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Sample records for relapsing favorable histology

  1. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX Homeodomain Mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Amy L.; Ooms, Ariadne; Gadd, Samantha; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Chen, Qing-Rong; Hsu, Chih Hao; Yan, Chunhua; Nguyen, Cu; Hu, Ying; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Schein, Jacqueline; Marra, Marco A.; Huff, Vicki; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Jafari, Nadereh; Ross, Nicole; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the most common single nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors (FHWT) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPG) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations. Significantly decreased expression of mature Let-7a and the miR-200 family (responsible for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition) in miRNAPG-mutant tumors is associated with an undifferentiated blastemal histology. The combination of SIX and miRNAPG mutations in the same tumor is associated with evidence of RAS activation and a higher rate of relapse and death. PMID:25670082

  2. Intraoperative Spillage of Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor Cells: Influence of Irradiation and Chemotherapy Regimens on Abdominal Recurrence. A Report From the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Li, Sierra M.; Breslow, Norman E.; Beckwith, J. Bruce; Ritchey, Michael L.; Shamberger, Robert C.; Haase, Gerald M.; Thomas, Patrick R.M.; Grundy, Paul; Green, Daniel M.; D'Angio, Giulio J.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: We undertook this study to determine (1) the frequency with which spilled tumor cells of favorable histology produced intra-abdominal disease in patients treated with differing chemotherapy regimens and abdominal radiation therapy (RT) and (2) the patterns of relapse and outcomes in such patients. Methods and Materials: The influence of RT dose (0, 10, and 20 Gy), RT fields (flank, whole abdomen), and chemotherapy with dactinomycin and vincristine (2 drugs) vs. added doxorubicin (three drugs) on intra-abdominal tumor recurrence rates was analyzed by logistic regression in 450 patients. Each patient was considered at risk for two types of failure: flank and subdiaphragmatic beyond-flank recurrence, with the correlation between the two outcomes accounted for in the analyses. Results: The crude odds ratio for the risk of recurrence relative to no RT was 0.35 (0.15-0.78) for 10Gy and 0.08 (0.01-0.58) for 20Gy. The odds ratio for the risk of recurrence for doxorubicin to two drugs after adjusting for RT was not significant. For Stage II patients (NWTS-4), the 8-year event rates with and without spillage, respectively, were 79% and 87% for relapse-free survival (p = 0.07) and 90% and 95% for overall survival (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Irradiation (10 Gy or 20 Gy) reduced abdominal tumor recurrence rates after tumor spillage. Tumor spillage in Stage II patients reduced relapse-free survival and overall survival, but only the latter was of statistical significance. These data provide a basis for assessing the risks vs. benefits when considering treatment for children with favorable histology Wilms tumor and surgical spillage.

  3. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX homeodomain mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    We report the most common single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWTs) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPGs) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations.

  4. Outcomes of Children With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor and Peritoneal Implants Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies-4 and -5

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Green, Daniel M.; Haase, Gerald; Anderson, James R.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Grundy, Paul E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: There are no published reports on the optimal management and survival rates of children with Wilms tumor (WT) and peritoneal implants (PIs). Methods and Materials: Among favorable histology WT patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-4 and NWTS-5, 57 children had PIs at the time of nephrectomy. The median age was 3 years 5 months (range, 3 months to 14 years). The majority of children (42 of 57 [74%)] had Stage III tumors; 15 had Stage IV disease. All patients received multimodality therapy. Of 56 children who underwent primary surgery, 48 (84%) had gross total resection of all tumors. All patients received 3-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, and doxorubicin. Whole-abdomen radiotherapy (RT) was used in 47 patients (82%), and in 50 patients (88%) the RT dose was 10.5 Gy. Results: After a median follow-up of 7.5 years, the overall abdominal and systemic tumor control rates were 97% and 93%, respectively. A comparative analysis between children with PIs and those without PIs showed no significant differences in the clinical characteristics between the two groups. The 5-year event-free survival rates with and without PIs were 90% (95% confidence interval, 78-96%) and 83% (95% confidence interval, 81-85%) respectively (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Multimodality therapy with surgery, whole-abdomen RT, and three-drug chemotherapy delivered according to the NWTS-4 and -5 protocols resulted in excellent abdominal and systemic tumor control rates. All children should be monitored in long-term surveillance programs for the early detection and management of therapy-related toxicities.

  5. Favorable NK cell activity after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in stage IV relapsed Ewing's sarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, P; Feuchtinger, T; Nitschke-Gérard, C; Seidel, U J Eva; Lang, A-M; Kyzirakos, C; Teltschik, H-M; Ebinger, M; Schumm, M; Koscielniak, E; Handgretinger, R; Lang, P

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity has been shown to have potential activity against Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) especially in tumors with low HLA I expression and high NKG2D expression. Two patients with metastatic relapsed and primary metastatic stage IV EWS who had received two courses of high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue were transplanted from a haploidentical parental stem cell donor. Patients are alive in ongoing CR for 10.2 and 3.4 years now. Post transplant local second and first relapses were treated successfully in both patients. In vivo IL-2 stimulation not only increased the number and activity of effector cells in one patient but was also associated with severe GvHD. In vitro studies demonstrated high NK cell activity against K562 and relevant activity against EWS cell line A673 post transplant. NK activity was enhanced by cytokine prestimulation as well as by EWS targeting anti-GD2 Ab. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) might contribute to long-term survival by NK cell-mediated effect exerted by donor-derived NK cells. Local tumor recurrence was manageable in both high-risk patients indicating systemic immune control preventing subsequent metastasizing. The efficacy of haploidentical HSCT, cytokine application and tumor targeting antibodies for the use of Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity needs evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:26039213

  6. TARGET Researchers Identify Mutations in SIX1/2 and microRNA Processing Genes in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    TARGET researchers molecularly characterized favorable histology Wilms tumor (FHWT), a pediatric renal cancer. Comprehensive genome and transcript analyses revealed single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in microRNA processing genes (15% of FHWT patients) and Sine Oculis Homeobox Homolog 1/2 (SIX1/2) genes (7% of FHWT patients). SIX1/2 genes play a critical role in renal development and were not previously associated with FHWT, thus presenting a novel role for SIX1/2 pathway aberrations in this disease.

  7. Radiation therapy for favorable histology Wilms tumor: Prevention of flank recurrence did not improve survival on National Wilms Tumor Studies 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, Norman E. . E-mail: norm@u.washington.edu; Beckwith, J. Bruce; Haase, Gerald M.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Ritchey, Michael L.; Shamberger, Robert C.; Thomas, Patrick; D'Angio, Giulio J.; Green, Daniel M.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) of patients with Wilms tumor of favorable histology prevented flank recurrence and thereby improved the survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: Recurrence and mortality risks were compared among groups of patients with Stage I-IV/favorable histology Wilms tumor enrolled in the third (n = 1,640) and fourth (n = 2,066) National Wilms Tumor Study Group studies. Results: Proportions of patients with flank recurrence were 0 of 513 = 0.0% for 20 Gy, 12 of 805 = 1.5% for 10 Gy, and 44 of 2,388 = 1.8% for no flank RT (p trend 0.001 adjusted for stage and doxorubicin); for intra-abdominal (including flank) recurrence they were 5 of 513 = 1.0%, 30 of 805 = 3.7%, and 58 of 2,388 = 2.4%, respectively (p trend = 0.02 adjusted). Survival percentages at 8 years after intra-abdominal recurrence were 0 of 5 = 0% for 20 Gy, 10 of 30 = 33% for 10 Gy, and 34 of 58 = 56% for no RT (p trend = 0.0001). NWTS-4 discontinued use of 20 Gy RT, and the 8-year flank recurrence risk increased to 2.1% from 1.0% on NWTS-3 (p = 0.013). However, event-free survival was unaltered (88% vs. 86%, p = 0.39), and overall survival was better (93.8% vs. 90.8%, p = 0.036) on NWTS-4. Conclusions: Partly because of lower postrecurrence mortality among nonirradiated patients, prevention of flank recurrence by RT did not improve survival. It is important to evaluate entire treatment policies with regard to long-term outcomes.

  8. Monotherapy with pixantrone in histologically confirmed relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: post-hoc analyses from a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Sebban, Catherine; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Derigs, Hans Gunter; Kravchenko, Sergey; Singer, Jack W; Theocharous, Panteli; Wang, Lixia; Pavlyuk, Mariya; Makhloufi, Kahina M; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    This post hoc analysis of a phase 3 trial explored the effect of pixantrone in patients (50 pixantrone, 47 comparator) with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) confirmed by centralized histological review. Patients received 28-d cycles of 85 mg/m(2) pixantrone dimaleate (equivalent to 50 mg/m(2) in the approved formulation) on days 1, 8 and 15, or comparator. The population was subdivided according to previous rituximab use and whether they received the study treatment as 3rd or 4th line. Median number of cycles was 4 (range, 2-6) with pixantrone and 3 (2-6) with comparator. In 3rd or 4th line, pixantrone was associated with higher complete response (CR) (23·1% vs. 5·1% comparator, P = 0·047) and overall response rate (ORR, 43·6% vs. 12·8%, P = 0·005). In 3rd or 4th line with previous rituximab (20 pixantrone, 18 comparator), pixantrone produced better ORR (45·0% vs. 11·1%, P = 0·033), CR (30·0% vs. 5·6%, P = 0·093) and progression-free survival (median 5·4 vs. 2·8 months, hazard ratio 0·52, 95% confidence interval 0·26-1·04) than the comparator. Similar results were found in patients without previous rituximab. There were no unexpected safety issues. Pixantrone monotherapy is more effective than comparator in relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL in the 3rd or 4th line setting, independently of previous rituximab. PMID:27118109

  9. The Impact of Graft-versus-Host Disease on the Relapse Rate in Patients with Lymphoma Depends on the Histological Subtype and the Intensity of the Conditioning Regimen.

    PubMed

    Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Pavletic, Steven Z; Flowers, Mary E; Klein, John P; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Montoto, Silvia; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Bredeson, Christopher N; Costa, Luciano J; Dandoy, Christopher; Freytes, César O; Fung, Henry C; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hayashi, Robert J; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Inwards, David J; Lazarus, Hillard M; Maloney, David G; Martino, Rodrigo; Munker, Reinhold; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F; Rizzieri, David A; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Smith, Sonali M; Socié, Gérard; Wirk, Baldeep; Yu, Lolie C; Saber, Wael

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on the relapse rate of different lymphoma subtypes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Adult patients with a diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma (FL), peripheral T cell lymphoma, or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) undergoing HLA-identical sibling or unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation between 1997 and 2009 were included. Two thousand six hundred eleven cases were included. A reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen was used in 62.8% of the transplantations. In a multivariate analysis of myeloablative cases (n = 970), neither acute (aGVHD) nor chronic GVHD (cGVHD) were significantly associated with a lower incidence of relapse/progression in any lymphoma subtype. In contrast, the analysis of RIC cases (n = 1641) showed that cGVHD was associated with a lower incidence of relapse/progression in FL (risk ratio [RR], .51; P = .049) and in MCL (RR, .41; P = .019). Patients with FL or MCL developing both aGVHD and cGVHD had the lowest risk of relapse (RR, .14; P = .007; and RR, .15; P = .0019, respectively). Of interest, the effect of GVHD on decreasing relapse was similar in patients with sensitive disease and chemoresistant disease. Unfortunately, both aGVHD and cGVHD had a deleterious effect on treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS) in FL cases but did not affect treatment-related mortality, OS or PFS in MCL. This study reinforces the use of RIC allo-HCT as a platform for immunotherapy in FL and MCL patients. PMID:25981509

  10. Extinction, Relapse, and Behavioral Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral-momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  11. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  12. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Crossed two relapse prevention conditions (skills training-vs-discussion control) with two levels of aversive smoking in volunteer subjects (N=123). Results indicated that relapse-prevention skill training did prevent relapse among cigarette smokers. Lighter smokers were more favorably influenced. (LLL)

  13. Find favorable reactions faster

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Chiang, P.Y. )

    1988-11-01

    Now, equations are given to identify whether the reactions are thermodynamically favorable. The method uses Gibbs free energy of formation for the reactants and products. The equation for any 700 major organic compounds is given as temperature coefficients. Then the reaction can be tested at various temperature levels beyond the standard 298/sup 0/K conditions imposed by many other data tabulations. Data for the water and hydrogen chloride are also included. Gibbs free energy of formation of ideal gas (..delta..G/sub f/, jkoule/g-mol) is calculated from the tabulated coefficients (A, B, C) and the temperature (T, /sup 0/K) using the following equation: (1) ..delta..G/sub f/ = A + BT + CT/sup 2/. Chemical equilibrium for a reaction is associated with the change in Gibbs free energy (..delta..G/sub r/) calculated as follows: (2) ..delta..G/sub r/ = ..delta..G/sub f/, products - ..delta..G/sub f/, reactants. If the change in Gibbs free energy is negative, the thermodynamics for the reaction are favorable. On the other hand, if the change in Gibbs free energy is highly positive, the thermodynamics for the reaction are not favorable and may be feasible only under special circumstances.

