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Sample records for reinforced steel matrix

  1. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  2. Damage Mechanisms of a TiB2-Reinforced Steel Matrix Composite for Lightweight Automotive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Z.; Luo, Z. C.; Yi, H. L.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-05-01

    The microscopic strain-and-stress fields related to primary and eutectic particles in a lightweight steel matrix composite (SMC) produced by in situ precipitation of TiB2 particles during solidification were investigated by means of microscale digital image correlation and finite element method. The damage process in this SMC is a sequential process of primary particles cracking, the fracture of the surrounding eutectic particles, and finally the growth and coalescence of voids in the ferrite matrix.

  3. Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, HongYu; Attard, Dr. Thomas L.; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

  4. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  5. Improving the corrosion wear resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by particulate reinforced Ni matrix composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhuo, Chengzhi; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Liu, Linlin

    2009-01-01

    In order to overcome the problem of corrosion wear of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS), two kinds of composite alloying layers were prepared by a duplex treatment, consisting of Ni/nano-SiC and Ni/nano-SiO2 predeposited by brush plating, respectively, and subsequent surface alloying with Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu by a double glow process. The microstructure of the two kinds of nanoparticle reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layers was investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of composite alloying layers compared with the Ni-based alloying layer and 316L SS under different conditions was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results showed that under alloying temperature (1000 °C) conditions, amorphous nano-SiO2 particles still retained the amorphous structure, whereas nano-SiC particles were decomposed and Ni, Cr reacted with SiC to form Cr6.5Ni2.5Si and Cr23C6. In static acidic solution, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer. However, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is prominently superior to that of the Ni-based alloying layer under acidic flow medium condition and acidic slurry flow condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiC particles interlayer is evidently lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer, but higher than that of 316L SS under all test conditions. The results show that the highly dispersive nano-SiO2 particles are helpful in improving the corrosion wear resistance of the Ni-based alloying layer, whereas carbides and silicide phase are deleterious to that of the Ni-based alloying layer due to the fact that the preferential removal of the matrix around the precipitated phase takes place by the chemical

  6. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (τ (app)) and slip coefficient (β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  7. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  8. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  9. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  10. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  11. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  12. Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Steel Fibre- Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, A.; Tamme, V.; Laurson, M.

    2015-11-01

    Steel fibre-reinforced concrete (SFRC) is widely used in the structural elements of buildings: industrial floors, slabs, walls, foundation, etc. When a load is applied to a fibre- reinforced composite consisting of a low-modulus matrix reinforced with high-strength, high- modulus fibres, the plastic flow of the matrix under stress transfers the load to the fibre; this results in high-strength, high-modulus material which determines the stiffness and stress of the composite. In this study the equivalent flexural strength, equivalent flexural ratio Re,3 and the compressing strength of SFRC are investigated. Notched test specimens with five different dosages of steel fibres (20, 25, 30, 35, 40 kg/m3) were prepared using industrial concrete. Determination of flexural tension strength was carried out according to the EU norm EVS-EN 14651:2005+A1:2007. The equivalent flexural strength and subsequent equivalent flexural ratio Re,3 of SFRC with a dosage of 20, 25, 30, 35 kg/m3 similar to their average values and with a dosage of 40 kg/m3 were 31% higher than their average values. The compressive strength of the steel fibre-reinforced concrete was slightly higher compared to plain concrete, except specimens with the dosage of 40 kg/m3 where the increase was 30%.

  13. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  14. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  15. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  16. Nanotube reinforced thermoplastic polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shofner, Meisha Lei

    The inherent high strength, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity make nanotubes attractive reinforcements for polymer matrix composites. However, the structure that makes them desirable also causes highly anisotropic properties and limited reactivity with other materials. This thesis isolates these problems in two separate studies aimed at improving mechanical properties with single wall nanotube (SWNT) reinforced thermoplastic polymer composites. The two studies demonstrate the effect of solid freeform fabrication (SFF) and chemical functionalization on anisotropy and limited reactivity, respectively. Both studies showed mechanical property improvements. The alignment study demonstrates a maximum increase of 93% in tensile modulus with single wall nanotubes (SWNTs). The chemical functionalization study shows a larger increase in storage modulus for functionalized SWNTs as compared to purified SVWNTs with respective increases of 9% and 44% in storage modulus. Improved interfacial properties are also observed as a decrease in mechanical damping. Maximum property increases in composites are obtained when nanotubes are aligned, requiring additional processing consideration to the anisotropic structure. Melt spinning and extrusion processing effectively align nanotubes, but the end product of these techniques, composite fibers, requires further processing to be incorporated into finished parts. Extrusion-based SFF is a novel technique for processing nanotube reinforced composites because it allows for the direct fabrication of finished parts containing aligned nanotubes. SFF processing produces parts containing preferentially oriented nanotubes with improved mechanical properties when compared to isotropic composites. Functionalization of the nanotube surface disrupts the rope structure to obtain smaller ropes and promote further interfacial bonding. The chemically inert nature of nanotubes resulting from a structure containing few defects and the

  17. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  18. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  19. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  20. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  1. 5. GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL, PIERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL, PIERS AND DETAILS FOR SWIMMING POOL Drawing 103-21 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  2. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  3. Strain rate effects on reinforcing steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Forni, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    It is unquestionable the fact that a structural system should be able to fulfil the function for which it was created, without being damaged to an extent disproportionate to the cause of damage. In addition, it is an undeniable fact that in reinforced concrete structures under severe dynamic loadings, both concrete and reinforcing bars are subjected to high strain-rates. Although the behavior of the reinforcing steel under high strain rates is of capital importance in the structural assessment under the abovementioned conditions, only the behaviour of concrete has been widely studied. Due to this lack of data on the reinforcing steel under high strain rates, an experimental program on rebar reinforcing steels under high strain rates in tension is running at the DynaMat Laboratory. In this paper a comparison of the behaviour in a wide range of strain-rates of several types of reinforcing steel in tension is presented. Three reinforcing steels, commonly proposed by the European Standards, are compared: B500A, B500B and B500C. Lastly, an evaluation of the most common constitutive laws is performed.

  4. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  5. Fracture toughness of steel-fiber-reinforced bone cement.

    PubMed

    Kotha, S P; Li, C; Schmid, S R; Mason, J J

    2004-09-01

    Fractures in the bone-cement mantle (polymethyl methacrylate) have been linked to the failure of cemented total joint prostheses. The heat generated by the curing bone cement has also been implicated in the necrosis of surrounding bone tissue, leading to loosening of the implants. The addition of reinforcements may improve the fracture properties of bone cement and decrease the peak temperatures during curing. This study investigates the changes in the fracture properties and the temperatures generated in the ASTM F451 tests by the addition of 316L stainless steel fibers to bone cement. The influence of filler volume fraction (5-15% by volume) and aspect ratios (19, 46, 57) on the fracture toughness of the acrylic bone cement was assessed. Increasing the volume fraction of the steel fibers resulted in significant increases in the fracture toughness of the steel-fiber-reinforced composite. Fracture-toughness increases of up to 2.63 times the control values were obtained with the use of steel-fiber reinforcements. No clear trend in the fracture toughness was discerned for increasing aspect ratios of the reinforcements. There is a decrease in the peak temperatures reached during the curing of the steel-fiber-reinforced bone cement, though the decrease is too small to be clinically relevant. Large increases in the fatigue life of acrylic bone cement were also obtained by the addition of steel fibers. These results indicate that the use of steel fibers may enhance the durability of cemented joint prostheses. PMID:15293326

  6. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  7. The elevated temperature behavior of particle reinforced Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The elevated temperature modulus, strength and creep of SiC particle reinforced composites produced by the DURALCAN{trademark} are discussed. It is shown that the reinforcing particles provide an increased modulus over the complete temperature range studied, and the temperature dependence of the composite modulus is controlled by the temperature dependence of the matrix modulus. The composite strength decreases with increasing temperature, reflecting softening of the matrix due to over aging, and as a result, is dependent on the thermal stability of the matrix. The particles provide increased creep resistance, and there are differences between the creep of melt processed composites and those produced by powder metallurgy.

  8. Toughened Matrix SiC Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Kiser, James D.

    2005-01-01

    First matrix cracking stress is a critical parameter for application of Sic fiber reinforced composites in highly stressed, environmentally demanding applications such as turbine blades. High matrix fracture toughness is a key property that contributes to high composite fracture stress. Silicon nitride offers reduced matrix elastic modulus, lower coefficient of thermal expansion, and potentially high fracture toughness compared to Sic matrices. All of these factors can be used to advantage to increase matrix fracture stress. As a first model system we are pursuing toughened silicon nitride matrix composites reinforced with SCS-9 fibers. Fabrication is by tape casting the matrix plies and tape lay-up with fiber plies followed by hot pressing at 1800 C. Progress toward this end will be reported.

  9. Estimation of corrosion damage in steel reinforced mortar using waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Henrique; Ervin, Benjamin L.; Kuchma, Daniel A.; Bernhard, Jennifer

    2005-05-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is a chronic infrastructure problem, particularly in areas with deicing salt and marine exposure. To maintain structural integrity, a testing method is needed to identify areas of corroding reinforcement. For purposes of rehabilitation, the method must also be able to evaluate the degree, rate and location of damage. Towards the development of a wireless embedded sensor system to monitor and assess corrosion damage in reinforced concrete, reinforced mortar specimens were manufactured with seeded defects to simulate corrosion damage. Taking advantage of waveguide effects of the reinforcing bars, these specimens were then tested using an ultrasonic approach. Using the same ultrasonic approach, specimens without seeded defects were also monitored during accelerated corrosion tests. Both the ultrasonic sending and the receiving transducers were mounted on the steel rebar. Advantage was taken of the lower frequency (<250 kHz) fundamental flexural propagation mode because of its relatively large displacements at the interface between the reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete. Waveform energy (indicative of attenuation) is presented and discussed in terms of corrosion damage. Current results indicate that the loss of bond strength between the reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete can be detected and evaluated.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  11. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  12. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  13. RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES AT TOP LEFT. CAMERA FACES WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2581. Unknown Photographer, 6/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS. PLACING REINFORCING STEEL AND FORMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS. PLACING REINFORCING STEEL AND FORMS IN GATE CHAMBER. Photocopy of historic photograph (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR photographer, September 26, 1940 - Wickiup Dam, Outlet Works, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  15. DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS, LOOKING UPSTREAM. REINFORCING STEEL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS, LOOKING UPSTREAM. REINFORCING STEEL IN PLACE FOR FLOOR OF STILLING BASIN IN FOREGROUND. Photocopy of historic photograph (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR photographer, June 17, 1940 - Wickiup Dam, Outlet Works, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  16. VIEW OF EAST GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE STEEL REINFORCING RODS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE STEEL REINFORCING RODS PROTRUDING FROM THE BROKEN TOP OF THE RETAINING WALL. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, East Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  18. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized is the progress achieved during the period September 16, 1987 to August 15, l988 on NASA Grant NAG1-724, Fracture Criteria for Discontinuously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites. Appended are copies of three manuscripts prepared under NASA funding during the performance period.

  19. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  20. Neutron imaging of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Wittmann, F. H.; Zhao, T.; Lehmann, E. H.

    2010-04-01

    Service life and durability of reinforced concrete structures have become a crucial issue because of the economical and ecological implications. Service life of reinforced concrete structures is often limited by penetration of water and chemical compounds dissolved in water into the porous cement-based material. By now it is well-known that cracks in reinforced concrete are preferential paths for ingress of aggressive substances. Neutron radiography was successfully applied to study the process of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete. In addition, the effectiveness of integral water repellent concrete to prevent ingress of water and salt solutions was investigated. Results are described in detail in this contribution. It will be shown that neutron radiography is a powerful method to visualize the process of water penetration into cracked and uncracked cement-based materials. On the basis of the obtained experimental data, it is possible to quantify the time-dependent water distributions in concrete with high accuracy and spatial resolution. It is of particular interest that penetration of water and salt solutions into damaged interfaces between concrete and steel can be visualized by means of neutron radiography. Deteriorating processes in cracked reinforced concrete structures can be studied in a completely new way. This advanced technology will help and find adequate ways to improve durability and service life of reinforced concrete structures. This will mean at the same time an essential contribution to improved sustainability.

  1. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  2. CP systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Soltesz, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for cathodic protection (CP) systems in Oregon?s reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. Oregon Department of Transportation (DOT) is investigating ways of monitoring the rebar corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges to identify conditions when protection of the rebar is needed. This approach reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for all environmental conditions, leading Oregon DOT to examine the use of intermittent, galvanic, and constant voltage cathodic protection systems. Results from these types of systems are reported.

  3. Corrosion of Steels in Steel Reinforced Concrete in Cassava Juice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwadare, G. O.; Agbaje, O.

    The corrosion of two types of construction steels, ST60Mn and RST37-2♦, in a low cyanide concentration environment (cassava juice) and embedded in concrete had been studied. The ST60 Mn was found to be more corrosion resistant in both ordinary water and the cassava juice environment. The cyanide in cassava juice does not attack the steel but it provides an environment of lower pH around the steel in the concrete which leads to breakdown of the passivating film provided by hydroxyl ions from cement. Other factors such as the curing time of the concrete also affect the corrosion rates of the steel in the concrete. The corrosion rate of the steel directly exposed to cassava juice i.e., steel not embedded in concrete is about twice that in concrete. Long exposure of concrete structure to cassava processing effluent might result in deterioration of such structures. Careful attention should therefore be paid to disposal of cassava processing effluents, especially in a country like Nigeria where such processing is now on the increase.

  4. Matrix Gla protein reinforces angiogenic resolution.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bikram; Albig, Allan R

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is an ECM molecule commonly associated with dysfunctions of large blood vessels such as arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis. However, the exact role of MGP in the microvasculature is not clear. Utilizing a mouse MGP knockout model we found that MGP suppresses angiogenic sprouting from mouse aorta restricts microvascular density in cardiac and skeletal muscle, and is an endogenous inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. Similarly, morpholino based knockdown of MGP in zebrafish embryos caused a progressive loss of luminal structures in intersegmental vessels, a phenotype reminiscent of Dll4/Notch inhibition. Accordingly, MGP suppressed Notch-dependent Hes-1 promoter activity and expression of Jagged1 mRNA relative to Dll4 mRNA. However, inhibition of BMP but not Notch or VEGF signaling reversed the excessive angiogenic sprouting phenotype of MGP knockout aortic rings suggesting that MGP may normally suppress angiogenic sprouting by blocking BMP signaling. Collectively, these results suggest that MGP is a multi-functional inhibitor of normal and abnormal angiogenesis that may function by coordinating with both Notch and BMP signaling pathways. PMID:23110920

  5. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  6. Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Setlock, John A.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the fabrication of small diameter, multifilament tow fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. Its application has been successfully demonstrated for the Hi-Nicalon/celsian system. Strong and tough celsian matrix composites, reinforced with BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers, have been fabricated by infiltrating the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding the tows on a drum, cutting and stacking of the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from the 0.75BaO-0.25SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 mixed precursor synthesized by solid state reaction from metal oxides. Hot pressing resulted in almost fully dense fiber-reinforced composites. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 vol% of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 percent, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was measured to be 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  7. 10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in Place and with 'Tower for Concrete' in the Background. The function of the 'tower for concrete' is uncertain, but may have to do with the transport of concrete from the point of mixing to the point of use (suggestion by NDOT Bridge Section personnel, February 1990). Original snapshot taken July, 1920. - Riverside Bridge, Spanning Truckee River at Booth Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  8. Tensile flow properties of Al-based matrix composites reinforced with a random planar network of continuous metallic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Boland, F.; Salmon, C.; Delannay, F.; Colin, C.

    1998-11-20

    Squeeze casting was used for processing two new types of composites: pure Al matrix composites reinforced with fibers of Inconel 601, and AS13 (Al-12% Si) matrix composites reinforced with fibers of Inconel 601 or stainless steel 316L. The fibers are continuous with a diameter of 12 {micro}m and their volume fraction in the composites varied from 20 to 80%. The processing conditions were such that no trace of interfacial reaction compound or of matrix precipitate resulting from the dissolution of elements of the fibers could be detected. The quality of the process was attested by Young`s modulus and electrical conductivity measurements. Tensile tests were carried out from room temperature up to 300 C. The composites with the pure Al matrix present a remarkable tensile ductility. They thus constitute convenient materials for assessing continuum plasticity models for composites. Properties of composites with the AS13 matrix are much affected by interface adhesion strength.

  9. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  10. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  11. Interfacial studies in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The major theme of this dissertation is structure/property relationships in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites. Effort has been focused on the interface: interfacial crystallization and fiber/matrix adhesion. Included are investigations on interfacial nucleation and morphology, measurement of fiber/matrix adhesion, effects of interfacial adsorption and crystallization on fiber/matrix adhesion, and composites reinforced with thermotropic liquid crystal copolyester fibers. Crystallization of a copolyester and polybutylene terephthalate with glass, carbon, or aramid fibers has been studied with regard to interfacial morphology. Techniques employed included hot-stage optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Nucleation by the fibers was found to be a general phenomenon. Morphology could be varied by changing the cooling rate. In order to better monitor fiber /matrix adhesion, a buckled plate test has been developed. The test measures transverse toughness as the parameter characterizing interfacial adhesion in unidirectional, continuous-fiber composites. The test is simple to perform yet has advantages over other interfacial evaluation techniques. The buckled plate test was found to be a sensitive measure of fiber/matrix adhesion. The buckled plate test has been used along with the transverse tensile test to examine how interfacial adsorption and crystallization affect fiber/matrix adhesion in polycarbonate/carbon fiber composites. Adsorption was found to be of primary importance in developing adhesion, while crystallization is a secondary effect. The toughness data have been fit successfully for annealing time and temperature dependence. The dependence of adsorption and transverse toughness on matrix molecular weight was found to be large, with higher molecular weights adsorbing more effectively.

  12. Fatigue damage criteria - Matrix, fibers and interfaces of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are projected for use in high temperature, stiffness critical parts that will be subjected to cyclic loadings. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four catagories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples. The emphasis is on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  13. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  14. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  15. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, James A.; Kattamis, Theodoulos; Chambers, Brent V.; Bond, Bruce E.; Varela, Raul H.

    1989-01-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  16. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  17. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  18. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  19. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  20. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  1. Characterization of bond in steel-fiber-reinforced cementitious composites under tensile loads

    SciTech Connect

    Namur, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated was bonding in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composites, like fiber-reinforced mortar. The study was basically analytical, consisting primarily of two analytical models that predict the bond shear stress distribution at the interface between the fibers and the matrix, as well as the normal tensile distributions in the fibers and the matrix. The two models were, however, based on separate assumptions. While the first model assumed a known bond shear stress versus slip relationship at the interface between the fibers and the surrounding matrix, the second model was based on a mechanism of force transfer between the fibers and the matrix, hence circumventing the rather complex task of determining the relationship between the bond stress and the slip for the given type of fiber and matrix. Some applications to this second model, such as the bond modulus, the debonding stress, the length of the debonded zone were also investigated. A theoretical study of the pull-out process of steel fibers in cementitious matrices is included. The problem consisted of relating an idealized bond shear stress versus slip relationship to a pull-out curve. The derivation as based on the assumption that this relationship is linearly elastic-perfectly frictional, and then extended to the case of a fiction decaying linearly with the slip. The problem was subdivided into two components: a primal problem, whereby the pull-out curve is predicted from an assumed bond shear stress-slip relationship, and the dual problem, in which an experimentally obtained pull-out curve was used to predict the interfacial constitutive model, namely the bond-slip curve. Model application was illustrated by three examples of pull-out tests. The pull-out curves obtained in the laboratory, which featured the pull-out force versus the end slip of the pull-out fiber, were used to predict bond shear stress-slip relationships.

  2. Steel reinforcement corrosion detection with coaxial cable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchaidze, Iana; Pommerenke, David; Chen, Genda

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion processes in the steel reinforced structures can result in structural deficiency and with time create a threat to human lives. Millions of dollars are lost each year because of corrosion. According to the U. S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) the average annual cost of corrosion in the infrastructure sector by the end of 2002 was estimated to be $22.6 billion. Timely remediation/retrofit and effective maintenance can extend the structure's live span for much less expense. Thus the considerable effort should be done to deploy corrosion monitoring techniques to have realistic information on the location and the severity of damage. Nowadays commercially available techniques for corrosion monitoring require costly equipment and certain interpretational skills. In addition, none of them is designed for the real time quality assessment. In this study the crack sensor developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology is proposed as a distributed sensor for real time corrosion monitoring. Implementation of this technology may ease the pressure on the bridge owners restrained with the federal budget by allowing the timely remediation with the minimal financial and labor expenses. The sensor is instrumented in such a way that the location of any discontinuity developed along its length can be easily detected. When the sensor is placed in immediate vicinity to the steel reinforcement it is subjected to the same chemical process as the steel reinforcement. And corrosion pitting is expected to develop on the sensor exactly at the same location as in the rebar. Thus it is expected to be an effective tool for active corrosion zones detection within reinforced concrete (RC) members. A series of laboratory tests were conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Nine sensors were manufactured and placed in the artificially created corrosive environment and observed over the time. To induce accelerated corrosion 3% and 5% Na

  3. 77 FR 64127 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... both the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (77 FR 39254, July 2... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from...

  4. 78 FR 55755 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and... from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, primarily provided for in subheadings...

  5. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  6. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  7. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  8. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  9. Effect of Steel Fibres Distribution on Impact Resistance Performance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Beddu, Salmia; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Itam, Zarina; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced with varied thickness and fraction volume subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact resistance SFRC for various slab thickness and fraction volume. Random fibre distribution is the more effective than the top and bottom fibre distribution in terms of absorption of impact energy, crack resistance, the ability to control crack formation and propagation against impact energy.

  10. The Corrosion Effects on the Structural Integrity of Reinforcing Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Ch. Alk.; Michalopoulos, D.; Koutsoukos, P.

    2008-08-01

    An experimental study conducted on 12 mm diameter, artificially corroded BSt500s steel rebars, showed that the mass loss, the fatigue limit, and the life expectancy were reduced according to the level of corrosion. Rebar corrosion has a great impact on the mass loss, mechanical properties, low cycle fatigue (LCF) and there is strong indication that embrittlement takes place. The extended salt-spray exposure enhanced the damage and promoted extended creation of pits and perforations suggesting progressive embrittlement and reduction of the available energy, justified by the SEM micrograph results. The low cycle strain-controlled fatigue testing under ±1, ±2.5, and ±4% constant amplitude strain indicated that the corroded steel bars exhibit gradual reduction in available energy, number of cycles to failure, and load bearing ability. For the ±1% strain level the fatigue limit was reduced considerably as the level of corrosion increased due to mass loss and reduction of the exterior martensitic layer. In addition, a drastic drop in the energy density of the specimens was observed with creation of stress concentration points. At ±2.5% and ±4% strain levels, the fatigue limit was reduced dramatically mainly due to accumulated damage from plastic deformation and minimally due to corrosion. Anti-seismic design that ignores the influence of corrosion and cumulative damage due to plastic deformation, and the mechanical behavior of reinforcing steel during severe ground motion, could lead to unpredictable performance.

  11. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al4C3) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al4C3. Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al4C3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials.

  12. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processes.

  13. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current CVI and PIP processes.

  14. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al(4)C(3)) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al(4)C(3). Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al(4)C(3) also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials. PMID:22571898

  15. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  16. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  17. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic glass matrix composites for use at 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Minford, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    The fabrication and properties of the graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system are described. By reinforcing borosilicate glass with graphite fibers it has been possible to develop a composite whose properties can be compared favorably with resin matrix counterparts. Both high elastic modulus and strength can be obtained and maintained to temperatures of approximately 600 C. In addition, composite dimensional stability is superior to resin or metal matrix systems due to the low thermal expansion behavior of the glass matrix.

  18. A micromorphic model for steel fiber reinforced concrete.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J; Mora, D F; Huespe, A E; Weyler, R

    2012-10-15

    A new formulation to model the mechanical behavior of high performance fiber reinforced cement composites with arbitrarily oriented short fibers is presented. The formulation can be considered as a two scale approach, in which the macroscopic model, at the structural level, takes into account the mesostructural phenomenon associated with the fiber-matrix interface bond/slip process. This phenomenon is contemplated by including, in the macroscopic description, a micromorphic field representing the relative fiber-cement displacement. Then, the theoretical framework, from which the governing equations of the problem are derived, can be assimilated to a specific case of the material multifield theory. The balance equation derived for this model, connecting the micro stresses with the micromorphic forces, has a physical meaning related with the fiber-matrix bond slip mechanism. Differently to previous procedures in the literature, addressed to model fiber reinforced composites, where this equation has been added as an additional independent ingredient of the methodology, in the present approach it arises as a natural result derived from the multifield theory. Every component of the composite is defined with a specific free energy and constitutive relation. The mixture theory is adopted to define the overall free energy of the composite, which is assumed to be homogeneously constituted, in the sense that every infinitesimal volume is occupied by all the components in a proportion given by the corresponding volume fraction. The numerical model is assessed by means of a selected set of experiments that prove the viability of the present approach. PMID:24049211

  19. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  20. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  1. Evaluating cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete using impact-echo testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Feng

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate of the cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete using the impact-echo testing. In order to evaluate the security of the construction, usually need to estimate the cover depth of the reinforced concrete. At present, the examination technique of the cover depth of the reinforced concrete without the steel fiber is mainly applied in the magnetic and electrical methods, its rapid detection and good results. But the research of the reactive powder concrete be gradually progress, with the steel fiber concrete structure will be increased, if should still operate the examination with the magnetic and electrical methods, theoretically the steel fiber will have the interference to its electromagnetism field. Therefore, this research designs four kinds of reinforced concrete plate that include different steel fiber contents, to evaluate test results of estimate of the cover depth of the reinforcing bar. The results showed that: estimate of the cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete reinforcing bar using the impact-echo testing, the variety of the steel fiber content does not have much influence, the test measurement error within ± 10%, and the most important source of uncertainty is the velocity of concrete.

  2. Elasto-plastic analysis of interface layers for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix in metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic fibers induces high thermal stresses in the matrix. Elasto-plastic analyses - with different degrees of simplification and modelization - show that an interface layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the tensile hoop stress in the matrix substantially.

  3. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  4. Role of matrix/reinforcement interfaces in the fracture toughness of brittle materials toughened by ductile reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Abbaschian, R.

    1992-10-01

    Crack interactions with ductile reinforcements, especially behavior of a crack tip at the interface, have been studied using MoSi2 composites reinforced with Nb foils. Effects of fracture energy of interfaces on toughness of the composites have also been investigated. Variation of interfacial bonding was achieved by depositing an oxide coating or by the development of a reaction prod- uct layer between the reinforcement and matrix. Toughness was measured using bend tests on chevron-notched specimens. It has been established that as a crack interacts with a ductile re- inforcement, three mechanisms compcte: interfacial debonding, multiple matrix fracture, and direct crack propagation through the reinforcement. Decohesion length at the matrix/reinforcement interface depends on the predominant mechanism. Furthermore, the results add to the evidence that the extent to which interfacial bonding is conducive to toughness of the composites depends on the criterion used to describe the toughness and that ductility of the ductile reinforcement is also an important factor in controlling toughness of the composites. Loss of ductility of the ductile reinforcement due to inappropriate processing could result in little improvement in tough- ness of the composites.

  5. Matrix cracking initiation stress in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kangutkar, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    One of the important design parameters in CMC's is the matrix cracking initiation stress (MCIS) which corresponds to the stress at which first matrix cracks are observed. Above the MCIS, the fibers will be exposed to the oxidizing environment which may degrade the mechanical property of the fibers and thus of the composite. In this thesis, a systematic study to explore the effects of matrix toughness and inherent strength, fiber diameter, stiffness and volume fraction, temperature and interfacial bonding on the MCIS was carried out. Composites were fabricated using three different matrices - borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass and polycrystalline zirconium silicate (or zircon), and two different reinforcing fibers - an SiC monofilament (140 {mu}m diameter) and an SiC yarn (16 {mu}m diameter). In-situ observations during 3-point bend test inside the SEM indicate that matrix cracking is a local phenomenon and occurs first in the matrix between widest spaced fibers. In all composites the MCIS was found to increase with fiber additions and scaled with the monolithic strength.

  6. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics.

  7. Hot extruded carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc

    2012-10-19

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials were successfully fabricated by mechanical ball milling followed by powder hot extrusion processes. Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs were well dispersed at the boundaries and were aligned with the extrusion direction in the composites obtained. Although only a small quantity of CNTs were added to the composite (1 vol%), the Vickers hardness and the tensile strength were significantly enhanced, with an up to three-fold increase relative to that of pure Al. From the fractography of the extruded Al-CNT composite, several shapes were observed in the fracture surface, and this unique morphology is discussed based on the strengthening mechanism. The damage in the CNTs was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. However, the Al-CNT composite materials were not only strengthened by the addition of CNTs but also enhanced by several synergistic effects. The nanoindentation stress-strain curve was successfully constructed by setting the effective zero-load and zero-displacement points and was compared with the tensile stress-strain curve. The yield strengths of the Al-CNT composites from the nanoindentation and tensile tests were compared and discussed. We believe that the yield strength can be predicted using a simple nanoindentation stress/strain curve and that this method will be useful for materials that are difficult to machine, such as complex ceramics. PMID:23011263

  8. Strength variability in alumina fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurty, U.; Zok, F.W.; Leckie, F.A.; Deve, H.E.

    1997-11-01

    The strength variability of an Al-2% Cu alloy matrix reinforced with 65 vol.% Nextel-610 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers has been investigated, with the aim of identifying and separating the contributions associated with the variabilities in both the fiber bundle strength and the fiber volume fraction. Strength distributions have been measured using three test geometries, including three- and four-point flexure and unixaxial tension. The measured distributions are rationalized on the basis of a fiber strength distribution that follows Weibull statistics and a fiber volume fraction distribution characterized by a Gaussian. The fiber bundle strength distribution is found to be extremely narrow, with a Weibull modulus in the range of {approximately}50--60. In addition, the coefficient of variation in the fiber volume fraction distribution is inferred to be {approximately}6%; by comparison, measurements made on relatively large specimens yield a coefficient of variation of {approximately}3%. The differences in these values are attributed to local volume fraction variations which are not detectable by the global measurements. The measured strengths are compared with the predicted values based on the theoretical work of Curtin and co-workers, incorporating the effects of local load sharing between broken fibers and their neighbors. Good correlations are obtained between the experimental data and the model predictions.

  9. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  10. Alternate anode materials for cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    2001-01-01

    Consumable and non-consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection (CP) systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where deicing salts are employed. The anode materials included Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, Al-12Zn-0.2In, and cobalt-sprayed Ti. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. Impressed current CP anodes were electrochemically aged at a current density 15 times as great as that used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in typical coastal ICCP systems (2.2 mA/m2 based on anode area). Increasing moisture at the anode-concrete interface reduced the operating voltage of all the anodes. Bond strength between the anodes and concrete decreased with electrochemical aging. The Zn-15Al and Al-12Zn-0.2In anodes provided adequate protection in GCP but their life was too short in the accelerated ICCP tests. Zinc had an adequate life in ICCP tests but was inadequate as a galvanic anode. Zinc-hydrogel performed well in both tests when the hydrogel was kept moist. Titanium was an excellent anode for ICCP, but is not suitable for GCP.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  12. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  13. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  14. Reuse of EAF Slag as Reinforcing Filler for Polypropylene Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, G.; Agnelli, S.; Gelfi, M.; Ramorino, G.; Roberti, R.

    2015-06-01

    Electric-arc furnace (EAF) slag, the by-product of steel fabricated at the EAF, is in most cases still sent to dumps, with serious environmental consequences. This work shows an innovative, economically convenient application for EAF slag: its use as reinforcing filler for polypropylene. Composites based on polypropylene containing 10-40 wt.% of EAF slag particles were prepared by melt compounding followed by injection molding. A physical-chemical analysis of the EAF slag was performed to determine microstructural features and main component phases. Leaching tests demonstrated that, although EAF slag can release small amounts of toxic elements, such as heavy metals, incorporating such material into the polymeric matrix immobilizes the heavy metals inside that matrix. The mechanical characterization of the polymer-based composites was performed. Incorporating EAF slag particles raises the Young's modulus and the tensile strength at yield, whereas elongation at break and the impact strength of the polymer-based composite are significantly reduced only when large amounts of filler are added, i.e., 30% or more.

  15. 78 FR 73838 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Investigations, 78 FR 60831 (October 2, 2013) (Initiation Notice). \\2\\ See Memorandum for the Record from Paul... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary... Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated a countervailing duty investigation on steel...

  16. 77 FR 71631 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... electronic filing have been amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Steel...

  17. Evaluation of passivation method and corrosion inhibitors for steel-reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard; Lee, K. Wayne; Cao, Yong

    1999-02-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel due to the ingression of chloride ions from deicing salt and/or seawater has been a major cause of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Typically reinforcing steel is protected from corrosion by the formation of passive film because of highly alkaline concrete environment. The film can be damaged with the introduction of chloride ions to concrete, then corrosion occurs. There are mainly three approaches to tackle this problem, i.e., protective coating, cathodic protection and corrosion inhibitors.

  18. Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts

    SciTech Connect

    C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  19. Nondestructive inspection of corrosion and delamination at the concrete-steel reinforcement interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tri Huu

    The proposed study explores the feasibility of detecting and quantifying corrosion and delamination (physical separation) at the interface between reinforcing steel bars and concrete using ultrasonic guided waves. The problem of corrosion of the reinforcing steel in structures has increased significantly in recent years. The emergence of this type of concrete deterioration, which was first observed in marine structures and chemical manufacturing plants, coincided with the increased applications of deicing salts (sodium and calcium chlorides) to roads and bridges during winter months in those states where ice and snow are of major concern. Concrete is strengthened by the inclusion of the reinforcement steel such as deformed or corrugated steel bars. Bonding between the two materials plays a vital role in maximizing performance capacity of the structural members. Durability of the structure is of concern when it is exposed to aggressive environments. Corrosion of reinforcing steel has led to premature deterioration of many concrete members before their design life is attained. It is therefore, important to be able to detect and measure the level of corrosion in reinforcing steel or delamination at the interface. The development and implementation of damage detection strategies, and the continuous health assessment of concrete structures then become a matter of utmost importance. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a nondestructive testing technique to quantify the amount of corrosion in the reinforcing steel. The guided mechanical wave approach has been explored towards the development of such methodology. The use of an embedded ultrasonic network for monitoring corrosion in real structures is feasible due to its simplicity. The ultrasonic waves, specifically cylindrical guided waves can p ropagate a long distance along the reinforcing steel bars and are found to be sensitive to the interface conditions between steel bars and concrete. Ultrasonic

  20. A method for measuring residual strains in fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurty, U.; Dary, F.C.; Zok, F.W.

    1996-08-01

    A new method for measuring the residual fiber strains in fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites has been developed. The method involves selectively etching the matrix over a prescribed length of composite and subsequently measuring the extension of the relaxed fibers relative to neighboring fibers that are still embedded within the matrix material. The extensions are measured using confocal microscopy. The method is demonstrated on three unidirectionally reinforced composites with varying fiber volume fractions. The effects of specimen tilt and fiber splaying following dissolution on the measured fiber extensions are analyzed. The residual fiber strains are rationalized on the basis of the thermoelastic properties of the constituents through a concentric cylinder model. The current method can be applied to other metal matrix composites reinforced with large diameter (monofilament) fibers, provided the matrix can be selectively etched.

  1. Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Hoffmann, Ernst

    2008-02-05

    Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

  2. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of TiB2 Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Gautam, Gaurav; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Mohan, Anita; Mohan, Sunil

    2015-09-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites (AMCs) are developed to meet the demands of light weight high performance materials in aerospace, automotive, marine and other applications. The properties of AMCs can be tailored suitably by combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. AMCs are one of the most attractive alternatives for the manufacturing of light weight and high strength parts due to their low density and high specific strength. There are various techniques for preparing the AMCs with different reinforcement particles. In AMCs, the reinforcements are usually in the form of metal oxides, carbides, borides, nitrides and their combination. Among the various reinforcements titanium di-boride (TiB2) is of much interest due to its excellent stiffness, hardness, and wear resistance. This paper attempts to provide an overview to explore the possibilities of synthesizing titanium di-boride reinforced AMCs with different techniques. The mechanical and tribological properties of these composites have been emphasized to project these as tribo-materials.

