Science.gov

Sample records for reinforcing steel evaluations

  1. Evaluating cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete using impact-echo testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Feng

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate of the cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete using the impact-echo testing. In order to evaluate the security of the construction, usually need to estimate the cover depth of the reinforced concrete. At present, the examination technique of the cover depth of the reinforced concrete without the steel fiber is mainly applied in the magnetic and electrical methods, its rapid detection and good results. But the research of the reactive powder concrete be gradually progress, with the steel fiber concrete structure will be increased, if should still operate the examination with the magnetic and electrical methods, theoretically the steel fiber will have the interference to its electromagnetism field. Therefore, this research designs four kinds of reinforced concrete plate that include different steel fiber contents, to evaluate test results of estimate of the cover depth of the reinforcing bar. The results showed that: estimate of the cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete reinforcing bar using the impact-echo testing, the variety of the steel fiber content does not have much influence, the test measurement error within ± 10%, and the most important source of uncertainty is the velocity of concrete.

  2. Evaluation of passivation method and corrosion inhibitors for steel-reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard; Lee, K. Wayne; Cao, Yong

    1999-02-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel due to the ingression of chloride ions from deicing salt and/or seawater has been a major cause of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Typically reinforcing steel is protected from corrosion by the formation of passive film because of highly alkaline concrete environment. The film can be damaged with the introduction of chloride ions to concrete, then corrosion occurs. There are mainly three approaches to tackle this problem, i.e., protective coating, cathodic protection and corrosion inhibitors.

  3. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (τ (app)) and slip coefficient (β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  4. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  5. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, M. J.; Pessiki, S.

    2006-03-06

    The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement.

  6. Performance evaluation of a novel rotational damper for structural reinforcement steel frames subjected to lateral excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Khadem, S. E.; Mirzabagheri, S.; Sanati, H.; Khosravieh, M. Y.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a novel rotational damper called a Rotational Friction Viscoelastic Damper (RFVD) is introduced. Some viscoelastic pads are added to the Rotational Friction Damper (RFD) in addition to the friction discs used in this conventional device. Consequently, the amount of energy dissipated by the damper increases in low excitation frequencies. In fact, the input energy to the structure is simultaneously dissipated in the form of friction and heat by frictional discs and viscoelastic pads. In order to compare the performance of this novel damper with the earlier types, a set of experiments were carried out. According to the test results, the RFVD showed a better performance in dissipating input energy to the structure when compared to the RFD. The seismic behavior of steel frames equipped with these dampers was also numerically evaluated based on a nonlinear time history analysis. The numerical results verified the performance of the dampers in increasing the energy dissipation and decreasing the energy input to the structural elements. In order to achieve the maximum dissipated energy, the dampers need to be installed in certain places called critical points in the structure. An appropriate approach is presented to properly find these points. Finally, the performance of the RFVDs installed at these critical points was investigated in comparison to some other configurations and the validity of the suggested method in increasing the energy dissipation was confirmed.

  7. Strain rate effects on reinforcing steels in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Forni, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    It is unquestionable the fact that a structural system should be able to fulfil the function for which it was created, without being damaged to an extent disproportionate to the cause of damage. In addition, it is an undeniable fact that in reinforced concrete structures under severe dynamic loadings, both concrete and reinforcing bars are subjected to high strain-rates. Although the behavior of the reinforcing steel under high strain rates is of capital importance in the structural assessment under the abovementioned conditions, only the behaviour of concrete has been widely studied. Due to this lack of data on the reinforcing steel under high strain rates, an experimental program on rebar reinforcing steels under high strain rates in tension is running at the DynaMat Laboratory. In this paper a comparison of the behaviour in a wide range of strain-rates of several types of reinforcing steel in tension is presented. Three reinforcing steels, commonly proposed by the European Standards, are compared: B500A, B500B and B500C. Lastly, an evaluation of the most common constitutive laws is performed.

  8. Estimation of corrosion damage in steel reinforced mortar using waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Henrique; Ervin, Benjamin L.; Kuchma, Daniel A.; Bernhard, Jennifer

    2005-05-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is a chronic infrastructure problem, particularly in areas with deicing salt and marine exposure. To maintain structural integrity, a testing method is needed to identify areas of corroding reinforcement. For purposes of rehabilitation, the method must also be able to evaluate the degree, rate and location of damage. Towards the development of a wireless embedded sensor system to monitor and assess corrosion damage in reinforced concrete, reinforced mortar specimens were manufactured with seeded defects to simulate corrosion damage. Taking advantage of waveguide effects of the reinforcing bars, these specimens were then tested using an ultrasonic approach. Using the same ultrasonic approach, specimens without seeded defects were also monitored during accelerated corrosion tests. Both the ultrasonic sending and the receiving transducers were mounted on the steel rebar. Advantage was taken of the lower frequency (<250 kHz) fundamental flexural propagation mode because of its relatively large displacements at the interface between the reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete. Waveform energy (indicative of attenuation) is presented and discussed in terms of corrosion damage. Current results indicate that the loss of bond strength between the reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete can be detected and evaluated.

  9. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  10. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  11. Evaluation of load-deflection properties of fiber-reinforced composites and its comparison with stainless steel wires

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Mamavi, Tayebe

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of common sized fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) to different deflections due to bending forces and comparing it with stainless steel (SS) wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two FRC groups with 0.75 mm and 1.2 mm diameters (Everstick Ortho, Stick Tech, Finland) and three SS groups with 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.7 mm diameters (3M Uniteck, Monrovia, California, USA) were tested. Each group contained 10 samples that were tested according to a three point bending test. Each group was tested at deflections of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm and the data was analyzed using the repeated measure ANOVA by SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA). P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The highest recorded load belonged to the 1.2 mm FRC and after that 0.7 mm SS wire, 0.75 mm FRC, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch SS wire and finally 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wire. The 0.7 mm SS wire and 0.75 mm FRC were compared as retainers and the results showed the 0.7 mm SS wire showed significantly higher load compared with 0.75 mm FRC (P < 0.05). The 1.2 mm FRC had significantly higher load compared to 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wires (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that the 1.2 mm FRC group had significantly higher load compared to SS wires and other FRC groups under the 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm deflections. Therefore, it can be suggested that FRC can be used as an esthetic replacement for SS wires for active and passive purposes in orthodontics. PMID:24932195

  12. 5. GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL, PIERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL, PIERS AND DETAILS FOR SWIMMING POOL Drawing 103-21 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  13. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  14. Fracture toughness of steel-fiber-reinforced bone cement.

    PubMed

    Kotha, S P; Li, C; Schmid, S R; Mason, J J

    2004-09-01

    Fractures in the bone-cement mantle (polymethyl methacrylate) have been linked to the failure of cemented total joint prostheses. The heat generated by the curing bone cement has also been implicated in the necrosis of surrounding bone tissue, leading to loosening of the implants. The addition of reinforcements may improve the fracture properties of bone cement and decrease the peak temperatures during curing. This study investigates the changes in the fracture properties and the temperatures generated in the ASTM F451 tests by the addition of 316L stainless steel fibers to bone cement. The influence of filler volume fraction (5-15% by volume) and aspect ratios (19, 46, 57) on the fracture toughness of the acrylic bone cement was assessed. Increasing the volume fraction of the steel fibers resulted in significant increases in the fracture toughness of the steel-fiber-reinforced composite. Fracture-toughness increases of up to 2.63 times the control values were obtained with the use of steel-fiber reinforcements. No clear trend in the fracture toughness was discerned for increasing aspect ratios of the reinforcements. There is a decrease in the peak temperatures reached during the curing of the steel-fiber-reinforced bone cement, though the decrease is too small to be clinically relevant. Large increases in the fatigue life of acrylic bone cement were also obtained by the addition of steel fibers. These results indicate that the use of steel fibers may enhance the durability of cemented joint prostheses. PMID:15293326

  15. Evaluating The Influence of Postsession Reinforcement on Choice of Reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    Kodak, Tiffany; Lerman, Dorothea C; Call, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Factors that influence reinforcer choice have been examined in a number of applied studies (e.g., Neef, Mace, Shea, & Shade, 1992; Shore, Iwata, DeLeon, Kahng, & Smith, 1997; Tustin, 1994). However, no applied studies have evaluated the effects of postsession reinforcement on choice between concurrently available reinforcers, even though basic findings indicate that this is an important factor to consider (Hursh, 1978; Zeiler, 1999). In this bridge investigation, we evaluated the influence of postsession reinforcement on choice of two food items when task responding was reinforced on progressive-ratio schedules. Participants were 3 children who had been diagnosed with developmental disabilities. Results indicated that response allocation shifted from one food item to the other food item under thinner schedules of reinforcement when no postsession reinforcement was provided. These findings suggest that the efficacy of instructional programs or treatments for problem behavior may be improved by restricting reinforcers outside treatment sessions. PMID:17970264

  16. Evaluating the Influence of Postsession Reinforcement on Choice of Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodak, Tiffany; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Factors that influence reinforcer choice have been examined in a number of applied studies (e.g., Neef, Mace, Shea, & Shade, 1992; Shore, Iwata, DeLeon, Kahng, & Smith, 1997; Tustin, 1994). However, no applied studies have evaluated the effects of postsession reinforcement on choice between concurrently available reinforcers, even though basic…

  17. RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES AT TOP LEFT. CAMERA FACES WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2581. Unknown Photographer, 6/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. VIEW OF EAST GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE STEEL REINFORCING RODS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE STEEL REINFORCING RODS PROTRUDING FROM THE BROKEN TOP OF THE RETAINING WALL. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, East Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS. PLACING REINFORCING STEEL AND FORMS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS. PLACING REINFORCING STEEL AND FORMS IN GATE CHAMBER. Photocopy of historic photograph (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR photographer, September 26, 1940 - Wickiup Dam, Outlet Works, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  20. DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS, LOOKING UPSTREAM. REINFORCING STEEL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES. WICKIUP DAM OUTLET WORKS, LOOKING UPSTREAM. REINFORCING STEEL IN PLACE FOR FLOOR OF STILLING BASIN IN FOREGROUND. Photocopy of historic photograph (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR photographer, June 17, 1940 - Wickiup Dam, Outlet Works, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  1. Neutron imaging of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Wittmann, F. H.; Zhao, T.; Lehmann, E. H.

    2010-04-01

    Service life and durability of reinforced concrete structures have become a crucial issue because of the economical and ecological implications. Service life of reinforced concrete structures is often limited by penetration of water and chemical compounds dissolved in water into the porous cement-based material. By now it is well-known that cracks in reinforced concrete are preferential paths for ingress of aggressive substances. Neutron radiography was successfully applied to study the process of water penetration into cracked steel reinforced concrete. In addition, the effectiveness of integral water repellent concrete to prevent ingress of water and salt solutions was investigated. Results are described in detail in this contribution. It will be shown that neutron radiography is a powerful method to visualize the process of water penetration into cracked and uncracked cement-based materials. On the basis of the obtained experimental data, it is possible to quantify the time-dependent water distributions in concrete with high accuracy and spatial resolution. It is of particular interest that penetration of water and salt solutions into damaged interfaces between concrete and steel can be visualized by means of neutron radiography. Deteriorating processes in cracked reinforced concrete structures can be studied in a completely new way. This advanced technology will help and find adequate ways to improve durability and service life of reinforced concrete structures. This will mean at the same time an essential contribution to improved sustainability.

  2. CP systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Soltesz, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for cathodic protection (CP) systems in Oregon?s reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. Oregon Department of Transportation (DOT) is investigating ways of monitoring the rebar corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges to identify conditions when protection of the rebar is needed. This approach reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for all environmental conditions, leading Oregon DOT to examine the use of intermittent, galvanic, and constant voltage cathodic protection systems. Results from these types of systems are reported.

  3. Corrosion of Steels in Steel Reinforced Concrete in Cassava Juice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwadare, G. O.; Agbaje, O.

    The corrosion of two types of construction steels, ST60Mn and RST37-2♦, in a low cyanide concentration environment (cassava juice) and embedded in concrete had been studied. The ST60 Mn was found to be more corrosion resistant in both ordinary water and the cassava juice environment. The cyanide in cassava juice does not attack the steel but it provides an environment of lower pH around the steel in the concrete which leads to breakdown of the passivating film provided by hydroxyl ions from cement. Other factors such as the curing time of the concrete also affect the corrosion rates of the steel in the concrete. The corrosion rate of the steel directly exposed to cassava juice i.e., steel not embedded in concrete is about twice that in concrete. Long exposure of concrete structure to cassava processing effluent might result in deterioration of such structures. Careful attention should therefore be paid to disposal of cassava processing effluents, especially in a country like Nigeria where such processing is now on the increase.

  4. Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Steel Fibre- Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, A.; Tamme, V.; Laurson, M.

    2015-11-01

    Steel fibre-reinforced concrete (SFRC) is widely used in the structural elements of buildings: industrial floors, slabs, walls, foundation, etc. When a load is applied to a fibre- reinforced composite consisting of a low-modulus matrix reinforced with high-strength, high- modulus fibres, the plastic flow of the matrix under stress transfers the load to the fibre; this results in high-strength, high-modulus material which determines the stiffness and stress of the composite. In this study the equivalent flexural strength, equivalent flexural ratio Re,3 and the compressing strength of SFRC are investigated. Notched test specimens with five different dosages of steel fibres (20, 25, 30, 35, 40 kg/m3) were prepared using industrial concrete. Determination of flexural tension strength was carried out according to the EU norm EVS-EN 14651:2005+A1:2007. The equivalent flexural strength and subsequent equivalent flexural ratio Re,3 of SFRC with a dosage of 20, 25, 30, 35 kg/m3 similar to their average values and with a dosage of 40 kg/m3 were 31% higher than their average values. The compressive strength of the steel fibre-reinforced concrete was slightly higher compared to plain concrete, except specimens with the dosage of 40 kg/m3 where the increase was 30%.

  5. Experimental and analytical behavior of strengthened reinforced concrete columns with steel angles and strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Essam S.; Al-Tersawy, Sherif H.

    2014-06-01

    The need of strengthening reinforced concrete columns, due to loss of strength and/or stiffness, is an essential requirement due to variation of the loads and environmental conditions applied on these columns. Steel jackets around the reinforced concrete (RC) columns are usually made by means of steel plates covering all over the column surface area. For the value of engineering purposes, another technique was developed using steel angles at the corners of the RC columns connected with discrete steel strips. In this paper, an experimental program is designed to evaluate the improvement in load-carrying capacity, stiffness and ductility of strengthened RC columns, concomitant with steel angles and strips. Despite of prevailing a substantially increased loading capacity and strength a pronounced enhancement in ductility and stiffness has been reported. A need for experimental test results with low value of concrete strength to mimic the local old-age structures condition that required strengthening in local countries. Seven columns specimens are tested to evaluate the strength improvement provided by steel strengthening of columns. The method of strengthened steel angles with strips is compared with another strengthening technique. This technique includes connected and unconnected steel-casing specimens. The observed experimental results describe load-shortening curves, horizontal strains in stirrups and steel strips, as well as description of failure mode. The extra-confinement pressure, due to existence of steel cage, of the strengthened RC column can be also observed from experimental results. The code provisions that predict the load-carrying capacity of the strengthened RC composite column has a discrepancy in the results. For this reason, an analytical model is developed in this paper to compare the code limit with experimental observed results. The proposed model accounts for the composite action for concrete confinement and enhancement of the local buckling

  6. Alternate anode materials for cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    2001-01-01

    Consumable and non-consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection (CP) systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where deicing salts are employed. The anode materials included Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, Al-12Zn-0.2In, and cobalt-sprayed Ti. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. Impressed current CP anodes were electrochemically aged at a current density 15 times as great as that used by the Oregon Department of Transportation in typical coastal ICCP systems (2.2 mA/m2 based on anode area). Increasing moisture at the anode-concrete interface reduced the operating voltage of all the anodes. Bond strength between the anodes and concrete decreased with electrochemical aging. The Zn-15Al and Al-12Zn-0.2In anodes provided adequate protection in GCP but their life was too short in the accelerated ICCP tests. Zinc had an adequate life in ICCP tests but was inadequate as a galvanic anode. Zinc-hydrogel performed well in both tests when the hydrogel was kept moist. Titanium was an excellent anode for ICCP, but is not suitable for GCP.

  7. 10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in Place and with 'Tower for Concrete' in the Background. The function of the 'tower for concrete' is uncertain, but may have to do with the transport of concrete from the point of mixing to the point of use (suggestion by NDOT Bridge Section personnel, February 1990). Original snapshot taken July, 1920. - Riverside Bridge, Spanning Truckee River at Booth Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  8. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  9. Stainless steel display evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Trissell, Terry L.

    2007-04-01

    Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) technology is one candidate to become a low power alternative in some applications to the currently dominant, active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), technology. Furthermore, fabrication of the AMOLED on stainless steel (SS) foil rather than the traditional glass substrate, while presenting a set of severe technical challenges, opens up the potential for displays that are both lighter and less breakable. Also, transition to an SS foil substrate may enable rollable displays - large when used but small for stowage within gear already worn or carried or installed. Research has been initiated on AMOLED/SS technology and the first 320 x 240 color pixel 4-in. demonstration device has been evaluated in the AFRL Display Test and Evaluation Laboratory. Results of this evaluation are reported along with a research roadmap.

  10. Steel reinforcement corrosion detection with coaxial cable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchaidze, Iana; Pommerenke, David; Chen, Genda

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion processes in the steel reinforced structures can result in structural deficiency and with time create a threat to human lives. Millions of dollars are lost each year because of corrosion. According to the U. S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) the average annual cost of corrosion in the infrastructure sector by the end of 2002 was estimated to be $22.6 billion. Timely remediation/retrofit and effective maintenance can extend the structure's live span for much less expense. Thus the considerable effort should be done to deploy corrosion monitoring techniques to have realistic information on the location and the severity of damage. Nowadays commercially available techniques for corrosion monitoring require costly equipment and certain interpretational skills. In addition, none of them is designed for the real time quality assessment. In this study the crack sensor developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology is proposed as a distributed sensor for real time corrosion monitoring. Implementation of this technology may ease the pressure on the bridge owners restrained with the federal budget by allowing the timely remediation with the minimal financial and labor expenses. The sensor is instrumented in such a way that the location of any discontinuity developed along its length can be easily detected. When the sensor is placed in immediate vicinity to the steel reinforcement it is subjected to the same chemical process as the steel reinforcement. And corrosion pitting is expected to develop on the sensor exactly at the same location as in the rebar. Thus it is expected to be an effective tool for active corrosion zones detection within reinforced concrete (RC) members. A series of laboratory tests were conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Nine sensors were manufactured and placed in the artificially created corrosive environment and observed over the time. To induce accelerated corrosion 3% and 5% Na

  11. 77 FR 64127 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... both the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (77 FR 39254, July 2... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from...