  14. Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Ivana; Stavraka, Chara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Borley, Jane; Hopkins, Thomas Glass; Gabra, Hani; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Huson, Les; Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to construct a prognostic index that predicts risk of relapse in women who have completed first-line treatment for ovarian cancer (OC). Methods A database of OC cases from 2000 to 2010 was interrogated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade and histological subtype of cancer, preoperative and posttreatment CA-125 level, presence or absence of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery and on postchemotherapy computed tomography scan, and time to progression and death. The strongest predictors of relapse were included into an algorithm, the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse (ROVAR) score. Results Three hundred fifty-four cases of OC were analyzed to generate the ROVAR score. Factors selected were preoperative serum CA-125, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade of cancer, and presence of residual disease at posttreatment computed tomography scan. In the validation data set, the ROVAR score had a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 61%, respectively. The concordance index for the validation data set was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.96). The score allows patient stratification into low (<0.33), intermediate (0.34–0.67), and high (>0.67) probability of relapse. Conclusions The ROVAR score stratifies patients according to their risk of relapse following first-line treatment for OC. This can broadly facilitate the appropriate tailoring of posttreatment care and support. PMID:25647256

  15. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. PMID:24084426

  16. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rene, Nicholas; Faria, Sergio; Cury, Fabio; David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Souhami, Luis

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Since the recognition that prostate cancer probably has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio, hypofractionated radiotherapy has become an attractive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. However, there is little experience with the use of hypofractionation delivering a high biologically equivalent dose. We report our experience with high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Material and Methods: A total of 129 patients with favorable risk prostate cancer were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment plans to the dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions, prescribed at the isocenter. Planning target volume consisted of the prostate plus a uniform 7-mm margin, including the rectal margin. No patient received hormonal therapy. Toxicity was prospectively graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria version3. Biochemical relapse was defined as postradiotherapy nadir prostate-specific antigen + 2 ng/mL. Results: With a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year actuarial biochemical control rate is 98%. The only 3 cases with biochemical failure did not have a clinical local relapse. More than 50% of patients did not develop acute toxicity. For late toxicity, the worst crude rate of Grade {>=}2 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity seen at any time during follow-up were 32% and 25%, respectively. There was no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. At the last follow-up, persistent Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity were 2% and 1.5%, respectively. Conclusions: This hypofractionated regimen provides excellent biochemical control in favorable risk prostate cancer with an acceptable rate of late toxicity. Further studies exploring this hypofractionation regimen are warranted.

  17. Insomnia, alcoholism and relapse.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2003-12-01

    Insomnia and alcoholism are significantly associated in community surveys and patient samples. Insomnia occurs in 36-72% of alcoholic patients and may last for weeks to months after initiating abstinence from alcohol. Some correlates of insomnia in alcoholic patients are identical to those observed in non-alcoholic insomniacs, including anxiety and depression, tobacco smoking, and the use of alcohol to aid sleep. Other studies suggest that as the severity of alcoholism increases, so does the likelihood of insomnia in alcoholic patients. In the sleep laboratory, alcoholic patients who complain of insomnia have disrupted sleep continuity when compared to alcoholic patients without insomnia complaints. Recently sober alcoholics are also more likely than non-alcoholics to have sleep-disordered breathing and increased periodic leg movements, which might contribute to insomnia in some alcoholic patients. The co-occurrence of insomnia and alcoholism is clinically significant because alcoholism can exacerbate the adverse consequences of insomnia (e.g. mood changes and performance decrements) and because insomnia among patients entering treatment for alcoholism has been significantly associated with subsequent alcoholic relapse. Baseline polysomnographic correlates of subsequent relapse include prolonged sleep latency, decreased sleep efficiency and total sleep time, increased rapid eye movement sleep pressure, and decreased slow wave sleep. Whether treatment of insomnia in alcoholic patients reduces relapse rates is unknown, but preliminary treatment guidelines that accommodate the special characteristics of alcoholic patients are provided, with a goal to reduce daytime impairment and psychological distress. PMID:15018094

  18. Survival of pediatric patients after relapsed osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Sarah E. S.; Wozniak, Amy W.; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; McPherson, Valerie; Neel, Michael D.; Rao, Bhaskar N.; Daw, Najat C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy has improved the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, but its role in relapsed disease is unclear. Methods We reviewed the records of all patients who were treated for relapsed high-grade osteosarcoma at our institution between 1970 and 2004. Post-relapse event-free survival (PREFS) and post-relapse survival (PRS) were estimated, and outcome comparisons were made using the exact log-rank test. Results The 10-year PREFS and PRS of the 110 patients were 11.8% ± 3.5% and 17.0% ± 4.3%, respectively. Metastasis at initial diagnosis (14%), and relapse in lung only (75%) were not significantly associated with PREFS or PRS. Time from initial diagnosis to first relapse (RL1) ≥18 months (43%), surgery at RL1 (76%), and ability to achieve second complete remission (CR2, 56%) were favorably associated with PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0002). In patients without CR2, chemotherapy at RL1 was favorably associated with PREFS (p=0.01) but not with PRS. In patients with lung relapse only, unilateral relapse and number of nodules (≤3) were associated with better PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0005); no patients with bilateral relapse survived 10 years. The median PREFS after treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide was 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.1-5.2) and median PRS 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.2-15.1). Conclusions Late relapse, surgical resection, and unilateral involvement (in lung relapse only) favorably impact outcome after relapse. Surgery is essential for survival; chemotherapy may slow disease progression in patients without CR2. These data are useful for designing clinical trials that evaluate novel agents. PMID:23625626

  19. [Relapse prevention in drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Rácz, József

    2013-12-01

    The literature review deals with methods of relapse prevention. Relapse prevention is the key in the treatment of clients with drug addictions according to the transtheoretical model of change. If relapse prevention is more effective then not only the relapse would be prevented, but the client would leave the circulus vitiosus of relapses. Among psychotherapies cognitive behavioural methods are proven effective. Shorter forms of cognitive therapies are also available: for example, cognitive bias modification. Pharmacotherapy partly decreases craving of the clients or ceases the effects of psychoactive substances. Specific pharmacotherapeutic methods prevent relapses in a non-abstinent treatment design. Here the goal is not the abstinence in a short time, but the reduction of harms associated with drug use. In this way, a new target group of drug users can be involved in treatment. PMID:24380964

  20. Handling Gifts, Gratuities, and Favors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastmond, Nick; Jones, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The twelfth in a series of articles featuring the principles of the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics focuses on the acceptance by professors of gratuities, gifts, or favors that might impair or appear to impair professional judgment. (LRW)

  1. Three histologically distinct cancers of the uterine corpus: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MASUYAMA, HISASHI; HARAGA, JUNKO; NISHIDA, TAKASHI; OGAWA, CHIKAKO; KUSUMOTO, TOMOYUKI; NAKAMURA, KEIICHIRO; SEKI, NORIKO; YANAI, HIROYUKI; HIRAMATSU, YUJI

    2016-01-01

    Collision tumors, which are characterized by the coexistence of two or more completely distinct and independent tumors in the uterine corpus, are very rare. A collision tumor is mainly composed of two distinct tumor types, epithelial and mesenchymal. To the best of our knowledge, there has only been a single case in which a choriocarcinoma with an endometrial carcinoma were coexistent but histologically distinct. We herein report the first case of a collision tumor in a 52-year-old woman, with a history of two pregnancies and two deliveries. The collision tumor was composed of three histologically distinct neoplasms in the uterine corpus, namely an endometrioid carcinoma, an undifferentiated carcinoma and a choriocarcinoma. The patient underwent hysterectomy, bilateral adnexectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, followed by six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel/carboplatin due to the high risk of endometrial cancer, and an additional five cycles of chemotherapy with methotrexate, as the β-human chorionic gonadotropin level was beyond the normal range. Following adjuvant chemotherapy, the tumor markers were within normal limits and no relapses of the cancer have been observed during 1 year of follow-up. Diagnosing a collision tumor prior to surgery is difficult if the neoplasms are in close proximity, or if one of the tumors predominates. Careful pathological examination is crucial for accurately diagnosing the neoplasms in a collision tumor and ensuring appropriate management and a favorable prognosis. PMID:27073663

  2. Clinico-Histologic Conferences: Histology and Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Phyllis A.; Friedman, Erica S.

    2012-01-01

    Providing a context for learning information and requiring learners to teach specific content has been demonstrated to enhance knowledge retention. To enhance students' appreciation of the role of science and specifically histology in clinical reasoning, disease diagnosis, and treatment, a new teaching format was created to provide clinical…

  3. Adult medulloblastoma: clinical characters, prognostic factors, outcomes and patterns of relapse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Ouyang, Taohui; Kang, Huicong; Long, Wang; Thomas, Benjamin; Zhu, Suiqiang

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the clinical characters, prognostic factors, patterns of relapse and treatment outcomes for medulloblastoma in adults. The clinical materials of 73 consecutive adult patients (age, ≥16 years) with medulloblastoma were analyzed retrospectively. Follow-up data were available in 62 patients, ranging from 10 to 142 months (median, 78.4 months). Outcome in survival was assessed by the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to determine the prognostic factors. Total or near-total tumor resection was achieved in 37 cases (59.7 %), subtotal in 19 cases (30.6 %), and partial resection in 6 cases (9.7 %).Twenty-two patients experienced recurrences, and 45 % percent of all recurrences occurred more than 4 years after initial surgery. The PFS rates at 5 and 8 years were 60.1 and 37.0 %, respectively. The OS rates at 5 and 8 years were 82.6 and 57.3 %, respectively. In univariate analysis, less tumor resection, non-desmoplastic pathology, and brainstem involvement were risk factors for worse PFS and OS (P < 0.05). High-risk category was associated with just lower PFS, but not OS. In multivariate analysis, complete resection and desmoplastic pathology were independently predictive factors of improved PFS and OS. In adult medulloblastoma, late relapse is common and therefore long-term follow-up is important for evaluating the real impact of treatments. Risk category had prognostic value just for PFS, but not for OS. Complete resection and desmoplastic histology are independently predictive factors for favorable outcomes. PMID:26026861

  4. Progressive-Relapsing MS (PRMS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease process in MS and in MRI technology. Individuals who were previously diagnosed with progressive-relapsing MS would now be ... The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? We ...

  5. [Relapse prevention in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Giel, Katrin; Leehr, Elisabeth; Becker, Sandra; Startup, Helen; Zipfel, Stephan; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2013-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa is characterised by high relapse rates and thus there is a need for strategies that reduce reoccurrence of illness. One way of achieving this is to integrate relapse prevention into treatment, but clearly this requires identification of risk and maintenance factors. The Maudsley Model of Anorexia Nervosa Treatment in Adults (MANTRA) by Schmidt & Treasure has 5 major treatment stages. These include an initial stage of motivation and dialogue about change, an individual relapse formulation, improvement of cognitive and socio-emotional skills, work on the patient's identity and eventually a final stage of ending and parting. These treatment stages are derived from a maintenance model of AN by Schmidt & Treasure and on evidence from recovered patients and part of their objective is to prevent relapse. PMID:23592490

  6. Histologic diagnosis of sodomy.

    PubMed

    Paparo, G P; Siegel, H

    1979-10-01

    A case of homicidal strangulation with sodomy is presented. Without the use of a simple routine histologic technique, the diagnosis of sodomy could not have been unequivocally substantiated. PMID:541642

  7. Histologic remission: the ultimate therapeutic goal in ulcerative colitis?

    PubMed

    Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Bressenot, Aude; Kampman, Wendy

    2014-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease of the mucosal layer, and activity of the disease is assumed to be related to mucosal appearance. Mucosal healing has emerged as a major therapeutic goal in UC. Whether mucosal healing should be the ultimate therapeutic goal in these patients is unknown. Even when endoscopy suggests mucosal healing, evidence of histologic activity has been observed. Histologic healing requires complete recovery of the colonic mucosa, with absence of inflammation or structural changes. Histologic improvements have been linked with improved clinical outcomes, such as a reduced risk of relapse and need for surgery/hospitalization and a reduced risk of developing cancer. Hence, there is a rationale for aiming for histologic remission in UC. Numerous methods of classification of histologic activity in UC have been proposed, although only some of these are widely used. We review the current definitions of histologic remission, the range of scoring systems most commonly used, and the evidence of histologic improvement that is available from the latest therapies for UC. We also highlight questions that will require careful consideration if histologic remission is to become more widely used as an end point in clinical trials and a treatment goal in clinical practice. PMID:23911875

  8. Late relapsing childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vora, A; Frost, L; Goodeve, A; Wilson, G; Ireland, R M; Lilleyman, J; Eden, T; Peake, I; Richards, S

    1998-10-01

    Childhood lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is usually assumed to have been permanently eradicated in patients in long-term remission, but occasionally can recur after many years. To learn more about the problem, we studied a group of children whose leukemia had been in remission for 10 or more years before relapse and tried to determine whether they had true recurrences or second malignancies. We studied children treated on Medical Research Council ALL protocols between 1970 and 1984 and followed up by the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford. Detailed clinical and laboratory data was collected from the centers concerned on all who were reported to have had a recurrence of their leukemia after 10 or more years from the time of achieving first complete remission (CR1). To prove that the relapse was a true recurrence rather than a second or secondary leukemia, DNA extracted from archived marrow smears was subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of an identical Ig heavy chain (IgH) or T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement at initial diagnosis and subsequent relapse. A total of 1,134 of 2,746 children had survived 10 years or more (range, 10 to 24 years) in CR1 and of those, 12 (approximately 1%) had subsequently relapsed. Relapse blast cells were shown to express the common ALL antigen (CD 10) in all cases and an identical clonal IgH or TCR gene rearrangement was found on PCR analysis of DNA from diagnosis and relapse in all eight cases where DNA extraction was successful. A further program of therapy was successful in inducing a second CR in all patients, four of whom have succumbed to a second relapse after 12 to 27 months. The remaining eight are in continuing CR2 at a follow-up of 12 to 108 months (median, 52) from relapse. Although the risk of relapse of childhood ALL after 10 years in remission appears to be small (around 1%), it persists. This raises questions about how blasts can survive quiescent for so long and when we can

  9. Relapse prevention for addictive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Relapse Prevention (RP) model has been a mainstay of addictions theory and treatment since its introduction three decades ago. This paper provides an overview and update of RP for addictive behaviors with a focus on developments over the last decade (2000-2010). Major treatment outcome studies and meta-analyses are summarized, as are selected empirical findings relevant to the tenets of the RP model. Notable advances in RP in the last decade include the introduction of a reformulated cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, the application of advanced statistical methods to model relapse in large randomized trials, and the development of mindfulness-based relapse prevention. We also review the emergent literature on genetic correlates of relapse following pharmacological and behavioral treatments. The continued influence of RP is evidenced by its integration in most cognitive-behavioral substance use interventions. However, the tendency to subsume RP within other treatment modalities has posed a barrier to systematic evaluation of the RP model. Overall, RP remains an influential cognitive-behavioral framework that can inform both theoretical and clinical approaches to understanding and facilitating behavior change. PMID:21771314

