeyad Hamed-Ramzy

    2000-11-01

    This study focuses on the retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames subjected to in-plane lateral loads using glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates that are epoxy-bonded to the exterior faces of the infill walls. An extensive experimental investigation using one-third scale modeling was conducted and consisted of two phases. In the first phase, 64 assemblages, half of which were retrofitted, were tested under various combined in-plane loading conditions similar to those which different regions of a typical infill wall are subjected to. In the second phase, one bare and four masonry-infilled steel frames representative of a typical single-story, single-bay panel were tested under diagonal loading to study the overall behavior and the infill-frame interaction. The relative infill-to-frame stiffness was varied as a test parameter by using two different steel frame sections. The laminates altered the failure modes of the masonry assemblages and reduced the variability and anisotropic nature of the masonry. For the prisms which failed due to shear and/or mortar joint slip, significant strength increases were observed. For those exhibiting compression failure modes, a marginal increase in strength resulted. Retrofitting the infilled frames resulted in an average increase in initial stiffness of two-fold compared to the unretrofitted infilled frames, and seemed independent of the relative infill-to-frame stiffness. However, the increase in the load-carrying capacity of the retrofitted frames compared to the unretrofitted counterparts was higher for those with the larger relative infill-to-frame stiffness parameter. Unlike the unretrofitted infill walls, the retrofitted panels demonstrated almost identical failure modes that were characterized as "strictly comer crushing" in the vicinity of the loaded comers whereas no signs of distress were evident throughout the remainder of the infill. The laminates also maintained the structural integrity of

  8. The stress-strain relationships in wood and fiber-reinforced plastic laminae of reinforced glued-laminated wood beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Daniel Arthur

    The reinforcement of wood and wood composite structural products to improve their mechanical properties has been in practice for many years. Recently, the use of high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) as a reinforcement in such applications has been commercialized. The reinforcement is manufactured using a standard pultrusion process or alternatively a sheet-forming process commonly referred to as "pulforming". The high-modulus fibers are predominately unidirectional, although off-axis fibers are often used to enhance off-axis properties. The fibers used are either of a single type or multiple types, which are called "hybrids". Unidirectional, single, and hybrid fiber FRP physical properties and characteristics were compared to wood. Full-scale reinforced glulams were tested. Aramid-reinforced plastics (ARP) used as tensile reinforcements were found to be superior in strength applications to other types of FRP made with fiber, such as carbon and fiberglass. Carbon/aramid-reinforced plastic (CARP) was shown to be superior in both modulus and strength design situations. Fiberglass was shown to be suitable only in hybrid situations with another fiber such as aramid or carbon and only in limited use situations where modulus was a design criteria. The testing and analysis showed that the global response of reinforced glulam beams is controlled by localized strength variations in the wood such as slope of grain, knots, finger joints, etc. in the tensile zone. The elemental tensile strains in the extreme wood tensile laminae, due to global applied loads, were found to be well below the strain at failure in clear wood samples recovered from the failure area. Two areas affecting the relationship between the wood and the FRP were investigated: compatibility of the wood and FRP materials and interface characteristics between the wood and FRP. The optimum strain value at yield point for an FRP was assessed to be slightly higher than the clear wood value in tension for a

  9. Damage analysis of CF/AF hybrid fabric reinforced plastic laminated composites with scanned image microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Kasano, Hideaki; Shull, Peter J.

    2004-07-01

    The article presents an experimental study that has been conducted to evaluate the impact loading damage within hybrid fabric laminates-carbon and Aramid fibers. The experiments have been undertaken on a series of interply hybrid specimens with different preprags stacking sequences. Impact damage was created using an air-gun like impact device propelling spherical steel balls with diameters of 5.0mm and 10.0mm and having velocities of 113m/s and 40m/s respectively. The resulting specimen surface and internal damage (e.g., micro-cracking and debonding) was visualized nondestructively by a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) while further interrogation of specific internal damage was visualized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on cross-sectioned panels.

  10. Recycled reinforced plastics as replacement for coremat and plywood cores in sandwich laminates: A comparison of mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, J.; Nilsson, P.

    1996-11-01

    A sprayable formulation, here called a scrap-mix, based on polyester resin, fillers and reground RP-scrap has been compared in mechanical tests to core materials used in marine applications. The tests have been carried out on sandwich laminates with glassfiber-reinforced polyester skins on various cores. The results indicate that significant increase in strength can be achieved for sandwich laminates when plywood is replaced with the scrap-mix. Flexural strength, here measured by three-point bending, is more than doubled when replacing 9 mm plywood-core with equal thickness of a scrap-mix core. When compared to Firet coremat, the increase in strength when using a scrap-mix core is in the region of 5% for a single layer (3 mm) coremat, and 15% when compared to a double layer (6 mm) of coremat. A test for screw-holding strength was carried out on similar samples. Depending on the type of screws the screw-holding strength was from 40% up to 60% higher for the scrap-mix laminates as compared to plywood laminates. After aging samples in distilled water at 40 C, the difference increased up to 100% after one week.

  11. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  12. Improvement of the mode II interface fracture toughness of glass fiber reinforced plastics/aluminum laminates through vapor grown carbon fiber interleaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Huiming; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Cao, Yanping; Yan, Cheng; Azuma, Takesi; Peng, Xianghe; Wu, Liangke; Li, Jinhua; Li, Leilei

    2014-06-01

    The effects of acid treatment, vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) interlayer and the angle, i.e., 0° and 90°, between the rolling stripes of an aluminum (Al) plate and the fiber direction of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) on the mode II interlaminar mechanical properties of GFRP/Al laminates were investigated. The experimental results of an end notched flexure test demonstrate that the acid treatment and the proper addition of VGCF can effectively improve the critical load and mode II fracture toughness of GFRP/Al laminates. The specimens with acid treatment and 10 g m-2 VGCF addition possess the highest mode II fracture toughness, i.e., 269% and 385% increases in the 0° and 90° specimens, respectively compared to those corresponding pristine ones. Due to the induced anisotropy by the rolling stripes on the aluminum plate, the 90° specimens possess 15.3%-73.6% higher mode II fracture toughness compared to the 0° specimens. The improvement mechanisms were explored by the observation of crack propagation path and fracture surface with optical, laser scanning and scanning electron microscopies. Moreover, finite element analyses were carried out based on the cohesive zone model to verify the experimental fracture toughness and to predict the interface shear strength between the aluminum plates and GFRP laminates.

  13. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  14. Reinforced plastics durability

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.

    1999-01-01

    Written especially for first-time users of reinforced plastics. The book offers substantial introductory information with key concepts. Chapters examine the long-term threats to the integrity of reinforced plastics: outdoor weathering, solvent/water attack, high temperatures, and repetitive stress.

  15. History of reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.V.; Rosato, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    This history of reinforced plastics is told by combining the individual histories of each reinforcement and the way in which they added to and changed the direction and rate of growth of the industry. The early history is based on all resins, fillers, and fibers found in nature. Then came the Baekeland revolution with the first synthetic resin which lasted about 25 years, at which time synthetic fiber glass and polyester resin dramatically changed the industry. Now, for the 1980s, the high modulus fibers developed 10 to 20 years ago are reshaping the industry. 32 figures.

  16. Composite laminate free edge reinforcement concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a free edge in a laminated composite structure can result in delamination of the composite under certain loading conditions. Linear finite element analysis predicts large or even singular interlaminar stresses near the free edge. Edge reinforcements which will reduce these interlaminar stresses, prevent or delay the onset of delaminations, and thereby increase the strength and life of the structure were studied. Finite element models are used to analyze reinforced laminates which were subsequently fabricated and loaded to failure in order to verify the analysis results.

  17. Fracture behavior of laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum material

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, T.M. |; Lewandowski, J.J.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Hunt, W.H. Jr

    1994-05-01

    Laminated metallic composites are being developed for applications which require high specific stiffness and fracture resistance. Recent work with laminated discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) materials has demonstrated the potential for marked improvements in stable crack growth resistance via extrinsic toughening. The purpose of this work is to compare the fracture mechanisms and fracture resistance of laminated DRA materials to unlaminated DRA materials. In particular, the production of extensive stable crack growth and the associated improvement in damage tolerance in DRA laminates is documented.

  18. Ultrasonic monitoring of asymmetric carbon fibre reinforced aluminum laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junqing; Yang, Fan; Wang, Rongguo

    2013-08-01

    Asymmetric carbon fibre reinforced aluminum alloy laminates was manufactured for the purpose with repeat tensile test, which will be applied in composite pressure vessel. Ultrasonic C scan and A scan approach are used to evaluate the damage of the asymmetric CFRP-Al (carbon fibre reinforced aluminum alloy) laminates. Nondestructive detection is carried out for the CFRP-Al laminates before and after tensile test. Comparison results and pulse echo analysis show that when subjected to repeat tensile test with 70% elastic limit strain load of the CFRP laminates, the interface debonding between CFRP and Al will not occur but the delamination within CFRP laminates becomes the main damage of the asymmetric CFRP-Al laminates. This investigation indicated that combined ultrasonic C scan and A scan is available for damage evaluation of fibre metal laminates.

  19. Dielectric strength of irradiated fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, Karl; Weber, Harald W.; Hastik, Ronald; Hauser, Hans; Gerstenberg, Heiko

    2001-05-01

    The insulation system for the toroidal field model coil of international thermonuclear experimental reactor is a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) laminate, which consists of a combined Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcement tape, vacuum-impregnated with an epoxy DGEBA system. Pure disk-shaped laminates, disk-shaped FRP/stainless-steel sandwiches, and conductor insulation prototypes were irradiated at 5 K in a fission reactor up to a fast neutron fluence of 10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) to investigate the radiation induced degradation of the dielectric strength of the insulation system. After warm-up to room temperature, swelling, weight loss, and the breakdown strength were measured at 77 K. The sandwich swells by 4% at a fluence of 5×10 21 m -2 and by 9% at 1×10 22 m -2. The weight loss of the FRP is 2% at 1×10 22 m -2. The dielectric strength remained unchanged over the whole dose range.

  20. Performance of integrated active fiber composites in fiber reinforced epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, M.; Kornmann, X.; Huber, C.; Barbezat, M.; Brunner, A. J.

    2006-02-01

    Active fiber composite (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) has been integrated into orthotropic glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates to characterize the performance of AFC as a smart material component in laminated materials. Monotonic cyclic tensile loading was performed on integrated specimens at different strain levels. The AFC output was monitored to determine the effect of applied strain level on the AFC performance. It was found that the AFC sensitivity degraded beyond strains of 0.20% and approached a minimum at 0.50% strain. The degradation in the AFC performance appears to be attributed to the dominating effect of PZT fiber fragmentation during testing, as opposed to depolarization. Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was used to detect damage in laminates during testing and was correlated with crack evidence from microscopy observations during testing to characterize damage evolution in response to strain levels.

  1. Development of laminated fiber-reinforced nanocomposites for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weijie

    There have been numerous efforts to develop synthetic and/or natural tissue engineering scaffolds that are suitable for bone regeneration applications to replace autograft and allograft bones. Current biomaterials as a scaffold for bone regeneration are limited by the extent of degradation concurrent with bone formation, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells migrating from the surrounding tissues. In this project, a novel laminated nanocomposite scaffold is fabricated, consisting of poly (L-lactide ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel reinforced with poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun nanofibers and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. PLEOF is a novel in situ crosslinkable macromer synthesized from biocompatible building units which can be functionalized with bioactive peptides like the cell-adhesive Arg--Gly--Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence. The hydrophilicity and degradation rate of the macromer can be tailored to a particular application by controlling the ratio of PEG to PLA blocks in the macromer and the unsaturated fumarate units can be used for in-situ crosslinking. The PLLA nanofibers were electrospun from high molecular weight PLLA. The laminated nanocomposites were fabricated by dry-hand lay up technique followed by compression molding and thermal crosslinking. The laminated nanocomposites were evaluated with respect to degradation, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Laminates with or without HA nanoparticles showed modulus values much higher than that of trabecular bone (50-100 MPa). The effect of laminated nanocomposites on osteogenic differentiation of BMS cells was determined in terms of cell number, ALPase activity and calcium content. Our results demonstrate that grafting RGD peptide and HA nanoparticles to a PLEOF hydrogel reinforced with PLLA nanofibers synergistically enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMS

  2. REDUCING EMISSIONS IN FIBERGLASS REINFORCED PLASTICS MANUFACTURING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes results of an evaluation of pollution prevention techniques, so that technical assistance providers can provide better information to fiber-reinforced plastics and composites (FRP/C) facilities about pollution prevention options. It gives background about the...

  3. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  4. Polarized light reveals stress in machined laminated plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J.

    1967-01-01

    Polarized light applied to drilled laminated plastic components exposes to the human eye the locked-in stresses that will result in fractures and delaminations when the soldering procedure takes place. This technique detects stresses early in the production cycle before appreciable man-hours are invested in an item destined for rejection.

  5. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  6. Investigation on the tensile behavior of fiber metal laminates based on self-reinforced polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Eon; Park, Tom; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Song, Woo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical tests have been carried out to accurately evaluate the tensile properties of fiber metal laminates (FMLs). The FMLs in this paper comprised of a layer of self-reinforced polypropylene (SRPP) sandwiched between two layers of aluminum alloy 5052-H34. In this study, nonlinear tensile and fracture behavior of FMLs under the in-plane loading conditions has been investigated with numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. The numerical simulation based on finite element modeling using the ABAQUS/Explicit and the theoretical constitutive model based on a volume fraction approach and a modified classical lamination theory, which incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of the aluminum alloy are used to predict the mechanical properties such as stress-strain response and deformation behavior of FMLs. In addition, through comparing the numerical simulations and the theoretical analysis with experimental results, it was concluded that a numerical simulation model adopted describes with sufficient accuracy the overall tensile stress-strain curve.

  7. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  8. Laminated plastic microfluidic components for biological and chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Matson, D.W.; Bennett, W.D.; Lin, Y.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    Laminated plastic microfluidic components are being developed for biological testing systems and chemical sensors. Applications include a DNA thermal cycler, DNA analytical systems, electrophoretic flow systems, dialysis systems, and metal sensors for ground water. This article describes fabrication processes developed for these plastic microfluidic components, and the fabrication of a chromium metal sensor and a microdialysis device. Most of the components have a stacked architecture. Using this architecture, the fluid flows, or is pumped through, as many as nine laminated functional levels. Functions include pumping, mixing, reaction, detection, reservoirs, separations, and electronics. Polyimide, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and polycarbonate materials with thicknesses between 25 and 125 {mu}m are used to construct the components. This makes the components low cost, inert to many biological fluids and chemicals, and disposable. The components are fabricated by excimer laser micromachining the microchannel patterns and microstructures in the various laminates. In some cases, micropumps are integrated into these components to move the fluids. Vias and interconnects are also cut by the laser and integrated with micropumps. The laminates are sealed and bonded by adhesive and thermal processes and are leak tight. The parts withstand pressures as high as 790 kPa. Typical channel widths are 50 to 100 {mu}m, with aspect ratios near 5. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  9. High-frequency components made of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics for satellite payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulich, G.

    1981-06-01

    The design and the material characteristics of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are discussed, taking into account characteristic data for various types of fibers and details of material construction. Waveguide filters made of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics are considered. These filters are used in satellite transponders in connection with the high resonator quality required. Attention is given to tubes and plates of CFRF, aspects of metallization, and adhesive bonding. Reflector antennas of CFRP are discussed, taking into account the design of CFRP reflectors, the reflection characteristics of CFRP reflectors, CFRP laminate characteristics, reflector coatings, and selection criteria for the design of CFRP reflectors.

  10. Analyses and design of underground reinforced plastic mortar pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Magid, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified design procedure for underground Reinforced Plastic Mortar (RPM) pipe is proposed. This procedure is based on finite-element analyses of the pipe-soil system and composite laminate analysis of the pipe. With the proposed method, the designer is able to select the best trench geometry and backfill conditions, to determine the construction effects, and to devise the constituent pipe materials according to the given installation conditions for a reliable and cost-effective design. Existing design methods of underground flexible pipes were evaluated. A thorough investigation of the problems encountered with the RPM pipe is made to study the possible modes and causes of failure. The new design method is based on a composite beam element model to account for the failure modes pertinent to fiberglass-reinforced plastic pipes. The design procedure and the required soil and pipe materials data are described. It is shown that simpler performance limits are needed and that the proposed design procedure can be fully implemented once these data are provided.

  11. Woven glass fabric reinforced laminates based on polyolefin wastes: Thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pietro; Acierno, Domenico; Simeoli, Giorgio; Lopresto, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    Potentialities of polyolefin wastes in place of virgin polypropylene to produce composite laminates have been investigated. Plaques reinforced with a woven glass fabric were prepared by film-stacking technique and systematically analyzed in terms of thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties. In case of PP matrices, the use of a typical compatibilizer to improve the adhesion at the interface has been considered. Thermal properties emphasized the chemical nature of plastic wastes. About mechanical properties, static tests showed an increase of flexural parameters for compatibilized systems due to the coupling effect between grafted maleic anhydride and silane groups on the surface of the glass fabric. These effects, maximized for composites based on car bumper wastes, is perfectly reflected in terms of storage modulus and damping ability of products as determined by single-cantilever bending dynamic tests.

  12. [The behavior of fiber-reinforced plastics during laser cutting].

    PubMed

    Emmrich, M; Levsen, K; Trasser, F J

    1992-06-01

    The pattern of the organic emissions, which are produced by processing of fibre reinforced plastics (epoxy resins reinforced by aramid and glass fibres and phenol resins reinforced by aramid fibre) with laser beam was studied and the concentrations of the main components determined. Despite the application of plastic materials with different chemical structures, the observed patterns are very similar. Mainly aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted, especially benzene and toluene, as well as some heteroatom-containing aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g. phenol). By use of oxygen as process gas the emissions during cutting of glass fibre reinforced plastics can be reduced, while they will be constantly high with aramid fibre reinforced plastics. PMID:1503604

  13. Elastic-plastic analysis of AS4/PEEK composite laminate using a one-parameter plasticity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The elastic-plastic stress-strain relations of coupon specimens were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter plasticity model. The results show that the one-parameter plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  14. Processing of microencapsulated dyes for the visual inspection of fibre reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmann, Ch. Kerschbaum, M. Küsters, K.

    2014-05-15

    The evaluation of damages caused during processing, assembly or usage of fibre reinforced plastics is still a challenge. The use of inspection technology like ultrasonic scanning enables a detailed damage analysis but requires high investments and trained staff. Therefore, the visual inspection method is widely used. A drawback of this method is the difficult identification of barely visible damages, which can already be detrimental for the structural integrity. Therefore an approach is undertaken to integrate microencapsulated dyes into the laminates of fibre reinforced plastic parts to highlight damages on the surface. In case of a damage, the microcapsules rupture which leads to a release of the dye and a visible bruise on the part surface. To enable a wide application spectrum for this technology the microcapsules must be processable without rupturing with established manufacturing processes for fibre reinforced plastics. Therefore the incorporation of microcapsules in the filament winding, prepreg autoclave and resin transfer moulding (RTM) process is investigated. The results show that the use of a carrier medium is a feasible way to incorporate the microcapsules into the laminate for all investigated manufacturing processes. Impact testing of these laminates shows a bruise formation on the specimen surface which correlates with the impact energy level. This indicates a microcapsule survival during processing and shows the potential of this technology for damage detection and characterization.

  15. Transverse isotropic modeling of the ballistic response of glass reinforced plastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1997-12-31

    The use of glass reinforced plastic (GRP) composites is gaining significant attention in the DoD community for use in armor applications. These materials typically possess a laminate structure consisting of up to 100 plies, each of which is constructed of a glass woven roving fabric that reinforces a plastic matrix material. Current DoD attention is focused on a high strength, S-2 glass cross-weave (0/90) fabric reinforcing a polyester matrix material that forms each ply of laminate structure consisting anywhere from 20 to 70 plies. The resulting structure displays a material anisotropy that is, to a reasonable approximation, transversely isotropic. When subjected to impact and penetration from a metal fragment projectile, the GRP displays damage and failure in an anisotropic manner due to various mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber fracture and pull-out, and fiber-matrix debonding. In this presentation, the author will describe the modeling effort to simulate the ballistic response of the GRP material described above using the transversely isotropic (TI) constitutive model which has been implemented in the shock physics code, CTH. The results of this effort suggest that the model is able to describe the delamination behavior of the material but has some difficulty capturing the in-plane (i.e., transverse) response of the laminate due to its cross-weave fabric reinforcement pattern which causes a departure from transverse isotropy.

  16. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  17. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  18. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  19. Homogenized In-Plane Elastic-Viscoplastic Behavior of Long Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Tetsuya; Ohno, Nobutada; Tanaka, Hiroki; Shimizu, Toshihiro

    In this work, the homogenized elastic-viscoplastic behavior of long fiber-reinforced laminates under in-plane loading is predicted by taking into account the microscopic structure and stacking sequence of laminae. A homogenization theory of nonlinear time-dependent composites is applied to such laminates, leading to the macroscopic rate-type constitutive equation of laminates and the evolution equations of microscopic and average stresses in each lamina. The macroscopic constitutive equation is shown to have a stiffness tensor and a stress relaxation function which are evaluated explicitly in terms of the microscopic structure and stacking sequence of laminae. The established theory is then verified by performing in-plane uniaxial tensile tests of unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic carbon fiber/epoxy laminates. It is thus shown that the theory predicts successfully the anisotropic viscoplasticity of unidirectional and cross-ply laminates and the negligible viscoplasticity of quasi-isotropic laminates.

  20. An investigation of the existence of a work potential for fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamborn, M. J.; Schapery, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data from axial and torsional deformation tests on inelastic, angle-ply fiber-reinforced plastic laminates and related theory are used to show that mechanical work is independent of path for suitably limited deformation paths, and thus is a potential. First, results from proportional deformation tests are shown to support the existence of a work potential. Domains of path-independence are then established for nonproportional deformation tests of laminates strained well into the range of nonlinear inelastic behavior. Lastly, a study is described in which a work potential-based theory is used to determine critical mixed-mode energy release rates for laminates subjected to axial and torsional deformations. This relatively simple analysis is shown to provide qualitative correlation between fracture surface morphology and calculated energy release rates.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of AS4/PEEK thermoplastic composite laminate using a one parameter plasticity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yoon, K. J.

    1990-01-01

    A one-parameter plasticity model was shown to adequately describe the orthotropic plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK (APC-2) unidirectional thermoplastic composite. This model was verified further for unidirectional and laminated composite panels with and without a hole. The nonlinear stress-strain relations were measured and compared with those predicted by the finite element analysis using the one-parameter elastic-plastic constitutive model. The results show that the one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model is suitable for the analysis of elastic-plastic deformation of AS4/PEEK composite laminates.

  2. Smart damping of laminated fuzzy fiber reinforced composite shells using 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundalwal, S. I.; Kumar, R. Suresh; Ray, M. C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of smart laminated continuous fuzzy fiber reinforced composite (FFRC) shells. The distinct constructional feature of a novel FFRC is that the uniformly spaced short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are radially grown on the circumferential surfaces of the continuous carbon fiber reinforcements. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of vertically/obliquely reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composite materials. A finite element (FE) model is developed for the laminated FFRC shells integrated with the two patches of the ACLD treatment to investigate the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells. The effect of variation of the orientation angle of the piezoelectric fibers on the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells has been studied when the piezoelectric fibers are coplanar with either of the two mutually orthogonal vertical planes of the piezoelectric composite layer. It is revealed that radial growth of CNTs on the circumferential surfaces of the carbon fibers enhances the attenuation of the amplitude of vibrations and the natural frequencies of the laminated FFRC shells over those of laminated base composite shells without CNTs.

  3. Hygrothermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of graphite fibre-reinforced epoxy laminates beyond initial failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, O.; Garg, A.; Nelson, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The critical load levels and associated cracking beyond which a multidirectional laminate can be considered as structurally failed has been determined by loading graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy laminates to different strain levels up to ultimate failure. Transverse matrix cracking was monitored by acoustic and optical methods. The residual stiffness and strength parallel and perpendicular to the cracks were determined and related to the environmental/loading history. Within the range of experimental conditions studied, it is concluded that the transverse cracking process does not have a crucial effect on the structural performance of multidirectional composite laminates.

  4. Evolution of damage and plasticity in titanium-based, fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, B.S. ); Newaz, G.M. ); Ellis, J.R. . Fatigue and Failure Branch)

    1993-07-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms were evaluated for a model titanium-based, fiber-reinforced composite: a beta titanium alloy (Ti-15V-3Al-3Cr-3Sn) reinforced with SiC (SCS-6) fibers. The primary emphasis of this article is to illustrate the sequence in which damage and plasticity evolved for this system. The mechanical responses and the results of detailed microstructural evaluations for the [0][sub 8], [90][sub 8], and [[plus minus]45][sub 2s] laminates are provided. It is shown that the characteristics of the reaction zone around the fiber play a very important role in the way damage and plasticity evolve, particularly in the microyield regime of deformation, and must be included in any realistic constitutive model. Fiber-matrix debonding was a major damage mode for the off-axis systems. The tension test results are also compared with the predictions of a few constitutive models.