  12. 78 FR 55755 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and... from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, primarily provided for in subheadings...

  13. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  14. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  15. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  16. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-1993 are available for inspection during... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  17. Effect of Steel Fibres Distribution on Impact Resistance Performance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Beddu, Salmia; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Itam, Zarina; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced with varied thickness and fraction volume subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact resistance SFRC for various slab thickness and fraction volume. Random fibre distribution is the more effective than the top and bottom fibre distribution in terms of absorption of impact energy, crack resistance, the ability to control crack formation and propagation against impact energy.

  18. The Corrosion Effects on the Structural Integrity of Reinforcing Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Ch. Alk.; Michalopoulos, D.; Koutsoukos, P.

    2008-08-01

    An experimental study conducted on 12 mm diameter, artificially corroded BSt500s steel rebars, showed that the mass loss, the fatigue limit, and the life expectancy were reduced according to the level of corrosion. Rebar corrosion has a great impact on the mass loss, mechanical properties, low cycle fatigue (LCF) and there is strong indication that embrittlement takes place. The extended salt-spray exposure enhanced the damage and promoted extended creation of pits and perforations suggesting progressive embrittlement and reduction of the available energy, justified by the SEM micrograph results. The low cycle strain-controlled fatigue testing under ±1, ±2.5, and ±4% constant amplitude strain indicated that the corroded steel bars exhibit gradual reduction in available energy, number of cycles to failure, and load bearing ability. For the ±1% strain level the fatigue limit was reduced considerably as the level of corrosion increased due to mass loss and reduction of the exterior martensitic layer. In addition, a drastic drop in the energy density of the specimens was observed with creation of stress concentration points. At ±2.5% and ±4% strain levels, the fatigue limit was reduced dramatically mainly due to accumulated damage from plastic deformation and minimally due to corrosion. Anti-seismic design that ignores the influence of corrosion and cumulative damage due to plastic deformation, and the mechanical behavior of reinforcing steel during severe ground motion, could lead to unpredictable performance.

  19. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  20. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  1. Ultrasonic assessment of service life of concrete structures subject to reinforcing steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udegbunam, Ogechukwu Christian

    Over half of the bridges in the United States were built before 1970. Such bridges and the network of roads that they carry include the Inter State system, which was built as part of the great public works program, following the end of the Second World War. During that era, the emphasis was on strength design and economical construction of new structures, and not much premium was placed on durability and maintainability concerns. Since the end of this construction boom in the early 1970s, the concern for the durability of transportation infrastructure has steadily gained prominence among those agencies that must secure, program and administer funds for maintaining highway networks. The objective of this research was to develop a nondestructive method of assessing the durability of concrete bridge decks susceptible to damage from corrosion of embedded reinforcing steel. This was accomplished by formulating a holistic approach that accounts for the major factors that influence corrosion based deterioration of reinforced concrete. In this approach, the assessment of the durability of concrete bridge decks is based on a model that estimates the time it takes for the cover concrete to fail a result of stresses caused by expansion of reinforcing steel bars, due to corrosion activities. This time to failure is comprised of two distinct periods that must be evaluated before the problem can be solved. The research consisted of an experimental program and an analytical study. In the experimental program concrete specimens were cast and tested to determine their diffusivity and mechanical properties. The diffusivity was used to evaluate the period it takes for corrosion of the reinforcing bars to commence. In the analytical study, the resistance of the concrete structure against the internal forces caused by corrosion was evaluated with the finite element techniques. This resistance was used to evaluate the period defining the failure of the cover concrete. These two periods

  2. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  3. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF WASTE SOLUTIONS ON CONCRETE AND REINFORCING STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DANIEL JI; START DC; KAAR PH

    1983-05-28

    This report has been prepared for the In Situ Waste Disposal Program Tank Assessment Task (WG-11) as part of an investigation to evaluate the long-term performance of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This report, prepared by the Portland Cement Association, presents the results of four years of concrete degradation studies which exposed concrete and reinforcing steel, under load and at 180 F, to simulated double-shell slurry, simulated salt cake solution, and a control solution. Exposure length varied from 3 months to 36 months. In all cases, examination of the concrete and reinforcing steel at the end of the exposure indicated there was no attack, i.e., no evidence of rusting, cracking, disruption of mill scale or loss of strength. Radioactive waste resulting from the chemical processing of reactor fuel for recovery of special nuclear materials (primarily plutonium), has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. The defense waste is currently being stored in underground waste tanks and in capsules stored in water basins. Current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) strategy is to emphasize development and implementation of technology for removal, solidification, and final disposition of defense waste at the Savannah River Site first, then at the Hanford Site. Final disposal of waste in tanks at Hanford is expected to consist of in-place stabilization of most tanks. Selected tank wastes may be retrieved. Disposal operations will be carried out during the next several decades. Consequently, defense waste will remain in the existing underground tanks at Hanford for at least several decades. To ensure the safe storage of the waste, the waste storage tanks are being evaluated for continued service as part of the DOE Waste Tank Evaluation Program (AR-005-10-02-G). Technical studies and laboratory tests have been conducted to determine the effect of the stored waste's chemicals and temperature on the reinforced concrete. Waste solutions, which can be

  4. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan A.; Addison, Laura R.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current…

  5. Reinforcement learning improves behaviour from evaluative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littman, Michael L.

    2015-05-01

    Reinforcement learning is a branch of machine learning concerned with using experience gained through interacting with the world and evaluative feedback to improve a system's ability to make behavioural decisions. It has been called the artificial intelligence problem in a microcosm because learning algorithms must act autonomously to perform well and achieve their goals. Partly driven by the increasing availability of rich data, recent years have seen exciting advances in the theory and practice of reinforcement learning, including developments in fundamental technical areas such as generalization, planning, exploration and empirical methodology, leading to increasing applicability to real-life problems.

  6. Evaluation of corrosion effect in reinforced concrete by chloride exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreto, G.; Di Benedetti, M.; Iovino, R.; Nanni, A.; Gonzalez, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    Durability is generally described as the ability of a material to maintain its physical and mechanical properties over time. In reinforced concrete (RC) structures, concrete is the ideal material to protect the steel reinforcement given its high alkalinity. In environments subjected to highly aggressive conditions, mostly due to the presence of chlorides, concrete may lose its protective characteristics and allow for accelerated ageing. Concrete degradation and steel reinforcement corrosion are phenomena closely connected. The aim of this research work is the characterization of the relationship between steel reinforcement corrosion and concrete degradation under accelerated ageing in a 3% sodium chloride solution. The method of linear polarization is used for identification of the corrosion rate of the steel bar. Additionally, the values of concrete residual strength are obtained, and correlated to both the corrosion rate and width of concrete cracks. Finally, the prediction of the concrete cover useful life is estimated.

  7. 78 FR 73838 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Investigations, 78 FR 60831 (October 2, 2013) (Initiation Notice). \\2\\ See Memorandum for the Record from Paul... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary... Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated a countervailing duty investigation on steel...

  8. 77 FR 71631 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... electronic filing have been amended. The amendments took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Steel...

  9. Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts

    SciTech Connect

    C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  10. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  11. Development of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete cribs to replace wood cribs in underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Tanious, N.S.; Becket, R.D.; Bollinger, E.R.

    1984-02-01

    The need to provide better mine roof support and control in longwall tailgate entries prompted the Bureau of Mines to search for a replacement product for wood cribs. Their search isolated steel-fiber-reinforced concrete (SFC) as the most effective replacement. Through successful laboratory and underground mine tests, handmade SFC cribs proved to be a viable and more effective roof support system. However, to ensure wider usage, U.S. Steel Mining Co. initiated a joint development and evaluation program with Burrell Construction Company in order to mass produce SFC blocks of reasonable dimension, weight, and cost. Small specimens and full-size cribs were evaluated during this program to determine their compressive strength and post failure characteristics. After considerable testing and adjusting of various concrete mixtures, a final formulation for the SFC crib blocks was selected. That formulation permitted the construction of SFC cribs possessing a nominal crib strength of 3200 psi (22.1 x 10/sup 6/ Pa) and a nominal modulus of elasticity of 1.0 x 10/sup 6/ psi (6894.76 x 10/sup 6/ Pa). These SFC cribs can support from 3.5 to 14.5 times as much load as a wood crib, depending on the size of the wood crib being replaced. Both laboratory and limited mine tests, conducted by U.S. Steel Mining Co. have shown the SFC crib to be an economical and effective means of roof control.

  12. Nondestructive inspection of corrosion and delamination at the concrete-steel reinforcement interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tri Huu

    The proposed study explores the feasibility of detecting and quantifying corrosion and delamination (physical separation) at the interface between reinforcing steel bars and concrete using ultrasonic guided waves. The problem of corrosion of the reinforcing steel in structures has increased significantly in recent years. The emergence of this type of concrete deterioration, which was first observed in marine structures and chemical manufacturing plants, coincided with the increased applications of deicing salts (sodium and calcium chlorides) to roads and bridges during winter months in those states where ice and snow are of major concern. Concrete is strengthened by the inclusion of the reinforcement steel such as deformed or corrugated steel bars. Bonding between the two materials plays a vital role in maximizing performance capacity of the structural members. Durability of the structure is of concern when it is exposed to aggressive environments. Corrosion of reinforcing steel has led to premature deterioration of many concrete members before their design life is attained. It is therefore, important to be able to detect and measure the level of corrosion in reinforcing steel or delamination at the interface. The development and implementation of damage detection strategies, and the continuous health assessment of concrete structures then become a matter of utmost importance. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a nondestructive testing technique to quantify the amount of corrosion in the reinforcing steel. The guided mechanical wave approach has been explored towards the development of such methodology. The use of an embedded ultrasonic network for monitoring corrosion in real structures is feasible due to its simplicity. The ultrasonic waves, specifically cylindrical guided waves can p ropagate a long distance along the reinforcing steel bars and are found to be sensitive to the interface conditions between steel bars and concrete. Ultrasonic

  13. Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Hoffmann, Ernst

    2008-02-05

    Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

  14. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  15. Evaluation of post-fire strength of concrete flexural members reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Devon S.

    Owing to their corrosion resistance and superior strength to weight ratio, there has been, over the past two decades, increased interest in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structural members. The mechanical behavior of FRP reinforcement differs from that of steel reinforcement. For example, FRP reinforcement exhibit a linear stress-strain behavior until the bar ruptures and the strength, stiffness and bond properties of FRP reinforcement are affected more adversely by elevated temperatures. All structures are subject to the risk of damage by fire and fires continue to be a significant cause of damage to structures. Many structures do not collapse after being exposed to fire. The safety of the structure for any future use is dependent on the ability to accurately estimate the post-fire load capacity of the structure. Assuming that the changes, due to fire exposure, in the mechanical behavior of the GFRP reinforcing bar and concrete, and the bond between the reinforcing bar and the concrete are understood, an analytical procedure for estimating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete flexural elements can be developed. This thesis investigates the changes in: a) tensile properties and bond of GFRP bars; and b) the flexural behavior of GFRP reinforced concrete beams flexural after being exposed to elevated temperatures up to 400°C and cooled to ambient temperature. To this end, twelve tensile tests, twelve pullout bond tests and ten four-point beam tests were performed. The data from the tests were used to formulate analytical procedures for evaluating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete beams. The procedure produced conservative results when compared with the experimental data. In general, the residual tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of GFRP bars decrease as the exposure temperature increases. The loss in properties is however, smaller than that observed by other researchers when

  16. 75 FR 7562 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ..., Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review in Part, and Determination To Revoke in Part, 70 FR... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision... certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey covering the period of review (POR) of April...

  17. Effect of Alloying Elements on Tensile Properties, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of Reinforcing Bar Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, B. K.; Srikanth, S.; Sahoo, G.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of copper, phosphorus, and chromium present in a semikilled reinforcing bar steel produced by in-line quenching [thermomechanical treatment (TMT)] process on the tensile properties, microstructure, and corrosion resistance of steel in simulated chloride environment has been investigated. The results have been compared with that of a semikilled C-Mn reinforcing bar steel without these alloying elements produced by the same process route. Though the amount of phosphorus (0.11 wt.%) was higher than that specified by ASTM A 706 standard, the Cu-P-Cr steel exhibited a composite microstructure, and good balance of yield stress, tensile stress, elongation, and ultimate tensile to yield stress ratio. Two conventional test methods, namely, the salt fog, and potentiodynamic polarization tests, were used for the corrosion test. The rust formed on Cu-P-Cr steel was adherent, and was of multiple colors, while the corrosion products formed on the C-Mn steel were weakly adherent and relatively darker blue. Also, the free corrosion potential of the Cu-P-Cr steel was nobler, and the corrosion current was markedly lower than that of a C-Mn rebar. The Cu-P-Cr steel did not develop any pits/deep grooves on its surface even after the prolonged exposure to salt fog. The improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr steel has been attributed to the presence of copper, phosphorus, and small amount of chromium in the dense, adherent rust layer on the surface of reinforcing steel bar. A schematic mechanism of charge transfer has been proposed to explain the improved corrosion resistance of the Cu-P-Cr alloyed TMT rebar.

  18. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  19. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  20. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing steel in place prior to pouring concrete for biparting doors between hot shop and special equipment service (SES) room. Facing north. Hot shop to left, SES room to right. slot for north half of door shows at upper left of view. Date: May 21, 1954. INEEL negative no. 10548 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Processing and evaluation of smart composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.

    1997-11-01

    The issues of processing and evaluation of pultruded smart composite reinforcements with embedded fiber optic sensors are discussed. The required modification of the pultrusion processing technology to allow for the incorporation of fiber optic sensors is developed. In order to fully evaluate the loads imposed on the Fabry Perot fiber optic sensors during the pultrusion process, the strain sensors were subjected to the separate variables of the total process. The following data was obtained for the carbon fiber rods. Compaction pressure alone caused negligible residual strain. The temperature profile caused a similar strain profile over the length of the pultrusion die. For the total pultrusion process, the residual strain after cooling appeared to present somewhat of a problem. For several experiments, the residual strain after exiting the pultrusion die was in the range of plus 200 to 400 microstrain, after which the sensors ceased to function. Calculations indicated that the radial shrinkage of the carbon fiber rods may have been sufficient to cause failure of the Fabry Perot sensors. A special procedure of reinforcing sensors prior to embedding them into the composite was successful in allowing the sensors to survive with only a slightly negative residual strain.

  2. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor. PMID:27608029

  3. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing.

    PubMed

    de Alcantara, Naasson P; da Silva, Felipe M; Guimarães, Mateus T; Pereira, Matheus D

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  4. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    de Alcantara, Naasson P.; da Silva, Felipe M.; Guimarães, Mateus T.; Pereira, Matheus D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  5. Practical experience of steel fiber reinforced wet shotcrete in large underground construction projects

    SciTech Connect

    Garshol, K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper discusses advantages of SFRS (steel fiber reinforced shotcrete) in underground construction projects, including trends in rock support design; quality and durability of wet mix shotcrete; advantages in safety and working environment and the technical properties of SFRS. Key data from cases illustrate the above. Cost and time factors are highlighted.

  6. 76 FR 48802 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Determination To Revoke in Part, 73 FR 66218 (Nov. 7, 2008). The period of review (POR) is April 1, 2006... Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). This clarification... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended...

  7. 78 FR 68090 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of September 11, 2013 (78 FR 55755). The... authority of Title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930 have been tolled by 16 days. 78 FR 64011, October 25, 2013... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey Determinations On the basis of the record...

  8. Field performance of sprayed zinc anodes in controlling corrosion of steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnea, J.

    1998-12-31

    The deterioration of concrete structures often results from the corrosion of their steel reinforcement. Cathodic protection (CP) is a proven means to stop rebar corrosion. One anode material gaining acceptance in the infrastructure corrosion fight is zinc thermal spray coating. This paper discusses an investigation of such CP systems.

  9. Driving Energy of Reinforcing Steel Bar for Discriminating Background Medium of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Ryo; Motooka, Seiichi

    2008-05-01

    A method for discriminating the background media of concrete using the quality factor of elastic waves multireflected in the concrete was proposed. A reinforcing steel bar buried inside the concrete is employed as a sound source driven by the induction of impact electromagnetic field radiated from a spiral coil placed on the surface of the concrete. In this paper, the appropriate energy for driving the reinforcing steel bar, to obtain stable quality factors with clear differences between different background media, is studied experimentally. With various driving energies, multireflected elastic waves corresponding to three types of background medium, air, sand, and water, are measured. The quality factors are calculated by the linear predictive coefficient analysis method. The results show that the quality factors tend to increase when the driving energy is at its lower region, and they remain comparatively stable when the driving energy is higher than a certain value. For reinforcing steel bars with different diameters, the curves of quality factors versus driving energies agree well by introducing a newly defined volume-normalized driving energy. For the reinforcing steel bar of 13 mm diameter, the appropriate driving energy for background media discrimination is approximately 0.5 J.

  10. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  11. Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Steel Reinforcement in Concrete — a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Ghoreishiamiri, Seyedmojtaba; Ismail, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Reinforced concrete is one of the widely used construction materials for bridges, buildings, platforms and tunnels. Though reinforced concrete is capable of withstanding a large range of severe environments including marine, industrial and alpine conditions, there are still a large number of failures in concrete structures for many reasons. Either carbonation or chloride attack is the main culprit which is due to depassivation of reinforced steel and subsequently leads to rapid steel corrosion. Among many corrosion prevention measures, application of corrosion inhibitors play a vital role in metal protection. Numerous range of corrosion inhibitors were reported for concrete protection that were also used commercially in industries. This review summarizes the application of natural products as corrosion inhibitors for concrete protection and also scrutinizes various factors influencing its applicability.