  4. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  5. Effect of reinforcement and fiber-matrix interface on dynamic fracture of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental technique of dynamic photoelasticity coupled with high speed photography has been used to study the interaction of running cracks with brittle and ductile fibers embedded in a brittle polymeric matrix. The effect of reinforcement and the fiber-matrix interface on dynamic stress intensity factor, crack bridging phenomena, crack surface morphology and toughening mechanisms occurring during dynamic fracturing of reinforced brittle matrix composites has been investigated. It is found that reinforcement reduces the crack velocity and the stress intensity factor. Thus the energy supplied to the crack tip is reduced resulting in reduction of the crack jump distance. Fiber pullout experiments were done to characterize the fiber-matrix interface. Rapid pullout results in an increase in interface shear strength. For rapid pullout of fibers the difference between maximum pullout loads. for well and weakly bonded fibers, is much smaller than for very slow pullout. A fiber-matrix interface which is weaker in the vicinity of the crack path, termed the partly debonded interface, produces higher crack closing forces and lower stress intensity factor compared to well bonded fibers. The former interface condition results in low fracture energy and shorter crack jump compared to the later. The interface condition significantly affects the fracture surface morphology. The fracture surface roughness is lower for reinforced materials compared to monolithic. Further the partly debonded fibers result in lower surface roughness compared to the well bonded fibers. Inclined fibers with various interface conditions have no significant effect on the stress intensity factor. The fiber debonded length, however, decreases, as compared to fibers which are aligned with the loading direction, due to the kinking of the fibers.

  6. Particle denuded zones in alumina reinforced aluminum matrix composite weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Chidambaram, A.; Bhole, S.D.

    1996-08-01

    The Welding Institute of Canada (WIC), Ontario, has been studying the weldability of different DURALCAN MMC`s. Research on alumina reinforced (20 vol.%) 6061 Al alloy GTA welds showed satisfactory tensile and yield strengths (0.2% Proof Stress) but the welds failed to pass the bend test requirements with fracture taking place in the relatively brittle heat affected zone (HAZ). Further, the welds were characterized by a region which was devoid of reinforcement particles adjacent to the fusion lines. The present study was undertaken to try and explain the formation of this particle denuded zone (PDZ) at the fusion lines.

  7. Fracture Analysis of Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Cornie, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A fracture analysis of highly loaded particulate reinforced composites was performed using laser moire interferometry to measure the displacements within the plastic zone at the tip of an advancing crack. Ten castings were made of five different particulate reinforcement-aluminum alloy combinations. Each casting included net-shape specimens which were used for the evaluation of fracture toughness, tensile properties, and flexure properties resulting in an extensive materials properties data. Measured fracture toughness range from 14.1 MPa for an alumina reinforced 356 aluminum alloy to 23.9 MPa for a silicon carbide reinforced 2214 aluminum alloy. For the combination of these K(sub Ic) values and the measured tensile strengths, the compact tension specimens were too thin to yield true plane strain K(sub Ic) values. All materials exhibited brittle behavior characterized by very small tensile ductility suggesting that successful application of these materials requires that the design stresses be below the elastic limit. Probabilistic design principles similar to those used with ceramics are recommended when using these materials. Such principles would include the use of experimentally determined design allowables. In the absence of thorough testing, a design allowable stress of 60 percent of the measured ultimate tensile stress is recommended.

  8. Microstructural factors controlling the strength and ductility of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorca, J.; González, C.

    1998-01-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the mechanical response in tension of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites. The microstructure of the composite is represented as a three-dimensional array of hexagonal prisms with one reinforcement at the centre of each prism. The shape, volume fraction and state (either intact or broken) of the reinforcement is independent for each cell, so the interaction among all these factors could be studied. The tensile response of the composite is determined from the behaviour of the intact and damaged cells, the fraction of damaged cells being calculated on the assumption that the reinforcement strength follows the Weibull statistics. The model is used to determine the microstructural factors which provide optimum behaviour from the point of view of the tensile strength and ductility. The analyses included the effect of the matrix and reinforcement properties, the reinforcement volume fraction, the interaction between reinforcements of different shape and the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcements within the composite.

  9. Toughening of a particulate-reinforced/ceramic-matrix composite. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, M.; Hayashi, S.; Kobayashi, A.S.; Yoon, H.S.

    1989-09-01

    The toughening mechanism of particulate-reinforced/ceramic-matrix composites was attributed to the thermal residual-stress field induced by the differential thermal expansions of the matrix and the particulate when the composite is cooled from the processing to room temperature. The measured increase 77% in toughness in a TiB{sub 2}-particulate/SiC-matrix ceramic composite compared well with the predicted increase of 52%.

  10. 75 FR 7562 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ..., Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review in Part, and Determination To Revoke in Part, 70 FR... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision... certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey covering the period of review (POR) of April...

  11. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  12. Effect of Alloying Elements on Tensile Properties, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of Reinforcing Bar Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, B. K.; Srikanth, S.; Sahoo, G.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of copper, phosphorus, and chromium present in a semikilled reinforcing bar steel produced by in-line quenching [thermomechanical treatment (TMT)] process on the tensile properties, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of steel in simulated chloride environment has been investigated. The results have been compared with that of a semikilled C-Mn reinforcing bar steel without these alloying elements produced by the same process route. Though the amount of phosphorus (0.11 wt.%) was higher than that specified by ASTM A 706 standard, the Cu-P-Cr steel exhibited a composite microstructure, and good balance of yield stress, tensile stress, elongation, and ultimate tensile to yield stress ratio. Two conventional test methods, namely, the salt fog, and potentiodynamic polarization tests, were used for the corrosion test. The rust formed on Cu-P-Cr steel was adherent, and was of multiple colors, while the corrosion products formed on the C-Mn steel were weakly adherent and relatively darker blue. Also, the free corrosion potential of the Cu-P-Cr steel was nobler, and the corrosion current was markedly lower than that of a C-Mn rebar. The Cu-P-Cr steel did not develop any pits/deep grooves on its surface even after the prolonged exposure to salt fog. The improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr steel has been attributed to the presence of copper, phosphorus, and small amount of chromium in the dense, adherent rust layer on the surface of reinforcing steel bar. A schematic mechanism of charge transfer has been proposed to explain the improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr alloyed TMT rebar.

  13. Fatigue of continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    Several lay-ups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites were investigated. Static and fatigue tests were conducted for both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 fibers is the controlling factor in fatigue life. The static and fatigue strength of these materials is shown to be dependent on the level of residual stresses and the fiber/ matrix interfacial strength. Fatigue tests of notched specimens showed that cracks can initiate and grow many fiber spacings in the matrix material without breaking fibers. These matrix cracks can significantly reduce the residual strength of notched composite.

  14. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing steel in place prior to pouring concrete for biparting doors between hot shop and special equipment service (SES) room. Facing north. Hot shop to left, SES room to right. slot for north half of door shows at upper left of view. Date: May 21, 1954. INEEL negative no. 10548 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Effect of fiber reinforcements on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermo-oxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. A compilation of some results from these studies is presented, and this information shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various polymer matrix composites. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material that was used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-40R graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. The Celion 6000/PMR-15 bond is very tight but the T-40/PMR-15 bond is less tight. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  16. Numerical exploration into the potential of tungsten reinforced CuCrZr matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohe, Jörg; Fliegener, Sascha; Findeisen, Claudio; Reiser, Jens; Widak, Verena; Rieth, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The present study provides a numerical investigation into the potential of tungsten reinforced CuCrZr materials in order to overcome their limited performance at higher temperatures. Metal matrix composites including (i) particle reinforced microstructures, (ii) short fiber reinforced microstructures with both randomly orientated and (iii) aligned fibers as well as (iv) laminates consisting of stacked tungsten and CuCrZr layers are considered. The numerical analysis is performed by means of an energy based homogenization procedure in conjunction with a finite element analysis of representative volume elements for the respective microstructures. The results of the screening analysis reveal a distinct improvement of the mechanical properties of CuCrZr materials by the tungsten reinforcements even for moderate tungsten volume fractions. In a comparison of the different microstructures, the ordered microstructures, i.e. laminates and the aligned short fiber reinforced composites in most cases outperform their disordered counterparts.

  17. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  19. Mechanisms controlling fatigue damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Damage in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composite materials can be quite complex since there are a number of different constituents (fiber, matrix, and the fiber/matrix interface) that can fail. Multidirectional lay-ups have an even greater number of possible damage orientations and mechanisms. Based on the simplifying assumption of equivalent constituent strain states in the absence of damage, a strain based failure criteria may be applied to determine when and where initial damage will occur. Based on the relative strain to fatigue failure of the fiber and matrix, the possible damage mechanisms of an MMC can be grouped into three categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, and (3) self-similar damage growth. A fourth type of damage development, fiber/matrix interface failure, is dependent on the relative strength of the fiber/matrix interface and the matrix yield strength. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  20. Al-based metal matrix composites reinforced with nanocrystalline Al-Ti-Ni particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudino, S.; Ali, F.; Surreddi, K. B.; Prashanth, K. G.; Sakaliyska, M.; Eckert, J.

    2010-07-01

    Al-based metal matrix composites containing different volume fractions of nanocrystalline Al70Ti20Ni10 reinforcing particles have been produced by powder metallurgy and the effect of the volume fraction of reinforcement on the mechanical properties of the composites has been studied. Room temperature compression tests reveal a considerable improvement of the mechanical properties as compared to pure Aluminum. The compressive strength increases from 155 MPa for pure Al to about 200 and 240 MPa for the samples with 20 and 40 vol.% of reinforcement, respectively, while retaining appreciable plastic deformation with a fracture strain ranging between 43 and 28 %.

  1. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  2. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  3. Hi Nicalon{trademark} SiC fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tredway, W.K.

    1996-12-31

    A multi-year research program was conducted by a team consisting of Nippon Carbon Corporation, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), the University of Tokyo, and the University of Delaware to study and analyze basic mechanisms of failure in SiC fiber reinforced glass matrix composites. This paper presents the results of one portion of this investigation performed by UTRC that studied the mechanical performance and in-situ carbon interfacial layer formation characteristics of glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites reinforced with Hi Nicalon{trademark} SiC fiber. The fiber was produced by Nippon Carbon Corp. and was supplied to UTRC for their use on the program.

  4. Experimental and analytical behavior of strengthened reinforced concrete columns with steel angles and strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Essam S.; Al-Tersawy, Sherif H.

    2014-06-01

    The need of strengthening reinforced concrete columns, due to loss of strength and/or stiffness, is an essential requirement due to variation of the loads and environmental conditions applied on these columns. Steel jackets around the reinforced concrete (RC) columns are usually made by means of steel plates covering all over the column surface area. For the value of engineering purposes, another technique was developed using steel angles at the corners of the RC columns connected with discrete steel strips. In this paper, an experimental program is designed to evaluate the improvement in load-carrying capacity, stiffness and ductility of strengthened RC columns, concomitant with steel angles and strips. Despite of prevailing a substantially increased loading capacity and strength a pronounced enhancement in ductility and stiffness has been reported. A need for experimental test results with low value of concrete strength to mimic the local old-age structures condition that required strengthening in local countries. Seven columns specimens are tested to evaluate the strength improvement provided by steel strengthening of columns. The method of strengthened steel angles with strips is compared with another strengthening technique. This technique includes connected and unconnected steel-casing specimens. The observed experimental results describe load-shortening curves, horizontal strains in stirrups and steel strips, as well as description of failure mode. The extra-confinement pressure, due to existence of steel cage, of the strengthened RC column can be also observed from experimental results. The code provisions that predict the load-carrying capacity of the strengthened RC composite column has a discrepancy in the results. For this reason, an analytical model is developed in this paper to compare the code limit with experimental observed results. The proposed model accounts for the composite action for concrete confinement and enhancement of the local buckling

  5. Evaluation of several micromechanics models for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Birt, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic experimental evaluation of whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites was conducted to assess the variation in tensile properties with reinforcement type, volume fraction, and specimen thickness. Each material was evaluated in three thicknesses, 1.8, 3.18, and 6.35 mm, to determine the size, distribution, and orientation of the reinforcements. This information was used to evaluate several micromechanical models that predict composite moduli. The longitudinal and transverse moduli were predicted for reinforced aluminum. The Paul model, the Cox model and the Halpin-Tsai model were evaluated. The Paul model gave a good upper bound prediction for the particulate reinforced composites but under predicted whisker reinforced composite moduli. The Cox model gave good moduli predictions for the whisker reinforcement, but was too low for the particulate. The Halpin-Tsai model gave good results for both whisker and particulate reinforced composites. An approach using a trigonometric projection of whisker length to predict the fiber contribution to the modulus in the longitudinal and transverse directions was compared to the more conventional lamination theory approach.

  6. Role of interfacial and matrix creep during thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, I.

    2000-03-14

    A uni-dimensional micro-mechanical model for thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites is developed. The model treats the fiber and matrix as thermo-elastic and thermo-elasto-plastic-creeping solids, respectively, and allows the operation of multiple matrix creep mechanisms at various stages of deformation through the use of unified creep laws. It also incorporates the effect of interfacial sliding by an interface-diffusion-controlled diffusional creep mechanism proposed earlier (Funn and Dutta, Acta mater., 1999, 47, 149). The results of thermal cycling simulations based on a graphite fiber reinforced pure aluminum-matrix composite were compared with experimental data on a P100 graphite-6061 Al composite. The model successfully captured all the important features of the observed heating/cooling rate dependence, strain hysteresis, residual permanent strain at the end of a cycle, as well as both intrusion and protrusion of the fiber-ends relative to the matrix at the completion of cycling. The analysis showed that the dominant deformation mechanism operative in the matrix changes continually during thermal cycling due to continuous stress and temperature revision. Based on these results, a framework for the construction of a transient deformation mechanism map for thermal excursions of continuous fiber composites is proposed.

  7. Preparation and Characteristics of Al Matrix Composites Reinforced with ZnWO4 Coated (WO3p + ABOw) Hybrid Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. C.; Cao, G. J.; Fan, G. H.; Wang, L. P.; Geng, L.

    2013-02-01

    In this article, a ZnWO4 coating was prepared successfully on the surfaces of WO3 particulates and Al18B4O33 whiskers by a chemical precipitation method. Then the Al matrix composite with coated reinforcements was fabricated by a squeeze casting technique. Scanning electronic microscope analysis shows that a thin coating is coated on the surfaces of reinforcements. Differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the Zn(OH)2 decomposes at 248°C and that the ZnWO4 is produced by reaction WO3 with ZnO at 716°C. Transmission electronic microscope and XRD analysis show that the coating of ZnWO4 is effective to prevent interfacial reaction between the WO3 particle and the Al matrix. The mechanical property testing shows that the ultimate tensile strength, elastic modulus, and elongation of the hybrid composites with coated reinforcements are improved greatly by introduction of ZnWO4 coating.

  8. 76 FR 48802 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Determination To Revoke in Part, 73 FR 66218 (Nov. 7, 2008). The period of review (POR) is April 1, 2006... Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). This clarification... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended...

  9. 78 FR 68090 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of September 11, 2013 (78 FR 55755). The... authority of Title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930 have been tolled by 16 days. 78 FR 64011, October 25, 2013... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey Determinations On the basis of the record...

  10. Practical experience of steel fiber reinforced wet shotcrete in large underground construction projects

    SciTech Connect

    Garshol, K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper discusses advantages of SFRS (steel fiber reinforced shotcrete) in underground construction projects, including trends in rock support design; quality and durability of wet mix shotcrete; advantages in safety and working environment and the technical properties of SFRS. Key data from cases illustrate the above. Cost and time factors are highlighted.

  11. Driving Energy of Reinforcing Steel Bar for Discriminating Background Medium of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Ryo; Motooka, Seiichi

    2008-05-01

    A method for discriminating the background media of concrete using the quality factor of elastic waves multireflected in the concrete was proposed. A reinforcing steel bar buried inside the concrete is employed as a sound source driven by the induction of impact electromagnetic field radiated from a spiral coil placed on the surface of the concrete. In this paper, the appropriate energy for driving the reinforcing steel bar, to obtain stable quality factors with clear differences between different background media, is studied experimentally. With various driving energies, multireflected elastic waves corresponding to three types of background medium, air, sand, and water, are measured. The quality factors are calculated by the linear predictive coefficient analysis method. The results show that the quality factors tend to increase when the driving energy is at its lower region, and they remain comparatively stable when the driving energy is higher than a certain value. For reinforcing steel bars with different diameters, the curves of quality factors versus driving energies agree well by introducing a newly defined volume-normalized driving energy. For the reinforcing steel bar of 13 mm diameter, the appropriate driving energy for background media discrimination is approximately 0.5 J.

  12. Field performance of sprayed zinc anodes in controlling corrosion of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnea, J.

    1998-12-31

    The deterioration of concrete structures often results from the corrosion of their steel reinforcement. Cathodic protection (CP) is a proven means to stop rebar corrosion. One anode material gaining acceptance in the infrastructure corrosion fight is zinc thermal spray coating. This paper discusses an investigation of such CP systems.

  13. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  14. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  15. Effect of Fiber Poisson Contraction on Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical methodology has been developed to investigate the effect of fiber Poisson contraction on matrix multicracking evolution of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The modified shear-lag model incorporated with the Coulomb friction law is adopted to solve the stress distribution in the interface slip region and intact region of the damaged composite. The critical matrix strain energy criterion which presupposes the existence of an ultimate or critical strain energy limit beyond which the matrix fails has been adopted to describe matrix multicracking of CMCs. As more energy is placed into the composite, matrix fractures and the interface debonding occurs to dissipate the extra energy. The interface debonded length under the process of matrix multicracking is obtained by treating the interface debonding as a particular crack propagation problem along the fiber/matrix interface. The effects of the interfacial frictional coefficient, fiber Poisson ratio, fiber volume fraction, interface debonded energy and cycle number on the interface debonding and matrix multicracking evolution have been analyzed. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data of unidirectional SiC/CAS, SiC/CAS-II and SiC/Borosilicate composites.

  16. A compliant, high failure strain, fibre-reinforced glass-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    A glass-matrix composite reinforced by discontinuous graphite fibers was produced by hot pressing glass-powder-impregnated two-dimensional arrays of in-plane randomly oriented graphite fibers held together by approximately 5-10% by weight of organic binder (generally polyester). The composite tensile behavior is characterized by a highly nonlinear stress-strain curve which differs markedly from that of either unreinforced glass or a similarly reinforced epoxy-matrix composite. By virtue of this nonlinearity, the composite is able to redistribute applied stresses to achieve a high load-carrying capacity. The fibrous microstructure and the low fiber-matrix bond provide a mechanism for achieving high fracture toughness and unusually high compliance. For a 96%-silica-matrix composite, the strength is retained to over 1000 C.

  17. Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Steel Reinforcement in Concrete — a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Ghoreishiamiri, Seyedmojtaba; Ismail, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Reinforced concrete is one of the widely used construction materials for bridges, buildings, platforms and tunnels. Though reinforced concrete is capable of withstanding a large range of severe environments including marine, industrial and alpine conditions, there are still a large number of failures in concrete structures for many reasons. Either carbonation or chloride attack is the main culprit which is due to depassivation of reinforced steel and subsequently leads to rapid steel corrosion. Among many corrosion prevention measures, application of corrosion inhibitors play a vital role in metal protection. Numerous range of corrosion inhibitors were reported for concrete protection that were also used commercially in industries. This review summarizes the application of natural products as corrosion inhibitors for concrete protection and also scrutinizes various factors influencing its applicability.

  18. Co-extrusion of Discontinuously, Non-centric Steel-reinforced Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Foydl, A.; Haase, M.; Khalifa, N. Ben; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2011-05-04

    The process of manufacturing discontinuously non-centric steel reinforced aluminum by means of co-extrusion has been examined. By this process semi-finished reinforced profiles can be fabricated for further treatment through forging techniques. Therefore, steel reinforcement elements consisting of E295GC were inserted into conventional aluminum billets and co-extruded into two different solid profiles; a rectangle one by an extrusion ratio of 10.1:1 and a round one by 4.8:1. The used aluminum alloy is EN AW-6060. The billet temperature as well as the ram speed were varied to investigate their influence on the position of the reinforcement elements inside the strand. The measurement was done by a video measurement system, called Optomess A250, after milling off the strand. The distances between the elements in longitudinal direction were nearly constant, apart from the rear part of the strand. The same was observed for the distance of the steel elements to the profile edge. This due to the inhomogeneous material flow in the transverse weld, related to the billet-to-billet extrusion. The rotation of the reinforcement elements occurs because the elements flow nearby the shear zone. Further, micrographs were made to investigate the embedding situation and the grain size distribution. The embedding of the reinforcement elements were good in the solid round profile, but in the rectangle profile were found some kind of air pocket. The grain size of the aluminum alloy close to the steel elements is much smaller than in the other parts of the solid round profile.

  19. Comparative investigation of corrosion resistance of steel reinforcement in alinite and Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Kostogloudis, G.C.; Kalogridis, D.; Ftikos, C.; Malami, C.; Georgali, B.; Kaloidas, V.

    1998-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of steel-reinforced mortar specimens made from alinite cement was investigated using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) specimens as reference. The specimens were prepared and exposed in three different environments: continuous exposure in tap water, interrupted exposure in tap water, and interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution. The steel weight loss and the half cell potential were measured vs. exposure time, up to the age of 12 months. Pore solution extraction and analysis and porosity determination were also performed. In continuous exposure in tap water, alinite cement provided adequate protection against corrosion. In interrupted exposure in tap water, a higher corrosion was observed for alinite cement compared to OPC. In the case of interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution, the simultaneous action of free chlorides and oxygen resulted in the depassivation of steel reinforcing bars in alinite and Portland cement mortars, and led to severe corrosion effect.

  20. Prospects of increasing the strength of aluminum by reinforcing it with stainless steel wire (a review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Ivanova, V. S.; Kopev, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental strength of aluminum reinforced with stainless steel wire is analyzed. Various methods of producing the composite material and it's static and cyclical strengths are considered. The reinforcement of aluminum with stainless steel wire was accomplished from the perspective of increasing the specific strength of aluminum and it's alloys, increasing the strength of the material with respect to high and low temperatures, as well as increasing the cyclical strength. The production of the composite aluminum-stainless steel wire material with approximated or calculated strengthening is possible by any of the considered methods. The selection of the proper production technology depends on precise details and conditions of application of the material.

  1. Internal impedance of steel-reinforced helically stranded conductors at commercial frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkushev, A. G.; Elagin, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    An original simplified mathematical model is proposed that describes the distribution of a harmonic electromagnetic field at a commercial frequency in steel-reinforced high-voltage cables with helically stranded single-layer winding. In the framework of the idealized physical concepts on which the proposed model is based, stranded conductors are treated as an anisotropic conducting layer. It is shown that taking into account the helical twist of conductors leads to the appearance of an axial magnetic field, the presence of which can significantly influence the level of ac losses. The model has been used to calculate the dependence of the internal impedance on the magnetic permeability of the steel core for commercial AS-70 grade steel-reinforced stranded aluminum cable. The results are compared to those obtained using a hollow cylinder model and full-scale numerical calculations using the finite element method.

  2. Structural Evolution of Silicon Oxynitride Fiber Reinforced Boron Nitride Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunrong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Xie, Zhengfang; Shao, Changwei

    2016-02-01

    The structural evolution of a silicon oxynitride fiber reinforced boron nitride matrix (Si-N-Of/BN) wave-transparent composite at high temperatures was investigated. When heat treated at 1600 °C, the composite retained a favorable bending strength of 55.3 MPa while partially crystallizing to Si2N2O and h-BN from the as-received amorphous structure. The Si-N-O fibers still performed as effective reinforcements despite the presence of small pores due to fiber decomposition. Upon heat treatment at 1800 °C, the Si-N-O fibers already lost their reinforcing function and rough hollow microstructure formed within the fibers because of the accelerated decomposition. Further heating to 2000 °C led to the complete decomposition of the reinforcing fibers and only h-BN particles survived. The crystallization and decomposition behaviors of the composite at high temperatures are discussed.

  3. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites - An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Results pertaining to graphite reinforced composites containing styrene-terminated oligomers as the matrix material are summarized. The processing parameters are determined and the properties of the resulting composite are evaluated. In terms of solvent impregnation techniques, CH2Cl2 is the preferred solvent due to its easy removal during the prepreg drying and consolidation steps.

  4. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  5. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  6. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  7. Investigation of failure modes in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Moschler, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This experimental study was conducted to investigate the damage progression in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites under tensile loading. As part of this study, the effect of the residual stresses at the fiber-matrix interface on damage progression was evaluated. Composite samples were fabricated from silicon carbide fibers and borosilicate glass matrices. Each glass had a different coefficient of thermal expansion than the fiber and through the variation of this mismatch, the residual stresses at the fiber-matrix interface were varied resulting in different bonding conditions at the fiber-matrix interface. The mechanical properties of the composites were measured using a servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. During these tests, transverse strain reversal was observed that is believed to be caused by axial matrix cracks and fiber-matrix debonding. Tensile tests were conducted on the composites using a constant-load straining device in which damage progression was observed using an optical microscope.

  8. Determination of Material Parameters for Microbuckling Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, M.

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on studying the effect of the constitutive law adopted for a matrix material on the compressive response of a unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite. To investigate this effect, a periodic unit cell model of a unidirectional composite with an initial fiber waviness and inelastic behavior of the matrix was used. The sensitivity of the compressive strength to the hydrostatic pressure, the flow rule and the fiber misalignment angle were presented. The model was verified against an analytical solution and experimental data. Results of this study indicate that a micromechanical model with correctly identified material parameters provides a useful alternative to theoretical models and experimentation.

  9. Fatigue Hysteresis of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-02-01

    When the fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. Under fatigue loading, the stress-strain hysteresis loops appear as fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading/reloading. Due to interface wear at room temperature or interface oxidation at elevated temperature, the interface shear stress degredes with increase of the number of applied cycles, leading to the evolution of the shape, location and area of stress-strain hysteresis loops. The evolution characteristics of fatigue hysteresis loss energy in different types of fiber-reinforced CMCs, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven, have been investigated. The relationships between the fatigue hysteresis loss energy, stress-strain hysteresis loops, interface frictional slip, interface shear stress and interface radial thermal residual stress, matrix stochastic cracking and fatigue peak stress of fiber-reinforced CMCs have been established.

  10. Effect of fiber reinforcement on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermooxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-4OR graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  11. Interfacial reaction in cast WC particulate reinforced titanium metal matrix composites coating produced by laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dejian; Hu, Peipei; Min, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    Laser injection of ceramic particle was conducted to produce particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Cast WC particle (WCp) was used as injection reinforcement to avoid excessive release of carbon atoms into the melt pool. The interfaces and boundaries between WC and Ti matrix were investigated by electron microscopy study. Compared with single crystal WCp, cast WCp was an appropriate solution to control the reaction products (TiC) in the matrix and the total amount of reaction products was significantly reduced. Irregular-shape reaction layers were formed around cast WCp. The reaction layers consist of a W2C layer and a mixed layer of W and TiC. Such reaction layers are effective in load transfer under an external load.

  12. Self-lubricating carbon nanotube reinforced nickel matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, T. W.; Neira, A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Banerjee, R.; Tiley, J.

    2009-07-01

    Nickel (Ni)--multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have been processed in a monolithic form using the laser-engineered net shape (LENS) processing technique. Auger electron spectroscopy maps determined that the nanotubes were well dispersed and bonded in the nickel matrix and no interfacial chemical reaction products were determined in the as-synthesized composites. Mechanisms of solid lubrication have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy spatial mapping of the worn surfaces to determine the formation of tribochemical products. The Ni-CNT composites exhibit a self-lubricating behavior, forming an in situ, low interfacial shear strength graphitic film during sliding, resulting in a decrease in friction coefficient compared to pure Ni.

  13. The influence of matrix microstructure and particle reinforcement on the creep behavior of 2219 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, P. E.; Allison, J. E.; Jones, J. W.

    1993-12-01

    The influence of matrix microstructure and reinforcement with 15 vol pct of TiC particles on the creep behavior of 2219 aluminum has been examined in the temperature range of 150 ‡C to 250 ‡C. At 150 ‡C, reinforcement led to an improvement in creep resistance, while at 250 ‡C, both materials exhibited essentially identical creep behavior. Precipitate spacing in the matrix exerted the predominant influence on minimum creep rate in both the unreinforced and the reinforced materials over the temperature range studied. This behavior and the high-stress dependence of minimum creep rate are explained using existing constant structure models where, in the present study, precipitate spacing is identified as the pertinent substructure dimension. A modest microstructure-independent strengthening from particle reinforcement was observed at 150 ‡C and was accurately modeled by existing continuum mechanical models. The absence of reinforcement creep strengthening at 250 ‡C can be attributed to diffusional relaxation processes at the higher temperature.

  14. Fabrication of fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites by reactive processing

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Horsfall, I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the fabrication by reactive processing of short, and continuous, alumina fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites. The fibre is introduced into the aluminide system to increase toughness and high temperature strength. The short fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a porous preform containing nickel powder and SAFFIL fibre with an aluminium or aluminium alloy melt. The continuous fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a jig containing nickel coated ALMAX fibre. The short fibre reinforced composite (containing 10% and 20% volume fibre) reacted during infiltration with an aluminium melt to form a single phase intermetallic. Using an aluminium-copper melt the intermetallic formation was inhibited and a multi-phase composite was obtained. A preliminary study into reactive processing of this system by utilising a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycle is presented. HIP was required to prevent the formation of porosity due to an imbalance in the diffusive mobility of the various components. It was found that HIP was only effective on canned samples, the preferred encapsulation material being glass. The continuous fibre reinforced composite did not react to an intermetallic phase when infiltrated with an aluminum melt. Use of an aluminum-copper melt resulted in partial nickel-melt reaction producing various nickel-aluminum (-copper) phases. HIP was then used to form a two phase intermetallic matrix with no evidence of fibre damage.

  15. Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites: Influence of Interface Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having 42-45 vol % of uncoated or BN-SIC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01%, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young modulus of the uncoated and coated fiber-reinforced composites were 184 +/- 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of composite with uncoated fibers is due to degradation of the fiber strength from mechanical damage during processing. Because both the coated- and uncoated-fiber-reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SIC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  16. Assessment of Steel Reinforcement Corrosion State by Parameters of Potentiodynamic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajči, Ľudovít; Jerga, Ján

    2015-12-01

    The environment of the steel reinforcement has a significant impact on the durability and service life of a concrete structure. It is not only the presence of aggressive substances from the environment, but also the own composition of concrete mixture. The use of new types of cements, additives and admixtures must be preceded by verification, if they themselves shall not initiate the corrosion. There is a need for closer physical expression of the parameters of the potentiodynamic diagrams allowing reliable assessment of the influence of the surrounding environment on electrochemical behaviour of reinforcement. The analysis of zero retardation limits of potentiodynamic curves is presented.

  17. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  18. Intermittent cathodic protection for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Soltesz, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on Oregon's reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. After a ICCP system is turned off, the rebar in the concrete remains passive and protected for a period of time. Intermittent operation of CP systems is possible when continuous corrosion rate monitoring is used to identify conditions when the CP system needs to be turned on to reestablish protection conditions for the rebar. This approach applies CP protection only when needed and reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for a range of environmental conditions. In doing so, intermittent CP would lower the average current necessary to protect rebar, increase the anode service life, and reduce the lifetime costs for protecting reinforced concrete bridges.

  19. PERFORMANCE OF RC AND FRC WALL PANELS REINFORCED WITH MILD STEEL AND GFRP COMPOSITES IN BLAST EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Garfield; William D. Richins; Thomas K. Larson; Chris P. Pantelides; James E. Blakeley

    2011-06-01

    The structural integrity of reinforced concrete structures in blast events is important for critical facilities. This paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating detailed finite element models that predict the performance of reinforced concrete wall panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The test specimens were 1.2 m square wall panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consists of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bar reinforcement (Type A); FRC panels without additional reinforcement (Type B); FRC panels with steel bar reinforcement (Type C); NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bar reinforcement (Type D); and NWC panels reinforced with steel bar reinforcement and external bidirectional GFRP overlays on both faces (Type E). An additional three Type C panels were used as control specimens (CON). Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. The panels were instrumented with strain gauges, and accelerometers; in addition, pressure sensors and high speed videos were employed during the blast events. Panel types C and E had the best performance, whereas panel type B did not perform well. Preliminary dynamic simulations show crack patterns similar to the experimental results.

  20. Mechanical behavior of a glass-fiber reinforced composite to steel joint for ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Li, Ping; Lin, Zhuang; Yang, Dongmei

    2015-03-01

    The use of a glass-fiber reinforced composite in marine structures is becoming more common, particularly due to the potential weight savings. The mechanical response of the joint between a glass-fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) superstructure and a steel hull formed is examined and subsequently modified to improve performance through a combined program of modeling and testing. A finite-element model is developed to predict the response of the joint. The model takes into account the contact at the interface between different materials, progressive damage, large deformation theory, and a non-linear stress-strain relationship. To predict the progressive failure, the analysis combines Hashin failure criteria and maximum stress failure criteria. The results show stress response has a great influence on the strength and bearing of the joint. The Balsawood-steel interface is proved to be critical to the mechanical behavior of the joint. Good agreement between experimental results and numerical predictions is observed.

  1. Effect of Thickness and Fibre Volume Fraction on Impact Resistance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Usman, Fathoni; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and fibre volume fraction (VF) on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance SFRC against slab thickness and volume fraction. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistances of SFRC against slab thickness. However the impact resistance of SFRC against percentage of volume fraction exhibit a non-linear relationship.

  2. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions (V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction (V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  3. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  4. Effects of manufacturing techniques on the flexural behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Toutanji, H.; Bayasi, Z.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental research investigating the effects of manufacturing techniques on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced concrete. Both the effects of curing environments and that of testing direction relative to casting direction on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete are reported. Specimens were cured in three different environmental conditions: steam, moisture, and air. Results show that steam curing, as compared to moisture curing, does not enhance the flexural strength of steel fibrous concrete but does reduce flexural toughness. As expected, air curing shows detrimental effects on all aspects of the test results, as compared to steam and moisture curing. The flexural behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete is strongly affected by testing direction. When testing direction is perpendicular to casting direction, specimens exhibit reductions in both flexural strength and toughness compared to the case when testing and casting directions are parallel. The effect of testing direction relative to casting direction on flexural strength and toughness increases with increasing the flowability (workability) of the fibrous mixture, which encourages fiber settlement during placement.

  5. Seismic performance of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete composite frame joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Changwang; Jia, Jinqing

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of a composite frame comprised of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete (SRUHSC) columns and steel reinforced concrete (SRC) beams, six interior frame joint specimens were designed and tested under low cyclically lateral load. The effects of the axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio were studied on the characteristics of the frame joint performance including crack pattern, failure mode, ductility, energy dissipation capacity, strength degradation and rigidity degradation. It was found that all joint specimens behaved in a ductile manner with flexural-shear failure in the joint core region while plastic hinges appeared at the beam ends. The ductility and energy absorption capacity of joints increased as the axial load ratio decreased and the volumetric stirrup ratio increased. The displacement ductility coefficient and equivalent damping coefficient of the joints fell between the corresponding coefficients of the steel reinforced concrete (SRC) frame joint and RC frame joint. The axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio have less influence on the strength degradation and more influence on the stiffness degradation. The stiffness of the joint degrades more significantly for a low volumetric stirrup ratio and high axial load ratio. The characteristics obtained from the SRUHSC composite frame joint specimens with better seismic performance may be a useful reference in future engineering applications.

  6. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  7. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  8. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  9. Ultrasonic velocity technique for monitoring property changes in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for measuring ultrasonic velocity was used to monitor changes that occur during processing and heat treatment of a SiC/RBSM composite. Results indicated that correlations exist between the ultrasonic velocity data and elastic modulus and interfacial shear strength data determined from mechanical tests. The ultrasonic velocity data can differentiate strength. The advantages and potential of this nondestructive evaluation method for fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite applications are discussed.

  10. Strong and Tough Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1997-01-01

    Strong, tough and almost fully dense Hi-Nicalon/BN/SiC fiber reinforced celsian matrix composites have been fabricated by impregnation of the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding on a drum, stacking the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from a mixed oxide precursor. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 volume percent of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  11. Characterization of SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using NASA's reaction forming process. Silicon-2 at a percent of niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bi-modal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon and silicon. Fiber push-out tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approx. 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approx. 60 MPa. A typical four point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pull out.

  12. Characterization of SiC Fiber (SCS-6) Reinforced-Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) reinforced-reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using a reaction-forming process. Silicon-2 at.% niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bimodal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon, and silicon. Fiber pushout tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approximately 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approximately 60 MPa. A typical four-point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pullout.

  13. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-01

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  14. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-15

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  15. The oxidative stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Batt, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The environmental stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites is assessed. Loss of composite strength due to oxidative exposure at elevated temperatures under no load, static load and cyclic fatigue as well as due to thermal cycling are all examined. It is determined that strength loss is gradual and predictable based on the oxidation of carbon fibres. The glass matrix was not found to prevent this degradation but simply to limit it to a gradual process progressing from the composite surfaces inward.

  16. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  17. Thermal expansion of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline silver matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Sharma, Vimal; Pal, Hemant

    2014-04-24

    Multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced silver matrix composite was fabricated by novel molecular level mixing method, which involves nucleation of Ag ions inside carbon nanotube dispersion at the molecular level. As a result the carbon nanotubes get embedded within the powder rather than on the surfaces. Micro structural characterization by X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes are homogeneously dispersed and anchored within the matrix. The thermal expansion of the composite with the multiwall nanotube content (0, 1.5 vol%) were investigated and it is found that coefficient of thermal expansion decreases with the addition of multiwall nanotube content and reduce to about 63% to that of pure Ag.