  10. Prognosis of patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia after first relapse

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Saiko; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Kanamori, Heiwa; Sakura, Toru; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Sano, Fumiaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kazuo; Yanada, Masamitsu; Nawa, Yuichiro; Takeuchi, Jin; Nakamura, Yukinori; Fujisawa, Shin; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Miura, Ikuo; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is known to have a favorable prognosis, however, there have been no detailed analyses on prognostic factors after first relapse. Using a nationwide database, we retrospectively analyzed core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia patients who relapsed after being treated with chemotherapy alone during their first complete remission. Of a total of 397 patients who were diagnosed with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia, 208 experienced a first relapse, and analyses were performed in 139 patients for whom additional data were available. In the entire cohort, the overall survival rate after relapse was 48% at 3 years. By multivariate analysis, younger age at diagnosis, a longer interval before relapse, and inv(16) were shown to be independently associated with better survival after relapse. Although there was no significant difference in survival after relapse between patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and those who did not in the overall series of relapsed patients, we found that transplantation significantly improved survival among patients who had t(8;21) (54% versus 26% at 3 years, P=0.002). In addition, among patients with t(8;21), those who had different cytogenetics at relapse had a significantly improved survival after transplantation, while those who had same cytogenetics did not. We showed that the prognosis differs significantly and optimal treatment strategies may vary between groups of patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia with different cytogenetic profiles at relapse. These findings may help to guide therapeutic decisions after first relapse. PMID:23716553

  11. Novel therapies for relapsed myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A Keith

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of myeloma relapse needs to be individualized to reflect the effectiveness and toxicities of prior therapies, with consideration given to pragmatic issues such as the tempo of relapse, age of the patient, access to drugs and patient preference. In general, combination therapies have been associated with higher response rates and improved progression-free survival and may be preferable when a rapid response is required. Nevertheless, in a slower-tempo relapse it is unclear at this juncture whether sequencing of drugs or multi-agent combinations offer superior overall survival results. Fortunately, active novel agents that offer further possibilities for some myeloma patients have become available in clinical trials. In this review we will describe the various classes of novel drugs being tested and the pros and cons of preclinical testing, and will particularly focus on two agents with single-agent activity in myeloma: carfilzomib, a proteasome inhibitor, and pomalidomide, a member of the immunomodulatory class of drugs. PMID:20008242

  12. Relapsing Fever Borreliae in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The study of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa has long suffered from the use of non-specific laboratory tools for the direct detection of these spirochetes in clinical and vector specimens. Accordingly, Borrelia hispanica, Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis have traditionally been distinguished on the basis of geography and vector and the unproven hypothesis that each species was exclusive to one vector. The recent sequencing of three relapsing fever Borrelia genomes in our laboratory prompted the development of more specific tools and a reappraisal of the epidemiology in Africa. Five additional potential species still need to be cultured from clinical and vector sources in East Africa to further assess their uniqueness. Here, we review the molecular evidence of relapsing fever borreliae in hosts and ectoparasites in Africa and explore the diversity, geographical distribution, and vector association of these pathogens for Africans and travelers to Africa. PMID:23926141

  13. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  14. Preventing Relapse Following Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Susan E.; Witkiewitz, Katie; Kirouac, Megan; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide. Long-term smoking cessation can drastically reduce people’s risk for developing smoking-related disease. The research literature points to a need for clearer operationalization and differentiation between smoking cessation and relapse prevention interventions and outcomes. That said, extensive meta-analyses and research studies have indicated that there are various efficacious smoking interventions that can both support smoking cessation and relapse prevention efforts. Specifically, behavioral treatments, relapse prevention psychotherapy, pharmacologic interventions, motivational enhancement, smoking reduction to quit, brief advice, alternative intervention modes (telephone, Internet, computer), self-help, and tailored treatments can help prepare smokers for longer-term abstinence. Although these methods vary on reach, they are relatively efficacious, particularly in combined formats. PMID:26550097

  15. Arsenic trioxide-based therapy of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: registry results from the European LeukemiaNet.

    PubMed

    Lengfelder, E; Lo-Coco, F; Ades, L; Montesinos, P; Grimwade, D; Kishore, B; Ramadan, S M; Pagoni, M; Breccia, M; Huerta, A J G; Nloga, A M; González-Sanmiguel, J D; Schmidt, A; Lambert, J-F; Lehmann, S; Di Bona, E; Cassinat, B; Hofmann, W-K; Görlich, D; Sauerland, M-C; Fenaux, P; Sanz, M

    2015-05-01

    In 2008, a European registry of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia was established by the European LeukemiaNet. Outcome data were available for 155 patients treated with arsenic trioxide in first relapse. In hematological relapse (n=104), 91% of the patients entered complete hematological remission (CR), 7% had induction death and 2% resistance, 27% developed differentiation syndrome and 39% leukocytosis, whereas no death or side effects occurred in patients treated in molecular relapse (n=40). The rate of molecular (m)CR was 74% in hematological and 62% in molecular relapse (P=0.3). All patients with extramedullary relapse (n=11) entered clinical and mCR. After 3.2 years median follow-up, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of second relapse were 68% and 41% in hematological relapse, 66% and 48% in molecular relapse and 90 and 11% in extramedullary relapse, respectively. After allogeneic or autologous transplantation in second CR (n=93), the 3-year OS was 80% compared with 59% without transplantation (n=55) (P=0.03). Multivariable analysis demonstrated the favorable prognostic impact of first remission duration ⩾1.5 years, achievement of mCR and allogeneic or autologous transplantation on OS of patients alive after induction (P=0.03, P=0.01, P=0.01) and on leukemia-free survival (P=0.006, P<0.0001, P=0.003), respectively. PMID:25627637

  16. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  17. Survival After Relapse of Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Bloom, Karina; Upadhyaya, Santhosh; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah E S

    2016-05-01

    Survival after recurrence of medulloblastoma has not been reported in an unselected cohort of patients in the contemporary era. We reviewed 55 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma between 2000 and 2010, and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital to evaluate patterns of relapse treatment and survival. Fourteen of 47 patients (30%) over the age of 3 experienced recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma after standard therapy. The median time from diagnosis to recurrence was 18.0 months (range, 3.6 to 62.6 mo), and site of recurrence was metastatic in 86%. The median survival after relapse was 10.3 months (range, 1.3 to 80.5 mo); 3-year survival after relapse was 18%. There were trend associations between longer survival and having received additional chemotherapy (median survival 12.8 vs. 1.3 mo, P=0.16) and radiation therapy (15.4 vs. 5.9 mo, P=0.20). Isolated local relapse was significantly associated with shorter survival (1.3 vs. 12.8 mo, P=0.009). Recurrence of medulloblastoma is more likely to be metastatic than reported in previous eras. Within the limits of our small sample, our data suggest a potential survival benefit from retreatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation even in heavily pretreated patients. This report serves as a baseline against which to evaluate novel therapy combinations. PMID:26907655

  18. Borrelia hispanica Relapsing Fever, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Sarih, M’hammed; Garnier, Martine; Boudebouch, Najma; Bouattour, Ali; Rihani, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Gern, Lise; Postic, Danièle

    2009-01-01

    We found that 20.5% of patients with an unexplained fever in northwestern Morocco had tick-borne relapsing fever. Molecular detection specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified Borrelia hispanica. The noncoding intergenic spacer sequence domain showed high sensitivity and good resolution for this species. PMID:19861058

  19. Borrelia hispanica relapsing fever, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Sarih, M'hammed; Garnier, Martine; Boudebouch, Najma; Bouattour, Ali; Rihani, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Gern, Lise; Postic, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel

    2009-10-01

    We found that 20.5% of patients with an unexplained fever in northwestern Morocco had tick-borne relapsing fever. Molecular detection specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified Borrelia hispanica. The noncoding intergenic spacer sequence domain showed high sensitivity and good resolution for this species. PMID:19861058

  20. Determinants of Relapse Following Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul M.

    Although research has been conducted on who will relapse after having quit smoking in clinics, little has been done to determine the immediate precipitants of recidivism. A telephone hotline, manned by four experienced interviewers, was set up to receive calls from ex-smokers who had relapsed or who felt at high risk for relapse. A structured…

  1. [Histological techniques in oncodermatology].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Le Guellec, S; Courtade-Saïdi, M; Gangloff, D; Meresse, T; Chavoin, J-P; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I

    2012-04-01

    The skin oncology or "oncodermatology" requires a surgical treatment in most cases. For some surgeons, the oncodermatology takes a very important part of their practice. In the course of diagnostic and therapeutic of skin lesions, the pathologist plays now an essential role. He will guide our surgery. The techniques used by this specialist are numerous. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to review the different histological methods used to improve our management of skin tumors. PMID:22463986

  2. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis as the primary presentation of relapse in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Keith; Muhammad, Aun; Saleem, Waqar; Alshaker, Heba; Monzon, Leonardo; Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul; Pchejetski, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) is an uncommon presentation of relapse in breast cancer, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes and poor prognosis. Notably, LM most commonly occurs in breast cancer. The aim of the present review was to investigate the occurrence of LM as the primary presentation of relapse following remission in breast cancer patients and to determine whether specific histological subtypes are predisposed to meningeal metastases. In addition, the present review evaluated whether patients presenting with LM as the primary site of relapse exhibit differences in survival when compared with patients exhibiting metastasis to other sites. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated that LM is commonly associated with other sites of distant metastasis including lung, liver and bone metastases. The histological breast cancer subtype most commonly associated with LM was invasive lobular carcinoma, while triple-negative breast cancer patients appear to be predisposed to the development of LM when considering the overall prevalence of histological breast cancer subtypes. At present, data regarding LM as the primary site of relapse are limited due to its rarity as the first site of metastasis in breast cancer. Case-controlled studies are required to investigate the incidence of LM as the primary site of recurrence in breast cancer patients as this would enable treatment standardization and identification of prognostic factors for improved survival. PMID:27446350

  3. Late Relapse of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Matthew J; Feldman, Darren R; Carver, Brett S; Sheinfeld, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Germ cell tumors of the testis have an overall survival rate greater than 90% as a result of a successful multidisciplinary approach to management. Late relapse affects a subset of patients however, and tends to be chemorefractory and the overall prognosis is poor. Surgery is the mainstay in management of late relapse but salvage chemotherapy can be successful. In this review, the clinical presentation and detection of late relapse, clinical outcomes, and predictors of survival in late relapse and the importance of a multidisciplinary treatment approach for successful management of late relapse are discussed. PMID:26216823

  4. Animal models of fear relapse.

    PubMed

    Goode, Travis D; Maren, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fear memories are rapidly acquired and enduring over time, extinction memories are slow to form and are susceptible to disruption. Consequently, behavioral therapies that involve extinction learning (e.g., exposure therapy) often produce only temporary suppression of fear and anxiety. This review focuses on the factors that are known to influence the relapse of extinguished fear. Several phenomena associated with the return of fear after extinction are discussed, including renewal, spontaneous recovery, reacquisition, and reinstatement. Additionally, this review describes recent work, which has focused on the role of psychological stress in the relapse of extinguished fear. Recent developments in behavioral and pharmacological research are examined in light of treatment of pathological fear in humans. PMID:25225304

  5. GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Terry L; Williams, Paul T; Yin, Shengjun; Klasky, Hilda B; Tadinada, Sashi; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the objective of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface project is to create the capability to apply GRIZZLY 3-D finite element (thermal and stress) analysis results as input to FAVOR probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses. The one benefit of FAVOR to Grizzly is the PROBABILISTIC capability. This document describes the implementation of the GRIZZLY/FAVOR Interface, the preliminary verification and tests results and a user guide that provides detailed step-by-step instructions to run the program.