  5. Evolution of damage and plasticity in titanium-based, fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.; Ellis, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms were evaluated for a model titanium-based, fiber-reinforced composite: a beta titanium alloy (Ti-15V-3Al-3Cr-3Sn) reinforced with SiC (SCS-6) fibers. The primary emphasis of this article is to illustrate the sequence in which damage and plasticity evolved for this system. The mechanical responses and the results of detailed microstructural evaluations for the 0(8), 90(8), and +/- 45(2s) line oriented laminates are provided. It is shown that the characteristics of the reaction zone around the fiber play a very important role in the way damage and plasticity evolve, particularly in the microyield regime of deformation, and must be included in any realistic constitutive model. Fiber-matrix debonding was a major damage mode for the off-axis systems. The tension test results are also compared with the predictions of a few constitutive models.

  6. Influence of the Geometric Parameters on the Mechanical Behaviour of Fabric Reinforced Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axinte, Andrei; Taranu, Nicolae; Bejan, Liliana

    2016-05-01

    A polymer fabric reinforced composite is a high performance material, which combines strength of the fibres with the flexibility and ductility of the matrix. For a better drapeability, the tows of fibres are interleaved, resulting the woven fabric, used as reinforcement. The complex geometric shape of the fabric is of paramount importance in establishing the deformability of the textile reinforced composite laminates. In this paper, an approach based on Classical Lamination Theory (CLT), combined with Finite Element Methods (FEM), using Failure Analysis and Internal Load Redistribution, is utilised, in order to compare the behaviour of the material under specific loads. The main goal is to analyse the deformability of certain types of textile reinforced composite laminates, using carbon fibre satin as reinforcement and epoxy resin as matrix. This is accomplished by studying the variation of the in-plane strains, given the fluctuation of several geometric parameters, namely the width of the reinforcing tow, the gap between two consecutive tows, the angle of laminae in a multi-layered configuration and the tows fibre volume fraction.

  7. Passive vibration damping of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with PZT particles and SMA powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Woo Il; Lee, Dasom; Park, Sungho; Moon, Sungnam

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) has been used various industrial fields, because of high strength, light weight, corrosion resistance and other properties. In this study, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles which is one of typical piezoelectric material and shape memory alloy powder dispersed in CFRP laminate in order to improve the vibration damping by dissipating vibration energy quickly. The loss factor (tanδ) is measured in Dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) which is used to measure the viscoelastic behavior of a material to verify the change in vibration damping. The results show that there exists difference on vibration damping ability between CFRP with PZT ceramic particles and CFRP with SMA powder.

  8. Reinforcement of composite laminate free edges with U-shaped caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Generalized plane strain finite element analysis is used to predict reduction of interlaminar normal stresses when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a laminate. Three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge cap designs. In an experimental program, symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of Kevlar-epoxy cloth are shown to be 130 to 140 percent stronger than uncapped laminates under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading. In addition, the coefficient of variation of the static tensile failure load decreases from 24 to 8 percent when edge caps are added. The predicted failure load calculated with the finite element results is 10 percent lower than the actual failure load. For both capped and uncapped laminates, actual failure loads are much lower than those predicted using classical lamination theory stresses and a two-dimensional failure criterion. Possible applications of the free edge reinforcement concept are described, and future research is suggested.

  9. Enhancing tensile ductility of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC by lamination with Mg-9% Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1995-05-01

    A laminated metal composite has been made by press bonding alternating layers of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC, 6090/SiC/25p, and a Mg-9%Li alloy. The mechanical properties including tensile ductility were evaluated. The tensile ductility of the Al MMC was found to increase from 3.5% to 11.5%. In contrast to other laminates based on ultrahigh carbon, steel, the laminate of this study and other Al MMC laminates exhibited tensile yield strengths that did not follow the rule of averages. This is attributed to interlayer reaction products developed during processing of the Al MMC laminates.

  10. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  11. Strength and failure analysis of composite laminate containing a circular hole with reinforcement. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.

    1987-12-01

    Tension and compression tests of quasi-isotropic, graphite/epoxy laminate containing a circular hole with reinforcement was conducted using an Instron static-testing machine. Two types of reinforcement boundary conditions were investigated; adhesive band reinforcement and snug-fit unbonded plug. For each case boundary conditions, four different sizes of hole diameter and three types of reinforcing material (aluminum, plexiglass, steel) were employed for investigation. The experiments were mainly focused on the evaluation of ultimate strength of reinforced panels relative to the case of open hole. In addition to this, the failure mechanism analysis for both boundary conditions were studied. To help designers and users of composites, previously available theoretical fracture models and their comparison with the present experimental results are also discussed.

  12. Study of delamination in fiber reinforced composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Mary Jacob

    The primary goal of this work was to characterize the fracture toughness of laminated composite materials using a combination of experiments and analyses. This goal was achieved by several contributions that improved the state-of-the-art of numerical analysis techniques for evaluating crack propagation in composite structures. It is shown that currently available finite element techniques do not provide accurate results when nonuniform elements are used to model the structure in the vicinity of the cracks. A new method is proposed in this dissertation to more accurately predict the material toughness in such circumstances. Delamination in composites is often complicated by mixed-mode fractures. Both interlaminar tensile and shear stresses can be present at the delamination front under mixed mode conditions. Although finite element analysis is widely used to calculate energy release rates (ERR), the individual mode I and mode II ERR do not converge when the delamination is at a bimaterial interface. This problem was solved by enclosing the delamination in a homogeneous layer that removes the difficulties associated with the interface cracks. The effect of the additional resin layer is minimized by evaluating the fracture toughness at the limit as the thickness of the interface layer goes to zero. Interlaminar fracture toughness of AS4/3501-6 (carbon/epoxy) composite laminates was measured using single mode and mixed mode bending tests. The results show that the critical mode I ERR for delamination decrease monotonically with increasing mode II loading. Failure loci are developed in this dissertation using the test data and new parameters are established for different failure criteria. An acoustic emission study was performed with the toughness characterization tests. The results indicate that passive emissions can be used as a nondestructive evaluation tool to predict the onset of delamination and other fractures in composites. The final contribution of this

  13. Acoustic Emission as a Tool for Damage Identification and Characterization in Glass Reinforced Cross Ply Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Loading of cross-ply laminates leads to the activation of distinct damage mechanisms, such as matrix cracking, delaminations between successive plies and fibre rupture at the final stage of loading. This study deals with the investigation of the failure of cross ply composites by acoustic emission (AE). Broadband AE sensors monitor the elastic waves originating from different sources of failure in coupons of this material during a tensile loading-unloading test. The cumulative number of AE activity, and other qualitative indices based on the waveforms shape, were well correlated to the sustained load and mechanical degradation as expressed by the gradual decrease of elastic modulus. AE parameters indicate the succession of failure mechanisms within the composite as the load increases. The proposed methodology based on Acoustic Emission for the identification of the damage stage of glass reinforced cross ply laminates is an initial step which may provide insight for the study of more complex laminations.

  14. Delamination growth behavior of a fabric reinforced laminated composite under Mode I fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atodaria, D.R.; Putatunda, S.K.; Mallick, P.K.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the delamination growth behavior of a glass fabric reinforced laminated composite under Mode I fatigue loading and to examine the applicability of a new fatigue crack growth rate model to this material. In this study, double cantilever beam specimens were subjected to tension-tension cyclic loads with three different load ratios and the delamination growth rate was measured using the compliance method. The delamination growth rate was related to the strain energy release rate during fatigue cycling by a power law equation that takes into account not only the effect of the strain energy release rate range, but also the effect of delamination growth at various stages of loading using a weight average strain energy release rate. It was observed that this new model can represent the delamination growth rate of the fabric reinforced laminated composite at three different load ratios in a single unifying curve.

  15. Design and behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mihilmy, Mahmoud Tharwat

    A comprehensive investigation of the design and behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP laminates has been conducted. The study has confirmed the applicability of the strain compatibility method for calculating the increased ultimate moment capacity of the repaired beams. An upper limit to the amount of FRP that can be added to a specific structure was recommended to ensure ductile behavior. Design charts to facilitate calculations of the ultimate moment capacity for reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP laminates were developed. The results of a subsequent parametric investigation indicate that strengthening reinforced concrete beams with FRP laminates can enhance their ultimate capacity by as much as three times the original strength, especially for beams with a low steel ratio. It was also determined that, increasing the concrete compressive strength and the FRP modulus of elasticity increases the beam ultimate flexural capacity significantly; however, the repaired beams are less ductile than the pre-repaired concrete beams. During the course of the study, it had been noticed that the current ACI recommended method for calculating deflections for ordinary reinforced concrete beams does not render an accurate estimate for reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP laminates. A simplified equation for predicting the deflection of reinforced concrete beams repaired with FRP was developed and verified with comparisons to experimental results. The effectiveness of strengthening an existing bridge with externally bonded FRP laminates was investigated through comprehensive static and dynamic finite element analyses. The results of these analyses correlate well with field load test results. The repaired girders exhibited an average reduction in reinforcing steel stresses of 11 percent and an average reduction in midspan girder deflections of 9 percent. The results of the study also indicated that existing methods for

  16. Analytical, Numerical and Experimental Examination of Reinforced Composites Beams Covered with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimzade, A. A.; Tuhta, S.

    2012-03-01

    In the article, analytical, numerical (Finite Element Method) and experimental investigation results of beam that was strengthened with fiber reinforced plastic-FRP composite has been given as comparative, the effect of FRP wrapping number to the maximum load and moment capacity has been evaluated depending on this results. Carbon FRP qualitative dependences have been occurred between wrapping number and beam load and moment capacity for repair-strengthen the reinforced concrete beams with carbon fiber. Shown possibilities of application traditional known analysis programs, for the analysis of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) strengthened structures.

  17. Automobile materials competition: energy implications of fiber-reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings-Saxton, J.

    1981-10-01

    The embodied energy, structural weight, and transportation energy (fuel requirement) characteristics of steel, fiber-reinforced plastics, and aluminum were assessed to determine the overall energy savings of materials substitution in automobiles. In body panels, a 1.0-lb steel component with an associated 0.5 lb in secondary weight is structurally equivalent to a 0.6-lb fiber-reinforced plastic component with 0.3 lb in associated secondary weight or a 0.5-lb aluminum component with 0.25 lb of secondary weight. (Secondary weight refers to the combined weight of the vehicle's support structure, engine, braking system, and drive train, all of which can be reduced in response to a decrease in total vehicle weight.) The life cycle transportation energy requirements of structurally equivalent body panels (including their associated secondary weights) are 174.4 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 104.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. The embodied energy requirements are 37.2 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 22.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 87.1 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. These results can be combined to yield total energy requirements of 211.6 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for steel, 126.7 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for fiber-reinforced plastics, and 174.3 x 10/sup 3/ Btu for aluminum. Fiber-reinforced plastics offer the greatest improvements over steel in both embodied and total energy requirements. Aluminum achieves the greatest savings in transportation energy.

  18. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  19. OCCUPATIONAL STYRENE EXPOSURE FOR TWELVE PRODUCT CATEGORIES IN THE REINFORCED-PLASTICS INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 1500 occupational styrene exposure values from 28 reinforced-plastic manufacturers were collected retrospectively from companies and state and federal agencies. The report describes the major types of manufacturing processes within the reinforced-plastics industry a...

  20. Stress and strength analysis of fiber reinforced plastic pipe tees with reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Z.; Widera, G.E.O.; Xue, M.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, a stress and strength analysis of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) pipe tees with reinforcement by use of 3-D finite element method is presented. Wilson`s incompatible elements and the 16-node 3-D element with relative degrees of freedom have been employed to carry out the analysis. The reliability of the program is also investigated. Two reinforcing methods, pad and compact reinforcement, are investigated. The fact that the properties and principal directions of the materials of the two intersecting pipes and the reinforcement are different has been taken into account in the analysis. The continuity of stress and strain fields at the intersecting surface of two different materials is considered in the post processing of the FEM results. The results show that the stress concentration in a FRP pipe intersection without reinforcement (r/R = 0.4--0.7) is significant. A reasonable design can be obtained by considering both stress fields and the orthotropic strength parameters of the materials. The in-plane shear stress may be the controlling factor because of the relatively low shear strength of most composites. Use of either reinforcing method does not change the location of the maximum tensile stress and the maximum shear stress, and both alleviate the stress concentration at the intersection. It is shown that the compact reinforcing method is more effective than the pad one. The larger the reinforcing area of the compact reinforcing method, the smaller the stress concentration factor, but the lower the rate of reduction.

  1. Progressive Fracture of Laminated Fiber-Reinforced Composite Stiffened Plate Under Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Abdi, Frank; Chamis, Christos C.; Tsouros, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    S-Glass/epoxy laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate structure with laminate configuration (0/90)5 was simulated to investigate damage and fracture progression, under uniform pressure. For comparison reasons a simple plate was examined, in addition with the stiffened plate. An integrated computer code was used for the simulation. The damage initiation began with matrix failure in tension, continuous with damage and/or fracture progression as a result of additional matrix failure and fiber fracture and followed by additional interply delamination. Fracture through the thickness began when the damage accumulation was 90%. After that stage, the cracks propagate rapidly and the structures collapse. The collapse load for the simple plate is 21.57 MPa (3120 psi) and for the stiffened plate 25.24 MPa (3660 psi).

  2. Effect of cyclical loading on the macroscopic failure behaviour of fibre reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Marder, J.; Kuesters, K.; Fischer, K.

    2014-05-01

    Fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) have become the preferred material choice for a wide range of lightweight applications. However, not only the static strength but also the strength and stiffness degradation under cyclical loading conditions have to be predicted for the efficient and reliable design of structures. The phenomenology of the macroscopic damage process of a laminate subjected to cyclical loads is commonly characterized by a first inter-fibre fracture (IFF) and a subsequent accumulation of these IFFs. Finally the laminate fails by one of the macroscopic failure modes named fibre failure (FF), inter-fibre fracture or delamination. Beside these macroscopic failure mechanisms, laminates are inherently characterized by microscopic flaws and cracks in the matrix and at the fibre matrix interface which accumulate especially in transversely loaded plies before the first macroscopic fracture occurs. In well-designed laminates the majority of the fibres are aligned with the loading direction. The fibre longitudinal compressive strength is therefore a critical value, since its inherently lower than the fibre longitudinal tensile strength. The fibre longitudinal compressive strength is influenced by a multitude of factors, such as fibre volume content, fibre and matrix material and also by the micro damage state of a ply. In this paper, the influence of the micro damage state on the fibre longitudinal compressive strength will be discussed. Experimental investigations have been performed to introduce a characteristic micro damage state into a ply by cyclical transverse preloading and quantify the effect of the preloading and the damage state on the fibre longitudinal compressive strength.

  3. Reversible dielectric property degradation in moisture-contaminated fiber-reinforced laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Luis A.; García, Carla; Fittipaldi, Mauro; Grace, Landon R.

    2016-03-01

    The potential for recovery of dielectric properties of three water-contaminated fiber-reinforced laminates is investigated using a split-post dielectric resonant technique at X-band (10 GHz). The three material systems investigated are bismaleimide (BMI) reinforced with an eight-harness satin weave quartz fabric, an epoxy resin reinforced with an eight- harness satin weave glass fabric (style 7781), and the same epoxy reinforced with a four-harness woven glass fabric (style 4180). A direct correlation between moisture content, dielectric constant, and loss tangent was observed during moisture absorption by immersion in distilled water at 25 °C for five equivalent samples of each material system. This trend is observed through at least 0.72% water content by weight for all three systems. The absorption of water into the BMI, 7781 epoxy, and 4180 epoxy laminates resulted in a 4.66%, 3.35%, and 4.01% increase in dielectric constant for a 0.679%, 0.608%, and 0.719% increase in water content by weight, respectively. Likewise, a significant increase was noticed in loss tangent for each material. The same water content is responsible for a 228%, 71.4%, and 64.1% increase in loss tangent, respectively. Subsequent to full desorption through drying at elevated temperature, the dielectric constant and loss tangent of each laminate exhibited minimal change from the dry, pre-absorption state. The dielectric constant and loss tangent change after the absorption and desorption cycle, relative to the initial state, was 0.144 % and 2.63% in the BMI, 0.084% and 1.71% in the style 7781 epoxy, and 0.003% and 4.51% in the style 4180 epoxy at near-zero moisture content. The similarity of dielectric constant and loss tangent in samples prior to absorption and after desorption suggests that any chemical or morphological changes induced by the presence of water have not caused irreversible changes in the dielectric properties of the laminates.

  4. Application of glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) mud-mats for Daria-A platform

    SciTech Connect

    Bertorelli, D.; Spessa, A.

    1994-12-31

    A review of the experience gained with glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GRP) mud-mat materials used for the Garibaldi-C jacket, in the Adriatic sea, has shown that this solution can result in substantial cost savings. Therefore, Agip has investigated a further use of GRP mud-mats for the Daria-A platform as a means of reducing the lifting weight of the jacket and, moreover, to negate the requirement for additional buoyancy tanks during the free flotation and upending phases. Two possible solutions, the ``pultrusion`` and the ``lamination`` techniques, have been investigated to fabricate sandwich panels for the mud-mats. In this paper these two technologies are discussed with respect to their application to the construction and they are compared on a performance and cost basis.

  5. Ultrasonic inspection of carbon fiber reinforced plastic by means of sample-recognition methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilgram, R.

    1985-01-01

    In the case of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), it has not yet been possible to detect nonlocal defects and material degradation related to aging with the aid of nondestructive inspection method. An approach for overcoming difficulties regarding such an inspection involves an extension of the ultrasonic inspection procedure on the basis of a use of signal processing and sample recognition methods. The basic concept involved in this approach is related to the realization that the ultrasonic signal contains information regarding the medium which is not utilized in conventional ultrasonic inspection. However, the analytical study of the phyiscal processes involved is very complex. For this reason, an empirical approach is employed to make use of the information which has not been utilized before. This approach uses reference signals which can be obtained with material specimens of different quality. The implementation of these concepts for the supersonic inspection of CFRP laminates is discussed.

  6. Draft EEC method for the determination of the global migration of plastics constituents into fatty-food simulants: applicability to lacquers, plastics and laminates.

    PubMed

    van Battum, D; Rijk, M A; Verspoor, R; Rossi, L

    1982-12-01

    An experimental study was carried out to establish whether the draft EEC method for the determination of the global migration of constituents from plastics packaging materials into fatty food simulants could be applied to all plastics, including lacquers and laminates. Some difficulties were encountered in the use of the EEC method for melamine, for hotmelt-coated packaging materials and for laminates containing one or more layers of materials sensitive to moisture, such as paper, cardboard or regenerated cellulose film. PMID:6891682

  7. Design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matalon, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    The design and development of a laminated glass-plastic Fresnel lens for point focus photovoltaic systems use is described. The objective of this development was to examine the feasibility of producing lenses with a cost effectiveness superior to that of lenses made by casting of acrylic. The procedure used in executing this development, the method used in cost effectiveness evaluation, results obtained and recommendations for further work are presented.

  8. Properties of fiber reinforced plastics about static and dynamic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2016-05-01

    A method for investigation of impact toughness of anisotropic polymer composite materials (reinforced plastics) with the help of CM model sample in the configuration of microplastic (micro plastic) and impact pendulum-type testing machine under static and dynamic loadings has been developed. The method is called "Break by Impact" (Impact Break IB). The estimation of impact resistance CFRP by this method showed that an increase in loading velocity ~104 times the largest changes occurs in impact toughness and deformation ability of a material.

  9. Steady state response of unsymmetrically laminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Kenji; Kawashima, Katsuya; Sakata, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A numerical approach for analyzing the forced vibration problem of a symmetrically laminated FRP (fiber reinforced plastic) composite plate was proposed by the authors. In the present paper, this approach is modified for application to an unsymmetrically laminated FRP composite plate. Numerical calculations are carried out for the clamped antisymmetrically laminated rectangular and elliptical plates which are a kind of unsymmetrically laminated plate. Then,, the effects of the lamina material and the fiber orientation angle on the steady state response are discussed. Furthermore, it is investigated that what structural damping factor is most influenced on the steady state response of an antisymmetrically laminated plate.

  10. High-strength fiber-reinforced plastic reinforcement of wood and wood composite

    SciTech Connect

    Tingley, D.A.; Eng, P.

    1996-12-31

    Research and development underway since 1982 has led to the development of a method of reinforcing wood and wood composite structural products (WWC) using high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic. This method allows the use of less wood fiber and lower grade wood fiber for a given load capacity. The first WWC in which reinforcement has been marketed is glulam beams. Marketed under the trade name FiRP{trademark} Reinforced glulam, the product has gained code approval and is now being used in the construction of buildings and bridges in the United States, Japan and other countries. The high-strength fiber-reinforced plastic (FiRP{trademark} Reinforced panel (RP)) has specific characteristics that are required to provide for proper use in WWC`s. This paper discusses these characteristics and the testing requirements to develop code approved allowable design values for carbon, aramid and fiberglass RP`s for such uses. Specific issues such as in-service characteristics, i.e. long term creep tests and tension-tension fatigue tests, are discussed.

  11. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  12. Plastic Fibre Reinforced Soil Blocks as a Sustainable Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, C. K. Subramania; Nambiar, E. K. Kunhanandan; Abraham, Benny Mathews

    2012-10-01

    Solid waste management, especially the huge quantity of waste plastics, is one of the major environmental concerns nowadays. Their employability in block making in the form of fibres, as one of the methods of waste management, can be investigated through a fundamental research. This paper highlights the salient observations from a systematic investigation on the effect of embedded fibre from plastic waste on the performance of stabilised mud blocks. Stabilisation of the soil was done by adding cement, lime and their combination. Plastic fibre in chopped form from carry bags and mineral water bottles were added (0.1% & 0.2% by weight of soil) as reinforcement. The blocks were tested for density, and compressive strength, and observed failure patterns were analysed. Blocks with 0.1% of plastic fibres showed an increase in strength of about 3 to 10%. From the observations of failure pattern it can be concluded that benefits of fibre reinforcement includes both improved ductility in comparison with raw blocks and inhibition of crack propogation after its initial formation.

  13. Plastic deformation of alumina reinforced with SiC whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    DeArellano-Lopez, A.R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    Addition of small amounts of stiff reinforcement (SiC whiskers) to a polycrystalline AL{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix partially inhibits grain boundary sliding because of an increase in threshold stress. When the concentration of whiskers is high enough, a pure diffusional mechanism takes over the control of plastic deformation of the composites. For higher whisker loadings, the materials creep properties depend on a microstructural feature different from the nominal grain size. A tentative correlation of this effective microstructural parameter with the spacing between the whiskers was established through a model.

  14. Fiber breakage phenomena in long fiber reinforced plastic preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Tsai; Tseng, Huan-Chang; Vlcek, Jiri; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2015-07-01

    Due to the high demand of smart green, the lightweight technologies have become the driving force for the development of automotives and other industries in recent years. Among those technologies, using short and long fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) to replace some metal components can reduce the weight of an automotive significantly. However, the microstructures of fibers inside plastic matrix are too complicated to manage and control during the injection molding through the screw, the runner, the gate, and then into the cavity. This study focuses on the fiber breakage phenomena during the screw plastification. Results show that fiber breakage is strongly dependent on screw design and operation. When the screw geometry changes, the fiber breakage could be larger even with lower compression ratio.

  15. Laser machined plastic laminates. Towards portable diagnostic devices for use in low resource environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jason C.; Carson, Bryan D.; Bachand, George D.; Arndt, William D.; Finley, Melissa R.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2015-07-14

    Despite significant progress in development of bioanalytical devices cost, complexity, access to reagents and lack of infrastructure have prevented use of these technologies in resource-limited regions. To provide a sustainable tool in the global effort to combat infectious diseases the diagnostic device must be low cost, simple to operate and read, robust, and have sensitivity and specificity comparable to laboratory analysis. Thus, in this mini-review we describe recent work using laser machined plastic laminates to produce diagnostic devices that are capable of a wide variety of bioanalytical measurements and show great promise towards future use in low-resource environments.

  16. Analysis and Test of Repair Concepts for a Carbon-Rod Reinforced Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    2000-01-01

    The use of pultruded carbon-epoxy rods for the reinforcement of composite laminates in some structures results in an efficient structural concept. The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of repair concepts of completely severed carbon-epoxy rods is presented. Three repair concepts are considered: (a) bonded repair with outside moldline and inside moldline doublers; (b) bonded repair with fasteners, and (c) bonded repair with outside moldline doubler only. The stiffness of the repairs was matched with the stiffness of the baseline specimen. The failure strains for the bonded repair with fasteners and the bonded repair with an outside moldline doubler exceeded a target design strain set for the repair concepts.