  18. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  19. Effect of fiber shape on mechanical behavior of composite with elastoplastic matrix and SMA reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuping; Dui, Guansuo

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, an equivalent three-phase micromechanical model of composite with an elasto- plastic matrix and shape memory alloy (SMA) reinforcement is developed. Compared with the traditional two-phase method, the interaction among the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase is considered. During applications of the model, the predicted curve shows good agreement with the experimental result. Most attention is given to the effect of fiber shape on the overall response of the composite and the residual stress. It is helpful to design an intelligent composite. PMID:19627851

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Sapphire Reinforced Alumina Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Setlock, John A.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconia coated sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites have been tested both after heat treatment to 1400 C and at temperatures ranging from 800 C to 1200 C in. air. Interfacial shear stress has also been measured with fiber pushout tests performed in air at room temperature, 800 C and 1OOO C. Matrix crack spacing was measured for the tensile tested composites and used to estimate interfacial shear stress up to 1200 C. Electron microscopy was used to determine the source of fiber fracture and to study interfacial failure within the composite.

  1. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  2. Development of High Performance Magnesium Matrix Nanocomposites Using Nano-SiC Particulates as Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M. J.; Ying, W. F.; Wang, X. J.; Zhang, M. F.; Wu, K.

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, magnesium-based composites with three different volume percentages of nano-sized SiC particulates (SiCp) reinforcement were fabricated using a simple and inexpensive technique followed by hot extrusion. Microstructural characterization of the materials revealed uniform distribution of nano-size SiCp and obvious grain refinement. The tensile test result indicates a remarkable improvement on the strength for the as-extruded SiCp/AZ31B nanocomposite, while the elongation to fracture was decreased by comparing with the AZ31B alloy. Although, compared with the as-extruded AZ31B alloy, the ductility of the SiCp-reinforced AZ31B nanocomposite is decreased, but the ductility of the present SiCp-reinforced AZ31B nanocomposite is far higher than that of the conventional micron or submicron SiCp-reinforced magnesium matrix composites. It is concluded that, compared with the larger sized (micron or submicron) particles, the addition of nano SiCp in the AZ31B alloy resulted in the best combination of the strength and ductility. An attempt is made in the present study to correlate the effect of presence of nano-SiCp as reinforcement and its increasing amount with the microstructural and mechanical properties of magnesium.

  3. Matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.

    1994-01-01

    Matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with unbonded frictional interface was studied using fracture mechanics theory. The critical stress for extension of a fiber-bridged crack was analyzed using the stress-intensity approach. The analysis used a new shear-lag formulation of the crack-closure traction applied by the bridging fibers based on the assumption of a constant sliding friction stress over the sliding length of the fiber-matrix interface. The new formulation satisfied two required limiting conditions: (1) when the stress in the bridging fiber approached the far-field applied stress, the crack-opening displacement approached a steady-state upper limit that was in agreement with the previous formulations; and (2) in the limit of zero crack opening, the stress in the bridging fiber approached the far-field fiber stress. This lower limit of the bridging stress was distinctly different from the previous formulations. Numerical calculations using the stress-intensity approach indicated that the critical stress for crack extension decreased with increasing crack length and approached a constant steady-state value for large cracks. The steady-state matrix-cracking stress agreed with a steady-state energy balance analysis applied to the continuum model, but it was slightly less than the matrix-cracking stress predicted by such theories of steady-state cracking as that of Aveston, Cooper, and Kelly (ACK). The origin of this difference and a method for reconciliation of the two theoretical approaches were discussed. The effects of residual stresses and partially bridged crack was studied and incorporated into the calculation of the critical stress for extension of matrix cracks. Matrix cracking was studied in a model, unidirectional SiC (fiber)-reinforced epoxy-alumina matrix composite. The fiber-matrix interface was tailored with coatings to achieve an unbonded frictional interface.

  4. Effect of reinforcement type and porosity on strength of metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. G.; Lal, Achchhe; Menghani, J. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, experimental investigation and the numerical analysis are carried out for strength analysis of A356 alloy matrix composites reinforced with alumina, fly ash and hybrid particle composites. The combined strengthening effect of load bearing, Hall-Petch, Orowan, coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and elastic modulus mismatch is studied for predicting accurate uniaxial stress-strain behavior of A356 based alloy matrix composite. The unit cell micromechanical approach and nine noded isoparametric finite element analysis (FEA) is used to investigate the yield failure load by considering material defect of porosity as fabrication errors in particulate composite. The Ramberg-Osgood approach is considered for the linear and nonlinear relationship between stress and strain of A356 based metal matrix composites containing different amounts of fly ash and alumina reinforcing particles. A numerical analysis of material porosity on the stress strain behavior of the composite is performed. The literature and experimental results exhibit the validity of this model and confirm the importance of the fly ash as the cheapest and low density reinforcement obtained as a waste by product in thermal power plants.

  5. Digital fast neutron radiography of steel reinforcing bar in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitton, K.; Jones, A.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutron imaging has previously been used in order to test for cracks, degradation and water content in concrete. However, these techniques often fall short of alternative non-destructive testing methods, such as γ-ray and X-ray imaging, particularly in terms of resolution. Further, thermal neutron techniques can be compromised by the significant expense associated with thermal neutron sources of sufficient intensity to yield satisfactory results that can often precipitate the need for a reactor. Such embodiments are clearly not portable in the context of the needs of field applications. This paper summarises the results of a study to investigate the potential for transmission radiography based on fast neutrons. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of heterogeneities in concrete, such as reinforcement structures, could be identified on the basis of variation in transmitted fast-neutron flux. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed and the results from these are compared to those arising from practical tests using a 252Cf source. The experimental data have been acquired using a digital pulse-shape discrimination system that enables fast neutron transmission to be studied across an array of liquid scintillators placed in close proximity to samples under test, and read out in real time. Whilst this study does not yield sufficient spatial resolution, a comparison of overall flux ratios does provide a basis for the discrimination between samples with contrasting rebar content. This approach offers the potential for non-destructive testing that gives less dose, better transportability and better accessibility than competing approaches. It is also suitable for thick samples where γ-ray and X-ray methods can be limited.

  6. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  7. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  8. Prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi SMA fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams. The SMA fibres were mixed with 1.5% volume content in a mortar matrix with the compressive strength of 50 MPa. The SMA fibres had an average length of 34 mm, and they were manufactured with a dog-bone shape: the diameters of the end- and middle-parts were 1.024 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Twenty mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B × H × L) were prepared. Two types of tests were conducted. One was to investigate the prestressing effect of the SMA fibres, and the beams with the SMA fibres were heated at the bottom. The other was to assess the bending behaviour of the beams prestressed by the SMA fibres. The SMA fibres induced upward deflection and cracking at the top surface by heating at the bottom; thus, they achieved an obvious prestressing effect. The beams that were prestressed by the SMA fibres did not show a significant difference in bending behaviour from that of the SMA fibre reinforced beams that were not subjected to heating. Stress analysis of the beams indicated that the prestressing effect decreased in relation to the cooling temperature.

  9. The effect of chloride ion concentration gradients on the initiation of localized corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    It has been established that for steel reinforced concrete roads treated with deicing salts or exposed to a marine environment, chloride ions are introduced at the surface of the concrete structure. Two models were discussed in which chloride ion concentration gradients would form in a steel reinforced concrete structure. Electrochemical testing to investigate the models was conducted on plain carbon steel specimens in a simulated concrete environment of saturated calcium hydroxide solution with varying concentrations of sodium chloride. The varying chloride ion concentrations promoted open circuit potential shifts. These potential shifts may lead to galvanic corrosion effects depending on the chloride ion concentration gradients in the structure.

  10. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  11. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  12. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamasri, Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka, Kusnanto

    2011-01-01

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 μm was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA. The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300° C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-Kα radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600° C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm2 and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  14. Strengthening behavior of chopped multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.E.; Bae, D.H.

    2013-09-15

    Strengthening behavior of the aluminum composites reinforced with chopped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or aluminum carbide formed during annealing at 500 °C has been investigated. The composites were fabricated by hot-rolling the powders which were ball-milled under various conditions. During the early annealing process, aluminum atoms can cluster inside the tube due to the diffusional flow of aluminum atoms into the tube, providing an increase of the strength of the composite. Further annealing induces the formation of the aluminum carbide phase, leading to an overall drop in the strength of the composites. While the strength of the composites can be evaluated according to the rule of mixture, a particle spacing effect can be additionally imparted on the strength of the composites reinforced with the chopped MWCNTs or the corresponding carbides since the reinforcing agents are smaller than the submicron matrix grains. - Highlights: • Strengthening behavior of chopped CNT reinforced Al-based composites is investigated. • Chopped CNTs have influenced the strength and microstructures of the composites. • Chopped CNTs are created under Ar- 3% H2 atmosphere during mechanical milling. • Strength can be evaluated by the rule of the mixture and a particle spacing effect.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Jamasri; Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka; Kusnanto

    2011-01-17

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 {mu}m was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA.The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300 deg. C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600 deg. C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm{sup 2} and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  16. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Singh, S P; Singh, A P

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  17. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, S. P.; Singh, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  18. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  19. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  20. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  1. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  2. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  3. Matrix free fiber reinforced polymeric composites via high-temperature high-pressure sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao

    2004-11-01

    A novel manufacturing process called high-temperature high-pressure sintering was studied and explored. Solid fiber reinforced composites are produced by consolidating and compacting layers of polymeric fabrics near their melting temperature under high pressure. There is no need to use an additional matrix as a bonding material. Partial melting and recrystallization of the fibers effectively fuse the material together. The product is called a "matrix free" fiber reinforced composite and essentially a one-polymer composite in which the fiber and the matrix have the same chemical composition. Since the matrix is eliminated in the process, it is possible to achieve a high fiber volume fraction and light weight composite. Interfacial adhesion between fibers and matrix is very good due to the molecular continuity throughout the system and the material is thermally shapeable. Plain woven Spectra RTM cloth made of SpectraRTM fiber was used to comprehensively study the process. The intrinsic properties of the material demonstrate that matrix free SpectraRTM fiber reinforced composites have the potential to make ballistic shields such as body armor and helmets. The properties and structure of the original fiber and the cloth were carefully examined. Optimization of the processing conditions started with the probing of sintering temperatures by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Coupled with the information from structural, morphological and mechanical investigations on the samples sintered at different processing conditions, the optimal processing windows were determined to ensure that the outstanding original properties of the fibers translate into high ballistic performance of the composites. Matrix free SpectraRTM composites exhibit excellent ballistic resistance in the V50 tests conducted by the US Army. In the research, process-structure-property relationship is established and correlations between various properties and structures are understood. Thorough knowledge is

  4. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  5. Model of brittle matrix composite toughening based on discrete fiber reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical approach for the analysis of the effectiveness of fiber reinforcement in brittle matrix composites is presented. The analytical method allows consideration of discrete fiber distribution and examination of the development of crack growth parameters on microscale. The problem associated with the bridging zone development is addressed here; therefore, the bridging zone is considered to be smaller than the main preexisting crack, and the small scale approach is used. The mechanics of the reinforcement is accurately accounted for in the process zone of a growing crack. Closed form solutions characterizing the initial failure process are presented for linear and nonlinear force - fiber pullout displacement relationships. The implicit exact solution for the extended bridging zone is presented as well.

  6. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture and ductility behavior of aluminum matrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement were evaluated. It was found that the elastic modulus of the composites was isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content, however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain is attributed to cleaner matrix powder and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys were compared and have shown that the properties of these low cost, lightweight composites have good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  7. Ultrasonic assessment of service life of concrete structures subject to reinforcing steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udegbunam, Ogechukwu Christian

    Over half of the bridges in the United States were built before 1970. Such bridges and the network of roads that they carry include the Inter State system, which was built as part of the great public works program, following the end of the Second World War. During that era, the emphasis was on strength design and economical construction of new structures, and not much premium was placed on durability and maintainability concerns. Since the end of this construction boom in the early 1970s, the concern for the durability of transportation infrastructure has steadily gained prominence among those agencies that must secure, program and administer funds for maintaining highway networks. The objective of this research was to develop a nondestructive method of assessing the durability of concrete bridge decks susceptible to damage from corrosion of embedded reinforcing steel. This was accomplished by formulating a holistic approach that accounts for the major factors that influence corrosion based deterioration of reinforced concrete. In this approach, the assessment of the durability of concrete bridge decks is based on a model that estimates the time it takes for the cover concrete to fail a result of stresses caused by expansion of reinforcing steel bars, due to corrosion activities. This time to failure is comprised of two distinct periods that must be evaluated before the problem can be solved. The research consisted of an experimental program and an analytical study. In the experimental program concrete specimens were cast and tested to determine their diffusivity and mechanical properties. The diffusivity was used to evaluate the period it takes for corrosion of the reinforcing bars to commence. In the analytical study, the resistance of the concrete structure against the internal forces caused by corrosion was evaluated with the finite element techniques. This resistance was used to evaluate the period defining the failure of the cover concrete. These two periods

  8. Update on sacrificial anode cathodic protection on steel reinforced concrete structures in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.J.; Powers, R.G.; Lasa, I.R.

    1995-12-01

    Various configurations of sacrificial zinc anodes have been successfully used to provide cathodic protection in the tidal zone of steel reinforced concrete structures. Studies conducted by the Florida Department of Transportation have shown that zinc anodes configured in simple fashion can provide long term cathodic protection. These simple systems represent an attractive alternative to conventional cathodic protection where rectifiers are used. This paper discusses a cathodic protection system comprised of zinc sheet anodes used in conjunction with a submerged bulk zinc anode. An overview of long term performance is presented along with estimated service life and costs.

  9. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF WASTE SOLUTIONS ON CONCRETE AND REINFORCING STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DANIEL JI; START DC; KAAR PH

    1983-05-28

    This report has been prepared for the In Situ Waste Disposal Program Tank Assessment Task (WG-11) as part of an investigation to evaluate the long-term performance of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This report, prepared by the Portland Cement Association, presents the results of four years of concrete degradation studies which exposed concrete and reinforcing steel, under load and at 180 F, to simulated double-shell slurry, simulated salt cake solution, and a control solution. Exposure length varied from 3 months to 36 months. In all cases, examination of the concrete and reinforcing steel at the end of the exposure indicated there was no attack, i.e., no evidence of rusting, cracking, disruption of mill scale or loss of strength. Radioactive waste resulting from the chemical processing of reactor fuel for recovery of special nuclear materials (primarily plutonium), has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. The defense waste is currently being stored in underground waste tanks and in capsules stored in water basins. Current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) strategy is to emphasize development and implementation of technology for removal, solidification, and final disposition of defense waste at the Savannah River Site first, then at the Hanford Site. Final disposal of waste in tanks at Hanford is expected to consist of in-place stabilization of most tanks. Selected tank wastes may be retrieved. Disposal operations will be carried out during the next several decades. Consequently, defense waste will remain in the existing underground tanks at Hanford for at least several decades. To ensure the safe storage of the waste, the waste storage tanks are being evaluated for continued service as part of the DOE Waste Tank Evaluation Program (AR-005-10-02-G). Technical studies and laboratory tests have been conducted to determine the effect of the stored waste's chemicals and temperature on the reinforced concrete. Waste solutions, which can be

  10. Impedance spectroscopy of concrete cover on bridge decks with reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Paul; Blankenagel, Bryan; Guthrie, Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian

    2011-10-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel is a major problem for aging bridge structures near marine environments or in cold regions where deicing salts are applied as part of winter maintenance. Corrosion is the result of the interaction of diffused chloride ions with the embedded steel. One property of affected decks that facilitates detection of chloride ions is their ability to conduct electricity. Impedance spectroscopy can be used to measure concrete conductivity and thereby identify areas of increased chloride concentration characterized by elevated risks of corrosion. A new probe and measurement apparatus has been engineered to measure large areas of concrete on bridge decks. Comparison between measurements obtained in the laboratory and in the field will be presented.

  11. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  12. Compressive and Tensile Behaviours of PLLA Matrix Composites Reinforced with Randomly Dispersed Flax Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussière, Fabrice; Baley, Christophe; Godard, Grégory; Burr, Dominique

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, the ecological footprint of a material is becoming tremendously important. The Poly l-Lactide Acid (PLLA) matrix composites reinforced by randomly scattered flax fibres have mechanical properties similar to polyester/glass composites [1], lower environmental impacts and can be compost at the end of their lives. In this study, the mechanical characterization of biocomposites has been pushed further with the determination of the compressive and tensile properties. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of single flax fibres have been measured and implemented in a micro-mechanical estimation of the composite elastic modulus. Tensile and compressive stiffness determined by the mechanical analyses show very good correlations with the mathematical estimation.

  13. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  14. Thermal expansion of selected graphite reinforced polyimide-, epoxy-, and glass-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of three epoxy-matrix composites, a polyimide-matrix composite and a borosilicate glass-matrix composite, each reinforced with continuous carbon fibers, has been measured and compared. The expansion of a composite with a rubber toughened epoxy-matrix and P75S carbon fibers was very different from the expansion of two different single phase epoxy-matrix composites with P75S fibers although all three had the same stacking sequence. Reasonable agreement was obtained between measured thermal-expansion data and results from classical laminate theory. The thermal expansion of a material may change markedly as a result of thermal cycling. Microdamage, induced by 250 cycles between -156 C and 121 C in the graphite/polyimide laminate, caused a 53 percent decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The thermal expansion of the graphite/glass laminate was not changed by 100 thermal cycles from -129 C to 38 C; however, a residual strain of about 10 x 10 to the minus 6 power was measured for the laminate tested.

  15. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2015-09-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  16. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, Lames D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  17. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.T.; Kiser, L.D.

    1990-08-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed. 18 refs.

  18. Influence of oxide reinforcement materials on high-temperatue oxidation resistance of Ni sub 3 A1 matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; McKamey, C.G.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of Ni{sub 3}Al-based metal matrix composites was studied in high-temperature air under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions as a function of the composition and form of oxide reinforcement material. The incorporation of oxide fibers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--ZrO{sub 2} or particles into the Ni{sub 3}Al matrix led to oxidation rates significantly greater than that for the monolithic aluminide. The increase in susceptibility was primarily due to internal oxidation along the fiber- (or particle-) matrix interfaces and depended on the type of reinforcement material and its deposition in the matrix. The results suggest that the choice of reinforcement material and the method of materials processing will be important considerations in the design of oxidation-resistant Ni{sub 3}Al composites. 10 refs, 4 figs.

  19. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  20. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  1. Mechanical behavior of fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composites: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN (Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride) composites with various fiber contents is evaluated. Both catastrophic and noncatastrophic failures are observed in tensile specimens. Damage and failure mechanisms are identified via in-situ monitoring using NDE (nondestructive evaluation) techniques through the loading history. Effects of fiber/matrix interface debonding (splitting) parallel to fibers are discussed. Statistical failure behavior of fibers is also observed, especially when the interface is weak. Micromechanical models incorporating residual stresses to calculate the critical matrix cracking strength, ultimate strength, and work of pull-out are reviewed and used to predict composite response. For selected test problems, experimental measurements are compared to analytical predictions.

  2. Local-global analysis of crack growth in continuously reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamin

    1988-01-01

    The development is described of a mathematical model for predicting the strength and micromechanical failure characteristics of continuously reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The local-globe analysis models the vicinity of a propagating crack tip as a local heterogeneous region (LHR) consisting of spring like representation of the matrix, fibers and interfaces. This region is embedded in an anisotropic continuum (representing the bulk composite) which is modeled by conventional finite elements. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects of LHR size, component properties, interface conditions, etc. on the strength and sequence of the failure processes in the unidirectional composite system. The results are compared with those predicted by the models developed by Marshall et al. (1985) and by Budiansky et al. (1986).

  3. Damage evolution in uniaxial silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Jay Clarke

    Fiber fractures initiate damage zones ultimately determining the strength and lifetime of metal matrix composites (MMCs). The evolution of damage in a MMC comprising a row of unidirectional SiC fibers (32 vol.%) surrounded by a Ti matrix was examined using X-ray microdiffraction (gym beam size) and macrodiffraction (mm beam size). A comparison of high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques including a powerful two-dimensional XRD method capable of obtaining powder averaged strains from a small number of grains is presented (HEmuXRD2). Using macrodiffraction, the bulk residual strain in the composite was determined against a true strain-free reference. In addition, the bulk in situ response of both the fiber reinforcement and the matrix to tensile stress was observed and compared to a three-dimensional finite element model. Using microdiffraction, multiple strain maps including both phases were collected in situ before, during, and after the application of tensile stress, providing an unprecedented detailed picture of the micromechanical behavior in the laminate metal matrix composite. Finally, the elastic axial strains were compared to predictions from a modified shear lag model, which unlike other shear lag models, considers the elastic response of both constituents. The strains showed excellent correlation with the model. The results confirmed, for the first time, both the need and validity of this new model specifically developed for large scale multifracture and damage evolution simulations of metal matrix composites. The results also provided unprecedented insight for the model, revealing the necessity of incorporating such factors as plasticity of the matrix, residual stress in the composite, and selection of the load sharing parameter. The irradiation of a small number of grains provided strain measurements comparable to a continuum mechanical state in the material. Along the fiber axes, thermal residual stresses of 740 MPa (fibers) and +350 MPa (matrix

  4. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  5. Micromechanics and Structural Response of Functionally Graded, Particulate-Matrix, Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    PubMed Central

    Genin, Guy M.; Birman, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Reinforcement of fibrous composites by stiff particles embedded in the matrix offers the potential for simple, economical functional grading, enhanced response to mechanical loads, and improved functioning at high temperatures. Here, we consider laminated plates made of such a material, with spherical reinforcement tailored by layer. The moduli for this material lie within relatively narrow bounds. Two separate moduli estimates are considered: a “two-step” approach in which fibers are embedded in a homogenized particulate matrix, and the Kanaun-Jeulin (2001) approach, which we re-derive in a simple way using the Benveniste (1988) method. Optimal tailoring of a plate is explored, and functional grading is shown to improve the performance of the structures considered. In the example of a square, simply supported, cross-ply laminated panel subjected to uniform transverse pressure, a modest functional grading offers significant improvement in performance. A second example suggests superior blast resistance of the panel achieved at the expense of only a small increase in weight. PMID:23874001

  6. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Martin, A.; Schubert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated.

  7. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  8. Properties of advanced fibers for reinforcing metal and ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.

    1993-12-31

    The mechanical properties of ceramic reinforcing fibers need to be well characterized before their incorporation into composite materials. Critical fiber properties include strength and Weibull modulus, bundle strength, modulus and creep resistance. Important composite properties include thermochemical stability, interface debond energy and interfacial sliding resistance. Tailoring these interfacial properties by fiber coating can, in turn, influence fiber properties. Methods of measuring strength related properties are addressed and the results of a computer simulation to assess the quality of measured data statistically are presented. The readily available monofilament fibers are mostly chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide. Current aerospace programs have identified the need for new ceramic fibers as enabling materials for their success. Alternate fibers such as sapphire are therefore currently under development with several objectives including: a CTE greater than that of SiC, higher strength and creep resistance, and chemical stability in new candidate matrices. The strength of a ceramic fiber is statistical, being determined by the largest flaw in the flaw population of the tested length of fiber. In a brittle matrix material such as an intermetallic, for toughening by continuous fiber reinforcement, fibers need to exhibit pull-out during matrix crack propagation. However, the stress distribution along a bridging fiber has a maximum in the crack plane and for fiber failure to occur away from the crack plane, a prerequisite for pull-out, a weak link must also exist away from the crack plane.

  9. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  10. On constitutive equations for thermoelastic analysis of fiber-reinforced composites with isotropic matrix material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usal, Melek; Usal, Mustafa Reşit; Esendemir, Ümran

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with developing constitutive equations for the thermoelastic analysis of composites consisting of an isotropic matrix reinforced by independent and inextensible two families of fibers having an arbitrary distribution. The composite medium is assumed to be incompressible, dependent on temperature gradient, and showing linear elastic behavior. The reaction of the composite material subject to external loads is expressed in stress tensor and heat flux vector. The matrix material made of elastic material involving an artificial anisotropy due to fibers reinforcing by arbitrary distributions has been assumed as an isotropic medium. The theory is formulated within the scope of continuum mechanics. As a result of thermodynamic constraints, it has been determined that the stress potential function is dependent on the deformation tensor, the fiber fields vectors and the temperature, while the heat flux vector function is dependent on the deformation tensor, the fiber fields vectors, the temperature and temperature gradient. To determine arguments of the constitutive functionals, findings relating to the theory of invariants have been used as a method because of that isotropy constraint is imposed on the material. The constitutive equations of stress and heat flux vector have been written in terms of different coordinate descriptions.

  11. A first look at erosion of continuous-fiber reinforced ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Karasek, K.R.; Gonczy, S.T. ); Kupperman, J.B.; Zamirowski, E.J.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L. )

    1991-12-01

    We report the initial results of a study of solid-particle erosion of Nicalon{trademark} Sic reinforced carbon-modified-silica-glass composites. SiC abrasives with diameters between 42 to 390{mu}m were used with impact angles of 30{degrees} and 90{degrees}, and velocities ranged 30 to 80 m/s. Fibers were parallel to the surface in all cases. Woven-fiber composites exhibited the same erosive behavior as uniaxial composites. Interfacial chemistry was controlled, and the comparison between composites which exhibit low-strength-brittle and high-strength-fibrous fractures under flexure conditions showed no significant difference in erosion resistance. This result and SEM data indicate that most of the fracture occurs within the matrix and/or at the fiber-matrix interface. We have found in previous work that polymer-matrix composites (with fibers parallel to the surface) are more susceptible to erosion damage than the matrix polymer. This also appears to be the case for the ceramic composites.

  12. The surgical treatment of reinforced steel bar injury penetrating the skull base and maxilla-mandibular area.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Pan, Lini; Xu, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Penetrating injuries with reinforced screwed steel bar in the skull base represent a unique challenge for oral maxillofacial surgeons. Management of these injuries is complicated by associated injuries and the proximity to vital neurovascular structures. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of injury due to a downward fall upon a reinforced steel rod. Radiologic studies of the skull base revealed that the steel bar traversed the temporomandibular space between the left cervical spine and the mastoid process to the space between the inner side of the left mandibular ramus and the maxilla. We performed osteotomy of the left mastoid process tip and the left mandibular ramus to take out the steel bar from the maxilla and repaired the left mandible with internal fixation. Appropriate preoperative planning, including three-dimensional computed tomographic images, is integral in the surgical approach for the safe removal of such objects. PMID:25347597

  13. Preparation and tribological properties of C fibre reinforced C/SiC dual matrix composites fabrication by liquid silicon infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuan; Xiao, Peng; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Bo-yun

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional needle carbon fibre reinforced carbon and silicon carbide dual matrix composite (C/C-SiC) is one of a new type of high performance brake material. The carbon fibre preform prepared by three-dimensional needling method was first densified by chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) to form porous carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. Then, the porous C/C composites were converted into C/C-SiC by liquid silicon infiltration (LSI), in which silicon carbide matrix was formed by reaction of carbon and melting silicon. The microstructure, mechanical properties and friction behaviour of C/C-SiC have been investigated. The results indicated that the composite was composed of 55 wt% C, 39 wt% SiC and 6 wt% Si. The density of C/C-SiC was 2.2 g cm-3 with 6.4% open porosity. The C/C-SiC exhibited good mechanical properties, especially excellent toughness which can help to avoid catastrophic brittle fracture. The flexural and compressive strength can reach to 214.6 MPa and 271.0 MPa, respectively. In addition, C/C-SiC had excellent impact damage tolerance of 25.2 kJ m-2. Compared to the self-friction, the C/C-SiC with steel opposing material shown higher static coefficient of friction (0.74) and better stability coefficient (0.28), while exhibited lower dynamic coefficient of friction (0.25), higher temperature of friction subsurface (444 °C), higher wear rate (2.88 μm cycle-1). The main wear mechanism of the C/C-SiC composites with different opposing material both includes adhesion and oxidation abrasion.

  14. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  15. Development of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete cribs to replace wood cribs in underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Tanious, N.S.; Becket, R.D.; Bollinger, E.R.

    1984-02-01

    The need to provide better mine roof support and control in longwall tailgate entries prompted the Bureau of Mines to search for a replacement product for wood cribs. Their search isolated steel-fiber-reinforced concrete (SFC) as the most effective replacement. Through successful laboratory and underground mine tests, handmade SFC cribs proved to be a viable and more effective roof support system. However, to ensure wider usage, U.S. Steel Mining Co. initiated a joint development and evaluation program with Burrell Construction Company in order to mass produce SFC blocks of reasonable dimension, weight, and cost. Small specimens and full-size cribs were evaluated during this program to determine their compressive strength and post failure characteristics. After considerable testing and adjusting of various concrete mixtures, a final formulation for the SFC crib blocks was selected. That formulation permitted the construction of SFC cribs possessing a nominal crib strength of 3200 psi (22.1 x 10/sup 6/ Pa) and a nominal modulus of elasticity of 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ psi (6894.76 x 10/sup 6/ Pa). These SFC cribs can support from 3.5 to 14.5 times as much load as a wood crib, depending on the size of the wood crib being replaced. Both laboratory and limited mine tests, conducted by U.S. Steel Mining Co. have shown the SFC crib to be an economical and effective means of roof control.

  16. A penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. I - The filament model. II - The crack problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The study deals with the elastostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which is reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack. An elastic filament model is first developed, followed by consideration of the application of the model to the penny-shaped crack problem in which the filaments of finite length are asymmetrically distributed around the crack. Since the primary interest is in the application of the results to studies relating to the fracture of fiber or filament-reinforced composites and reinforced concrete, the main emphasis of the study is on the evaluation of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. Using the filament model developed, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix is formulated.

  17. Manufacturing of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Iron Oxide (Fe3O4) Nanoparticles: Microstructural and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayraktar, Emin; Ayari, Fayza; Tan, Ming Jen; Tosun-Bayraktar, Ayse; Katundi, Dhurata

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the low-cost manufacturing of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with nano iron oxide as light and efficient materials for engineering applications. It is very desirable to use reinforced aluminum matrix composites in structural applications (automotive, aeronautical, etc.) because of their outstanding stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios. In modern industry, it is increasingly important to develop new composites as alternative materials to fabricate multifunctional pieces. Detailed information is presented on the manufacturing process of this composite, and a preliminary study was performed on the cryogenic-cycling behavior to evaluate the interface between the matrix and the reinforcement. Microindentation tests were carried out to evaluate the micromechanical properties of these materials; a simple and practical finite element model is proposed to predict certain parameters related to the composition of the composite.

  18. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior. PMID:25971115

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 2D SiC-reinforced carbon matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bourrat, X.; Evans, A.G.

    1995-10-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites consisting of combinations of SiC and C have been explored as materials having thermostructural characteristics suitable for elevated temperature applications. There are two opposing strategies. One uses C fibers and a matrix of SiC, usually produced by CVI. The other uses SiC fibers and a matrix consisting of C; those are designated CERACARB{trademark} and were studied in this paper. Among different grades of CERACARB{trademark} examined in this work, one has a high tensile strength and good notch resistance. This material has a relatively low interface sliding resistance, {tau} (10--15 MPa) and satisfies global load sharing (GLS) criteria for the ultimate tensile strength (UTS). The present designations for this material is LT. The second material, designated HT, has lower tensile strength and greater notch sensitivity. This material has a relatively large interface sliding resistance ({tau} {approx} 90MPa). This UTS loss is related to the addition of oxidation inhibitors (B{sub 4}C) as filler in the matrix. This work was focused on the structural investigation of this effect and the addition of a pyrocarbon interface to recover the right mechanical behavior (material LTC).

  20. Microstructure and properties of alumina-whisker-reinforced tetragonal zirconia polycrystal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.M.; Singh, J.P. ); Scattergood, R.O. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    With the increasing demand of today's technology, there is a growing need for high temperature materials with improved fracture toughness. Whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are materials with potentially high fracture toughness. Many whisker-matrix systems are possible, but the choices for toughened composites are limited by such considerations as chemical compatibility and thermal expansion mismatch. In view of the high fracture toughness of tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP) matrix, many investigators have successfully attempted to improve the mechanical properties of yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) with the addition of strong, single crystal SiC whiskers. The primary objective of this work was to place Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} whiskers into an Y-TZP matrix and study the toughening effects on the new composite. This particular system was chosen because of the high strength and reasonably high toughness inherent within Y-TZP and potentially high strength obtainable within a single crystal alumina. This, combined with an agreeable thermal expansion mismatch, could theoretically produce a composite of exceptionally high toughness. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  1. 75 FR 22552 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Administrative Review, 74 FR 65515 (Dec. 10, 2009) and Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony with Final Results of Administrative Review, 75 FR 7562 (Feb. 22... in Part, 70 FR 67665 (Nov. 8, 2005) (Final Results). In the Final Results the Department followed...

  2. 75 FR 47260 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and New Shipper Review and Determination To Revoke in Part, 72 FR 62630... from Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony with Final Results of Administrative Review, 74 FR... International Trade Administration (A-489-807) Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice...

  3. German guidelines for steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnels with special consideration of design and statical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Schleicher, H.

    1995-12-31

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete can undoubtedly absorb tensile forces. The utilization of this characteristic for the design and specifications of support structures for underground tunnels is regulated by the new Guidelines from the German Concrete Association. Recommendations are given in these guidelines for construction design and for construction itself. The required tests for classification, suitability and quality monitoring are presented.

  4. Mechanical behavior of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to transverse and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers were investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The results of an experimental program indicate that the shakedown concept of structural mechanics provides a means of describing the material behavior. When the loading conditions are within the shakedown region, the material finally responds in an elastic manner after initial plastic response, and for loading conditions outside the shakedown region, the material exhibits a rapid incremental plastic strain accumulation. The failure strain varies by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. Hence, for high mechanical and low thermal loading, the failure strains is small; for low mechanical and high thermal loading, the failure strain is large.

  5. Graphene-reinforced aluminum matrix composites prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wen-ming; Li, Song-mei; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xin; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2016-06-01

    Graphene-reinforced 7055 aluminum alloy composites with different contents of graphene were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The structure and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Testing results show that the hardness, compressive strength, and yield strength of the composites are improved with the addition of 1wt% graphene. A clean, strong interface is formed between the metal matrix and graphene via metallurgical bonding on atomic scale. Harmful aluminum carbide (Al4C3) is not formed during SPS processing. Further addition of graphene (above 1wt%) results in the deterioration in mechanical properties of the composites. The agglomeration of graphene plates is exacerbated with increasing graphene content, which is the main reason for this deterioration.

  6. A novel processing route for carbon nanotube reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2015-03-01

    The current study reports the establishment of a novel feasible way for processing glass- and ceramic- matrix composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The technique is based on high shear compaction of glass/ceramic and CNT blends in the presence of polymeric binders for the production of flexible green bodies which are subsequently sintered and densified by spark plasma sintering. The method was successfully applied on a borosilicate glass / multi-wall CNT composite with final density identical to that of the full-dense ceramic. Preliminary non-destructive evaluation of dynamic mechanical properties such as Young's and shear modulus and Poisson's ratio by ultrasonics show that property improvement maximizes up to a certain CNT loading; after this threshold is exceeded, properties degrade with further loading increase.

  7. A study of the composition and microstructure of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, D.; Serpova, V.; Prokofiev, M.; Rabinskiy, L.; Shavnev, A.

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the microstructure and the composition of aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) reinforced with continuous alumina fibers. An Al-Mg-Cu alloy similar to that of AA 2024 was used. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analyses were used for investigation of a probable volume fraction of a spinel phase in MMC. Scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray microanalysis were used to study a change of the elemental composition of the composites microstructure on the polished cross sections. The constant mass fractions of magnesium (0.65 wt. %) and copper (1.25 wt. %) were found in the interphase area within radius of 1 μm around fibers.

  8. Fabrication Of Carbon-Boron Reinforced Dry Polymer Matrix Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation aerospace vehicles will require specialized hybrid material forms for component structure fabrication. For this reason, high temperature composite prepregs in both dry and wet forms are being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In an attempt to improve compressive properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites, a hybrid carbon-boron tape was developed and used to fabricate composite laminates which were subsequently cut into flexural and compression specimens and tested. The hybrid material, given the designation HYCARB, was fabricated by modifying a previously developed process for the manufacture of dry polymer matrix composite (PMC) tape at LaRC. In this work, boron fibers were processed with IM7/LaRC(TradeMark)IAX poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg to form a dry hybrid tape for Automated Tow Placement (ATP). Boron fibers were encapsulated between two (2) layers of reduced volatile, low fiber areal weight poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg. The hybrid prepreg was then fully imidized and consolidated into a dry tape suitable for ATP. The fabrication of a hybrid boron material form for tow placement aids in the reduction of the overall manufacturing cost of boron reinforced composites, while realizing the improved compression strengths. Composite specimens were press-molded from the hybrid material and exhibited excellent mechanical properties.