  12. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  13. Co-extrusion of Discontinuously, Non-centric Steel-reinforced Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Foydl, A.; Haase, M.; Khalifa, N. Ben; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2011-05-04

    The process of manufacturing discontinuously non-centric steel reinforced aluminum by means of co-extrusion has been examined. By this process semi-finished reinforced profiles can be fabricated for further treatment through forging techniques. Therefore, steel reinforcement elements consisting of E295GC were inserted into conventional aluminum billets and co-extruded into two different solid profiles; a rectangle one by an extrusion ratio of 10.1:1 and a round one by 4.8:1. The used aluminum alloy is EN AW-6060. The billet temperature as well as the ram speed were varied to investigate their influence on the position of the reinforcement elements inside the strand. The measurement was done by a video measurement system, called Optomess A250, after milling off the strand. The distances between the elements in longitudinal direction were nearly constant, apart from the rear part of the strand. The same was observed for the distance of the steel elements to the profile edge. This due to the inhomogeneous material flow in the transverse weld, related to the billet-to-billet extrusion. The rotation of the reinforcement elements occurs because the elements flow nearby the shear zone. Further, micrographs were made to investigate the embedding situation and the grain size distribution. The embedding of the reinforcement elements were good in the solid round profile, but in the rectangle profile were found some kind of air pocket. The grain size of the aluminum alloy close to the steel elements is much smaller than in the other parts of the solid round profile.

  14. Comparative investigation of corrosion resistance of steel reinforcement in alinite and Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Kostogloudis, G.C.; Kalogridis, D.; Ftikos, C.; Malami, C.; Georgali, B.; Kaloidas, V.

    1998-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of steel-reinforced mortar specimens made from alinite cement was investigated using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) specimens as reference. The specimens were prepared and exposed in three different environments: continuous exposure in tap water, interrupted exposure in tap water, and interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution. The steel weight loss and the half cell potential were measured vs. exposure time, up to the age of 12 months. Pore solution extraction and analysis and porosity determination were also performed. In continuous exposure in tap water, alinite cement provided adequate protection against corrosion. In interrupted exposure in tap water, a higher corrosion was observed for alinite cement compared to OPC. In the case of interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution, the simultaneous action of free chlorides and oxygen resulted in the depassivation of steel reinforcing bars in alinite and Portland cement mortars, and led to severe corrosion effect.

  15. Prospects of increasing the strength of aluminum by reinforcing it with stainless steel wire (a review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Ivanova, V. S.; Kopev, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental strength of aluminum reinforced with stainless steel wire is analyzed. Various methods of producing the composite material and it's static and cyclical strengths are considered. The reinforcement of aluminum with stainless steel wire was accomplished from the perspective of increasing the specific strength of aluminum and it's alloys, increasing the strength of the material with respect to high and low temperatures, as well as increasing the cyclical strength. The production of the composite aluminum-stainless steel wire material with approximated or calculated strengthening is possible by any of the considered methods. The selection of the proper production technology depends on precise details and conditions of application of the material.

  16. Internal impedance of steel-reinforced helically stranded conductors at commercial frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkushev, A. G.; Elagin, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    An original simplified mathematical model is proposed that describes the distribution of a harmonic electromagnetic field at a commercial frequency in steel-reinforced high-voltage cables with helically stranded single-layer winding. In the framework of the idealized physical concepts on which the proposed model is based, stranded conductors are treated as an anisotropic conducting layer. It is shown that taking into account the helical twist of conductors leads to the appearance of an axial magnetic field, the presence of which can significantly influence the level of ac losses. The model has been used to calculate the dependence of the internal impedance on the magnetic permeability of the steel core for commercial AS-70 grade steel-reinforced stranded aluminum cable. The results are compared to those obtained using a hollow cylinder model and full-scale numerical calculations using the finite element method.

  17. Compound characterization of laser brazed SiC-steel joints using tungsten reinforced SnAgTi-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Südmeyer, I.; Rohde, M.; Fürst, T.

    2010-02-01

    With the help of a CO2-laser (λ = 10.64 μm) Silicon carbide (Trade name: Ekasic-F, Comp: ESK Ceramics) has been brazed to commercial steel (C45E, Matnr. 1.1191) using SnAgTi-filler alloys. The braze pellets were dry pressed based on commercially available powders and polished to a thickness of 300 μm. The SnAgTi-fractions were varied with the objective of improving the compound strength. Furthermore, tungsten reinforced SnAgTi-fillers were examined with regard to the shear strength of the ceramic/steel joints. Polished microsections of SnAgTi-pellets were investigated before brazing in order to evaluate the particle distribution and to detect potential porosities using optical microscopy. The brazing temperature and the influence of the reinforcing particles on the active braze filler were determined by measurements with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). After brazing. the ceramic-steel joints were characterized by scanning electron micrographs and EDX-analysis. Finally the mechanical strength of the braze-joints was determined by shear tests.

  18. Effect of Reinforcement Using Stainless Steel Mesh, Glass Fibers, and Polyethylene on the Impact Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, H B Mallikarjuna; Shaik, Sharaz; Sachdeva, Harleen; Khare, Sumit; Haralur, Satheesh B; Roopa, K T

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact strength of denture base resin is of great concern and many approaches have been made to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. The objective of this study was to compare the impact strength of the denture base resin with and without reinforcement and to evaluate the impact strength of denture base resin when reinforced with stainless steel mesh, glass fiber, and polyethylene fibers in the woven form. Materials and Methods: The specimens (maxillary denture bases) were fabricated using a standard polyvinylsiloxane mold with conventional heat cured polymethyl methacrylate resin. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10). Group I specimens or control group were not reinforced. Group II specimens were reinforced with stainless steel mesh and Group III and Group IV specimens were reinforced with three percent by weight of glass fibers and polyethylene fibers in weave form respectively. All the specimens were immersed in water for 1-week before testing. The impact strength was measured with falling weight impact testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Highest impact strength values were exhibited by the specimens reinforced with polyethylene fibers followed by glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and control group. Conclusions: Reinforcement of maxillary complete dentures showed a significant increase in impact strength when compared to unreinforced dentures. Polyethylene fibers exhibit better impact strength followed by glass fibers and stainless steel mesh. By using pre-impregnated glass and polyethylene fibers in woven form (prepregs) the impact strength of the denture bases can be increased effectively. PMID:26124604

  19. Assessment of Steel Reinforcement Corrosion State by Parameters of Potentiodynamic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajči, Ľudovít; Jerga, Ján

    2015-12-01

    The environment of the steel reinforcement has a significant impact on the durability and service life of a concrete structure. It is not only the presence of aggressive substances from the environment, but also the own composition of concrete mixture. The use of new types of cements, additives and admixtures must be preceded by verification, if they themselves shall not initiate the corrosion. There is a need for closer physical expression of the parameters of the potentiodynamic diagrams allowing reliable assessment of the influence of the surrounding environment on electrochemical behaviour of reinforcement. The analysis of zero retardation limits of potentiodynamic curves is presented.

  20. A micromorphic model for steel fiber reinforced concrete.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J; Mora, D F; Huespe, A E; Weyler, R

    2012-10-15

    A new formulation to model the mechanical behavior of high performance fiber reinforced cement composites with arbitrarily oriented short fibers is presented. The formulation can be considered as a two scale approach, in which the macroscopic model, at the structural level, takes into account the mesostructural phenomenon associated with the fiber-matrix interface bond/slip process. This phenomenon is contemplated by including, in the macroscopic description, a micromorphic field representing the relative fiber-cement displacement. Then, the theoretical framework, from which the governing equations of the problem are derived, can be assimilated to a specific case of the material multifield theory. The balance equation derived for this model, connecting the micro stresses with the micromorphic forces, has a physical meaning related with the fiber-matrix bond slip mechanism. Differently to previous procedures in the literature, addressed to model fiber reinforced composites, where this equation has been added as an additional independent ingredient of the methodology, in the present approach it arises as a natural result derived from the multifield theory. Every component of the composite is defined with a specific free energy and constitutive relation. The mixture theory is adopted to define the overall free energy of the composite, which is assumed to be homogeneously constituted, in the sense that every infinitesimal volume is occupied by all the components in a proportion given by the corresponding volume fraction. The numerical model is assessed by means of a selected set of experiments that prove the viability of the present approach. PMID:24049211

  1. Intermittent cathodic protection for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Soltesz, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on Oregon's reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. After a ICCP system is turned off, the rebar in the concrete remains passive and protected for a period of time. Intermittent operation of CP systems is possible when continuous corrosion rate monitoring is used to identify conditions when the CP system needs to be turned on to reestablish protection conditions for the rebar. This approach applies CP protection only when needed and reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for a range of environmental conditions. In doing so, intermittent CP would lower the average current necessary to protect rebar, increase the anode service life, and reduce the lifetime costs for protecting reinforced concrete bridges.

  2. Reinforcer Identification and Evaluation of Choice within an Educational Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Charna; Wallace, Michele D.; Najdowski, Adel C.; Atcheson, Katy; Bosch, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Current research on preference methodology and the effects of choice with children who are typically developing is limited. This study evaluated two preference methodologies for identifying reinforcers across two choice options within the classroom. These methods include a teacher-generated list of reinforcers, a student-generated list of…

  3. PERFORMANCE OF RC AND FRC WALL PANELS REINFORCED WITH MILD STEEL AND GFRP COMPOSITES IN BLAST EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Garfield; William D. Richins; Thomas K. Larson; Chris P. Pantelides; James E. Blakeley

    2011-06-01

    The structural integrity of reinforced concrete structures in blast events is important for critical facilities. This paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating detailed finite element models that predict the performance of reinforced concrete wall panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The test specimens were 1.2 m square wall panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consists of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bar reinforcement (Type A); FRC panels without additional reinforcement (Type B); FRC panels with steel bar reinforcement (Type C); NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bar reinforcement (Type D); and NWC panels reinforced with steel bar reinforcement and external bidirectional GFRP overlays on both faces (Type E). An additional three Type C panels were used as control specimens (CON). Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. The panels were instrumented with strain gauges, and accelerometers; in addition, pressure sensors and high speed videos were employed during the blast events. Panel types C and E had the best performance, whereas panel type B did not perform well. Preliminary dynamic simulations show crack patterns similar to the experimental results.

  4. Friction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Chandrasekaran, M; Bonfield, W

    2002-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear. PMID:15348592

  5. Mechanical behavior of a glass-fiber reinforced composite to steel joint for ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Li, Ping; Lin, Zhuang; Yang, Dongmei

    2015-03-01

    The use of a glass-fiber reinforced composite in marine structures is becoming more common, particularly due to the potential weight savings. The mechanical response of the joint between a glass-fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) superstructure and a steel hull formed is examined and subsequently modified to improve performance through a combined program of modeling and testing. A finite-element model is developed to predict the response of the joint. The model takes into account the contact at the interface between different materials, progressive damage, large deformation theory, and a non-linear stress-strain relationship. To predict the progressive failure, the analysis combines Hashin failure criteria and maximum stress failure criteria. The results show stress response has a great influence on the strength and bearing of the joint. The Balsawood-steel interface is proved to be critical to the mechanical behavior of the joint. Good agreement between experimental results and numerical predictions is observed.

  6. Effect of Thickness and Fibre Volume Fraction on Impact Resistance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Usman, Fathoni; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and fibre volume fraction (VF) on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance SFRC against slab thickness and volume fraction. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistances of SFRC against slab thickness. However the impact resistance of SFRC against percentage of volume fraction exhibit a non-linear relationship.

  7. Seismic performance of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete composite frame joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Changwang; Jia, Jinqing

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of a composite frame comprised of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete (SRUHSC) columns and steel reinforced concrete (SRC) beams, six interior frame joint specimens were designed and tested under low cyclically lateral load. The effects of the axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio were studied on the characteristics of the frame joint performance including crack pattern, failure mode, ductility, energy dissipation capacity, strength degradation and rigidity degradation. It was found that all joint specimens behaved in a ductile manner with flexural-shear failure in the joint core region while plastic hinges appeared at the beam ends. The ductility and energy absorption capacity of joints increased as the axial load ratio decreased and the volumetric stirrup ratio increased. The displacement ductility coefficient and equivalent damping coefficient of the joints fell between the corresponding coefficients of the steel reinforced concrete (SRC) frame joint and RC frame joint. The axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio have less influence on the strength degradation and more influence on the stiffness degradation. The stiffness of the joint degrades more significantly for a low volumetric stirrup ratio and high axial load ratio. The characteristics obtained from the SRUHSC composite frame joint specimens with better seismic performance may be a useful reference in future engineering applications.

  8. Effects of manufacturing techniques on the flexural behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Toutanji, H.; Bayasi, Z.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental research investigating the effects of manufacturing techniques on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced concrete. Both the effects of curing environments and that of testing direction relative to casting direction on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete are reported. Specimens were cured in three different environmental conditions: steam, moisture, and air. Results show that steam curing, as compared to moisture curing, does not enhance the flexural strength of steel fibrous concrete but does reduce flexural toughness. As expected, air curing shows detrimental effects on all aspects of the test results, as compared to steam and moisture curing. The flexural behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete is strongly affected by testing direction. When testing direction is perpendicular to casting direction, specimens exhibit reductions in both flexural strength and toughness compared to the case when testing and casting directions are parallel. The effect of testing direction relative to casting direction on flexural strength and toughness increases with increasing the flowability (workability) of the fibrous mixture, which encourages fiber settlement during placement.

  9. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  10. Digital fast neutron radiography of steel reinforcing bar in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitton, K.; Jones, A.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutron imaging has previously been used in order to test for cracks, degradation and water content in concrete. However, these techniques often fall short of alternative non-destructive testing methods, such as γ-ray and X-ray imaging, particularly in terms of resolution. Further, thermal neutron techniques can be compromised by the significant expense associated with thermal neutron sources of sufficient intensity to yield satisfactory results that can often precipitate the need for a reactor. Such embodiments are clearly not portable in the context of the needs of field applications. This paper summarises the results of a study to investigate the potential for transmission radiography based on fast neutrons. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of heterogeneities in concrete, such as reinforcement structures, could be identified on the basis of variation in transmitted fast-neutron flux. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed and the results from these are compared to those arising from practical tests using a 252Cf source. The experimental data have been acquired using a digital pulse-shape discrimination system that enables fast neutron transmission to be studied across an array of liquid scintillators placed in close proximity to samples under test, and read out in real time. Whilst this study does not yield sufficient spatial resolution, a comparison of overall flux ratios does provide a basis for the discrimination between samples with contrasting rebar content. This approach offers the potential for non-destructive testing that gives less dose, better transportability and better accessibility than competing approaches. It is also suitable for thick samples where γ-ray and X-ray methods can be limited.

  11. Effects of cement alkalinity, exposure conditions and steel-concrete interface on the time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold for reinforcing steel in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jingak

    Effects of (1) cement alkalinity (low, normal and high), (2) exposure conditions (RH and temperature), (3) rebar surface condition (as-received versus cleaned) and (4) density and distribution of air voids at the steel-concrete interface on the chloride threshold and time-to-corrosion for reinforcing steel in concrete have been studied. Also, experiments were performed to evaluate effects of RH and temperature on the diffusion of chloride in concrete and develop a method for ex-situ pH measurement of concrete pore water. Once specimens were fabricated and exposed to a corrosive chloride solution, various experimental techniques were employed to determine time-to-corrosion, chloride threshold, diffusion coefficient and void density along the rebar trace as well as pore water pH. Based upon the resultant data, several findings related to the above parameters have been obtained as summarized below. First, time for the corrosion initiation was longest for G109 concrete specimens with high alkalinity cement (HA). Also, chloride threshold increased with increasing time-to-corrosion and cement alkalinity. Consequently, the HA specimens exhibited the highest chloride threshold compared to low and normal alkalinity ones. Second, high temperature and temperature variations reduced time-to-corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete since chloride diffusion was accelerated at higher temperature and possibly by temperature variations. The lowest chloride threshold values were found for outdoor exposed specimens suggesting that variation of RH or temperature (or both) facilitated rapid chloride diffusion. Third, an elevated time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold values were found for the wire brushed steel specimens compared to as-received ones. The higher ratio of [OH-]/[Fe n+] on the wire brushed steel surface compared to that of as-received case can be the possible cause because the higher ratio of this parameter enables the formation of a more protective passive film on

  12. Performance Evaluation for Enhancement of Some of the Engineering Properties of Bamboo as Reinforcement in Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kute, S. Y.; Wakchaure, M. R.

    2013-11-01

    Bamboo is one of the alternative materials with strong potential for reinforcing the cement matrices. Unlike steel, during casting and curing of concrete, reinforced bamboo absorbs water and expands, which results in radial cracking of surrounding concrete. When curing is stopped, bamboo starts shrinking slowly loosing the contact with concrete. The dimensional changes of bamboo resulting from moisture and temperature variations, causes de-bonding which affects the bond strength severely. This paper presents the results of experimental investigations made to evaluate potential of bamboo to be used as concrete reinforcement. Specimens with and without node were extracted from well seasoned Dendrocalamus strictus variety of bamboo. They were tested for water absorption, dimensional changes, tensile and bond strength in M20 concrete with twenty different treatments. The paper also presents the comparison of bond strength of mild steel, TMT steel and untreated bamboo with that of bamboo having different low cost treatments for reducing the water absorption thereby enhancing bond strength of bamboo in concrete.

  13. The effect of chloride ion concentration gradients on the initiation of localized corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    It has been established that for steel reinforced concrete roads treated with deicing salts or exposed to a marine environment, chloride ions are introduced at the surface of the concrete structure. Two models were discussed in which chloride ion concentration gradients would form in a steel reinforced concrete structure. Electrochemical testing to investigate the models was conducted on plain carbon steel specimens in a simulated concrete environment of saturated calcium hydroxide solution with varying concentrations of sodium chloride. The varying chloride ion concentrations promoted open circuit potential shifts. These potential shifts may lead to galvanic corrosion effects depending on the chloride ion concentration gradients in the structure.

  14. Evaluation of RC Bridge Piers Retrofitted using Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shayanfar, M. A.; Zarrabian, M. S.

    2008-07-08

    For many long years, steel reinforcements have been considered as the only tool for concrete confinements and studied widely, but nowadays application of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) as an effective alternative is well appreciated. Many bridges have been constructed in the past that are necessary to be retrofitted for resisting against the earthquake motions. The objective of this research is evaluation of nonlinear behavior of RC bridge piers. Eight RC bridge piers have been modeled by ABAQUS software under micromechanical model for homogeneous anisotropic fibers. Also the Bilinear Confinement Model by Nonlinear Transition Zone of Mirmiran has been considered. Then types and angles of fibers and their effects on the final responses were evaluated. Finally, effects of retrofitting are evaluated and some suggestions presented.