  17. Damage threshold study of sonic IR imaging on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoyan; He, Qi; Zhang, Ding; Ashbaugh, Mike; Favro, Lawrence D.; Newaz, Golam; Thomas, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Infrared Imaging, as a young NDE technology, has drawn a lot of attentions due to it's fast, wide-area evaluation capability, and due to its broad applications in different materials such as metal/metal alloy, composites and detection of various types of defects: surface, subsurface, cracks, delaminations/disbonds. Sonic IR Imaging combines pulsed ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging to detect defects in materials. The sound pulse causes rubbing due to non-unison motion between faces of defects, and infrared sensors image the temperature map over the target to identify defects. However, concerns have also been brought up about possible damages which might occur at the contact spots between the ultrasound transducer from the external excitation source and the target materials. In this paper, we present our results from a series of systematically designed experiments on carbon-fiber reinforced laminated composite panels to address the concerns.

  18. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter RCC thermal protection material. [Reinforced Carbon-Carbon laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is noted that the Shuttle Orbiter will be more subject to meteoroid impact than previous spacecraft, due to its greater surface area and longer cumulative time in space. The Orbiter structural material, RCC, a reinforced carbon-carbon laminate with a diffused silicon carbide coating, is evaluated in terms of its resistance to hypervelocity impact. It was found that the specimens (disks with a mass of 34 g and a thickness of 5.0 mm) were cratered only on the front surface when the impact energy was 3 J or less. At 3 J, a trace of the black carbon interior was exposed. The specimens were completely penetrated when the energy was 34 J or greater.

  19. Development and characterization of fatigue resistant Aramid reinforced aluminium laminates (ARALL) for fatigue Critical aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiser, M. H.; Umar, S.; Nauman, S.

    2014-06-01

    The structural weight of an aircraft has always been a controlling parameter that governs its fuel efficiency and transport capacity. In pursuit of achieving light-weight aircraft structures, high design stress levels have to be adopted and materials with high specific strength such as Aluminum etc. are to be deployed. However, an extensive spectrum of fatigue load exists at the aircraft wings and other aerodynamic components that may cause initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks and concludes in a catastrophic rupture. Fatigue is therefore the limiting design parameter in such cases and materials with high fatigue resistance are then required. A major improvement in the fatigue behavior was observed by laminating Kevlar fibers with Aluminum using epoxy. ARALL (Aramid Reinforced ALuminum Laminates) is a fatigue resistant hybrid composite that consists of layers of thin high strength aluminum alloy sheets surface bonded with aramid fibers. The intact aramid fibers tie up the fatigue cracks, thus reducing the stress intensity factor at the crack tip as a result of which the fatigue properties of can be enhanced with orders of magnitude as compared to monolithic high strength Aluminum alloy sheets. Significant amount of weight savings can be achieved in fatigue critical components in comparison with the traditional materials used in aircraft.

  20. Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Hoffmann, Ernst

    2008-02-05

    Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

  1. Skin problems among fiber-glass reinforced plastics factory workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Keiko; Nagano, Megumi; Inaoka, Tsukasa; Kitano, Takao; Ushijima, Kayo; Fukuda, Yoshiharu; Futatsuka, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Two surveys, one in winter the other in summer time, examined the skin problems of the entire manual workers (N=148) from 11 small-to-medium sized fiber-glass reinforced plastics (FRP) factories located in Kyushu, Japan. The workers were exposed to unsaturated polyester resin, including styrene and auxiliary agents such as cobalt naphthenate, hardeners such as methyl ethyl ketone peroxides, glass fiber and dust including shortened glass fiber and plastic particles. Eighty-seven workers (58.8%) reported having skin problems (mainly itching or dermatitis) since they started to work in FRP manufacturing and 25 workers had consulted a physician because of their skin problems; one worker was forced to take sick leave because of his severe dermatitis. History of allergic diseases and shorter occupational period (duration of employment) in a FRP factory were associated with greater probability of having a history of work-related skin symptoms. Workers in factories where dust-generating and lamination sites were located in different buildings were significantly less likely to have a history of skin problems than those in factories where the two sites were located in the same building. Of the 67 workers examined in both seasons closed to double the prevalence of dermatitis was found in summer (23.3%) than winter (13.4%). PMID:11926514

  2. Strain gradient plasticity modeling of the cyclic behavior of laminate microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfinghoff, Stephan; Forest, Samuel; Böhlke, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Two recently proposed Helmholtz free energy potentials including the full dislocation density tensor as an argument within the framework of strain gradient plasticity are used to predict the cyclic elastoplastic response of periodic laminate microstructures. First, a rank-one defect energy is considered, allowing for a size-effect on the overall yield strength of micro-heterogeneous materials. As a second candidate, a logarithmic defect energy is investigated, which is motivated by the work of Groma et al. (2003). The properties of the back-stress arising from both energies are investigated in the case of a laminate microstructure for which analytical as well as numerical solutions are derived. In this context, a new regularization technique for the numerical treatment of the rank-one potential is presented based on an incremental potential involving Lagrange multipliers. The results illustrate the effect of the two energies on the macroscopic size-dependent stress-strain response in monotonic and cyclic shear loading, as well as the arising pile-up distributions. Under cyclic loading, stress-strain hysteresis loops with inflections are predicted by both models. The logarithmic potential is shown to provide a continuum formulation of Asaro's type III kinematic hardening model. Experimental evidence in the literature of such loops with inflections in two-phased FFC alloys is provided, showing that the proposed strain gradient models reflect the occurrence of reversible plasticity phenomena under reverse loading.

  3. Fabrication of Multi-Ply Birefringent Fibrous Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I.; Niiro, T.

    1984-01-01

    Fabrication method produces unidirectional, multi-ply, transparent birefringent fibrous composite laminates for use in macromechanical stress analysis conducted by means of anisotropic photoelasticity. New laminates glass-fiber-reinforced plastics for which matrix and fibers have same index of refraction. Method utilized in structural applications of composites.

  4. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates with Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH). Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quasi-isotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  5. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates with Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH) based on Cosserat couple stress theory. Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. Compression strengths of lamina without z-pins agreed well with a closed form expression derived by Budiansky and Fleck. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quaiisotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  6. Influence of Compression and Shear on the Strength of Composite Laminates With Z-Pinned Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The influence of compression and shear loads on the strength of composite laminates with z-pins is evaluated parametrically using a 2D Finite Element Code (FLASH) based on Cosserat couple stress theory. Meshes were generated for three unique combinations of z-pin diameter and density. A laminated plate theory analysis was performed on several layups to determine the bi-axial stresses in the zero degree plies. These stresses, in turn, were used to determine the magnitude of the relative load steps prescribed in the FLASH analyses. Results indicated that increasing pin density was more detrimental to in-plane compression strength than increasing pin diameter. Compression strengths of lamina without z-pins agreed well with a closed form expression derived by Budiansky and Fleck. FLASH results for lamina with z-pins were consistent with the closed form results, and FLASH results without z-pins, if the initial fiber waviness due to z-pin insertion was added to the fiber waviness in the material to yield a total misalignment. Addition of 10% shear to the compression loading significantly reduced the lamina strength compared to pure compression loading. Addition of 50% shear to the compression indicated shear yielding rather than kink band formation as the likely failure mode. Two different stiffener reinforced skin configurations with z-pins, one quasi-isotropic and one orthotropic, were also analyzed. Six unique loading cases ranging from pure compression to compression plus 50% shear were analyzed assuming material fiber waviness misalignment angles of 0, 1, and 2 degrees. Compression strength decreased with increased shear loading for both configurations, with the quasi-isotropic configuration yielding lower strengths than the orthotropic configuration.

  7. Fibre-reinforced laminated composite tubes with free ends under uniform internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayir, M. B.; Motavalli, M.

    1995-11-01

    The stress and deformation fields in a fibre-reinforced composite tube under uniform internal pressure are discussed in some detail. In the interior region far from the ends classical laminate theory delivers rather poor results and has to be adjusted to include effects due to lateral contraction and to curvature. In the region near the ends boundary conditions (here stress-free ends will be assumed) require more elaborate methods of calculation. The use of finite element methods may prove to be problematic because in some parts of the boundary region very large gradients are expected. The problem is particularly acute in lay-ups with angle-plies where 3D-elements would be needed. In the following study analytical solutions based on asymptotic approximations of the three-dimensional equations of linear elasticity for homogeneous orthotropic materials will be presented. One "small" parameter ɛR characterising thin shell geometry and another "small" parameter ɛG following from homogenised material properties of the shell structure and whose order of magnitude is comparable with ɛR are used to derive asymptotically consistent approximate solutions according to the following pattern: The adjusted laminate theory leads to stress distributions in each ply of the laminated tube which do not satisfy zero stress boundary conditions at the stress-free ends. In terms of asymptotic theory this is a typical problem of singular perturbations and can be solved by considering boundary layers near the free ends where stress and deformation fields satisfy the boundary conditions and match conveniently with stress and deformation distributions calculated with the adjusted laminate theory in the interior zone. To derive boundary layer equations which are easy to handle analytically and still obtain fairly accurate results, we replace the laminated structure by its homogeneous orthotropic equivalent. The boundary layer solutions are then obtained following the main ideas developed

  8. Influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the baseline acoustic nonlinearity of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave techniques are increasingly becoming popular in detecting damage in composite materials. It was earlier observed by the authors that the non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composite is influenced by the fiber orientation [Chakrapani, Barnard, and Dayal, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 617-624 (2015)]. The current study expands this effort to investigate the effect of laminate sequence and fabric type on the non-classical nonlinear response. Two hypotheses were developed using the previous results, and the theory of interlaminar stresses to investigate the influence of laminate sequence and fabric type. Each hypothesis was tested by capturing the nonlinear response by performing nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and measuring frequency shifts, loss factors, and higher harmonics. It was observed that the laminate sequence can either increase or decrease the nonlinear response based on the stacking sequence. Similarly, tests were performed to compare unidirectional fabric and woven fabric and it was observed that woven fabric exhibited a lower nonlinear response compared to the unidirectional fabric. Conjectures based on the matrix properties and interlaminar stresses were used in an attempt to explain the observed nonlinear responses for different configurations. PMID:27250126

  9. Occupational dermatoses among fibreglass-reinforced plastics factory workers.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Keiko; Nagano, Megumi; Inaoka, Tsukasa; Futatsuka, Makoto

    2002-06-01

    Fibreglass-reinforced plastics (FRP) factory workers are at high risk of developing occupational dermatoses because of their exposure to many chemicals used in the manufacture of plastics as well as to glass fibre or dust. Patch tests were carried out on 29 workers involved in FRP manufacturing processes where unsaturated polyester (UP) resin was used, to investigate the causes of their skin problems. Of the 22 workers who reported experiencing skin problems, 16 showed positive results to at least 1 chemical, including 6 cases of multiple sensitivity. 2 showed positive reactions to UP base resin, 6 to cobalt chloride, 5 to benzoyl peroxide (BPO), 4 to methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKPO), 2 to para-tertiary butyl catechol (PTBC), 1 to styrene and 1 to formaldehyde. After taking into account their exposures and reported causes by questionnaires and their patch test results, 7 cases were diagnosed as allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) due to chemicals, 3 as irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) due to chemicals, and 3 as dermatitis due to mechanical irritation (MI) from glass fibre or dust, as well as 9 as ACD and/or MI. 18 of the total of 29 subjects (62.1%), including 2 workers without a history of skin problems, were sensitized to at least 1 chemical. Cobalt, peroxides, PTBC and UP base resin were the common causes of ACD. PMID:12190622

  10. The strong diamagnetic behaviour of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galehdar, A.; Nicholson, K. J.; Callus, P. J.; Rowe, W. S. T.; John, S.; Wang, C. H.; Ghorbani, K.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fibers are finite conductors with a weak diamagnetic response in a static magnetic field. When illuminated with a high-frequency alternating electromagnetic wave such that the skin depth is greater than the fiber diameter, carbon-fiber composites are shown to exhibit a strong dynamic diamagnetic response. The magnetic susceptibility (χm) is controlled by the polarization angle (θ), which is the angle between the incident electric field and conductor direction. A closed form solution for this behaviour was derived using Maxwell's equations and an understanding of the induced conductor currents. The equation was verified using simulation and free space "wall" and waveguide measurements on unidirectional IM7/977-3 carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. The measured responses ranged from non-magnetic at θ = 90°, χm = 0, up to strongly diamagnetic at θ = 30°, χm = -0.75, over the 8-18 GHz bandwidth. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and computational simulations.

  11. Prediction of failure in notched carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymer laminates under multi-axial loading.

    PubMed

    Tan, J L Y; Deshpande, V S; Fleck, N A

    2016-07-13

    A damage-based finite-element model is used to predict the fracture behaviour of centre-notched quasi-isotropic carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymer laminates under multi-axial loading. Damage within each ply is associated with fibre tension, fibre compression, matrix tension and matrix compression. Inter-ply delamination is modelled by cohesive interfaces using a traction-separation law. Failure envelopes for a notch and a circular hole are predicted for in-plane multi-axial loading and are in good agreement with the observed failure envelopes from a parallel experimental study. The ply-by-ply (and inter-ply) damage evolution and the critical mechanisms of ultimate failure also agree with the observed damage evolution. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of notched compressive strength are obtained upon employing the band broadening stress for microbuckling, highlighting the importance of this damage mode in compression. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242302

  12. Application of Acoustic Emission on the Characterization of Fracture in Textile Reinforced Cement Laminates

    PubMed Central

    Blom, J.; Wastiels, J.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of textile reinforced cementitious (TRC) composites under flexural loading. The main objective is to link specific AE parameters to the fracture mechanisms that are successively dominating the failure of this laminated material. At relatively low load, fracture is initiated by matrix cracking while, at the moment of peak load and thereafter, the fiber pull-out stage is reached. Stress modeling of the material under bending reveals that initiation of shear phenomena can also be activated depending on the shape (curvature) of the plate specimens. Preliminary results show that AE waveform parameters like frequency and energy are changing during loading, following the shift of fracturing mechanisms. Additionally, the AE behavior of specimens with different curvature is very indicative of the stress mode confirming the results of modeling. Moreover, AE source location shows the extent of the fracture process zone and its development in relation to the load. It is seen that AE monitoring yields valuable real time information on the fracture of the material and at the same time supplies valuable feedback to the stress modeling. PMID:24605050

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  18. Matrix Dominated Failure of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates Under Static and Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joseph Daniel

    Hierarchical material systems provide the unique opportunity to connect material knowledge to solving specific design challenges. Representing the quickest growing class of hierarchical materials in use, fiber-reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) offer superior strength and stiffness-to-weight ratios, damage tolerance, and decreasing production costs compared to metals and alloys. However, the implementation of FRPCs has historically been fraught with inadequate knowledge of the material failure behavior due to incomplete verification of recent computational constitutive models and improper (or non-existent) experimental validation, which has severely slowed creation and development. Noted by the recent Materials Genome Initiative and the Worldwide Failure Exercise, current state of the art qualification programs endure a 20 year gap between material conceptualization and implementation due to the lack of effective partnership between computational coding (simulation) and experimental characterization. Qualification processes are primarily experiment driven; the anisotropic nature of composites predisposes matrix-dominant properties to be sensitive to strain rate, which necessitates extensive testing. To decrease the qualification time, a framework that practically combines theoretical prediction of material failure with limited experimental validation is required. In this work, the Northwestern Failure Theory (NU Theory) for composite lamina is presented as the theoretical basis from which the failure of unidirectional and multidirectional composite laminates is investigated. From an initial experimental characterization of basic lamina properties, the NU Theory is employed to predict the matrix-dependent failure of composites under any state of biaxial stress from quasi-static to 1000 s-1 strain rates. It was found that the number of experiments required to characterize the strain-rate-dependent failure of a new composite material was reduced by an order of

  19. Numerical simulating and experimental study on the woven carbon fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanyang; Tang, Zhanwen; Pan, Lingying; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Baogang; Jiang, Wenge

    2016-05-01

    Impact damage has been identified as a critical form of the defects that constantly threatened the reliability of composite structures, such as those used in the aerospace structures and systems. Low energy impacts can introduce barely visible damage and cause the degradation of structural stiffness, furthermore, the flaws caused by low-velocity impact are so dangerous that they can give rise to the further extended delaminations. In order to improve the reliability and load carrying capacity of composite laminates under low-velocity impact, in this paper, the numerical simulatings and experimental studies on the woven fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact with impact energy 16.7J were discussed. The low velocity impact experiment was carried out through drop-weight system as the reason of inertia effect. A numerical progressive damage model was provided, in which the damages of fiber, matrix and interlamina were considered by VUMT subroutine in ABAQUS, to determine the damage modes. The Hashin failure criteria were improved to cover the failure modes of fiber failure in the directions of warp/weft and delaminations. The results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were compared with the experimental results of nondestructive examination including the results of ultrasonic C-scan, cross-section stereomicroscope and contact force - time history curves. It is found that the response of laminates under low-velocity impact could be divided into stages with different damage. Before the max-deformation of the laminates occurring, the matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delaminations were simulated during the impactor dropping. During the releasing and rebounding period, matrix cracking and delaminations areas kept increasing in the laminates because of the stress releasing of laminates. Finally, the simulating results showed the good agreements with the results of experiment.

  20. An experiment on the use of disposable plastics as a reinforcement in concrete beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhury, Mostafiz R.

    1992-01-01

    Illustrated here is the concept of reinforced concrete structures by the use of computer simulation and an inexpensive hands-on design experiment. The students in our construction management program use disposable plastic as a reinforcement to demonstrate their understanding of reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete beams. The plastics used for such an experiment vary from plastic bottles to steel reinforced auto tires. This experiment will show the extent to which plastic reinforcement increases the strength of a concrete beam. The procedure of using such throw-away plastics in an experiment to explain the interaction between the reinforcement material and concrete, and a comparison of the test results for using different types of waste plastics are discussed. A computer analysis to simulate the structural response is used to compare the test results and to understand the analytical background of reinforced concrete design. This interaction of using computers to analyze structures and to relate the output results with real experimentation is found to be a very useful method for teaching a math-based analytical subject to our non-engineering students.

  1. A parallel microfluidic channel fixture fabricated using laser ablated plastic laminates for electrochemical and chemiluminescent biodetection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thayne L; Harper, Jason C; Polsky, Ronen; Lopez, Deanna M; Wheeler, David R; Allen, Amy C; Brozik, Susan M

    2011-12-01

    Herein is described the fabrication and use of a plastic multilayer 3-channel microfluidic fixture. Multilayer devices were produced by laser machining of plastic polymethylmethacrylate and polyethyleneterapthalate laminates by ablation. The fixture consisted of an array of nine individually addressable gold or gold/ITO working electrodes, and a resistive platinum heating element. Laser machining of both the fluidic pathways in the plastic laminates, and the stencil masks used for thermal evaporation to form electrode regions on the plastic laminates, enabled rapid and inexpensive implementation of design changes. Electrochemiluminescence reactions in the fixture were achieved and monitored through ITO electrodes. Electroaddressable aryl diazonium chemistry was employed to selectively pattern gold electrodes for electrochemical multianalyte DNA detection from double stranded DNA (dsDNA) samples. Electrochemical detection of dsDNA was achieved by melting of dsDNA molecules in solution with the integrated heater, allowing detection of DNA sequences specific to breast and colorectal cancers with a non-specific binding control. Following detection, the array surface could be renewed via high temperature (95 °C) stripping using the integrated heating element. This versatile and simple method for prototyping devices shows potential for further development of highly integrated, multi-functional bioanalytical devices. PMID:22276087

  2. A parallel microfluidic channel fixture fabricated using laser ablated plastic laminates for electrochemical and chemiluminescent biodetection of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Thayne L.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Wheeler, David R.; Allen, Amy C.; Brozik, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Herein is described the fabrication and use of a plastic multilayer 3-channel microfluidic fixture. Multilayer devices were produced by laser machining of plastic polymethylmethacrylate and polyethyleneterapthalate laminates by ablation. The fixture consisted of an array of nine individually addressable gold or gold/ITO working electrodes, and a resistive platinum heating element. Laser machining of both the fluidic pathways in the plastic laminates, and the stencil masks used for thermal evaporation to form electrode regions on the plastic laminates, enabled rapid and inexpensive implementation of design changes. Electrochemiluminescence reactions in the fixture were achieved and monitored through ITO electrodes. Electroaddressable aryl diazonium chemistry was employed to selectively pattern gold electrodes for electrochemical multianalyte DNA detection from double stranded DNA (dsDNA) samples. Electrochemical detection of dsDNA was achieved by melting of dsDNA molecules in solution with the integrated heater, allowing detection of DNA sequences specific to breast and colorectal cancers with a non-specific binding control. Following detection, the array surface could be renewed via high temperature (95 °C) stripping using the integrated heating element. This versatile and simple method for prototyping devices shows potential for further development of highly integrated, multi-functional bioanalytical devices. PMID:22276087

  3. Tension-Compression fatigue behavior of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy quasi-isotropic laminated composites subjected to low energy impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.C.M.; Wu, G.Y.; Lin, S.H.; Lin, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Tension-Compression fatigue behavior of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites subjected to low energy impact was investigated. The [0/45/90/-45]2S laminates of T300/976 Carbon/Epoxy were utilized. The impact toughness and residual strength after various low impact energies were measured. The static tensile strength and tension-compression fatigue tests at various levels of stress amplitude were also measured. The median rank method was applied to predict the statistical probability of fatigue fife and residual strength after impact. The S-N curves for various survival probabilities were established using the pooled Weibull distribution function. The theoretical prediction methods were applied to illustrate the fatigue behavior of thermoset T300/976 Carbon/Epoxy [0/45190/-45]2s laminated composites.

  4. Numerical Predictions of Damage and Failure in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Laminates Using a Thermodynamically-Based Work Potential Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    A thermodynamically-based work potential theory for modeling progressive damage and failure in fiber-reinforced laminates is presented. The current, multiple-internal state variable (ISV) formulation, referred to as enhanced Schapery theory (EST), utilizes separate ISVs for modeling the effects of damage and failure. Consistent characteristic lengths are introduced into the formulation to govern the evolution of the failure ISVs. Using the stationarity of the total work potential with respect to each ISV, a set of thermodynamically consistent evolution equations for the ISVs are derived. The theory is implemented into a commercial finite element code. The model is verified against experimental results from two laminated, T800/3900-2 panels containing a central notch and different fiber-orientation stacking sequences. Global load versus displacement, global load versus local strain gage data, and macroscopic failure paths obtained from the models are compared against the experimental results.

  5. GUIDES TO POLLUTION PREVENTION: THE FIBERGLASS REINFORCED AND COMPOSITE PLASTICS INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fiberglass reinforced and composite plastic industries generate wastes (including air emissions) during fabrication processes and from the use of solvents for clean-up tools, molds and spraying equipment. he wastes generated are: artially solidified resins, contaminated solve...

  6. UTILIZATION OF SCRAP PREPREG WASTES AS A REINFORCEMENT IN A WHOLLY RECYCLED PLASTIC - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Foster-Miller is proposing to combine Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) commingled plastics with a high performance reinforcement (scrap prepreg) to form a durable and cost competitive wood substitute with superior moisture, rodent and insect resistance. This proposed technology ...

  7. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERGLASS-REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses several projects to measure hydrocarbon emissions associated with the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastics. The main purpose of the projects was to evaluate pollution prevention techniques to reduce emissions by altering raw materials, application equ...

  8. Mechanisms of large strain, high strain rate plastic flow in the explosively driven collapse of Ni-Al laminate cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, K. L.; Chiu, P. H.; Higgins, A.; Serge, M.; Weihs, T. P.; Fritz, G.; Stover, A.; Benson, D. J.; Nesterenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Ni-Al laminates have shown promise as reactive materials due to their high energy release through intermetallic reaction. In addition to the traditional ignition methods, the reaction may be initiated in hot spots that can be created during mechanical loading. The explosively driven thick walled cylinder (TWC) technique was performed on two Ni-Al laminates composed of thin foil layers with different mesostructues: concentric and corrugated. These experiments were conducted to examine how these materials accommodate large plastic strain under high strain rates. Finite element simulations of these specimens with mesostuctures digitized from the experimental samples were conducted to provide insight into the mesoscale mechanisms of plastic flow. The dependence of dynamic behaviour on mesostructure may be used to tailor the hot spot formation and therefore the reactivity of the material system.

  9. UTILIZATION OF SCRAP PREPREG WASTES AS A REINFORCEMENT IN A WHOLLY RECYCLED PLASTIC - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Foster-Miller proposes to utilize scrap prepreg waste as a reinforcement in recycled polyethylene. By reinforcing recycled plastics such as polyethylene with scrap prepreg and suitable binders, an economical useful product can be obtained. At the same time, this innovation ...