  9. Abrasive wear behavior of a brittle matrix (MoSi2) composite reinforced with a ductile phase (Nb)

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    The toughness of a variety of brittle ceramic and intermetallic matrices has been improved through the incorporation of ductile metallic reinforcements. In these composites resistance to catastrophic failure of the matrix is derived through a combination of mechanisms, including matrix crack bridging, matrix crack defection and rupturing of the ductile phase. The degree to which these mechanisms operate is a function of composite microstructure. In general, the ductile phase is softer than the matrix phase. This may have unique implications when the materials are subjected to a wear environment, whether intentional or not. Hence, it is important to understand the wear behavior of these new materials. MoSi2–Nb was selected as a model composite system, in part because of the wide body of open literature regarding this system. The influences of abrasive wear environment and the composite microstructure (Nb reinforcement size, shape and volume fraction) on the wear resistance of the composites are reported.

  10. Mechanics of interfaces in fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composites. [reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN composites with strong and weak interface characteristics is evaluated. Both catastrophic and noncatastrophic failures are observed in tensile specimens. Effects of fiber/matrix interface debonding (splitting) parallel to the fibers are discussed. Micromechanical models incorporating residual stresses to calculate the critical matrix cracking strength, ultimate strength and work of pull-out are reviewed and used to predict composite response. Experimental results are compared to analytical predictions.

  11. Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  12. Effects of Interface Modification on Mechanical Behavior of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having approx. 42 volume percent of uncoated or BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 +/- 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with BN/SiC-coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young's modulus of the uncoated and BN/SiC-coated fiber-reinforced composites were measured as 184 q 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of the uncoated fiber-reinforced composite is probably due to degradation of the fibers from mechanical surface damage during processing. Because both the coated and uncoated fiber reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SiC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  13. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing.

    PubMed

    de Alcantara, Naasson P; da Silva, Felipe M; Guimarães, Mateus T; Pereira, Matheus D

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  14. Effect of Waste Plastic Shreds on Bond Resistance between Concrete and Steel Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osifala, K. B.; Salau, M. A.; Adeniyi, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the effect of waste plastic shreds on steel-concrete bond. Forty RILEM test specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter high-yield reinforcing bars were cast and tested. Fifteen specimens with 16mm and 20mm each were cast with the addition of waste plastic shreds at varying percentages of 1%, 1.5% and 2%; another ten RILEM specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter bars at 0% of waste plastic shreds were cast as reference. Nine 150mm cubes, with three taken from each batch of various percentages of waste plastic shreds, were used to monitor the concrete strength. From the test results and analysis, the compressive strength of concrete was found to reduce with increased percentages of waste plastic shreds, while the waste plastic shreds material was found not to improve the bond resistance between concrete and steel. However, though lower than normal concrete, there was an increase in the bond resistance with increase in the percent of plastic shreds. The bond resistance of 16mm was also found to be higher than that of 20mm in all the specimens tested.

  15. Hysteretic behavior of special shaped columns composed of steel and reinforced concrete (SRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zongping; Xu, Jinjun; Xue, Jianyang

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a series of experimental investigations on seventeen specimens of steel reinforced concrete special shaped (SRCSS) columns under low cyclic reversed loading using parallel crosshead equipment. Nine T-shaped SRC columns, four L-shaped SRC columns and four +-shaped SRC columns were tested to examine the effects of shape steel configuration, loading angle, axial compressive ratio and shear-span ratio on the behavior (strength, stiffness, energy dissipation, ductility, etc.) of SRCSS column specimens. The failure modes and hysteretic performance of all the specimens were obtained in the tests. Test results demonstrate that the shear-span ratio is the main parameter affecting the failure modes of SRCSS columns. The specimens with small shear-span ratio are prone to shear failure, and the primary failure planes in SRCSS columns are parallel to the loading direction. As a result, there is a symmetry between positive and negative loading directions in the hysteretic curves of the SRCSS columns. The majority of displacement ductility coefficients for all the specimens are over 3.0, so that the SRCSS columns demonstrate a better deformation capacity. In addition, the equivalent viscous damping coefficients of all the specimens are greater than 0.2, indicating that the seismic behavior of SRCSS columns is adequate. Finally, the superposition theory was used to calculate the limits of axial compressive ratio for the specimens, and it is found that the test axial compressive ratio is close to or smaller than the calculated axial compressive ratio limit.

  16. Research on the mechanical properties of a glass fiber reinforced polymer-steel combined truss structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  17. Research on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Steel Combined Truss Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  18. The performance analysis of distributed Brillouin corrosion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2013-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  19. The Performance Analysis of Distributed Brillouin Corrosion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2014-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  20. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-01-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl−]/[OH−] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels. PMID:26673425

  1. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    de Alcantara, Naasson P.; da Silva, Felipe M.; Guimarães, Mateus T.; Pereira, Matheus D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  2. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl-]/[OH-] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  3. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Porras, R; Bavykin, D V; Zekonyte, J; Walsh, F C; Wood, R J

    2016-05-13

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the 'drop-cast' method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young's modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM. PMID:27039947

  4. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Flyash Reinforced ZA-27 Alloy Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the wear rate of ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with fly ash particles from 1 to 3 wt% in steps of 1 wt%. The compo-casting method has been used to fabricate the composites using Raichur fly ash of average size 3-5 microns. The wear specimens are tested under dry conditions using a pin-on-disc sliding wear testing machine with wear loads of 20-120 N in steps of 20 N, and the sliding distances in the range of 0.5 km to 2.5 km. The results indicate that the wear rate of the composites is less than that of the matrix alloy and it further decreases with the increase in fly ash content. However, the material loss in terms of wear rate and wear volume increases with the increase in load and sliding distance, both in the cases of composites and the matrix alloy. An increase in the applied load increases the wear severity by changing the wear mechanism from abrasion to particle-cracking induced delamination wear. It is found that with the increase in fly ash content, the wear resistance increases monotonically. The observations have been explained using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the worn surfaces of the composites.

  5. Long-term water-aging of whisker-reinforced polymer-matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H K

    2003-01-01

    Long-term water exposure may degrade polymer-matrix composites. This study investigated the water-aging of whisker composites. It was hypothesized that whiskers would provide stable and substantial reinforcement, and that whisker type would affect water-aging resistance. Silica-fused Si(3)N(4) and SiC whiskers were incorporated into a resin. The specimens were tested by three-point flexure and nano-indentation vs. water-aging for 1 to 730 days. After 730 days, SiC composite had a strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 185 +/- 33 MPa, similar to 146 +/- 44 MPa for Si(3)N(4) composite (p = 0.064); both were significantly higher than 67 +/- 23 MPa for an inlay/onlay control (p < 0.001). Compared with 1 day, the strength of the SiC composite showed no decrease, while that of the Si(3)N(4) composite decreased. The decrease was due to whisker weakening rather than to resin degradation or interface breakdown. Whisker composites also had higher moduli than the controls. In conclusion, silica-fused whiskers bonded to polymer matrix and resisted long-term water attack, resulting in much stronger composites than the controls after water-aging. PMID:12508045

  6. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R.; Bavykin, D. V.; Zekonyte, J.; Walsh, F. C.; Wood, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the ‘drop-cast’ method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM.

  7. Using Goals, Feedback, Reinforcement, and a Performance Matrix to Improve Customer Service in a Large Department Store

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eikenhout, Nelson; Austin, John

    2005-01-01

    This study employed an ABAC and multiple baseline design to evaluate the effects of (B) feedback and (C) a package of feedback, goalsetting, and reinforcement (supervisor praise and an area-wide celebration as managed through a performance matrix, on a total of 14 various customer service behaviors for a total of 115 employees at a large…

  8. Effect of particle concentration on the structure and tribological properties of submicron particle SiC reinforced Ni metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings produced by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, H.; Kılıç, F.; Uysal, M.; Aslan, S.; Alp, A.; Akbulut, H.

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, a nickel sulfate bath containing SiC submicron particles between 100 and 1000 nm was used as the plating electrolyte. The aim of this work is to obtain Ni-SiC metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with submicron particles on steel surfaces with high hardness and wear resistance for using in anti-wear applications such as dies, tools and working parts for automobiles and vehicles. The influence of the SiC content in the electrolyte on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of nano-composite coatings was studied. During the electroplating process, the proper stirring speed was also determined for sub-micron SiC deposition with Ni matrix. The Ni films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The depositions were controlled to obtain a specific thickness (between 50 and 200 μm) and volume fraction of the particles in the matrix (between 0.02 and 0.10). The hardness of the coatings was measured to be 280-571 HV depending on the particle volume in the Ni matrix. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited SiC nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a tribometer. All the friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (with a relative humidity of 55-65%). The results showed that the wear resistance of the nanocomposites was approximately 2-2.2 times more than those of unreinforced Ni.

  9. Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Copper Matrix Composites for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of pitch-based graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites usable for space applications such as radiator fins were investigated. Thermal conductivity was measured as a function of fiber volume fraction and architecture. Results showed for unidirectional P-100 Gr/Cu composites, the longitudinal thermal conductivity was nearly independent of fiber volume fraction. Transverse thermal conductivities (perpendicular to the fibers) were strongly affected by the fiber volume fraction with higher volume fractions resulting in lower thermal conductivities. The effect of architecture on thermal conductivity followed the cosine squared law for simple architectures. Insufficient data are available currently to model more complex architectures, but adding fibers in the direction of the heat flow increases the thermal conductivity as low conductivity plies are supplemented by high conductivity plies. Thermal expansion tests were conducted on the Gr fibers and Gr/Cu composites. The results show a considerable thermal expansion mismatch between the fibers and the Cu matrix. The longitudinal thermal expansion showed a strong dependence on the architecture of the Gr/Cu composites. The composites also show a thermal expansion hysteresis. The hysteresis was eliminated by an engineered interface. Mechanical testing concentrated on the dynamic modulus and strength of the composites. The dynamic modulus of the Gr/Cu composites was 305 GPa up to 400 C, a value equivalent to Be. The strengths of the composites were less than expected, but this is attributed to the poor bond across the interface between the Gr fibers and Cu matrix. Testing of composites with an engineered interface is expected to yield strengths nearer the values predicted by the rule of mixtures.

  10. Experimental investigation of interface properties in SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, J.I.; Bhatt, R.T.

    1995-10-01

    Interfacial properties of 1-D SiC/RBSN composites were measured by the matrix crack spacing method and by the fiber push-out method, and the results were compared. The composites consisted of 8 to 33 vol% of aligned SCS-6 SiC fibers (142 {micro}m diameter) in a relatively porous (20 to 40 vol%) Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix. The effects of fiber volume fraction and test temperature on the interfacial properties have been investigated. The advantages and limitations of both methods in evaluating the interface properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites and the factors influencing the interfacial measurements are discussed.

  11. Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Warren; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-02-01

    Metal matrix composites have found selected application in areas that can cost-effectively capitalize on improvements in specific stiffness, specific strength, fatigue resistance, wear resistance, and coefficient of thermal expansion. Metal matrix composites comprise a relatively wide range of materials defined by the metal matrix, reinforcement type, and reinforcement geometry. In the area of the matrix, most metallic systems have been explored, including aluminum, beryllium, magnesium, titanium, iron, nickel, cobalt, and silver. However, aluminum is by far the most preferred. For reinforcements, the materials are typically ceramics, which provide a very beneficial combination of stiffness, strength, and relatively low density. Candidate reinforcement materials include SiC, Al2O3, B4C, TiC, TiB2, graphite, and a number of other ceramics. In addition, metallic materials such as tungsten and steel fibers have been considered.

  12. Superior reinforcement effect of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils in polystyrene matrix: optical, thermal, and mechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Shuji; Ikeuchi, Tomoyasu; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2012-07-01

    Polystyrene (PS) composites reinforced with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) with various weight ratios were fabricated by casting and vacuum-drying mixtures of PS/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solution and TOCN/DMF dispersion. TOCNs of 3 to 4 nm width were dispersed homogeneously at the individual nanofibril level in the PS matrix, such that the TOCN/PS nanocomposite films exhibited high optical transparencies and their tensile strengths, elastic moduli, and thermal dimensional stabilities increased with increasing TOCN content. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the storage modulus of the TOCN/PS films increased significantly with TOCN content above the glass-transition temperature of PS by the formation of an interfibrillar network structure of TOCNs in the PS matrix, based on percolation theory. The outstanding and effective polymer reinforcement by TOCNs results from their high aspect ratio, high crystallinity, and nanodispersibility in the PS matrix. PMID:22642863

  13. Corrosive effect of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic on stainless-steel screws during implantation into man.

    PubMed

    Tayton, K

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion of stainless-steel screws used to fix carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates to human fractures was compared with the corrosion on similar screws used to fix stainless-steel AO plates. Corrosive changes were noted in both sets of screws with similar frequency and severity; however, the stainless-steel plates were 'in situ' almost twice as long as the CFRP ones, showing that the corrosive changes occurred more rapidly on screws in contact with CFRP. Nevertheless, over the implantation time necessary for bone healing, corrosion was very mild and there is no clinical contra-indication to the use of stainless-steel and CFRP together in this particular application. PMID:6842566

  14. Enamel coated steel reinforcement for improved durability and life-cycle performance of concrete structures: microstructure, corrosion, and deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fujian

    This study is aimed (a) to statistically characterize the corrosion-induced deterioration process of reinforced concrete structures (concrete cracking, steel mass loss, and rebar-concrete bond degradation), and (b) to develop and apply three types of enamel-coated steel bars for improved corrosion resistance of the structures. Commercially available pure enamel, mixed enamel with 50% calcium silicate, and double enamel with an inner layer of pure enamel and an outer layer of mixed enamel were considered as various steel coatings. Electrochemical tests were respectively conducted on steel plates, smooth bars embedded in concrete, and deformed bars with/without concrete cover in 3.5 wt.% NaCl or saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The effects of enamel microstructure, coating thickness variation, potential damage, mortar protection, and corrosion environment on corrosion resistance of the steel members were investigated. Extensive test results indicated that corrosion-induced concrete cracking can be divided into four stages that gradually become less correlated with corrosion process over time. The coefficient of variation of crack width increases with the increasing level of corrosion. Corrosion changed the cross section area instead of mechanical properties of steel bars. The bond-slip behavior between the corroded bars and concrete depends on the corrosion level and distribution of corrosion pits. Although it can improve the chemical bond with concrete and steel, the mixed enamel coating is the least corrosion resistant. The double enamel coating provides the most consistent corrosion performance and is thus recommended to coat reinforcing steel bars for concrete structures applied in corrosive environments. Corrosion pits in enamel-coated bars are limited around damage locations.

  15. Matrix Dominated Failure of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates Under Static and Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joseph Daniel

    Hierarchical material systems provide the unique opportunity to connect material knowledge to solving specific design challenges. Representing the quickest growing class of hierarchical materials in use, fiber-reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) offer superior strength and stiffness-to-weight ratios, damage tolerance, and decreasing production costs compared to metals and alloys. However, the implementation of FRPCs has historically been fraught with inadequate knowledge of the material failure behavior due to incomplete verification of recent computational constitutive models and improper (or non-existent) experimental validation, which has severely slowed creation and development. Noted by the recent Materials Genome Initiative and the Worldwide Failure Exercise, current state of the art qualification programs endure a 20 year gap between material conceptualization and implementation due to the lack of effective partnership between computational coding (simulation) and experimental characterization. Qualification processes are primarily experiment driven; the anisotropic nature of composites predisposes matrix-dominant properties to be sensitive to strain rate, which necessitates extensive testing. To decrease the qualification time, a framework that practically combines theoretical prediction of material failure with limited experimental validation is required. In this work, the Northwestern Failure Theory (NU Theory) for composite lamina is presented as the theoretical basis from which the failure of unidirectional and multidirectional composite laminates is investigated. From an initial experimental characterization of basic lamina properties, the NU Theory is employed to predict the matrix-dependent failure of composites under any state of biaxial stress from quasi-static to 1000 s-1 strain rates. It was found that the number of experiments required to characterize the strain-rate-dependent failure of a new composite material was reduced by an order of

  16. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber–fiber and fiber–matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  17. Cyclotriphosphazene and TiO2 reinforced nanocomposite coated on mild steel plates for antibacterial and corrosion resistance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnadevi, Krishnamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-03-01

    The mild steel surface has been modified to impart anticorrosion and antibacterial properties through a dip coating method followed by thermal curing of a mixture containing amine terminated cyclotriphosphazene and functionalized titanium dioxide nanoparticles reinforced benzoxazine based cyanate ester composite (ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE). The corrosion resistance behavior of coating material has been investigated by electrochemical and antibacterial studies by disc diffusion method. The nanocomposites coated mild steels have displayed a good chemical stability over long immersion in a corrosive environment. The protection efficiency has found to be high for ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE composites, which can be used in microelectronics and marine applications.

  18. Dynamic impact response of high-density square honeycombs made of TRIP steel and TRIP matrix composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehinger, D.; Krüger, L.; Krause, S.; Martin, U.; Weigelt, C.; Aneziris, C. G.

    2012-08-01

    Two designs of square-celled metallic honeycomb structures fabricated by a modified extrusion technology based on a powder feedstock were investigated. The strength and ductility of these cellular materials are achieved by an austenitic CrNi (AISI 304) steel matrix particle reinforced by an MgO partially-stabilized zirconia building up their cell wall microstructure. Similar to the mechanical behaviour of the bulk materials, the strengthening mechanism and the martensitic phase transformations in the cell walls are affected by the deformation temperature and the nominal strain rate. The microstructure evolution during quasi-static and dynamic impact compression up to high strain rates of 103 1/s influences the buckling and failure behaviour of the honeycomb structures. In contrast to bending-dominated quasi-isotropic networks like open-celled metal foams, axial compressive loading to the honeycomb's channels causes membrane stretching as well as crushing of the vertical cell node elements and cell walls. The presented honeycomb materials differ geometrically in their cell wall thickness-to-cell size-ratio. Therefore, the failure behaviour is predominantly controlled by global buckling and torsional-flexural buckling, respectively, accompanied by plastic matrix flow and strengthening of the cell wall microstructure.

  19. Friction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Chandrasekaran, M; Bonfield, W

    2002-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear. PMID:15348592

  20. Double layer oxidation resistant coating for carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. H.; Du, Y. G.; Xiao, J. Y.; Zhang, W. J.; Zhang, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    Double layer coatings, with celsian-Y 2SiO 5 as inner layer and Y 2Si 2O 7 as outer layer, were prepared by microwave sintering on the surface of carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite. Both celsian, Y 2SiO 5 and Y 2Si 2O 7 were synthesized by in situ method using BAS glass, Y 2O 3 and SiO 2 as staring materials. The sintering temperature was 1500 °C, and little damage was induced to the composite. The composition and micrograph of the fired coating were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The oxidation and thermal shock resistance of samples with doubled-layered coating were characterized at 1400 °C in air. After 150 min oxidation and thermal cycling between 1400 °C and room temperature for 15 times, the weight loss of double layer-coated sample was 1.22% and there were no cracks in the coating.

  1. Application of weakest-link fracture statistics to fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, J.C.; Zok, F.W.

    1997-06-01

    The strength and reliability of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) are dependent on whether conditions of local or global load sharing prevail. Global load sharing is promoted by a low interfacial sliding stress and is manifested in a zero-tangent modulus at the point of tensile failure along with random fiber failures and extensive fiber pullout. In this paper, it is demonstrated that conditions of global load sharing are not present in two commonly studied CMCs, despite the fibrous appearance of their fracture surfaces. This behavior is manifested in a volume-dependent strength, as evidenced by strength differences measured in tension and flexure (accounting for the nonlinear stress distribution in flexure). Methods of weakest-link statistics are used to relate the strengths measured in the two test configurations. Estimates for the Weibull moduli of the two systems are obtained from the experiments and compared with values obtained through Monte Carlo simulations based on a three-dimensional-lattice Green`s function method. The implications of these results on the strength of large components and of small regions of high stress concentration are discussed briefly.

  2. Retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames using glass fiber reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakam, Zeyad Hamed-Ramzy

    2000-11-01

    This study focuses on the retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames subjected to in-plane lateral loads using glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates that are epoxy-bonded to the exterior faces of the infill walls. An extensive experimental investigation using one-third scale modeling was conducted and consisted of two phases. In the first phase, 64 assemblages, half of which were retrofitted, were tested under various combined in-plane loading conditions similar to those which different regions of a typical infill wall are subjected to. In the second phase, one bare and four masonry-infilled steel frames representative of a typical single-story, single-bay panel were tested under diagonal loading to study the overall behavior and the infill-frame interaction. The relative infill-to-frame stiffness was varied as a test parameter by using two different steel frame sections. The laminates altered the failure modes of the masonry assemblages and reduced the variability and anisotropic nature of the masonry. For the prisms which failed due to shear and/or mortar joint slip, significant strength increases were observed. For those exhibiting compression failure modes, a marginal increase in strength resulted. Retrofitting the infilled frames resulted in an average increase in initial stiffness of two-fold compared to the unretrofitted infilled frames, and seemed independent of the relative infill-to-frame stiffness. However, the increase in the load-carrying capacity of the retrofitted frames compared to the unretrofitted counterparts was higher for those with the larger relative infill-to-frame stiffness parameter. Unlike the unretrofitted infill walls, the retrofitted panels demonstrated almost identical failure modes that were characterized as "strictly comer crushing" in the vicinity of the loaded comers whereas no signs of distress were evident throughout the remainder of the infill. The laminates also maintained the structural integrity of

  3. Development of structural health assessment system for steel and reinforced concrete structures using acceleration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yu; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Because of the repeated earthquake and the problem such as the aging of buildings, a number of studies of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is have been done. Now, the writer is developing structural health assessment system for steel and reinforced concrete structures aiming for completion in 2014. In this system, following three programs for automatically estimating the physical quantity that is important for assessing the integrity of the structure are planned. First program is what automatically estimate the modal parameters (natural frequency and damping ratio) of the structure by the time history by using the subspace method. Second program is what automatically estimate the inter-layer parameters (stiffness and damping coefficient) by the time history by using the adaptive Kalman filter. Third program is what automatically estimate the story drift angle by time history by using the adaptive Kalman filter. The proposed method is expected to be estimated in consideration of the higher order modes than the conventional method by reverse modal analysis.

  4. Erosion Characteristics of Nanoparticle-Reinforced Polyurethane Coatings on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamsundar, C.; Chatterjee, Dhiman; Kamaraj, M.; Maiti, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    Hydropower generation from the Himalayan rivers in India faces challenge in the form of silt-laden water which can erode the turbine blades and reduce turbine life. To address this issue, polyurethane coatings reinforced with boron carbide (B4C) or silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on 16Cr-5Ni martensitic stainless steel substrate were used in the present investigation to improve erosion wear resistance in silt erosion conditions. Slurry erosive wear tests were carried out based on ASTM G-73 protocol at various test conditions of impact velocity, impingement angle, and erodent particle size as well as slurry concentrations as determined by the implementation of Taguchi design of experiments. Analysis of variance studies of erosion rate indicated that nanoparticle content in PU material is the single most important parameter, and interaction of impact velocity and impingement angle was also proved to be significant. The coatings with B4C nanoparticles had higher wear resistances than those with SiC nanoparticles due to higher hardness of the former. An interesting finding from the results is that there is an optimum amount of nanoparticles at which mass removal is the minimum. This observation has been explained in terms of surface characteristics of coatings as brought out by a combination of measurements including SEM images as well as roughness measurement.

  5. Measurement and simulation of millimeter wave scattering cross-sections from steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. M.; Martys, N. S.; Garboczi, E. J.; McMichael, R. D.; Stiles, M. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Stutzman, P. E.; Wang, S.; Provenzano, V.; Surek, J. T.; Novotny, D. R.; Coder, J. B.; Janezic, M. D.; Kim, S.

    2014-02-01

    Some iron oxide corrosion products exhibit antiferromagnetic magnetic resonances (AFMR) at frequencies on the order of 100 GHz at ambient temperatures. AFMR can be detected in laboratory conditions, which serves as the basis for a new non-destructive spectroscopic method for detecting early corrosion. When attempting to measure the steel corrosion in reinforced concrete in the field, rebar geometry must be taken into account. Experiments and numerical simulations have been developed at frequencies near 100 GHz to sort out these effects. The experimental setup involves a vector network analyzer with converter heads to up-convert the output frequency, which is then connected to a horn antenna followed by a 7.5 cm diameter polymer lens to focus the waves on the sample. Two sets of samples were studied: uniform cylindrical rods and rebar corrosion samples broken out of concrete with different kinds of coatings. Electromagnetic scattering from uniform rods were calculated numerically using classical modal expansion. A finite-element electromagnetic solver was used to model more complex rebar geometry and non-uniform corrosion layers. Experimental and numerical data were compared to help quantify and understand the anticipated effect of local geometrical features on AFMR measurements.

  6. Probabilistic lifetime assessment of marine reinforced concrete with steel corrosion and cover cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Jin, Wei-Liang; Liu, Rong-Gui

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the durability behavior of marine reinforced concrete structure suffering from chloride attack, the structural service life is assumed to be divided into three critical stages, which can be characterized by steel corrosion and cover cracking. For each stage, a calculated model used to predict the lifetime is developed. Based on the definition of durability limit state, a probabilistic lifetime model and its time-dependent reliability analytical method are proposed considering the random natures of influencing factors. Then, the probabilistic lifetime prediction models are applied to a bridge pier located in the Hangzhou Bay with Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the time to corrosion initiation t 0 follows a lognormal distribution, while that the time from corrosion initiation to cover cracking t 1 and the time for crack to develop from hairline crack to a limit crack width t 2 can be described by Weibull distributions. With the permitted failure probability of 5.0%, it is also observed that the structural durability lifetime mainly depends on the durability life t 0 and that the percentage of participation of the life t 0 to the total service life grows from 61.5% to 83.6% when the cover thickness increases from 40 mm to 80 mm. Therefore, for any part of the marine RC bridge, the lifetime predictions and maintenance efforts should also be directed toward controlling the stage of corrosion initiation induced by chloride ion.

  7. Effect of Matrix Modification on Interlaminar Shear Strength of Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    In order to investigate the effect of the matrix variability on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass fiber reinforced composites at 77K, three kinds of modifiers were employed to diethyl toluene diamine (DETD) cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy resin system. The woven glass fiber reinforced composites were fabricated by vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). The ILSS at 77 K was studied and the results indicated that introduction of modifiers used in this study can enhance the ILSS of composite at 77 K. A maximum of 14.87% increase was obtained by addition of 10 wt% IPBE into the epoxy matrix. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the fracture mechanism and strengthening effect.

  8. Tensile Properties of Nano AL2O3 Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdinia, M.; Jenabali Jahromi, S. A.

    The powder of the micro Al and variant volume fractions of nano Al2O3 were milled by a high energy planetary ball-mill. By milling, a homogenous distribution of nano Al2O3 particles in the metal matrix were developed. Then the milled powder was cold compressed and sintered at 545°C for one hr. The mold and the sintered sample hold in a furnace until the temperature reached 545°C. Then the hot 27mm diameter sample was extruded to 6mm diameter. From the extruded specimens, tensile, hardness and microstructure of the prepared specimens were determined. By these tests the effect of milling time, the percent of nano-particles and the microstructure were evaluated. The hardness and tensile behaviors of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with nano Al2O3 particulate have been found to increase remarkably with the volume fraction of the reinforcement.

  9. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  10. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor. PMID:27608029

  11. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  12. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  13. Understanding the interdiffusion behavior and determining the long term stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium-base matrix composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, John K.

    1990-01-01

    The long term interdiffusional stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium alloy composites is addressed. The matrix alloy that is most promising for use as a high temperature structural material for reliable long-term space power generation is Nb1Zr. As an ancillary project to this program, efforts were made to assess the nature and kinetics of interphase reaction between selected beryllide intermetallics and nickel and iron aluminides.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Ti3SiC2 Particulate-Reinforced Novel Zn Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Habib, M. A.; Dunnigan, R.; Kaabouch, N.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis and characterization of novel Ti3SiC2-reinforced Zn matrix composites. All the composites were hot pressed at 500 °C for 5 min at a uniaxial pressure of ~150 MPa. Microstructure analysis by scanning electron microscopy and phase analysis by x-ray diffraction confirmed that there was minimal interfacial reaction between Ti3SiC2 particles and Zn matrix. The addition of Ti3SiC2 improved the tribological performance of these composites against alumina substrates but did not have any beneficial effect on the mechanical performance.

  15. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  16. Lifetime Response of a Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Singh, M.

    1999-04-25

    Lifetime studies in four-point flexure were performed on a Hi-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite over a temperature range of 700 degrees to 1150 degrees C in air. The composite consisted of ~40 vol. % Hi-NicalonTM fiber (8-harness weave) with a 0.5 Mu-m BN fiber coating and a melt-infiltration SiC matrix wand was tested with as-machined surfaces. Lifetime results indicated that the composite exhibited a stress-dependent lifetime at stress levels above an apparent fatigue limit, similar to the trend observed in CG-NicalonTM fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. At less than or equal to 950 degrees C, the lifetimes of Hi-Nicalon/MI SiC composites decreased with increasing applied stress level and test temperature. However, the lifetimes were extended as test temperature increased from 950 degees to 1150 degrees C as a result of surface crack sealing due to glass formation by the oxidation of Mi SiC matrix. The lifetime governing processes were, in general, attributed to the progressive oxidation of BN fiber coating and formation of glassy phase, which formed a strong bond between fiber and matrix, resulting in embrittlement of the composite with time.

  17. Modeling the Effect of Interface Wear on Fatigue Hysteresis Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on fatigue hysteresis behavior in carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and interface wear, fibers fracture, slip and pull-out, have been considered. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress and subsequent cyclic loading, the fibers failure probabilities and fracture locations were determined by combining the interface wear model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the global load sharing criterion. The effects of matrix properties, i.e., matrix cracking characteristic strength and matrix Weibull modulus, interface properties, i.e., interface shear stress and interface debonded energy, fiber properties, i.e., fiber Weibull modulus and fiber characteristic strength, and cycle number on fibers failure, hysteresis loops and interface slip, have been investigated. The hysteresis loops under fatigue loading from the present analytical method were in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-12-15

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%.

  19. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the periodontal ligament, and embedded in polymethylmethacrylate. The specimens (N = 50), with two teeth each, were randomly divided into five groups (n = 10/group) according to the retainer materials: (1) Interlig (E-glass), (2) everStick Ortho (E-glass), (3) DentaPreg Splint (S2-glass), (4) Ribbond (polyethylene), and (5) Quad Cat wire (stainless steel). After the recommended adhesive procedures, the retainers were bonded to the teeth by using flowable composite resin (Tetric Flow). The teeth were subjected to 10,00,000 cyclic loads (8 Hz, 3 - 100 N, 45° angle, under 37 ± 3℃ water) at their incisoproximal contact, and debonding forces were measured with a universal testing machine (1 mm/min crosshead speed). Failure sites were examined under a stereomicroscope (×40 magnification). Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Results All the specimens survived the cyclic loading. Their mean debonding forces were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The DentaPreg Splint group (80%) showed the highest incidence of complete adhesive debonding, followed by the Interlig group (60%). The everStick Ortho group (80%) presented predominantly partial adhesive debonding. The Quad Cat wire group (50%) presented overlying composite detachment. Conclusions Cyclic loading did not cause debonding. The retainers presented similar debonding forces but different failure types. Braided stainless steel wire retainers presented the most repairable failure type. PMID:24015388

  20. Stress-deformation theories for the analysis of steel beams reinforced with GFRP plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phe, Pham Van

    A theory is developed for the analysis of composite systems consisting of steel wide flange sections reinforced with GFRP plates connected to one of the flanges through a layer of adhesive. The theory is based on an extension of the Gjelsvik theory and thus incorporates local and global warping effects but omits shear deformation effects. The theory captures the longitudinal transverse response through a system of three coupled differential equations of equilibrium and the lateral-torsional response through another system of three coupled differential equations. Closed form solutions are developed and a super-convergent finite element is formulated based under the new theory. A comparison to 3D FEA results based on established solid elements in Abaqus demonstrates the validity of the theory when predicting the longitudinal-transverse response, but showcases its shortcomings in predicting the torsional response of the composite system. The comparison sheds valuable insight on means of improving the theory. A more advanced theory is subsequently developed based on enriched kinematics which incorporates shear deformation effects. The shear deformable theory captures the longitudinal-transverse response through a system of four coupled differential equations of equilibrium and the lateral-torsional response through another system of six coupled differential equations. A finite difference approximation is developed for the new theory and a new finite element formulation is subsequently to solve the new system of equations. A comparison to 3D FEA illustrates the validity of the shear deformable theory in predicting the longitudinal-transverse response as well as the lateral-torsional response. Both theories are shown to be computationally efficient and reduce the modelling and running time from several hours per run to a few minutes or seconds while capturing the essential features of the response of the composite system.

  1. Matrix toughness, long-term behavior, and damage tolerance of notched graphite fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakis, C. E.; Simonds, R. A.; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Vick, L. W.

    1990-01-01

    The long-term behavior of notched graphite-fiber-reinforced composite laminates with brittle or tough matrix materials and different fiber architectures was investigated using damage measurements and stiffness change, residual strength, and life data. The fiber/matrix materials included T300/5208, AS4/3501-6, AS4/1808, AS4/PEEK, and C3000/PMR-15 matrices and unidirectional tape and woven cloth fiber architectures. Results of damage evaluation and of residual strength measurements during the fatigue damage development showed that the long-term behavior and damage tolerance are controlled by a number of interacting factors such as the matrix toughness, fiber architecture, loading levels, and damage types and distributions.

  2. Compound characterization of laser brazed SiC-steel joints using tungsten reinforced SnAgTi-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Südmeyer, I.; Rohde, M.; Fürst, T.

    2010-02-01

    With the help of a CO2-laser (λ = 10.64 μm) Silicon carbide (Trade name: Ekasic-F, Comp: ESK Ceramics) has been brazed to commercial steel (C45E, Matnr. 1.1191) using SnAgTi-filler alloys. The braze pellets were dry pressed based on commercially available powders and polished to a thickness of 300 μm. The SnAgTi-fractions were varied with the objective of improving the compound strength. Furthermore, tungsten reinforced SnAgTi-fillers were examined with regard to the shear strength of the ceramic/steel joints. Polished microsections of SnAgTi-pellets were investigated before brazing in order to evaluate the particle distribution and to detect potential porosities using optical microscopy. The brazing temperature and the influence of the reinforcing particles on the active braze filler were determined by measurements with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). After brazing. the ceramic-steel joints were characterized by scanning electron micrographs and EDX-analysis. Finally the mechanical strength of the braze-joints was determined by shear tests.

  3. Dynamic behaviors of various volume rate steel-fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature burnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Wang, Liwen; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic strain-stress curves of reactive powder concrete under high strain rate (10/s-100/s) were determined by improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A plumbum pulse shaper was used to ensure the symmetrical stress in the specimens before fracture and avoid the fluctuation of test data due to input shaky stress pulse. A time modified method was induced for data processing in order to get accurate SHPB results. The results of experiment showed after high temperature burnt, different volume rate (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) steel-fiber reinforced reactive power concrete had the same changing tendency of residual mechanics behaviors, e.g. after 400 centigrade burnt, the residual compression strength was about 70% of material strength without burnt under 100/s. After 800 centigrade burnt, the compression strength is about 30% under 100/s while the deformation ability increased. At meanwhile, steel fiber had improved the mechanism of reinforcing effect and toughening effect of concrete material after burnt. With increasing of steel fiber volume rate, dynamic residual behavior of samples was improved. Microcosmic characteristics and energy absorption were induced for explaining the experiment results.

  4. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Cui, Yanjun; Wei, Heming; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Sun, Changsen

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost.

  5. Laser surface forming of AlCoCrCuFeNi particle reinforced AZ91D matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guanghui; Yue, T. M.; Lin, Xin; Yang, Haiou; Xie, Hui; Ding, Xu

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, the laser melt injection (LMI) technique can only be used for forming ceramic particles reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) for enhancing surface properties of lightweight engineering materials. In this research, the LMI method was employed to form metal particles reinforced MMCs on AZ91D instead. This was viable because of the unique properties of the AlCoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) metal particles used. The large difference in melting point between the HEA and the substrate material (AZ91D), and the limited reaction and the lack of fusion between the HEA and Mg have made it possible that a metal particles reinforced AZ91D composite material was produced. The reason of limited reaction was considered mainly due to the relatively high mixing enthalpy between the HEA constituent elements and Mg. Although there was some melting occurred at the particles surface with some solute segregation found in the vicinity close to the surface, intermetallic compounds were not observed. With regard to the wear resistance of the MMCs, it was found that when the volume fraction of the reinforcement phase, i.e. the HEA particles, reached about 0.4, the wear volume loss of the coating was only one-seventh of that of the substrate material.