  15. Use Impact-Echo Method to Evaluate Bond of Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Early-Age Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Keng-Tsang; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Lin, Yiching

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a non-destructive test method for evaluating the bond of reinforcing bars in concrete structure which was damaged by earthquake while still cast in the form. In the experimental design, the specimens containing a steel reinforcing bar with one end extruded outside were constructed. Different degrees of damage on the rebar-concrete interfaces were successfully created by the resonant vibration of exposed steel bar induced by the cyclic motion of the specimen. The local bond-loss of the steel bars was evaluated by both non-destructive impact-echo tests and the destructive pullout tests. To create different kinds of failure mode in the pullout test, some of the specimens contain stirrups surrounding reinforcing bar. Poor-bond was quantitatively evaluated before the pullout test by the amplitude of the peak corresponding to the multiple reflections from the steel bar in the normalized spectra derived from the impact-echo tests. As a result, two empirical formulas displaying the proportional relations between the percentage of loss of local bond-stress and loss of steel-amplitude for specimens failed by split failure and pull-out failure modes were established.

  16. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Singh, S P; Singh, A P

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  17. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, S. P.; Singh, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  18. Using Fuzzy Logic for Performance Evaluation in Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap S.

    1992-01-01

    Current reinforcement learning algorithms require long training periods which generally limit their applicability to small size problems. A new architecture is described which uses fuzzy rules to initialize its two neural networks: a neural network for performance evaluation and another for action selection. This architecture is applied to control of dynamic systems and it is demonstrated that it is possible to start with an approximate prior knowledge and learn to refine it through experiments using reinforcement learning.

  19. Update on sacrificial anode cathodic protection on steel reinforced concrete structures in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.J.; Powers, R.G.; Lasa, I.R.

    1995-12-01

    Various configurations of sacrificial zinc anodes have been successfully used to provide cathodic protection in the tidal zone of steel reinforced concrete structures. Studies conducted by the Florida Department of Transportation have shown that zinc anodes configured in simple fashion can provide long term cathodic protection. These simple systems represent an attractive alternative to conventional cathodic protection where rectifiers are used. This paper discusses a cathodic protection system comprised of zinc sheet anodes used in conjunction with a submerged bulk zinc anode. An overview of long term performance is presented along with estimated service life and costs.

  20. Impedance spectroscopy of concrete cover on bridge decks with reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Paul; Blankenagel, Bryan; Guthrie, Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian

    2011-10-01

    Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel is a major problem for aging bridge structures near marine environments or in cold regions where deicing salts are applied as part of winter maintenance. Corrosion is the result of the interaction of diffused chloride ions with the embedded steel. One property of affected decks that facilitates detection of chloride ions is their ability to conduct electricity. Impedance spectroscopy can be used to measure concrete conductivity and thereby identify areas of increased chloride concentration characterized by elevated risks of corrosion. A new probe and measurement apparatus has been engineered to measure large areas of concrete on bridge decks. Comparison between measurements obtained in the laboratory and in the field will be presented.

  1. The surgical treatment of reinforced steel bar injury penetrating the skull base and maxilla-mandibular area.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Pan, Lini; Xu, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Penetrating injuries with reinforced screwed steel bar in the skull base represent a unique challenge for oral maxillofacial surgeons. Management of these injuries is complicated by associated injuries and the proximity to vital neurovascular structures. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of injury due to a downward fall upon a reinforced steel rod. Radiologic studies of the skull base revealed that the steel bar traversed the temporomandibular space between the left cervical spine and the mastoid process to the space between the inner side of the left mandibular ramus and the maxilla. We performed osteotomy of the left mastoid process tip and the left mandibular ramus to take out the steel bar from the maxilla and repaired the left mandible with internal fixation. Appropriate preoperative planning, including three-dimensional computed tomographic images, is integral in the surgical approach for the safe removal of such objects. PMID:25347597

  2. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  3. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  4. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  5. Evaluating the Role of Contingency in Differentially Reinforced Tic Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himle, Michael B.; Woods, Douglas W.; Bunaciu, Liviu

    2008-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of tokens delivered on differential reinforcement of zero-rate behavior (DRO) schedules or noncontingently on tic suppression in 4 children with tics. Tic frequency was lower in 3 of 4 children when tokens were delivered contingent on the absence of tics than when tokens were delivered noncontingently.…

  6. A Brief Overview and Evaluation of Covert Positive Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview of the theoretical and technical components of covert positive reinforcement and reviews the experimental literature to ascertain the efficacy of CPR and to evaluate the operant basis for the technique. The empirical evidence confirmed the effectiveness of CPR in modifying analogue and clinical target behaviors, but challenged…

  7. Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Cement Using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W.; Carey, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile – digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure. PMID:26039590

  8. Evaluation of fiber reinforced cement using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Melenka, Garrett W; Carey, Jason P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile - digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure. PMID:26039590

  9. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT INVERT-LOW STEEL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. E. Taylor and D. H. Tang

    2000-09-29

    This technical report evaluates and develops options for reducing the amount of steel in the emplacement drift invert. Concepts developed in the ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' were evaluated to determine material properties required for the proposed invert concepts. Project requirements documents prescribe the use of a carbon steel frame for the invert with a granular material of crushed tuff as ballast. The ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' developed three concepts: (1) All-Ballast Invert; (2) Modified Steel Invert with Ballast; and (3) Steel Tie with Ballast Invert. Analysis of the steel frame members, runway beams, and guide beams, for the modified steel invert with ballast, decreased the quantity of steel in the emplacement drift invert, however a substantial steel support frame for the gantry and waste package/pallet assembly is still required. Use of one of the other two concepts appears to be an alternative to the steel frame and each of the concepts uses considerably less steel materials. Analysis of the steel tie with ballast invert shows that the bearing pressure on the ballast under the single steel tie, C 9 x 20, loaded with the waste package/pallet assembly, drip shield, and backfill exceeds the upper bound of the allowable bearing capacity for tuff used in this study. The single tie, C 10 x 20, will also fail for the same loading condition except for the tie length of 4.2 meters and longer. Analysis also shows that with two ties, C 9 or 10 x 20's, the average ballast pressure is less than the allowable bearing capacity. Distributing the waste package/pallet, drip shield, and backfill loads to two steel ties reduces the contact bearing pressure. Modifying the emplacement pallet end beams to a greater width, reducing the tie spacing, and increasing the width of the ties would ensure that the pallet beams are always supported by two steel ties. Further analysis is required to determine compatible tie size and spacing

  10. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior. PMID:25971115

  11. German guidelines for steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnels with special consideration of design and statical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Schleicher, H.

    1995-12-31

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete can undoubtedly absorb tensile forces. The utilization of this characteristic for the design and specifications of support structures for underground tunnels is regulated by the new Guidelines from the German Concrete Association. Recommendations are given in these guidelines for construction design and for construction itself. The required tests for classification, suitability and quality monitoring are presented.

  12. 75 FR 22552 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Administrative Review, 74 FR 65515 (Dec. 10, 2009) and Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony with Final Results of Administrative Review, 75 FR 7562 (Feb. 22... in Part, 70 FR 67665 (Nov. 8, 2005) (Final Results). In the Final Results the Department followed...

  13. 75 FR 47260 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and New Shipper Review and Determination To Revoke in Part, 72 FR 62630... from Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony with Final Results of Administrative Review, 74 FR... International Trade Administration (A-489-807) Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice...

  14. Non-linear finite element-based material constitutive law for zero slump steel fiber reinforced concrete pipe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova, Alena

    This study presents a comprehensive investigation of performance and behavior of steel-fiber reinforced concrete pipes (SFRCP). The main goal of this study is to develop the material constitutive model for steel fiber reinforced concrete used in dry-cast application. To accomplish this goal a range of pipe sizes varying from 15 in. (400 mm) to 48 in. (1200 mm) in diameter and fiber content of 0.17%, 0.25%, 0.33%, 0.5%, 0.67% and 83% by volume were produced. The pipes were tested in three-edge bearing condition to obtain the load-deformation response and overall performance of the pipe. The pipes were also subjected to hydrostatic joint and joint shear tests to evaluate the performance of the fiber-pipe joints for water tightness and under differential displacements, respectively. In addition, testing on hardened concrete was performed to obtain the basic mechanical material properties. High variation in the test results for material testing was identified as a part of experimental investigation. A three-dimensional non-linear finite element model of the pipe under the three edge bearing condition was developed to identify the constitutive material relations of fiber-concrete composite. A constitutive model of concrete implementing the concrete plasticity and continuum fracture mechanics was considered for defining the complex non-linear behavior of fiber-concrete. Three main concrete damage algorithms were examined: concrete brittle cracking, concrete damaged plasticity with adaptive meshing technique and concrete damaged plasticity with visco-plastic regularization. The latter was identified as the most robust and efficient to model the post-cracking behavior of fiber reinforced concrete and was used in the subsequent studies. The tension stiffening material constitutive law for composite concrete was determined by converging the FEM solution of load-deformation response with the results of experimental testing. This was achieved by iteratively modifying the non

  15. Characterization of bond in steel-fiber-reinforced cementitious composites under tensile loads

    SciTech Connect

    Namur, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated was bonding in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composites, like fiber-reinforced mortar. The study was basically analytical, consisting primarily of two analytical models that predict the bond shear stress distribution at the interface between the fibers and the matrix, as well as the normal tensile distributions in the fibers and the matrix. The two models were, however, based on separate assumptions. While the first model assumed a known bond shear stress versus slip relationship at the interface between the fibers and the surrounding matrix, the second model was based on a mechanism of force transfer between the fibers and the matrix, hence circumventing the rather complex task of determining the relationship between the bond stress and the slip for the given type of fiber and matrix. Some applications to this second model, such as the bond modulus, the debonding stress, the length of the debonded zone were also investigated. A theoretical study of the pull-out process of steel fibers in cementitious matrices is included. The problem consisted of relating an idealized bond shear stress versus slip relationship to a pull-out curve. The derivation as based on the assumption that this relationship is linearly elastic-perfectly frictional, and then extended to the case of a fiction decaying linearly with the slip. The problem was subdivided into two components: a primal problem, whereby the pull-out curve is predicted from an assumed bond shear stress-slip relationship, and the dual problem, in which an experimentally obtained pull-out curve was used to predict the interfacial constitutive model, namely the bond-slip curve. Model application was illustrated by three examples of pull-out tests. The pull-out curves obtained in the laboratory, which featured the pull-out force versus the end slip of the pull-out fiber, were used to predict bond shear stress-slip relationships.

  16. Impressed-current cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete pilings: Protection criteria and the threshold for hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, D.G.; Williams, A.J. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Clemena, G.G.

    1998-05-01

    Safe cathodic protection (CP) limits for prestressing steel in concrete and the adequacy of CP using established criteria were evaluated in regard to hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Impressed-current CP was applied to laboratory scale pilings at current densities from 0.1 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} to 3.0 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Adequate CP was achieved at positions 25 cm (9.8 in.) above to 50 cm (19.7 in.) below the waterline, according to the 100-mV depolarization criterion, at an apparent applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. However, the {minus}780 mV{sub SCE} criterion was not met for currents as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} for these positions. Hydrogen production, absorption, and permeation in steel first was observed via embedded hydrogen sensors 50 cm and 25 cm above the water line at an applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. Observation of hydrogen production verified concerns that the local oxygen concentration might be depleted readily at modest CP levels and that local pH levels may be below 12.5. Experimentation demonstrated that steel crevice corrosion was initiated readily within chloride (Cl{sup {minus}})-contaminated concrete prior to CP application and that this corrosion was accompanied by acidification of the local environment to pH {le} 6 as a result of ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}) hydrolysis. The mobile subsurface hydrogen concentration present within the steel reinforcement was determined for each applied cathodic current density. Although hydrogen production and uptake occurred at current densities as low as 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}, the critical hydrogen concentration for embrittlement (i.e., 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol H/cm{sup 3}, as determined in prior research for bluntly notched prestressing steel) was not exceeded at area averaged current densities <1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  18. A yield line evaluation methodology for reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.

    1997-03-01

    Yield line theory is an analytical technique that can be used to determine the ultimate bending capacity of flat reinforced concrete plates. Alternately, yield line theory, combined with rotation limits, can be used to determine the energy absorption capacity of plates subjected to impulsive and impact loadings. Typical components analyzed by yield line theory are basements, floor and roof slabs subjected to vertical loads, and walls subjected to out of plane loadings. Yield line theory equates plastic strain energy to external work for postulated collapse mechanisms. Multiple collapse mechanisms are evaluated and the mechanism with the minimum strain energy corresponds to the collapse load. Numerous investigators have verified yield line theory by experiment. Analysis by yield line theory is currently accepted by the ACI-318 Building Code Requirements for Reinforced Concrete and ACI-349 Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete Structures. One limitation of yield line theory is that it is computational difficult to evaluate some collapse mechanism. This problem is aggravated by the complex geometry nd reinforcing layouts commonly found in practice. The Yield Line Evaluator (YLE) is a computer program which was developed to solve computationally tedious yield line mechanisms. The program has the capability to either evaluate a single user-defined mechanism or to iterate over a range of mechanisms to determine the minimum ultimate capacity. The program is verified by comparison to a series of yield line mechanisms with known solutions.

  19. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl-]/[OH-] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  20. Research on the mechanical properties of a glass fiber reinforced polymer-steel combined truss structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  1. Research on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Steel Combined Truss Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  2. The performance analysis of distributed Brillouin corrosion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2013-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  3. The Performance Analysis of Distributed Brillouin Corrosion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2014-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  4. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-01-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl−]/[OH−] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels. PMID:26673425

  5. Effect of Waste Plastic Shreds on Bond Resistance between Concrete and Steel Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osifala, K. B.; Salau, M. A.; Adeniyi, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the effect of waste plastic shreds on steel-concrete bond. Forty RILEM test specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter high-yield reinforcing bars were cast and tested. Fifteen specimens with 16mm and 20mm each were cast with the addition of waste plastic shreds at varying percentages of 1%, 1.5% and 2%; another ten RILEM specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter bars at 0% of waste plastic shreds were cast as reference. Nine 150mm cubes, with three taken from each batch of various percentages of waste plastic shreds, were used to monitor the concrete strength. From the test results and analysis, the compressive strength of concrete was found to reduce with increased percentages of waste plastic shreds, while the waste plastic shreds material was found not to improve the bond resistance between concrete and steel. However, though lower than normal concrete, there was an increase in the bond resistance with increase in the percent of plastic shreds. The bond resistance of 16mm was also found to be higher than that of 20mm in all the specimens tested.

  6. Hysteretic behavior of special shaped columns composed of steel and reinforced concrete (SRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zongping; Xu, Jinjun; Xue, Jianyang

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a series of experimental investigations on seventeen specimens of steel reinforced concrete special shaped (SRCSS) columns under low cyclic reversed loading using parallel crosshead equipment. Nine T-shaped SRC columns, four L-shaped SRC columns and four +-shaped SRC columns were tested to examine the effects of shape steel configuration, loading angle, axial compressive ratio and shear-span ratio on the behavior (strength, stiffness, energy dissipation, ductility, etc.) of SRCSS column specimens. The failure modes and hysteretic performance of all the specimens were obtained in the tests. Test results demonstrate that the shear-span ratio is the main parameter affecting the failure modes of SRCSS columns. The specimens with small shear-span ratio are prone to shear failure, and the primary failure planes in SRCSS columns are parallel to the loading direction. As a result, there is a symmetry between positive and negative loading directions in the hysteretic curves of the SRCSS columns. The majority of displacement ductility coefficients for all the specimens are over 3.0, so that the SRCSS columns demonstrate a better deformation capacity. In addition, the equivalent viscous damping coefficients of all the specimens are greater than 0.2, indicating that the seismic behavior of SRCSS columns is adequate. Finally, the superposition theory was used to calculate the limits of axial compressive ratio for the specimens, and it is found that the test axial compressive ratio is close to or smaller than the calculated axial compressive ratio limit.

  7. Yield Line Evaluation Methodology for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-12-30

    Yield line theory is an analytical technique that can be used to determine the ultimate bending capacity of flat reinforced concrete plates subject to distributed and concentrated loadings. Alternately, yield line theory, combined with rotation limits can be used to determine the energy absorption capacity of plates subject to impulsive and impact loadings. Typical components analyzed by yield line theory are basemats, floor and roof slabs subject to vertical loads along with walls subject tomore » out of plane loadings. One limitation of yield line theory is that it is computationally difficult to evaluate some mechanisms. This problem is aggravated by the complex geometry and reinforcing layouts commonly found in practice. The program has the capability to either evaluate a single user defined mechanism or to iterate over a range of mechanisms to determine the minimum ultimate capacity. The program is verified by comparison to a series of yield line mechanisms with known solutions.« less

  8. Yield Line Evaluation Methodology for Reinforced Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-30

    Yield line theory is an analytical technique that can be used to determine the ultimate bending capacity of flat reinforced concrete plates subject to distributed and concentrated loadings. Alternately, yield line theory, combined with rotation limits can be used to determine the energy absorption capacity of plates subject to impulsive and impact loadings. Typical components analyzed by yield line theory are basemats, floor and roof slabs subject to vertical loads along with walls subject to out of plane loadings. One limitation of yield line theory is that it is computationally difficult to evaluate some mechanisms. This problem is aggravated by the complex geometry and reinforcing layouts commonly found in practice. The program has the capability to either evaluate a single user defined mechanism or to iterate over a range of mechanisms to determine the minimum ultimate capacity. The program is verified by comparison to a series of yield line mechanisms with known solutions.