  10. Separation properties of aluminium-plastic laminates in post-consumer Tetra Pak with mixed organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S F; Zhang, L L; Luo, K; Sun, Z X; Mei, X X

    2014-04-01

    The separation properties of the aluminium-plastic laminates in postconsumer Tetra Pak structure were studied in this present work. The organic solvent blend of benzene-ethyl alcohol-water was used as the separation reagent. Then triangle coordinate figure analysis was taken to optimize the volume proportion of various components in the separating agent and separation process. And the separation temperature of aluminium-plastic laminates was determined by the separation time, efficiency, and total mass loss of products. The results show that cost-efficient separations perform best with low usage of solvents at certain temperatures, for certain times, and within a certain range of volume proportions of the three components in the solvent agent. It is also found that similar solubility parameters of solvents and polyethylene adhesives (range 26.06-34.85) are a key factor for the separation of the aluminium-plastic laminates. Such multisolvent processes based on the combined-system concept will be vital to applications in the recycling industry. PMID:24622294

  11. Nonlinear Spring Finite Elements for Predicting Mode I-Dominated Delamination Growth in Laminated Structure with Through-Thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Krueger, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    One particular concern of polymer matrix composite laminates is the relatively low resistance to delamination cracking, in particular when the dominant type of failure is mode I opening. One method proposed for alleviating this problem involves the insertion pultruded carbon pins through the laminate thickness. The pins, known as z-pins, are inserted into the prepreg laminate using an ultrasonic hammer prior to the curing process, resulting in a field of pins embedded normal to the laminate plane as illustrated in Figure. 1. Pin diameters range between 0.28-mm to 0.5-mm and standard areal densities range from 0.5% to 4%. The z-pins are provided by the manufacturer, Aztex(Registered TradeMark) , in a low-density foam preform, which acts to stabilize orientation of the pins during the insertion process [1-3]. Typical pin materials include boron and carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix. A number of methods have been developed for predicting delamination growth in laminates reinforced with z-pins. During a study on the effect of z-pin reinforcement on mode I delamination resistance, finite element analyses of z-pin reinforced double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were performed by Cartie and Partridge [4]. The z-pin bridging stresses were modeled by applying equivalent forces at the pin locations. Single z-pin pull-out tests were performed to characterize the traction law of the pins under mode I loading conditions. Analytical solutions for delamination growth in z-pin reinforced DCB specimens were independently derived by Robinson and Das [5] and Ratcliffe and O'Brien [6]. In the former case, pin bridging stresses were modeled using a distributed load and in the latter example the bridging stresses were discretely modeled by way of grounded springs. Additionally, Robinson and Das developed a data reduction strategy for calculating mode I fracture toughness, G(sub Ic), from a z-pin reinforced DCB specimen test [5]. In both cases a traction law similar to that

  12. Increasing the Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Asbestos-Reinforced Laminates Through Modification of their Polymer Matrix with Carbon Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilova-Tret'yak, S. M.; Evseeva, L. E.; Tanaeva, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    Experimental investigations of the thermophysical properties of traditional and modified asbestos-reinforced laminates depending on the type of their carbon nanofiller have been carried out in the range of temperatures from -150 to 150°C. It has been shown that the largest (nearly twofold) increase in the thermal-conductivity and thermal-diffusivity coefficients of the indicated materials is observed when they are modified with a small-scale fraction of a nanofiller (carbon nanotubes). The specific heats of the modified and traditional asbestos-reinforced laminates turned out to be identical, in practice, within the measurement error.

  13. Interfibre Failure Characterisation of Unidirectional and Triax Glass Fibre Non-Crimp Fabric Reinforced Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laustsen, S.; Lund, E.; Kühlmeier, L.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2015-02-01

    The in-plane failure envelopes of unidirectional (UD) laminae in a UD and a Triax (0°, ±45°) laminate configuration have been investigated. The two laminate configurations have been characterised by testing off-axis specimens in uniaxial tension and compression at different angles relative to the fibre direction and further by Iosipescu shear tests. Strain gauge and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) measurements were used to measure the deformation states during loading, and to record the stress-strain responses to identify the initiation of failure and investigate the heterogeneity of the material and possible parasitic effects. A novel analysis methodology to determine the so-called `failure initiation strength' based on the second derivative of the stresses with respect to the strains has been adopted. The experimentally determined `failure initiation stresses' were compared with predictions from the commonly applied Maximum Stress, Tsai-Wu, and Puck failure criteria. From this work, a thorough comparison of the UD and Triax failure envelopes has been facilitated. It is shown that failure prediction for the Triax laminate based on the failure envelope derived from UD lamina tests may be too conservative in comparison with fitting a failure criterion directly to the Triax laminate test data. The latter approach implies that the Triax laminate is considered as a single lamina with homogenised properties, which in principle violates the theoretical background of the considered failure criteria, since these are established to predict failure for a UD lamina. However, the simple homogenisation is shown to be a useful design oriented approach for providing a simple estimation of the onset of failure in laminate configurations composed of e.g., multiple layers of Triax. Thus, a reliable and efficient approach is offered for the structural integrity assessment, which takes the non-crimp fabric configurations directly or `as delivered' into account.

  14. Boron, metal, and aramid fiber reinforced plastics. January 1973-May 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning properties and applications of boron, metal, and fiber-reinforced plastics. Discussions on improvements of electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of plastics by boron, metal, and aramid fiber reinforcement are presented. Applications are considered in automotive, aerospace, electronics, marine, sports, and medical industries. (This updated bibliography contains 338 citations, 121 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Tailoring nanostructured, graded, and particle-reinforced Al laminates by accumulative roll bonding.

    PubMed

    Göken, Mathias; Höppel, Heinz Werner

    2011-06-17

    Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) is a very attractive process for processing large sheets to achieve ultrafine-grained microstructure and high strength. Commercial purity Al and many Al alloys from the 5xxx and the precipitation strengthened 6xxx alloy series have been successfully processed by the ARB process into an ultrafine-grained state and superior ductility have been achieved for some materials like technical purity Al. It has also been shown that the ARB process can be successfully used to produce multi-component materials with tailored properties by reinforcement or grading, respectively. This allows optimizing the properties based on two or more materials/alloys. For example, to achieve high corrosion resistance and good visual surface properties it is interesting to produce a composite of two different Al alloys, where for example a high strength alloy of the 5xxx series is used as the core material and a 6xxx series alloy as the clad material. It has been shown that such a composite achieves more or less the same strength as the core material although 50% of the composite consists of the significant softer clad alloy. Furthermore, it has been found, that the serrated yielding which typically appears in 5xxx series alloys and limits applications as outer skin materials completely disappears. Moreover, the ARB process allows many other attractive ways to design new composites and graded material structures with unique properties by the introduction of particles, fibres and sheets. Strengthening with nanoparticles for example is a very attractive way to improve the properties and accelerate the grain refining used in the severe plastic deformation process. With an addition of only 0.1 vol.-% Al2O3 nanoparticles a significantly accelerated grain refinement has been found which reduces the number of ARB passes necessary to achieve the maximum in strength. The paper provides a short review on recent developments in the field of ARB processing for producing

  16. Designing with figer-reinforced plastics (planar random composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of composite mechanics to predict the hygrothermomechanical behavior of planar random composites (PRC) is reviewed and described. These composites are usually made from chopped fiber reinforced resins (thermoplastics or thermosets). The hygrothermomechanical behavior includes mechanical properties, physical properties, thermal properties, fracture toughness, creep and creep rupture. Properties are presented in graphical form with sample calculations to illustrate their use. Concepts such as directional reinforcement and strip hybrids are described. Typical data that can be used for preliminary design for various PRCs are included. Several resins and molding compounds used to make PRCs are described briefly. Pertinent references are cited that cover analysis and design methods, materials, data, fabrication procedures and applications.

  17. Fire test method for graphite fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A potential problem in the use of graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites is the dispersal of graphite fibers during accidential fires. Airborne, electrically conductive fibers originating from the burning composites could enter and cause shorting in electrical equipment located in surrounding areas. A test method for assessing the burning characteristics of graphite fiber reinforced composites and the effectiveness of the composites in retaining the graphite fibers has been developed. The method utilizes a modified rate of heat release apparatus. The equipment and the testing procedure are described. The application of the test method to the assessment of composite materials is illustrated for two resin matrix/graphite composite systems.

  18. Fire test method for graphite fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A potential problem in the use of graphite fiber reinforced resin matrix composites is the dispersal of graphite fibers during accidental fires. Airborne, electrically conductive fibers originating from the burning composites could enter and cause shorting in electrical equipment located in surrounding areas. A test method for assessing the burning characteristics of graphite fiber reinforced composites and the effectiveness of the composites in retaining the graphite fibers has been developed. The method utilizes a modified Ohio State University Rate of Heat Release apparatus. The equipment and the testing procedure are described. The application of the test method to the assessment of composite materials is illustrated for two resin matrix/graphite composite systems.

  19. Smart damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of laminated composite beams using vertically reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S. K.; Ray, M. C.

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations of laminated composite beams using vertically reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composite material as the material of the constraining layer of the ACLD treatment. A nonlinear finite element model has been developed for analyzing the ACLD of laminated symmetric and antisymmetric cross-ply and angle-ply composite beams integrated with such ACLD treatment. The von Kármán-type nonlinear strain-displacement relations and the first-order shear deformation theory are used for deriving this coupled electromechanical nonlinear finite element model. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been used to model the constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment in the time domain. The backbone curves of such a class of nonlinear systems are plotted to determine the excitation levels for causing geometrical nonlinearity. The numerical results reveal that the ACLD treatment significantly improves the damping characteristics of the cross-ply and antisymmetric angle-ply beams for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations of the beams.

  20. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (Inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (Inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  1. Numerical Modelling of Glass Fibre Reinforced Laminates Subjected to a Low Velocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. Y.; Guana, Z. W.; Cantwell, W. J.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a series of numerical predictions of the perforation behaviour of glass fibre laminates subjected to quasi-static and low-velocity impact loading. Both shear and tensile failure criteria were used in the finite element models to simulate the post-failure processes via an automatic element removal procedure. The appropriate material properties, obtained through a series of uniaxial tension and bending tests on the composites, were used in the numerical models. Four, eight and sixteen ply glass fibre laminates panels were perforated at quasi-static rates and under low-velocity impact loading. Reasonably good correlation was obtained between the numerical simulations and the experimental results, both in terms of the failure modes and the load-deflection relationships before and during the penetration phase. The predicted impact energies of the GFRP panels were compared with the experimental data and reasonable agreement was observed.

  2. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  3. Comparative study of the ballistic performance of glass reinforced plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudev, A.; Mehlman, M.J.

    1987-07-01

    The study consisted of two parts: 1) selection and characterization of E and S-2 Glass woven roving prepregs suitable for thick ballistic laminate fabrication; and 2) comparative evaluation of the ballistic performance of flat composite laminates ranging in thickness from 1.4'' to 1.9'' fabricated with the prepregs. E and S-2 glass woven roving reinforcements were prepregged with polyester, polyester Interpenetrating Network (IPN), vinylester and epoxy resins. A total of 14 different prepregs (2 E glass, 12 S-2 glass) from seven vendors were selected for evaluation. Two types of fiber finishes (epoxy compatible and starch-oil) were chosen to vary the level of surface compatibility (bond strength) with the particular matrix resin chosen. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  4. A New Generation of Sub Mm Telescopes, Made of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezger, P.; Baars, J. W. M.; Ulich, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) appears to be the material most suited for the construction of submillimeter telescopes (SMT) not only for ground-based use but also for space applications. The accuracy of the CFRP reflectors needs to be improved beyond value of the 17 micron rms envisaged for the 10 m SMT.

  5. Elasto-plastic analysis of interface layers for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix in metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic fibers induces high thermal stresses in the matrix. Elasto-plastic analyses - with different degrees of simplification and modelization - show that an interface layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the tensile hoop stress in the matrix substantially.

  6. AN EMPIRICAL MODEL TO PREDICT STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM FIBER-REINFORCED PLASTICS FABRICATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Styrene is a designated hazardous air pollutant, per the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. It is also a tropospheric ozone precursor. Fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) fabrication is the primary source of anthropogenic styrene emissions in the United States. This paper describes an em...

  7. Prediction of thermal strains in fibre reinforced plastic matrix by discretisation of the temperature exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoy, E. K.

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of environmental effects on fibre reinforced plastics habitually is made difficult due to the complex variability of the natural service environment. This paper suggests a method to predict thermal strain distribution over the material lifetime by discretisation of the exposure history. Laboratory results show a high correlation between predicted and experimentally measured strain distribution

  8. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF NEW RESIN APPLICATION EQUIPMENT FOR FIBER- REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a pilot-scale evaluation of new resin application equipment for fiber- reinforced plastics. The study, an evaluation and comparison of styrene emissions, utilized Magnum's FIT(TM) nozzle with conventional spray guns and flow coaters (operated at both ...

  9. Finite element simulation of an artificial intervertebral disk using fiber reinforced laminated composite model.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi, Mehrdad; Asgharzadeh Shirazi, Hadi; Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-10-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral disk (IVD) has been increased in recent years. The lumbar herniation can be cured using conservative and surgical procedures. Surgery is considered after failure of conservative treatment. Partial discectomy, fusion, and total disk replacement (TDR) are also common surgical treatments for degenerative disk disease. However, due to limitations and disadvantages of the current treatments, many studies have been carried out to approach the best design of mimicking natural disk. Recently, a new method of TDRs has been introduced using nature deformation of IVD by reinforced fibers of annulus fibrosis. Nonetheless, owing to limitations of experimental works on the human body, numerical studies of IVD may help to understand load transfer and biomechanical properties within the disks with reinforced fibers. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the L2-L3 disk vertebrae unit with 12 vertical fibers embedded into annulus fibrosis was constructed. The IVD was subjected to compressive force, bending moment, and axial torsion. The most important parameters of disk failures were compared to that of experimental data. The results showed that the addition of reinforced fibers into the disk invokes a significant decrease of stress in the nucleus and annulus. The findings of this study may have implications not only for developing IVDs with reinforced fibers but also for the application of fiber reinforced IVD in orthopedics surgeries as a suitable implant. PMID:24981720

  10. Design aid for shear strengthening of reinforced concrete T-joints using carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, Ioan

    The research presented in the present work focuses on the shear strengthening of beam column joints using carbon fiber composites, a material considered in seismic retrofit in recent years more than any other new material. These composites, or fiber reinforced polymers, offer huge advantages over structural steel reinforced concrete or timber. A few of these advantages are the superior resistance to corrosion, high stiffness to weight and strength to weight ratios, and the ability to control the material's behavior by selecting the orientation of the fibers. The design and field application research on reinforced concrete cap beam-column joints includes analytical investigations using pushover analysis; design of carbon fiber layout, experimental tests and field applications. Several beam column joints have been tested recently with design variables as the type of composite system, fiber orientation and the width of carbon fiber sheets. The surface preparation has been found to be critical for the bond between concrete and composite material, which is the most important factor in joint shear strengthening. The final goal of this thesis is to develop design aids for retrofitting reinforced concrete beam column joints. Two bridge bents were tested on the Interstate-15 corridor. One bent was tested in the as-is condition. Carbon fiber reinforced plastic composite sheets were used to externally reinforce the second bridge bent. By applying the composite, the displacement ductility has been doubled, and the bent overall lateral load capacity has been increased as well. The finite element model (using DRAIN-2DX) was calibrated to model the actual stiffness of the supports. The results were similar to the experimental findings.

  11. Scanning tone burst eddy-current thermography (S-TBET) for NDT of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libin, M. N.; Maxfield, B. W.; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2014-02-01

    Tone Burst Eddy Current technique uses eddy current to apply transient heating inside a component and uses a conventional IR camera for visualization of the response to the transient heating. This technique has been earliest demonstrated for metallic components made of AL, Steel, Stainless Steel, etc., and for detection of cracks, corrosion and adhesive dis-bonds. Although, not nearly as conducting as metals, the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) material absorbs measurable electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range above 10 kHz. When the surface temperature is observed on the surface that is being heated (defined as the surface just beneath and slightly to one side of the heating coil), the surface temperature increases with increasing frequency because the internal heating increases with frequency. A 2-D anisotropic transient Eddy current heating and thermal conduction model has been developed that provides a reasonable description of the processes described above. The inherent anisotropy of CFRP laminates is included in this model by calculating the heating due to three superimposed, tightly coupled isotropic layers having a specified ply-layup. The experimental apparatus consists of an induction heating coil and an IR camera with low NETD and high frame rates. The coil is moved over the sample using a stepper motor controlled manipulator. The IR data recording is synchronized with the motion control to provide a movie of the surface temperature over time. Several components were evaluated for detection of impact damage, location of stiffeners, etc. on CFRP components.

  12. Scanning tone burst eddy-current thermography (S-TBET) for NDT of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) components

    SciTech Connect

    Libin, M. N.; Maxfield, B. W.; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2014-02-18

    Tone Burst Eddy Current technique uses eddy current to apply transient heating inside a component and uses a conventional IR camera for visualization of the response to the transient heating. This technique has been earliest demonstrated for metallic components made of AL, Steel, Stainless Steel, etc., and for detection of cracks, corrosion and adhesive dis-bonds. Although, not nearly as conducting as metals, the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) material absorbs measurable electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range above 10 kHz. When the surface temperature is observed on the surface that is being heated (defined as the surface just beneath and slightly to one side of the heating coil), the surface temperature increases with increasing frequency because the internal heating increases with frequency. A 2-D anisotropic transient Eddy current heating and thermal conduction model has been developed that provides a reasonable description of the processes described above. The inherent anisotropy of CFRP laminates is included in this model by calculating the heating due to three superimposed, tightly coupled isotropic layers having a specified ply-layup. The experimental apparatus consists of an induction heating coil and an IR camera with low NETD and high frame rates. The coil is moved over the sample using a stepper motor controlled manipulator. The IR data recording is synchronized with the motion control to provide a movie of the surface temperature over time. Several components were evaluated for detection of impact damage, location of stiffeners, etc. on CFRP components.

  13. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  14. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I know if my reinforced plastic... for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source...

  15. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I know if my reinforced plastic... Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new...

  16. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I know if my reinforced plastic... for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source...

  17. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I know if my reinforced plastic... Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new...

  18. 40 CFR 63.5795 - How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new affected source or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I know if my reinforced plastic... Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.5795 How do I know if my reinforced plastic composites production facility is a new...

  19. Recyclability assessment of nano-reinforced plastic packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez, C.; Hortal, M.; Aliaga, C.; Devis, A.; Cloquell-Ballester, V.A.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The study compares the recyclability of polymers with and without nanoparticles. • Visual appearance, material quality and mechanical properties are evaluated. • Minor variations in mechanical properties in R-PE and R-PP with nanoparticles. • Slight degradation of R-PET which affect mechanical properties. • Colour deviations in recycled PE, PP and PET in ranges higher that 0.3 units. - Abstract: Packaging is expected to become the leading application for nano-composites by 2020 due to the great advantages on mechanical and active properties achieved with these substances. As novel materials, and although there are some current applications in the market, there is still unknown areas under development. One key issue to be addressed is to know more about the implications of the nano-composite packaging materials once they become waste. The present study evaluates the extrusion process of four nanomaterials (Layered silicate modified nanoclay (Nanoclay1), Calcium Carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), Silver (Ag) and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) as part of different virgin polymer matrices of polyethylene (PE), Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethyleneterephtalate (PET). Thus, the following film plastic materials: (PE–Nanoclay1, PE–CaCO{sub 3}, PP–Ag, PET–ZnO, PET–Ag, PET–Nanoclay1) have been processed considering different recycling scenarios. Results on recyclability show that for PE and PP, in general terms and except for some minor variations in yellowness index, tensile modulus, tensile strength and tear strength (PE with Nanoclay1, PP with Ag), the introduction of nanomaterial in the recycling streams for plastic films does not affect the final recycled plastic material in terms of mechanical properties and material quality compared to conventional recycled plastic. Regarding PET, results show that the increasing addition of nanomaterial into the recycled PET matrix (especially PET–Ag) could influence important properties of the recycled material, due to a

  20. Recyclability assessment of nano-reinforced plastic packaging.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C; Hortal, M; Aliaga, C; Devis, A; Cloquell-Ballester, V A

    2014-12-01

    Packaging is expected to become the leading application for nano-composites by 2020 due to the great advantages on mechanical and active properties achieved with these substances. As novel materials, and although there are some current applications in the market, there is still unknown areas under development. One key issue to be addressed is to know more about the implications of the nano-composite packaging materials once they become waste. The present study evaluates the extrusion process of four nanomaterials (Layered silicate modified nanoclay (Nanoclay1), Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3), Silver (Ag) and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) as part of different virgin polymer matrices of polyethylene (PE), Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethyleneterephtalate (PET). Thus, the following film plastic materials: (PE-Nanoclay1, PE-CaCO3, PP-Ag, PET-ZnO, PET-Ag, PET-Nanoclay1) have been processed considering different recycling scenarios. Results on recyclability show that for PE and PP, in general terms and except for some minor variations in yellowness index, tensile modulus, tensile strength and tear strength (PE with Nanoclay1, PP with Ag), the introduction of nanomaterial in the recycling streams for plastic films does not affect the final recycled plastic material in terms of mechanical properties and material quality compared to conventional recycled plastic. Regarding PET, results show that the increasing addition of nanomaterial into the recycled PET matrix (especially PET-Ag) could influence important properties of the recycled material, due to a slight degradation of the polymer, such as increasing pinholes, degradation fumes and elongation at break. Moreover, it should be noted that colour deviations were visible in most of the samples (PE, PP and PET) in levels higher than 0.3 units (limit perceivable by the human eye). The acceptance of these changes in the properties of recycled PE, PP and PET will depend on the specific applications considered (e.g. packaging applications are more

  1. Deformation Behavior during Processing in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Shinji; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    In this study, we manufacture the device for measuring the friction between the prepreg curing process and subjected to pull-out tests with it The prepreg used in this study is a unidirectional carbon/epoxy, produced by TORAY designation of T700SC/2592.When creating specimens 4-ply prepregs are prepared and laminated. The 2-ply prepregs in the middle are shifted 50mm. In order to measure the friction between the prepreg during the cure process, we simulate the environment in the autoclave in the device, and we experiment in pull-out test. Test environment simulating temperature and pressure. The speed of displacement should be calculated by coefficient of thermal expansions (CTE). By calculation, 0.05mm/min gives the order of magnitude of displacement speed. In this study, 3 pull-out speeds are used: 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1mm/min. The specimen was heated by a couple of heaters, and we controlled the heaters with a temperature controller along the curing conditions of the prepreg. We put pressure using 4 bolts. Two strain gages were put on the bolt. We can understand the load applied to the specimen from the strain of the bolt. Pressure was adjusted the tightness of the bolt according to curing conditions. By using such a device, the pull-out test performed by tensile testing machine while adding temperature and pressure. During the 5 hours, we perform experiments while recording the load and stroke. The shear stress determined from the load and the stroke, and evaluated.

  2. Fiber-reinforced dielectric elastomer laminates with integrated function of actuating and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiefeng; Xie, Yuhan; Li, Chi; Yang, Xuxu; Jin, Yongbin; Liu, Junjie; Huang, Xiaoqiang

    2015-04-01

    The natural limbs of animals and insects integrate muscles, skins and neurons, providing both the actuating and sensing functions simultaneously. Inspired by the natural structure, we present a novel structure with integrated function of actuating and sensing with dielectric elastomer (DE) laminates. The structure can deform when subjected to high voltage loading and generate corresponding output signal in return. We investigate the basic physical phenomenon of dielectric elastomer experimentally. It is noted that when applying high voltage, the actuating dielectric elastomer membrane deforms and the sensing dielectric elastomer membrane changes the capacitance in return. Based on the concept, finite element method (FEM) simulation has been conducted to further investigate the electromechanical behavior of the structure.

  3. Ply level failure prediction of carbon fibre reinforced laminated composite panels subjected to low velocity drop-weight impact using adaptive meshing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umar; Myler, Peter

    2014-09-01

    This work is concerned with physical testing and numerical simulations of flat and round nose drop-weight impact of carbon fibre-reinforced laminate composite panels to predict ply level failure. Majority of the existing studies on impact of composites by spherical nose impactors are experimental, computational models are simplified, and based on classical laminated plate theories where contributions of through-thickness stresses are neglected. Present work considers flat nose impact and contributions from through-thickness stresses and is mainly simulation based. A computational model was developed in ABAQUS™ software using adaptive meshing techniques. Simulation produced (2D model) stresses were numerically integrated using MATALB™ code to predict through-thickness (3D) stresses. Through-the-thickness stresses were then utilised in advanced failure criteria coded in MATLAB™ software to predict ply level failures. Simulation produced results demonstrate that the computational model can efficiently and effectively predict ply-by-ply failure status of relatively thick laminates.