  6. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case. PMID:12206221

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  8. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  9. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  10. Optimization of the strength-fracture toughness relation in particulate-reinforced aluminum composites via control of the matrix microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, I.; McNelley, T. R.; Nagarajan, R.; Quiles, F. N.

    1998-09-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 17.5 vol. pct SiC particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy 6092-matrix composite has been studied as a function of postfabrication processing and heat treatment. It is demonstrated that, by the control of particulate distribution, matrix grain, and substructure and of the matrix precipitate state, the strength-toughness combination in the composite can be optimized over a wide range of properties, without resorting to unstable, underaged (UA) matrix microstructures, which are usually deemed necessary to produce a higher fracture toughness than that displayed in the peak-aged condition. Further, it is demonstrated that, following an appropriate combination of thermomechanical processing and unconventional heat treatment, the composite may possess better stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness than a similar unreinforced alloy. In the high- and low-strength matrix microstructural conditions, the matrix grain and substructure were found to play a substantial role in determining fracture properties. However, in the intermediate-strength regime, properties appeared to be optimizable by the utilization of heat treatments only. These observations are rationalized on the basis of current understanding of the grain size dependence of fracture toughness and the detailed microstructural features resulting from thermomechanical treatments.

  11. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, M. J.; Pessiki, S.

    2006-03-06

    The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement.

  12. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-04-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability.

  13. Fabrication of W-1%ThO[sub 2] reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0. 5Y superalloy matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.; Ramulu, M.; Taya, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Four different aligned W-1%ThO[sub 2] reinforced Fe-25Cr-8Al-0.5Y matrix fiber reinforced superalloy [FRS] material billets were produced by powder metallurgical processing. Three materials differed only in reinforcing fiber aspect ratio, while one material included a small diameter, misoriented Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] hybrid reinforcement. Tensile and thermal cycling specimens were fabricated from the composite billets by using abrasive water jet and turning processes. Finally the specimens were protected from high temperature oxidation by a FeCrAlY thermal spray coating. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were evaluated and discussed.

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Ti-Based In Situ Dendrite-Reinforced Metallic Glass Matrix Composites in Various Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Tian, H. F.; Lan, A. D.; Zhou, H. F.; Wang, B. C.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2015-06-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviors of Ti40Zr24V12Cu5Be19 in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization experiments and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in acidic, salty, and alkaline solutions. Ti40Zr24V12Cu5Be19 in situ dendrite-reinforced MGMCs have an impressive corrosion resistance in strong acidic environment, while their performance was not so great in strong alkaline environment. Further immersion test in same solutions revealed similar chemical corrosion behaviors. XRD and SEM examinations were conducted to check the structure and surface modification of the material during the corrosion process. EDS test indicated that the amorphous matrices, which show excellent corrosion resistance, have a considerable composition variation from its crystalline dendrites counterpart.

  15. Corrosion resistance of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particle for steel reinforcement in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fujian

    Porcelain enamel has stable chemical property in harsh environments such as high temperature, acid and alkaline, and it can also chemically react with substrate reinforcing steel resulting in improved adherence strength. In this study, the corrosion resistances of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particles, which are designed for improved bond strength with surrounding concrete, were investigated in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. It consists of two papers that describe the results of the study. The first paper investigates the corrosion behavior of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The coatings include a pure enamel, a mixed enamel that consists of 50% pure enamel and 50% calcium silicate by weight, and a double enamel that has an inner pure enamel layer and an outer mixed enamel layer. Electrochemical tests demonstrates that both pure and double enamel coatings can significantly improve corrosion resistance, while the mixed enamel coating offers very little protection due to connected channels. The second paper is focused on the electrochemical characteristics of enamel coating modified by sand particle applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by EIS. Six percentages by weight are considered including 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. Results reveal that addition of sand particle does not affect its corrosion resistance significantly. Most of the sand particles can wet very well with enamel body, while some have a weak zone which is induced during the cooling stage due to different coefficient of thermal expansion. Therefore, quality control of sand particle is the key factor to improve its corrosion resistance.

  16. Thermomechanical Performance of C and SiC Multilayer, Fiber-Reinforced, CVI SiC Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid fiber approaches have been attempted in the past to alloy desirable properties of different fiber-types for mechanical properties, thermal stress management, and oxidation resistance. Such an approach has potential for the CrSiC and SiCrSiC composite systems. SiC matrix composites with different stacking sequences of woven C fiber (T300) layers and woven Sic fiber (Hi-NicalonTM) layers were fabricated using the standard CVI process. Delamination occurred to some extent due to thermal mismatch for all of the composites. However, for the composites with a more uniform stacking sequence, minimal delamination occurred, enabling tensile properties to be determined at room temperature and elevated temperatures (stress-rupture in air). Composites were seal-coated with a CVI SiC layer as well as a proprietary C-B-Si (CBS) layer. Definite improvement in rupture behavior was observed in air for composites with increasing SiC fiber content and a CBS layer. The results will be compared to standard C fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix and Hi-Nicalon reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites.

  17. Estimation of Structure-Borne Noise Reduction Effect of Steel Railway Bridge Equipped with Floating Ladder Track and Floating Reinforced-Concrete Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Sogabe, Masamichi; Asanuma, Kiyoshi; Wakui, Hajime

    A number of steel railway bridges have been constructed in Japan. Thin steel members used for the bridges easily tend to vibrate and generate structure-borne noise. Accordingly, the number of constructions of steel railway bridges tends to decrease in the urban areas from a viewpoint of environmental preservation. Then, as a countermeasure against structure-borne noise generated from steel railway bridges, we have developed a new type of the steel railway bridge equipped with a floating-ladder track and a floating reinforced-concrete (RC) deck. As a result of train-running experiment, it became apparent that the new steel railway bridge installed by double floating system has reduced a vibration velocity level by 10.5 dB(A) at main girder web as compared with a steel railway bridge installed by directly fastened track. This reduction effect was achieved by the ladder track and RC deck supported by resilient materials.

  18. Computational modeling of high performance steel fiber reinforced concrete using a micromorphic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huespe, A. E.; Oliver, J.; Mora, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    A finite element methodology for simulating the failure of high performance fiber reinforced concrete composites (HPFRC), with arbitrarily oriented short fibers, is presented. The composite material model is based on a micromorphic approach. Using the framework provided by this theory, the body configuration space is described through two kinematical descriptors. At the structural level, the displacement field represents the standard kinematical descriptor. Additionally, a morphological kinematical descriptor, the micromorphic field, is introduced. It describes the fiber-matrix relative displacement, or slipping mechanism of the bond, observed at the mesoscale level. In the first part of this paper, we summarize the model formulation of the micromorphic approach presented in a previous work by the authors. In the second part, and as the main contribution of the paper, we address specific issues related to the numerical aspects involved in the computational implementation of the model. The developed numerical procedure is based on a mixed finite element technique. The number of dofs per node changes according with the number of fiber bundles simulated in the composite. Then, a specific solution scheme is proposed to solve the variable number of unknowns in the discrete model. The HPFRC composite model takes into account the important effects produced by concrete fracture. A procedure for simulating quasi-brittle fracture is introduced into the model and is described in the paper. The present numerical methodology is assessed by simulating a selected set of experimental tests which proves its viability and accuracy to capture a number of mechanical phenomenon interacting at the macro- and mesoscale and leading to failure of HPFRC composites.

  19. Effects of cement alkalinity, exposure conditions and steel-concrete interface on the time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold for reinforcing steel in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jingak

    Effects of (1) cement alkalinity (low, normal and high), (2) exposure conditions (RH and temperature), (3) rebar surface condition (as-received versus cleaned) and (4) density and distribution of air voids at the steel-concrete interface on the chloride threshold and time-to-corrosion for reinforcing steel in concrete have been studied. Also, experiments were performed to evaluate effects of RH and temperature on the diffusion of chloride in concrete and develop a method for ex-situ pH measurement of concrete pore water. Once specimens were fabricated and exposed to a corrosive chloride solution, various experimental techniques were employed to determine time-to-corrosion, chloride threshold, diffusion coefficient and void density along the rebar trace as well as pore water pH. Based upon the resultant data, several findings related to the above parameters have been obtained as summarized below. First, time for the corrosion initiation was longest for G109 concrete specimens with high alkalinity cement (HA). Also, chloride threshold increased with increasing time-to-corrosion and cement alkalinity. Consequently, the HA specimens exhibited the highest chloride threshold compared to low and normal alkalinity ones. Second, high temperature and temperature variations reduced time-to-corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete since chloride diffusion was accelerated at higher temperature and possibly by temperature variations. The lowest chloride threshold values were found for outdoor exposed specimens suggesting that variation of RH or temperature (or both) facilitated rapid chloride diffusion. Third, an elevated time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold values were found for the wire brushed steel specimens compared to as-received ones. The higher ratio of [OH-]/[Fe n+] on the wire brushed steel surface compared to that of as-received case can be the possible cause because the higher ratio of this parameter enables the formation of a more protective passive film on

  20. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  1. Crack initiation and propagation behavior of WC particles reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composite produced by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang

    2016-08-01

    It is generally believed that cracks in metal matrix composites (MMC) parts manufacturing are crucial to the reliable material properties, especially for the reinforcement particles with high volume fraction. In this paper, WC particles (WCp) reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composites (WCp/Fe) were manufactured by laser melting deposition (LMD) technology to investigate the characteristics of cracks formation. The section morphology of composites were analyzed by optical microscope (OM), and microstructure of WCp, matrix and interface were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in order to study the crack initiation and propagation behavior under different laser process conditions. The temperature of materials during the laser melting deposition was detected by the infrared thermometer. The results showed that the cracks often appeared after five layers laser deposition in this experiment. The cracks crossed through WC particles rather than the interface, so the strength of interface obtained by the LMD was relatively large. When the thermal stress induced by high temperature gradient during LMD and the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between WC and matrix was larger than yield strength of WC, the cracks would initiate inside WC particle. Cracks mostly propagated along the eutectic phases whose brittleness was very large. The obtained thin interface was beneficial to transmitting the stress from particle to matrix. The influence of volume fraction of particles, laser power and scanning speed on cracks were investigated. This paper investigated the influence of WC particles size on cracks systematically, and the smallest size of cracked WC in different laser processing parameters was also researched.

  2. Fatigue damage growth mechanisms in continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fiber/matrix interface strength, residual thermal stresses, and fiber and matrix properties on fatigue damage accumulation in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) will be discussed. Results from titanium matrix/silicon-carbide fiber composites will be the primary topic of discussion. Results have been obtained from both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The stress in the 0 deg fibers has been indentified as the controlling factor in fatigue life. Fatigue of the notched specimens indicated that cracks can grow many fiber spacings in the matrix materials without breaking fibers.

  3. Fatigue damage growth mechanisms in continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fiber/matrix interface strength, residual thermal stresses, and fiber and matrix properties on fatigue damage accumulation in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) is discussed. Results from titanium matrix silicon carbide fiber composites is the primary topic of discussion. Results were obtained from both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The stress in the 0 deg fibers was identified as the controlling factor in fatigue life. Fatigue of the notched specimens indicated that cracks can grow in the matrix materials without breaking fibers.

  4. Mesoscopic bead-and-spring model of hard spherical particles in a rubber matrix. I. Hydrodynamic reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raos, Guido; Allegra, Giuseppe

    2000-11-01

    Exploiting an electrostatic analogy, we show that the elastic forces between a set of rigid particles embedded in a phantom polymer network can be represented by a simple bead-and-spring model. The beads represent the particles and the springs the rubber matrix. The model is validated by Monte Carlo simulation of rubbers filled with hard spherical particles, at volume fractions between 0.1 and 0.3. We derive both the moduli and the full stress-strain curves, under uniaxial elongation. The model reproduces and extends previous theoretical results on the so-called hydrodynamic reinforcement effect.

  5. Applicability of ultrasonic testing for the determination of volume fraction of particulates in alumina-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.K.; Fang, R.L.; Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1999-10-01

    An ultrasonic testing technique was employed to determine the volume fraction of alumina particulate reinforcement in 6061 aluminum matrix composites. this study was performed on various composites with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nominal volume fractions of 10, 15, and 20%. For comparison, other techniques were employed as well, including the Archimedes method, metallographic image analysis, X-ray diffraction, and acid dissolution. Observations indicated that ultrasonic testing and acid dissolution methods are more reliable than the other techniques, while ultrasonic testing is faster than the acid dissolution method.

  6. Modeling for Fatigue Hysteresis Loops of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites under Multiple Loading Stress Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the fatigue hysteresis loops of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple loading stress levels considering interface wear has been investigated using micromechanical approach. Under fatigue loading, the fiber/matrix interface shear stress decreases with the increase of cycle number due to interface wear. Upon increasing of fatigue peak stress, the interface debonded length would propagate along the fiber/matrix interface. The difference of interface shear stress existed in the new and original debonded region would affect the interface debonding and interface frictional slipping between the fiber and the matrix. Based on the fatigue damage mechanism of fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading and subsequent reloading, the interface slip lengths, i.e., the interface debonded length, interface counter-slip length and interface new-slip length, are determined by fracture mechanics approach. The fatigue hysteresis loops models under multiple loading stress levels have been developed. The effects of single/multiple loading stress levels and different loading sequences on fatigue hysteresis loops have been investigated. The fatigue hysteresis loops of unidirectional C/SiC composite under multiple loading stress levels have been predicted.

  7. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  8. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  9. Development and analysis of three-dimensionally reinforced cellular matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a new class of lightweight three-dimensional textile reinforced cellular matrix composite (3-D CMC) materials using a high-pressure foaming method. The scope of the research includes fabrication, experimental evaluation and mathematical modeling of the new composite materials. Principles of thermodynamics and transport phenomena involved in the cell nucleation and bubble growth in plastics using gas blowing agents were reviewed. The determinative factors for the foaming process were the foaming pressure, surface tension, viscous and inertial resistance forces. Foaming of epoxy resins by pressure quenching were carried out using a high-pressure vessel with a digital temperature controller and nitrogen gas as the blowing agent, at 100°C and 28--110.5 bar. The cure time was 2--2.5 hr., well before the time of gel point, 293 min., determined by means of dynamic mechanical spectroscopy. It was found that the foam density decreased monotonously and the average bubble radius slightly decreased, while the cell density increased, with the increasing foaming pressure. Cure time of 2 and 2.5 hours have no influence on the foam density, but have opposite influences on the bubble radius and cell density. Samples of 3-D woven carbon CMC materials were fabricated using the high-pressure foaming apparatus at a foaming pressure of 60 bar as the epoxy resin cured for 1.5--2 hr. at 100°C. Photomicrographs of cross-sections of the samples revealed that the epoxy resins in the epoxy pockets of the 3-D CMC samples were removed during foaming. Average density was found 1.009 g/cm 3 for TM samples and 1.076 g/cm3 for TS samples, corresponding to weight reduction of 36.92% and 28.37%, respectively, as compared with the 3-D RMC material, where TM and TS samples used 3-D woven carbon preforms of different weaving parameters. Tensile test, 3-point bending and high velocity projectile impact test were conducted to evaluate the mechanical

  10. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  11. Mechanical behavior of fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composites - Theory and experiment. [Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN (Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride) composites with various fiber contents is evaluated. Both catastrophic and noncatastrophic failures are observed in tensile specimens. Damage and failure mechanisms are identified via in-situ monitoring using NDE (nondestructive evaluation) techniques throughout the loading history. Effects of fiber/matrix interface debonding (splitting) parallel to fibers are discussed. Statistical failure behavior of fibers is also observed, especially when the interface is weak. Micromechanical models incorproating residual stresses to calculate the critical matrix cracking strength, ultimate strength, and work of pull-out are reviewed and used to predict composite response. For selected test problems, experimental measurements are compared to analytical predictions.

  12. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  13. Powder Processing of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics: Strengthening of the Powder Matrix Without Shrinkage. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Wen-chiang

    1994-01-01

    Powder processing of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites is limited by constrained densification if the powder matrix is allowed to shrink during heat treatment. This produces large, strength-limiting crack-like voids. The objective of this study was to avoid this damage phenomenon by strengthening the powder matrix without shrinkage by using the cyclic infiltration/pyrolysis of ceramic liquid precursors. The following issues were addressed: (1) liquid precursor infiltration kinetics, (2) microstructural development during heat treatment, and (3) the mechanical properties of the porous bodies thus produced. Si3N4 powder matrices were infiltrated with either Zr(Y)-nitrate, which produces ZrO2, or polysilazane, which converts to Si3N4 during pyrolysis. Infiltration kinetics were shown to depend on the permeability of the powder compact, as well as that of the intruded material developed after heat treatment. The large volume changes during precursor pyrolysis is manifested by the formation of randomly distributed voids, which coalesce at higher temperatures. In this study, the powder matrix cannot be made fully dense; its fracture toughness was found to increase proportionally with the fraction of filled porosity and with the fracture toughness of the intruded material. The fracture strength appeared to follow the same trend. However, relatively strong bodies can be obtained despite high porosity, provided that the strength-limiting flaws are small. Large cracks are introduced in the powder matrix during infiltration if a layer of precursor remains on the surface. Cracks which develop in the precursor layer can extend into the matrix. Fracture mechanisms of thin films-on-substrates under residual thermal stress were used to explain this phenomenon. Matrix damage can be avoided by removing the precursor layer prior to pyrolysis and/or by strengthening the powder compact before infiltration.

  14. Optimization of interface layers in the design of ceramic fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.; Lemaitre, J.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of using an interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix was investigated. It was found that the performance of the layer can be defined by the product of the CTE and the thickness, and that a compensating layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the thermal stresses in the matrix significantly. A practical procedure offering a window of candidate layer materials is proposed.

  15. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of using interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix has been investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  16. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of using an interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix was investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  17. Torsional moment to failure for carbon fibre polysulphone expandable rivets as compared with stainless steel screws for carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy fracture plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Sell, P J; Prakash, R; Hastings, G W

    1989-04-01

    A method of securing carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates with carbon fibre polysulphone expanding rivets was investigated. Six carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates were secured to rods with carbon fibre polysulphone rivets and six were secured with standard cortical stainless steel screws. These constructions were then subjected to pure torsional load to failure. The carbon fibre expandable rivets failed at a greater torsional moment. PMID:2720038

  18. Mechanical Properties of High Purity SiC Fiber-Reinforced CVI-SiC Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Snead, Lance L.

    2003-07-15

    Mechanical properties of silicon carbide composites reinforced with highly crystalline fibers and fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration method were evaluated. Materials used were SiC/SiC composites reinforced with unidirectional Hi-Nicalon Type-S fibers and unidirectional Tyranno SA fibers with various fiber/matrix interphase. Also, SiC/SiC composites reinforced with plain weave Tyranno SA fibers with carbon or multilayers of silicon carbide and carbon interphase were evaluated. In-plane tensile, transthickness tensile and interlaminar shear properties were evaluated by the in-plane tensile test, the transthickness tensile test, the diametral compression test and the compression test of double-notched specimens.The elastic modulus and proportional limit stress were improved by using high purity silicon carbide fibers. The in-plane tensile properties were insensitive to carbon interphase thickness for a range of thicknesses between 30 and 230 nm. It was found that the in-plane tensile strength of composites containing multilayers of silicon carbide and carbon coating of fibers and fiber bundles was superior to that of composites with carbon alone. Transthickness tensile strength and shear strength of high purity silicon carbide composites were successfully evaluated.

  19. Prediction of thermal strains in fibre reinforced plastic matrix by discretisation of the temperature exposure history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoy, E. K.

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of environmental effects on fibre reinforced plastics habitually is made difficult due to the complex variability of the natural service environment. This paper suggests a method to predict thermal strain distribution over the material lifetime by discretisation of the exposure history. Laboratory results show a high correlation between predicted and experimentally measured strain distribution

  20. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced calcium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    Hot corrosion effects of Sodium Sulfate (NaSO4) coated Calcium Aluminosilicate (CAS)/Silicon Carbide (SiC) reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The samples provided by the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) were unidirectional SiC/CAS as follows: (1) as received, (2) uncoated in air, (3) Na2SO4, coated in air and (4) Na2SO4 coated in argon. A heat treatment was conducted at 900 deg C for 100 hours. Experimental observations indicated that the Na2S04 coating in an oxidising environment had severely corroded the silicon fiber resulting in a silica rich, Nepheline, Wollastonite, Rankinite, Albite and glassy phases. In the argon atmosphere fiber degradation was present although less severe than in the oxygen environment. Similar phases of silica rich, Nepheline, Albite, Rankinite, Mullite, Pseudo-Wollastonite and a glassy region were present. Minimal fiber and matrix degradation was observed in the uncoated sample beat treated in air. Calcium aluminosilicate, SiC Fiber reinforced composites.

  1. Tensile behavior and cyclic creep of continuous fiber-reinforced glass matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccini, A. R.; West, G.; Janczak, J.; Lewis, M. H.; Kern, H.

    1997-06-01

    In this study we investigated the stress-strain behavior at room and elevated temperatures and the tensile creep and cyclic creep response of a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced aluminosilicate glass matrix composite. The interfacial condition of the as-received material was measured by a push-out indentation technique. The stress-strain behavior was that expected for this kind of composite, i.e. “pseudoductile” behavior with extensive fiber “pull-out” at room temperature and brittle failure at intermediate temperatures (750 °C) due to oxidation embrittlement. The stiffness of the composite at 750°C was analyzed for different loading rates, highlighing the influence of the loading rate on apparent composite stiffness, due to matrix softening. The creep studies were conducted at temperatures above and below the softening temperature of the glass (T g, 745 °C) in air. The cyclic creep experiments showed the existence of extensive viscous strain recovery during the unloading period. The creep strain recovery was quantified using strain recovery ratios. These ratios showed a slight dependence on the temperatures investigated (700 and 750 °C). The crept composites retained their “graceful” fracture behavior only partially after testing, indicating that oxidation of the fiber/matrix interface due to oxygen diffusion through the matrix occurred in the peripheral area of the samples.

  2. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites: An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene terminated polysulfone oligomers are part of an oligomeric class of compounds with end groups capable of thermal polymerization. These materials can be used as matrices for graphite reinforced composites. The initial evaluation of styrene terminated polysulfone oligomer based composites are summarized in terms of fabrication methods, and mechanical and environmental properties. In addition, a description and evaluation is provided of the NASA/Industry Fellowship Program for Technology Transfer.

  3. Interphase for ceramic matrix composites reinforced by non-oxide ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Bhatt, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Morscher, Gregory N. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A ceramic matrix composite material is disclosed having non-oxide ceramic fibers, which are formed in a complex fiber architecture by conventional textile processes; a thin mechanically weak interphase material, which is coated on the fibers; and a non-oxide or oxide ceramic matrix, which is formed within the interstices of the interphase-coated fiber architecture. During composite fabrication or post treatment, the interphase is allowed to debond from the matrix while still adhering to the fibers, thereby providing enhanced oxidative durability and damage tolerance to the fibers and the composite material.

  4. Effect of Reinforcement Using Stainless Steel Mesh, Glass Fibers, and Polyethylene on the Impact Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, H B Mallikarjuna; Shaik, Sharaz; Sachdeva, Harleen; Khare, Sumit; Haralur, Satheesh B; Roopa, K T

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact strength of denture base resin is of great concern and many approaches have been made to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. The objective of this study was to compare the impact strength of the denture base resin with and without reinforcement and to evaluate the impact strength of denture base resin when reinforced with stainless steel mesh, glass fiber, and polyethylene fibers in the woven form. Materials and Methods: The specimens (maxillary denture bases) were fabricated using a standard polyvinylsiloxane mold with conventional heat cured polymethyl methacrylate resin. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10). Group I specimens or control group were not reinforced. Group II specimens were reinforced with stainless steel mesh and Group III and Group IV specimens were reinforced with three percent by weight of glass fibers and polyethylene fibers in weave form respectively. All the specimens were immersed in water for 1-week before testing. The impact strength was measured with falling weight impact testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Highest impact strength values were exhibited by the specimens reinforced with polyethylene fibers followed by glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and control group. Conclusions: Reinforcement of maxillary complete dentures showed a significant increase in impact strength when compared to unreinforced dentures. Polyethylene fibers exhibit better impact strength followed by glass fibers and stainless steel mesh. By using pre-impregnated glass and polyethylene fibers in woven form (prepregs) the impact strength of the denture bases can be increased effectively. PMID:26124604

  5. Carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites and syntactic foams - mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Ronald Leonel

    The tailorability of composite materials is crucial for use in a wide array of real-world applications, which range from heat-sensitive computer components to fuselage reinforcement on commercial aircraft. The mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of composites are highly dependent on their material composition, method of fabrication, inclusion orientation, and constituent percentages. The focus of this work is to explore carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as potential nanoscale reinforcement for hollow particle filled polymer composites referred to as syntactic foams. In the present study, polymer composites with high weight fractions of CNFs, ranging from 1-10 wt.%, are used for quasi-static and high strain rate compression analysis, as well as for evaluation and characterization of thermal and electrical properties. It is shown that during compressive characterization of vapor grown carbon nanofiber (CNF)/epoxy composites in the strain rate range of 10-4-2800 s-1, a difference in the fiber failure mechanism is identified based on the strain rate. Results from compression analyses show that the addition of fractions of CNFs and glass microballoons varies the compressive strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites by as much as 53.6% and 39.9%. The compressive strength and modulus of the syntactic foams is also shown to generally increase by a factor of 3.41 and 2.96, respectively, with increasing strain rate when quasi-static and high strain rate testing data are compared, proving strain rate sensitivity of these reinforced composites. Exposure to moisture over a 6 month period of time is found to reduce the quasi-static and high strain rate strength and modulus, with a maximum of 7% weight gain with select grades of CNF/syntactic foam. The degradation of glass microballoons due to dealkalization is found to be the primary mechanism for reduced mechanical properties, as well as moisture diffusion and weight gain. In terms of thermal analysis results, the

  6. Interfacial properties of as-received and coated SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed SiC matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gaeta, P.J.; Sisson, R.D. Jr.; Singh, M.; Eldridge, J.I.

    1995-10-01

    The possibility of improving the interfacial shear strength of the SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composite system was examined. A ceramic fiber coating was chosen based on availability and chemical stability with the fiber and matrix. Fiber push-out tests conducted on as-received and coated fiber reinforced composite samples allowed characterization of the interfacial shear strength. Average debond shear and frictional sliding stresses were calculated. The effects of sample thickness and second phase addition in the matrix were also evaluated. Tested samples were examined by SEM to determine the location of the interfacial failure and to determine if any interface reactions had occurred. The coating was then evaluated based on the resulting interfacial shear strength, failure location, and integrity of the interface as compared to those properties of samples reinforced with as-received fibers.

  7. Effects of filament-matrix interfaces on the mechanical properties of SiC-reinforced Si sub 3 N sub 4: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, C.H.

    1989-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a literature review of the effects of filament-matrix interfaces on the mechanical properties of ceramic composites composed of SiC-filament-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. A general review of the processing and mechanical properties of SiC-filament-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is presented with special emphasis on research pertaining to processing-related effects on filament-matrix interfaces and the resulting effects of these interfaces on fracture behavior. A review of coating techniques for ceramic filaments is also presented, and recommendations are made for future directions in processing SiC-filament-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with mechanical properties that are enhanced by the microstructure of the filament-matrix interface. 148 refs., 1 tab.

  8. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Tang

    2004-12-19

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  9. Sodium sulfate corrosion of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Maldia, L.C.

    1993-12-01

    Sodium sulfate hot corrosion of a SiC fiber-reinforced lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Changes in the microstructural chemical composition of the specimens were investigated. The samples provided by Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, PA were grouped as follows: (1) as-received, (2) Na2SO4 salt-coated and heat-treated in oxygen, (3) noncoated and heat-treated in oxygen, (4) Na2SO4. Salt-coated and heat-treated in argon, and (5) noncoated and heat-treated in argon. Heat treatment was performed by NAWC for 100 hours at 900 deg C. Experimental data obtained indicated that the presence of Na2SO4 in an oxidative environment resulted in rapid corrosion of the matrix and SiC fibers and in the latter rings of SiO2 replaced what had previously been SiC. There was very limited degradation of the fibers and matrix exposed at the surface in the noncoated sample heat-treated in oxygen and in the salt-coated sample heat-treated in argon. A significant reduction in the amount of mullite in the matrices of all heat-treated samples was observed. Mullite dissolved into either the glassy phase or into the Beta-spodumene matrix. Lastly, the presence of distinct magnesium silicate crystalline phases in the salt-coated and heat-treated in oxygen sample implies that the MgO at the surface reacted with the SiO2 in the matrix.

  10. Effect of re-melting on particle distribution and interface formation in SiC reinforced 2124Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Durbadal; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2013-12-15

    The interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement particles plays an important role in improving properties of the metal matrix composites. Hence, it is important to find out the interface structure of composite after re-melting. In the present investigation, the 2124Al matrix with 10 wt.% SiC particle reinforced composite was re-melted at 800 °C and 900 °C for 10 min followed by pouring into a permanent mould. The microstructures reveal that the SiC particles are distributed throughout the Al-matrix. The volume fraction of SiC particles varies from top to bottom of the composite plate and the difference increases with the decrease of re-melting temperature. The interfacial structure of re-melted 2124Al–10 wt.%SiC composite was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, an electron probe micro-analyzer, a scanning transmission electron detector fitted with scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer. It is found that a thick layer of reaction product is formed at the interface of composite after re-melting. The experimental results show that the reaction products at the interface are associated with high concentration of Cu, Mg, Si and C. At re-melting temperature, liquid Al reacts with SiC to form Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and Al–Si eutectic phase or elemental Si at the interface. High concentration of Si at the interface indicates that SiC is dissociated during re-melting. The X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer analyses confirm that Mg- and Cu-enrich phases are formed at the interface region. The Mg is segregated at the interface region and formed MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the presence of oxygen. The several elements identified at the interface region indicate that different types of interfaces are formed in between Al matrix and SiC particles. The Al–Si eutectic phase is formed around SiC particles during re-melting which restricts the SiC dissolution. - Highlights: • Re-melted composite shows homogeneous particle

  11. The fatigue crack initiation at the interface between matrix and {delta}-ferrite in 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rho, B.S.; Hong, H.U.; Nam, S.W.

    1998-10-13

    It is well known that austenitic stainless steels have good mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance at high temperatures and are widely used in high temperature application. However, representative 304L stainless steel among austenitic stainless steels has the undesirable {delta}-ferrite in {gamma} matrix unavoidably because of the limitation of the manufacturing process. While large amounts of {delta}-ferrite in the austenitic stainless steels can give rise to a decrease in the hot workability, the absence of {delta}-ferrite in 304L stainless steel can be the cause of longitudinal facial crack and shortness of continuous cast slab. However, there are few reported papers related with the effect of {delta}-ferrite nucleating the initial crack at the interface between matrix and {delta}-ferrite on fatigue properties at high temperature. In the present work, a comparison of fatigue life with the amount of {delta}-ferrite was examined and to find out the mechanism of crack initiation caused by {delta}-ferrite, dislocation behavior near the interface between {delta}-ferrite and matrix during fatigue testing was analyzed. To analyze the dislocation character near the interface between the matrix and {delta}-ferrite during a low cycle fatigue test, trace analysis was applied. Using Burgers vector and dislocation line direction, calculated by trace analysis, it was possible to obtain some characteristic of dislocation behaviors near the interface.

  12. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of High-Cr WCI Matrix Surface Composite Reinforced with Cemented Carbide Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shuzeng; Bao, Chonggao; Zhang, Zhiyun; Bai, Yaping

    2013-07-01

    The present article reports a new superior wear resistance surface composite prepared by a vacuum evaporative pattern casting-in process. This surface composite was constructed with reinforcing cemented carbide rod (CCR) array within high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) matrix. Three reaction zones that formed around the CCRs were characterized and established the good metallurgical bonding between CCRs and matrix. In addition, some compound carbide containing Fe, Cr, W, and Co elements were formed in the reaction zones, owing to the partial dissolution of the CCRs and the resulting interdiffusion of elements such as W, Co, C, Fe, and Cr. The wear behavior of the composite was evaluated and compared with unreinforced high-Cr WCI by means of a three-body abrasive wear tester. The results showed that the wear resistance of the composite was significantly higher than that of the unreinforced high-Cr WCI. The exciting wear resistance can be ascribed to protective effect introduced by the CCRs during wear process and the good metallurgical bonding between CCRs and matrix.

  13. Computational Simulation of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a methodology which predicts the behavior of ceramic matrix composites and has been incorporated in the computational tool CEMCAN (CEramic Matrix Composite ANalyzer). The approach combines micromechanics with a unique fiber substructuring concept. In this new concept, the conventional unit cell (the smallest representative volume element of the composite) of the micromechanics approach is modified by substructuring it into several slices and developing the micromechanics-based equations at the slice level. The methodology also takes into account nonlinear ceramic matrix composite (CMC) behavior due to temperature and the fracture initiation and progression. Important features of the approach and its effectiveness are described by using selected examples. Comparisons of predictions and limited experimental data are also provided.

  14. A penny shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. 2: The crack problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacella, A. H.; Erdogan, F.

    1973-01-01

    The elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix was formulated. For a single filament as well as multiple identical filaments located symmetrically around the crack the problem is shown to reduce to a singular integral equation. The solution of the problem is obtained for various geometries and filament-to-matrix stiffness ratios, and the results relating to the angular variation of the stress intensity factor and the maximum filament stress are presented.

  15. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  16. 78 FR 43858 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Korea and Ukraine, 66 FR 46777 (September 7, 2001). On August 9, 2007, the Department revoked the... Reinforcing Bars from South Korea: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Order, 72 FR 44830 (August 9, 2007). DATES... be revoked.\\3\\ \\2\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 77 FR 39218, 39219 (July 2,...

  17. 77 FR 39254 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... concrete reinforcing bar from Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine (66 FR 46777... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request..., Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine (72 FR 44830). The Commission is now conducting...

  18. Relationship Between Hysteresis Dissipated Energy and Temperature Rising in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between hysteresis dissipated energy and temperature rising of the external surface in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) during the application of cyclic loading has been analyzed. The temperature rise, which is caused by frictional slip of fibers within the composite, is related to the hysteresis dissipated energy. Based on the fatigue hysteresis theories considering fibers failure, the hysteresis dissipated energy and a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter changing with the increase of cycle number have been investigated. The relationship between the hysteresis dissipated energy, a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter and a temperature rise-based damage parameter have been established. The experimental temperature rise-based damage parameter of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2D woven CMCs corresponding to different fatigue peak stresses and cycle numbers have been predicted. It was found that the temperature rise-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  19. Mechanical properties of several neat polymer matrix materials and unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of three neat matrix materials, i.e., PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, Hexcel F155 rubber-toughened epoxy and Hercules 8551-7 rubber-toughened epoxy, were experimentally determined. Twelve unidirectional carbon fiber composites, incorporating matrix materials characterized in this or earlier studies (with one exception; the PISO(sub 2)-TPI matrix itself was not characterized), were also tested. These composite systems included AS4/2220-1, AS4/2220-3, T500/R914, IM6/HX1504, T300/4901A (MDA), T700/4901A (MDA), T300/4901B (MPDA), T700/4901B (MPDA), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, ICI), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, Langley Research Center), AS4/8551-7, and AS4/PISO(sub 2)-TPI. For the neat matrix materials, the tensile, shear, fracture toughness, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were measured as a function of both temperature and moisture content. For the unidirectional composites, axial and transverse tensile, longitudinal shear, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were determined, at room temperature and 100 C.

  20. The high frequency fatigue behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Nikhilesh

    Many potential applications for continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCMCs), such as gas turbines and heat exchangers, will involve high frequency cyclic loading (75 Hz or higher). While most of the work in the area of fatigue of CFCMCs has concentrated on low frequency behavior, it has been shown that fatigue at high frequencies can exacerbate the accumulation of microstructural damage and significantly decrease fatigue life. "Soft" matrix composites with strong interface bonding provided superior resistance to high frequency fatigue damage. Nicalon/SiCON composites with strong interfacial bonding between the fibers and matrix exhibited very little internal heating during high frequency fatigue loading. This composite system exhibited excellent fatigue life, with fatigue runout at 10sp7 cycles occurring for stresses close to 80% of the ultimate strength (at a loading frequency of 100 Hz). Thick fiber coatings may be more effective in reducing the amount of fiber wear and damage which occur during high frequency fatigue. More effective lubrication at the fiber/matrix interface was achieved with thicker carbon coatings in Nicalon/C/SiC composites subjected to high frequency fatigue loading. Composites with thicker coatings exhibited substantially lower frictional heating and had much higher fatigue lives. The effect of laminate stacking sequence had a significant effect on the high frequency fatigue behavior of CFCMCs. In SCS-6/Sisb3Nsb4 composites, frictional heating in angle-ply laminates (±45) was substantially higher than that in cross-ply laminates (0/90). Since the angle-ply had a lower stiffness, matrix microcracking in this composite was more predominant. Finally, preliminary fatigue damage mechanism maps for CFCMCs were developed. These maps provided a means to identify which fatigue mechanisms were operating at a given stress level and number of cycles.