  9. Influence of calcium sulfoaluminate cement on the pullout performance of reinforcing fibers: An evaluation of the micro-mechanical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Robert Benjamin

    The objective of this research was to determine the influence of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement on reinforcing fibers by evaluating the fiber pullout behavior, and bonding characteristics, of a single fiber embedded in a cementitious paste matrix. Four types of fibers commonly used in industry were evaluated: 1) Polyvinyl alcohol; 2) Polypropylene; 3) Coated Steel; and 4) Plain Steel. Upward trends in energy costs and potential greenhouse gas regulations favor an increased use of construction materials that require lower energy and lower CO2 emissions to fabricate, such as CSA cement, as opposed to the production of ordinary portland cement (OPC), which is more energy intensive and produces more CO2 emissions. However, widespread use of CSA cement requires a more in-depth understanding of the engineering characteristics that govern its performance, including interaction with reinforcing fibers. The overarching objective of this research was to provide the engineering base needed for the utilization of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement-based construction materials. The aims of the research were (1) to develop an ettringite-rich calcium sulfoaluminate cement, and (2) evaluate the pullout characteristics of reinforcing fibers embedded in a CSA-cement matrix. Key elements of the strategy included (1) Compare the performance of a laboratory-fabricated CSA cement to a commercial CSA cement and OPC, (2) Evaluate the peak load, and toughness of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement and OPC, (3) Evaluate the debonding-energy density and multiple-cracking behavior of fibers in CSA cement and OPC, and (4) Evaluate the shear bond strength of reinforcing fibers in CSA cement and OPC. Based on the findings of this PhD dissertation, calcium sulfoaluminate cement has a significant influence on the characteristics and behavior of embedded reinforcing fibers. An important factor contributing to the bond strength between fiber and matrix was the ability to transfer interfacial

  10. Shear Strength at 75 F to 500 F of Fourteen Adhesives Used to Bond a Glass-fabric-reinforced Phenolic Resin Laminate to Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John R

    1956-01-01

    Fourteen adhesives used to bond a glass-fabric-reinforced phenolic resin laminate to steel were tested in order to determine their shear strengths at temperatures from 75 F to 500 F. Fabrication methods were varied to evaluate the effect of placing cloth between the facing surfaces to maintain a uniform bond-line thickness. One glass-fabric supported phenolic adhesive was found to have a shear strength of 3,400 psi at 300 F and over 1,000 psi at 500 F. Strength and fabrication data are tabulated for all adhesives tested.

  11. Corrosive effect of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic on stainless-steel screws during implantation into man.

    PubMed

    Tayton, K

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion of stainless-steel screws used to fix carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates to human fractures was compared with the corrosion on similar screws used to fix stainless-steel AO plates. Corrosive changes were noted in both sets of screws with similar frequency and severity; however, the stainless-steel plates were 'in situ' almost twice as long as the CFRP ones, showing that the corrosive changes occurred more rapidly on screws in contact with CFRP. Nevertheless, over the implantation time necessary for bone healing, corrosion was very mild and there is no clinical contra-indication to the use of stainless-steel and CFRP together in this particular application. PMID:6842566

  12. Enamel coated steel reinforcement for improved durability and life-cycle performance of concrete structures: microstructure, corrosion, and deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fujian

    This study is aimed (a) to statistically characterize the corrosion-induced deterioration process of reinforced concrete structures (concrete cracking, steel mass loss, and rebar-concrete bond degradation), and (b) to develop and apply three types of enamel-coated steel bars for improved corrosion resistance of the structures. Commercially available pure enamel, mixed enamel with 50% calcium silicate, and double enamel with an inner layer of pure enamel and an outer layer of mixed enamel were considered as various steel coatings. Electrochemical tests were respectively conducted on steel plates, smooth bars embedded in concrete, and deformed bars with/without concrete cover in 3.5 wt.% NaCl or saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The effects of enamel microstructure, coating thickness variation, potential damage, mortar protection, and corrosion environment on corrosion resistance of the steel members were investigated. Extensive test results indicated that corrosion-induced concrete cracking can be divided into four stages that gradually become less correlated with corrosion process over time. The coefficient of variation of crack width increases with the increasing level of corrosion. Corrosion changed the cross section area instead of mechanical properties of steel bars. The bond-slip behavior between the corroded bars and concrete depends on the corrosion level and distribution of corrosion pits. Although it can improve the chemical bond with concrete and steel, the mixed enamel coating is the least corrosion resistant. The double enamel coating provides the most consistent corrosion performance and is thus recommended to coat reinforcing steel bars for concrete structures applied in corrosive environments. Corrosion pits in enamel-coated bars are limited around damage locations.

  13. DISTRIBUTED AND ACCUMULATED REINFORCEMENT ARRANGEMENTS: EVALUATIONS OF EFFICACY AND PREFERENCE

    PubMed Central

    DELEON, ISER G.; CHASE, JULIE A.; FRANK-CRAWFORD, MICHELLE A.; CARREAU-WEBSTER, ABBEY B.; TRIGGS, MANDY M.; BULLOCK, CHRISTOPHER E.; JENNETT, HEATHER K.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement. PMID:24782203

  14. Distributed and accumulated reinforcement arrangements: evaluations of efficacy and preference.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Iser G; Chase, Julie A; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A; Carreau-Webster, Abbey B; Triggs, Mandy M; Bullock, Christopher E; Jennett, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement. PMID:24782203

  15. Cyclotriphosphazene and TiO2 reinforced nanocomposite coated on mild steel plates for antibacterial and corrosion resistance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnadevi, Krishnamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-03-01

    The mild steel surface has been modified to impart anticorrosion and antibacterial properties through a dip coating method followed by thermal curing of a mixture containing amine terminated cyclotriphosphazene and functionalized titanium dioxide nanoparticles reinforced benzoxazine based cyanate ester composite (ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE). The corrosion resistance behavior of coating material has been investigated by electrochemical and antibacterial studies by disc diffusion method. The nanocomposites coated mild steels have displayed a good chemical stability over long immersion in a corrosive environment. The protection efficiency has found to be high for ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE composites, which can be used in microelectronics and marine applications.

  16. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  17. Retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames using glass fiber reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakam, Zeyad Hamed-Ramzy

    2000-11-01

    This study focuses on the retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames subjected to in-plane lateral loads using glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates that are epoxy-bonded to the exterior faces of the infill walls. An extensive experimental investigation using one-third scale modeling was conducted and consisted of two phases. In the first phase, 64 assemblages, half of which were retrofitted, were tested under various combined in-plane loading conditions similar to those which different regions of a typical infill wall are subjected to. In the second phase, one bare and four masonry-infilled steel frames representative of a typical single-story, single-bay panel were tested under diagonal loading to study the overall behavior and the infill-frame interaction. The relative infill-to-frame stiffness was varied as a test parameter by using two different steel frame sections. The laminates altered the failure modes of the masonry assemblages and reduced the variability and anisotropic nature of the masonry. For the prisms which failed due to shear and/or mortar joint slip, significant strength increases were observed. For those exhibiting compression failure modes, a marginal increase in strength resulted. Retrofitting the infilled frames resulted in an average increase in initial stiffness of two-fold compared to the unretrofitted infilled frames, and seemed independent of the relative infill-to-frame stiffness. However, the increase in the load-carrying capacity of the retrofitted frames compared to the unretrofitted counterparts was higher for those with the larger relative infill-to-frame stiffness parameter. Unlike the unretrofitted infill walls, the retrofitted panels demonstrated almost identical failure modes that were characterized as "strictly comer crushing" in the vicinity of the loaded comers whereas no signs of distress were evident throughout the remainder of the infill. The laminates also maintained the structural integrity of

  18. Development of structural health assessment system for steel and reinforced concrete structures using acceleration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yu; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Because of the repeated earthquake and the problem such as the aging of buildings, a number of studies of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is have been done. Now, the writer is developing structural health assessment system for steel and reinforced concrete structures aiming for completion in 2014. In this system, following three programs for automatically estimating the physical quantity that is important for assessing the integrity of the structure are planned. First program is what automatically estimate the modal parameters (natural frequency and damping ratio) of the structure by the time history by using the subspace method. Second program is what automatically estimate the inter-layer parameters (stiffness and damping coefficient) by the time history by using the adaptive Kalman filter. Third program is what automatically estimate the story drift angle by time history by using the adaptive Kalman filter. The proposed method is expected to be estimated in consideration of the higher order modes than the conventional method by reverse modal analysis.

  19. Erosion Characteristics of Nanoparticle-Reinforced Polyurethane Coatings on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamsundar, C.; Chatterjee, Dhiman; Kamaraj, M.; Maiti, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    Hydropower generation from the Himalayan rivers in India faces challenge in the form of silt-laden water which can erode the turbine blades and reduce turbine life. To address this issue, polyurethane coatings reinforced with boron carbide (B4C) or silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on 16Cr-5Ni martensitic stainless steel substrate were used in the present investigation to improve erosion wear resistance in silt erosion conditions. Slurry erosive wear tests were carried out based on ASTM G-73 protocol at various test conditions of impact velocity, impingement angle, and erodent particle size as well as slurry concentrations as determined by the implementation of Taguchi design of experiments. Analysis of variance studies of erosion rate indicated that nanoparticle content in PU material is the single most important parameter, and interaction of impact velocity and impingement angle was also proved to be significant. The coatings with B4C nanoparticles had higher wear resistances than those with SiC nanoparticles due to higher hardness of the former. An interesting finding from the results is that there is an optimum amount of nanoparticles at which mass removal is the minimum. This observation has been explained in terms of surface characteristics of coatings as brought out by a combination of measurements including SEM images as well as roughness measurement.

  20. Measurement and simulation of millimeter wave scattering cross-sections from steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. M.; Martys, N. S.; Garboczi, E. J.; McMichael, R. D.; Stiles, M. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Stutzman, P. E.; Wang, S.; Provenzano, V.; Surek, J. T.; Novotny, D. R.; Coder, J. B.; Janezic, M. D.; Kim, S.

    2014-02-01

    Some iron oxide corrosion products exhibit antiferromagnetic magnetic resonances (AFMR) at frequencies on the order of 100 GHz at ambient temperatures. AFMR can be detected in laboratory conditions, which serves as the basis for a new non-destructive spectroscopic method for detecting early corrosion. When attempting to measure the steel corrosion in reinforced concrete in the field, rebar geometry must be taken into account. Experiments and numerical simulations have been developed at frequencies near 100 GHz to sort out these effects. The experimental setup involves a vector network analyzer with converter heads to up-convert the output frequency, which is then connected to a horn antenna followed by a 7.5 cm diameter polymer lens to focus the waves on the sample. Two sets of samples were studied: uniform cylindrical rods and rebar corrosion samples broken out of concrete with different kinds of coatings. Electromagnetic scattering from uniform rods were calculated numerically using classical modal expansion. A finite-element electromagnetic solver was used to model more complex rebar geometry and non-uniform corrosion layers. Experimental and numerical data were compared to help quantify and understand the anticipated effect of local geometrical features on AFMR measurements.

  1. Probabilistic lifetime assessment of marine reinforced concrete with steel corrosion and cover cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Jin, Wei-Liang; Liu, Rong-Gui

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the durability behavior of marine reinforced concrete structure suffering from chloride attack, the structural service life is assumed to be divided into three critical stages, which can be characterized by steel corrosion and cover cracking. For each stage, a calculated model used to predict the lifetime is developed. Based on the definition of durability limit state, a probabilistic lifetime model and its time-dependent reliability analytical method are proposed considering the random natures of influencing factors. Then, the probabilistic lifetime prediction models are applied to a bridge pier located in the Hangzhou Bay with Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the time to corrosion initiation t 0 follows a lognormal distribution, while that the time from corrosion initiation to cover cracking t 1 and the time for crack to develop from hairline crack to a limit crack width t 2 can be described by Weibull distributions. With the permitted failure probability of 5.0%, it is also observed that the structural durability lifetime mainly depends on the durability life t 0 and that the percentage of participation of the life t 0 to the total service life grows from 61.5% to 83.6% when the cover thickness increases from 40 mm to 80 mm. Therefore, for any part of the marine RC bridge, the lifetime predictions and maintenance efforts should also be directed toward controlling the stage of corrosion initiation induced by chloride ion.

  2. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  3. Fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the fatigue resistance, debonding force, and failure type of fiber-reinforced composite, polyethylene ribbon-reinforced, and braided stainless steel wire lingual retainers in vitro. Methods Roots of human mandibular central incisors were covered with silicone, mimicking the periodontal ligament, and embedded in polymethylmethacrylate. The specimens (N = 50), with two teeth each, were randomly divided into five groups (n = 10/group) according to the retainer materials: (1) Interlig (E-glass), (2) everStick Ortho (E-glass), (3) DentaPreg Splint (S2-glass), (4) Ribbond (polyethylene), and (5) Quad Cat wire (stainless steel). After the recommended adhesive procedures, the retainers were bonded to the teeth by using flowable composite resin (Tetric Flow). The teeth were subjected to 10,00,000 cyclic loads (8 Hz, 3 - 100 N, 45° angle, under 37 ± 3℃ water) at their incisoproximal contact, and debonding forces were measured with a universal testing machine (1 mm/min crosshead speed). Failure sites were examined under a stereomicroscope (×40 magnification). Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Results All the specimens survived the cyclic loading. Their mean debonding forces were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The DentaPreg Splint group (80%) showed the highest incidence of complete adhesive debonding, followed by the Interlig group (60%). The everStick Ortho group (80%) presented predominantly partial adhesive debonding. The Quad Cat wire group (50%) presented overlying composite detachment. Conclusions Cyclic loading did not cause debonding. The retainers presented similar debonding forces but different failure types. Braided stainless steel wire retainers presented the most repairable failure type. PMID:24015388

  4. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  5. Stress-deformation theories for the analysis of steel beams reinforced with GFRP plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phe, Pham Van

    A theory is developed for the analysis of composite systems consisting of steel wide flange sections reinforced with GFRP plates connected to one of the flanges through a layer of adhesive. The theory is based on an extension of the Gjelsvik theory and thus incorporates local and global warping effects but omits shear deformation effects. The theory captures the longitudinal transverse response through a system of three coupled differential equations of equilibrium and the lateral-torsional response through another system of three coupled differential equations. Closed form solutions are developed and a super-convergent finite element is formulated based under the new theory. A comparison to 3D FEA results based on established solid elements in Abaqus demonstrates the validity of the theory when predicting the longitudinal-transverse response, but showcases its shortcomings in predicting the torsional response of the composite system. The comparison sheds valuable insight on means of improving the theory. A more advanced theory is subsequently developed based on enriched kinematics which incorporates shear deformation effects. The shear deformable theory captures the longitudinal-transverse response through a system of four coupled differential equations of equilibrium and the lateral-torsional response through another system of six coupled differential equations. A finite difference approximation is developed for the new theory and a new finite element formulation is subsequently to solve the new system of equations. A comparison to 3D FEA illustrates the validity of the shear deformable theory in predicting the longitudinal-transverse response as well as the lateral-torsional response. Both theories are shown to be computationally efficient and reduce the modelling and running time from several hours per run to a few minutes or seconds while capturing the essential features of the response of the composite system.

  6. Acoustic inspection of bond strength of steel-reinforced mortar after exposure to elevated temperatures

    PubMed

    Chiang; Tsai; Kan

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the bond strength between the reinforcement and concrete after fire damage, a combination of acoustic through-transmission and pull-out tests were used. Previous studies have shown a 25% decrease in the ultrasonic pulse velocity at 90% of the maximum load at room temperature. The specimens were kept in the oven at an elevated temperature for 1, 2, or 3 h. They were then removed and cooled to room temperature. Inspection was conducted using a high-power ultrasonic pulse velocity system while a pull-out load was applied. The correlation between preheated temperature, acoustic wave velocity, and the applied load was analyzed. Initial results show that bond strength and pulse velocity decreased substantially as the temperature or the heating time increased. PMID:10829721

  7. Dynamic behaviors of various volume rate steel-fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature burnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Wang, Liwen; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic strain-stress curves of reactive powder concrete under high strain rate (10/s-100/s) were determined by improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A plumbum pulse shaper was used to ensure the symmetrical stress in the specimens before fracture and avoid the fluctuation of test data due to input shaky stress pulse. A time modified method was induced for data processing in order to get accurate SHPB results. The results of experiment showed after high temperature burnt, different volume rate (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) steel-fiber reinforced reactive power concrete had the same changing tendency of residual mechanics behaviors, e.g. after 400 centigrade burnt, the residual compression strength was about 70% of material strength without burnt under 100/s. After 800 centigrade burnt, the compression strength is about 30% under 100/s while the deformation ability increased. At meanwhile, steel fiber had improved the mechanism of reinforcing effect and toughening effect of concrete material after burnt. With increasing of steel fiber volume rate, dynamic residual behavior of samples was improved. Microcosmic characteristics and energy absorption were induced for explaining the experiment results.

  8. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Cui, Yanjun; Wei, Heming; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Sun, Changsen

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost.

  9. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case. PMID:12206221

  10. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-04-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability.

  11. Corrosion resistance of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particle for steel reinforcement in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fujian

    Porcelain enamel has stable chemical property in harsh environments such as high temperature, acid and alkaline, and it can also chemically react with substrate reinforcing steel resulting in improved adherence strength. In this study, the corrosion resistances of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particles, which are designed for improved bond strength with surrounding concrete, were investigated in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. It consists of two papers that describe the results of the study. The first paper investigates the corrosion behavior of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The coatings include a pure enamel, a mixed enamel that consists of 50% pure enamel and 50% calcium silicate by weight, and a double enamel that has an inner pure enamel layer and an outer mixed enamel layer. Electrochemical tests demonstrates that both pure and double enamel coatings can significantly improve corrosion resistance, while the mixed enamel coating offers very little protection due to connected channels. The second paper is focused on the electrochemical characteristics of enamel coating modified by sand particle applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by EIS. Six percentages by weight are considered including 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. Results reveal that addition of sand particle does not affect its corrosion resistance significantly. Most of the sand particles can wet very well with enamel body, while some have a weak zone which is induced during the cooling stage due to different coefficient of thermal expansion. Therefore, quality control of sand particle is the key factor to improve its corrosion resistance.

  12. Estimation of Structure-Borne Noise Reduction Effect of Steel Railway Bridge Equipped with Floating Ladder Track and Floating Reinforced-Concrete Deck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Sogabe, Masamichi; Asanuma, Kiyoshi; Wakui, Hajime

    A number of steel railway bridges have been constructed in Japan. Thin steel members used for the bridges easily tend to vibrate and generate structure-borne noise. Accordingly, the number of constructions of steel railway bridges tends to decrease in the urban areas from a viewpoint of environmental preservation. Then, as a countermeasure against structure-borne noise generated from steel railway bridges, we have developed a new type of the steel railway bridge equipped with a floating-ladder track and a floating reinforced-concrete (RC) deck. As a result of train-running experiment, it became apparent that the new steel railway bridge installed by double floating system has reduced a vibration velocity level by 10.5 dB(A) at main girder web as compared with a steel railway bridge installed by directly fastened track. This reduction effect was achieved by the ladder track and RC deck supported by resilient materials.