  6. Endocannabinoid regulation of relapse mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter

    2007-11-01

    Addiction involves a complex neuropharmacologic behavioural cycle, in which positive reinforcement exerted by the drug and the negative state of withdrawal drive the user to extremes to obtain the drug. Comprehensive studies have established that relapse is the most common outcome of recovery programs treating addictive behaviours. Several types of anticraving medication are available nowadays, such as naltrexone for the treatment of alcoholism, bupropion for nicotine, methadone or buprenorphine for heroin. This review focuses on recent behavioural data providing a rationale for an endocannabinoid mechanism underlying reinstatement of compulsive drug seeking. Studies supporting the contention that reinstatement of extinguished drug self-administration behaviour may be generated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and attenuated, if not blocked, by CB1 receptor antagonists, are here reviewed. In support to these findings, conditioned place preference studies substantiate the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in recidivism mechanisms by demonstrating that motivation to relapse can be triggered by CB1 receptor activation while blockade of such receptors may prevent reinstatement of place conditioning induced by either drug primings or drug-associated cues. Finally, biochemical studies evaluating changes in endocannabinoid levels, CB1 receptor density and CB1 mRNA expression during re-exposure to drug following extinction are also examined. Taken together, the evidence available has important implications in the understanding and treatment of relapsing episodes in patients undergoing detoxification. PMID:17936008

  7. Why do patients with ulcerative colitis relapse?

    PubMed

    Riley, S A; Mani, V; Goodman, M J; Lucas, S

    1990-02-01

    To determine the factors responsible for ulcerative colitis relapse a cohort of 92 patients (18 to 78 years, 50 men) with clinically inactive disease have been followed for over 48 weeks. At 12 weekly intervals patients were asked, by means of standardised questionnaires, about infections, compliance with maintenance medication, new drug treatment, dietary changes, episodes of non-bloody diarrhoea, life stresses, and feelings of anxiety and depression. Thirty five patients (38%) relapsed (median interval 17 weeks, range three to 46 weeks). Patients who relapsed had a higher previous relapse rate than non-relapsers (p less than 0.001) and a shorter time from previous relapse to trial entry (p less than 0.05). Other clinical characteristics were equally matched in the two groups. Between and within group comparisons revealed that upper respiratory tract symptoms, antibiotic ingestion, analgesic intake, diarrhoeal episodes and stressful life events were no more common in the four weeks before relapse than before routine attendance. Anxiety and depression ratings were also similar in the two groups. The timing of ulcerative colitis relapse showed a clear seasonal pattern with 26 patients relapsing from August to January and only nine from January to July (p less than 0.001). In addition, a retrospective case note analysis revealed significant seasonality of onset of ulcerative colitis. We conclude that seasonal factors may contribute to both onset and relapse of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2311975

  8. Cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy. Combined clinical and histological criteria for diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Robinson, M J; Prathap, K; Sumithran, E; Yadav, M

    1978-01-01

    Cows' milk protein enteropathy is recognised as a significant cause of persistent diarrhoea and malabsorption in young infants, but there are as yet no generally accepted diagnostic criteria. A combined clinical and histological approach to the diagnosis of cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy has been used in 15 patients, and the following set of criteria are proposed. (1) Clinical disease (diarrhoea with or without vomiting) while receiving cows' milk protein. (2) Clinical improvement on a diet free of cows' milk protein. (3) Normal or mildly abnormal histology of jejunal mucosa when taken 6-8 weeks after symptoms subside. (4) Histological relapse, with or without clinical relapse, after re-exposure to cows' milk protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:564668

  9. Lymphoma relapse presenting as neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, My; Awad, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare neurological manifestation of lymphoma characterized by malignant lymphoma cells infiltrating cranial or peripheral nerve, or their roots. We present the first reported Australian case of a patient whose initial presentation of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma was NL. Our case highlights that clinical and imaging findings of NL often mimic other neuropathies, and hence presents unique challenges that may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. We emphasize the importance of considering NL in the differential diagnosis and combining imaging with other diagnostic modalities such as lumbar puncture (LP) to aid in the diagnosis of NL particularly where there is acute neurological deterioration. PMID:26889293

  10. Comparison of two locus of control scales in predicting relapse in an alcoholic population.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E E; Nora, R M; Tan, B; Bustos, N

    1991-02-01

    A 3-mo. follow-up was made of 64 male veterans who were discharged from a 21-day Alcohol Detoxification Treatment Program at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Lyons, NJ. Scores on the Rotter I-E and Alcohol Responsibility Scales were significantly correlated with tendencies toward a more external direction among the 13% who relapsed, significant on the I-E scale and nonsignificant on the Alcohol Responsibility Scale. When tests were compared as possible predictor variables of alcoholic relapse, the difference in favor of the I-E scale was statistically nonsignificant. PMID:2038534

  11. Severe alcoholic relapse after liver transplantation: What consequences on the graft? A study based on liver biopsies analysis.

    PubMed

    Erard-Poinsot, Domitille; Guillaud, Olivier; Hervieu, Valérie; Thimonier, Elsa; Vallin, Mélanie; Chambon-Augoyard, Christine; Boillot, Olivier; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Dumortier, Jérôme

    2016-06-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major indication for liver transplantation (LT), but up to 20% of patients experience severe alcoholic relapse. The aims of this study were to evaluate the impact of severe alcoholic relapse on the graft (based on histological examination) and to identify predictive factors associated with recurrent alcoholic cirrhosis (RAC). From 1990 to 2010, 369 patients underwent LT for ALD at Edouard Herriot Hospital (Lyon, France) and survived more than 1 year. All patients who presented severe alcoholic relapse and histological follow-up were included. Liver biopsies were performed at 1 and 5 years and at every 5 years after LT, and when clinically indicated. The median follow-up after LT was 11 years (range, 3-18 years). Severe alcoholic relapse was observed in 73 (20%) of the 369 patients, from whom 56 patients with histological evaluation were included. RAC was diagnosed in 18 (32%) of the 56 patients included, which represents 5% of the 369 patients transplanted for ALD. The median delay between LT and RAC was 6 years (range, 3-10 years) and 4.5 years (range, 2-8 years) after severe alcoholic relapse. The median cumulated years of alcohol use before RAC was 3.5 years (range, 2-7 years). The cumulative risk for F4 fibrosis was 15% at 3 years, 32% at 5 years, and 54% at 10 years after severe alcoholic relapse. A young age at LT (≤50 years old) and an early onset of heavy drinking (within the first 3 years after LT) were associated with RAC. In conclusion, severe alcoholic relapse usually occurs in the first years after LT and is responsible for accelerated severe graft injury. Liver Transplantation 22 773-784 2016 AASLD. PMID:26929100

  12. Salvage Treatment Improved Survival of Patients With Relapsed Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xinxing; Xie Conghua; Xu Yong; Deng Di; Zhao Yanhai; Zou Bingwen; Zhou Lin; Li Mei; Wang Jin; Liu Weiping; Huang Meijuan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of salvage treatment for patients with relapsed natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients who had achieved complete response during initial treatment and experienced histologically proven relapse were reviewed. Twenty-nine of them received salvage treatment with radiotherapy (RT) alone (n = 7), chemotherapy (CT) alone (n = 10), or both RT and CT (n = 12); the other 15 patients received best supportive care alone. Results: The estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) rate for patients with or without salvage treatment was 37.8% vs. 0 (p < 0.0001), respectively. Salvage CT did not improve survival of relapsed Stage IE and IIE patients. Among relapsed Stage IIIE and IVE patients who received salvage treatment, RT developed significantly better survival when compared with that of non-RT (1-year OS, 62.5% vs. 0, p = 0.006). Relapsed Ann Arbor stage and receiving salvage treatment were found to be significant factors influencing OS at both univariate and multivariate levels. Conclusions: Salvage treatment improved survival in patients with relapsed NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. Salvage RT may play an important role in salvage treatment of relapsed extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma.

  13. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  14. Preventing Adolescent Relapse: Concepts, Theories and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shitala P.; Ressler, Robert A.

    This chapter discusses adolescent drug abuse relapse prevention. It presents the following four conclusions regarding the efficacy of prevention programs. First, more controlled studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of relapse prevention strategies with adolescents in reducing factors such as cravings and increasing their…

  15. Adjuvant steroids and relapse of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Cooles, P

    1986-10-01

    In a retrospective study, relapse after non-severe acute typhoid fever was highly significantly related to the use of adjuvant steroid in the initial illness. The steroid was given late and in small doses when compared with other studies. Caution should be observed when using steroids in this way as relapse though often mild may be a severe illness. PMID:3795323

  16. Relapse Crises and Coping among Dieters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined situational antecedents of dieting relapse crises and dieters'attempts to cope with temptations to overeat among obese type II diabetics (N=57). Found three categories of relapse crises: mealtime, low-arousal, and emotional upset situations. Found upset situations most frequently produced negative outcome while strong cognitive and…

  17. Favorable response of reticular erythematous mucinosis to ultraviolet B irradiation using a 308-nm excimer lamp.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Ken; Miyajima, Osamu; Yokogawa, Maki; Sano, Shigetoshi

    2010-02-01

    Abstract Reticular erythematous mucinosis (REM) is a rare chronic mucinosis. Histologically, the presence of mucin in the upper dermis is the most specific feature. A 73-year-old woman presented to our outpatient clinic with a 4-year history of netlike macular erythema with slight edema on her left arm. She was diagnosed as having REM on the basis of the clinical picture and histological findings. She was treated with ultraviolet B irradiation using the VTRAC Excimer Lamp system with favorable response. This is the first reported case that was treated with a 308-nm excimer lamp. PMID:20175851

  18. Relapsing polychondritis: A clinical update.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lucia; Greco, Antonio; Rea, Andrea; Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; De Virgilio, Armando; De Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare connective tissue disease in which recurrent bouts of inflammation, involve the cartilage of the ears, nose, larynx, tracheobronchial tree and cardiovascular system. RP is generally observed in the fourth and fifth decades of life and occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The cause of RP is still unknown. It is considered an immune-mediated disease, as there is an overlap between well documented RP with other rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. There is a significant association of RP with the antigen HLA-DR4. RP includes loss of basophilic staining of cartilage matrix perichondral accompanied by inflammation of the cartilage. Cells are present perivascular mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells infiltrated. The chondrocytes become vacuolated and necrotic and are replaced by fibrous tissue. Common symptoms are often absent in the early stages of the disease in almost half the cases, resulting in delay in diagnosis. The development of chondrite allows the diagnosis of RP in patients initially evaluated for joint abnormalities, ocular, cutaneous, or audio-vestibular. Diagnostic criteria for RP are based on characteristic clinical manifestations. According to Damiani and Levine, the diagnosis can be considered final when one or more of the clinical features are present in conjunction with biopsy confirmation. The course of symptoms for patients with relapsing polychondritis is often unpredictable. Patients with mild signs of acute inflammation are usually treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and small doses of prednisone. Patients with severe manifestations, such as airway compromise may require high doses of prednisone or even intravenous pulse methyl-prednisone. PMID:26876384

  19. Modelling intervention effects after cancer relapses

    PubMed Central

    González, Juan R.; Peña, Edsel A.; Slate, Elizabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This article addresses the problem of incorporating information regarding the effects of treatments or interventions into models for repeated cancer relapses. In contrast to many existing models, our approach permits the impact of interventions to differ after each relapse. We adopt the general model for recurrent events proposed by Peña and Hollander, in which the effect of interventions is represented by an effective age process acting on the baseline hazard rate function. To accommodate the situation of cancer relapse, we propose an effective age function that encodes three possible therapeutic responses: complete remission, partial remission, and null response. The proposed model also incorporates the effect of covariates, the impact of previous relapses, and heterogeneity among individuals. We use our model to analyse the times to relapse for 63 patients with a particular subtype of indolent lymphoma and compare the results to those obtained using existing methods. PMID:16320269

  20. Relapsed or poorly responsive nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents - a report from the United Kingdom's Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Study Group.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Ananth G; Kirkwood, Amy A; Depani, Sarita; Bianchi, Eleonora; Hayward, Janis; Ramsay, Alan D; Hall, Georgina W

    2016-05-01

    There is a paucity of data on the treatment outcome in children with relapsed or poorly responsive nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (nLPHL). This retrospective report evaluates the treatment outcome in a national cohort of children with relapsed or poorly responsive nLPHL. A total of 37 patients, 22 with relapsed and 15 with poorly responding disease, are the subjects of this report. Of the 22 patients with relapsed nLPHL, 11 had relapsed after primary excision biopsy, 10 after chemotherapy and 1 after chemotherapy and involved field radiotherapy. The majority had localized disease at relapse. The median time to relapse was 8 months after chemotherapy and 11 months after excision biopsy. Seven of the 15 patients with poorly responding nLPHL had variant histology. Three patients with initial poor response did not receive any further treatment and have had no disease progression. Transformation to diffuse large B cell lymphoma, in addition to evolution from typical to variant nLPHL occurred in one patient each. Thirty-four patients have been successfully re-treated with second chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Multiple relapses were uncommon but treatable. Relapse or poorly responsive nLPHL is fully salvageable with either additional chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. PMID:26996288

  1. Relapse of pemphigus vulgaris after topical application of ingenol mebutate.

    PubMed

    Russo, I; Ferrazzi, A; Alaibac, M

    2016-08-01

    Ingenol mebutate is a recently approved topical agent for the treatment of actinic keratosis. Its most common adverse effects are transient local skin reactions. We report a 63-year-old white man who presented with a red-brownish crusted plaque involving the dorsum of his nose and an eroded area on his lower lip, which appeared soon after topical application of ingenol mebutate gel. Clinical, histological and immunopathological features were consistent with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris (PV). To our knowledge, this is the first report of relapse of PV after topical application of ingenol mebutate gel. The temporal relationship between the application of the drug and the outbreak of PV supports the involvement of this agent in triggering the disease. It is plausible that ingenol mebutate may have induced the disease by its action on the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27381839

  2. A Case of Relapsing Polychondritis Initiating with Unexplained Fever

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Kosuke; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Yoshimura, Satoshi; Kurohama, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Mai; Takahata, Taichi; Oku, Ryuta; Ito, Masahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease affecting the multiple organ system. Here, we describe a case of RP initially presenting with high fever. The patient was referred to our hospital for further examination of fever of unknown origin (FUO). On admission, the patient reported dry cough in addition to fever. On physical examination, her red, swollen ears were noted, attributed on histology to inflammation with auricular perichondritis. She was diagnosed with RP and treated with oral prednisone (50 mg/day); her fever and auricular inflammation resolved. The patient no longer reported cough and body temperature returned to normal and the elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were normalized. In this case, identification of the origin of fever was a challenge because of unspecific symptoms; however, awareness of the systemic manifestations of RP may lead to the prompt diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26981127

  3. Lumpectomy Plus Tamoxifen or Anastrozole With or Without Whole Breast Irradiation in Women With Favorable Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poetter, Richard . E-mail: Richard.Poetter@meduniwien.ac.at; Gnant, Michael; Kwasny, Werner; Tausch, Christoph; Handl-Zeller, Leonore; Pakisch, Brigitte; Taucher, Susanne; Hammer, Josef; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Gero; Schmid, Marianne; Kapp, Karin; Sedlmayer, Felix; Stierer, Michael; Reiner, Georg; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Rottenfusser, Andrea; Poestlberger, Sabine; Haider, Karin; Draxler, Wolfgang; Jakesz, Raimund

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: In women with favorable early breast cancer treated by lumpectomy plus tamoxifen or anastrazole, it remains unclear whether whole breast radiotherapy is beneficial. Methods and Material: Between January 1996 and June 2004, the Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group (ABCSG) randomly assigned 869 women to receive breast radiotherapy {+-} boost (n 414) or not (n = 417) after breast-conserving surgery (ABCSG Study 8A). Favorable early breast cancer was specified as tumor size <3 cm, Grading 1 or 2, negative lymph nodes, positive estrogen and/or progesterone receptor status, and manageable by breast-conserving surgery. Breast radiotherapy was performed after lumpectomy with 2 tangential opposed breast fields with mean 50 Gy, plus boost in 71% of patients with mean 10 Gy, in a median of 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was local relapse-free survival; further endpoints were contralateral breast cancer, distant metastases, and disease-free and overall survival. The median follow-up was 53.8 months. Results: The mean age was 66 years. Overall, there were 21 local relapses, with 2 relapses in the radiotherapy group (5-y rate 0.4%) vs. 19 in the no-radiotherapy group (5.1%), respectively (p = 0.0001, hazard ratio 10.2). Overall relapses occurred in 30 patients, with 7 events in the radiotherapy group (5-y rate 2.1%) vs. 23 events in the no-radiotherapy group (6.1%) (p = 0.002, hazard ratio 3.5). No significant differences were found for distant metastases and overall survival. Conclusion: Breast radiotherapy {+-} boost in women with favorable early breast cancer after lumpectomy combined with tamoxifen/anastrazole leads to a significant reduction in local and overall relapse.