  1. Effect of monomer composition of polymer matrix on flexural properties of glass fibre-reinforced orthodontic archwire.

    PubMed

    Ohtonen, J; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2013-02-01

    To compare force levels obtained from glass fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) archwires. Specifically, FRC wires were compared with polymer matrices having different dimethacrylate monomer compositions. FRC material (E-glass provided by Stick Tech Ltd, Turku, Finland) with continuous unidirectional glass fibres and four different types of dimethacrylate monomer compositions for the resin matrix were tested. Cross-sectionally round FRC archwires fitting into the 0.3 mm slot of a bracket were divided into 16 groups with six specimens in each group. Glass fibres were impregnated by the manufacturer, and they were initially light-cured by hand light-curing unit or additionally post-cured in light-curing oven. The FRC archwire specimens were tested at 37°C according to a three-point bending test in dry and wet conditions using a span length of 10 mm and a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The wires were loaded until final failure. The data were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The dry FRC archwire specimens revealed higher load values than water stored ones, regardless of the polymer matrix. A majority of the FRC archwires showed higher load values after being post-cured. ANOVA revealed that the polymer matrix, curing method, and water storage had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on the flexural behaviour of the FRC archwire. Polymer matrix composition, curing method, and water storage affected the flexural properties and thus, force level and working range which could be obtained from the FRC archwire. PMID:22058110

  2. Poly /Diels-Alder/ matrix resins. [high temperature resistant graphite reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A poly (Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high-temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication conditions. The results of the study were highly promising and program objectives were achieved. Low-void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepreg prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 400 F and 100 psi for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 600 F, the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 550 F. The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term (over 1000 hours) use at 500 F and shorter-term use at 550 F.

  3. Wear Resistance of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Al2O3 Particles After Multiple Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasik, Adam; Pietrzak, Krystyna; Makowska, Katarzyna; Sobczak, Jerzy; Rudnik, Dariusz; Wojciechowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Based on previous results, the commercial composites of A359 (AlSi9Mg) alloy reinforced with 22 vol.% Al2O3 particles were submitted to multiple remelting by means of gravity casting and squeeze-casting procedures. The studies were focused on tribological tests, x-ray phase analyses, and microstructural examinations. More promising results were obtained for squeeze-casting method mainly because of the reduction of the negative microstructural effects such as shrinkage porosity or other microstructural defects and discontinuities. The results showed that direct remelting may be treated as economically well-founded and alternative way compared to other recycling processes. It was underlined that the multiple remelting method must be analyzed for any material separately.

  4. Numerical simulations of interfacial debonding in ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Zywicz, E.; Strum, M.J.

    1993-08-10

    The fracture toughness of brittle intermetallic compounds can be improved by ductile-phase reinforcements. Effectiveness of the ductile phase in bridging cracks, and therefore increasing, the composite toughness, is known qualitatively to depend upon the extent of debonding, between the two phases. Numerical crack-growth simulations are used here to provide semi-quantitative predictions of the influence of interfacial debonding on the macroscopic stress-displacement behavior and, hence, the fracture toughness of an idealized Pb/glass composite. The interfacial toughness required to cause debonding, characterized by a constant critical energy release rate, is varied parametrically. As expected, higher interfacial toughness results in less interphase debonding, higher composite strength, and greater ductile-phase constraint. Consequently, the increase in ductile-phase triaxiality can potentially accelerate internal void formation and growth or facilitate cleavage fracture, either of which would likely decrease the toughness of the composite.

  5. Fabrication and fracture behavior of metallic fiber reinforced NiAl matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.Y.; Lin, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    NiAl intermetallic is recently of considerable interest as the high temperature structure material because of its high melting point, high specific stiffness, better oxidation and creep resistance. However, the low-temperature brittleness of the NiAl intermetallic remained a main reason for its unpopularity for industrial applications. Composite ductile phase toughening approaches have been utilized by many researchers to improve the fracture toughness of intermetallics. In liquid metallurgy, pressure casting or infiltration of molten nickel aluminide into a preform is the usual method for the fabrication of nickel aluminide intermetallic composites. But generally, it is not useful for metallic reinforcements because of the drastic reactions between the molten nickel aluminide and the metallic preform, and the difficulty in sustaining the performance of the metallic preform at a high temperature. In solid metallurgy, this process is based on reactive powder metallurgy and hot pressing, hot extrusion and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). High processing temperature and pressure, generally at a temperature of at least 1,200 C, are necessary conditions for hot pressing, hot extrusion and HIP. Hence the processes require sophisticated manufacturing equipment and considerable energy and render the application of nickel aluminide intermetallic composites unpopular. Work on reactive hot pressing(RHP) at a low temperature near the melting point of aluminum is reconsidered again. Efforts indicated that by combining the spontaneous reaction of the electrically coated nickel film and the aluminum foils, and hot pressing at a temperature about 500 C lower than previously accomplished by HIP, would overcome the fabrication problem of NiAl intermetallic composites reinforced with the uniformly distributed metallic fibers.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and interface of SiC particle reinforced 2124 Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Durbadal; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2013-11-15

    The microstructure and interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement of a composite play an important role in improving its properties. In the present investigation, the interface and intermetallic compound present in the samples were characterized to understand structural stability at an elevated temperature. Aluminum based 2124 alloy with 10 wt.% silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced composite was prepared through vortex method and the solid ingot was deformed by hot rolling for better particle distribution. Heat treatment of the composite was carried out at 575 °C with varying holding time from 1 to 48 h followed by water quenching. In this study, the microstructure and interface of the SiC particle reinforced Al based composites have been studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) associated with wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the precipitate and intermetallic phases that are formed during heat treatment. The SiC particles are uniformly distributed in the aluminum matrix. The microstructure analyses of Al–SiC composite after heat treatment reveal that a wide range of dispersed phases are formed at grain boundary and surrounding the SiC particles. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy analyses confirm that finely dispersed phases are CuAl{sub 2} and CuMgAl{sub 2} intermetallic and large spherical phases are Fe{sub 2}SiAl{sub 8} or Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si. It is also observed that a continuous layer enriched with Cu and Mg of thickness 50–80 nm is formed at the interface in between Al and SiC particles. EDS analysis also confirms that Cu and Mg are segregated at the interface of the composite while no carbide is identified at the interface. - Highlights: • The composite was successfully heat treated at 575°C for 1

  7. Strain intensity factor approach for predicting the strength of continuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A method was previously developed to predict the fracture toughness (stress intensity factor at failure) of composites in terms of the elastic constants and the tensile failing strain of the fibers. The method was applied to boron/aluminum composites made with various proportions of 0 to + or - 45 deg plies. Predicted values of fracture toughness were in gross error because widespread yielding of the aluminum matrix made the compliance very nonlinear. An alternate method was developed to predict the strain intensity factor at failure rather than the stress intensity factor because the singular strain field was not affected by yielding as much as the stress field. Strengths of specimens containing crack-like slits were calculated from predicted failing strains using uniaxial stress-strain curves. Predicted strengths were in good agreement with experimental values, even for the very nonlinear laminates that contained only + or - 45 deg plies. This approach should be valid for other metal matrix composites that have continuous fibers.

  8. Penny-shaped crack in a fiber-reinforced matrix. [elastostatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, T. V.; Erdogan, F.

    1974-01-01

    Using a slender inclusion model developed earlier, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and elastic fibers in an elastic matrix is formulated. For a single set and for multiple sets of fibers oriented perpendicularly to the plane of the crack and distributed symmetrically on concentric circles, the problem was reduced to a system of singular integral equations. Techniques for the regularization and for the numerical solution of the system are outlined. For various fiber geometries numerical examples are given, and distribution of the stress intensity factor along the crack border was obtained. Sample results showing the distribution of the fiber stress and a measure of the fiber-matrix interface shear are also included.

  9. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  10. Consolidation of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites by High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, Hamed; Joo, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2014-08-01

    Al-3 vol pct carbon nanotube (CNT) composites are fabricated by consolidation through high-pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature. The densification behavior, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties of Al/CNT composites are studied. The results show that density and microstructural homogeneity increase with increasing number of revolutions under a high pressure of 6 GPa. Substantial grain refinement is achieved after 10 turns of HPT with an average grain thickness of ~38 nm perpendicular to the compression axis of HPT. The Al/CNT composite shows a considerable increase in hardness and strength compared to the Al matrix. The strengthening mechanisms of the Al/CNT composite are found to be (i) grain refinement of Al matrix and (ii) Orowan looping. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the structure of most of CNTs is changed during processing through mechanical milling and HPT.

  11. Fabrication of in-situ grown graphene reinforced Cu matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yakun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; Shi, Chunsheng; Li, Jiajun; Nash, Philip; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-01-01

    Graphene/Cu composites were fabricated through a graphene in-situ grown approach, which involved ball-milling of Cu powders with PMMA as solid carbon source, in-situ growth of graphene on flaky Cu powders and vacuum hot-press sintering. SEM and TEM characterization results indicated that graphene in-situ grown on Cu powders guaranteed a homogeneous dispersion and a good combination between graphene and Cu matrix, as well as the intact structure of graphene, which was beneficial to its strengthening effect. The yield strength of 244 MPa and tensile strength of 274 MPa were achieved in the composite with 0.95 wt.% graphene, which were separately 177% and 27.4% enhancement over pure Cu. Strengthening effect of in-situ grown graphene in the matrix was contributed to load transfer and dislocation strengthening. PMID:26763313

  12. Effect of superficial oxides on corrosion of steel reinforcement embedded in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Mendoza, J. . Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico); Flores, J.M. ); Castillo, U.C.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of superficial coverage with different iron oxides on the general corrosion resistance of steel embedded in concrete was investigated. Electrochemical corrosion rate and potential measurements were made of rebars that had a bare surface (polished), an atmospherically rusted (hematite [Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3

  13. Properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of NASA Lewis developed SiC/RBSN composites and their thermal and environmental stability havd been studied. The composites consist of nearly 30 vol pct of aligned 142 micron diameter chemically vapor-deposited SiC fibers in a relatively porous silicon nitride matrix. In the as-fabricated condition, the unidirectional and 2-D composites exhibited metal-like stress-strain behavior, graceful failure, and showed improved properties when compared with unreinforced matrix of comparable density. Furthermore, the measured room temperature tensile properties were relativley independent of tested volume and were unaffected by artifical notches normal to the loading direction or by thermal shocking from temperatures up to 800 C. The four-point bend strength data measured as a function of temperature to 1400 C in air showed that as-fabricated strength was maintained to 1200 C. At 1400 C, however, nearly 15 pct loss in strength was observed. Measurement of room temperature tensile strength after 100 hr exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in a nitrogen environment indicated no loss from the as-fabricated composite strength. On the other hand, after 100 hr exposure in flowing oxygen at 1200 and 1400 C, the composites showed approximately 40 pct loss from their as-fabricated ultimate tensile strength. Those exposed between 400 to 1200 C showed nearly 60 pct strength loss. Oxidation of the fiber/matrix interface as well as internal oxidation of the porous Si3N4 matrix are likely mechanisms for strength degradation. The excellent strength reproducibility, notch insensitivity, and high temperature strength of the composite makes it an ideal candidate for advanced heat engine applications provided coating or densification methods are developed to avoid internal oxidation attack.

  14. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2011-08-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23-314%), six-fold in Young's modulus (5.3-33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85-4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  15. A constitutive law for continuous fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites with fiber fragmentation and stress recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeister, Jonas M.

    1993-08-01

    THE TENSILE BEHAVIOR of a brittle matrix composite is studied for post matrix crack saturation conditions. Scatter of fiber strength following the Weibull distribution as well as the influence of the major microstructural variables is considered. The stress in a fiber is assumed to recover linearly around a failure due to a fiber-matrix interface behavior mainly ruled by friction. The constitutive behavior for such a composite is analysed. Results are given for a simplified and a refined approximate description and compared with an analysis resulting from the exact analytical theory of fiber fragmentation. It is shown that the stress-strain relation for the refined model excellently follows the exact solution and gives the location of the maximum to within 1% in both stress and strain; for most materials the agreement is even better. Also it is shown that all relations can be normalized to depend on only two variables; a stress reference and the Weibull exponent. For systems with low scatter in fiber strength the simplified model is sufficient to determine the stress maximum but not the postcritical behavior. In addition, the simplified model gives explicit analytical expressions for the maximum stress and corresponding strain. None of the models contain any volume dependence or statistical scatter, but the maximum stress given by the stress-strain relation constitutes an upper bound for the ultimate tensile strength of the composite.

  16. Creep behavior of interfaces in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Funn, J.V.; Dutta, I.

    1998-12-11

    The elevated temperature deformation behavior of interfaces in model single fiber composites was isolated and studied using a fiber push-down approach, whereby the interface is loaded in shear. Two fiber-matrix systems, one with no mutual solubility (quartz-lead) and the other with limited mutual solubility (nickel-lead), were investigated. In both systems, the matrix and fiber underwent sliding relative to each other, with the interface acting as a high diffusivity path. The mechanism of sliding was inferred to be interface-diffusion-controlled diffusional creep with a threshold stress (Bingham flow). The behavior was modeled analytically using a continuum approach, and an expression for the constitutive creep behavior of the interface was derived. The model provided a physical basis for the observed threshold behavior, which was found to be directly related to the normal (radial) residual stress acting on the fiber-matrix interface. The results are deemed to be significant because (1) in some instances, interfacial sliding may be instrumental in determining the overall creep/thermal cycling response of a composite; and (2) they offer an alternative rationalization of threshold behavior during diffusional flow (besides interface reaction control) and may be useful in understanding creep in multi-phase systems with internal stresses.

  17. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  18. Impressed-current cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete pilings: Protection criteria and the threshold for hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, D.G.; Williams, A.J. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Clemena, G.G.

    1998-05-01

    Safe cathodic protection (CP) limits for prestressing steel in concrete and the adequacy of CP using established criteria were evaluated in regard to hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Impressed-current CP was applied to laboratory scale pilings at current densities from 0.1 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} to 3.0 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Adequate CP was achieved at positions 25 cm (9.8 in.) above to 50 cm (19.7 in.) below the waterline, according to the 100-mV depolarization criterion, at an apparent applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. However, the {minus}780 mV{sub SCE} criterion was not met for currents as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} for these positions. Hydrogen production, absorption, and permeation in steel first was observed via embedded hydrogen sensors 50 cm and 25 cm above the water line at an applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. Observation of hydrogen production verified concerns that the local oxygen concentration might be depleted readily at modest CP levels and that local pH levels may be below 12.5. Experimentation demonstrated that steel crevice corrosion was initiated readily within chloride (Cl{sup {minus}})-contaminated concrete prior to CP application and that this corrosion was accompanied by acidification of the local environment to pH {le} 6 as a result of ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}) hydrolysis. The mobile subsurface hydrogen concentration present within the steel reinforcement was determined for each applied cathodic current density. Although hydrogen production and uptake occurred at current densities as low as 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}, the critical hydrogen concentration for embrittlement (i.e., 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol H/cm{sup 3}, as determined in prior research for bluntly notched prestressing steel) was not exceeded at area averaged current densities <1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Non-linear finite element-based material constitutive law for zero slump steel fiber reinforced concrete pipe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova, Alena

    This study presents a comprehensive investigation of performance and behavior of steel-fiber reinforced concrete pipes (SFRCP). The main goal of this study is to develop the material constitutive model for steel fiber reinforced concrete used in dry-cast application. To accomplish this goal a range of pipe sizes varying from 15 in. (400 mm) to 48 in. (1200 mm) in diameter and fiber content of 0.17%, 0.25%, 0.33%, 0.5%, 0.67% and 83% by volume were produced. The pipes were tested in three-edge bearing condition to obtain the load-deformation response and overall performance of the pipe. The pipes were also subjected to hydrostatic joint and joint shear tests to evaluate the performance of the fiber-pipe joints for water tightness and under differential displacements, respectively. In addition, testing on hardened concrete was performed to obtain the basic mechanical material properties. High variation in the test results for material testing was identified as a part of experimental investigation. A three-dimensional non-linear finite element model of the pipe under the three edge bearing condition was developed to identify the constitutive material relations of fiber-concrete composite. A constitutive model of concrete implementing the concrete plasticity and continuum fracture mechanics was considered for defining the complex non-linear behavior of fiber-concrete. Three main concrete damage algorithms were examined: concrete brittle cracking, concrete damaged plasticity with adaptive meshing technique and concrete damaged plasticity with visco-plastic regularization. The latter was identified as the most robust and efficient to model the post-cracking behavior of fiber reinforced concrete and was used in the subsequent studies. The tension stiffening material constitutive law for composite concrete was determined by converging the FEM solution of load-deformation response with the results of experimental testing. This was achieved by iteratively modifying the non

  20. MWNT-Doped Epoxy Matrix for Detecting Impact Damages in Fiber Reinforced Composites by Electrical Resistance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Marco; Natali, Maurizio; Kenny, Josè M.; Torre, Luigi

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a glass fiber reinforced composite based on a MWNT-doped epoxy matrix. The intrinsic electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes has allowed the production of a nanocomposite with enhanced electrical properties, respect the neat matrix. Due to the high aspect ratio of carbon nanotubes, very small amounts of these particles were enough for modifying the electrical properties of the obtained glass fiber composites. A low-velocity impact was created on the surface of the laminate, in order to produce a damage, which not involved the catastrophic failure of the sample. In order to evaluate the damage level, a mechanical characterization was performed on pristine samples, on one hand, and impacted The measurement of the electrical resistance, before and after the impact, was exploited as a way for detecting the presence of the damage produced. The results have shown that it is possible to associate the increase in electrical resistance of the composite with the formation of a damage due to an impact.

  1. SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced-Reaction Formed SiC Matrix Composites: Microstructure and Interfacial Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.; Olmstead, Forrest A.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Microstructural and interfacial characterization of unidirectional SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed SiC (RFSC) composites has been carried out. Silicon-1.7 at.% molybdenum alloy was used as the melt infiltrant, instead of pure silicon, to reduce the activity of silicon in the melt as well as to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix. Electron microprobe analysis was used to evaluate the microstructure and phase distribution in these composites. The matrix is SiC with a bi-modal grain-size distribution and small amounts of MoSi2, silicon, and carbon. Fiber push-outs tests on these composites showed that a desirably low interfacial shear strength was achieved. The average debond shear stress at room temperature varied with specimen thickness from 29 to 64 MPa, with higher values observed for thinner specimens. Initial frictional sliding stresses showed little thickness dependence with values generally close to 30 MPa. Push-out test results showed very little change when the test temperature was increased to 800 C from room temperature, indicating an absence of significant residual stresses in the composite.

  2. Modeling the Effect of Active Fiber Cooling on the Microstructure of Fiber-Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Q.; Peterson, Sean D.; Gupta, Nikhil; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2009-08-01

    A modified pressure infiltration process was recently developed to synthesize carbon-fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites. In the modified process, the ends of carbon fibers are extended out of the crucible to induce selective cooling. The process is found to be effective in improving the quality of composites. The present work is focused on determining the effect of the induced conductive heat transfer on the composite system through numerical methods. Due to the axisymmetry of the system, a two-dimensional (2-D) model is studied that can be expanded into three dimensions. The variables in this transient analysis include the fiber radius, fiber length, and melt superheat temperature. The results show that the composite system can be tailored to have a temperature on the fiber surface that is lower than the melt, to promote nucleation on the fiber surface. It is also observed that there is a point of inflection in the temperature profile along the particle/melt interface at which there is no temperature gradient in the radial direction. The information about the inflection point can be used to control the diffusion of solute atoms in the system. The result can be used in determining the optimum fiber volume fraction in metal matrix composite (MMC) materials to obtain the desired microstructure.

  3. Novel iron metal matrix composite reinforced by quartz sand for the effective dechlorination of aqueous 2-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Yang, Bo; Han, Yanni; Jiang, Chaojin; Wu, Deli; Fan, Jinhong; Ma, Luming

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we tested a novel iron metal matrix composite (MMC) synthesized by mechanically introducing quartz sand (SiO2) into an iron matrix (denoted as SiO2-Fe MMC). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant of the SiO2-Fe MMC (initial pH 5.0) for 20 mg/L of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) was 0.051 × 10(-3) L/m(2)/min, which was even higher than that of some reported Pd/Fe bimetals. This extraordinary high activity was promoted by the quick iron dissolution rate, which was caused by the formation of Fe-C internal electrolysis from carbonization of process control agent (PCA) and the active reinforcement/metal interfaces during the milling process. In addition, pH has slight effect on the dechlorination rate. The SiO2-Fe MMC retained relatively stable activity, still achieving 71% removal efficiency for 2-CP after six consecutive cycles. The decrease in dechlorination efficiency can be attributed to the rapid consumption of Fe(0). A dechlorination mechanism using the SiO2-Fe MMC was proposed by a direct electron transfer from Fe(0) to 2-CP at the quartz sand/iron interface. PMID:26735731

  4. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  5. Life Limiting Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar shear strength of four different fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites was determined with doublenotch shear test specimens as a function of test rate at elevated temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1316 C in air. Life limiting behavior, represented as interlaminar shear strength degradation with decreasing test rate, was significant for 2-D crossplied SiC/MAS-5 and 2-D plain-woven C/SiC composites, but insignificant for 2-D plain-woven SiC/SiC and 2-D woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, Michigan) SiC/SiC composites. A phenomenological, power-law delayed failure model was proposed to account for and to quantify the rate dependency of interlaminar shear strength of the composites. Additional stress rupture testing in interlaminar shear was conducted at elevated temperatures to validate the proposed model. The model was in good agreement with SiC/MAS-5 and C/SiC composites, but in poor to reasonable agreement with Sylramic SiC/SiC. Constant shear stress-rate testing was proposed as a possible means of life prediction testing methodology for ceramic matrix composites subjected to interlaminar shear at elevated temperatures when short lifetimes are expected.

  6. Damping mechanisms in alumina borate whisker-reinforced-aluminum matrix composites with or without SnO{sub 2} coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Wang, X. F.; Zheng, Z. Z.

    2010-01-15

    SnO{sub 2} was successfully coated on the surface of alumina borate whiskers. The pure aluminum matrix composites reinforced with a SnO{sub 2}-coated alumina borate whisker were fabricated by squeeze casting. The effects of coating contents on the damping properties of the coated composites at various temperatures, frequencies, and strain amplitudes were examined. The microstructures of the coated composites were also investigated through transmission electron microscopy observations. These results indicate that the introduction of Sn at the interface between whisker and matrix in the coated composites during the squeeze casting process alters not only the interface structures but also the dislocation status of the matrices in the vicinity of the interface. The results of damping characterization indicate that the damping capacities of the coated composites strongly depend on the coating contents and strain amplitudes. A damping peak at low temperatures appeared not only in the coated composites but also in the noncoated one, which is related to dislocation motion and interfacial slip caused by Sn. A damping peak at high temperatures appeared only in the coated composites, and the damping mechanisms at high temperature change with the increase in strain amplitudes. Sn played an important role on the damping mechanisms of the coated composites all along.

  7. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  8. Hot isostatic pressing of SiC particulate reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N.L.; Wei, Z.; Xu, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Two as-cast SiC particulate reinforced A359-based composites were hot isostatically pressed for a fixed length of time but at various pressures (in the range 100--150 MPa) and temperatures (in the range 450--550 C). It was found that HIP treatment generally increased the ductility but reduced the yield stress drastically. The improvement of ductility was attributed to a reduction of the porosity levels. Quantitative image analyses showed that the HIP treatment reduced the porosity levels significantly. It is of interest to observe that increasing HIP temperature is more effective than increasing HIP pressure in terms of improvement in strength and ductility. Another interesting observation is that most eutectic Si particles were spheroidized during HIP. The spheroidization of Si was believed to contribute to the improvement of mechanical properties, because fracture initiation of the composites was observed to be related to either the breaking of Si particles or the debonding of Si particles from the nearby SiC particles.

  9. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  10. Cyclic saturation behavior of tungsten monofilament-reinforced monocrystalline copper matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Laird, C.

    1999-10-26

    Studies on saturation behavior produced by cyclic deformation have been conducted on tungsten monofilament-reinforced monocrystalline copper composites. The effect of the fiber on strain localization has been investigated using interferometry. For a given applied strain amplitude, local strain and volume fraction of the persistent slip bands (PSBs) in the composite appeared no different from those observed in monolithic copper single crystals. However, the distribution of the PSBs was observed to be more uniform, and the total number of PSBs is substantially higher than that in monolithic crystals. The PSBs appeared mostly in the form of micro-PSBs or macro-PSBs with very limited width. Instead of expanding existing PSBs, new PSBs were more likely to nucleate at new locations during cyclic deformation. The volume fraction and width of the PSBs were observed to increase during saturation, which indicates that some of the PSBs become aged and new PSBs form in order to continue to carry the plastic strain. A rule of mixtures model was established to link the cyclic stress-strain response of the monocrystalline composites to the behavior of monolithic single crystals and fibers. The results calculated from the model show very good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Laser treatment of carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic matrix for adhesive bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genna, S.; Leone, C.; Ucciardello, N.; Giuliani, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laser surface treatment of CFRP made of PPS thermoplastic matrix by means of a 30 W Q-Switched Yb:YAG fiber laser, is investigated with the aim to improve adhesive bonding. The process parameters pulse power, scanning speed, hatch distance and scanning strategy, were varied to the aim to study the influence of the process condition on the first top resin layer removal and fibre damage. The operating window was experimentally determined. The effectiveness of laser treatment was verified by single lap shear test.

  12. Studies of Matrix/Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials for the High Speed Research (HSR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The research on the curing mechanism of the phenylethynyl terminated imide matrix resins was the primary focus of this research. The ability to process high performance polymers into useful adhesives and high quality composites has been significantly advanced by synthetic techniques in which oligomers terminated with reactive groups cure or crosslink at elevated temperature after the article has been fabricated. The research used a variety of analytical techniques. Many stable products were isolated, and attempts at identification were made. This research was intended to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of these new engineering materials.

  13. Fabrication and properties of CNTs reinforced polymeric matrix nanocomposites for sports applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, A.; Khalid, F. A.

    2014-06-01

    The polymeric matrix composites have found extensive applications in sports because of high strength to weight ratio, ease of processing, and longer life. This work was carried out to study the properties of different sections of composite field hockey sticks and the influence of carbon nanotubes on their properties. The samples were fabricated by compression molding process. The increase in mechanical properties by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes is correlated with the process parameters to consider enhancement in the overall performance of the stick sections.

  14. Effects of High-Temperature Annealing in Air on Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2008-01-01

    BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fiber-reinforced celsian matrix composites (CMC) were annealed for 100 h in air at various temperatures to 1200 C, followed by flexural strength measurements at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain, ultimate strength, and composite modulus remain almost unchanged for samples annealed up to 1100 C. A thin porous layer formed on the surface of the 1100 C annealed sample and its density decreased from 3.09 to 2.90 g/cu cm. The specimen annealed at 1200 C gained 0.43 wt%, was severely deformed, and was covered with a porous layer of thick shiny glaze which could be easily peeled off. Some gas bubbles were also present on the surface. This surface layer consisted of elongated crystals of monoclinic celsian and some amorphous phase(s). The fibers in this surface ply of the CMC had broken into small pieces. The fiber-matrix interface strength was characterized through fiber push-in technique. Values of debond stress, alpha(sub d), and frictional sliding stress, tau(sub f), for the as-fabricated CMC were 0.31+/-0.14 GPa and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively. These values compared with 0.53+/-0.47 GPa and 8.33+/-1.72 MPa for the fibers in the interior of the 1200 C annealed sample, indicating hardly any change in fiber-matrix interface strength. The effects of thermal aging on microstructure were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Only the surface ply of the 1200 C annealed specimens had degraded from oxidation whereas the bulk interior part of the CMC was unaffected. A mechanism is proposed explaining the various steps involved during the degradation of the CMC on annealing in air at 1200 C.

  15. High-energy ion implantation of polymeric fibers for modification of reinforcement-matrix adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grummon, D. S.; Schalek, R.; Ozzello, A.; Kalantar, J.; Drzal, L. T.

    1991-07-01

    We have previously reported on the effect of high-energy ion irradiation of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), and Kevlar-49 polyaramid fibers, on fiber-matrix adhesion and interfacial shear strength (ISS) in epoxy matrix composites. Irradiation of UHMW-PE fibers produced large improvements in interfacial shear strength, without degrading fiber tensile strength. ISS was not generally affected in irradiated Kevlar-49, and fiber tensile strength decreased. The divergence in response between polyaramid and polyethylene relates both to differences in the mesoscopic structure of the individual fibers, and to the different forms of beam induced structural modification favored by the individual polymer chemistries. Here we report results of surface energy measurements, infrared spectroscopy analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on UHMW-PE and polyaramid fibers, irradiated to fluences between 2 × 10 12 and 5 × 10 15 cm -2 with N +, Ar +, Ti +, Na +, and He + at energies between 30 and 400 keV. UHMW-PE fibers showed a pronounced increase in the polar component of surface energy which could be associated with carbonyl, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide groups at the surface. Kevlar, on the other hand, tended toward carbonization and showed a decrease in nitrogen and oxygen concentrations and a sharp drop in polar surface energy.

  16. Enhancement of Wettability of Aluminum Based Silicon Carbide Reinforced Particulate Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V. K.; Chauhan, Sakshi; Gope, P. C.; Chaudhary, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    Lately, materials research has shifted to composite materials from monolithic, adjusting to the global need for light weight, low cost, quality, and high performance in structural materials. Every effort aims to develop a material which can be appropriate for various industry and machinery purpose. In the present study, a modest attempt has been made to develop cast aluminum based silicon carbide (SiC) particulate metal matrix composite (MMC) and worked upon to raise the wettability factor between the matrix and dispersion phase. Magnesium (Mg) is used as wetting agent. It works by scavenging the oxygen from dispersoids surface and thinning the gas layer around dispersoids and this is done by forming MgO or MgAl2O4 or both according to concentration of Magnesium added. Mg2Si is the compound responsible for strengthening. The combination of aluminum and magnesium seems to have synergetic effect on wetting and give appropriate strength. All mechanical properties obtained are well correlated with microstructure obtained by Scanning electron micrograph. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) also justified the results obtained in present investigations.

  17. A damage mechanics of a particle-reinforced ductile matrix composite with progressive partial debonding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.H.; Weng, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    A micromechanical damage theory is developed to determine the overall elastoplastic stress-strain behavior of a ductile composite containing homogeneously dispersed prolate inclusions which, under the action of external tension, experience debonding on the top and bottom of the interface. The debonding process is described by Weibull`s probability function in terms of the tensile stress of the inclusions. Qiu and Weng`s energy approach is also used here to determine the internal stress state of the damaged composite. The initial two-phase system gradually turns into a three-phase one as the debonded inclusions lose their load-carrying capacity partially. The stress-strain responses are then derived as a function of volume concentrations of still bonded particles and already debonded ones, and of the shape of inclusions and the average interfacial strength. It is shown that the stress-strain curve of the system always starts out with that of perfectly a bonded composite, then deviates from it, and finally approaches a state parallel to that of a porous material containing similarly aligned voids. A detail comparison is provided with the results from Mochida, Taya, and Obata`s rigid particle theory with an elastic matrix and Togho and Weng`s completely debonding theory with an elastoplastic matrix. It is found that the behavior of a partially debonded composite always lies between the two.

  18. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  19. Three-Dimensional Nanoporous Cellulose Gels as a Flexible Reinforcement Matrix for Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuqun; Huang, Junchao; Liu, Chuanjun; Ding, Beibei; Kuga, Shigenori; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina

    2015-10-21

    With the world's focus on utilization of sustainable natural resources, the conversion of wood and plant fibers into cellulose nanowhiskers/nanofibers is essential for application of cellulose in polymer nanocomposites. Here, we present a novel fabrication method of polymer nanocomposites by in-situ polymerization of monomers in three-dimensionally nanoporous cellulose gels (NCG) prepared from aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea solution. The NCG have interconnected nanofibrillar cellulose network structure, resulting in high mechanical strength and size stability. Polymerization of the monomer gave P(MMA/BMA)/NCG, P(MMA/BA)/NCG nanocomposites with a volume fraction of NCG ranging from 15% to 78%. SEM, TEM, and XRD analyses show that the NCG are finely distributed and preserved well in the nanocomposites after polymerization. DMA analysis demonstrates a significant improvement in tensile storage modulus E' above the glass transition temperature; for instance, at 95 °C, E' is increased by over 4 orders of magnitude from 0.03 MPa of the P(MMA/BMA) up to 350 MPa of nanocomposites containing 15% v/v NCG. This reinforcement effect can be explained by the percolation model. The nanocomposites also show remarkable improvement in solvent resistance (swelling ratio of 1.3-2.2 in chloroform, acetone, and toluene), thermal stability (do not melt or decompose up to 300 °C), and low coefficients of thermal expansion (in-plane CTE of 15 ppm·K(-1)). These nanocomposites will have great promising applications in flexible display, packing, biomedical implants, and many others. PMID:26397710

  20. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  1. Impressed current cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete pilings: Protection criteria and the threshold for hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, D.G.; Williams, A.J. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Clemena, G.G.

    1997-12-01

    This paper addresses both safe cathodic protection limits for pre-stressing steel in concrete given the concern of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and the adequacy of cathodic protection using established criteria. Impressed current cathodic protection was applied to laboratory scale pilings at current densities ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Adequate cathodic protection was achieved at positions ranging from 25 cm above to 50 cm below the waterline, according to the 100 mV depolarization criterion, at an apparent applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. However, the {minus}780 mV{sub SCE} criterion was not met for currents as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} for these positions. Hydrogen production, absorption, and permeation in steel was first observed via embedded hydrogen sensors, located 50 cm and 25 cm above the waterline, at an applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. The observation of hydrogen production verifies the concerns that the local oxygen concentration may be readily depleted at modest cathodic protection levels and that local pH levels may be below 12.5. Experimentation presented here, as well as within the literature, has demonstrated that steel crevice corrosion is readily initiated within chloride contaminated concrete prior to the application of cathodic protection, and that this corrosion is accompanied by an acidification of the local environment to a pH of 6 or below due to ferrous ion hydrolysis. The mobile subsurface hydrogen concentration present within the steel reinforcement was determined for each applied cathodic current density. Although hydrogen production and uptake occurred at current densities as low as 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}, the critical hydrogen concentration for embrittlement (2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol H/cm{sup 3}) was not exceeded at area averaged current densities as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}.

  2. The interface in tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1989-01-01

    The creep resistance of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites was evaluated. The interface region between the fiber and matrix was characterized by microhardness and electron probe microanalysis measurements which indicated that its properties were between those of fiber and matrix. However, the measured properties of the composite exceeded those calculated by the rule of mixtures even when the interface zone was assumed to retain all the strength of the fiber. The composite structure appeared to enhance the strengths of both the fibers and the matrix above what they exhibited in stand-alone tests. The effect of fiber orientation and matrix alloy composition on the fiber/matrix interface were also evaluated. Small alloying additions of zirconium and tungsten to the niobium matrix affected the creep resistance of the composites only slightly. A decrease in the creep resistance of the composite with increasing zirconium content in the matrix was ascribed to an increase in the diffusion rate of the fiber/matrix interdiffusion reaction, and a slight increase in the creep resistance of the composite was observed with an addition of 9 w percent tungsten to the matrix. In addition, Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis.

  3. Inertia-friction welding of a particulate-reinforced aluminum-matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cola, M. J.; Baeslack, W. A., III; Altshuller, B.; Sjostrom, T.

    Inertia-friction welds were produced between an aluminum-matrix composite tube and a monolithic aluminum alloy bar. The effects of flywheel speed and axial pressure, and the effect of the flywheel speed/axial pressure interaction for a tube-to-bar joint geometry were statistically evaluated. Welds were evaluated with light and scanning-electron microscopy, tensile tested, and measured for hardness. Light microscopy of the interface region of selected inertia-friction welds were sound and free of discontinuities. The tensile strength of the inertia-friction welds was 82 percent of the aluminum-composite base material. Failures were at, or near the weld interface. Fractography of failed tensile specimen fracture surfaces revealed a varying topography and mixed-mode fracture morphology.

  4. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the rapid consolidation of continuously reinforced, metal-matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, P. D.; Semiatin, S. L.; Goetz, R. L.

    1996-06-01

    The feasibility of the rapid consolidation of T-14Al-21Nb/SCS-6 foil/fiber/foil composites using a forging approach was established as an alternative to slower and more expensive processes such as those based on hot isostatic pressing (HIP) or vacuum hot pressing (VHP). A firm basis for the technique was developed through theoretical analyses of temperature transients, forging pressures, and fiber fracture. These analyses demonstrated that there exists an optimal forging speed at which the consolidation stresses are a minimum. It was also shown that the flow stress of the encapsulation material relative to that of the densifying layup is an important consideration in achieving full consolidation during forging. Specifically, the difference in flow stress between the two materials influences the magnitude and sign of the in-plane (secondary) stresses that are developed during forging and therefore the rate of pore closure during the latter stages of the process. With regard to fiber fracture, analyses were performed to estimate the axial and tangential stresses during rapid consolidation. The theoretical work was validated by experimental trials using the Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix/silicon carbide fiber system. Measured forging pressures were in good agreement with predictions. Fiber fracture observations indicated that tangential tensile stresses developed in the fiber control failure; a forging window to avoid such failures was thus developed. Finally, it was demonstrated that matrix microstructures and mechanical properties similar to those of conventionally consolidated Ti-14Al-21Nb/silicon carbide composites can be achieved by the forge-consolidation technique.