  13. Evaluation of Steel Cleanliness in a Steel Deoxidized Using Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Cedeño, Edgar-Ivan; Herrera-Trejo, Martín; Castro-Román, Manuel; Castro-Uresti, Fabián; López-Cornejo, Monserrat

    2016-06-01

    The effect of magnesium in the aluminum used as a deoxidizer on the cleanliness of steel was studied throughout a steelmaking route for the production of thin slabs. Two deoxidizers with different Mg contents were used. The Mg content of a "typical" deoxidizer was ~0.5 wt pct Mg, whereas that for an alternative deoxidizer was ~2 wt pct Mg. The inclusion population at different stages of the steelmaking process was characterized in terms of chemical composition, number, and size distribution. The inclusion modification path shows that the solid Al2O3 and Al2O3-MgO inclusions formed in the early stage of the steel ladle treatment are modified into Al2O3-MgO-CaO liquid and MgO-Al2O3-liquid inclusions. Although some slight differences were observed in the ladle furnace samples, the chemical composition of inclusions was similar in the samples taken at the mold of the continuous casting, regardless of the deoxidizer used. Gumbel, generalized extreme value (GEV), and generalized Pareto (GP) distributions were used for the description of the size distribution. The GEV and GP distributions resulted in proper distributions to describe the evolution of size distribution throughout the steelmaking process. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences between inclusion size distributions resulting from the use of either deoxidizer were found.

  14. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  15. Torsional moment to failure for carbon fibre polysulphone expandable rivets as compared with stainless steel screws for carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy fracture plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Sell, P J; Prakash, R; Hastings, G W

    1989-04-01

    A method of securing carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates with carbon fibre polysulphone expanding rivets was investigated. Six carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates were secured to rods with carbon fibre polysulphone rivets and six were secured with standard cortical stainless steel screws. These constructions were then subjected to pure torsional load to failure. The carbon fibre expandable rivets failed at a greater torsional moment. PMID:2720038

  16. Flexural Toughness of Steel Fiber Reinforced High Performance Concrete Containing Nano-SiO2 and Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (PV-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (PV-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  17. Flexural toughness of steel fiber reinforced high performance concrete containing nano-SiO2 and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (P(V)-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (P(V)-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  18. Reinforced wind turbine blades--an environmental life cycle evaluation.

    PubMed

    Merugula, Laura; Khanna, Vikas; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2012-09-01

    A fiberglass composite reinforced with carbon nanofibers (CNF) at the resin-fiber interface is being developed for potential use in wind turbine blades. An energy and midpoint impact assessment was performed to gauge impacts of scaling production to blades 40 m and longer. Higher loadings force trade-offs in energy return on investment and midpoint impacts relative to the base case while remaining superior to thermoelectric power generation in these indicators. Energy-intensive production of CNFs forces impacts disproportionate to mass contribution. The polymer nanocomposite increases a 2 MW plant's global warming potential nearly 100% per kWh electricity generated with 5% CNF by mass in the blades if no increase in electrical output is realized. The relative scale of impact must be compensated by systematic improvements whether by deployment in higher potential zones or by increased life span; the trade-offs are expected to be significantly lessened with CNF manufacturing maturity. Significant challenges are faced in evaluating emerging technologies including uncertainty in future scenarios and process scaling. Inventories available for raw materials and monte carlos analysis have been used to gain insight to impacts of this development. PMID:22857256

  19. Evaluation of a new fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Saimi, Y; Ono, T

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of the usage of an experimental fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) on mechanical properties of an indirect composite was investigated by means of three-point bending and Charpy impact tests. Bond strength between the FRC and the indirect composite was also evaluated by tensile testing. The FRC consisted of a matrix resin with 25% silanized milled glass fiber (11-microm diameter, 150-microm length) and 5% colloidal silica. The values of strain of proportional limit, total strain, and fracture energy of the FRC during the bending test (1.2%, 10.4%, and 41.6 x 10(-3) J) were significantly higher than those of the indirect composite (0.1%, 2.5%, and 11.9 x 10(-3) J). The impact strengths of the 1-mm specimens with FRC ranged from 15.2 to 15.9 kJ/m(2), and were significantly higher than that of the control (3.1 kJ/m(2)). The 2-mm specimens showed significant difference from the control when the FRC thickness was equal or greater than 0.5 mm. The bond strength after the thermocycling was 15.2 MPa, and all of the specimens exhibited cohesive fracture inside the indirect composite. Based upon the results, it was concluded that the FRC tested in this study improved toughness and impact resistance of the indirect composite. The interfacial bonding between the FRC and the indirect composite was strong enough to prevent delamination. PMID:16161120

  20. Evaluation of several micromechanics models for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Birt, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic experimental evaluation of whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites was conducted to assess the variation in tensile properties with reinforcement type, volume fraction, and specimen thickness. Each material was evaluated in three thicknesses, 1.8, 3.18, and 6.35 mm, to determine the size, distribution, and orientation of the reinforcements. This information was used to evaluate several micromechanical models that predict composite moduli. The longitudinal and transverse moduli were predicted for reinforced aluminum. The Paul model, the Cox model and the Halpin-Tsai model were evaluated. The Paul model gave a good upper bound prediction for the particulate reinforced composites but under predicted whisker reinforced composite moduli. The Cox model gave good moduli predictions for the whisker reinforcement, but was too low for the particulate. The Halpin-Tsai model gave good results for both whisker and particulate reinforced composites. An approach using a trigonometric projection of whisker length to predict the fiber contribution to the modulus in the longitudinal and transverse directions was compared to the more conventional lamination theory approach.

  1. Evaluating the Separate and Combined Effects of Positive and Negative Reinforcement on Task Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouxsein, Kelly J.; Roane, Henry S.; Harper, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Positive and negative reinforcement are effective for treating escape-maintained destructive behavior. The current study evaluated the separate and combined effects of these contingencies to increase task compliance. Results showed that a combination of positive and negative reinforcement was most effective for increasing compliance. (Contains 1…

  2. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  3. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  4. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  5. 78 FR 43858 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Korea and Ukraine, 66 FR 46777 (September 7, 2001). On August 9, 2007, the Department revoked the... Reinforcing Bars from South Korea: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Order, 72 FR 44830 (August 9, 2007). DATES... be revoked.\\3\\ \\2\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 77 FR 39218, 39219 (July 2,...

  6. 77 FR 39254 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... concrete reinforcing bar from Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine (66 FR 46777... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request..., Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine (72 FR 44830). The Commission is now conducting...

  7. Static and Fatigue Strength Evaluations for Bolted Composite/Steel Joints for Heavy Vehicle Chassis Components

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-09-14

    In May 2003, ORNL and PNNL began collaboration on a four year research effort focused on developing joining techniques to overcome the technical issues associated with joining lightweight materials in heavy vehicles. The initial focus of research is the development and validation of joint designs for a composite structural member attached to a metal member that satisfy the structural requirements both economically and reliably. Huck-bolting is a common joining method currently used in heavy truck chassis structures. The initial round of testing was conducted to establish a performance benchmark by evaluating the static and fatigue behavior of an existing steel/steel chassis joint at the single huck-bolt level. Both tension and shear loading conditions were considered, and the resulting static and fatigue strengths will be used to guide the joint design for a replacement composite/steel joint. A commercially available, pultruded composite material was chosen to study the generic issues related to composite/steel joints. Extren is produced by STRONGWELL, and it is a combination of fiberglass reinforcement and thermosetting polyester or vinyl ester resin systems. Extren sheets of 3.2 mm thick were joined to 1.4 mm SAE1008 steel sheets with a standard grade 5 bolt with 6.35 mm diameter. Both tension and shear loading modes were considered for the single hybrid joint under static and fatigue loading conditions. Since fiberglass reinforced thermoset polymer composites are a non-homogenous material, their strengths and behavior are dependent upon the design of the composite and reinforcement. The Extren sheet stock was cut along the longitudinal direction to achieve maximum net-section strength. The effects of various manufacturing factors and operational conditions on the static and fatigue strength of the hybrid joint were modeled and experimentally verified. It was found that loading mode and washer size have significant influence on the static and fatigue strength of

  8. Prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi SMA fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams. The SMA fibres were mixed with 1.5% volume content in a mortar matrix with the compressive strength of 50 MPa. The SMA fibres had an average length of 34 mm, and they were manufactured with a dog-bone shape: the diameters of the end- and middle-parts were 1.024 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Twenty mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B × H × L) were prepared. Two types of tests were conducted. One was to investigate the prestressing effect of the SMA fibres, and the beams with the SMA fibres were heated at the bottom. The other was to assess the bending behaviour of the beams prestressed by the SMA fibres. The SMA fibres induced upward deflection and cracking at the top surface by heating at the bottom; thus, they achieved an obvious prestressing effect. The beams that were prestressed by the SMA fibres did not show a significant difference in bending behaviour from that of the SMA fibre reinforced beams that were not subjected to heating. Stress analysis of the beams indicated that the prestressing effect decreased in relation to the cooling temperature.

  9. Effect of superficial oxides on corrosion of steel reinforcement embedded in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Avila-Mendoza, J. . Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico); Flores, J.M. ); Castillo, U.C.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of superficial coverage with different iron oxides on the general corrosion resistance of steel embedded in concrete was investigated. Electrochemical corrosion rate and potential measurements were made of rebars that had a bare surface (polished), an atmospherically rusted (hematite [Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3

  10. A proposed standard for evaluating structural integrity of reinforced concrete beams by acoustic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yuyama, Shigenori; Okamoto, Takahisa; Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro; Ohtsu, Masayasu; Kishi, Teruo

    1999-07-01

    A series of studies has been performed to evaluate the structural integrity of reinforced concrete (RC) beams by acoustic emission (AE). Cyclic loadings were applied to RC beams with a single reinforcing bar, large repaired beams, beams deteriorated due to corrosion of reinforcement, and two beams with different damage levels in an aging dock. The test results demonstrated that the Kaiser effect starts to break down when shear cracking starts to play a primary role. It has been also shown that high AE activity is observed during unloadings after serious damage (slips between the concrete and the reinforcement or those between the original concrete and the repaired part) has occurred. A standard for evaluating structural integrity of RC beams by AE is proposed, based on these results.

  11. Damage Mechanisms of a TiB2-Reinforced Steel Matrix Composite for Lightweight Automotive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Z.; Luo, Z. C.; Yi, H. L.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-05-01

    The microscopic strain-and-stress fields related to primary and eutectic particles in a lightweight steel matrix composite (SMC) produced by in situ precipitation of TiB2 particles during solidification were investigated by means of microscale digital image correlation and finite element method. The damage process in this SMC is a sequential process of primary particles cracking, the fracture of the surrounding eutectic particles, and finally the growth and coalescence of voids in the ferrite matrix.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  13. Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, HongYu; Attard, Dr. Thomas L.; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

  14. Do Children Prefer Contingencies? An Evaluation of the Efficacy of and Preference for Contingent versus Noncontingent Social Reinforcement during Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczynski, Kevin C.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2009-01-01

    Discovering whether children prefer reinforcement via a contingency or independent of their behavior is important considering the ubiquity of these programmed schedules of reinforcement. The current study evaluated the efficacy of and preference for social interaction within differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) and…

  15. Impressed current cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete pilings: Protection criteria and the threshold for hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, D.G.; Williams, A.J. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Clemena, G.G.

    1997-12-01

    This paper addresses both safe cathodic protection limits for pre-stressing steel in concrete given the concern of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and the adequacy of cathodic protection using established criteria. Impressed current cathodic protection was applied to laboratory scale pilings at current densities ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Adequate cathodic protection was achieved at positions ranging from 25 cm above to 50 cm below the waterline, according to the 100 mV depolarization criterion, at an apparent applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. However, the {minus}780 mV{sub SCE} criterion was not met for currents as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} for these positions. Hydrogen production, absorption, and permeation in steel was first observed via embedded hydrogen sensors, located 50 cm and 25 cm above the waterline, at an applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. The observation of hydrogen production verifies the concerns that the local oxygen concentration may be readily depleted at modest cathodic protection levels and that local pH levels may be below 12.5. Experimentation presented here, as well as within the literature, has demonstrated that steel crevice corrosion is readily initiated within chloride contaminated concrete prior to the application of cathodic protection, and that this corrosion is accompanied by an acidification of the local environment to a pH of 6 or below due to ferrous ion hydrolysis. The mobile subsurface hydrogen concentration present within the steel reinforcement was determined for each applied cathodic current density. Although hydrogen production and uptake occurred at current densities as low as 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}, the critical hydrogen concentration for embrittlement (2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol H/cm{sup 3}) was not exceeded at area averaged current densities as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  17. Fatigue evaluation of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumesnil, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels was investigated in combined metal and composite materials subjected to fatigue loading. The systems investigated were aluminum-graphite/epoxy, and aluminum-S glass/epoxy. It was found that the composite material would support the total load at limit stress after the metal had completely failed, and the weight of the composite-metal system would be equal to that of an all metal system which would carry the same total load at limit stress.

  18. Flexural Upgrading of Steel-Concrete Composite Girders Using Externally Bonded CFRP Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Eshaghian, M.

    2010-04-01

    This study focuses on the flexural performance of composite steel-concrete beam girders retrofitted with CFRP. The current work is a numerical study of the load carrying capacity of a section which is strengthened by externally bonding of CFRP to the tension flange. At the primarily stage of the work, the model is verified by published experimental data. The three dimensional interactive failure Tsai-Wu criteria was implemented to retrofitted composite girder in order to identify the failure mode. Then a detailed parametric study is carried out to investigate the effects of geometry parameters and material characteristics on flexural performance of a composite section.

  19. Nitrogen implantation into steel wire coated with zinc used as reinforcement in power transmission conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Maldonado, J. J.; Dulcé-Moreno, H. J.; V-Niño, E. D.

    2013-11-01

    In tropical environments, diversity of climatic factors such as temperature, relative humidity, deposition of environmental contaminants (such as sulfates and chlorides) affect a large proportion of materials exposed to the weather, and electrochemical corrosion is one of the phenomena that occur in the case of metals and alloys [1, 2]. It is therefore particularly important to study this behavior in the Zinc-coated steel, since this material is used for its economy in the industry specifically in the area of transport of electricity.

  20. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  1. Damage evaluation of reinforced concrete frame based on a combined fiber beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Bing; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2014-04-01

    In order to analyze and simulate the impact collapse or seismic response of the reinforced concrete (RC) structures, a combined fiber beam model is proposed by dividing the cross section of RC beam into concrete fiber and steel fiber. The stress-strain relationship of concrete fiber is based on a model proposed by concrete codes for concrete structures. The stress-strain behavior of steel fiber is based on a model suggested by others. These constitutive models are implemented into a general finite element program ABAQUS through the user defined subroutines to provide effective computational tools for the inelastic analysis of RC frame structures. The fiber model proposed in this paper is validated by comparing with experiment data of the RC column under cyclical lateral loading. The damage evolution of a three-dimension frame subjected to impact loading is also investigated.

  2. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF NEW RESIN APPLICATION EQUIPMENT FOR FIBER- REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a pilot-scale evaluation of new resin application equipment for fiber- reinforced plastics. The study, an evaluation and comparison of styrene emissions, utilized Magnum's FIT(TM) nozzle with conventional spray guns and flow coaters (operated at both ...

  3. Objective Surface Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of advanced composites are essential for their structural performance, but the surface finish on exterior composite panels is of critical importance for customer satisfaction. This paper describes the application of wavelet texture analysis (WTA) to the task of automatically classifying the surface finish properties of two fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite construction types (clear resin and gel-coat) into three quality grades. Samples were imaged and wavelet multi-scale decomposition was used to create a visual texture representation of the sample, capturing image features at different scales and orientations. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the texture feature vector, permitting successful classification of the samples using only the first principal component. This work extends and further validates the feasibility of this approach as the basis for automated non-contact classification of composite surface finish using image analysis.

  4. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  5. An Adaptive PID Controller for Reinforcement of Carbon Steel:Performance Analysis using MATLAB Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, Ramakrishnan; Usha, Mahalingam

    2012-03-01

    dent on the grain size and percentage of volume fraction recrystallization. In this Paper, a new approach for controlling microstructure development during hot working process by percentage of volume fraction recrystallization is proposed. Here two different methods are employed. One of the approaches is based on the Optimal Control theory and involves the developing of state space models to describe the material behavior and the mechanics of the process. This approach is applied to obtain the desired percentage of volume fraction recrystallization of '1' from an initial value of '0'. The standard Arrehenious equation of 0.3% carbon steel is utilized to obtain an optimal deformation path such that the percentage of volume fraction recrystallization should be 1. The plant model is developed and an appropriate optimality criterion is selected to maintain strain, strain rate and temperature. The state-space model together with an optimality criterion is used to control the percentage of volume fraction recrystallization using Linear Quadrat

  6. Effect of pulse laser parameters on TiC reinforced AISI 304 stainless steel composite coating by laser surface engineering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Chinmaya Kumar; Masanta, Manoj

    2015-04-01

    In this work, TiC reinforced steel composite layer has been produced by laser scanning over the preplaced TiC powder on AISI 304 steel substrate, using a pulse Nd:YAG laser. Depending on the pulse laser parameters, TiC either deposited or dispersed on the surface of steel substrate. Depth and width of laser processed TiC-steel composite layer has been deliberated from the SEM images at the transverse cross section of the laser scanned samples. Hardness of the laser processed composite layer has been measured through Vickers micro-hardness tester. Effect of pulsed laser parameters i.e. peak power, pulse duration, overlapping factor (corresponding to scan speed and frequency) on micro-hardness, composite layer profile (depth and width) and microstructure of the laser processed TiC-steel composite layer has been studied. From the experimental analysis, it is revealed that, laser peak power and overlapping factor have significant effect on the TiC-steel composite layer profile and its hardness value.