  4. Effect of oil lamination between plasticized starch layers on film properties.

    PubMed

    Basiak, Ewelina; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Lenart, Andrzej

    2016-03-15

    To reduce the hygroscopic character of biodegradable starch-based films, rapeseed oil was incorporated by lamination (starch-oil-starch 3-layers technique). The lipid lamination followed by starch solution casting step induced an emulsion type structure of dried films. Composite films are more opalescent and glossier than fatty free starch films. For all the films, structure is heterogeneous in the cross-section only. Adding fat induced a twice decrease of the tensile strength. Thermal gravimetry analysis did not show differences between films with and without oil. Lipid reduced the moisture absorption particularly at higher RH as well as the surface swelling index, when water droplet contact occurred. Addition of lipids always decreases the contact angle for all liquid tested, except for water. Surface affinity of films for liquids less polar that water increased with rapeseed oil addition. The addition of rapeseed oil significantly reduces water vapour and oxygen permeability. PMID:26575712

  5. Processing and characterization of polyols plasticized-starch reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Rodríguez-Llamazares, S; Barral, L; Bouza, R; Montero, B

    2016-09-20

    Biocomposites suitable for short-life applications such as food packaging were prepared by melt processing and investigated. Biocomposites studied are wheat starch plasticized with two different molecular weight polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and reinforced with various amounts of microcrystalline cellulose. The effect of the plasticizer type and the filler amount on the processing properties, the crystallization behavior and morphology developed for the materials, and the influence on thermal stability, dynamic mechanical properties and water absorption behavior were investigated. Addition of microcrystalline cellulose led to composites with good filler-matrix adhesion where the stiffness and resistance to humidity absorption were improved. The use of sorbitol as a plasticizer of starch also improved the stiffness and water uptake behavior of the material as well as its thermal stability. Biodegradable starch-based materials with a wide variety of properties can be tailored by varying the polyol plasticizer type and/or by adding microcrystalline cellulose filler. PMID:27261733

  6. Bond of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) rods to concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Zahrani, M.M.; Nanni, A.; Al-Dulaijan, S.U.; Bakis, C.E.

    1996-11-01

    The bond behavior between FRP rods and concrete is one of the most important aspects to predicting the short- and long-term performance of FRP reinforced concrete structures including development and transfer length. In this research, the direct pull-out test was used to study the FRP/concrete bond behavior. This method allows measurement of the loaded- and free-end slip of the FRP rod and placement of a strain probe inside the rod to measure internal strain distribution in both axial and radial directions along the bonded length without affecting the FRP/concrete interface. Knowledge of strain distribution is necessary to study the load transfer mechanism between FRP rod and concrete. The scope of this paper include experimental results obtained with the direct pull-out test using 12.7 mm glass and carbon FRP rods with smooth and axisymmetrical deformed surfaces. The typical results are given as nominal bond and shear stress vs. free- and loaded-end slip. Experimental results obtained from strain probes used during pull-out tests are also presented as nominal bond and shear stress vs. strain. For smooth rods, friction is the main controlling factor. For deformed rods, bond tends to be controlled by strength and mechanical action of the axisymmetrical deformations rather than adhesion and friction. The strength of concrete appears to have no effect on the bond strength and failure mechanism of these particular machined FRP rods when concrete splitting is avoided.

  7. Effect of Waste Plastic Shreds on Bond Resistance between Concrete and Steel Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osifala, K. B.; Salau, M. A.; Adeniyi, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the effect of waste plastic shreds on steel-concrete bond. Forty RILEM test specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter high-yield reinforcing bars were cast and tested. Fifteen specimens with 16mm and 20mm each were cast with the addition of waste plastic shreds at varying percentages of 1%, 1.5% and 2%; another ten RILEM specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter bars at 0% of waste plastic shreds were cast as reference. Nine 150mm cubes, with three taken from each batch of various percentages of waste plastic shreds, were used to monitor the concrete strength. From the test results and analysis, the compressive strength of concrete was found to reduce with increased percentages of waste plastic shreds, while the waste plastic shreds material was found not to improve the bond resistance between concrete and steel. However, though lower than normal concrete, there was an increase in the bond resistance with increase in the percent of plastic shreds. The bond resistance of 16mm was also found to be higher than that of 20mm in all the specimens tested.

  8. Boron fiber reinforced plastics. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the applications, molding processes, properties, design concepts, and market trends of polyester and epoxy resins reinforced with boron fibers. Performance evaluations from nondestructive test results are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Boron fiber reinforced plastics. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the applications, molding processes, properties, design concepts, and market trends of polyester and epoxy resins reinforced with boron fibers. Performance evaluations from nondestructive test results are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Occupational styrene exposure for twelve product categories in the reinforced-plastics industry.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K; Carson, A; Samuels, S J

    1985-08-01

    Approximately 1500 occupational styrene exposure values from 28 reinforced-plastic manufacturers were collected retrospectively from companies and state and federal agencies. This report describes the major types of manufacturing processes within the reinforced-plastics industry and reports on the availability, collection and analysis of historical exposure information. Average exposure to styrene in most open-mold companies (24-82 ppm) was generally 2-3 times the exposure in press-mold companies (11-26 ppm). Manufacturers of smaller boats had mean styrene exposures of 82 ppm as compared to 37 ppm for yacht companies. There was considerable overlap in styrene exposure among job titles classified as directly exposed within open- and press-mold processing. PMID:4050680

  11. Occupational styrene exposure for twelve product categories in the reinforced-plastics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lemasters, G.K.; Carson, A.; Samuels, S.J.

    1985-08-01

    Approximately 1500 occupational styrene exposure values from 28 reinforced-plastic manufacturers were collected retrospectively from companies and state and federal agencies. This report describes the major types of manufacturing processes within the reinforced-plastics industry and reports on the availability, collection and analysis of historical exposure information. Average exposure to styrene in most open-mold companies (24-82 ppm) was generally 2-3 times the exposure in press-mold companies (11-26 ppm). Manufacturers of smaller boats had mean styrene exposures of 82 ppm as compared to 37 ppm for yacht companies. There was considerable overlap in styrene exposure among job titles classified as directly exposed within open- and press-mold processing.

  12. Computational Implementation of a Thermodynamically Based Work Potential Model For Progressive Microdamage and Transverse Cracking in Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Collier, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    A continuum-level, dual internal state variable, thermodynamically based, work potential model, Schapery Theory, is used capture the effects of two matrix damage mechanisms in a fiber-reinforced laminated composite: microdamage and transverse cracking. Matrix microdamage accrues primarily in the form of shear microcracks between the fibers of the composite. Whereas, larger transverse matrix cracks typically span the thickness of a lamina and run parallel to the fibers. Schapery Theory uses the energy potential required to advance structural changes, associated with the damage mechanisms, to govern damage growth through a set of internal state variables. These state variables are used to quantify the stiffness degradation resulting from damage growth. The transverse and shear stiffness of the lamina are related to the internal state variables through a set of measurable damage functions. Additionally, the damage variables for a given strain state can be calculated from a set of evolution equations. These evolution equations and damage functions are implemented into the finite element method and used to govern the constitutive response of the material points in the model. Additionally, an axial failure criterion is included in the model. The response of a center-notched, buffer strip-stiffened panel subjected to uniaxial tension is investigated and results are compared to experiment.

  13. Sensitivity of the coefficients of thermal expansion of selected graphite reinforced composite laminates to lamina thermoelastic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Funk, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study of the sensitivity of the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE, to changes in lamina elastic properties has been made. High modulus graphite/epoxy (P75/934, P100/934, P120/934), graphite/aluminum (P100/Al), and graphite/glass (HMS/Gl) composite materials were considered in quasi-isotropic, low thermal stress, and 'near-zero' thermal expansion laminate configurations. The effects of a positive or negative 10 percent change in lamina properties on laminate CTE is strongly dependent upon both the composite material and the laminate configuration. A 10 percent change in all of the lamina properties had very little effect on the laminate CTE of the HMS/Gl composite laminates investigated. The sensitivity and direction of change in the laminate CTE of Gr/934 depended very strongly on the fiber properties. A 10 percent change in the lamina transverse CTE resulted in changes as large as 0.216 ppm/C in the laminate CTE of a quasi-isotropic Gr/934 laminate. No significant difference was observed in the sensitivity of the laminate CTE of the P100/934 and P120/934 composite materials due to changes in lamina properties. Large changes in laminate CTE can result from measured temperature and radiation effects on lamina properties.

  14. Damage of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haery, Haleh A.; Kim, Ho Sung

    2013-08-01

    Hybrid laminates consisting of woven glass fabric/epoxy composite plies and woven carbon fabric/epoxy composite plies are studied for fatigue damage and residual strength. A theoretical framework based on the systems approach is proposed as a guide to deal with the complexity involving uncertainties and a large number of variables in the hybrid composite system. A relative damage sensitivity factor expression was developed for quantitative comparisons between non-hybrid and hybrid composites. Hypotheses derived from the theoretical framework were tested and verified. The first hypothesis was that the difference between two different sets of properties produces shear stress in interface between carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CRP) and glass fibre reinforced plastics (GRP), and eventually become a source for CRP/GRP interfacial delamination or longitudinal cracking. The second hypothesis was that inter-fibre bundle delamination occurs more severely to CRP sub-system than GRP sub-system.

  15. μ-COMPUTED Tomography for Micro-Structure Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (cfrp)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoessel, R.; Guenther, T.; Dierig, T.; Schladitz, K.; Godehardt, M.; Kessling, P.-M.; Fuchs, T.

    2011-06-01

    Non-destructive testing is of major importance for quality assurance of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) in aerospace industry. It is of interest to obtain information of the 3D inner micro-structure of CFRP. A promising option is the usage of μ-CT inspection. State-of-the art software tools are used to characterize the 3D inner micro-structure and to gather knowledge about porosity, cracks, and fiber orientation.

  16. Thermal characterization and tomography of carbon fiber reinforced plastics using individual identification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, V.P.; Grinzato, E.; Bison, P.G.; Marinetti, S.; Bressan, C.

    1996-05-01

    A method for thermal characterization of defect depth and thickness using individual inversion functions is described. Experimental results are obtained with standard carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimens which contained Teflon inserts and impact damage. Accuracy in determining defect dimensions was about 10 percent for defect depth and 33 percent for defect thickness. A technique to synthesize images of defect parameters is proposed. Thermal tomography advantages in analyzing defect in-depth propagation are illustrated.

  17. Energy Dependent Processing of Fiber Reinforced Plastics with Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, N.; Lasagni, A.; Klotzbach, U.

    In this paper the processing of a fiber reinforced plastic consisting of glass fibers embedded in polypropylene with ultra short laser systems is shown. Focus of the study is on the dependence of working wavelength (1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and pulse duration (500 fs to 10 ps) on the laser ablation characteristic of the treated material. Depending on the energy density and the material properties, two different process regions could be identified.

  18. Buckling analysis for structural sections and stiffened plates reinforced with laminated composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Soong, T.-C.; Miller, R. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A classical buckling analysis is developed for stiffened, flat plates composed of a series of linked flat plate and beam elements. Plates are idealized as multilayered orthotropic elements; structural beads and lips are idealized as beams. The loaded edges of the stiffened plate are simply supported and the conditions at the unloaded edges can be prescribed arbitrarily. The plate and beam elements are matched along their common junctions for displacement continuity and force equilibrium in an exact manner. Offsets between elements are considered in the analysis. Buckling under uniaxial compressive load for plates, sections and stiffened plates is investigated. Buckling loads are found as the lowest of all possible general and local failure modes and the mode shape is used to determine whether buckling is a local or general instability. Numerical correlations with existing analysis and test data for plates, sections and stiffened plates including boron-reinforced structures are discussed. In general, correlations are reasonably good.

  19. Bond variability of glass-fiber-reinforcing-plastic reinforcement in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hanus, J.P.

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes an experimental program that investigated the bond variability of glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer (GFRP) reinforcement in concrete. The variables in the study were manufacturer (Marshall Industries Composites, Incorporated M1 and Corrosion Proof Products/Hughes Brothers M2), bar size (Number 5 and 6), cover (2 and 3 bar diameters), and embedment length (10 through 47 inch). Tensile tests were also performed on the GFRP rebar for comparison to bond tests that exhibited bar failure. Eighty-four inverted half-beam bond specimens were tested while monitoring load, loaded-end slip, free-end slip, cracking, and acoustic emissions on the embedded bar and concrete. Three to six replicate tests were conducted for each set of variables. The results of each test within a series were examined to investigate the relative variability with respect to the failure types. The M1 rebar was observed to rely primarily on mechanical interlock to develop bond strength. This conclusion was based on investigations of the rebar surface condition, bar deformation geometry, slip curves, AE results, crack patterns and forensic investigations. Additionally, the ultimate loads for the bond tests with the Ml rebar were affected by changes in embedment lengths but did not vary for tests with 2 and 3d(b) cover. Overall, the M1 rebar had coefficients of variation (COV) of 14.3 and 8.9% for bond tests that exhibited bar failure and tensile test bar failures, respectively. The bond tests that failed in concrete splitting had COVs from 5.2 to 5.9%.

  20. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  1. Composite laminate free-edge reinforcement with U-shaped caps. I - Stress analysis. II - Theoretical-experimental correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, Terry, Jr.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The present generalized plane-strain FEM analysis for the prediction of interlaminar normal stress reduction when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a composite laminate gives attention to the highly variable transverse stresses near the free edge, cap length and thickness, and a gap under the cap due to the manufacturing process. The load-transfer mechanism between cap and laminate is found to be strain-compatibility, rather than shear lag. In the second part of this work, the three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge-cap designs; symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of kevlar-epoxy are shown to carry 130-140 percent greater loading than uncapped laminates, under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading.

  2. Enhanced Schapery Theory Software Development for Modeling Failure of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive damage and failure analysis (PDFA) tools are needed to predict the nonlinear response of advanced fiber-reinforced composite structures. Predictive tools should incorporate the underlying physics of the damage and failure mechanisms observed in the composite, and should utilize as few input parameters as possible. The purpose of the Enhanced Schapery Theory (EST) was to create a PDFA tool that operates in conjunction with a commercially available finite element (FE) code (Abaqus). The tool captures the physics of the damage and failure mechanisms that result in the nonlinear behavior of the material, and the failure methodology employed yields numerical results that are relatively insensitive to changes in the FE mesh. The EST code is written in Fortran and compiled into a static library that is linked to Abaqus. A Fortran Abaqus UMAT material subroutine is used to facilitate the communication between Abaqus and EST. A clear distinction between damage and failure is imposed. Damage mechanisms result in pre-peak nonlinearity in the stress strain curve. Four internal state variables (ISVs) are utilized to control the damage and failure degradation. All damage is said to result from matrix microdamage, and a single ISV marks the micro-damage evolution as it is used to degrade the transverse and shear moduli of the lamina using a set of experimentally obtainable matrix microdamage functions. Three separate failure ISVs are used to incorporate failure due to fiber breakage, mode I matrix cracking, and mode II matrix cracking. Failure initiation is determined using a failure criterion, and the evolution of these ISVs is controlled by a set of traction-separation laws. The traction separation laws are postulated such that the area under the curves is equal to the fracture toughness of the material associated with the corresponding failure mechanism. A characteristic finite element length is used to transform the traction-separation laws into stress-strain laws

  3. Application of fiber-reinforced plastic rods as prestressing tendons in concrete structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattock, A.H.; Babaei, K.

    1989-08-01

    The study is concerned with the possibility of utilizing fiber-reinforced plastic rods as prestressing tendons, in place of traditional steel tendons, in elements of prestressed-concrete bridges exposed to corrosive environments. A survey was made of available information on the behavior characteristics of fiber-reinforced plastic tension elements and, in particular, those of glass-fiber-reinforced (GFR) tension elements. Also, an analytical study was made of the flexural behavior of concrete elements prestressed by GFR tendons. Based on the analytical study and on the survey of available information, an assessment is made of the impact on the design of prestressed-concrete members if GFR tendons are used. Some preliminary design recommendations are made, together with proposals for research needed before GFR prestressing tendons should be used in practice. Four GFR tendons with Con-Tech Systems anchorages were tested, the primary variable being the embedded length of the GFR rods in the anchorages. All the tendons failed by the rods pulling out of the anchorages. For embedded lengths of 15.2 in or greater, the failure loads were 90% of the advertised tendon strength of 220 ksi, or about 100% of the guaranteed tensile strength of 197 ksi (60 kN/rod).

  4. 46 CFR 160.035-8 - Construction of fibrous glass reinforced plastic (F.R.P.), oar-, hand-, and motor-propelled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Construction of fibrous glass reinforced plastic (F.R.P... reinforced plastic (F.R.P.), oar-, hand-, and motor-propelled lifeboats. (a) General requirements. (1) Plastic lifeboats shall comply with the general requirements for the construction and arrangement of...

  5. 46 CFR 160.035-8 - Construction of fibrous glass reinforced plastic (F.R.P.), oar-, hand-, and motor-propelled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction of fibrous glass reinforced plastic (F.R.P... reinforced plastic (F.R.P.), oar-, hand-, and motor-propelled lifeboats. (a) General requirements. (1) Plastic lifeboats shall comply with the general requirements for the construction and arrangement of...

  6. Fatigue behavior of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites -[{+-}45]{sub 4s} laminate under tension-tension and tension - compression fatigue loading test

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.C.M.; Tai, N.H.; Wu, G.Y.; Lin, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Fatigue behaviors of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composite have been investigated. The [{+-}45]4S laminates of T300/976 Carbon/Epoxy were utilized. The static tensile strength and tension-tension tension-compression fatigue loading tests at various levels of stress amplitude were measured. The median rank method was applied to predict the statistical probability of experimental data of fatigue life. The S-N curves for various survival probabilities were established using the pooled Weibull distribution function. The theoretical prediction methods could be applied to illustrate the fatigue behavior of thermoset matrix polymer composites. Furthermore, the fatigue behaviors under tension - tension and tension-compression fatigue loading test were investigated. Both the stiffness degradation and the surface temperature change during fatigue test are discussed.

  7. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of kenaf fiber-polypropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E.; Rowell, R.M. |

    1995-05-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In these experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the nonpolar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50% by weight (39% by volume) of kenaf-PP composite compare favorably with a 40% by weight of glass fiber-PP injection-molded composite. These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral-based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and they are used in applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  8. Renewable agricultural fibers as reinforcing fillers in plastics: Mechanical properties of Kenaf fiber-polpyropylene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanadi, A.R.; Caulfield, D.F.; Jacobson, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus) is a fast growing annual growth plant that is harvested for its bast fibers. These fibers have excellent specific properties and have potential to be outstanding reinforcing fillers in plastics. In our experiments, the fibers and polypropylene (PP) were blended in a thermokinetic mixer and then injection molded, with the fiber weight fractions varying to 60%. A maleated polypropylene was used to improve the interaction and adhesion between the non-polar matrix and the polar lignocellulosic fibers. The specific tensile and flexural moduli of a 50 % by volume (39 % by volume) of kenaf-PP composites compares favorably with a 40 % by weight of glass fiber-PP injection molded composites, These results suggest that kenaf fibers are a viable alternative to inorganic/mineral based reinforcing fibers as long as the right processing conditions are used and for applications where the higher water absorption is not critical.

  9. Damage initiation and propagation in metal laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.

    1996-07-26

    The metal laminates proposed here for aircraft structures are Al alloy interlayers between Al alloy based metal matrix composite (MMC) plates reinforced with Si carbide particles. Properties to be tailored for jet engine fan containment and wing and auxiliary support structures include the important property fracture toughness. A method was developed for simulating and predicting crack initiation/growth using finite element analysis and fracture mechanics. An important key in predicting the failure is the tie- break slideline with prescribed (chosen based on J Integral calculations) effective plastic strain to failure in elements along the slideline. More development of the method is needed, particularly in its correlation with experimental data from various fracture toughness and strength tests of metal laminates. Results show that delamination at the interface of the ductile interlayer and MMC material can add significantly to the energy required to propagate a crack through a metal laminate. 11 figs, 7 refs.

  10. Experimental versus design correlations in multi-cellular fiber reinforced plastic panels

    SciTech Connect

    GangaRao, H.V.S.; Lopez-Anido, R.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sonti, S.S.; Winegardner, T.

    1996-11-01

    Reinforced plastic (RP) multi-cellular panels have been used recently in designing low-rise buildings. These RP panels were 24 in. wide and 5{1/2} in. thick and were manufactured by pultrusion process using an existing die with a modified (bidirectional) fiber architecture. Constituent materials were rovings, mats, and bi-directional fabrics made of E-glass, and polyester resin. Bending tests were conducted to characterize the stiffness performance of the RP panels and the stiffness results were compared with a simple analytical model. The joining of panels to create a modular deck or wall system is briefly discussed.

  11. Laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by UV pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Ryozo

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report on a micro-cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by nanosecond-pulsed laser ablation with a diode-pumped solid state UV laser (DPSS UV laser, λ= 355nm). A well-defined cutting of CFRP which were free of debris and thermal-damages around the grooves, were performed by the laser ablation with a multiple-scanpass irradiation method. CFRP is a high strength composite material with a lightweight, and is increasingly being used various applications. UV pulsed laser ablation is suitable for laser cutting process of CFRP materials, which drastically reduces a thermal damage at cut regions.

  12. Simplified analyses of a fiber-reinforced plastic joint for filament-wound pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, H.; Parsons, I.D.

    1999-08-01

    A simplified analysis procedure is described for a fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) stub-flanged joint which addresses some of the problems with current FRP joints. The joint consists of a tapered hub that is filament-wound with the pipe. A separate stub is used to connect the two halves of the joint. This system avoids material discontinuities at the flange-pipe intersection and pull-back of the flange. The joint is modeled following the Taylor Forge approach used in metallic joint analysis. The analytical model is verified using finite element analysis; the results are in excellent agreement.

  13. Matched excitation for thermal nondestructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Subbarao, Ghali Venkata; Amarnath, Muniyappa

    2012-06-01

    Active thermographic studies proved their capabilities for detection of deeper subsurface details with reduced non uniform emissivity problems for defect detection. In this contribution analysis of subsurface anomalies has been carried out by probing a suitable frequency component with sufficient energy. This paper highlights the comparative analysis of different non-stationary thermographic schemes on the basis of probing equal energy to the chosen frequency component used for the analysis of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) sample used in experimentation. Experiments have been carried out to find the detection ability of different excitation schemes and comparisons have been made by taking signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the defects into consideration.

  14. Effect of ultrasonically-assisted drilling on carbon-fibre-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhdum, Farrukh; Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2014-11-01

    This research focuses on the effect of ultrasonically-assisted drilling (UAD) on carbon fibre-reinforced plastics. High-frequency vibration was used to excite a drill bit during its standard operation. An extensive experimental study of drilling forces, temperature, chip formation, surface finish, circularity, delamination and tool wear was conducted using ∅3 mm drill and presented here. UAD showed a significant improvement in drill quality when compared to conventional drilling processes. A finite-element study was also conducted to understand the nature of drilling-force reduction in UAD.

  15. Anomalous enhancement of drilling rate in carbon fiber reinforced plastic using azimuthally polarized CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Araya, Naohiro; Kurokawa, Yuki; Uno, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-01

    We developed an azimuthally polarized pulse-periodic CO2 laser for high-performance drilling applications. We discovered an anomalous enhancement in the drilling rate with the azimuthally polarized beam compared to that with radially or randomly polarized beams. We drilled 0.45 mm-thick carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) using a focusing lens with a focal length of 50 mm and a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.09. The conditions other than polarization states were identical for all the experiments. The azimuthally polarized beam exhibited a drilling rate more than 10 times greater on average than those of the other two polarizations.

  16. Shear Strength at 75 F to 500 F of Fourteen Adhesives Used to Bond a Glass-fabric-reinforced Phenolic Resin Laminate to Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John R

    1956-01-01

    Fourteen adhesives used to bond a glass-fabric-reinforced phenolic resin laminate to steel were tested in order to determine their shear strengths at temperatures from 75 F to 500 F. Fabrication methods were varied to evaluate the effect of placing cloth between the facing surfaces to maintain a uniform bond-line thickness. One glass-fabric supported phenolic adhesive was found to have a shear strength of 3,400 psi at 300 F and over 1,000 psi at 500 F. Strength and fabrication data are tabulated for all adhesives tested.

  17. Effect of inter-laminar adhesive on yielding behavior of aluminum fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.

    1994-12-31

    An adhesive stress-release model is proposed to predict the thermal residual stress released due to the presence of adhesive layer in hybrid aluminum fiber/polymer laminate. The model is developed based on the thermal curing temperature and composite constituent properties, and is used to determine the laminate initial yielding and deformation behavior. The adhesive layer functions as a compliant layer to release the thermal residual stresses and to delay the yield occurrence, thus enhances the laminates deformation behavior. Compared with available experimental data for graphite/PPS and glass/PPS with 2024-T3 or 7075-T6 aluminum hybrid thermoplastic laminates, the proposed model presents a better prediction than some other commonly used models.