  4. How to predict clinical relapse in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Liverani, Elisa; Scaioli, Eleonora; Digby, Richard John; Bellanova, Matteo; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a natural course characterized by alternating periods of remission and relapse. Disease flares occur in a random way and are currently unpredictable for the most part. Predictors of benign or unfavourable clinical course are required to facilitate treatment decisions and to avoid overtreatment. The present article provides a literature review of the current evidence on the main clinical, genetic, endoscopic, histologic, serologic and fecal markers to predict aggressiveness of inflammatory bowel disease and discuss their prognostic role, both in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. No single marker seems to be reliable alone as a flare predictor, even in light of promising evidence regarding the role of fecal markers, in particular fecal calprotectin, which has reported good results recently. In order to improve our daily clinical practice, validated prognostic scores should be elaborated, integrating clinical and biological markers of prognosis. Finally, we propose an algorithm considering clinical history and biological markers to intercept patients with high risk of clinical relapse. PMID:26811644

  5. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  6. Trait impulsive choice predicts resistance to extinction and propensity to relapse to cocaine seeking: a bidirectional investigation.

    PubMed

    Broos, Nienke; Diergaarde, Leontien; Schoffelmeer, Anton Nm; Pattij, Tommy; De Vries, Taco J

    2012-05-01

    Despite the strong association between impulsivity and addiction in humans, it is still a matter of debate whether impulsive choice predisposes to, or results from, drug dependence. Furthermore, it is unknown whether treating impulsivity can protect against relapse propensity. Therefore, this study explored the bidirectional relationship between impulsive choice and cocaine taking and seeking in rat behavioral models. In experiment 1, to determine whether impulsive choice predisposes to cocaine taking or seeking, rats were selected based on trait impulsivity in a delayed reward task and subsequently compared on various stages of cocaine self-administration (SA). To examine the consequence of cocaine intake on impulsive choice, impulsivity was monitored once a week throughout various stages of cocaine SA. To determine whether treating impulsive choice can protect against relapse propensity, in experiment 2, impulsive choice was manipulated by pharmacological interventions and cocaine-associated contextual cues. Trait impulsive choice as determined in experiment 1 predicted high extinction resistance and enhanced propensity to context-induced relapse in the cocaine SA model, whereas cocaine intake did not alter impulsive choice. Furthermore, acute changes in impulsive choice were not related to rates of context-induced relapse. Taken together, the current data indicate that trait impulsive choice predicts persistent cocaine seeking during extinction and enhanced propensity to relapse, whereas acute manipulations of impulsive choice had no favorable outcomes on relapse measures. These observations suggest that trait impulsivity can be used as a predictive factor for addiction liability, but treating this impulsivity does not necessarily protect against relapse. PMID:22318198

  7. Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplants for patients with relapsed acute leukemia: long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Raiola, A M; Ibatici, A; di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Piaggio, G; Podesta, M; Bruno, B; Lombardi, A; Frassoni, F; Viscoli, C; Sacchi, N; Van Lint, M T

    2007-03-01

    We assessed the long-term outcome of patients with relapsed acute myeloid (n=86) or acute lymphoid leukemia (n=66), undergoing an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in our unit. The median blast count in the marrow was 30%. Conditioning regimen included total body irradiation (TBI) (10-12 Gy) in 115 patients. The donor was a matched donor (n=132) or a family mismatched donor (n=20). Twenty-two patients (15%) survive disease free, with a median follow-up of 14 years: 18 are off medications. The cumulative incidence of transplant related mortality is 40% and the cumulative incidence of relapse related death (RRD) is 45%. In multivariate analysis of survival, favorable predictors were chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) (P=0.0003), donor other than family mismatched (P=0.02), donor age less than 34 years (P=0.02) and blast count less than 30% (P=0.07). Patients with all four favorable predictors had a 54% survival. In multivariate analysis of relapse, protective variables were the use of TBI (P=0.005) and cGvHD (P=0.01). This study confirms that a fraction of relapsed leukemias is cured with an allogeneic transplant: selection of patients with a blast count <30%, identification of young, human leukocyte antigen-matched donors and the use of total body radiation may significantly improve the outcome. PMID:17277788

  8. Management of relapsed ovarian cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Giornelli, Gonzalo H

    2016-01-01

    Around 70 % of ovarian cancer patients relapse after primary cytoreductive surgery and standard first-line chemotherapy. The biology of relapse remains unclear, but cancer stem cells seem to play an important role. There are still some areas of controversy on how to manage these relapses and or progressions that occur almost unavoidably in the course of this disease with shorter intervals between them as the natural history of this disease develops. The goal of treatments investigated in this neoplasm has shifted to maintenance therapy, trying to extend the progression free intervals in a disease that is becoming more and more protracted. PMID:27516935

  9. Improving reporting of multiple sclerosis relapse.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Megan; Lush, Tessa; Pohorely, John

    Many people with multiple sclerosis do not report a relapse. When it is reported, it is not always recorded in their notes. This can mean patients do not always have the most appropriate treatment. This article reviews some of the reasons why relapse reports are lacking and how the problem could be addressed. As a result, the decision was made to develop an app that patients could use to record their symptoms and wellbeing over time, to help identify and record relapses. Information could then be passed to their health professional via email, if desired. PMID:26775329

  10. Preferences and attitudes toward approaches to depression relapse/recurrence prevention among pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Dimidjian, Sona; Goodman, Sherryl H

    2014-03-01

    Patient preferences are increasingly recognized as important in clinical research and the delivery of evidence based practice in psychology. Although the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence among perinatal women is an important public health goal, little is known about pregnant women's preferences and attitudes toward relapse/recurrence prevention interventions. Such information is important given low rates of care seeking among this population, and the potential for a relapse/recurrence prevention to avert negative outcomes among both vulnerable women and their offspring. Pregnant women seeking routine prenatal care in obstetric clinics (n = 200) were surveyed to assess their preferences for and attitudes about psychotherapy and pharmacological approaches to relapse/recurrence prevention. Women preferred psychotherapy (mindfulness based cognitive therapy and interpersonal therapy) more so than pharmacotherapy and reported significantly more favorable perceptions of the psychotherapy as compared to pharmacotherapy approaches to depression relapse/recurrence prevention. Results suggest also that depression history is important to consider in evaluating women's preferences and attitudes. Clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:24440577

  11. Long-Term Survival And Late Relapse In 2-Year Survivors Of Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation For Hodgkin And Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S.; Bajorunaite, Ruta; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Wang, Zhiwei; Klein, John P.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Rizzo, J. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study described long-term outcomes of autologous hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) for advanced Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The study included recipients of autologous HCT for HL (N=407) and NHL (N=960) from 1990–98 who were in continuous complete remission for at least 2 years post-HCT. Median follow-up was 104 months for HL and 107 months for NHL. Overall survival at 10-years was 77% (72–82%) for HL, 78% (73–82%) for diffuse large-cell NHL, 77% (71–83%) for follicular NHL, 85% (75–93%) for lymphoblastic/Burkitt NHL, 52% (37–67%) for mantle-cell NHL and 77% (67–85%) for other NHL. On multivariate analysis, mantle-cell NHL had the highest relative-risk for late mortality (2.87 (1.70–4.87)), while the risks of death for other histologies were comparable. Relapse was the most common cause of death. Relative mortality compared to age, race and gender adjusted normal population remained significantly elevated and was 14.8 (6.3–23.3) for HL and 5.9 (3.6–8.2) for NHL at 10-years post-HCT. Recipients of autologous HCT for HL and NHL who remain in remission for at least 2-years have favorable subsequent long-term survival but remain at risk for late relapse. Compared to the general population, mortality rates continue to remain elevated at 10-years post-transplantation. PMID:19573079

  12. Late relapses in acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Latagliata, Roberto; Carmosino, Ida; Breccia, Massimo; Minni, Antonio; Testi, Anna; Iorio, Nicol; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Petti, Maria Concetta; Mandelli, Franco; Cimino, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    From January 1988 to December 1997, among 53 acute promyelocytic leukaemia patients in 1st complete remission (CR) after 5 years from diagnosis, we observed 5 late relapses (9.4%) after 60, 61, 71, 101 and 155 months from diagnosis; 3 of those late relapses (7.7%) occurred among 39 patients previously treated with all-trans-retinoic acid. An involvement of the mastoid occurred in 3/5 patients (60%), compared with 2/32 patients (6.3%) at an early relapse (p < 0.02). As to the treatment of the late relapse, 1 patient received all-trans-retinoic acid alone followed by allogeneic transplantation and 4 patients were treated according to the GIMEMA 0191 protocol. All patients achieved a 2nd CR and are still alive: 4 in the 2nd molecular CR after 6, 33, 34 and 115 months; 1 relapsed after 15 months and is now in the 3rd CR. In conclusion, a late relapse occurred in a sizeable fraction of acute promyelocytic leukaemia patients: the high rate of ear involvement might be explained considering the ear as a 'disease sanctuary'. PMID:17135723

  13. Relapse Prevention with Substance Abusers: Clinical Issues and Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Dennis C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems of relapse with alcoholics and other drug abusers from three perspectives: client-related variables, common erroneous beliefs and myths held by professionals regarding relapse, and treatment system problems that may contribute to relapse. Offers proposed solutions and describes a relapse prevention model. (Author/ABB)

  14. Idelalisib-associated Colitis: Histologic Findings in 14 Patients.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Anna-Sophie; Panarelli, Nicole C; Geyer, Julia T; Bhavsar, Erica B; Furman, Richard R; Leonard, John P; Jessurun, Jose; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2015-12-01

    Idelalisib is an inhibitor of the PI3Kδ isoform approved for treatment of patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia and indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Many patients develop gastrointestinal symptoms during idelalisib therapy; however, the pathologic effects of this drug have not been characterized. We identified 50 patients who received at least 3 months of idelalisib therapy. Clinical findings and symptoms were noted for each patient, and endoscopic findings were recorded for those who underwent colonoscopic examination. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from colonic biopsy samples were evaluated for histologic patterns of injury. Twenty-three (46%) patients experienced diarrhea during treatment with idelalisib, including 8 with severe symptoms (≥7 stools/d above baseline and/or requiring hospitalization). Fourteen patients underwent colonoscopic examination with mucosal biopsy. Twelve (86%) of these had colitis characterized by intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt cell apoptosis, and neutrophilic infiltration of crypt epithelium. Eleven patients had symptoms severe enough to warrant drug withdrawal, including 9 who were also treated with corticosteroids. Idelalisib commonly causes diarrheal symptoms in patients undergoing therapy for B-cell neoplasia, which may be severe in nearly 20% of patients. Characteristic histologic features include the combination of intraepithelial lymphocytosis and crypt cell apoptosis, often accompanied by neutrophils. Discontinuation of the drug results in symptomatic improvement and resolution of histologic changes. PMID:26448188

  15. Genomic, immunophenotypic, and NPM1/FLT3 mutational studies on 17 patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (AML) followed by aberrant karyotype AML at relapse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eunice S; Sait, Sheila N J; Gold, David; Mashtare, Terry; Starostik, Petr; Ford, Laurie Ann; Wetzler, Meir; Nowak, Norma J; Deeb, George

    2010-10-15

    Normal karyotype (NK) is the most common cytogenetic group in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) diagnosis; however, up to 50% of these patients at relapse will have aberrant karyotype (AK) AML. To determine the etiology of relapsed AK AML cells, we evaluated cytogenetic, immunophenotypic, and molecular results of 17 patients with diagnostic NK AML and relapsed AK AML at our institute. AK AML karyotype was diverse, involving no favorable and largely (8 of 17) complex cytogenetics. Despite clear cytogenetic differences, immunophenotype and NPM1/FLT3 gene mutation status did not change between presentation and relapse in 83% (10 of 12) and 94% (15 of 16) cases, respectively. High-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) performed via paired aCGH on NK AML and AK AML samples from the same patient confirmed cytogenetic aberrations only in the relapse sample. Analysis of 16 additional diagnostic NK AML samples revealed no evidence of submicroscopic aberrations undetected by conventional cytogenetics in any case. These results favor evolution of NK AML leukemia cells with acquisition of novel genetic changes as the most common etiology of AK AML relapse as opposed to secondary leukemogenesis. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether AK AML cells represent selection of rare preexisting clones below aCGH detection and to further characterize the molecular lesions found at time of AK AML relapse. PMID:20875872

  16. Appearance Normalization of Histology Slides

    PubMed Central

    Niethammer, Marc; Borland, David; Marron, J. S.; Woosley, John; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearances across slides, that is very effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols, and to slide fading. The approach is validated using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. PMID:25360444

  17. Temporal bone metastasis as a sign of relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aljafar, Hadeel M.; Alsuhibani, Sari S.; Alahmari, Mohammad S.; Alzahrani, Musaed A.