  5. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the rapid consolidation of continuously reinforced, metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaou, P.D.; Semiatin, S.L.; Goetz, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The feasibility of the rapid consolidation of Ti-14Al-21Nb/SCS-6 foil/fiber/foil composites using a forging approach was established as an alternative to slower and more expensive processes such as those based on hot isostatic pressing (HIP) or vacuum hot pressing (VHP). A firm basis for the technique was developed through theoretical analyses of temperature transients, forging pressures, and fiber fracture. These analyses demonstrated that there exists an optimal forging speed at which the consolidation stresses are a minimum. It was also shown that the flow stress of the encapsulation material relative to that of the densifying layup is an important consideration in achieving full consolidation during forging. Specifically, the difference in flow stress between the two materials influences the magnitude and sign of the in-plane (secondary) stresses that are developed during forging and therefore the rate of pore closure during the latter stages of the process. With regard to fiber fracture, analyses were performed to estimate the axial and tangential stresses during rapid consolidation. The theoretical work was validated by experimental trials using the Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix/silicon carbide fiber system. Measured forging pressures were in good agreement wit h predictions. Fiber fracture observations indicated that tangential tensile stresses developed in the fiber control failure; a forging window to avoid such failures was thus developed. Finally, it was demonstrated that matrix microstructures and mechanical properties similar to those of conventionally consolidated Ti-14Al-21Nb/silicon carbide composites can be achieved by the forge-consolidation technique.

  6. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation in particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianku.

    1989-01-01

    Consequences of the interaction of cracks with SiC particles are examined with emphasis on micromechanisms influencing fatigue crack propagation in high strength aluminum alloy matrix composites. Fatigue crack propagation is found to show three distinct regimes; each accompanied by growth mechanisms reflecting different roles of SiC particles. At near-threshold levels, SiC particles impeded fatigue crack growth by deflecting the crack to promote roughness-induced crack closure and by acting as crack traps along the crack front. A two-dimensional crack trapping analysis based on the interaction of a finite crack with a SiC particle indicates that a limiting criterion for fatigue crack growth in SiC{sub p}/Al composites can be established, which requires that the maximum plastic-zone size exceed the effective mean particle size or that the tensile stress in the matrix beyond the particle on the crack front exceed the yield strength of the material. Implications of crack closure and crack trapping to near-threshold crack growth, including load-ration and particle-size dependence of fatigue thresholds, are discussed in terms of contributions from each mechanism. At higher stress intensities, limited fracture of SiC particles ahead of the crack tip leads to the development of uncracked ligaments along the crack length, resulting in a reduced crack-tip stress intensity from ligament bridging. Micromechanical models are developed for such bridges induced by both overlapping cracks and co-planar ligaments, based on the notion of a limiting crack opening displacement or limiting strain in the ligament. The predicted reduction in crack tip stress intensity is shown to be consistent with experimental observations.

  7. Flexural Upgrading of Steel-Concrete Composite Girders Using Externally Bonded CFRP Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Eshaghian, M.

    2010-04-01

    This study focuses on the flexural performance of composite steel-concrete beam girders retrofitted with CFRP. The current work is a numerical study of the load carrying capacity of a section which is strengthened by externally bonding of CFRP to the tension flange. At the primarily stage of the work, the model is verified by published experimental data. The three dimensional interactive failure Tsai-Wu criteria was implemented to retrofitted composite girder in order to identify the failure mode. Then a detailed parametric study is carried out to investigate the effects of geometry parameters and material characteristics on flexural performance of a composite section.

  8. Nitrogen implantation into steel wire coated with zinc used as reinforcement in power transmission conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Maldonado, J. J.; Dulcé-Moreno, H. J.; V-Niño, E. D.

    2013-11-01

    In tropical environments, diversity of climatic factors such as temperature, relative humidity, deposition of environmental contaminants (such as sulfates and chlorides) affect a large proportion of materials exposed to the weather, and electrochemical corrosion is one of the phenomena that occur in the case of metals and alloys [1, 2]. It is therefore particularly important to study this behavior in the Zinc-coated steel, since this material is used for its economy in the industry specifically in the area of transport of electricity.

  9. Interface characterization of fiber-reinforced Ni3Al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.-M.; Kao, W. H.; Liu, C. T.

    1989-11-01

    The interfacial reaction characteristics of SCS-6, Sigma, and B4C/B fibers with nickel aluminide (Ni3Al) matrix have been investigated between 780°C to 980°C for times ranging from 1 to 100 hours. The microstructure and elemental compositions across the reaction zone have been analyzed quantitatively using microscopy and electron probe microanalyses, respectively. The results show that Ni3Al reacts extensively with SCS-6, Sigma, and B4C/B fibers to form complex reaction products, and Ni is the dominant diffusing species controlling the extent of reaction. In the SiC/Ni3Al composite, the C-rich layer on the SiC surface can slow down but cannot stop the inward diffusion of Ni into SiC fiber. When the C-rich layer is depleted, a rapid increase in reaction zone thickness occurs. Diffusion barrier coating on the fibers is required to minimize the interfacial reactions.

  10. Acoustic inspection of bond strength of steel-reinforced mortar after exposure to elevated temperatures

    PubMed

    Chiang; Tsai; Kan

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the bond strength between the reinforcement and concrete after fire damage, a combination of acoustic through-transmission and pull-out tests were used. Previous studies have shown a 25% decrease in the ultrasonic pulse velocity at 90% of the maximum load at room temperature. The specimens were kept in the oven at an elevated temperature for 1, 2, or 3 h. They were then removed and cooled to room temperature. Inspection was conducted using a high-power ultrasonic pulse velocity system while a pull-out load was applied. The correlation between preheated temperature, acoustic wave velocity, and the applied load was analyzed. Initial results show that bond strength and pulse velocity decreased substantially as the temperature or the heating time increased. PMID:10829721

  11. Shear debonding behavior of a carbon-coated interface in a tungsten fiber-reinforced tungsten matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Höschen, T.; Rasinski, M.; You, J.-H.

    2011-10-01

    One of the crucial issues related to structural application of tungsten for fusion reactor components is its brittleness. To improve tungsten toughness we explored a novel toughening method based on W fiber reinforcement. The idea is to utilize the effective energy dissipation caused by controlled cracking and friction at fiber/matrix interfaces. To realize this, the interfaces need to be engineered by means of adequate coating. In this work we investigated fracture behavior of a carbon-coated (0.6 μm) interface in a single-filament mini-composite using fiber push-out test. The composite was fabricated by CVD process. Mechanical parameters were determined by fitting the related theoretical models with the experimental data. Calibrated fracture energy and debonding strength was 7.4 J/m 2 and 285 MPa, respectively. This fracture energy value satisfied the theoretical criterion of controlled crack deflection. The result of the carbon coating was compared to the case of uncoated interface which exhibited stronger friction.

  12. Effects of Temperature, Oxidation and Fiber Preforms on Fatigue Life of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation and fiber preforms on the fatigue life of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic-matrix composites (C/SiC CMCs) have been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D, 2.5D and 3D C/SiC composites at room temperature, 800 °C in air, 1100, 1300 and 1500 °C in vacuum conditions have been predicted.

  13. Oxidation of SiC Fiber-Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites with a BN Interphase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth; Boyd, Meredith K.

    2010-01-01

    SiC-fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites with a BN interphase were oxidized in reduced oxygen partial pressures of oxygen to simulate the environment for hypersonic vehicle leading edge applications. The constituent fibers as well as composite coupons were oxidized in oxygen partial pressures ranging from 1000 ppm O2 to 5% O2 balance argon. Exposure temperatures ranged from 816 C to 1353 C (1500 F to 2450 F). The oxidation kinetics of the coated fibers were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). An initial rapid transient weight gain was observed followed by parabolic kinetics. Possible mechanisms for the transient oxidation are discussed. One edge of the composite coupon seal coat was ground off to simulate damage to the composite which allowed oxygen ingress to the interior of the composite. Oxidation kinetics of the coupons were characterized by scanning electron microscopy since the weight changes were minimal. It was found that sealing of the coupon edge by silica formation occurred. Differences in the amount and morphology of the sealing silica as a function of time, temperature and oxygen partial pressure are discussed. Implications for use of these materials for hypersonic vehicle leading edge materials are summarized.

  14. Control of interfacial reactions during liquid phase processing of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with INCONEL 601 fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, F.; Colin, C.; Delannay, F.

    1998-06-01

    A comprehensive investigation is made of the parameters affecting the extent of interface reactions during squeeze casting of composites consisting of a matrix of either pure Al or alloy AS13 reinforced with fibers of INCONEL 601. The process parameters are the preform thickness and temperature, the fiber volume fraction, the temperature and mass of the liquid metal, and the temperature of the die. Adjustment of these process parameters made possible the full control of reactions. It is found that reactions proceed mainly in the solid state after decomposition of the oxide barrier layer covering the fibers. A simple kinetic model is developed that enlightens the role of this barrier layer. No trace of reaction could be detected in composites processed using preoxidized preforms. Alloying Al with Si also induces a drastic reduction of reactivity. The high ductility of the composites attests to the processing quality. An original procedure is proposed for measuring the activation energy for initiation of reactions by differential thermal analysis.

  15. Effects of Temperature, Oxidation and Fiber Preforms on Fatigue Life of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation and fiber preforms on the fatigue life of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic-matrix composites (C/SiC CMCs) have been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D, 2.5D and 3D C/SiC composites at room temperature, 800 °C in air, 1100, 1300 and 1500 °C in vacuum conditions have been predicted.

  16. Matrix effects in the energy dispersive X-ray analysis of CaO-Al(2)O(3)-MgO inclusions in steel.

    PubMed

    Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan; Verma, Neerav

    2011-12-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of micron-sized inclusions in steel is of considerable industrial importance. Measured spectra and Monte Carlo simulations show a significant effect of the steel matrix on analysis of CaO-Al(2)O(3)-MgO inclusions: the steel matrix filters the softer (Al and Mg) characteristic X-rays, increasing the relative height of the Ca peak. Bulk matrix correction methods would not result in correct inclusion compositions, but operating at a lower acceleration voltage shifts the effect to smaller inclusion sizes. PMID:22051086

  17. An Adaptive PID Controller for Reinforcement of Carbon Steel:Performance Analysis using MATLAB Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, Ramakrishnan; Usha, Mahalingam

    2012-03-01

    dent on the grain size and percentage of volume fraction recrystallization. In this Paper, a new approach for controlling microstructure development during hot working process by percentage of volume fraction recrystallization is proposed. Here two different methods are employed. One of the approaches is based on the Optimal Control theory and involves the developing of state space models to describe the material behavior and the mechanics of the process. This approach is applied to obtain the desired percentage of volume fraction recrystallization of '1' from an initial value of '0'. The standard Arrehenious equation of 0.3% carbon steel is utilized to obtain an optimal deformation path such that the percentage of volume fraction recrystallization should be 1. The plant model is developed and an appropriate optimality criterion is selected to maintain strain, strain rate and temperature. The state-space model together with an optimality criterion is used to control the percentage of volume fraction recrystallization using Linear Quadrat

  18. In Situ Laser Synthesis of Fe-Based Amorphous Matrix Composite Coating on Structural Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana; Hwang, Jun Y.; Paital, Sameer; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Vora, Hitesh; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2012-12-01

    Iron-based amorphous materials, owing to their very high hardness, elastic modulus, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance, can be potential materials for surface modification and engineering of many structural alloys. The current study focuses on a novel functional coating, synthesized via laser cladding of an iron-based (Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B) amorphous precursor powder, on AISI 4130 steel substrate, using a continuous-wave diode-pumped ytterbium laser. The coatings were characterized by different techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM and TEM studies indicated the presence of Fe-based nanocrystalline dendrites intermixed within an amorphous matrix. A three-dimensional thermal modeling approach based on COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL Inc., Burlington, MA) was used to approximately predict the temperature evolution and cooling rates achieved during laser processing. The mechanisms for the formation of crystalline phases and the morphological changes in the microstructure were studied based on the thermal model developed. Although the thermal model predicted substantially high cooling rates as compared to the critical cooling rate required for retaining an amorphous phase, the formation of crystalline phases is attributed to formation of yttrium oxide, reducing the glass-forming ability, and formation of different oxide phases that act as heterogeneous nucleation sites resulting in the composite microstructure.

  19. The effects of long-duration space exposure on the mechanical properties of some carbon-reinforced resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyhnal, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0175 involved the non-instrumented exposure of seven carbon-fiber reinforced resin-matrix advanced composite panels contained in two trays - A7 and A1. These two trays were located, respectively, on the leading and trailing faces of LDEF, obliquely oriented to the RAM (Row 9) and WAKE (Row 3) directions. The identity and location of the seven panels, which consisted of six flat laminates of the following material systems are shown: carbon/epoxy (T300/934), carbon/bismaleimide (T300/F178), and carbon/polyimide (C6000/LARC-160 and C6000/PMR-15), plus one bonded honeycomb sandwich panel (T300/934 face sheets and Nomex core) patterned after the Space Shuttle payload bay door construction. These material systems were selected to represent a range of then-available matrix resins which, by virtue of their differing polymer chemistry, could conceivably exhibit differing susceptibility to the low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. The principal exposure conditions of the LDEF environment at these tray locations are shown. Noteworthy to some of the observations discussed is the four-orders-of magnitude difference in the atomic oxygen (AO) fluence, which made a shallow incidence angle (approximately 22 deg) to Tray A7, while Tray A1 on the trailing face was essentially shielded from AO exposure. This evaluation focused on determining the individual and relative suitability of a variety of resin-matrix composite systems for long-term space structural applications. This was accomplished primarily by measuring and comparing a range of engineering mechanical properties on over 300 test coupons sectioned from the flight panels and from identical control panels, and tested at ambient and elevated temperatures. This testing was supported by limited physical characterization, involving visual examination of flight panel surface features, measurements of weight loss and warpage, and examination for changes in internal integrity (micro

  20. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  1. Raman Study of Uncoated and p-BN/SiC-Coated Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites. Part 1; Distribution and Nanostructure of Different Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouadec, Gwenael; Colomban, Philippe; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2000-01-01

    Hi-Nicalon fiber reinforced celsian matrix composites were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and imaging, using several laser wavelengths. Composite #1 is reinforced by as-received fibers while coatings of p-BN and SiC protect the fibers in composite #2. The matrix contains traces of the hexagonal phase of celsian, which is concentrated in the neighborhood of fibers in composite #1. Some free silicon was evident in the coating of composite #2 which might involve a {BN + SiC yields BNC + Si} "reaction" at the p-BN/SiC interface. Careful analysis of C-C peaks revealed no abnormal degradation of the fiber core in the composites.

  2. Factors affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced Al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baisong; Yi, Jianhong; Ni, Song; Shen, Rujuan; Song, Min

    2016-04-01

    This work studied the effects of matrix powder and sintering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ formed Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced pure Al-based composites. It has been shown that both factors have significant effects on the morphology of the reinforcements and densification behaviour of the composites. Due to the strong interfacial bonding and the limitation of the crack propagation in the intermetallic shell during deformation by soft Al matrix and Ti core, the composite fabricated using fine spherical-shaped Al powder and sintered at 570 °C for 5 h has the optimal combination of the overall mechanical properties. The study provides a direction for the optimum combination of high strength and ductility of the composites by adjusting the fabrication parameters.

  3. Effect of pulse laser parameters on TiC reinforced AISI 304 stainless steel composite coating by laser surface engineering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Chinmaya Kumar; Masanta, Manoj

    2015-04-01

    In this work, TiC reinforced steel composite layer has been produced by laser scanning over the preplaced TiC powder on AISI 304 steel substrate, using a pulse Nd:YAG laser. Depending on the pulse laser parameters, TiC either deposited or dispersed on the surface of steel substrate. Depth and width of laser processed TiC-steel composite layer has been deliberated from the SEM images at the transverse cross section of the laser scanned samples. Hardness of the laser processed composite layer has been measured through Vickers micro-hardness tester. Effect of pulsed laser parameters i.e. peak power, pulse duration, overlapping factor (corresponding to scan speed and frequency) on micro-hardness, composite layer profile (depth and width) and microstructure of the laser processed TiC-steel composite layer has been studied. From the experimental analysis, it is revealed that, laser peak power and overlapping factor have significant effect on the TiC-steel composite layer profile and its hardness value.

  4. Performance evaluation of a novel rotational damper for structural reinforcement steel frames subjected to lateral excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Khadem, S. E.; Mirzabagheri, S.; Sanati, H.; Khosravieh, M. Y.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a novel rotational damper called a Rotational Friction Viscoelastic Damper (RFVD) is introduced. Some viscoelastic pads are added to the Rotational Friction Damper (RFD) in addition to the friction discs used in this conventional device. Consequently, the amount of energy dissipated by the damper increases in low excitation frequencies. In fact, the input energy to the structure is simultaneously dissipated in the form of friction and heat by frictional discs and viscoelastic pads. In order to compare the performance of this novel damper with the earlier types, a set of experiments were carried out. According to the test results, the RFVD showed a better performance in dissipating input energy to the structure when compared to the RFD. The seismic behavior of steel frames equipped with these dampers was also numerically evaluated based on a nonlinear time history analysis. The numerical results verified the performance of the dampers in increasing the energy dissipation and decreasing the energy input to the structural elements. In order to achieve the maximum dissipated energy, the dampers need to be installed in certain places called critical points in the structure. An appropriate approach is presented to properly find these points. Finally, the performance of the RFVDs installed at these critical points was investigated in comparison to some other configurations and the validity of the suggested method in increasing the energy dissipation was confirmed.

  5. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  6. Joint Strength Control at the Fiber/Matrix Interface during the Production of Polymer Composite Materials Reinforced with High Performance Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the study of the joint strength between polymer matrix and high performance polyethylene fiber. The fiber/matrix joints simulate the unit cell of the fiber-reinforced composite materials. Effect of heat treatment on the composite properties at the interface was estimated by a multifilament wet-pull-out method. It was found that the joint strength may be increased with the help of extra heart treatment. Both the energy to peak load and the energy to failure for CM joints at various stages of loading were determined.

  7. Valorization of an industrial organosolv-sugarcane bagasse lignin: Characterization and use as a matrix in biobased composites reinforced with sisal fibers.

    PubMed

    Ramires, Elaine C; Megiatto, Jackson D; Gardrat, Christian; Castellan, Alain; Frollini, Elisabete

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, the main focus was the characterization and application of the by-product lignin isolated through an industrial organosolv acid hydrolysis process from sugarcane bagasse, aiming at the production of bioethanol. The sugarcane lignin was characterized and used to prepare phenolic-type resins. The analysis confirmed that the industrial sugarcane lignin is of HGS type, with a high proportion of the less substituted aromatic ring p-hydroxyphenyl units, which favors further reaction with formaldehyde. The lignin-formaldehyde resins were used to produce biobased composites reinforced with different proportions of randomly distributed sisal fibers. The presence of lignin moieties in both the fiber and matrix increases their mutual affinity, as confirmed by SEM images, which showed good adhesion at the biocomposite fiber/matrix interface. This in turn allowed good load transference from the matrix to the fiber, leading to biobased composites with good impact strength (near 500 J m(-1) for a 40 wt% sisal fiber-reinforced composite). The study demonstrates that sugarcane bagasse lignin obtained from a bioethanol plant can be used without excessive purification in the preparation of lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced biobased composites displaying high mechanical properties. PMID:20589841

  8. Finite element analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC): validation of experimental tensile capacity of dog-bone specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Elsha Al; Ahmed, Sheikh Saleh; Siddique, Ashfia

    2014-09-01

    Finite element analyses are conducted to model the tensile capacity of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). For this purpose dog-bone specimens are casted and tested under direct and uniaxial tension. Two types of aggregates (brick and stone) are used to cast the SFRC and plain concrete. The fiber volume ratio is maintained 1.5 %. Total 8 numbers of dog-bone specimens are made and tested in a 1000-kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM). The strain data are gathered employing digital image correlation technique from high-definition images and high-speed video clips. Then, the strain data are synthesized with the load data obtained from the load cell of the UTM. The tensile capacity enhancement is found 182-253 % compared to control specimen to brick SFRC and in case of stone SFRC the enhancement is 157-268 %. Fibers are found to enhance the tensile capacity as well as ductile properties of concrete that ensures to prevent sudden brittle failure. The dog-bone specimens are modeled in the ANSYS 10.0 finite element platform and analyzed to model the tensile capacity of brick and stone SFRC. The SOLID65 element is used to model the SFRC as well as plain concretes by optimizing the Poisson's ratio, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and stress-strain relationships and also failure pattern as well as failure locations. This research provides information of the tensile capacity enhancement of SFRC made of both brick and stone which will be helpful for the construction industry of Bangladesh to introduce this engineering material in earthquake design. Last of all, the finite element outputs are found to hold good agreement with the experimental tensile capacity which validates the FE modeling.

  9. Experimental research on the penetration of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullet into steel target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. W.; Chen, G.

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, the penetration experiments of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material bullets into 45# steel targets are conducted by employing H25 artillery. In which, an experimental technique of sub-caliber penetration is constructed. The quasi static and dynamic behaviours of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are also experimental investigated. The self-sharpening phenomenon of composite material is observed. Integrated with metallographic analysis, the failure modes of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material are identified systemically and compared with the quasi-static and dynamic material tests. It includes four failure modes, i.e., shear fracture of tungsten fiber, brittle fracture of tungsten fiber and shear fracture of metallic glass matrix as well as melting of tungsten fiber and metallic glass matrix. Comparatively, three failure mechanisms of tungsten fiber in the bullet nose are also identified, i.e., shear fracture, splitting fracture and bending or/and buckling. Finally, the mechanism of self-sharpening behaviour of tungsten-fiber/metallic-glass matrix composite material is discussed.

  10. Phyllanthus muellerianus and C6H15NO3 synergistic effects on 0.5 M H2SO4-immersed steel-reinforced concrete: Implication for clean corrosion-protection of wind energy structures in industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 (triethanolamine: TEA) synergistic effects on reinforcing-steel corrosion-inhibition and the compressive-strength of steel-reinforced concrete immersed in 0.5 M H2SO4. This is to assess suitability of the synergistic admixture usage for wind-energy steel-reinforced concrete structures designed for industrial environments. Steel-reinforced concrete specimens were admixed with individual and synergistic designs of Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures and immersed in the 0.5 M H2SO4. Electrochemical monitoring of corrosion potential, as per ASTM C876-91 R99, and corrosion current were obtained and statistically analysed, as per ASTM G16-95 R04, for modelling noise resistance. Post-immersion compressive-strength testing then followed, as per ASTM C39/C39M-03, for detailing the admixture effect on load-bearing strength of the steel-reinforced concrete specimens. Results showed that while individual Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract concentrations exhibited better inhibition-efficiency performance than C6H15NO3, synergistic additions of C6H15NO3 to Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract improved steel-rebar corrosion-inhibition. Thus, 6 g Phyllanthus muellerianus + 2 g C6H15NO3 synergistically improved inhibition-efficiency to η = 84.17%, from η = 55.28% by the optimal chemical or from η = 74.72% by the optimal plant-extract admixtures. The study also established that improved compressive strength of steel-reinforced concrete with acceptable inhibition of the steel-rebar corrosion could be attained through optimal combination of the Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures.

  11. Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Mg (AM60)/Al2O3 Metal Matrix Composites with Varying Volume Fractions of Fiber Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Fang, Li; Xiong, Bojun; Hu, Henry

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium alloy AM60 matrix-based composite reinforced with 7, 9, 11, 22, and 35 vol.% of Al2O3 fibers was squeeze cast. The microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated in comparison with the matrix alloy AM60. The results of tensile testing indicated that the addition of Al2O3 fibers to magnesium alloy AM60 led to a significant improvement in mechanical properties. As the fiber volume fraction increased, the strengths and moduli of the composites were enhanced considerably. However, the notable increase in strengths was at sacrifice in elongation. Microstructural analyses via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the grain size decreased with increasing volume fractions of reinforcement. The restriction of grain growth by the limited inter-fiber spacing could be the primary mechanism for a reduction in the grain size of the matrix alloy. The SEM fractography evidently reveals that the debonding of fibers from the matrix alloy and the fiber cracking were two primary mechanisms for the tensile failure of the composites.

  12. Matrix grain characterisation by electron backscattering diffraction of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites reinforced with MoSi{sub 2} intermetallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Corrochano, J. Hidalgo, P.; Lieblich, M.; Ibanez, J.

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: Six extruded PM AA6061/MoSi{sub 2}/15p were processed with and without ball milling {yields} EBSD was used to characterise matrix grain size and grain orientation. {yields} Ball milling decreases matrix grain size to submicrometric level. {yields} Ball milling produces a more equiaxed microstructure and larger misorientation. {yields} Increasing milling time produces matrix texture randomization.

  13. Processing and properties of TiNi shape memory fiber-reinforced 6061 aluminum matrix composite made by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Kanryu; Hamada, K.; Sugioka, M.; Itami, M.; Okanda, Y.; Kawahara, M.

    2000-08-01

    Aluminum alloy matrix composite reinforced by continuous TiNi shape memory allow (SMA) fiber was fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process of A1 alloy powder with 20 vol. % of the TiNi SMA fiber, and its microstructure and mechanical properties were examined. The A1 alloy powder with the TiNi fiber was readily consolidated into composite at temperatures between 633K and 873K. The relative packing density of the composite fabricated increased with increasing sintering temperature. Reaction occurred at the boundary between A1 alloy matrix and TiNi fiber and the interfacial reaction is considered to consist of three intermetallic phases, Ni3Ti (next to TiNI), Ni2Ti and Al3Ni (next to A1 matrix). The tensile yield stress of the composite deformed in tension at 373K was higher by about 40MPa than at 293K.

  14. The effect of TiB2 reinforcement on the mechanical properties of an Al-Cu-Li alloy-based metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The addition of ceramic particles to aluminum based alloys can substantially improve mechanical properties, especially Young's modulus and room and elevated temperature strengths. However, these improvements typically occur at the expense of tensile ductility. The mechanical properties are evaluated to a metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of an ultrahigh strength aluminum lithium alloy, Weldalite (tm) 049, reinforced with TiB2 particles produced by an in situ precipitation technique called the XD (tm) process. The results are compared to the behavior of a nonreinforced Weldalite 049 variant. It is shown that both 049 and 049-TiB2 show very attractive warm temperature properties e.g., 625 MPa yield strength at 150 C after 100 h at temperature. Weldalite 049 reinforced with a nominal 4 v pct. TiB2 shows an approx. 8 pct. increase in modulus and a good combination of strength (529 MPa UTS) and ductility (6.5 pct.) in the T3 temper. And the high ductility of Weldalite 049 in the naturally aged and underaged tempers makes the alloy a good, high strength matrix for ceramic reinforcement.

  15. Tensile and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of In-Situ Al3Zr + Al2O3-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, G.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, aluminum-based in-situ intermetallic Al3Zr and Al2O3-reinforced metal matrix composites have been synthesized by direct melt reaction through stir casting of zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl2·8H2O) powder in commercially pure aluminum. The in-situ reaction produces intermetallic Al3Zr needles that change to feathery morphology with increasing ZrOCl2·8H2O, while the Al2O3 is of fine globular shape. The tensile strengths of these composites increase with increasing volume percent reinforcements, attaining a peak value with 18 pct addition. The dry sliding wear behavior of the composites was evaluated with varying parameters, viz. sliding distance, normal load, and sliding velocities. The wear mechanisms are explained based on the microstructure, the topography of the worn surface, and the interfacial strength of the matrix and reinforcement. The tensile and wear properties are compared with widely used wear resistant hypereutectic Al-17 pct Si cast alloy.

  16. A trapped field of 17.6 T in melt-processed, bulk Gd-Ba-Cu-O reinforced with shrink-fit steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrell, J. H.; Dennis, A. R.; Jaroszynski, J.; Ainslie, M. D.; Palmer, K. G. B.; Shi, Y.-H.; Campbell, A. M.; Hull, J.; Strasik, M.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of large-grain (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-δ ((RE)BCO; RE = rare earth) bulk superconductors to trap magnetic fields is determined by their critical current. With high trapped fields, however, bulk samples are subject to a relatively large Lorentz force, and their performance is limited primarily by their tensile strength. Consequently, sample reinforcement is the key to performance improvement in these technologically important materials. In this work, we report a trapped field of 17.6 T, the largest reported to date, in a stack of two silver-doped GdBCO superconducting bulk samples, each 25 mm in diameter, fabricated by top-seeded melt growth and reinforced with shrink-fit stainless steel. This sample preparation technique has the advantage of being relatively straightforward and inexpensive to implement, and offers the prospect of easy access to portable, high magnetic fields without any requirement for a sustaining current source.

  17. Shear Strength at 75 F to 500 F of Fourteen Adhesives Used to Bond a Glass-fabric-reinforced Phenolic Resin Laminate to Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John R

    1956-01-01

    Fourteen adhesives used to bond a glass-fabric-reinforced phenolic resin laminate to steel were tested in order to determine their shear strengths at temperatures from 75 F to 500 F. Fabrication methods were varied to evaluate the effect of placing cloth between the facing surfaces to maintain a uniform bond-line thickness. One glass-fabric supported phenolic adhesive was found to have a shear strength of 3,400 psi at 300 F and over 1,000 psi at 500 F. Strength and fabrication data are tabulated for all adhesives tested.

  18. Microwave combustion synthesis of in situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Heguo; Hua, Bo; Cui, Tao; Huang, Jiewen; Li, Jianliang; Xie, Zonghan

    2015-08-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites were fabricated from Al and ZrO{sub 2} powders by SiC assisted microwave combustion synthesis. The microstructure and reaction pathways were analyzed by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the heating rate during microwave synthesis was very high and the entire process took several minutes and that the ignition temperature of the reaction was much lower than that of conventional methods. In addition, the resulting microstructure was found to be finer than that prepared by the conventional methods and no cracks can be seen in the Al{sub 3}Zr reinforcements. As such, the newly developed composites have potential for safety-critical applications where catastrophic failure is not tolerated.

  19. The effect of matrix microstructure on cyclic response and fatigue behavior of particle-reinforced 2219 aluminum: Part II. Behavior at 150 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyletel, G. M.; van Aken, D. C.; Allison, J. E.

    1995-12-01

    The 150 °C cyclic response of peak-aged and overaged 2219/TiC/15p and 2219 Al was examined using fully reversed plastic strain-controlled testing. The cyclic response of peak-aged and overaged particle-reinforced materials showed extensive cyclic softening. This softening began at the commencement of cycling and continued until failure. At a plastic strain below 5 × 103, the unreinforced materials did not show evidence of cyclic softening until approximately 30 pct of the life was consumed. In addition, the degree of cyclic softening (†σ) was significantly lower in the unreinforced microstructures. The cyclic softening in both reinforced and unreinforced materials was attributed to the decomposition of the θ' strengthening precipitates. The extent of the precipitate decomposition was much greater in the composite materials due to the increased levels of local plastic strain in the matrix caused by constrained deformation near the TiC particles.

  20. Raman Study of Uncoated and P-bn/sic-coated Hi-nicalon Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites. Part 2; Residual Stress in the Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouadec, Gwenael; Colomban, Philippe; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2000-01-01

    Band shifts on Raman spectra were used to assess, at a microscopic scale, the residual strain existing in Hi-Nicalon fibers reinforcing celsian matrix composites. Uncoated as well as p-BN/SiC- and p-B(Si)N/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were used as the reinforcements. We unambiguously conclude that the fibers are in a state of compressive residual stress. Quantitative determination of the residual stress was made possible by taking into account the heating induced by laser probing and by using a reference line, of fixed wavenumber. We found fiber compressive residual stress values between 110 and 960 MPa depending on the fiber/matrix coating in the composite. A stress relaxation-like phenomenon was observed at the surface of p-BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers whereas the uncoated or p-B(Si)N/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers did not show any stress relaxation in the Celsian matrix composites.

  1. Evaluation of load-deflection properties of fiber-reinforced composites and its comparison with stainless steel wires

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Mamavi, Tayebe

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of common sized fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) to different deflections due to bending forces and comparing it with stainless steel (SS) wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two FRC groups with 0.75 mm and 1.2 mm diameters (Everstick Ortho, Stick Tech, Finland) and three SS groups with 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.7 mm diameters (3M Uniteck, Monrovia, California, USA) were tested. Each group contained 10 samples that were tested according to a three point bending test. Each group was tested at deflections of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm and the data was analyzed using the repeated measure ANOVA by SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA). P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The highest recorded load belonged to the 1.2 mm FRC and after that 0.7 mm SS wire, 0.75 mm FRC, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch SS wire and finally 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wire. The 0.7 mm SS wire and 0.75 mm FRC were compared as retainers and the results showed the 0.7 mm SS wire showed significantly higher load compared with 0.75 mm FRC (P < 0.05). The 1.2 mm FRC had significantly higher load compared to 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wires (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that the 1.2 mm FRC group had significantly higher load compared to SS wires and other FRC groups under the 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm deflections. Therefore, it can be suggested that FRC can be used as an esthetic replacement for SS wires for active and passive purposes in orthodontics. PMID:24932195

  2. Stress-Dependent Matrix Cracking in 2D Woven SiC-Fiber Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2003-01-01

    The matrix cracking of a variety of SiC/SiC composites has been characterized for a wide range of constituent variation. These composites were fabricated by the 2-dimensional lay-up of 0/90 five-harness satin fabric consisting of Sylramic fiber tows that were then chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) with BN, CVI with SiC, slurry infiltrated with SiC particles followed by molten infiltration of Si. The composites varied in number of plies, the number of tows per length, thickness, and the size of the tows. This resulted in composites with a fiber volume fraction in the loading direction that ranged from 0.12 to 0.20. Matrix cracking was monitored with modal acoustic emission in order to estimate the stress-dependent distribution of matrix cracks. It was found that the general matrix crack properties of this system could be fairly well characterized by assuming that no matrix cracks originated in the load-bearing fiber, interphase, chemical vapor infiltrated Sic tow-minicomposites, i.e., all matrix cracks originate in the 90 degree tow-minicomposites or the large unreinforced Sic-Si matrix regions. Also, it was determined that the larger tow size composites had a much narrower stress range for matrix cracking compared to the standard tow size composites.

  3. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Produced in-situ Particle Reinforced Fe-matrix Composite Coating with High Nickel Content on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiwen, W.; Mingxing, M.; Cunyuan, P.; Xiaohui, Y.; Weiming, Z.

    Fe-matrix composite coatings reinforced by in-situ particles with high nickel content were produced on QT450-10 by laser alloying. Coatings with different microstructure proportions and particle distributions were obtained by the adjustment of the content of Ni, Ti and Zr in the alloying powder and the laser parameters. The influence of the content of Ni and the particle distribution on coating's corrosion resistance is studied, which is revealed by the electrochemical characteristics. The results indicate that the alloying coating with more content of nickel and less particles get corroded much harder with a higher corrosion rate.

  4. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  5. Role of the matrix precipitation and interface dislocations on the nanostability of an Al-4w%Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber-reinforced composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sgobba, S.; Parrini, L.; Kuenzi, H.U.; Ilschner, B.

    1994-12-31

    In many industrial applications the elastic and dimensional stability of materials is required at a nanometric scale. High resolution laser interferometry and mechanical spectroscopy have been employed to measure low temperature creep of the short-fiber reinforced composite Al-4w%Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The typical strain resolution of the laser interferometer is 10{sup {minus}10}. Fiber reinforcement generally increases the dislocation density in the metal matrix; in parallel, damping is enhanced. The models relating the dislocation structures at the precipitate-matrix and fiber-matrix interfaces to the damping behavior are discussed.

  6. Characterization of crack growth resistance under cyclic loading in the presence of an unbridged defect in fiber-reinforced titanium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper considers the experimental characterization of crack growth from unbridged defects in fiber-reinforced titanium metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading by the use of fracture mechanics parameters. The conditions under which parameters such as the nominal applied stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub app}, the nominal maximum stress intensity factor, K{sub max}, and the effective stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub eff}, are of use, and their experimental measurements are considered. Effects of fiber fracture, stress intensity factor range, mean stress, loading configuration (bending versus tension), test temperature, crack size, crack shape, and fiber-matrix interfacial strength on fatigue crack growth resistance are highlighted. The experimental determination of crack arrest in such composites is outlined.