  18. An engineering approach to the prediction of fatigue behavior of unnotched/notched fiber reinforced composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Mclaughlin, P. V., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An engineering approach is proposed for predicting unnotched/notched laminate fatigue behavior from basic lamina fatigue data. The fatigue analysis procedure was used to determine the laminate property (strength/stiffness) degradation as a function of fatigue cycles in uniaxial tension and in plane shear. These properties were then introduced into the failure model for a notched laminate to obtain damage growth, residual strength, and failure mode. The approach is thus essentially a combination of the cumulative damage accumulation (akin to the Miner-Palmgren hypothesis and its derivatives) and the damage growth rate (similar to the fracture mechanics approach) philosophies. An analysis/experiment correlation appears to confirm the basic postulates of material wearout and the predictability of laminate fatigue properties from lamina fatigue data.

  19. [Tribological properties of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. Experimental and clinical results].

    PubMed

    Früh, H J; Ascherl, R; Hipp, E

    1997-02-01

    Wear of the articulating components (especially PE-UHMW) of total hip endoprostheses is the most important technical factor limiting the functional lifetime. To minimize wear debris, ceramic heads, according to ISO 6474 (Al2O3), have been used, from 1969 paired with Al2O3 and since 1975 paired with PE-UHMW. Al2O3 balls articulating with cups made from CFRP have been in clinical use since 1988. Laboratory experiments and in-vivo testing showed minimized wear debris and mild biological response to wear products using CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) instead of PE-UHMW as the cup material. The articulating surfaces of retrieved ceramic heads (Al2O3-Biolox) and cementless CFRP cups (carbon fiber reinforced plastic, Caproman) were compared using sphericity measurement techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and roughness measurements (including advanced roughness parameters Rvk or Rpk according to ISO 4287). Altogether, the first results of the clinical study showed that the combination Al2O3-ball/CFRP-cup came up to the expected lower wear rates compared with the conventional combinations. The wear rates are comparable with the combination Al2O3/Al2O3 without the material-related problems of ceramic components in all ceramic combinations. PMID:9157355

  20. Quantitative damage detection and sparse sensor array optimization of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates for wind turbine blade structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    The active structural health monitoring (SHM) approach for the complex composite laminate structures of wind turbine blades (WTBs), addresses the important and complicated problem of signal noise. After illustrating the wind energy industry's development perspectives and its crucial requirement for SHM, an improved redundant second generation wavelet transform (IRSGWT) pre-processing algorithm based on neighboring coefficients is introduced for feeble signal denoising. The method can avoid the drawbacks of conventional wavelet methods that lose information in transforms and the shortcomings of redundant second generation wavelet (RSGWT) denoising that can lead to error propagation. For large scale WTB composites, how to minimize the number of sensors while ensuring accuracy is also a key issue. A sparse sensor array optimization of composites for WTB applications is proposed that can reduce the number of transducers that must be used. Compared to a full sixteen transducer array, the optimized eight transducer configuration displays better accuracy in identifying the correct position of simulated damage (mass of load) on composite laminates with anisotropic characteristics than a non-optimized array. It can help to guarantee more flexible and qualified monitoring of the areas that more frequently suffer damage. The proposed methods are verified experimentally on specimens of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates. PMID:24763210

  1. Quantitative Damage Detection and Sparse Sensor Array Optimization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Resin Composite Laminates for Wind Turbine Blade Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    The active structural health monitoring (SHM) approach for the complex composite laminate structures of wind turbine blades (WTBs), addresses the important and complicated problem of signal noise. After illustrating the wind energy industry's development perspectives and its crucial requirement for SHM, an improved redundant second generation wavelet transform (IRSGWT) pre-processing algorithm based on neighboring coefficients is introduced for feeble signal denoising. The method can avoid the drawbacks of conventional wavelet methods that lose information in transforms and the shortcomings of redundant second generation wavelet (RSGWT) denoising that can lead to error propagation. For large scale WTB composites, how to minimize the number of sensors while ensuring accuracy is also a key issue. A sparse sensor array optimization of composites for WTB applications is proposed that can reduce the number of transducers that must be used. Compared to a full sixteen transducer array, the optimized eight transducer configuration displays better accuracy in identifying the correct position of simulated damage (mass of load) on composite laminates with anisotropic characteristics than a non-optimized array. It can help to guarantee more flexible and qualified monitoring of the areas that more frequently suffer damage. The proposed methods are verified experimentally on specimens of carbon fiber reinforced resin composite laminates. PMID:24763210

  2. Tensile strength of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Egusa, S.; Birtcher, R.C.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    The influence of radiation damage on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs), which are considered as candidate materials for the insulation of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion reactors, has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (epoxies, bismaleimides; two- and three-dimensional reinforcement structures with E-, S-, or T-glass fibers) has been included in the test program. Three aspects of our present results will be discussed in detail. The first is related to an assessment of the tensile strength and its radiation dependence under the influence of strongly varying radiation conditions. The second aspect refers to low temperature ({approx}5 K) reactor irradiation of selected materials. In this case, identical sets of tensile test samples were transferred into the tensile testing machine, one without warming-up to room temperature and the other after an annealing cycle to room temperature. Finally, a comparison between the radiation response of different materials is made. It turns out that the three-dimensionally reinforced bismaleimide shows the smallest degradation of its tensile properties under all irradiation conditions.

  3. A Thermodynamically-Based Mesh Objective Work Potential Theory for Predicting Intralaminar Progressive Damage and Failure in Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamically-based work potential theory for modeling progressive damage and failure in fiber-reinforced laminates is presented. The current, multiple-internal state variable (ISV) formulation, enhanced Schapery theory (EST), utilizes separate ISVs for modeling the effects of damage and failure. Damage is considered to be the effect of any structural changes in a material that manifest as pre-peak non-linearity in the stress versus strain response. Conversely, failure is taken to be the effect of the evolution of any mechanisms that results in post-peak strain softening. It is assumed that matrix microdamage is the dominant damage mechanism in continuous fiber-reinforced polymer matrix laminates, and its evolution is controlled with a single ISV. Three additional ISVs are introduced to account for failure due to mode I transverse cracking, mode II transverse cracking, and mode I axial failure. Typically, failure evolution (i.e., post-peak strain softening) results in pathologically mesh dependent solutions within a finite element method (FEM) setting. Therefore, consistent character element lengths are introduced into the formulation of the evolution of the three failure ISVs. Using the stationarity of the total work potential with respect to each ISV, a set of thermodynamically consistent evolution equations for the ISVs is derived. The theory is implemented into commercial FEM software. Objectivity of total energy dissipated during the failure process, with regards to refinements in the FEM mesh, is demonstrated. The model is also verified against experimental results from two laminated, T800/3900-2 panels containing a central notch and different fiber-orientation stacking sequences. Global load versus displacement, global load versus local strain gage data, and macroscopic failure paths obtained from the models are compared to the experiments.

  4. Numerical Implementation of a Multiple-ISV Thermodynamically-Based Work Potential Theory for Modeling Progressive Damage and Failure in Fiber-Reinforced Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamically-based work potential theory for modeling progressive damage and failure in fiber-reinforced laminates is presented. The current, multiple-internal state variable (ISV) formulation, enhanced Schapery theory (EST), utilizes separate ISVs for modeling the effects of damage and failure. Damage is considered to be the effect of any structural changes in a material that manifest as pre-peak non-linearity in the stress versus strain response. Conversely, failure is taken to be the effect of the evolution of any mechanisms that results in post-peak strain softening. It is assumed that matrix microdamage is the dominant damage mechanism in continuous fiber-reinforced polymer matrix laminates, and its evolution is controlled with a single ISV. Three additional ISVs are introduced to account for failure due to mode I transverse cracking, mode II transverse cracking, and mode I axial failure. Typically, failure evolution (i.e., post-peak strain softening) results in pathologically mesh dependent solutions within a finite element method (FEM) setting. Therefore, consistent character element lengths are introduced into the formulation of the evolution of the three failure ISVs. Using the stationarity of the total work potential with respect to each ISV, a set of thermodynamically consistent evolution equations for the ISVs is derived. The theory is implemented into commercial FEM software. Objectivity of total energy dissipated during the failure process, with regards to refinements in the FEM mesh, is demonstrated. The model is also verified against experimental results from two laminated, T800/3900-2 panels containing a central notch and different fiber-orientation stacking sequences. Global load versus displacement, global load versus local strain gage data, and macroscopic failure paths obtained from the models are compared to the experiments.

  5. MWCNTs-reinforced epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid nanocomposite and its electroactive shape memory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Alam, Javed; Alam, Manawwer; Raja, Mohan; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy

    2014-01-01

    A novel electroactive shape memory polymer nanocomposite of epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared by a combination of solution blending, solvent cast technique, and hydraulic hot press moulding. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) was first plasticized by epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) in order to overcome the major limitations of PLA, such as high brittleness, low toughness, and low tensile elongation. Then, MWCNTs were incorporated into the ELO plasticized PLA matrix at three different loadings (2, 3 and 5 wt. %), with the aim of making the resulting nanocomposites electrically conductive. The addition of ELO decreased glass transition temperature, and increased the elongation and thermal degradability of PLA, as shown in the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile test, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to observe surface morphology, topography, and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the nanocomposite. Finally, the electroactive-shape memory effect (electroactive-SME) in the resulting nanocomposite was investigated by a fold-deploy "U"-shape bending test. As per the results, the addition of both ELO and MWCNTs to PLA matrix seemed to enhance its overall properties with a great deal of potential in improved shape memory. The 3 wt. % MWCNTs-reinforced nanocomposite system, which showed 95% shape recovery within 45 s at 40 DC voltage, is expected to be used as a preferential polymeric nanocomposite material in various actuators, sensors and deployable devices. PMID:25365179

  6. MWCNTs-Reinforced Epoxidized Linseed Oil Plasticized Polylactic Acid Nanocomposite and Its Electroactive Shape Memory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Javed; Alam, Manawwer; Raja, Mohan; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy

    2014-01-01

    A novel electroactive shape memory polymer nanocomposite of epoxidized linseed oil plasticized polylactic acid and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was prepared by a combination of solution blending, solvent cast technique, and hydraulic hot press moulding. In this study, polylactic acid (PLA) was first plasticized by epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) in order to overcome the major limitations of PLA, such as high brittleness, low toughness, and low tensile elongation. Then, MWCNTs were incorporated into the ELO plasticized PLA matrix at three different loadings (2, 3 and 5 wt. %), with the aim of making the resulting nanocomposites electrically conductive. The addition of ELO decreased glass transition temperature, and increased the elongation and thermal degradability of PLA, as shown in the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile test, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to observe surface morphology, topography, and the dispersion of MWCNTs in the nanocomposite. Finally, the electroactive-shape memory effect (electroactive-SME) in the resulting nanocomposite was investigated by a fold-deploy “U”-shape bending test. As per the results, the addition of both ELO and MWCNTs to PLA matrix seemed to enhance its overall properties with a great deal of potential in improved shape memory. The 3 wt. % MWCNTs-reinforced nanocomposite system, which showed 95% shape recovery within 45 s at 40 DC voltage, is expected to be used as a preferential polymeric nanocomposite material in various actuators, sensors and deployable devices. PMID:25365179

  7. A New Framework for Cortico-Striatal Plasticity: Behavioural Theory Meets In Vitro Data at the Reinforcement-Action Interface

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Kevin N.

    2015-01-01

    Operant learning requires that reinforcement signals interact with action representations at a suitable neural interface. Much evidence suggests that this occurs when phasic dopamine, acting as a reinforcement prediction error, gates plasticity at cortico-striatal synapses, and thereby changes the future likelihood of selecting the action(s) coded by striatal neurons. But this hypothesis faces serious challenges. First, cortico-striatal plasticity is inexplicably complex, depending on spike timing, dopamine level, and dopamine receptor type. Second, there is a credit assignment problem—action selection signals occur long before the consequent dopamine reinforcement signal. Third, the two types of striatal output neuron have apparently opposite effects on action selection. Whether these factors rule out the interface hypothesis and how they interact to produce reinforcement learning is unknown. We present a computational framework that addresses these challenges. We first predict the expected activity changes over an operant task for both types of action-coding striatal neuron, and show they co-operate to promote action selection in learning and compete to promote action suppression in extinction. Separately, we derive a complete model of dopamine and spike-timing dependent cortico-striatal plasticity from in vitro data. We then show this model produces the predicted activity changes necessary for learning and extinction in an operant task, a remarkable convergence of a bottom-up data-driven plasticity model with the top-down behavioural requirements of learning theory. Moreover, we show the complex dependencies of cortico-striatal plasticity are not only sufficient but necessary for learning and extinction. Validating the model, we show it can account for behavioural data describing extinction, renewal, and reacquisition, and replicate in vitro experimental data on cortico-striatal plasticity. By bridging the levels between the single synapse and behaviour, our

  8. Mid IR pulsed light source for laser ultrasonic testing of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, H.; Watanabe, M.; Kitamura, K.; Naito, M.; Yamawaki, H.; Slater, R.

    2015-09-01

    A quasi-phase-matched (QPM) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was developed using a periodically poled Mg-doped stoichiometric LiTaO3 crystal to generate mid-IR light for excitation of laser ultrasound in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The ultrasound generation efficiency was measured at the three different wavelengths that emanate from the OPO: 1.064 μm, 1.59/1.57 μm, and 3.23/3.30 μm. The measurements indicate that mid-IR 3.2-3.3 μm light generates the most efficient ultrasonic waves in CFRP with the least laser damage. We used mid-IR light in conjunction with a laser interferometer to demonstrate the detection of flaws/defects in CFRP such as the existence of air gaps that mimic delamination and voids in CFRP, and the inhomogeneous adhesion of CFRP material to a metal plate was also clearly detected.

  9. Cutting forces in ultrasonically assisted drilling of carbon fibre-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhdum, Farrukh; Jennings, Luke T.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2012-08-01

    Ultrasonically assisted drilling (UAD) is a non-traditional hybrid machining process, which combines features of conventional drilling and vibratory machining techniques to obtain remarkable improvements in machinability of advanced materials. The experiments are conducted on commercially available samples of a carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) at a feed rate of 16 mm/min. In this study, a thrust force reduction in excess of 60% is observed in UAD when compared to conventional drilling (CD). Lower delamination was observed when compared to CD techniques. Optical microscopy revealed that the material is removed as a continuous chip in UAD whereas in case of CD we observe powdered dust. Light and scanning electron microscopy of CFRP chips obtained in drilling elucidate fundamental differences in the underlying machining processes in UAD of CFRP.

  10. Development of an x-ray telescope using the carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwase, Toshihiro; Maejima, Masato; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Kunieda, Hideyo; Ishida, Naoki; Sugita, Satoshi; Miyazawa, Takuya; Shima, Naoki; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2015-09-01

    We are developing an X-ray mirror using the carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) as a substrate in order to improve the angular resolution of tightly-nested thin-foil Wolter-I X-ray mirrors. We found that curing of the epoxy used in the replication process at the room temperature is effective to suppress the print through. We were able to make mirrors whose shape accuracy is 3 - 5 μm. Characterization at the synchrotron facility SPring-8 using the X-ray pencil beam of 20 keV showed that the angular resolution was 3 - 5 arcmin as a whole, but can reach to 20 arcsec locally.

  11. Acoustic surface waveguides for acoustic emission monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.L.R.; He, Y.; Superfesky, M. . Constructed Facilities Center)

    1994-09-01

    Acoustic surface waveguides are developed to enhance the transmission of acoustic emission (AE) signals in high attenuating fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) structures. In this paper, the design of the surface waveguide system and the source location technique are described. Experimental results of using a surface waveguide for AE monitoring of a FRP composite pressure pipe are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide system. A metal wire was selected as a waveguide, and pencil breaks and electronic pulses were used as artificial AE signals. The results indicate that the use of the surface waveguide can significantly increase the AE monitoring range. Also, a high transmission efficiency was experimentally determined for the epoxy joints developed to attach the surface waveguide to the FRP pipe. The proposed surface waveguide appears to be a promising technique for AE monitoring on existing FRP pressure vessels and storage tanks.

  12. Advanced Grounding Methods in the Presence of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leininger, M.; Thurecht, F.; Pfeiffer, E.; Ruddle, A.

    2012-05-01

    Lightweight satellite structures are usually of sandwich type where the core is formed of a honeycomb-like structure made of aluminium foil. The outer facesheets are made of aluminium and serve as a ground reference plane. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP), however, is a composite material having an electrical conductivity that is about 2000 times lower than the conductivity of aluminium. Since such a material is not suitable to carry electrical current of high value a network of metal sheets (grounding rails) connects all equipment mounted on the satellite structure. This paper describes an evaluation whether the classical grounding rail system can be replaced by a network of round wires while the high-frequency portion of the current is flowing along the CFRP sheet.

  13. Nondestructive Detection of Delamination in Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastics Using Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi; Kasai, Naoko; Ishiyama, Atsushi

    2001-06-01

    The use of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) in aircraft and space structures is recently increasing. We investigated the possibility of nondestructively detecting a delamination in CFRP using a low-Tc first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) loop. A CFRP plate including a thin insulator sheet between the central layers was prepared. The injected current method was adopted. The magnetic field due to the sheet was measured by a SQUID nondestructive evaluation system using the lock-in detection technique. The position and size of the sheet were successfully detected by mapping the measured field. The result agreed with that by ultrasonic testing. Future application of this method for detecting deep-lying flaws was discussed.

  14. [Experimental study on carbon fiber reinforced plastic plate--analysis of stabilizing force required for plate].

    PubMed

    Iizuka, H

    1990-11-01

    Plates currently in use for the management of bone fracture made of metal present with various problems. We manufactured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates from Pyrofil T/530 puriplegs overlaid at cross angles of +/- 10 degrees, +/- 20 degrees, and +/- 30 degrees for trial and carried out an experimental study on rabbit tibiofibular bones using 316L stainless steel plates of comparable shape and size as controls. The results indicate the influence of CFRP plate upon cortical bone was milder than that of stainless steel plate, with an adequate stabilizing force for the repair of fractured rabbit tibiofibular bones. CFRP has the advantages over metals of being virtually free from corrosion and fatigue, reasonably radiolucent and able to meet a wide range of mechanical requirements. This would make CFRP plate quite promising as a new devices of treating fracture of bones. PMID:2273322

  15. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  16. Oxygen-assisted multipass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics with ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, T. V.; Komlenok, M. S.; Konov, V. I.; Freitag, C.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    2014-03-14

    Deep multipass cutting of bidirectional and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with picosecond laser pulses was investigated in different static atmospheres as well as with the assistance of an oxygen or nitrogen gas flow. The ablation rate was determined as a function of the kerf depth and the resulting heat affected zone was measured. An assisting oxygen gas flow is found to significantly increase the cutting productivity, but only in deep kerfs where the diminished evaporative ablation due to the reduced laser fluence reaching the bottom of the kerf does not dominate the contribution of reactive etching anymore. Oxygen-supported cutting was shown to also solve the problem that occurs when cutting the CFRP parallel to the fiber orientation where a strong deformation and widening of the kerf, which temporarily slows down the process speed, is revealed to be typical for processing in standard air atmospheres.

  17. Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics - Investigation of Hazardous Process Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Juergen; Hustedt, Michael; Staehr, Richard; Kaierle, Stefan; Jaeschke, Peter; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) show high potential for use in lightweight applications not only in aircraft design, but also in the automotive or wind energy industry. However, processing of CFRP is complex and expensive due to their outstanding mechanical properties. One possibility to manufacture CFRP structures flexibly at acceptable process speeds is high-power laser cutting. Though showing various advantages such as contactless energy transfer, this process is connected to potentially hazardous emission of respirable dust and organic gases. Moreover, the emitted particles may be fibrous, thus requiring particular attention. Here, a systematic analysis of the hazardous substances emitted during laser cutting of CFRP with thermoplastic and thermosetting matrix is presented. The objective is to evaluate emission rates for the total particulate and gaseous fractions as well as for different organic key components. Furthermore, the influence of the laser process conditions shall be assessed, and first proposals to handle the emissions adequately are made.

  18. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  19. Circular Functions Based Comprehensive Analysis of Plastic Creep Deformations in the Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Analytically based model is presented for behavioral analysis of the plastic deformations in the reinforced materials using the circular (trigonometric) functions. The analytical method is proposed to predict creep behavior of the fibrous composites based on basic and constitutive equations under a tensile axial stress. New insight of the work is to predict some important behaviors of the creeping matrix. In the present model, the prediction of the behaviors is simpler than the available methods. Principal creep strain rate behaviors are very noteworthy for designing the fibrous composites in the creeping composites. Analysis of the mentioned parameter behavior in the reinforced materials is necessary to analyze failure, fracture, and fatigue studies in the creep of the short fiber composites. Shuttles, spaceships, turbine blades and discs, and nozzle guide vanes are commonly subjected to the creep effects. Also, predicting the creep behavior is significant to design the optoelectronic and photonic advanced composites with optical fibers. As a result, the uniform behavior with constant gradient is seen in the principal creep strain rate behavior, and also creep rupture may happen at the fiber end. Finally, good agreements are found through comparing the obtained analytical and FEM results.

  20. Spectroscopic study of terahertz reflection and transmission properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Shi, Changcheng; Ma, Yuting; Han, Xiaohui; Li, Wei; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites are widely used in aerospace and concrete structure reinforcement due to their high strength and light weight. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy is an attractive tool for defect inspection in CFRP composites. In order to improve THz nondestructive testing of CFRP composites, we have carried out systematic investigations of THz reflection and transmission properties of CFRP. Unidirectional CFRP composites with different thicknesses are measured with polarization directions 0 deg to 90 deg with respect to the fiber direction, in both reflection and transmission modes. As shown in the experiments, CFRP composites are electrically conducting and therefore exhibit a high THz reflectivity. In addition, CFRP composites have polarization-dependent reflectivity and transmissivity for THz radiation. The reflected THz power in the case of parallel polarization is nearly 1.8 times higher than for perpendicular polarization. At the same time, in the transmission of THz wave, a CFRP acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity resulting from multiple internal reflections from the CFRP-air interfaces. Moreover, from the measured data, we extract the refractive index and absorption coefficient of CFRP composites in the THz frequency range.

  1. Prediction of cutting forces in machining of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastics composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Meenu; Satsangi, P. S.

    2013-06-01

    Machining of plastic materials has become increasingly important in any engineering industry subsequently the prediction of cutting forces. Forces quality has greater influence on components, which are coming in contact with each other. So it becomes necessary to measure and study machined forces and its behavior. In this research work, experimental investigations are conducted to determine the effects of cutting conditions and tool geometry on the cutting forces in the turning of the unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastics (UD-GFRP) composites. In this experimental study, carbide tool (K10) having different tool nose radius and tool rake angle is used. Experiments are conducted based on the established Taguchi's technique L18 orthogonal array on a lathe machine. It is found that the depth of cut is the cutting parameter, which has greater influence on cutting forces. The effect of the tool nose radius and tool rake angles on the cutting forces are also considerably significant. Based on statistical analysis, multiple regression model for cutting forces is derived with satisfactory coefficient ( R 2). This model proved to be highly preferment for predicting cutting forces.

  2. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  3. Study on the impact of fiber length on the correlation of separation and orientation in flow molded glass fiber-reinforced plastic composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dong-Gi

    2014-10-01

    During the compression molding of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, there are two issues: one is separation of fiber and matrix because of the different flow state and fiber orientation. Due to separation and orientation, moldings become nonhomogeneous, and show anisotropy. Therefore, separation and orientation should be closely corresponded to molding condition and fiber structure. If fiber shows strong agglomeration, it increases the separation, but fiber orientation will be limited. That is, separation and orientation of fiber is closely related, and the relationship should be clearly defined. In this study, fiber content and length is varied for stacked laminates, and primary sheet is fabricated with thermal compression press. Primary sheet is heated and molded with 30-ton hydraulic press. Nonhomogeneity, one of indicators for separation, is measured from one-dimensional rectangular plate after compression. Orientation function is calculated using X-ray image on moldings and image scanner for processing imagery data. From the correlation between the separation and the orientation of fiber and matrix, the correlation coefficient is defined, and the impact of fiber length on the coefficient is evaluated. PMID:25942851

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  5. Color stability of laboratory glass-fiber-reinforced plastics for esthetic orthodontic wires

    PubMed Central

    Inami, Toshihiro; Minami, Naomi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective In our previous study, glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) made from polycarbonate and glass fibers were prepared for esthetic orthodontic wires using pultrusion. These laboratory GFRP wires are more transparent than the commercially available nickel-titanium wire; however, an investigation of the color stability of GFRP during orthodontic treatment is needed. Accordingly, in the present study, the color stability of GFRP was assessed using colorimetry. Methods Preparation of GFRP esthetic round wires (diameter: 0.45 mm [0.018 inch]) using pultrusion was described previously. Here, to investigate how the diameter of fiber reinforcement affects color stability, GFRPs were prepared by incorporating either 13-µm (GFRP-13) or 7-µm glass (GFRP-7) fibers. The color changes of GFRPs after 24 h, and following 1, 2, and 4 weeks of coffee immersion at 37℃, were measured by colorimetry. We evaluated the color stability of GFRPs by two evaluating units: the color difference (ΔE*) and National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Results After immersion, both GFRPs showed almost no visible color change. According to the colorimetry measurements, the ΔE* values of GFRP-13 and GFRP-7 were 0.73-1.16, and 0.62-1.10, respectively. In accordance with NBS units, both GFRPs showed "slight" color changes. As a result, there were no significant differences in the ΔE* values or NBS units for GFRP-13 or GFRP-7. Moreover, for both GFRPs, no significant differences were observed in any of the immersion periods. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the GFRPs will maintain high color stability during orthodontic treatment, and are an attractive prospect as esthetic orthodontic wires. PMID:26023541

  6. Glass fiber reinforced plastics within the fringe and flexure tracker of LINC-NIRVANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smajic, Semir; Eckart, A.; Horrobin, M.; Lindhorst, B.; Pott, J.-U.; Rauch, C.; Rost, S.; Straubmeier, C.; Tremou, E.; Wank, I.; Zuther, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Fringe and Flexure Tracking System (FFTS) is meant to monitor and correct atmospheric piston varia­ tion and instrumental vibrations and flexure during near-infrared interferometric image acquisition of LING­ NIRVANA. In close work with the adaptive optics system the FFTS enables homothetic imaging for the Large Binocular Telescope. One of the main problems we had to face is the connection between the cryogenic upper part of the instrument, e.g. detector head, and the lower ambient temperature part. In this ambient temperature part the moving stages are situated that move the detector head in the given field of view (FOV). We show how we solved this problem using the versatile material glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP's) and report in what way this material can be worked. We discuss in detail the exquisite characteristics of this material which we use to combine the cryogenic and ambient environments to a fully working system. The main characteristics that we focus on are the low temperature conduction and the tensile strength of the GFRP's. The low temperature conduction is needed to allow for a low heat-exchange between the cryogenic and ambient part whereas the tensile strength is needed to support heavy structures like the baffle motor and to allow for a minimum of flexure for the detector head. Additionally, we discuss the way we attached the GFRP to the remaining parts of the FFTS using a two component encapsulant.