    2015-01-01

    Otologic manifestations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are common presentations. However, temporal bone metastasis is rarely described as a sign of relapsing CLL. A 65-year-old male diabetic patient known to have CLL on remission presented to the outpatient otolaryngology clinic with a one month history of progressive bilateral otalgia and right otorrhea, despite multiple courses of antibiotics. He was admitted with suspicion of malignant otitis externa. Left ear showed large hemorrhagic bullae on the posterior segment of tympanic membrane. Left sided facial paralysis developed on the third day of admission. Full recovery of facial paralysis is achieved by 10 days course of corticotherapy. Histological examination of middle ear tissue biopsy showed infiltration by monotonous small lymphoid cells, showing round nuclei, condensed chromatin suggestive of CLL. Although rare, unusual otologic manifestations should raise the suspicion of a temporal bone metastasis as a sign of relapsing CLL. PMID:26446337

  18. Risk Factors for Relapse of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Moulana, Zahra; Afshar, Zeinab Mohseni; Ebrahimpour, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Background & Propose: Brucellosis is serious disease around the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. Relapse is major problem in therapy of brucellosis. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors of relapse after treatment in patients. Methods: It is a descriptive-analytic study from 1990 to 2014, in Ayatolla Rohani hospital in Babol, Iran. We studied 980 patients with brucellosis. The studied community included patients infected with brucellosis and the required information was gathered based on their hospital files. The base for recognizing Malta fever were clinical symptoms and Para-clinical sign congruent with infection like as, titer SAT>1:320 and 2-ME>1:160. Patients with relapse and patients without relapse were placed separately in two groups. The data were statistically compared with Spss 16, by Chi-square and Cox–regression tests. Results: Based on this study, treatment regimen is a preventive factor (P=0.000). Moreover, Based on some statistical methods, regimens no. 3 and 4 were introduce preventive factors (P=0.001) and (P=0.004). It should also be noted that findings the same statistical model, factors like gender, age, residence, professional contacts, complications and delay in treatment were also analyzed but none of them are considered as preventive factors. Conclusion: Based our finding, we suggest aminoglycosides (gentamicin or streptomycin with doxycycline) are associated with lower rate of relapse in brucellosis.

  19. Relapse prevention with intellectually disabled sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Jenny A; Rose, John L

    2005-10-01

    The adaptation of relapse prevention theory to sexual offending (W. D. Pithers, J. K. Marques, C. C. Gibat, & G. A. Marlatt, 1983) has represented an important movement in cognitive-behavioural treatment for sexual offenders. However, this model of relapse prevention has been criticised for its limited view and oversimplification of the relapse prevention process (R. K. Hanson, 2000; T. Ward & S. M. Hudson, 1996). As a result, T. Ward and S. M. Hudson (2000a) have developed a multiple pathway model of the relapse prevention process based on self-regulation theory. Although this model continues to be empirically validated on sexual offenders (J. A. Bickley & A. R. Beech, 2002; T. Ward, S. M. Hudson, & J. C. McCormick, 1999), there has been no empirical research regarding the application of this theory to intellectually disabled sexual offenders. This paper discusses whether the characteristics of offenders in each of the relapse offence pathways, as described by T. Ward and S. M. Hudson (2000a), may be similar to the characteristics of intellectually disabled sexual offenders. From a review of the literature, it appears that the intellectually disabled sexual offender may be most likely to offend via the approach-automatic pathway or the avoidant-passive pathway. The potential treatment implications of the self-regulation model for intellectually disabled sexual offenders is discussed, as well as the need for empirical evaluation with regards to the application of this model to the intellectually disabled sexual offender population. PMID:16341602

  20. Pathological gambling: understanding relapses and dropouts.

    PubMed

    Aragay, Núria; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Ramos-Grille, Irene; Cardona, Sara; Garrido, Gemma; Anisul Islam, Mohammed; Menchón, José M; Vallès, Vicenç

    2015-02-01

    There is little available information on the factors that influence relapses and dropouts during therapy for pathological gambling (PG). The aim of this study was to determine socio-demographic, clinical, personality, and psychopathological predictors of relapse and dropout in a sample of pathological gamblers seeking treatment. A total of 566 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with PG according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were included. All patients underwent an individualized cognitive-behavioral treatment program. We analyzed predictors of relapse during 6months of treatment and during the subsequent 6months of follow-up, and predictors of dropout over the entire therapeutic program. Eighty patients (14.1%) experienced at least one relapse during the entire follow-up of the study: 50 (8.8%) within the treatment period and 12 (2.1%) during the subsequent 6-month follow-up period. The main predictors of relapse were single marital status, spending less than 100euros/week on gambling, active gambling behavior at treatment inclusion, and high scores on the TCI-R Harm Avoidance personality dimension. One hundred fifty-seven patients (27.8%) missed 3 or more therapeutic sessions over the entire therapeutic program. The main predictors of dropout were single marital status, younger age, and high scores on the TCI-R Novelty Seeking personality dimension. The presence of these factors at inclusion should be taken into account by physicians dealing with PG patients. PMID:25434846

  1. Results of sustained long-term use of interferon beta-1a in a community-based cohort of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, Stanley; Chen, Chiayi; Baraban, Elizabeth; Stuchiner, Tamela; Grote, Lois; Rodriguez, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated long-term efficacy of interferon beta-1a in large community-based cohorts. Objective Evaluate time to relapse, relapse rate, and disability progression in patients treated with intramuscular interferon beta-1a. Methods A retrospective review of medical records from 2000–2010 was performed. Adult patients with relapsing-remitting MS or clinically isolated syndrome treated with interferon beta-1a were included. Primary outcomes were time to relapse, annualized relapse rate, and changes in Expanded Disability Status Scale score. Other outcomes included factors associated with time to first relapse, risk of having a relapse while receiving interferon beta-1a, and discontinuation of therapy. Results In total, 364 of 696 patients screened were enrolled, with a mean age of 51 ± 12.1 years, disease duration of 9.39 ± 7.02 years, and duration of therapy of 4.03 ± 2.56 years. Mean time to first on-therapy relapse was 5.58 ± 0.26 years, annualized relapse rate was 0.30 ± 0.55 years, and mean increase in sustained Expanded Disability Status Scale score was 0.018. Relapse risk was associated with higher baseline Expanded Disability Status Scale score, age at disease onset, and number of relapses in the 12 months prior to therapy initiation. Conclusions This study demonstrates favorable clinical outcomes observed in a large community-based cohort, and serves to emphasize the continued therapeutic importance of interferon beta-1a, despite the development of newer agents with greater convenience of use, but also more potential risk of serious morbidity.

  2. Anti-relapse medications: Preclinical models for drug addiction treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yahyavi-Firouz-Abadi, Noushin; See, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease and treatment of relapse to drug-seeking is considered the most challenging part of treating addictive disorders. Relapse can be modeled in laboratory animals using reinstatement paradigms, whereby behavioral responding for a drug is extinguished and then reinstated by different trigger factors, such as environmental cues or stress. In this review, we first describe currently used animal models of relapse, different relapse triggering factors, and the validity of this model to assess relapse in humans. We further summarize the growing body of pharmacological interventions that have shown some promise in treating relapse to psychostimulant addiction. Moreover, we present an overview on the drugs tested in cocaine or methamphetamine addicts and examine the overlap of existing preclinical and clinical data. Finally, based on recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of relapse and published preclinical data, we highlight the most promising areas for future anti-relapse medication development. PMID:19683019

  3. Reordering Histology to Enhance Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amerongen, Helen

    2011-01-01

    In redesigning the preclinical curriculum and shifting from a discipline-based approach to an organ system-based approach, faculty at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson took the opportunity to restructure the sequence of introductory histology content to make it more engaging and relevant. In this article, the author describes…

  4. Histological findings in human brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, A. C.; Bothwell, P. W.

    1967-01-01

    The histological findings in 14 cases of brucellosis are described. Unusual findings include the occurrence of brucellosis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease and in another with lymphosarcoma. A patient with hepatic cirrhosis apparently due to brucellosis is included in the series. Images PMID:5632572

  5. Strongyloidiasis histologically mimicking eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Serafinella P; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Guarneri, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of strongyloidiasis in an Italian patient, who has always lived in Sicily. The patient presented with marked blood eosinophilia and an itching maculo-papular eruption, histologically simulating eosinophilic folliculitis. The clinical resolution was achieved after albendazol therapy. PMID:15319162

  6. Histologic Technician. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for histologic technician is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task…

  7. Histological evolution of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Takako; Yoshida, Yuji; Kitasato, Yasuhiko; Yoshimi, Michihiro; Koga, Takaomi; Tsuruta, Nobuko; Minami, Masato; Harada, Taishi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Nagata, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the histological evolution in the development of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE). Methods and results We examined four patients who had undergone surgical lung biopsy twice, or who had undergone surgical lung biopsy and had been autopsied, and in whom the histological diagnosis of the first biopsy was not PPFE, but the diagnosis of the second biopsy or of the autopsy was PPFE. The histological patterns of the first biopsy were cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia, cellular interstitial pneumonia (CIP) with organizing pneumonia, CIP with granulomas and acute lung injury in cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Septal elastosis was already present in the non-specific interstitial pneumonia-like histology of case 1, but a few additional years were necessary to reach consolidated subpleural fibroelastosis. In case 3, subpleural fibroelastosis was already present in the first biopsy, but only to a small extent. Twelve years later, it was replaced by a long band of fibroelastosis. The septal inflammation and fibrosis and airspace organization observed in the first biopsies were replaced by less cellular subpleural fibroelastosis within 3–12 years. Conclusions Interstitial inflammation or acute lung injury may be an initial step in the development of PPFE. PMID:25234959

  8. An Interpersonal Model of Addiction Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Leach, David; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on interpersonal stress and rejection sensitivity and examine how these factors increase the risk of relapse in individuals with alcohol or drug dependence. We begin by considering the constructs of social pain and social threat, examining their evolutionary origins and their neuroanatomical, neuropsychological and neurophysiological dimensions. Together, these perspectives provide insight into the role of interpersonal stress as a powerful and oftentimes destructive factor that affects individuals in recovery from substance dependence. We then review the empirical evidence showing that intrapersonal traits and interpersonal environments interact to increase an addict’s risk of relapse. We conclude by proposing that substance-dependent individuals with high trait rejection sensitivity and a critical interpersonal environment are particularly vulnerable to relapse to substance use. PMID:24489485

  9. Outcome of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first relapse.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Gardin, Claude; Gachard, Nathalie; Merabet, Fathia; Turlure, Pascal; Malfuson, Jean-Valère; Pautas, Cécile; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Xavier; Quesnel, Bruno; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Preudhomme, Claude; Terré, Christine; Fenaux, Pierre; Chevret, Sylvie; Castaigne, Sylvie; Dombret, Hervé

    2013-09-01

    To provide data for future drug evaluation, we analyzed the outcome of 393 patients aged 50 years or older (median, 64 years) with AML in first relapse after treatment in recent ALFA trials. Salvage options were retrospectively classified as follows: best supportive care (BSC), low-dose cytarabine (LDAC), gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), intensive chemotherapy (ICT), or ICT combined with GO. Second complete remission (CR2) rate was 31% and median post-relapse survival was 6.8 months (0, 17, 42.5, 53, and 80% and 3.2, 5.6, 8.9, 9, and 19.8 months in BSC, LDAC, GO, ICT, and ICT + GO subsets, respectively). Age, performance status, WBC, CR1 duration, and favorable AML karyotype, but not other cytogenetic or molecular features, influenced post-relapse outcome. Multivariate adjustment and propensity score matching showed that intensive salvage (ICT/ICT+GO/GO versus LDAC/BSC) was associated with longer post-relapse survival, at least in patients with CR1 duration ≥12 months (P = 0.001 and 0.0005, respectively). Of interest, GO appeared to be as effective as standard ICT, and ICT + GO combination more effective than standard ICT. In conclusion, older patients with CR1 duration ≥12 months appeared to benefit from intensive salvage and results observed with GO-containing salvage suggest that GO combination studies should be actively pursued in this setting. PMID:23749683

  10. Clinical Utility of Glatiramer Acetate in the Management of Relapse Frequency in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) represents one of the most common disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis. GA is currently approved for patients at high risk of developing clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) after having experienced a well-defined first clinical episode (clinically isolated syndrome or CIS) and for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). GA’s efficacy and effectiveness to reduce relapse frequency have been proved in placebo-controlled and observational studies. Comparative trials have also confirmed the lack of significant differences over other choices of treatment in the management of relapse frequency, and long-term studies have supported its effect at extended periods of time. Additionally, RRMS patients with suboptimal response to interferon β may benefit from reduced relapse rate after switching to GA, and those with clinically isolated syndrome may benefit from delayed conversion to CDMS. All these results, together with its proven long-term safety and positive effect on patients’ daily living, support the favorable risk-benefit of GA for multiple sclerosis treatment. PMID:23650472

  11. Durable responses to ibrutinib in patients with relapsed CLL after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Link, C S; Teipel, R; Heidenreich, F; Rücker-Braun, E; Schmiedgen, M; Reinhardt, J; Oelschlägel, U; von Bonin, M; Middeke, J M; Muetherig, A; Trautmann-Grill, K; Platzbecker, U; Bornhäuser, M; Schetelig, J

    2016-06-01

    Ibrutinib, a recently approved inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), has shown great efficacy in patients with high-risk CLL. Nevertheless, there are few data regarding its use in patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). We report clinical data from five CLL patients treated with ibrutinib for relapse after first or even second allogeneic transplantation. Additionally, we performed analyses on cytokine levels and direct measuring of CD4 Th1 and CD4 Th2 cells to evaluate possible clinically relevant immunomodulatory effects of ibrutinib. All patients achieved partial responses including one minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative remission. Within 1 year of follow-up, no relapse was observed. One patient died of severe pneumonia while on ibrutinib treatment. Beside this, no unexpected adverse events were observed. Flow cytometry and analyses of T cell-mediated cytokine levels (IL10 and TNFα) did not reveal substantial changes in T-cell distribution in favor of a CD4 Th1 T-cell shift in our patients. No acute exacerbation of GvHD was reported. In conclusion, these results support further evaluation of ibrutinib in CLL patients relapsing after alloSCT. PMID:26752141

  12. Children's need for favorable acoustics in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2003-10-01

    Children continue to improve their understanding of speech in noise and reverberation throughout childhood and adolescence. They do not typically achieve adult performance levels until their late teenage years. As a result, schools that are designed to be acoustically adequate for adult understanding may be insufficient for full understanding by young children. In addition, children with hearing loss, those with attention problems, and those learning in a non-native language require even more favorable signal-to-noise ratios. This tutorial will review the literature gathered by the ANSl/ASA working group on classroom acoustics that shaped the recommendations of the working group. Special topics will include speech perception data from typically developing infants and children, from children with hearing loss, and from adults and children listening in a non-native language. In addition, the tutorial will overview recommendations contained within ANSI standard 12.60-2002: Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools. The discussion will also include issues related to designing quiet classrooms and working with local schools and professionals.