  7. An In Vitro Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Custom Made, Metal, Glass Fiber Reinforced and Carbon Reinforced Posts in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Sonkesriya, Subhash; Olekar, Santosh T; Saravanan, V; Somasunderam, P; Chauhan, Rashmi Singh; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posts are used to enhance crown buildup in pulpless teeth with destructed crown portion. Different types of post are used in endodontically treated teeth. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate fracture resistance of custom made, metal, glass fiber reinforced and carbon reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was carried out on extracted 40 human maxillary central incisor teeth, which was divided into four groups with 10 samples in each group with custom made, metal post, glass fiber reinforced, and carbon reinforced posts. The samples were decoronated at cemento-enamel junction and endodontically treated. Post space was prepared and selected posts were cemented. The composite cores were prepared at the height of 5 mm and samples mounted on acrylic blocks. Later fracture resistance to the compressive force of samples was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Results: The maximum resistance to the compressive force was observed in carbon reinforced and glass fiber reinforced posts compared others which is statistically significant (P > 0.001) and least was seen in custom fabricated post. Conclusion: It is concluded that carbon reinforced fiber post and glass fiber posts showed good fracture resistance compared to custom made and metal posts. PMID:26028904

  8. Computational modeling of high performance steel fiber reinforced concrete using a micromorphic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huespe, A. E.; Oliver, J.; Mora, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    A finite element methodology for simulating the failure of high performance fiber reinforced concrete composites (HPFRC), with arbitrarily oriented short fibers, is presented. The composite material model is based on a micromorphic approach. Using the framework provided by this theory, the body configuration space is described through two kinematical descriptors. At the structural level, the displacement field represents the standard kinematical descriptor. Additionally, a morphological kinematical descriptor, the micromorphic field, is introduced. It describes the fiber-matrix relative displacement, or slipping mechanism of the bond, observed at the mesoscale level. In the first part of this paper, we summarize the model formulation of the micromorphic approach presented in a previous work by the authors. In the second part, and as the main contribution of the paper, we address specific issues related to the numerical aspects involved in the computational implementation of the model. The developed numerical procedure is based on a mixed finite element technique. The number of dofs per node changes according with the number of fiber bundles simulated in the composite. Then, a specific solution scheme is proposed to solve the variable number of unknowns in the discrete model. The HPFRC composite model takes into account the important effects produced by concrete fracture. A procedure for simulating quasi-brittle fracture is introduced into the model and is described in the paper. The present numerical methodology is assessed by simulating a selected set of experimental tests which proves its viability and accuracy to capture a number of mechanical phenomenon interacting at the macro- and mesoscale and leading to failure of HPFRC composites.

  9. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique. PMID:24676627

  10. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D. ); Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D. )

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 [times] 6l0 [times] 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m[sup 2] of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 [mu]m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO[sub 2] aerosols. We used a 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m[sup 3]/hr exhaust system.

  11. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D.; Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 {times} 6l0 {times} 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m{sup 2} of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 {mu}m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO{sub 2} aerosols. We used a 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m{sup 3}/hr exhaust system.

  12. An Evaluation of Simultaneous Presentation and Differential Reinforcement with Response Cost to Reduce Packing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Scott D.; Newchok, Debra K.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of multiple treatment procedures, including simultaneous presentation of preferred foods, on the packing behavior of a 9-year-old girl with autism. A reversal design was used to assess the effects of differential reinforcement with response cost alone and with simultaneous presentation. In addition, simultaneous…

  13. Influencing Preschoolers' Free-Play Activity Preferences: An Evaluation of Satiation and Embedded Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, Gregory P.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Ingvarsson, Einar T.; Cammilleri, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of classwide satiation and embedded reinforcement procedures on preschoolers' activity preferences during scheduled free-play periods. The goal of the study was to increase time allocation to originally nonpreferred, but important, activities (instructional zone, library, and science) while continuing to…

  14. The Role of Context in the Evaluation of Reinforcer Efficacy: Implications for the Preference Assessment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Aphrodite; Fredrick, Laura; Pabico, Robert; Roane, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Highly preferred stimuli were identified via two preference assessments (based on Fisher et al., 1992), the second of which included stimuli that were ranked low in the initial preference assessment. Following the preference assessments, a subset of stimuli was evaluated as reinforcers in single- and concurrent-operant arrangements. In general,…

  15. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured...

  16. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 § 176.110 Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and... cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods being unreasonable, in accordance...

  17. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  18. An expert system for the evaluation of reinforced concrete structure durability

    SciTech Connect

    Berra, M.; Bertolini, L.; Briglia, M.C.; Lazzari, L.; Pastore, T.

    1999-11-01

    A user-friendly expert system has been developed to evaluate primarily the durability of reinforced concrete structures, either in the design phase or during service life related to reinforcement corrosion. Besides the durability module, the ES has been provided with three other expert modules in order to support the user during the following activities: inspections, corrosion diagnosis and repair strategy (of concrete and reinforcement). Corrosion induced by carbonation and chlorides penetration and caused by concrete degradation such as sulfate attack, freeze/thaw cycles, alkali silica reaction are considered. The knowledge used for the expert system is based both on open literature and international standards as well as on specific experiences and proprietary databases. The paper describes main features of the system, including the modeling of the knowledge, input data, the algorithms, the rules and the outputs for each module.

  19. Finite element analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC): validation of experimental tensile capacity of dog-bone specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Elsha Al; Ahmed, Sheikh Saleh; Siddique, Ashfia

    2014-09-01

    Finite element analyses are conducted to model the tensile capacity of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). For this purpose dog-bone specimens are casted and tested under direct and uniaxial tension. Two types of aggregates (brick and stone) are used to cast the SFRC and plain concrete. The fiber volume ratio is maintained 1.5 %. Total 8 numbers of dog-bone specimens are made and tested in a 1000-kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM). The strain data are gathered employing digital image correlation technique from high-definition images and high-speed video clips. Then, the strain data are synthesized with the load data obtained from the load cell of the UTM. The tensile capacity enhancement is found 182-253 % compared to control specimen to brick SFRC and in case of stone SFRC the enhancement is 157-268 %. Fibers are found to enhance the tensile capacity as well as ductile properties of concrete that ensures to prevent sudden brittle failure. The dog-bone specimens are modeled in the ANSYS 10.0 finite element platform and analyzed to model the tensile capacity of brick and stone SFRC. The SOLID65 element is used to model the SFRC as well as plain concretes by optimizing the Poisson's ratio, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and stress-strain relationships and also failure pattern as well as failure locations. This research provides information of the tensile capacity enhancement of SFRC made of both brick and stone which will be helpful for the construction industry of Bangladesh to introduce this engineering material in earthquake design. Last of all, the finite element outputs are found to hold good agreement with the experimental tensile capacity which validates the FE modeling.

  20. Ultimate capacity evaluation of reinforced concrete slabs using yield line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Yield line theory offers a simplified nonlinear analytical method that can determine the ultimate bending capacity of flat reinforced concrete planes subject to distributed and concentrated loads. Alternately, yield line theory, combined with hinge rotation limits can determine the energy absorption capacity of plates subject to impulsive and impact loads. This method is especially useful in evaluating existing structures that cannot be qualified using conservative simplifying analytical assumptions. Typical components analyzed by yield line theory are basements, floor and roof slabs subject to vertical loads along with walls subject to out of plant wall loads. One limitation of yield line theory is that it is difficult to evaluate some mechanisms; this is aggravated by the complex geometry and reinforcing layouts commonly found in practice. A yield line evaluation methodology is proposed to solve computationally tedious yield line mechanisms. This methodology is implemented in a small PC based computer program that allows the engineer to quickly evaluate multiple yield line mechanisms.

  1. Phyllanthus muellerianus and C6H15NO3 synergistic effects on 0.5 M H2SO4-immersed steel-reinforced concrete: Implication for clean corrosion-protection of wind energy structures in industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 (triethanolamine: TEA) synergistic effects on reinforcing-steel corrosion-inhibition and the compressive-strength of steel-reinforced concrete immersed in 0.5 M H2SO4. This is to assess suitability of the synergistic admixture usage for wind-energy steel-reinforced concrete structures designed for industrial environments. Steel-reinforced concrete specimens were admixed with individual and synergistic designs of Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures and immersed in the 0.5 M H2SO4. Electrochemical monitoring of corrosion potential, as per ASTM C876-91 R99, and corrosion current were obtained and statistically analysed, as per ASTM G16-95 R04, for modelling noise resistance. Post-immersion compressive-strength testing then followed, as per ASTM C39/C39M-03, for detailing the admixture effect on load-bearing strength of the steel-reinforced concrete specimens. Results showed that while individual Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract concentrations exhibited better inhibition-efficiency performance than C6H15NO3, synergistic additions of C6H15NO3 to Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract improved steel-rebar corrosion-inhibition. Thus, 6 g Phyllanthus muellerianus + 2 g C6H15NO3 synergistically improved inhibition-efficiency to η = 84.17%, from η = 55.28% by the optimal chemical or from η = 74.72% by the optimal plant-extract admixtures. The study also established that improved compressive strength of steel-reinforced concrete with acceptable inhibition of the steel-rebar corrosion could be attained through optimal combination of the Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures.

  2. Efficient Nondestructive Evaluation of Prototype Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermography inspection is an optic based technology that can reduce the time and cost required to inspect propellant tanks or aero structures fabricated from composite materials. Usually areas identified as suspect in the thermography inspection are examined with ultrasonic methods to better define depth, orientation and the nature of the anomaly. This combination of nondestructive evaluation techniques results in a rapid and comprehensive inspection of composite structures. Examples of application of this inspection philosophy to prototype will be presented. Methods organizing the inspection and evaluating the results will be considered.

  3. Evaluation of tantalum 316 stainless steel transition joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular transition joints providing a metallurgically bonded connection between tantalum and 316 stainless steel pipe sections were comparatively evaluated for durability under thermal cycling conditions approximating the operation of a SNAP-8 mercury boiler. Both coextruded and vacuum brazed transition joints of 50mm (2 inch) diameter were tested by thermal cycling 100 times between 730 C and 120 C(1350 F and 250 F) in a high vacuum environment. The twelve evaluated transition joints survived the full test sequence without developing leaks, although liquid penetrant bond line indications eventually developed in all specimens. The brazed transition joints exhibited the best dimensional stability and bond line durability.

  4. Summary and evaluation of low-velocity impact tests of solid steel billet onto concrete pads

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, M.C.; Hovingh, W.J.; Mok, G.C.; Murty, S.S.; Chen, T.F.; Fischer, L.E.

    1998-02-01

    Spent fuel storage casks intended for use at independent spent fuel storage installations are evaluated during the application and review process for low-velocity impacts representative of possible handling accidents. In the past, the analyses involved in these evaluations have assumed that the casks dropped or tipped onto an unyielding surface - a conservative and simplifying assumption. Since 10 CFR Part 72, the regulation imposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), does not require this assumption, applicants are currently seeking a more realistic model for the analyses to predict the effect of a cask dropping onto a reinforced concrete pad, including energy absorbing aspects such as cracking and flexure. To develop data suitable for benchmarking these analyses, the NRC has conducted several series of drop-test studies of a solid steel billet and of a near-full-scale empty cask. This report contains a summary and evaluation of all steel billet testing conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A series of finite element analyses of the billet testing is described and benchmarked against the test data. A method to apply the benchmarked finite element model of the soil and concrete pad to an analysis of a full-size storage cask is provided. In addition, an application to a {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} full-size cask is presented for side and end drops, and tipover events. The primary purpose of this report is to provide applicants for an NRC license under 10 CFR Part 72 with a method for evaluating storage casks for low-velocity impact conditions.

  5. A trapped field of 17.6 T in melt-processed, bulk Gd-Ba-Cu-O reinforced with shrink-fit steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrell, J. H.; Dennis, A. R.; Jaroszynski, J.; Ainslie, M. D.; Palmer, K. G. B.; Shi, Y.-H.; Campbell, A. M.; Hull, J.; Strasik, M.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of large-grain (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-δ ((RE)BCO; RE = rare earth) bulk superconductors to trap magnetic fields is determined by their critical current. With high trapped fields, however, bulk samples are subject to a relatively large Lorentz force, and their performance is limited primarily by their tensile strength. Consequently, sample reinforcement is the key to performance improvement in these technologically important materials. In this work, we report a trapped field of 17.6 T, the largest reported to date, in a stack of two silver-doped GdBCO superconducting bulk samples, each 25 mm in diameter, fabricated by top-seeded melt growth and reinforced with shrink-fit stainless steel. This sample preparation technique has the advantage of being relatively straightforward and inexpensive to implement, and offers the prospect of easy access to portable, high magnetic fields without any requirement for a sustaining current source.

  6. Strength Evaluation and Failure Prediction of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nylon Spur Gears by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong; Hossan, Mohammad Robiul

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, short carbon fiber reinforced nylon spur gear pairs, and steel and unreinforced nylon spur gear pairs have been selected for study and comparison. A 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the multi-axial stress-strain behaviors of the gear tooth. Failure prediction has been conducted based on the different failure criteria, including Tsai-Wu criterion. The tooth roots, where has stress concentration and the potential for failure, have been carefully investigated. The modeling results show that the short carbon fiber reinforced nylon gear fabricated by properly controlled injection molding processes can provide higher strength and better performance.

  7. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods...

  8. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods...

  9. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods being unreasonable,...

  10. Methodological and assessment considerations in evaluating reinforcement programs in applied settings1

    PubMed Central

    Kazdin, Alan E.

    1973-01-01

    The extensive use of reinforcement programs in applied settings has led to experimentation that often fails to consider potential problems in design. The logic of the within-subject design is reviewed and specific designs employed in reinforcement programs are discussed. For each design (ABAB, or multiple-baseline design across behaviors, individuals, or situations), effects are discussed that make that design less powerful with respect to demonstrating the effect of the experimental variable. Problems in interpreting results of experiments in this area of inquiry are evaluated from the standpoint of internal and external validity. The issue of control groups is presented with considerations as to situations that require their use. Finally, the assessment strategy for evaluating operant programs is discussed and recommendations are made for measurement of behaviors in addition to the target response. PMID:16795436

  11. Improving the corrosion wear resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by particulate reinforced Ni matrix composite alloying layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhuo, Chengzhi; Tao, Jie; Jiang, Shuyun; Liu, Linlin

    2009-01-01

    In order to overcome the problem of corrosion wear of AISI 316L stainless steel (SS), two kinds of composite alloying layers were prepared by a duplex treatment, consisting of Ni/nano-SiC and Ni/nano-SiO2 predeposited by brush plating, respectively, and subsequent surface alloying with Ni-Cr-Mo-Cu by a double glow process. The microstructure of the two kinds of nanoparticle reinforced Ni-based composite alloying layers was investigated by means of SEM and TEM. The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of composite alloying layers compared with the Ni-based alloying layer and 316L SS under different conditions was characterized by potentiodynamic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results showed that under alloying temperature (1000 °C) conditions, amorphous nano-SiO2 particles still retained the amorphous structure, whereas nano-SiC particles were decomposed and Ni, Cr reacted with SiC to form Cr6.5Ni2.5Si and Cr23C6. In static acidic solution, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer. However, the corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiO2 particles interlayer is prominently superior to that of the Ni-based alloying layer under acidic flow medium condition and acidic slurry flow condition. The corrosion resistance of the composite alloying layer with the brush plating Ni/nano-SiC particles interlayer is evidently lower than that of the Ni-based alloying layer, but higher than that of 316L SS under all test conditions. The results show that the highly dispersive nano-SiO2 particles are helpful in improving the corrosion wear resistance of the Ni-based alloying layer, whereas carbides and silicide phase are deleterious to that of the Ni-based alloying layer due to the fact that the preferential removal of the matrix around the precipitated phase takes place by the chemical

  12. Evaluation of Concrete Consolidation: DSS-35 Antenna Reinforced Concrete Pedestal, Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldua, B. P.; Dodge, E. C.; Kolf, P. R.; Olson, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Antenna structures for the Deep Space Network track spacecraft that are millions of miles away. Therefore, these structures have tight specifications for translation, rotation, and differential settlement. This article presents several nondestructive test methods that were used to evaluate, locate, and repair imperfections in the reinforced concrete pedestal that supports the DSS-35 antenna structure. These methods include: (1) impulse response (IR), (2) ultrasonic shear-wave tomography (MIRA), and (3) ground-penetrating radar (GPR).

  13. Clinical evaluation of bond failures and survival between mandibular canine-to-canine retainers made of flexible spiral wire and fiber-reinforced composite

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria F.; Fraticelli, Danilo; Castellazzi, Linda; Gandini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the clinical reliability of two different types of postorthodontic treatment retainers: a silanised-treated glass fibers-reinforced resin composite (FRC) and a directly bonded multistranded stainless steel wire. The hypothesis of the study was to assess if significant differences are present between failure rates of the two retainers. Study Design: This prospective study was based on an assessment of 87 patients (35 men and 52 women),with an average age of 24 years who required a lower arch fixed retainer after orthodontic treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Assignment was carried out with random tables. A follow-up examination was carried out once a month. The number, cause, and date of single bond adhesive failures were recorded for both retainers over 12 months. Teeth that were rebonded after failure were not included in the success analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by means of a Fisher’s exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, and log rank test. Results: Bond failure rate was significantly higher (P=0.0392) for multistranded metallic wire than for FRC. Conclusions: Glass fiber-reinforced resin composite retainers and multistranded metallic wires showed no significant difference in single bond failure rates over a one-year follow up. Key words:Fiber reinforced composite, fixed retention, multistranded wire, orthodontics, retainer, splint. PMID:24790714

  14. Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Hemispheres Reflected by Steel and Oil

    SciTech Connect

    John Darrell Bess

    2008-06-01

    During the period from June 1967 through September 1969 a series of critical experiments was performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory with spherical and hemispherical plutonium assemblies as nested hemishells as part of a Nuclear Safety Facility Experimental Program to evaluate operational safety margins for the Rocky Flats Plant. These assemblies were both bare and fully or partially oil-reflected. Many of these experiments were subcritical with an extrapolation to critical configurations or critical at a particular oil height. Existing records reveal that 167 experiments were performed over the course of 28 months. Unfortunately, much of the data was not recorded. A reevaluation of the experiments had been summarized in a report for future experimental and computational analyses. This report examines only fifteen partially oil-reflected hemispherical assemblies. Fourteen of these assemblies also had close-fitting stainless-steel hemishell reflectors, used to determine the effective critical reflector height of oil with varying steel-reflector thickness. The experiments and their uncertainty in keff values were evaluated to determine their potential as valid criticality benchmark experiments of plutonium.