  7. Studies on Geometries for Inducing Homogeneous Magnetic Fields in the Application of Real Time Imaging of Steel Reinforcing Bars Embedded Within Pre-Stressed and Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quek, S.; Benitez, D.; Gaydecki, P.; Torres, V.

    2006-03-01

    This paper addresses fundamental issues associated with the development of a real time inductive scanning system for non-destructive testing of pre-stressed and reinforced concrete. Simulated results has indicated that given a coil dimension of 300mm×300mm×2.5mm, 10mm rebars can be imaged down to a depth of 100 mm. Studies also indicate that the vertical component of the induced magnetic field is most favourable as it can be readily reconstructed to yield geometry and dimensional information pertaining to the rebar structure.

  8. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  9. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Martinez, Adam W.; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyerplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239–2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8–8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35–192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 ± 43 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 ± 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 ± 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo. PMID:20584549

  10. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  11. A model cerium oxide matrix composite reinforced with a homogeneous dispersion of silver particulate - prepared using the glycine-nitrate process

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.

    2005-01-31

    Recently a new method of ceramic brazing has been developed. Based on a two-phase liquid composed of silver and copper oxide, brazing is conducted directly in air without the need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. Because the braze displays excellent wetting characteristics on a number ceramic surfaces, including alumina, various perovskites, zirconia, and ceria, we were interested in investigating whether a metal-reinforced ceramic matrix composite (CMC) could be developed with this material. In the present study, two sets of homogeneously mixed silver/copper oxide/ceria powders were synthesized using a combustion synthesis technique. The powders were compacted and heat treated in air above the liquidus temperature for the chosen Ag-CuO composition. Metallographic analysis indicates that the resulting composite microstructures are extremely uniform with respect to both the size of the metallic reinforcement as well as its spatial distribution within the ceramic matrix. The size, morphology, and spacing of the metal particulate in the densified composite appears to be dependent on the original size and the structure of the starting combustion synthesized powders.

  12. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities. The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composite.

  13. Flexural Toughness of Steel Fiber Reinforced High Performance Concrete Containing Nano-SiO2 and Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (PV-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (PV-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  14. Flexural toughness of steel fiber reinforced high performance concrete containing nano-SiO2 and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (P(V)-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (P(V)-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  15. Effect of interfacial thermal conductance and fiber orientation on the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of unidirectional fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu Devshankar

    The role of an interfacial barrier at the fiber-matrix interface in the heat conduction behavior of a uniaxial silicon nitride and the effect of fiber orientation on the heat conduction characteristics of carbon fiber-reinforced borosilicate glass was investigated. A composite with fibers having a carbon-rich coating of about 3 microns was chosen as the reference material. The fiber-matrix interface was then modified using fibers with no carbon coating and using hot-isostatic-pressure (HIP) after nitridation. The formation of an interfacial gap at the interface resulted in the dependence of thermal diffusivity/conductivity on the surrounding atmosphere. However, no atmospheric effects were observed for composites with fibers without the carbon coating. HIP'ing increased the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of the composites due to densification of the matrix, crystallization of the fibers and increased physical contact at the interface. Removal of the interfacial carbon layer lowered the interfacial conductance considerably, due to decrease in the direct thermal contact between the fibers and the matrix. Interfacial contact conductance increased rapidly with increasing temperature in accordance with interfacial gap closure. These observations indicate that the heat conduction behavior was strongly affected by the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier. An analysis was conducted to determine the expression for the effective thermal conductivity of a uniaxially reinforced finite composite strip with insulated edges as a function of the angle between the fiber direction and the temperature gradient. Three carbon fiber-reinforced aluminoborosilicate glass composite specimens were used: thin, angled and thick rectangular. The thin specimens and the angled specimens represented the case of a composite infinite in extent. The thick rectangular specimens were expected to behave like a finite composite strip. For thin and angled specimens, the thermal conductivity

  16. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  17. Strong Surface Treatment Effects on Reinforcement Efficiency in Biocomposites Based on Cellulose Nanocrystals in Poly(vinyl acetate) Matrix.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Farhan; Salajková, Michaela; Zhou, Qi; Berglund, Lars A

    2015-12-14

    In this work, the problem to disperse cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in hydrophobic polymer matrices has been addressed through application of an environmentally friendly chemical modification approach inspired by clay chemistry. The objective is to compare the effects of unmodified CNC and modified CNC (modCNC) reinforcement, where degree of CNC dispersion is of interest. Hydrophobic functionalization made it possible to disperse wood-based modCNC in organic solvent and cast well-dispersed nanocomposite films of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) with 1-20 wt % CNC. Composite films were studied by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), tensile testing, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Strongly increased mechanical properties were observed for modCNC nanocomposites. The reinforcement efficiency was much lower in unmodified CNC composites, and specific mechanisms causing the differences are discussed. PMID:26505077

  18. Finite element based simulation on friction stud welding of metal matrix composites to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga; Kumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Friction welding is a solid state joining technique used for joining similar and dissimilar materials with high integrity. This new technique is being successfully applied to the aerospace, automobile, and ship building industries, and is attracting more and more research interest. The quality of Friction Stud Welded joints depends on the frictional heat generated at the interface. Hence, thermal analysis on friction stud welding of stainless steel (AISI 304) and aluminium silicon carbide (AlSiC) combination is carried out in the present work. In this study, numerical simulation is carried out using ANSYS software and the temperature profiles are predicted at various increments of time. The developed numerical model is found to be adequate to predict temperature distribution of friction stud weld aluminium silicon carbide/stainless steel joints.

  19. Effect of reciprocating sliding speed on the tribological performance of nano SiC(p) reinforced Ni-metal matrix composites produced by electrocodeposition.

    PubMed

    Gül, H; Akbulut, H; Aslan, S; Alp, A

    2012-12-01

    In the present work, Ni/SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings were prepared from a modified Watt's type electrolyte containing nano-SiC particles by direct current (DC) plating method to increase wear resistance of the electro co-deposited Ni. SiC nano particles with average particle size of 0, 1-1 microm were co-deposited with nickel matrix on the steel substrates. For this purpose, several studies were carried out to optimize deposition parameters for specific applications. The depositions were controlled to obtain the specific thickness (between 175-200 microm) and particle volume fraction in the matrix (between 0.03 and 0.10). The hardness of the resultant coatings was measured and found to be 280-571 HV depending on the particle concentration in the electrolyte and therefore, particle volume in the Ni matrix. The tribological tests were performed by a reciprocating ball-on disk apparatus sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø10 mm). All the friction and wear tests were performed under the unlubricated conditions at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%). The wear tests were carried out at different sliding velocities of 50 mm/s, 100 mm/s and 150 mm/s by using a constant dead load of 1.0 N. It was detected that increasing sliding speed resulted to increase wear rate but decreasing friction coefficient due to change in wear mechanism. Increasing sliding speed showed formation of tribo induced oxides up to 20 g/l SiC(p) in the electrolyte and wear mechanism was controlled by temperature induced fatigue wear. Further increase in the SiC(p) in the electrolyte caused an abrasive type of the wear. PMID:23447960

  20. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part II: Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    This paper follows on from the earlier study (Part I) which investigated the fatigue behavior of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D C/SiC composites at room and elevated temperatures. In this paper, a micromechanics approach to predict the fatigue life S-N curves of fiber-reinforced CMCs has been developed considering the fatigue damage mechanism of interface wear or interface oxidation. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress, matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur. The two-parameter Weibull model is used to describe fibers strength distribution. The stress carried by broken and intact fibres on the matrix crack plane under fatigue loading is determined based on the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. The fibres failure probabilities under fatigue loading considering the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength have been obtained. When the broken fibres fraction approaches critical value, the composite would fatigue fail. The fatigue life S-N curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D C/SiC composites at room and elevated temperatures have been predicted. The predicted results agreed with experimental data.

  1. Investigation of electrical and impact properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites with carbon nanotube buckypaper layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Christopher Brandon

    Carbon fiber reinforced composite materials have become commonplace in many industries including aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods. Previous research has determined a coupling relationship between the mechanical and electrical properties of these materials where the application of electrical current has been shown to improve their mechanical strengths. The next generations of these composites have started to be produced with the addition of nanocarbon buckypaper layers which provide even greater strength and electrical conductivity potentials. The focus of this current research was to characterize these new composites and compare their electro-mechanical coupling capabilities to those composites which do not contain any nonocarbons.

  2. Effect of fiber length on static and fatigue strengths of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics with polypropylene matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Fujii, T.; Tanaka, T.

    1996-10-01

    Changes in the damage mechanism as a function of fiber length were examined in a quasi-isotropically reinforced random chopped glass/polypropylene composite during uniaxial tensile testing (at various temperatures) and fatigue testing (at room temperature). Three types of specimens, which have the different fiber length in a pellet, were used. As a result, the effect of fiber length on mechanical properties was revealed. Moreover, the outline of the percolation theory was given, which estimates the strength and other important mechanical properties on the basis of the probabilistic microcrack initiation and bonding of microcracks.

  3. Potential use of a polycarbonate-urethane matrix reinforced with polyethylene fibers for shock-absorbing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sheikhhassani, Ramtin; Anvari, Pasha; Taei, Simin; Sheikhhassani, Yasmin

    2015-09-01

    The absence of a shock-absorbing mechanism in commercial dental implants is a likely factor in the resulting bone loss and possible implant failure. The aim of the current study is to generate a shock-absorbing dental implant that resembles the periodontal ligament, which naturally absorbs occlusal overloading forces. To achieve this, a polycarbonate-urethane composite reinforced with polyethylene fibers will be constructed. Tests based on finite element analysis and mechanical testing are proposed to further examine this novel implant type. PMID:26008614

  4. Effects of oxyfluorination on surface and mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polarized-polypropylene matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ii; Choi, Woong-Ki; Oh, Sang-Yub; Seo, Min-Kang; Park, Soo-Jin; An, Kay-Hyeok; Lee, Young Sil; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, oxyfluorination treatments on carbon fiber surfaces were carried out to improve the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and polarized-polypropylene (P-PP). The surface properties of oxyfluorinated carbon fibers were characterized using a single fiber contact angle, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the composites were calculated in terms of work of adhesion between fibers and matrices and also measured by a critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)). The K(IC) of oxyfluorinated carbon fibers-reinforced composites showed higher values than those of as-received carbon fibers-reinforced composites. The results showed that the adhesion strength between the carbon fibers and P-PP had significantly increased after the oxyfluorination treatments. As the theoretical and practical comparisons, OF-CF-60s showed the best mechanical interfacial performance due to the good surface free energy. This indicates that oxyfluorination produced highly polar functional groups on the fiber surface, resulting in strong adhesion between carbon fibers and P-PP in this composite system. PMID:25971017

  5. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  6. The influence of fiber/matrix interface on the mechanical behavior of Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.M.; Mitchell, T.E.; Wadley, H.N.G.

    1996-11-01

    Mechanical properties of unidirectional Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced Ca aluminosilicate (CAS/SiC) and Mg aluminosilicate (MAS/SiC) glass-ceramic composites were investigated by tensile testing and nondestructive laser-ultrasound technique. The Ba-stuffed MAS was either undoped or doped with 5% borosilicate glass. Degradation of elastic stiffness constant C{sub 11} in transverse direction due to interface damage was monitored in situ by measuring the laser- generated ultrasound wave velocity. The three composite materials show different characteristics of macroscopic deformation behavior, which is correlated strongly to interface degradation. A stronger reduction trend of the elastic constant C{sub 11} is associated with a larger degree of inelastic deformation. The fracture surfaces also reveal the close relation between fiber pullout length and interfacial characteristics. Interfaces of these composites were studied by TEM; their influence on inhibiting and deflecting matrix cracks is discussed.

  7. Crack Propagation Resistance of α-Al2O3 Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  8. On the Mechanical Stability of Austenite Matrix After Martensite Formation in a Medium Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. B.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-07-01

    The present work employs the nanoindentation technique to investigate the effect of prior martensite formation on the mechanical stability of a retained austenite matrix. It is found that the small austenite grains that were surrounded by martensite laths have higher mechanical stability than the large austenite grains that were free of martensite laths. The higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains is due to its higher amount of defects resulting from the prior martensite formation. These defects act as barriers for the later martensite formation and therefore contribute to the higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains. As a result, the present work suggests that the formation of martensite tends to stabilize the surrounding austenite matrix. Therefore, it may explain the lower transformed amount of martensite after quenching as compared to the theoretical calculation using the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) equation.

  9. On the Mechanical Stability of Austenite Matrix After Martensite Formation in a Medium Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. B.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-04-01

    The present work employs the nanoindentation technique to investigate the effect of prior martensite formation on the mechanical stability of a retained austenite matrix. It is found that the small austenite grains that were surrounded by martensite laths have higher mechanical stability than the large austenite grains that were free of martensite laths. The higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains is due to its higher amount of defects resulting from the prior martensite formation. These defects act as barriers for the later martensite formation and therefore contribute to the higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains. As a result, the present work suggests that the formation of martensite tends to stabilize the surrounding austenite matrix. Therefore, it may explain the lower transformed amount of martensite after quenching as compared to the theoretical calculation using the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) equation.

  10. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  11. (60)Co in cast steel matrix: A European interlaboratory comparison for the characterisation of new activity standards for calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers in metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Faidra; Burda, Oleksiy; Hult, Mikael; Arnold, Dirk; Marroyo, Belén Caro; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Ferreux, Laurent; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Javornik, Andrej; Klemola, Seppo; Luca, Aurelian; Moser, Hannah; Nečemer, Marijan; Peyrés, Virginia; Reis, Mario; Silva, Lidia; Šolc, Jaroslav; Svec, Anton; Tyminski, Zbigniew; Vodenik, Branko; Wätjen, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Two series of activity standards of (60)Co in cast steel matrix, developed for the calibration of gamma-ray spectrometry systems in the metallurgical sector, were characterised using a European interlaboratory comparison among twelve National Metrology Institutes and one international organisation. The first standard, consisting of 14 disc shaped samples, was cast from steel contaminated during production ("originally"), and the second, consisting of 15 similar discs, from artificially-contaminated ("spiked") steel. The reference activity concentrations of (60)Co in the cast steel standards were (1.077±0.019) Bqg(-1) on 1 January 2013 12h00 UT and (1.483±0.022) Bqg(-1) on 1 June 2013 12h00 UT, respectively. PMID:27236833

  12. In-plane and Interlaminar Shear Strength of a Unidirectional Hi-nicalon Fiber-reinforced Celsian Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uenal, O.; Bansal, N. P.

    2000-01-01

    In-plane and interlaminar shear strength of a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced (BaSr)Al2Si2O8 celsian composite were measured by the double-notch shear test method between room temperature and 1200 C. The interlaminar shear strength was lower than the in-plane shear strength at all temperatures. Stress analysis, using finite element modeling, indicated that shear stress concentration was not responsible for the observed difference in strength. Instead, the difference in layer architecture and thus, the favorable alignment of fiber-rich layers with the shear plane in the interlaminar specimens appears to be the reason for the low strength of this composite. A rapid decrease in strength was observed with temperature due to softening of the glassy phase in the material.

  13. Ballistic Impact Properties of Zr-Based Amorphous Alloy Composites Reinforced with Woven Continuous Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyeong Su; Son, Chang-Young; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Song, Young Buem; Lee, Sunghak

    2012-03-01

    This study aims at investigating ballistic impact properties of Zr-based amorphous alloy (LM1 alloy) matrix composites reinforced with woven stainless steel or glass continuous fibers. The fiber-reinforced composites with excellent fiber/matrix interfaces were fabricated without pores and misinfiltration by liquid pressing process, and contained 35 to 41 vol pct of woven continuous fibers homogeneously distributed in the amorphous matrix. The woven-STS-continuous-fiber-reinforced composite consisted of the LM1 alloy layer of 1.0 mm in thickness in the upper region and the fiber-reinforced composite layer in the lower region. The hard LM1 alloy layer absorbed the ballistic impact energy by forming many cracks, and the fiber-reinforced composite layer interrupted the crack propagation and blocked the impact and traveling of the projectile, thereby resulting in the improvement of ballistic performance by about 20 pct over the LM1 alloy. According to the ballistic impact test data of the woven-glass-continuous-fiber-reinforced composite, glass fibers were preferentially fragmented to form a number of cracks, and the amorphous matrix accelerated the fragmentation of glass fibers and the initiation of cracks. Because of the absorption process of ballistic impact energy by forming very large amounts of cracks, fragments, and debris, the glass-fiber-reinforced composite showed better ballistic performance than the LM1 alloy.

  14. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  15. Electrochemical characterization of the steel wire used as reinforcement in the conductors transmission networks electricity nitride by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Maldonado, J. J.; Dulcé Moreno, H. J.; Aperador, W.

    2016-02-01

    The power company feature infrastructure, which are generally shaped so the transmission and distribution lines, here is why it is necessary to characterize the process of electrochemical corrosion of these components. In this case the steel wire coated with zinc or aluminium, as it is undergoes the rigor of corrosive environments. Given the geographical diversity and different climatic environments, atmospheric corrosion carried affecting service life of structures. For example in very humid environments such as coasts and high altitudes, wetting time (TOW), parameter that meets the conditions of temperature and relative humidity, it affects large proportion, accelerating the corrosion of ferrous materials. Given the importance of establishing mechanisms that lessen the impact on degradation in transmission and distribution lines of both the reliability and the availability of the same. This paper presents the implementation in nitride steels as an alternative or complement to zinc coating.

  16. Microtensile bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix to dentin using various bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) to dentin using various adhesive systems. Forty eight (n = 8/group) human molars were flattened to expose dentin. A layer of preimpregnated unidirectional FRC (everStick) was applied on the dentin surface after treatment with either a single-step self-etching adhesive, two-step self-etching system, or a conventional three-step adhesive system. For the control, particulate filler composite (PFC) (Filtek Z250) layering without FRC was used. After 24-hour water storage at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned, further water-stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days and then tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and reliability was analyzed with Weibull distribution. microTBS values differed significantly according to the adhesive material used (p < 0.05). Single-step self-etching adhesive showed the lowest bond reliability and microTBS values with both FRC and PFC, whereas conventional three-step and two-step self-etching systems showed higher bond reliability and microTBS with both materials. PMID:19241691

  17. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  18. Processing and properties of fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composites: I. IM7/LARC(TM)-PETI-7 polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1995-01-01

    A phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomer formed from the reaction of benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, an 75:25 molar ratio of 4,4'-oxydianiline and meta-phenylenediamine and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride as the endcapper at a theoretical number average molecular weight (Mn) of approximately 3,700 g/mol was evaluated as a composite resin matrix. A glass transition temperature (Tg) of 315 deg C was reached after 250 deg C/1 hr annealing of the matrix resin. Unidirectional prepreg was made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidinone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7 graphite fibers. The thermal and rheological properties and the solvent/volatile depletion rates of the amide acid/NMP system were determined. This information was used to successfully design a molding cycle for composite fabrication. Composites molded under 800 Psi at 371 C consistently yielded good consolidation as measured by C-scan and optical photomicrography. The composite's short beam shear strength (SBS), longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths and moduli were measured at various temperatures. These composites exhibited excellent room temperature (RT) longitudinal flexural strength and modulus and RT SBS strength retention at 177 C.

  19. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  20. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  1. General Motors Corporation and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Inspection of case hardened steels and metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Good, M.S.; Rogers, D.D.

    1993-10-01

    Staff exchanges, such as the one described in this report, are intended to facilitate communication and collaboration among scientists and engineers at Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, in US industry, and academia. Funding support for these exchanges is provided by the DOE, Office of Energy Research, Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. The exchanges offer the opportunity for the laboratories to transfer technology and expertise to industry, gain a perspective on industry`s problems, and develop the basis for further cooperative efforts through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or other mechanisms. The objectives of this report were as follows: for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff to present technology to General Motors (GM) staff on nondestructive measurement of hardened steel components and uniformity of particle dispersion in metal-matrix composites for evaluation for possible application in GM`s manufacturing processes; for GM staff to discuss with PNL staff common manufacturing processes, metallurgy, and flaw criteria for hardening of various components and manufacturing of metal-matrix composites; to provide an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between PNL and GM. Information in this report on the staff exchange of PNL staff with GM Corporation includes the purpose and objectives, a summary of activities, significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefits from that work, and three appendixes. Appendix A is a description of ultrasonic backscatter technology and its applications to the two nondestructive inspection interests defined by GM. Appendix B is a list of key contacts and the schedule of activities pertaining to the staff exchange. Appendix C is an article from American Society for Metals News relating to sensor needs.

  2. Strength distribution of reinforcing fibers in a Nicalon fiber/chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The strength distribution of fibers within a two-dimensional laminate ceramic/ceramic composite consisting of an eight harness satin weave of Nicalon continuous fiber within a chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix was determined from analysis of the fracture mirrors of the fibers. Comparison of the fiber strengths and the Weibull moduli with those for Nicalon fibers prior to incorporation into composites suggests that possible fiber damage may occur either during the weaving or during another stage of the composite manufacture. Observations also indicate that it is the higher-strength fibers which experience the greatest extent of fiber pullout and thus make a larger contribution to the overall composite toughness than do the weaker fibers.

  3. Formation of magnesium aluminate (spinel) in cast SiC particulate-reinforced Al(A356) metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Zhirui; Weatherly, George C.

    1992-05-01

    Transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are employed to study the SiC/Al-alloy interface in a cast SiCp/Al(A356) metal matrix composite (MMC). Magnesium aluminate (spinel), MgAl2O4, was found at the interface as a reaction product after material processing. Comparisons of the crystal structure, structure factor, and interface reaction ther-modynamics between MgAl2O4 and MgO have been carried out. The results from these com-parisons confirm the experimental observation; i.e., the favored interface phase is magnesium aluminate (spinel). Based on the thermodynamic analysis, the presence of oxygen in various forms in the system during processing, such as SiO2, A12O3, and MgO, is believed to be the source which supplies the oxygen for the formation of MgAl2O4.

  4. Numerical, micro-mechanical prediction of crack growth resistance in a fibre-reinforced/brittle matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Ghosh, Asish; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1990-01-01

    Micromechanics fracture models are incorporated into three distinct fracture process zones which contribute to the crack growth resistance of fibrous composites. The frontal process zone includes microcracking, fiber debonding, and some fiber failure. The elastic process zone is related only to the linear elastic creation of new matrix and fiber fracture surfaces. The wake process zone includes fiber bridging, fiber pullout, and fiber breakage. The R-curve predictions of the model compare well with empirical results for a unidirectional, continuous fiber C/C composite. Separating the contributions of each process zone reveals the wake region to contain the dominant crack growth resistance mechanisms. Fractography showed the effects of the micromechanisms on the macroscopic fracture behavior.

  5. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fibre reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  6. X-ray diffraction study of residual stresses in metal-matrix composite-jacketed steel cylinders subjected to internal pressure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.L.; Doxbeck, M.; Capsimalis, G.

    1992-03-01

    The study of aluminum/silicon carbide metal matrix composite (MMC)-jacketed steel structural components was made because of their light weight and high stiffness. Steel 'liner' cylinders were wrapped with MMC 'jackets' with an all-hoop layup and put through various degrees of hydraulic autofrettage and thermal soak. In this report, the results from our x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements on cylinders using a position-sensitive scintillation detection system are discussed. Our experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions from a model based on the elastic-plastic analysis of a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal pressure. Interpretation of the interference effect caused by the MMC jacket on the steel liner is also discussed.

  7. Adhesion of tungsten carbide reinforced amorphous hydrocarbon thin films (WC/a-C:H) to steel substrates for tribological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Schiller, P. J; Howe, Jane Y

    2011-01-01

    We have explored the adhesive interlayer structure for a tungsten carbide reinforced amorphous hydrocarbon thin film coating (WC/a-C:H) that demonstrated excellent coating adhesion under highly stressed tribological contact. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis including cross-sectional imaging, electron diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was performed on abrupt and gradient interfaces within the multilayer film architecture. Interpretation of these results is aided by quantum mechanical calculations that were performed to investigate bonding interactions of the Cr adhesive interlayer to the Fe substrate surface within a - 3 nm thick interfacial region. Low levels of oxygen present in the coating deposition chamber during deposition were found at the Fe-Cr interface using high-resolution TEM. Molecular orbital calculations for a linear three-atom molecular model Fe-O-Cr demonstrate the role of O in strengthening Fe to Cr bonding within that interfacial region.

  8. Studies on the corrosion resistance of reinforced steel in concrete with ground granulated blast-furnace slag--An overview.

    PubMed

    Song, Ha-Won; Saraswathy, Velu

    2006-11-16

    The partial replacement of clinker, the main constituent of ordinary Portland cement by pozzolanic or latent hydraulic industrial by-products such as ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), effectively lowers the cost of cement by saving energy in the production process. It also reduces CO2 emissions from the cement plant and offers a low priced solution to the environmental problem of depositing industrial wastes. The utilization of GGBFS as partial replacement of Portland cement takes advantage of economic, technical and environmental benefits of this material. Recently offshore, coastal and marine concrete structures were constructed using GGBFS concrete because high volume of GGBFS can contribute to the reduction of chloride ingress. In this paper, the influence of using GGBFS in reinforced concrete structures from the durability aspects such as chloride ingress and corrosion resistance, long term durability, microstructure and porosity of GGBFS concrete has been reviewed and discussed. PMID:16930831

  9. Adhesion of tungsten carbide reinforced amorphous hydrocarbon thin films (WC/a-C:H) to steel substrates for tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. D.; Shiller, P. J.; Howe, J. Y.

    2011-01-01

    We have explored the adhesive interlayer structure for a tungsten carbide reinforced amorphous hydrocarbon thin film coating (WC/a-C:H) that demonstrated excellent coating adhesion under highly stressed tribological contact. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis including cross-sectional imaging, electron diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was performed on abrupt and gradient interfaces within the multilayer film architecture. Interpretation of these results is aided by quantum mechanical calculations that were performed to investigate bonding interactions of the Cr adhesive interlayer to the Fe substrate surface within a ˜3 nm thick interfacial region. Low levels of oxygen present in the coating deposition chamber during deposition were found at the Fe-Cr interface using high-resolution TEM. Molecular orbital calculations for a linear three-atom molecular model Fe-O-Cr demonstrate the role of O in strengthening Fe to Cr bonding within that interfacial region.

  10. Characteristic of copper matrix simultaneously reinforced with nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, Viseslava Bozic, Dusan; Devecerski, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Milan T.

    2012-05-15

    The effect of the simultaneous presence of nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles on the microstructure and properties of copper matrix was the object of this study. The mixture of inert gas-atomized prealloyed copper powder (with 1 wt.% Al) and 0.6 wt.% commercial Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder (serving as micro-sized particles) was used as the starting materials. Strengthening of the copper matrix was performed by treating the powders in the air for up to 20 h in the planetary ball mill. During milling of the prealloyed powder, finely dispersed nano-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were formed in situ by internal oxidation. The approximate size of these particles was between 30 and 60 nm. The highest values of microhardness were reached in compacts processed from 10 h-milled powders. The microhardness of compact obtained from 10 h-milled powder was 3 times higher than the microhardness of compact processed from as-received and non-milled prealloyed powder. At the maximum microhardness the grain size reaches the smallest value as a result of the synergetic effect of nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Recrystallization, which occurred during prolonged milling, was the main factor influencing the decrease in microhardness. The increase in electrical conductivity of compacts after 15 h of milling is the result of the decrease in microhardness and activated recrystallization processes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper matrix was reinforced with nano- and micro-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The twofold role of coarse Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in matrix strengthening exists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During shorter milling time these particles contribute to increase of microhardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At longer milling time decrease in microhardness is related to recrystallization.

  11. Processing and Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Matrix Composites. Part 2; Processing Robustness of IM7/PETI Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1996-01-01

    The processability of a phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resin matrix composite was investigated. Unidirectional prepregs were made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7. Two batches of prepregs were used: one was made by NASA in-house, and the other was from an industrial source. The composite processing robustness was investigated with respect to the effect of B-staging conditions, the prepreg shelf life, and the optimal processing window. Rheological measurements indicated that PETI's processability was only slightly affected over a wide range of B-staging temperatures (from 250 C to 300 C). The open hole compression (OHC) strength values were statistically indistinguishable among specimens consolidated using various B-staging conditions. Prepreg rheology and OHC strengths were also found not to be affected by prolonged (i.e., up to 60 days) ambient storage. An optimal processing window was established using response surface methodology. It was found that IM7/PETI composite is more sensitive to the consolidation temperature than to the consolidation pressure. A good consolidation was achievable at 371 C/100 Psi, which yielded an OHC strength of 62 Ksi at room temperature. However, processability declined dramatically at temperatures below 350 C.

  12. Method Developed for the High-Temperature Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites have emerged as candidate materials to allow higher operating temperatures (1000 to 1400 C) in gas turbine engines. A need, therefore, exists to develop nondestructive methods to evaluate material integrity at the material operating temperature by monitoring thermal and mechanical fatigue. These methods would also have potential as quality inspection tools. The goal of this investigation at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to survey and correlate the temperature-dependent damping and stiffness of advanced ceramic composite materials with imposed thermal and stress histories that simulate in-service turbine engine conditions. A typical sample size of 100 by 4 by 2 cubic millimeters, along with the specified stiffness and density, placed the fundamental vibration frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz. A modified Forster apparatus seemed most applicable to simultaneously measure both damping and stiffness. Testing in vacuum reduced the effects of air on the measurements. In this method, a single composite sample is vibrated at its fundamental tone; then suddenly, the mechanical excitation is removed so that the sample's motion freely decays with time. Typical results are illlustrated in this paper.

  13. Effect of Micro- and Nano-SiC Particulate Reinforcements in Magnesium-Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming-Jie; Ying, Tao; Chen, Fu-Yu; Hou, Jun-Ming

    2016-06-01

    The effects of the volume ratios of micro and nano-SiC particles (SiCp) on the grain refinement, distribution of SiCp particle, and tensile properties of the as-cast AZ31B (Mg-3Al-1Zn-0.3Mn) magnesium-based metal matrix composites have been investigated. As the volume fraction of micron SiCp decreases to 9 vol.% and the nano-SiCp increases to 1 vol.%, excellent grain refinement effect is achieved. This is due to both the uniform distribution and refining effects of micro- and nano-SiCp. Moreover, the micron SiCp distribute along the grain boundaries, while nano-SiCp is mainly distributed around the micron SiCp. The room-temperature tensile results show that the optimal room-temperature yield and tensile strengths are achieved with a 9/1 ratio of micro to nano-SiCp, while the 9.5/0.5 ratio yielded the highest elongation.

  14. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement Architecture on the Hygrothermal-Mechanical Performance of Polyimide Matrix Composites for Aeropropulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Thesken, John C.; Sutter, James K.; Chuang, Kathy; Juhas, John; Veverka, Adrienne; Inghram, Linda; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Burke, Chris; Scheiman, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A lightweight sandwich support structure, for the combustor chamber of a new generation liquid propellant rocket engine, was designed and fabricated using a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facesheet on a Ti honeycomb core. The PMC facesheet consisted of high stiffness carbon fiber, M40JB, and high temperature Polyimides, such as PMR-II-50 and HFPE-II-52. Six different fiber architectures; four harness satin (4HS) woven fabric, uni-tape, woven-uni hybrid, stitched woven fabric, stitched uni-tape and triaxial braided structures have been investigated for optimum stiffness-thickness-weight-hygrothermal performance design criteria for the hygrothermal-mechanical propulsion service exposure conditions including rapid heating up to 200 F/sec, maximum operating temperature of 600 F, internal pressure up to 100 psi. One of the specific objectives in this study is to improve composite blistering resistance in z-direction at minimum expense of in-plane mechanical properties. An extensive property-performance database including dry-wet mechanical properties at various temperatures, thermal-physical properties, such as blistering onset condition was generated for fiber architecture down-selection and design guidelines. Various optimized process methods such as vacuum bag compression molding, solvent assistant resin transfer molding (SaRTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and autoclaving were utilized for PMC panel fabrication depending on the architecture type. In the case of stitched woven fabric architecture, the stitch pattern in terms of stitch density and yarn size was optimized based on both in-plane mechanical properties and blistering performance. Potential reduction of the in-plane properties transverse to the line of stitching was also evaluated. Efforts have been made to correlate the experimental results with theoretical micro-mechanics predictions. Changes in deformation mechanism and failure sequences in terms of fiber architecture will be discussed.

  15. The effect of the electrochemical chloride extraction treatment on steel-reinforced mortar. Part II: Microstructural characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, T.D.; Hansson, C.M.; Hope, B.B.

    1999-10-01

    A study has been made of the changes in cement composition and microstructures resulting from electrochemical chloride extraction applied to mortar samples in which the chlorides were added with the mixing water, ingressed by ponding with an NaCl solution, or both. After exposure for 1 year, specimens with and without chlorides were subjected to an electrochemical chloride extraction treatment. Microstructural analyses of fracture surfaces through the steel/mortar interface revealed a significant alteration of the cementitious phases. In untreated samples, calcium-silicon-rich phases consistent with Types I and II calcium silicate hydrate were observed. After the extraction treatment, these phases were not detectable and instead, sodium-rich, iron-rich, and calcium-aluminum-rich phases were observed.

  16. Fabrication of an r-Al2Ti intermetallic matrix composite reinforced with α-Al2O3 ceramic by discontinuous mechanical milling for thermite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosleh, A.; Ehteshamzadeh, M.; Taherzadeh Mousavian, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a powder mixture with an Al/TiO2 molar ratio of 10/3 was used to form an r-Al2Ti intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) reinforced with α-Al2O3 ceramic by a novel milling technique, called discontinuous mechanical milling (DMM) instead of milling and ignition of the produced thermite. The results of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of samples with varying milling time indicate that this fabrication process requires considerable mechanical energy. It is shown that Al2Ti-Al2O3 IMC with small grain size was produced by DMM after 15 h of ball milling. Peaks for γ-TiAl as well as Al2Ti and Al2O3 are observed in XRD patterns after DMM followed by heat treatment. The microhardness of the DMM-treated composite produced after heat treatment was higher than Hv 700.

  17. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  18. The effect of matrix microstructure on cyclic response and fatigue behavior of particle- reinforced 2219 aluminum: Part I. room temperature behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyletel, G. M.; Allison, J. E.; van Aken, D. C.

    1995-12-01

    The low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue behavior and cyclic response of naturally aged and overaged 2219/TiC/15p and unreinforced 2219 Al were investigated using plastic strain-controlled and stress-controlled testing. In addition, the influence of grain size on the particle-reinforced materials was examined. In both reinforced and unreinforced materials, the naturally aged conditions were cyclically unstable, exhibiting an initial hardening behavior followed by an extended region of cyclic stability and ultimately a softening region. The overaged reinforced material was cyclically stable for the plastic strains examined, while the overaged unreinforced material exhibited cyclic hardening at plastic strains greater than 2.5 × 10-4. Decreasing grain size of particle-reinforced materials modestly increased the cyclic flow stress of both naturally aged and overaged materials. Reinforced and unreinforced materials exhibited similar fatigue life behaviors; however, the reinforced and unreinforced naturally aged materials had superior fatigue lives in comparison to the overaged materials. Grain size had no effect on the fatigue life behavior of the particle-reinforced materials. The fatigue lives were strongly influenced by the presence of clusters of TiC particles and exogenous Al3Ti intermetallics.

  19. Utility of Wastage Material as Steel Fibre in Concrete Mix M-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Ashish Kumar; Parashar, Rinku

    2012-10-01

    Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) is a composite material consisting of cement based matrix with an ordered or random distribution of fiber which can be steel, nylon, polythene etc. The addition of steel fibre increases the properties of concrete, viz., flexural strength, impact strength and shrinkage properties to name a few. A number of papers have already been published on the use of steel fibres in concrete and a considerable amount of research has been directed towards studying the various properties of concrete as well as reinforced concrete due to the addition of steel fibres. Hence, an attempt has been made in the present investigations to study the influence of addition of Lathe Machines wastematerial as fibers at a dosage of 5% to 30% by weight of cement. The properties studied include compressive strength. The studies were conducted on a M20 mix and tests have been carried out. The results are compared and conclusions are made.

  20. Band gaps in the low-frequency range based on the two-dimensional phononic crystal plates composed of rubber matrix with periodic steel stubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kunpeng; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the numerical investigation of elastic wave propagation in two-dimensional phononic crystals composed of an array of steel stepped resonators on a thin rubber slab is presented. For the first time the rubber material is used as the matrix of the PCs. With the finite-element method, the dispersion relations of this novel PCs structure and some factors of the band structure are studied. Results show that, with the rubber material as matrix, the PC structures exhibit extremely low-frequency band gaps, in the frequency range of hundreds of Hz or even tens of Hz; the geometrical parameters and the material parameters can modulate the band gaps to different extents. Furthermore, to understand the low-frequency band gaps caused by this new structure, some resonance eigenmodes of the structure are calculated. Results show that the vibration of the unit cell of the structure can be seen as several mass-spring systems, in which the vibration of the steel stepped resonator decides the lower boundary of the first band gap and the vibration of the rubber that is not in contact with the resonator decides the upper boundary.