  13. Pathways to relapse: the neurobiology of drug- and stress-induced relapse to drug-taking.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J

    2000-01-01

    Relapse is a major characteristic of drug addiction, and remains the primary problem in treating drug abuse. Without an understanding of the factors that determine renewed drug-seeking, the urge to use drugs, and the persistent craving for them, it is unlikely that health care professionals can provide effective treatment. Using an animal model of relapse, the author and her team are studying factors that induce reinstatement of drug-taking behaviour after short and long periods of abstinence, and they are exploring the neurobiological basis of these effects. In their experiments, rats are trained to self-administer drugs intravenously by pressing 1 of 2 levers. During a subsequent period, the drug is no longer available, but the rats are free to try to obtain the drug (a period of "extinction training"). After extinction of responding, the investigators test for the ability of various events to reinitiate drug-seeking. On this background of renewed drug-seeking or relapse, the investigators search for pharmacological and neurochemical manipulations that might block or attenuate such behaviour. They have found that the 2 most effective events for reinstating responding after both short and long drug-free periods are re-exposure to the drug itself and exposure to a brief period of stress. The critical neurochemical pathways mediating drug-induced relapse are not identical to those mediating stress-induced relapse. Relapse induced by "priming" injections of heroin or cocaine involves activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, whereas relapse induced by stress involves actions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the brain, and of brain noradrenergic (NE) systems. In addition, evidence shows that CRF and NE may interact at the level of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in stress-induced relapse. By contrast, relapse induced by "priming" injections of drugs is relatively unaffected by manipulation of CRF and NE systems of the brain. PMID:10740986

  14. Efficacy of immune suppression tapering in treating relapse after reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kekre, Natasha; Kim, Haesook T.; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Cutler, Corey; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ho, Vincent T.; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For patients who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while still on immune suppression, there is anecdotal evidence that tapering the immune suppression may result in graft-versus-tumor activity. We reviewed the medical records of all patients with documented histological or radiographic disease recurrence within 1 year of stem cell transplantation while on immune suppression at our institution. The median time to relapse was 110 days (range, 18–311) after transplant. Among 123 patients with relapse treated with immune suppression tapering without chemotherapy, radiation, or donor lymphocyte infusion, 34 responded (33/101 reduced intensity conditioning transplant and 1/22 myeloablative conditioning transplant, 32.7% and 4.5% respectively; P=0.007). The median time to response after initiation of immune suppression tapering was 82 days (range, 16–189). Thirty-three patients (97.1%) had development or progression of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease as a consequence of immune suppression tapering, at a median time of 39 days (range, 16–98). Six patients subsequently relapsed late after initial response to immune suppression tapering at a median time of 2 years (range, 0.9–3.8). The median overall survival from immune suppression tapering for responders was 5.1 years (range, 1.9-not estimable). When clinically feasible, immune suppression tapering alone in patients who relapse early after reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation can produce durable remissions, but is almost always associated with graft-versus-host disease. PMID:26088931

  15. Appearance normalization of histology slides.

    PubMed

    Vicory, Jared; Couture, Heather D; Thomas, Nancy E; Borland, David; Marron, J S; Woosley, John; Niethammer, Marc

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the plane estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearance across slides and is effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols and counteracting slide fading. The approach is validated against non-prior plane-fitting using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. Results of application of the method to adjustment of faded slides are given, and the effectiveness of the method in aiding statistical classification is shown. PMID:25863518

  16. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  17. The School Counselor's Role in Relapse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gary L.; Harrison, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that most individuals who receive treatment for alcohol or other drug problems fail to maintain abstinence. Sees it as essential that school counselors be aware of relapse prevention strategies and use these strategies proactively when adolescents complete treatment. Discusses strategies, adapted from work using cognitive-behavioral…

  18. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  19. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemia causing relapsing altered mental status

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwada, Binod; Holbrook, Christopher; Ekeh, Ifeoma Sylvia; Uzoka, Chukwuemeka; Ikwu, Isaac; Upadhyay, Bishwas

    2015-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a recognized cause of encephalopathy. However, it is commonly seen in patients with liver disease. The clinical entity of noncirrhotic hyperammonemia is now being increasingly recognized. We report a man who presented to our hospital with relapsing altered mental status later diagnosed as noncirrhotic hyperammonemia. PMID:26424945

  20. Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's Research supports immediate drug treatment after bowel surgery for ... Crohn's disease patients will have relapses after bowel surgery, new research suggests. The study included 240 Crohn's disease patients ...

  1. Hypopyon uveitis (without scleritis) a manifestation symptom of relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Calenda, E; Nasser, Z; Benzerroug, M; Gardea, E; Muraine, M

    2009-01-01

    We report an atypical ocular symptom, hypopyon uveitis without scleritis encountered in relapsing polychondritis. Relapsing polychondritis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sterile hypopyon uveitis. PMID:20214060

  2. [Explanation and forecast: relapse of juvenile offenders].

    PubMed

    Giebel, S M

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of n=82 juvenile offenders from a prison for juvenile offenders in Rheinland Pfalz the model of the logistic regression is compared with a procedure from the family of the neural nets in its efficiency to explain and predict "relapse" in form of a renewed imprisonment or prosecution /police search after dismissal. The group which can be examined is limited by the population of the prison for juvenile offenders and the explaining variables for "relapse" as "addicted to drugs" present non-metric scaling. For the explanation only probabilities for "relapse" can be indicated in this connection. By means of this probability it is possible to classify the individual case. The forecast is simulated by coincidental dividing of the data: the first part of the data is used for the explanation, the second for the forecast. With the comparison of the logistic regression with the neural nets, the superiority of neural nets in the explanation of "relapse" can be shown, since the neural nets are able to consider dependence between the explaining variables and according to that they offer a differentiated explanation. Their efficiency to predict "relapse" depends on the comparability of the distribution in the two coincidentally provided samples, the training data record for determining the explanation and the test case for the use of the explanation regarding the forecast. For optimal explanation and forecast neural nets are to be preferred to the logistic regression, since in the model with the better explanation also includes the potential for a usable better forecast. Moreover the model of the logistic regression is in fact a special case of the neural net, with a reduced complexity of the net. PMID:17124800

  3. Dimethyl fumarate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: rationale, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Duvyanshu; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans P; Hemmer, Bernhard; Warnke, Clemens; Menge, Til; Miller-Little, William A; Stuve, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a fumaric acid ester, is a new orally available disease-modifying agent that was recently approved by the US FDA and the EMA for the management of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fumaric acid has been used for the management of psoriasis, for more than 50 years. Because of the known anti-inflammatory properties of fumaric acid ester, DMF was brought into clinical development in MS. More recently, neuroprotective and myelin-protective mechanism actions have been proposed, making it a possible candidate for MS treatment. Two Phase III clinical trials (DEFINE, CONFIRM) have evaluated the safety and efficacy of DMF in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Being an orally available agent with a favorable safety profile, it has become one of the most commonly prescribed disease-modifying agents in the USA and Europe. PMID:25800129

  4. The Role of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus; Kazantsev, Ilya; Zabelina, Tatjana; Ayuk, Francis; Zander, Axel Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Despite the favorable prognosis of most patients with Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL), 15–20% of patients remain refractory to chemoradiotherapy, and 20–40% experience relapses following autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) being used as salvage approach in this situation. Long-term survival of only 20% was reported for patients who failed this option. As some authors suggested the presence of a graft versus HL effect, allogeneic SCT was introduced as a further option. Myeloablative strategies were reported to be able to achieve cure in some younger patients, but high nonrelapse mortality remains a problem. Reduced intensity conditioning, in turn, was found to be associated with high posttransplant relapse rates. As there is currently no standard in the management of HL patients who failed autologous SCT, we here review the literature on allogeneic stem cell transplantation in HL patients with a special focus on the outcomes and risk factors being reported in the largest studies. PMID:20981158

  5. [Relapse of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in a patient treated with artesunate].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Delaunay, P; Del Giudice, P; Counillon, E

    2006-05-01

    Chemoprophylaxis and the curative treatment of malaria are well documented in France. Nevertheless this data is still not accounted for by healthcare professionals and in the global population, and no longer approved treatments may be prescribed. The authors report the case of a 24-year-old female traveler having stayed in Africa where she was used to treat fever with artesunate. Soon after her return, she presented with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria once again treated with artesunate. The evolution was initially favorable but a relapse occurred 3 weeks later. A conventional mefloquine treatment lead to a final cure. This observation confirms that artesunate monotherapy in malaria exposes to a risk of relapse. Artesunate should not be used as monotherapy in P. falciparum malaria. PMID:16697545

  6. Antipsychotic withdrawal-induced relapse predicts future relapses in institutionalized adults with severe intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, David S; Barnhill, L Jarrett; Khalid, Abdul S; Davis, John M

    2008-08-01

    Severe intellectual and developmental disabilities are frequently associated with aggression toward self and others, destruction of property, and disruption. Antipsychotic medications are a mainstay of treatment of such behaviors. National and state guidelines suggest stopping these medications or decreasing their dosages when possible if patients have maintained stability. The current study evaluated the likelihood of future antipsychotic drug withdrawal-induced relapses in those individuals where such a relapse had occurred previously. Subjects were 57 institutionalized adults with severe or profound intellectual disability. Between 1990 and 2000, each had experienced an initial activation of maladaptive aggressive behaviors after an attempt at antipsychotic drug withdrawal and/or termination. Quarterly behavioral reports were evaluated to determine whether subsequent antipsychotic drug withdrawal attempts were also associated with future relapses. Initial relapse was followed by subsequent antipsychotic drug withdrawal attempts in 49 of the 57 individuals. Between 1990 and 2005, 28.6% of these 49 subjects had experienced 1, 38.7% had 2, 20.4% had 3, and 8.2% had 4 additional relapses. Two (4.1%) had not relapsed. Eight individuals remained on antipsychotic agents without a subsequent withdrawal attempt. By the end of 2005, only 4 (7%) of the 57 individuals had become antipsychotic drug free, 22.8% were receiving first-generation antipsychotic agents alone, 45.6% were receiving second-generation antipsychotic agents alone, and 24.6% were receiving a combination of first- and second-generation antipsychotic agents. Thus, if relapse occurs after an antipsychotic drug withdrawal attempt, subsequent attempts at withdrawal are also very likely to lead to further relapses. PMID:18626266

  7. Chinese youth favor one-child families.

    PubMed

    Yu, P

    1995-04-01

    with parents about having children or received information from parents about sexuality. 62% knew almost nothing about family planning. Only 16% of 12th grade students knew three or more methods. Sexual practices were not surveyed. More formally educated students and students with a modern outlook were most likely to have greater knowledge of sexual matters. The population education curriculum favored social aspects over reproductive content. PMID:12319246

  8. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  9. The role of neuroadaptations in relapse to drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2005-11-01

    One of the most difficult problems in treating addiction is not withdrawing addicts from drugs, but preventing relapse. Persistent neuroadaptations are thought to underlie aspects of addiction, including relapse. This commentary assesses the degree to which these neuroadaptations, primarily identified in preclinical studies on cocaine, induce relapse. PMID:16251983

  10. Relapse Prevention Model of Behavioral Maintenance: Implications for Alcohol Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Colley, Mary; Cinelli, Bethann

    1992-01-01

    Describes Relapse Prevention as therapeutic modality, based on Social Learning Theory, used to prevent relapse for individuals who have completed treatment for substance abuse behaviors. Outlines relapse prevention theory and suggests various components of model be incorporated into alcohol education curricula. Outlines teaching strategies to…

  11. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  12. Histological aspects of cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, M; Shimizu, T; Sasai, Y

    1976-02-01

    There is a close relationship between the rate of the uterine cervix opening during parturition and the presence or absence of a completely ripened cervix. In order to learn the basic pattern of the ripening of cervix, histological and histochemical studies were performed on the human uterine cervix during pregnancy. It was noted that the collagen bundles disintegrated into fine fibers and also underwent quantitative changes during the ripening process of the cervix. During pregnancy, the number of connective tissue cells was increased, but that of mast cells was decreased. Acid mucopolysaccharides in the cervical ground substance were found to increase in late pregnancy. PMID:136067

  13. 22 CFR 1203.735-305 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-305....735-305 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a..., gratuity, loan, entertainment, or favor for the employee or another person, particularly one with whom...