  15. Quantitative evaluation and visualization of cracking process in reinforced concrete by a moment tensor analysis of acoustic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yuyama, Shigenori; Okamoto, Takahisa; Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro; Ohtsu, Masayasu

    1995-06-01

    Fracture tests are conducted on two types of reinforced concrete specimens under cyclic loadings. Cracking process is quantitatively evaluated and visualized by applying a moment tensor analysis to the AE waveforms detected during the fracture. First, bending tests are performed on reinforced concrete beams. It is found that both tensile and shear cracks are generated around the reinforcement in the low loading stages. However, shear cracks become dominant as the cracking process progresses. In the final stages, shear cracks are generated near the interface between the reinforcement and concrete even during unloadings. A bond strength test, made second, shows that tensile cracks are produced around the reinforcement in the early stages. They spread apart from the reinforcement to wider areas in the later stages. An intense AE cluster due to shear cracks is observed along the interface between the reinforcement and concrete. The previous result from an engineering structure is also presented for comparison. All these results demonstrate a great promise of the analysis for quantitative evaluation and visualization of the cracking process in reinforced concrete. The relationship between the opening width of surface cracks and the Kaiser effect is intensively studied. It is shown that a breakdown of the Kaiser effect and high AE activities during unloading can be effective indices to estimate the level of deterioration in concrete structures.

  16. Studies on Geometries for Inducing Homogeneous Magnetic Fields in the Application of Real Time Imaging of Steel Reinforcing Bars Embedded Within Pre-Stressed and Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quek, S.; Benitez, D.; Gaydecki, P.; Torres, V.

    2006-03-01

    This paper addresses fundamental issues associated with the development of a real time inductive scanning system for non-destructive testing of pre-stressed and reinforced concrete. Simulated results has indicated that given a coil dimension of 300mm×300mm×2.5mm, 10mm rebars can be imaged down to a depth of 100 mm. Studies also indicate that the vertical component of the induced magnetic field is most favourable as it can be readily reconstructed to yield geometry and dimensional information pertaining to the rebar structure.

  17. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  18. A New Evaluation Method of Stored Heat Effect of Reinforced Concrete Wall of Cold Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tomohiro; Murakami, Yuji; Uchikawa, Motoyuki

    Today it has become imperative to save energy by operating a refrigerator in a cold storage executed by external insulate reinforced concrete wall intermittently. The theme of the paper is to get the evaluation method to be capable of calculating, numerically, interval time for stopping the refrigerator, in applying reinforced concrete wall as source of stored heat. The experiments with the concrete models were performed in order to examine the time variation of internal temperature after refrigerator stopped. In addition, the simulation method with three dimensional unsteady FEM for personal-computer type was introduced for easily analyzing the internal temperature variation. Using this method, it is possible to obtain the time variation of internal temperature and to calculate the interval time for stopping the refrigerator.

  19. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-12-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  20. Acceleration of reinforcement learning by policy evaluation using nonstationary iterative method.

    PubMed

    Senda, Kei; Hattori, Suguru; Hishinuma, Toru; Kohda, Takehisa

    2014-12-01

    Typical methods for solving reinforcement learning problems iterate two steps, policy evaluation and policy improvement. This paper proposes algorithms for the policy evaluation to improve learning efficiency. The proposed algorithms are based on the Krylov Subspace Method (KSM), which is a nonstationary iterative method. The algorithms based on KSM are tens to hundreds times more efficient than existing algorithms based on the stationary iterative methods. Algorithms based on KSM are far more efficient than they have been generally expected. This paper clarifies what makes algorithms based on KSM makes more efficient with numerical examples and theoretical discussions. PMID:24733037

  1. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  2. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber–fiber and fiber–matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  3. Characterization and Evaluation of Aged Chromium Nickel Niobium Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Matthew

    20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steel alloys are commonly used in hydrogen reformer manifolds for transporting hot hydrogen by-products at 750-950°C. After long periods of exposure, embrittling secondary carbides and intermetallic phases can precipitate at the grain boundaries which can drastically reduce the ductility, and the repair weldability of the alloy. The intermetallic silicide, G-phase, is commonly observed in 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steels, and is prone to liquation cracking during welding operations. G-phase is deleterious to the material, where a high degree of G-phase coarsening will render the material unweldable. The present work will investigate various methods in mitigating G-phase precipitation. Variations in casting methods, wall thickness, homogenization treatments, and alloy chemistry will be examined by evaluating their microstructure after periodically aging the samples. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using computational thermodynamic tools will be used to optimize the 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb chemistry following ASTM specifications.

  4. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Simon, K.; Frye, L.

    1994-11-01

    The authors have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2{prime} x 2{prime} {times} l{prime} HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to the authors specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. The authors suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  5. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.

    1995-02-01

    We have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2` x 2` x 1` HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to our specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. We suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  6. In Vitro Evaluation of Carbon-Nanotube-Reinforced Bioprintable Vascular Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  7. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M.; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-04-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication.

  8. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits.

    PubMed

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2014-04-11

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  9. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. Aim To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Materials and Methods Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7th to 21st day using combination ion selective electrode. Results Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Conclusion Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment. PMID:27190957

  10. Evaluation of weld crack susceptibility for neutron irradiated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Narui, M.

    In order to clarify the mechanisms of weld cracking, especially for heat affected zone cracking in heavily neutron irradiated stainless steels and to establish a measure to evaluate crack susceptibility, a mini-sized Varestraint (variable restraint) test machine for hot laboratory operation was designed and fabricated. This unique PIE facility was successfully applied in the hot laboratory of IMR Oarai Branch of Tohoku University. The maximum restraint applied was 4% at the surface of the specimen. Specimen surface morphology and specimen microstructures were inspected by video microscope, SEM and TEM. Under the 2% surface restraint condition, clear formation of heat affected zone (HAZ) crack was observed for the case of neutron irradiation to produce 0.5 appm He and of 2.4 kJ heat input by TIG.

  11. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  12. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  13. Evaluation of Reinforcement and Analysis of Stability of a High-Arch Dam Based on Geomechanical Model Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, Y. R.; Yang, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Reinforcement measures are often used in high-arch dams with complicated geological foundations. The geomechanical model test is an effective method to study the global stability of arch dams and to evaluate the reinforcement effects of foundation treatments. The block masonry technique was developed to simulate the jointed rock mass, tectonic discontinuities, and reinforcement measures. A tailor-made low-strength binder and small blocks were developed to simulate the strength and deformation of the jointed rock mass and discontinuities, respectively. We applied this technique to geomechanical model tests of the Dagangshan arch dam with and without foundation reinforcements. A rupture test was conducted, and the stress and displacement distribution of the dam and abutments were recorded; the failure mechanisms and processes were explored. The reinforcement effects of the foundation treatment were evaluated by comparing the test results of the models with and without foundation reinforcements. Our analysis indicates that foundation reinforcements can improve the stress distribution, decrease deformation, prevent slides, reduce fault movement, and improve the global stability of high-arch dams.

  14. Evaluation of the rate of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers across preference assessments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soyeon; O'Reilly, Mark F; Fragale, Christina L; Aguilar, Jeannie M; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The rates of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers were evaluated across 3 preference assessment formats (i.e., paired stimulus, multiple-stimulus without replacement, and free operant). The experimenter administered each assessment format 5 times in a random order for 7 children with developmental disabilities whose problem behavior was maintained by attention, tangible items, or escape. Results demonstrated different effects related to the occurrence of problem behavior, suggesting an interaction between function of problem behavior and assessment format. Implications for practitioners are discussed with respect to assessing preferences of individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit problem behavior. PMID:22219533

  15. EVALUATION OF THE RATE OF PROBLEM BEHAVIOR MAINTAINED BY DIFFERENT REINFORCERS ACROSS PREFERENCE ASSESSMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soyeon; O'Reilly, Mark F; Fragale, Christina L; Aguilar, Jeannie M; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The rates of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers were evaluated across 3 preference assessment formats (i.e., paired stimulus, multiple-stimulus without replacement, and free operant). The experimenter administered each assessment format 5 times in a random order for 7 children with developmental disabilities whose problem behavior was maintained by attention, tangible items, or escape. Results demonstrated different effects related to the occurrence of problem behavior, suggesting an interaction between function of problem behavior and assessment format. Implications for practitioners are discussed with respect to assessing preferences of individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit problem behavior. PMID:22219533

  16. Evaluation of residual strength in the basalt fiber reinforced composites under impact damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Jin-Woo; Moon, Kyung-Man; Yoon, Sung-Won; Baek, Tae-Sil; Hwang, Kwang-Il

    2015-03-01

    Composites are vulnerable to the impact damage by the collision as to the thickness direction, because composites are being manufactured by laminating the fiber. The understanding about the retained strength after the impact damage of the material is essential in order to secure the reliability of the structure design using the composites. In this paper, we have tried to evaluate the motion of the material according to the kinetic energy and potential energy and the retained strength after impact damage by testing the free fall test of the basalt fiber reinforced composite in the limelight as the environment friendly characteristic.

  17. Preliminary Clinical Evaluation of Short Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resin in Posterior Teeth: 12-Months Report

    PubMed Central

    Garoushi, S; Tanner, J; Vallittu, PK; Lassila, L

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary clinical trial evaluated 12 month clinical performance of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin and conventional particulate filler composite resin in high stress bearing applications. A total of 37 class I and II restorations (compound and complex type) were placed in 6 premolars and 31 molars. The restorations were reviewed clinically at 6 months (baseline) and 12 months using modified USPHS codes change criteria for marginal adaptation, post-operative sensitivity, pulpal pain and secondary caries criteria. Photographs and x-rays were obtained for restorative analysis. Results of 12 months evaluation showed 5 restorations having little marginal leakage (B score) and 1 patient had minor pulpal symptom and post-operative sensitivity (B score). No secondary caries or bulk fracture was detected. The majority of restorations exhibited A scores of the evaluated criteria. After 12 months, restorations combining base of short fiber reinforced composite resin as substructure and surface layer of hybrid composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas. PMID:22408696

  18. Stress state evaluation in low carbon and TRIP steels by magnetic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouli, M.-E.; Giannakis, M.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic permeability is an indicative factor for the steel health monitoring. The measurements of magnetic permeability lead to the evaluation of the stress state of any ferromagnetic steel. The magnetic permeability measurements were conducted on low carbon and TRIP steel samples, which were subjected to both tensile and compressive stresses. The results indicated a direct correlation of the magnetic permeability with the mechanical properties, the stress state and the microstructural features of the examined samples.

  19. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A final program summary is reported for test and evaluation activities that were conducted for space shuttle web selection. Large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of advanced composite shear web construction to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners and logitudinal aluminum stiffening. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs.

  20. Electrochemical Evaluation of Stainless Steels in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; MacDowell, L. G.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation in which several 300-series stainless steels (SS): AISI S30403 SS (UNS S30403), AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603), and AISI 317L SS (LINS S31703), as well as highly-alloyed: SS 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C (UNS S44735), were evaluated using DC electrochemical techniques in three different electrolyte solutions. The solutions consisted of neutral 3.55% NaCl, 3.55% NaCl in 0.1N HCl, and 3.55% NaCl in 1.0N HCl. These solutions were chosen to simulate environments that are less, similar, and more aggressive, respectively, than the conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pads. The electrochemical test results were compared to atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the subject alloys. The electrochemical measurements for the six alloys indicated that the higher-alloyed SS 254-SMO, AL29-4C, and AL-6XN exhibited significantly higher resistance to localized corrosion than the 300-series SS. There was a correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys during a two-year atmospheric exposure and the corrosion rates calculated from electrochemical (polarization resistance) measurements.

  1. Crack Propagation Resistance of α-Al2O3 Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  2. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  3. Springback evaluation for TRIP 800 steel sheets by simple bending tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avellaneda, F. J.; Miguel, V.; Coello, J.; Martínez, A.; Calatayud, A.

    2012-04-01

    TRIP steels, or Transformed Induced Plasticity steels, have excellent mechanical properties if compared with conventional steels. Strain hardening is also greater, thus they offer a good combination of strength and formability properties that may be justified by the multiphase structure of these steels. The highlighted characteristic of these steels is that they modify the microstructure with the deformation process as part of the austenite transforms to martensite, with the consequent change of the material properties. One of the main problems of TRIP steels is strong elastic recovery, or springback, after forming. In this work, the springback phenomenon is evaluated by bending tests and the influence of the variables involved in it is determined. The factor found to affect material recovery the most was the bending angle. Experimental bending forces do not agree with theoretical predictions.

  4. Microstructure Evaluation and Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Cryogenic Steel Processed by Normalizing Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zili; Liu, Xiqin; Hou, Zhiguo; Zhou, Shuangshuang; Tian, Qingchao

    2016-06-01

    Effects of the normalizing treatment on microstructural evolution, mechanical properties, and impact fracture behavior of 20MnV low alloy cryogenic as-rolled steel were evaluated. The results indicate that grain boundary carbide and acicular ferrite of the as-rolled steel were eliminated and a large amount of nanoscale VC precipitates were observed after 860 °C normalizing treatment. The as-normalized steel had lower strength, higher elongation, and impact absorbed energy than as-rolled steel. The optimal comprehensive mechanical property, especially the superior cryogenic toughness with impact absorbed energy values at -20 and -50 °C were 62 and 40 J, respectively, was obtained at 860 °C. The as-rolled steel contained shearing crack and necking crack simultaneously, while 860 °C as-normalized steel only contained deflecting necking crack, indicating the significant improvement of the toughness.

  5. Single-Case Evaluation of a Negative Reinforcement Toilet Training Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.

    2007-01-01

    A negative reinforcement intervention was used to toilet train a child with multiple disabilities. The child appeared to actively withhold urinating in the toilet and was unresponsive to two positive reinforcement training programs. Negative reinforcement required that the child remain in the bathroom during toileting opportunities until he…

  6. The fabrication and biochemical evaluation of alumina reinforced calcium phosphate porous implants.

    PubMed

    Jun, Youn Ki; Kim, Wan Hee; Kweon, Oh Kyeong; Hong, Seong Hyeon

    2003-09-01

    Alumina reinforced calcium phosphate porous implants were manufactured to improve the mechanical strength while maintaining the bioactivity of calcium phosphate ceramics. The alumina porous bodies, which provided the mechanical strength, were fabricated by a polyurethane sponge method and multiple coating techniques resulted in the porous bodies with a 90-75% porosity and a compressive strength of up to approximately 6MPa. The coating of hydroxyapatite (HAp) or tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) was performed by dipping the alumina porous bodies into calcium phosphate ceramic slurries and sintering the specimens. The fairly strong bonding between the HAp or TCP coating layer and the alumina substrate was obtained by repeating the coating and sintering processes. The biochemical evaluations of the porous implants were conducted by in vitro and in vivo tests. For in vitro test, the implants were immersed in Ringer's solution and the release of Ca and P ions were detected and compared with those of calcium phosphate powders. For in vivo test, the porous bodies were implanted into mixed breed dogs and bone mineral density measurements and histological studies were conducted. The alumina reinforced HAp porous implants had a higher strength than the HAp porous implants and exhibited a similar bioactivity and osteoconduction property to the HAp porous implants. PMID:12818545

  7. Design and Mechanical Evaluation of a Novel Fiber-Reinforced Scaffold for Meniscus Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Eric; Gatt, Charles J.; Dunn, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced degradable scaffold for replacement of meniscal tissue was designed, fabricated, and mechanically evaluated. The hypotheses were that 1) the fiber network design would share a portion of compressive loads via the generation of circumferential tensile loads, and 2) the scaffold tensile properties would be similar to those of the meniscus. Two meniscus scaffold designs varying in fiber content (1,000 or 500 fibers: MS1000, MS500) underwent cyclic compressive loading up to 100N and 250N, with resultant tensile loads measured at the anterior and posterior anchors. Standard tensile testing was also performed on each device and ovine menisci. Both scaffolds generated tensile loads directly proportional to the applied compressive loads, with MS1000 scaffolds generating approximately twice the tensile loads of MS500 scaffolds. The tensile strength of MS1000 scaffolds was significantly higher than that of the medial and lateral ovine menisci, and approximately twice that of the MS500 scaffolds. The stiffness of MS1000 scaffolds was lower than that of the lateral meniscus, but not statistically different from that of the medial meniscus. These results support our hypotheses that this novel fiber-reinforced scaffold can mimic the tensile and hoop stress behavior of normal meniscal tissue under compressive loading. The circumferential tensile strength and stiffness are appropriate for a meniscus replacement device. PMID:22021218

  8. Clinical evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced carbon endodontic post, glass fiber reinforced post with cast post and core: A one year comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Preethi, GA; Kala, M

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Restoring endodontically treated teeth is one of the major treatments provided by the dental practitioner. Selection and proper use of restorative materials continues to be a source of frustration for many clinicians. There is controversy surrounding the most suitable choice of restorative material and the placement method that will result in the highest probability of successful treatment. This clinical study compares two different varieties of fiber posts and one cast post and core in terms of mobility of crown margin under finger pressure, recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology requiring crown removal over the period of 12months as evaluated by clinical and radiographical examination. Materials and Methods: 30 root canal treated, single rooted maxillary anterior teeth of 25 patients in the age range of 18–60 years where a post retained crown was indicated were selected for the study between January 2007 and August 2007; and prepared in a standard clinical manner. It was divided into 3 groups of 10 teeth in each group. After post space preparation, the Carbon fiber and Glass fiber reinforced posts were cemented with Scotch bond multipurpose plus bonding agent and RelyX adhesive resin cement in the first and second groups respectively. The Cast post and cores were cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement in the third group. Following post- cementation, the preparation was further refined and a rubber base impression was taken for metal-ceramic crowns which was cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement. A baseline periapical radiograph was taken once each crown was cemented. All patients were evaluated after one week (baseline), 3 months, 6 months and one year for following characteristics mobility of crown margin under finger pressure, recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology

  9. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  10. Electrochemical characterization of the steel wire used as reinforcement in the conductors transmission networks electricity nitride by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Maldonado, J. J.; Dulcé Moreno, H. J.; Aperador, W.

    2016-02-01

    The power company feature infrastructure, which are generally shaped so the transmission and distribution lines, here is why it is necessary to characterize the process of electrochemical corrosion of these components. In this case the steel wire coated with zinc or aluminium, as it is undergoes the rigor of corrosive environments. Given the geographical diversity and different climatic environments, atmospheric corrosion carried affecting service life of structures. For example in very humid environments such as coasts and high altitudes, wetting time (TOW), parameter that meets the conditions of temperature and relative humidity, it affects large proportion, accelerating the corrosion of ferrous materials. Given the importance of establishing mechanisms that lessen the impact on degradation in transmission and distribution lines of both the reliability and the availability of the same. This paper presents the implementation in nitride steels as an alternative or complement to zinc coating.