  7. Micromechanical Modeling the Plastic Deformation of Particle-Reinforced Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Shi, Xueping; Qiu, Kun

    2015-08-01

    A micromechanics model was employed to investigate the mechanical performance of particle-reinforced bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites. The roles of shear banding in the tensile deformation are accounted for in characterizing the strength and ductility of ductile particle-filled BMGs. For the sake of simplicity and convenience, shear band was considered to be a micro-crack in the present model. The strain-based Weibull probability distribution function and percolation theory were applied to describe the equivalent micro-crack evolution, which results in the progressive failure of BMG composites. Based on the developed model, the influences of shear bands on the plastic deformation were discussed for various microstructures. The predictions were in fairly good agreement with the experimental data from the literatures, which confirms that the developed analytical model is able to successfully describe the mechanical properties, such as yield strength, strain hardening, and stress softening elongation of composites. The present results will shed some light on optimizing the microstructures in effectively improving the tensile ductility of BMG composites.

  8. The electrostatic properties of Fiber-Reinforced-Plastics double wall underground storage gasoline tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yipeng; Liu, Quanzhen; Meng, He; Sun, Lifu; Zhang, Yunpeng

    2013-03-01

    At present Fiber Reinforced Plastics (FRP) double wall underground storage gasoline tanks are wildly used. An FRP product with a resistance of more than 1011 Ω is a static non-conductor, so it is difficult for the static electricity in the FRP product to decay into the earth. In this paper an experimental system was built to simulate an automobile gasoline filling station. Some electrostatic parameters of the gasoline, including volume charge density, were tested when gasoline was unloaded into a FRP double wall underground storage tank. Measurements were taken to make sure the volume charge density in the oil-outlet was similar to the volume charge density in the tank. In most cases the volume charge density of the gasoline was more than 22.7 μC m-3, which is likely to cause electrostatic discharge in FRP double wall underground storage gasoline tanks. On the other hand, it would be hard to ignite the vapor by electrostatic discharge since the vapor pressure in the tanks is over the explosion limit. But when the tank is repaired or re-used, the operators must pay attention to the static electricity and some measurements should be taken to avoid electrostatic accident. Besides the relaxation time of charge in the FRP double wall gasoline storage tanks should be longer.

  9. Changes Induced by Exposure of the Human Lung to Glass Fiber–Reinforced Plastic

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Carmelo; Giorgianni, Concetto; Brecciaroli, Renato; Giacobbe, Giovanni; Costa, Chiara; Cavallari, Vittorio; Albiero, Francesca; Catania, Stefania; Tringali, Maria Antonietta; Martino, Lucia Barbaro; Abbate, Simona

    2006-01-01

    The inhalation of glass dusts mixed in resin, generally known as glass fiber–reinforced plastic (GRP), represents a little-studied occupational hazard. The few studies performed have highlighted nonspecific lung disorders in animals and in humans. In the present study we evaluated the alteration of the respiratory system and the pathogenic mechanisms causing the changes in a group of working men employed in different GRP processing operations and exposed to production dusts. The study was conducted on a sample of 29 male subjects whose mean age was 37 years and mean length of service 11 years. All of the subjects were submitted to a clinical check-up, basic tests, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); microscopic studies and biochemical analysis were performed on the BAL fluid. Tests of respiratory function showed a large number of obstructive syndromes; scanning electron microscopy highlighted qualitative and quantitative alterations of the alveolar macrophages; and transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of electron-dense cytoplasmatic inclusions indicating intense and active phlogosis (external inflammation). Biochemical analyses highlighted an increase in protein content associated with alterations of the lung oxidant/antioxidant homeostasis. Inhalation of GRP, independent of environmental concentration, causes alterations of the cellular and humoral components of pulmonary interstitium; these alterations are identified microscopically as acute alveolitis. PMID:17107859

  10. Exposure, skin protection and occupational skin diseases in the glass-fibre-reinforced plastics industry.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, K; Jolanki, R; Forsman-Grönholm, L; Estlander, T; Pfäffli, P; Juntunen, J; Kanerva, L

    1993-09-01

    A total of 100 workers, 86 from the glass-fibre-reinforced plastics (GRP) industry, 11 from polystyrene production and 3 from polyester resin coating manufacture, were examined for occupational skin hazards and for evaluation of skin protection. The workers had been exposed to many chemicals. Those working in the GRP industry had also been exposed to glass fibre and to dust produced by finishing work. 94% used protective gloves. 22 workers, all employed in the GRP industry, had contracted occupational skin disorders. 6 had allergic and 12 irritant contact dermatitis. 4 workers had an accidental injury caused by a peroxide catalyst, fire, hot air and constant mechanical friction. Allergic dermatoses were due to natural rubber (latex) (4 cases) in protective gloves, phenol-formaldehyde resin (1 case) and cobalt naphthenate (1 case). Irritant hand dermatoses (5 cases) were caused by the combined hazardous effect of unsaturated polyester or vinyl ester resins, organic solvents, glass fibre and dust from finishing work on the skin. Other cases of irritant dermatoses (7 cases) were due to the dust, promoted by mechanical friction of clothes. Skin disorders in the GRP industry were common (26%) but the symptoms were mild and only 3 patients had been on sick leave because of occupational skin disease. PMID:8222622

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Warm-Sprayed Titanium Coating on Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Amirthan; Takuma, Okada; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Polymer materials are increasingly dominating various engineering fields. Recently, polymer-based composite materials' surface performances—in particular, surface in relative motion—have been improved markedly by thermal spray coating. Despite this recent progress, the deposition of high-strength materials—producing a coating thickness of the order of more than 500 μm—remains highly challenging. In the present work, a highly dense and thick titanium coating was successfully deposited onto the carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrate using a newly developed high-pressure warm spray (WS) system. The coating properties, such as hardness (300 ± 20 HV) and adhesion strength (8.1 ± 0.5 MPa), were evaluated and correlated with the microstructures of the coating. In addition, a wipe-test and in situ particle velocity and temperature measurement were performed to validate the particle deposition behavior as a function of the nitrogen flow rate in the WS system. It was found that the microstructures, deposition efficiency, and mechanical properties of the coatings were highly sensitive to nitrogen flow rates. The coating porosity increased with increasing nitrogen flow rates; however, the highest density was observed for nitrogen flow rate of 1000 standard liters per minute (SLM) samples due to the high fraction of semi-molten particles in the spray stream.

  12. Scanning induction thermography (SIT) for imaging damages in carbon-fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. Renil; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) combines both Eddy Current Technique (ECT) and Thermographic Non-Destructive Techniques (TNDT) [1],[2]. This NDT technique has been earlier demonstrated for metallic components for the detection of cracks, corrosion, etc.[3]-[9] Even though Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) has a relatively less electrical conductivity compared to metals, it was observed that sufficient heat could be generated using induction heating that can be used for nondestructive evaluation using the Induction Thermography technique. Also, measurable temperatures could be achieved using relatively less currents, when compared to metals. In Scanning Induction Thermography (SIT) technique, the induction coil moves over the sample at optimal speeds and the temperature developed in the sample due to Joule heating effects is captured as a function of time and distance using an IR camera in the form of video images. A new algorithm is also presented for the analysis of the video images for improved analysis of the data obtained. Several CFRP components were evaluated for detection of impact damage and delaminations using the SIT technique.

  13. Numerical simulation of combustion effects during laser processing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Sato, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    We applied the finite difference method to a numerical simulation of material removal in the laser ablation of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). Although a few theoretical and numerical studies of heat-affected zone (HAZ) formation have been reported, there has been no report describing heat generation due to oxidization of the materials. It is important to consider combustion effects when discussing the generation of a HAZ in order to improve the quality of CFRP cutting by laser. To develop a new calculation model that includes the effects of the combustion of each element of the CFRP, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were performed for CFRP in air. We succeeded in qualitatively simulating the generation of a HAZ, including the effects of combustion, using data obtained by TGA and DTA. Therefore, not only thermal conductivity, but also combustion effects, should be considered when discussing how a HAZ is generated and in order to improve the cutting quality of CFRPs in laser processing.

  14. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  15. A composite-appropriate integration method of thick functional components in fibre-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippatos, A.; Höhne, R.; Kliem, M.; Gude, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of integrated structural health monitoring systems for critical composite parts, such as wind turbine blades, fuselage and wing parts, is an promising approach to guarantee a safe and efficient operational lifetime of such components. Therefore, the integration of thick functional components like sensors, actuators and electronic components is often necessary. An optimal integration of such components should be ensured without material imperfections in the composite structure, i.e. voids and resin rich areas, and failure of the functional components. In this paper, first investigations were undertaken for a basic understanding of the mechanical performance of a fibre reinforced plastic component with integrated functional elements. The influence of different materials and treatment methods for the encapsulation of electronic components was experimentally investigated under static and dynamic loading tests. By means of a parametric finite element model, the effects of an encapsulation and various parameters such as the shape and orientation of the electronic components were examined. Several encapsulation variants were investigated in order to minimise the chance of failure initiations. Based both on experimental and numerical results, a preferred composite integration concept was selected for an electronic board and some first recommendations for an optimal integration were derived.

  16. Heat accumulation effects in short-pulse multi-pass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Freitag, C.; Komlenok, M. S.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Konov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    The formation of a matrix evaporation zone (MEZ) in carbon fiber reinforced plastics during multi-pass laser cutting with picosecond laser pulses is studied for a wide range of pulse frequencies (fp = 10-800 kHz) and feed rates (vf = 0.002-10 m/s). Three regimes of the formation of the MEZ are found and related with different heat accumulation effects: (i) small MEZ (<2 μm) with negligible heat accumulation, (ii) moderate-size MEZ (up to a few hundred microns) determined by heat accumulation between pulses, and (iii) large MEZ (up to a few millimeters) caused by heat accumulation between scans. The dependence of the size of the MEZ on the number of scans and the scan frequency was studied to distinguish the two heat accumulation effects (between pulses and between scans), which occur on different time-scales. A diagram to illustrate the boundaries between the three regimes of the formation of the MEZ as a function of feed rate and pulse frequency is proposed as a promising base for further studies and as a useful tool to optimize the processing parameters in practice.

  17. Optics of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics - A theoretical and an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Ansgar; ElMaklizi, Ahmed; Foschum, Florian; Voit, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Simon, Emanuel; Reitzle, Dominik; Kienle, Alwin

    2016-09-01

    Laser processing of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) as well as their design optimization are strongly emerging fields. As the optics of CFRP is still rather unknown, the optical behavior of CFRP was investigated in this study. Different simulation models were implemented to simulate reflectance from CFRP samples as well as distribution and absorption of light within these samples. The methods include an analytical solution of Maxwell's equations and Monte Carlo solutions of the radiative transfer theory. We show that strong inaccurracies occur, if light propagation in CFRP is modeled using the radiative transfer theory. Therefore, the solution of Maxwell's equations is the method of choice for calculation of light propagation in CFRP. Furthermore, measurements of the reflectance of light from CFRP were performed and compared to the simulations for investigation of the optical behavior. Information on the refractive index of carbon fibers was obtained via goniometric measurements. The amount of reflected light was determined as 6.05±0.38% for light polarized parallel to the fiber direction, while it was 3.65±0.41% for light polarized perpendicular to the fiber direction in case of laser-processed CFRP.

  18. Laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) by single-mode fiber laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sato, Tadatake; Narazaki, Aiko; Kurosaki, Ryozo; Muramatsu, Mayu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Anzai, Kenji; Aoyama, Mitsuaki; Matsushita, Masafumi; Furukawa, Koichi; Nishino, Michiteru; Fujisaki, Akira; Miyato, Taizo; Kayahara, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    We report on the laser cutting of carbon fiber reinforced thermo-plastics (CFRTP) with a cw IR fiber laser (single-mode fiber laser, average power: 350 W). CFRTP is a high strength composite material with a lightweight, and is increasingly being used various applications. A well-defined cutting of CFRTP which were free of debris and thermal-damages around the grooves, were performed by the laser irradiation with a fast beam galvanometer scanning on a multiple-scanpass method.

  19. Production of Starch Based Bioplastic from Cassava Peel Reinforced with Microcrystalline Celllulose Avicel PH101 Using Sorbitol as Plasticizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulida; Siagian, M.; Tarigan, P.

    2016-04-01

    The production of starch based bioplastics from cassava peel reeinforced with microcrystalline cellulose using sorbitol as plasticizer were investigated. Physical properties of bioplastics were determined by density, water uptake, tensile strength and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Bioplastics were prepared from cassava peel starch plasticized using sorbitol with variation of 20; 25; 30% (wt/v of sorbitol to starch) reinforced with microcrystalline celllulose (MCC) Avicel PH101 fillers with range of 0 to 6% (wt/wt of MCC to starch). The results showed improvement in tensile strength with higher MCC content up to 9, 12 mpa compared to non-reinforced bioplastics. This could be mainly attributed to the strong hydrogen bonds between MCC and starch. On the contrary, the addition of MCC decreased the elongation at break, density and water uptake. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy showed the functional groups of bioplastics, which the majority of O-H groups were found at the bioplastics with reinforcing filler MCC that represented substantial hydrogen bonds. The highest tensile strength value was obtained for bioplastic with MCC content 6% and sorbitol content 20%. With good adhesion between MCC and starch the production of bioplastics could be widely used as a substitute for conventional plastics with more benefits to the environment.

  20. Improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminates. Part 2: AS-4/Polyimidesulfone prepreg system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    AS-4/polyimidesulfone (PISO2) composite prepreg was utilized for the improved compression molding technology investigation. This improved technique employed molding stops which advantageously facilitate the escape of volatile by-products during the B-stage curing step, and effectively minimize the neutralization of the consolidating pressure by intimate interply fiber-fiber contact within the laminate in the subsequent molding cycle. Without the modifying the resin matrix properties, composite panels with both unidirectional and angled plies with outstanding C-scans and mechanical properties were successfully molded using moderate molding conditions, i.e., 660 F and 500 psi, using this technique. The size of the panels molded were up to 6.00 x 6.00 x 0.07 in. A consolidation theory was proposed for the understanding and advancement of the processing science. Processing parameters such as vacuum, pressure cycle design, prepreg quality, etc. were explored.

  1. Plasticization and Reinforcement in a Boron Cage Compound Polyurethane Nanocomposite: A Dielectric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Dan; Liu, J.; Zhang, X.; Eastwood, E.; Bowler, N.

    2012-09-21

    In order to control and modify the physical properties of nanocomposite systems, it is essential to understand the nano-filler/polymer structure-property relationships. Boron cage compounds (BCCs) are a class of icosahedral, closed cage molecules that are of interest due to their high boron content and inherent neutron absorbing/shielding properties, and because of their ability to act as molecular nano-particles. When the BCC n-hexylcarborane is blended with a polybutadiene (PBD)/polyurethane (PU) segmented copolymer (EN8) an increase in the glass transition (Tg) temperature of the PBD phase (reinforcement) and a decrease in the Tg temperatures of the PU phases (plasticization) are observed. These observations were investigated by examining the dielectric relaxation properties of copolymer samples with and without added n-hexylcarborane (0wt% and 5wt% n-hexylcarborane) using broadband dielectric spectroscopy in the frequency range from 0.01 to 1 MHz and temperature range from -140 to 130 °C. Parametric fitting techniques aided in the identification of two α relaxation processes associated with the glass transitions of the soft PBD phase and the hard urethane phases, and a secondary β relaxation process due to the localized motions of side groups. The conductivities at low frequencies were also identified and modeled. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) did not indicate the presence of a crystalline component within the copolymer samples, so interfacial polarization (Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars) relaxation is not possible. A relaxation map (Arrhenius diagram) associated with these processes has been developed from the experimental data to elucidate the role of n-hexylcarborane in the molecular dynamics of the system. Values of fitting parameters, calculated Tg values, and a fragility index are also given for comparison. Reduced localized motion of the soft PBD phase, as well as reinforcement of the hard urethane phases is observed upon the introduction of n

  2. An experimental study of permeability within an out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only CFRP laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Landon F.

    The out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only (OOA-VBO) manufacturing process is a process that eliminates an autoclave when manufacturing aerospace quality carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). OOA-VBO pre-impregnated resin tow systems rely on air channel networks that guide unwanted voids out of the laminate. The air path networks can be characterized by measuring the permeability of a pre-cured laminate. Permeability results were successfully obtained for a laminate with a compaction similar to that found in a typical vacuum bagging setup. A study was done to find the relationship between compaction of the laminate and permeability. Permeability was measured as the laminate cured, using a constant temperature ramp rate. An experimental nodal analysis was performed to find the permeability at the midpoint of the in-plane direction.

  3. Suppression of interlaminar damage in carbon/epoxy laminates by use of interleaf layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Toshio . Dept. of Materials Science Ceramic Technology)

    1994-10-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have been widely used as a structural material. In general, fiber orientation angle of each lamina in these laminates is variously chosen in order to taylor a material which meets the particular requirement for the material properties in arbitrary direction of laminate. Quasi-isotropic lamination, in which the laminate consisted of laminae with fiber orientation of 0[degree], +45[degree], [minus]45[degree] and 90[degree] to loading axis, is most commonly employed in the actual application. However, quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminates are known to develop the interlaminar stress concentrations near the free edge region. These laminates have a strong tendency to delaminate near the edges when subjected to axial in-plane loading. Such a free edge delamination under loading in the plane of the laminate is a unique problem to laminated composites. This paper summarizes the author's investigation which was performed to reduce the free edge interlaminar stresses in the laminate by incorporating interleaf films between plies and thus to improve the mechanical properties of these materials. In their previous work, the authors have shown that these laminates exhibit a high vibration damping capability. Loss factor values for these CFRP/interleaf laminates which were measured in cantilever beam tests, are 5 to 50 times as large as that for conventional CFRP. In this paper, discussion will be provided on the mechanical properties of the interleaved quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminate, [0/[+-]45/90][sub s], with a special emphasis on the optimum design of interply locations to incorporate the interleaf films for the particular requirement such as static strength, elastic modulus, fatigue resistance and so on.

  4. Cytogenetic analysis of lymphocytes from fiberglass-reinforced plastics workers occupationally exposed to styrene.

    PubMed

    Van Hummelen, P; Severi, M; Pauwels, W; Roosels, D; Veulemans, H; Kirsch-Volders, M

    1994-10-01

    In this study a group of 52 workers employed in a plant manufacturing fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) pipes and cisterns, and therefore daily exposed to styrene, were monitored. As a control group 24 non-exposed workers from another factory producing and repairing pallets volunteered to participate. The airborne styrene during the monitoring ranged from 2.2 to 110.1 mg/m3. As a metabolic marker for styrene exposure mandelic acid was measured in the urine and ranged from 11 to 649 mg/g creatinine. From 43 exposed and 15 control workers sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) and high frequency cell (HFC) data and from 49 exposed and 23 control workers micronucleus (MN) data from peripheral lymphocytes are reported. Although the two groups of workers could clearly be distinguished on the basis of the airborne styrene concentrations and urinary mandelic acid concentrations no differences in any of the cytogenetic markers were found. Correlations between the cytogenetic data and the level of airborne styrene concentrations or urinary mandelic acid levels could also not be demonstrated. Otherwise, smoking increased the SCE frequency. Grouping the workers according to smoking habits showed a statistically significant difference in SCE. Moreover, levels of urinary thiocyanate (SCN), which can be used as a metabolic marker for smoking, showed a significant positive correlation with the number of SCE. This indicates that SCE is a sensitive biomarker and might still be useful in biomonitoring. However, only chronic exposures over a long period would probably be detectable. In this study, where exposure was rather low and the number of working years was small (mean of 2.9 years), cytogenetic effects are probably too low or rare to be detectable with any assay. PMID:7523881

  5. Trends in Occupational Exposure to Styrene in the European Glass Fibre-Reinforced Plastics Industry

    PubMed Central

    Van Rooij, J. G. M.; Kasper, A.; Triebig, G.; Werner, P.; Kromhout, H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study presents temporal trends of styrene exposure for workers in the European glass fibre-reinforced plastics (GRP) industry during the period 1966–2002. Methods: Data of personal styrene exposure measurements were retrieved from reports, databases and peer-reviewed papers. Only sources with descriptive statistics of personal measurements were accepted. The styrene exposure data cover personal air samples and biological monitoring data, that is, urinary styrene metabolites (mandelic acid and/or phenylglyoxylic acid) and styrene in blood. Means of series of measurements were categorized by year, country, production process, job and sampling strategy. Linear mixed models were used to identify temporal trends and factors affecting exposure levels. Results: Personal exposure measurements were available from 60 reports providing data on 24145 1–8-h time-weighted average shift personal air samples. Available data of biological exposure indicators included measurements of mandelic acid in post-shift urine (6361 urine samples being analysed). Trend analyses of the available styrene exposure data showed that the average styrene concentration in the breathing zone of open-mould workers in the European GRP industry has decreased on average by 5.3% per year during the period 1966–1990 and by only 0.4% annually in the period after 1990. The highest exposures were measured in Southern Europe and the lowest exposures in Northern Europe with Central Europe in between. Biological indicators of styrene (mandelic acid in post-shift urine) showed a somewhat steeper decline (8.9%), most likely because urine samples were collected in companies that showed a stronger decrease of styrene exposure in air than GRP companies where no biological measurements were carried out. PMID:18550625

  6. Anisotropy of conductivity in carbon fiber-reinforced plastics with continuous fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Anatoliy T.; Shevchenko, Vitaliy G.; Letyagin, Sergey V.; Klason, Carl

    1995-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP), as high strength advanced materials are often used as media for embedding sensors and actuators. Due to the properties of components and processing conditions they are electrically anisotropic, with coefficient of anisotropy sometimes exceeding several thousands. This may prevent elimination of static electricity and cause erosion of material due to micro discharges at contacts with fastenings and embedded sensors and actuators, causing their malfunction. For this reason, the investigation of electrical properties of CFRP may provide the solution to this problem. Distribution of electric current field in CFRP and related with it possible errors in measurements of longitudinal conductivity and anisotropy are analyzed. CFRP have been prepared from PAN or cellulose fibers with different heat treatment temperatures and conductivity anisotropy was measured as a function of filler volume fraction and processing conditions. With increasing loading coefficient of anisotropy (alpha) decreases. Lower values of (alpha) were observed when curing agents containing ionic complexes of metals were used. Modifications of fiber surface with hydrophobic agents results in increased anisotropy. Composites prepared with carbon fabrics are isotropic in the fabric plane. Coefficient of anisotropy decreases with increasing molding pressure and depends on the type of weaving of fabric. In hybrid composites with alternating layers of carbon fabric and complex fiber fabric anisotropy is higher due to partial decomposition of conducting layer on top of complex fibers. A method for reducing anisotropy by introducing conducting `jumpers', shorting individual fibers or layers of fabric is proposed. The change of anisotropy in the process of fabrication of carbon-carbon composite by passing electric current through fibers has been investigated. In conclusion, alternative uses of CFRP with reduced anisotropy for contact elements of electric current through

  7. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  8. A cohort mortality study and a case-control study of workers potentially exposed to styrene in the reinforced plastics and composites industry.

    PubMed

    Wong, O

    1990-11-01

    The cohort consisted of 15,908 men and women who worked for at least six months between 1948 and 1977 in 30 participating manufacturing plants in the reinforced plastics and composites industry. These workers were occupationally exposed to the working environment in the industry, which included exposure to styrene. Cause specific mortality analyses were performed based on the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) with the United States population as a comparison. No significant excess of cause specific mortality was found for the total cohort. Mortality from cancer was slightly less than expected (SMR = 88.1). For cancer of the respiratory system, a small non-significant excess was detected (SMR = 116.1). For lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer, a non-significant deficit was found (SMR = 73.3). The observed mortality from leukaemia was similar to that expected (five observed v 4.76 expected deaths). The plants with hot processes (injection moulding, centrifugal casting, compression moulding, continuous lamination, and pultrusion) experienced a significantly increased SMR (177.9) for respiratory cancer, which was more than twice that (78.3) for those with cold processes (resin mixing, lay up and spray up, bag moulding, and filament winding). As potential exposure to styrene from hot processes is considerably less than that from the cold processes, this finding could not be attributed to occupational exposures. A subsequent nested case-control study consisting of 40 cases of deaths from respiratory cancer was conducted. Further information on detailed work history, occupational exposures, and smoking history was collected. The case-control study did not show any significant association between respiratory cancer and direct exposure to styrene (contained in polyester resins), duration of exposure to styrene, the type of process (hot or cold), or whether a resin was used. A statistically significant association (relative risk = 7.33) was found between cigarette smoking

  9. A cohort mortality study and a case-control study of workers potentially exposed to styrene in the reinforced plastics and composites industry.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O

    1990-01-01

    The cohort consisted of 15,908 men and women who worked for at least six months between 1948 and 1977 in 30 participating manufacturing plants in the reinforced plastics and composites industry. These workers were occupationally exposed to the working environment in the industry, which included exposure to styrene. Cause specific mortality analyses were performed based on the standardised mortality ratio (SMR) with the United States population as a comparison. No significant excess of cause specific mortality was found for the total cohort. Mortality from cancer was slightly less than expected (SMR = 88.1). For cancer of the respiratory system, a small non-significant excess was detected (SMR = 116.1). For lymphatic and haematopoietic cancer, a non-significant deficit was found (SMR = 73.3). The observed mortality from leukaemia was similar to that expected (five observed v 4.76 expected deaths). The plants with hot processes (injection moulding, centrifugal casting, compression moulding, continuous lamination, and pultrusion) experienced a significantly increased SMR (177.9) for respiratory cancer, which was more than twice that (78.3) for those with cold processes (resin mixing, lay up and spray up, bag moulding, and filament winding). As potential exposure to styrene from hot processes is considerably less than that from the cold processes, this finding could not be attributed to occupational exposures. A subsequent nested case-control study consisting of 40 cases of deaths from respiratory cancer was conducted. Further information on detailed work history, occupational exposures, and smoking history was collected. The case-control study did not show any significant association between respiratory cancer and direct exposure to styrene (contained in polyester resins), duration of exposure to styrene, the type of process (hot or cold), or whether a resin was used. A statistically significant association (relative risk = 7.33) was found between cigarette smoking

  10. Dynamic response of concrete beams externally reinforced with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) subjected to impulsive loads

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, D.M.; Ross, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    A series of 54 laboratory scale concrete beams 3 x 3 x 30 in. in size were impulsively loaded to failure in a drop weight impact machine. The beams had no internal reinforcement, but instead were externally reinforced on the bottom or tension side of the beams with 1, 2, and 3 ply AS4C/1919 graphite epoxy panels. In addition, several of the beams were also reinforced on the sides with 3 ply CFRP. The beams were simply supported in a drop weight machine and subjected to impact loads with amplitudes up to 10 kips, and durations less than 1 ms, at beam midspan. Measurements made during the loading event included beam total load, midspan displacement, as well as midspan strain at 3 locations in the beam`s cross-section. A high speed framing camera was also used to record the beam`s displacement-time behavior as well as to gain insight into the failure mechanisms. Beam midspan accelerations were determined by double differentiation of the displacement versus time data, and in turn, the beam`s inertial loads were calculated using the beam`s equivalent mass. Beam dynamic bending loads versus time were determined from the difference between the total load versus time and the inertial load versus time data. Bending loads versus displacements were also determined along with fracture energies. Failure to correct the loads for inertia will result in incorrect conclusions being drawn from the data, especially for bending resistance of brittle concrete test specimens. A comparison with quasistatic bending (fracture) energy data showed that the dynamic failure energy absorbed by the beams was always less than the static fracture energy, due to the brittle nature of concrete when impulsively loaded.

  11. Reliable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for investigation of primary aromatic amines migration from food packaging and during industrial curing of multilayer plastic laminates.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Francesca; Di Lallo, Valentina; Catellani, Dante; Mattarozzi, Monica; Careri, Maria; Suman, Michele

    2014-09-01

    Primary aromatic amines (PAAs) can migrate from packaging into food from different sources such as polyurethanic adhesives used for the manufacture of multilayer films, which may contain residual aromatic isocyanates, or recycled paperboard, because of the presence of azo dyes in the printed paper massively used in the recycling process. In the present work, a reliable analytical method, exploiting a conventional high-performance liquid chromatography-(selected ion monitoring)-mass spectrometry system, for PAAs compliance assessment in food contact materials was developed as an effective alternative to the current standard spectrophotometric one, moving in this way from the screening to the accurate and selective quantitation perspective for the analysis of PAAs both in aqueous and acidic food simulants. The main validation parameters were verified achieving very satisfactory results in terms of linearity range, limit of detection (ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 µg kg(-1)) and quantitation (ranging from 0.1 to 3.6 µg kg(-1)), repeatability and accuracy. Suitability of the method was demonstrated for a wide range of commercial samples, chosen among different producers of the most common used food packaging plastic and paperboard categories and then analyzed to assess the risk related to PAAs migration. Finally, the method was also successfully exploited to monitor the evolution of potential PAAs migration during the industrial curing process of multilayer plastic laminates, prior to their release for delivery to the food industry end user. PMID:25230184

  12. Modeling and numerical simulation of the progressive failure of pultruded fiber-reinforced plastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianshen

    Fiber reinforced plastic pultruded (FRP) materials generally fail in a brittle manner. After first failure, a small increment of applied load can cause the failure to propagate to neighboring regions in the material and seriously reduce the load carrying capacity of the FRP structure. Two methods are being developed to model progressive failure of solid structures by the finite element method. One method is based on reduction of the stiffness components of failed elements. The other is based on node/element separation so that the failure configuration of the structure can be simulated. The latter one is more appropriate to large scales of failures. This method has been applied mainly in explicit finite element codes. In an explicit code, which is appropriate to transient dynamic problems, the solution is at element level at each time step. No global stiffness matrix is needed. In an implicit code, which is appropriate for static or quasi-static problems, the global stiffness matrix must be assembled at each time step. The geometrical configuration of the finite element model at failure changes the global stiffness matrix. Therefore, implementing the node separation method in an implicit code is more difficult than in an explicit code. Although efforts have been made to model static failure problems with explicit codes using dynamic relaxation, the results of these tests have been disappointing. The computational methods for progressive failures of statics problems will need to rely on implicit codes. This thesis presents a methodology for implementing the node/element separation method in an implicit code. Numerical strategies such as constrained node pairs with failure, releasing constraints and regenerating node-variable relations, are proposed to accomplish this task. The modifications to the general implicit time procedure due to the inclusion of this method are investigated in detail. NIKE3D, a 3-D implicit finite element code, was employed to test this method

  13. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Egusa, Shigenori; Birtcher, R.C.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and {sup 6O}Co {gamma}-rays up to 1.8 {times} 1 0{sup 8} Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 {times} lO{sup 22} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed.

  14. Laser drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by picosecond laser pulses: comparative study of different drilling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Stolze, M.; L'huillier, J.

    2014-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) as a lightweight material with superior properties is increasingly being used in industrial manufacturing. Using ultrashort laser pulses can improve the quality in cutting or drilling applications, but at high power levels it is more complicated to maintain the accuracy and precision in CFRP drilling. According to the application requirements for the extent of the heat affected zone, the geometric precision and the productivity different drilling tools can be used. Therefore we report on the application of three different beam delivery systems to drilling processes of CFRP: Galvanometer scanner, trepanning head and diffractive optical elements.

  15. Frequency-modulated thermal wave imaging for non-destructive testing of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghali, V. S.; Mulaveesala, R.; Takei, M.

    2011-10-01

    Phase-based methods of active thermographic studies provide deeper subsurface details and reduce non-uniform emissivity problems in defect detection. In this contribution analysis of subsurface anomalies has been carried out by probing a suitable frequency component with sufficient energy. This paper highlights the comparative analysis of different thermographic schemes on the basis of supplying equal energy to the chosen frequency used for the analysis of a given carbon fiber-reinforced plastic sample used in experimentation. Experiments have been carried out to find the detection ability of different excitation schemes, and comparisons have been made by taking the signal-to-noise ratio of the defects into consideration.

  16. One-sided ultrasonic inspection to detect flaws in CFRP composite solid laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Zhang, Guilina; Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Dan; Kim, Sun-Kyu; Yang, Yong-Jun; Hwang, Woo-Chae; Yang, In-Young; Park, Je-Woong

    2012-04-01

    The importance of Carbon Fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been generally recognized, and the CFRP composite laminates are widely used. When ultrasonic inspection is applied on actual aircraft components, the part geometry often lacks flat and parallel faces and the benefit of a backwall echo maybe unavailable. So, it is very necessary to detect flaws and defects in the CFRP composite solid laminates due to the flaws of CFRP composite laminates affecting the properties of the laminate. Firstly, we used miniature potted angle beam transducers (designed for generating mode-converted shear waves or Rayleigh waves in steel) on solid laminates of composites. A pair of such transducers was mounted in a holder in a nose-to-nose fashion to be used as a scanning probe on composites. Secondly, a method was utilized to determine the porosity content of a composite lay-up by processing micrograph images of the laminate. The results from the image processing method are compared with existing data. C-scan images of CFRP samples, which were based on the impacted samples were then produced by combining the pitch-catch probe with a portable manual scanner known as the Generic Scanner ("GenScan"). The signal amplitude of pitch-catch C-scan images was also correlated to the volume percent of porosity in carbon composite laminates. Finally, a simulation was performed with the numerical Wave-2000 Code for predicting the ultrasonic wave in the sample.

  17. The influence of porosity on ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced plastic composites using the laser-ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabutov, A. A.; Podymova, N. B.; Belyaev, I. O.

    2013-11-01

    Wideband acoustic spectroscopy with a laser ultrasound source for quantitative analysis of the effect of porosity on the attenuation coefficient of longitudinal acoustic waves in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials was experimentally implemented. The samples under study had different bulk-porosity levels (up to 10%), which were determined using X-ray computer tomography. A resonance ultrasound attenuation peak associated with the one-dimensional periodicity of the layered composite structure was observed for all samples. The absolute value of the resonance-peak maximum and its width depend on the local concentration of microscopic isolated pores and extended delaminations in the sample structure. The obtained empirical relationships between these parameters of the frequency dependence of the ultrasound attenuation coefficient and the type of inhomogeneities and their volume concentration can be used for rapid evaluation of the structural quality of CFRP composites.

  18. Corrosive effect of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic on stainless-steel screws during implantation into man.

    PubMed

    Tayton, K

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion of stainless-steel screws used to fix carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates to human fractures was compared with the corrosion on similar screws used to fix stainless-steel AO plates. Corrosive changes were noted in both sets of screws with similar frequency and severity; however, the stainless-steel plates were 'in situ' almost twice as long as the CFRP ones, showing that the corrosive changes occurred more rapidly on screws in contact with CFRP. Nevertheless, over the implantation time necessary for bone healing, corrosion was very mild and there is no clinical contra-indication to the use of stainless-steel and CFRP together in this particular application. PMID:6842566

  19. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  20. Invertebrate lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Melcer, Shai; Gruenbaum, Yosef . E-mail: gru@vms.huji.ac.il; Krohne, Georg . E-mail: krohne@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2007-06-10

    Lamins are the main component of the nuclear lamina and considered to be the ancestors of all intermediate filament proteins. They are localized mainly at the nuclear periphery where they form protein complexes with integral proteins of the nuclear inner membrane, transcriptional regulators, histones and chromatin modifiers. Studying lamins in invertebrate species has unique advantages including the smaller number of lamin genes in the invertebrate genomes and powerful genetic analyses in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. These simpler nuclear lamina systems allow direct analyses of their structure and functions. Here we give an overview of recent advances in the field of invertebrate nuclear lamins with special emphasis on their evolution, assembly and functions.

  1. Fracture Analysis of Competing Failure Modes of Aluminum-CFRP Joints Using Three-Layer Titanium Laminates as Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, P.; Vollertsen, F.

    2015-09-01

    The structural properties of lightweight constructions can be adapted to specific local requirements using multi-material designs. Aluminum alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are materials of great interest requiring suitable joining techniques in order to transfer the advantages of combining the materials to structural benefits. Thus, the research group "Schwarz-Silber" investigates novel concepts to enable frontal aluminum-CFRP joints using transition structures. In the foil concept titanium foils are used as transition elements. Specimens have been produced using three-layer titanium laminates. In tensile tests, three failure locations have been observed: (1) Al-Ti seam, (2) Ti-CFRP hybrid laminate, and (3) CFRP laminate. In this paper, the fracture mechanisms of these failure modes are investigated by analyzing metallographic micrographs and fracture surfaces as well as by correlating load-displacement curves to video imaging of tensile tests. The results show that the cracking of the CFRP layers can be traced back to an assembly error. The laminate character of the titanium part tends to reduce the Al-Ti seam strength. However, two sub-joint tests demonstrate that the Al-Ti seam can endure loads up to 9.5 kN. The ductile failure behavior of the Ti-CFRP hybrid laminates is caused by plastic deformations of the titanium laminate liners.

  2. Improvement of fatigue life and prevention of internal crack initiation of chopped carbon fiber reinforced plastics modified with micro glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Ryohei; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve fatigue properties of chopped carbon fiber reinforced plastics fabricated by SMC (Sheet Molding Compound) method and to clarify the mechanism for improvement. To enhance the properties, micro glass fibers with 500nm in diameter were added directly into vinyl ester resin with 0.3wt% contents. The chopped carbon fiber reinforced plastics were fabricated and cured at room temperature for 1hour under 1MPa and then at 60degree-C for 3hours. After curing, the fabricated plate was cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile and bending strength and fatigue life of chopped carbon fiber reinforced plastics were investigated by tensile and three point bending test and cyclic tension-tension test, respectively. The behavior of strain concentration around the tips of carbon fiber were discussed with model specimen on the observations with DIC (Digital Image Correlation) method and polarizing microscope under tensile loading, in which one chopped carbon fiber was embedded into the matrix. In conclusion, when toughened vinyl ester resin modified with micro glass fibers was used as matrix, tensile and bending strength and fatigue life of chopped carbon fiber reinforced plastics were increased 56.6%, 49.8% and 14 to 23 times compared with those of unmodified specimens. It should be explained that static and dynamic properties of chopped carbon fiber reinforced plastics were improved by that crack initiation and propagation were prevented according to the prevention of the locally increasing of strain around the tip of carbon fiber, when vinyl ester resin modified with micro glass fibers was used as matrix.

  3. Nonlinear FE simulations of structural behavior parameters of reinforced concrete beam with epoxy-bonded FRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Saptarshi; Kalidoss, S.

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, investigations on fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) plated-reinforced concrete (RC) beam are carried out. Numerical investigations are performed by using a nonlinear finite element analysis by incorporating cracking and crushing of concrete. The numerical models developed in the present study are validated with the results obtained from the experiment under monotonic load using the servo-hydraulic actuator in displacement control mode. Further, the validated numerical models are used to evaluate the influence of different parameters. It is found from the investigations that increase in the elastic modulus of adhesive layer and CFRP laminate increases the interfacial stresses whereas increase in laminate modulus decreases the displacement and reinforcement strain of the beam. It is also observed that increase in the adhesive layer can largely reduce the interfacial stresses, whereas increase in laminate thickness increases it. However, increase in laminate thickness decreases the displacement and reinforcement strain of the beam significantly. It is mention worthy that increase in laminate length reduces the interfacial stresses, whereas CFRP width change does not affect the interfacial stresses. The study will be useful for the design and practicing engineers for arriving at the FRP-based strengthening schemes for RC structures judiciously.

  4. Infrared thermography inspection of glass reinforced plastic (GRP) wind turbine blades and the concept of an automated scanning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Maldague, X. P. V.

    2013-05-01

    Infrared thermography techniques have been used for many years in the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT and E) of materials and structures. The main advantage of thermography over classical NDT techniques resides in the possibility of inspecting large areas in a fast and safe manner without needing to have access to both sides of the component. Nonetheless infrared thermography is limited to the detection of relatively shallow defects (a few millimetres under the surface), since it is affected by 3D heat diffusion. However, the most common types of anomalies found on composites, such as GRP wind turbine blades are delaminations, disbonds, water ingress, node failure and core crushing, and can be effectively detected and sometimes quantified using active thermographic techniques. This research work presents the use of infrared thermography on glass reinforced plastic (GRP) wind turbine blades assessment. Finally, the development of an autonomous, novel and lightweight multi-axis scanning system, as a concept, deploying in situ thermography NDT is also presented, with the intention of developing maximisation of the blade area coverage in a single run, at a known sensitivity, with the utilisation of the minimum number of system degrees of freedom and the maximum repeatability, as well as positional accuracy possible.

  5. Studies of print-through and reflectivity of x-ray mirrors using thin carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Satoshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Yoshioka, Kenya; Ogi, Keiji; Kunieda, Hideyo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Iwase, Toshihiro; Saji, Shigetaka; Tachibana, Sasagu; Maejima, Masato; Yoshikawa, Shun; Shima, Naoki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Hamada, Takayoshi; Ishida, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiromichi; Kishimoto, Kazuaki; Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated x-ray mirrors from carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic with a tightly nested design for x-ray satellites, using a replication method for the surfaces. We studied the effects of print-through on the mirror surface as a function of curing temperature. With room temperature curing, the root-mean-square value of the surface error was 0.8 nm. The reflectivity was measured using 8-keV x-rays, and the roughness was calculated as 0.5 nm by model fitting-comparable to that of the ASTRO-H/HXT mirror. We verified the long-term stability of the mirror surface over 6 months. We fabricated Wolter type-I quadrant-shell mirrors with a diameter of 200 mm and performed x-ray measurements at BL20B2 in the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. We obtained reflection images of the mirrors using a 20-keV x-ray spot beam with a slit size of 10×1 mm in the radial and circumferential directions, respectively. The averaged half-power diameter (HPD) of the images in one mirror was 1.2 arc min in the circumferential center of the mirror and 3.0 arc min at the edge. In the spot images with a smaller slit size of 10×0.2 mm, we achieved an HPD of 0.38 arc min in the best case.

  6. Studies of the moisture absorption of thin carbon fiber reinforced plastic substrates for x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Satoshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Kurihara, Daichi; Yoshioka, Kenya; Nomura, Mizuki; Ogi, Keiji; Tomita, Yuuki; Mita, Tomoki; Kunieda, Hideyo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Iwase, Toshihiro; Maejima, Masato; Shima, Naoki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Hamada, Takayoshi; Ishida, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiromichi; Kishimoto, Kazuaki; Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro

    2015-07-01

    We study a lightweight x-ray mirror with a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrate for next-generation x-ray satellites. For tightly nested x-ray mirrors, such as those on the Suzaku and ASTRO-H telescopes, CFRP is the suitable substrate material because it has a higher strength-to-weight ratio and forming flexibility than those of metals. In flat CFRP substrate fabrication, the surface waviness has a root mean square (RMS) of ˜1 μm in the best products. The RMS approximately reaches a value consistent with the RMS of the mold used for the forming. We study the effect of moisture absorption using accelerated aging tests in three environments. The diffusivity of the CFRP substrate at 60°C and at relative humidity of 100% is ˜9.7×10-4 mm2.h-1, and the acceleration rate to the laboratory environment was 180 times higher. We also develop co-curing functional sheets with low water-vapor transmissivity on the CFRP substrate. Co-curing the sheets successfully reduced the moisture absorption rate by 440 times compared to the un-co-cured substrate. Details of the CFRP substrate fabrication and moisture absorption tests are also reported.

  7. Development of a lightweight portable optical measurement system for the print-through phenomenon of fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiou, Fang-Jung; Lai, Yao-Zih; Tsai, Min-Long

    2011-12-01

    Due to the volumetric shrinkage of the resin and the induced residual stress during the curing process, the reflection on the gel-coating layer surface will be imperfect if twists and wrinkles exist on the gel-coating surface. This phenomenon is denoted as print-through phenomenon (PTP). Currently, the detection of PTP for most of the yacht industry using the composite materials is performed mainly by visual inspection, and its quality is needed to be quantified to determine their grades. Therefore, there is a need to develop a lightweight portable optical measurement system that can be applied quickly to inspect different levels of PTP for the fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) of the yacht body. The measurement system was developed based on the scattering principle of a reflected laser fringe projected on to the workpiece surface. Two indexes, namely the profile peak-valley height and wave-height of the Fast-Fourier Transform based on the centerline of the extracted image profile, were proposed to quantify the PTP of a test specimen. The mean line width of the extracted image was applied to evaluate the surface roughness of the test specimen, based on the scattering theorem. A set of software programmed with Borland C++ Builder language was developed to calculate the proposed indexes and the mean line width. The developed measurement system has been taken to some yacht factories to do the on-site measurements. The measurement results were, in general, consistent with the surface conditions of the polished surfaces.

  8. Measurement of Three-Dimensional Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities for Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics Using Lock-In Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Takuya; Nagano, Hosei

    2015-11-01

    A new measurement technique to measure the in-plane thermal diffusivity, the distribution of in-plane anisotropy, and the out-of-plane thermal diffusivity has been developed to evaluate the thermal conductivity of anisotropic materials such as carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs). The measurements were conducted by using a laser-spot-periodic-heating method. The temperature of the sample is detected by using lock-in thermography. Thermography can analyze the phase difference between the periodic heat input and the temperature response of the sample. Two kinds of samples, unidirectional (UD) and cross-ply (CP) pitch-based CFRPs, were fabricated and tested in an atmospheric condition. All carbon fibers of the UD sample run in one direction [90°]. The carbon fibers of the CP sample run in two directions [0°/90°]. It is found that, by using lock-in thermography, it is able to visualize the thermal anisotropy and calculate the angular dependence of the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the CFRPs. The out-of-plane thermal diffusivity of CFRPs was also measured by analyzing the frequency dependence of the phase difference.

  9. Prediction of Damage Factor in end Milling of Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic Composites Using Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan, Ömer; Işık, Birhan; Çiçek, Adem; Kara, Fuat

    2013-08-01

    Glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites are an economic alternative to engineering materials because of their superior properties. Some damages on the surface occur due to their complex cutting mechanics in cutting process. Minimisation of the damages is fairly important in terms of product quality. In this study, a GFRP composite material was milled to experimentally minimise the damages on the machined surfaces, using two, three and four flute end mills at different combinations of cutting parameters. Experimental results showed that the damage factor increased with increasing cutting speed and feed rate, on the other hand, it was found that the damage factor decreased with increasing depth of cut and number of the flutes. In addition, analysis of variance (ANOVA) results clearly revealed that the feed rate was the most influential parameter affecting the damage factor in end milling of GFRP composites. Also, in present study, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models with five learning algorithms were used in predicting the damage factor to reduce number of expensive and time-consuming experiments. The highest performance was obtained by 4-10-1 network structure with LM learning algorithm. ANN was notably successful in predicting the damage factor due to higher R2 and lower RMSE and MEP.

  10. Plasma vitrification and re-use of non-combustible fiber reinforced plastic, gill net and waste glass.

    PubMed

    Chu, J P; Chen, Y T; Mahalingam, T; Tzeng, C C; Cheng, T W

    2006-12-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composite material has widespread use in general tank, special chemical tank and body of yacht, etc. The purpose of this study is directed towards the volume reduction of non-combustible FRP by thermal plasma and recycling of vitrified slag with specific procedures. In this study, we have employed three main wastes such as, FRP, gill net and waste glass. The thermal molten process was applied to treat vitrified slag at high temperatures whereas in the post-heat treatment vitrified slags were mixed with specific additive and ground into powder form and then heat treated at high temperatures. With a two-stage heat treatment, the treated sample was generated into four crystalline phases, cristobalite, albite, anorthite and wollastonite. Fine and relatively high dense structures with desirable properties were obtained for samples treated by the two-stage heating treatment. Good physical and mechanical properties were achieved after heat treatment, and this study reveals that our results could be comparable with the commercial products. PMID:16839685