  14. Tickborne Relapsing Fever, Bitterroot Valley, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua; Fischer, Robert J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In July 2013, a resident of the Bitterroot Valley in western Montana, USA, contracted tickborne relapsing fever caused by an infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. The patient’s travel history and activities before onset of illness indicated a possible exposure on his residential property on the eastern side of the valley. An onsite investigation of the potential exposure site found the vector, Ornithodoros hermsi ticks, and 1 chipmunk infected with spirochetes, which on the basis of multilocus sequence typing were identical to the spirochete isolated from the patient. Field studies in other locations found additional serologic evidence and an infected tick that demonstrated a wider distribution of spirochetes circulating among the small mammal populations. Our study demonstrates that this area of Montana represents a previously unrecognized focus of relapsing fever and poses a risk for persons of acquiring this tickborne disease. PMID:25625502

  15. Histology of the first fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.P.; Sansom, I.J.; Repetski, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    THE first description of Anatolepis Bockelie & Fortey was from early Ordovician sediments of Ny Friesland, Spitsbergen1,2, but the genus is now known from many localities in North America and Greenland, ranging in age from the Late Cambrian period to the Early Ordovician3-6. Although initially interpreted as an agnathan fish2,3 that predated other representatives7, this has been widely disputed because the available histological data were unconvincing6,8-10 and the scales fell outside the known morphological range of other accepted early vertebrates9-11. Further doubt was cast upon the vertebrate affinity of Anatolepis when specimens from East Greenland were interpreted as the cuticular fragments of aglaspid arthropods6, although this interpretation has also been refuted12. Here we report on the morphology and histology of large collections of Anatolepis, and demonstrate the presence of dentine, a tissue unique to vertebrates, confirming that the taxon is both a vertebrate and the oldest known fish.

  16. Craving and relapse measurement in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, A S; Deckers, F; Geerlings, P

    1999-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the measurement of craving with four different craving instruments and to relate this to definitions and measurement of relapse. The definitions of relapse may vary between studies and researchers, but are usually well defined. Five commonly used methods to measure relapse are: (1) quantity/frequency of drinking; (2) cumulative duration of abstinence (CDA); (3) post-withdrawal abstinent period; (4) stable recovery period; (5) the time line follow-back method. The definition of craving is much less clear and is mostly described as an emotional-motivational state or as obsessive-compulsive behaviour. Four self-rating instruments are briefly discussed and compared: the Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale, OCDS, the Lübeck Craving Scale, LCRR, the Alcohol Craving Questionnaire, ACQ-Now-SF-R, and ordinal scales (e.g. visual analogue, Likert, or verbal descriptive scales). These instruments measure different aspects or dimensions of craving over different periods. The different dimensions measured suggest that there is still a need to conceptualize a standard interpretation of the word craving. There is a need also to measure an emotional-motivational dimension, a cognitive-behavioural dimension, expectancies, and effects on positive and negative reinforcement with different instruments or with one multidimensional instrument. It is suggested that different patients are expected to have different craving profiles. PMID:10344785

  17. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analogue approved in pediatric leukemia, has shown activity in adult acute leukemias including ALL and acute myeloid leukemia. The role of pegaspargase in adult ALL requires further investigation. The benefit of matched related-donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation is significant for standard-risk ALL but not for high-risk ALL. Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL. PMID:20425428

  18. Treatment of relapsed and refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    von Tresckow, Bastian; Moskowitz, Craig H

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high first-line cure rates in patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) still 10%-20% of patients suffer from relapsed or refractory disease. High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is standard of care for suitable patients with relapsed or refractory HL and allows for cure in approximately 50%. Due to the poor prognosis of high-risk patients even with HDCT and ASCT, consolidation strategies have been evaluated to improve the cure rates. For patients with recurrence after HDCT and ASCT, treatment is palliative in most cases. The anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin (BV) has been shown to induce high response rates in these patients; however, durable responses were reported in a small percentage of patients only. For carefully selected patients with multiple relapses, dose-reduced allogeneic transplant (RICallo) is a potentially curative option. The role of RICallo will have to be re-evaluated in the era of anti-programmed death-1 (PD1) antibodies. PMID:27496309

  19. A Case of Relapsing-Remitting Neuroborreliosis? Challenges in the Differential Diagnosis of Recurrent Myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, P.; Henke, N.; Lehmann, H.C.; Macht, S.; Hefter, H.; Goebels, N.; Mackenzie, C.; Rupprecht, T.A.; Fingerle, V.; Hartung, H.P.; Methner, A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with 4 episodes of myelitis with pleocytosis, a positive Borrelia burgdorferi serology with positive antibody indices, and full recovery each time after antibiotic and steroid treatment, suggesting neuroborreliosis. We nevertheless believe that recurrent neuroborreliosis is improbable based on the levels of the chemokine CXCL13 in cerebrospinal fluid and favor the diagnosis of post-infectious autoimmune-mediated transverse myelitis possibly triggered by an initial neuroborreliosis as the cause of the relapses observed in our patient. We demonstrate the diagnostic steps and procedures which were important in the differential diagnosis of this unusual and challenging case. PMID:22649342

  20. Predictors of Relapse and Dropout During a 12-Week Relapse Prevention Program for Methamphetamine Users.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chih; Chen, Chih-Ken; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the possible neuropsychological predictors of relapse and dropout of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Participants were 42 MA users sentenced by the judicial system to take part in an out-patient relapse prevention program for MA abuse and dependence that employs a CBT model once a week over the course of 12 weeks. Baseline neuropsychological functions were evaluated with the Conners' Continuous Performance Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Iowa Gambling Task, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. All participants had to submit to urine drug tests every week. Of the 42 participants, 69.0% had a MA positive urine screening result at least once throughout the program (relapse), while 40.5% dropped out of the treatment program prior to its completion. Short duration of MA abstinence at baseline and poor attention predicted relapse. Predictors of dropout included being unmarried and having risky decision making. Findings may be helpful for clinicians, who can screen for the aforementioned risk factors and provide strategies for high-risk patients to help prevent relapse and dropout among MA users in treatment programs. PMID:26267045

  1. Association between prolonged neutropenia and reduced relapse risk in pediatric AML: A report from the children's oncology group.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Meshinchi, Soheil; Gamis, Alan S

    2016-11-01

    Objective was to describe the relationship between the number of sterile site infections and duration of neutropenia during the first four cycles of chemotherapy and the risk of recurrence and overall survival in children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AAML0531 was a Children's Oncology Group randomized phase 3 clinical trial that included 1022 children with de novo AML. For this analysis, we focused on non-Down syndrome favorable and standard risk patients who completed at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy without recurrence or withdrawal during protocol therapy. Those receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission were excluded. Five hundred and sixty-nine patients were included; 274 (48.2%) were favorable risk. The median cumulative time with neutropenia between Induction II to completion of Intensification II was 96 (range 54-204) days. Number of sterile site infections did not influence the risk of relapse or overall survival. However, longer duration of neutropenia was associated with a lower risk of relapse (hazard ratio 0.81 per 20 days neutropenia, p = 0.007). Longer duration of neutropenia was associated with a reduced risk of relapse for children with favorable and standard risk AML. Toxicity may be influenced by pharmacogenomics suggesting that individualized chemotherapy dosing may be an effective strategy. PMID:27312107

  2. Are Early Relapses in Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer Doomed to a Poor Prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Fabien; Guerby, Paul; Luyckx, Mathieu; Haddad, Pascale; Stoeckle, Eberhard; Morice, Philippe; Leblanc, Eric; Lecuru, Fabrice; Daraï, Emile; Classe, Jean Marc; Pomel, Christophe; Filleron, Thomas; Ferron, Gwenael; Querleu, Denis; Rafii, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early recurrence (ER) after completion of therapeutic regimen in advanced-stage ovarian cancer is a challenging clinical situation. Patients are perceived as invariably having a poor prognosis. We investigated the possibility of defining different prognostic subgroups and the parameters implicated in prognosis of ER patients. Study Design We analyzed a multi-centric database of 527 FIGO stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer patients. We defined patients relapsing within 12 months as ER and investigated using Cox logistic regression the prognostic factors in ER group. We subsequently divided ER patients into good and poor prognosis groups according to a lower or higher overall survival (OS) at 12 months after relapse and determined parameters associated to poor prognosis. Results The median follow up was 49 months. One hundred and thirty eight patients recurred within 12 months. OS and Disease Free Survival (DFS) were 24.6 and 8.6 months, respectively, in this group of patients. Among the ER patients, 73 had a poor prognosis with an OS after relapse below 12 months (mean OS = 5.2 months) and 65 survived after one year (mean OS = 26.9 months). Residual disease (RD) after debulking surgery and mucinous histological subtype negatively impacted prognosis (HR = 1.758, p = 0.017 and HR = 8.641, p = 0.001 respectively). The relative risk of death within 12 months following relapse in ER patients was 1.61 according to RD status. However, RD did not affect DFS (HR = 0.889, p = 0.5). Conclusion ER in advanced-stage ovarian cancer does not inevitably portend a short-term poor prognosis. RD status after initial cytoreduction strongly modulates OS, that gives additional support to the concept of maximum surgical effort even in patients who will experience early recurrence. The heterogeneity in outcomes within the ER group suggests a role for tumor biology in addition to classical clinical parameters. PMID:26820579

  3. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. PMID:25997994

  4. New Findings on Biological Factors Predicting Addiction Relapse Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Relapse is a highly prevalent phenomenon in addiction. This paper examines the new research on identifying biological factors that contribute to addiction relapse risk. Prospective studies examining relapse risk are reviewed, and clinical, biological, and neural factors that predict relapse risk are identified. Clinical factors, patient-related factors, and subjective and behavioral measures such as depressive symptoms, stress, and drug craving all predict future relapse risk. Among biological measures, endocrine measures such as cortisol and cortisol/corticotropin (ACTH) ratio as a measure of adrenal sensitivity and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also predictive of future relapse risk. Among neural measures, brain atrophy in the medial frontal regions and hyperreactivity of the anterior cingulate during withdrawal were identified as important in drug withdrawal and relapse risk. Caveats pertaining to specific drug abuse type and phase of addiction are discussed. Finally, significant implications of these findings for clinical practice are presented, with a specific focus on determining biological markers of relapse risk that may be used to identify those individuals who are most at risk of relapse in the clinic. Such markers may then be used to assess treatment response and develop specific treatments that will normalize these neural and biological sequelae so as to significantly improve relapse outcomes. PMID:21792580

  5. Does internet-based prevention reduce the risk of relapse for anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Fichter, Manfred M; Quadflieg, Norbert; Nisslmüller, Kerstin; Lindner, Susanne; Osen, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Wünsch-Leiteritz, Wally

    2012-03-01

    Technological advancements allow new approaches to psychotherapy via electronic media. The eating disorder literature currently contains no studies on internet intervention in anorexia nervosa (AN). This study presents a RCT on an internet-based relapse prevention program (RP) over nine months after inpatient treatment for AN. The sample comprised 258 women, randomized to the RP or treatment as usual (TAU). Expert- and self-ratings were evaluated by intent-to-treat analyses. Concerning age, age at onset and comorbidity, both groups were comparable at randomization. During the RP, the intervention group gained weight while the TAU group had minimal weight loss. RP completers gained significantly more body weight than patients in the TAU condition. Group-by-time comparisons for eating-related cognitions and behaviors and general psychopathology showed a significantly more favorable course in the RP program for "sexual anxieties" and "bulimic symptoms" (interview), and "maturity fears" and "social insecurity" (EDI-2). General psychopathology showed no significant group-by-time interaction. Important factors for successful relapse prevention were adherence to the intervention protocol and increased spontaneity. Considering the unfavorable course and chronicity of anorexia nervosa (AN), internet-based relapse prevention in AN following inpatient treatment appears a promising approach. Future internet-based programs may be further improved and enhanced. PMID:22317754

  6. Recent developments in animal models of drug relapse.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Nathan J; Li, Xuan; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-08-01

    Drug craving and relapse to drug use during abstinence are defining features of addiction. Evidence indicates that drug craving and relapse in humans are often provoked by acute exposure to the self-administered drug, drug-associated cues, or stress. During the last two decades, this clinical scenario has been primarily studied at the preclinical level using the classical reinstatement model. However, a single preclinical model cannot capture the complicated nature of human drug relapse. Therefore, more recently, we and others have developed several other models to study different facets of human drug relapse. In this review, we introduce and discuss recent findings from these other relapse models, including incubation of drug craving, reacquisition and resurgence models, and punishment-based and conflict-based relapse models. PMID:23374536

  7. The Alcohol Relapse Situation Appraisal Questionnaire: Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rosemarie A.; MacKinnon, Selene M.; Johnson, Jennifer E.; Myers, Mark G.; Cook, Travis A. R.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of cognitive appraisal of the threat of alcohol relapse has received little attention. A previous instrument, the Relapse Situation Appraisal Questionnaire (RSAQ), was developed to assess cocaine users’ primary appraisal of the threat of situations posing a high risk for cocaine relapse. The purpose of the present study was to modify the RSAQ in order to measure primary appraisal in situations involving a high risk for alcohol relapse. Methods The development and psychometric properties of this instrument, the Alcohol Relapse Situation Appraisal Questionnaire (A-RSAQ), were examined with two samples of abstinent adults with alcohol abuse or dependence. Factor structure and validity were examined in Study 1 (N=104). Confirmation of the factor structure and predictive validity were assessed in Study 2 (N=161). Results Results demonstrated construct, discriminant and predictive validity and reliability of the A-RSAQ. Discussion Results support the important role of primary appraisal of degree of risk in alcohol relapse situations. PMID:21237586

  8. Relapsing Fever Borreliae: A Global Review.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Sally J

    2015-12-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae were notorious and feared infectious agents that earned their place in history through their devastating impact as causes of both epidemic and endemic infection. They are now considered more as an oddity, and their burden of infection is largely overshadowed by other infections such as malaria, which presents in a similar clinical way. Despite this, they remain the most common bacterial infection in some developing countries. Transmitted by soft ticks or lice, these fascinating spirochetes have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to survive within their diverse environments. PMID:26593261

  9. Callosal Disconnection Syndrome Associated with Relapsing Polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toru; Kanno, Shigenori; Shijo, Tomomi; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Osamu; Kamimura, Naoto; Ishii, Tomonori; Mori, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the cartilagenous structures, and it sometimes involves the central nervous system. Encephalitis associated with RP causes a wide variety of symptoms according to the affected sites. We herein report the first case of 72-year-old right-handed man who developed acute meningoencephalitis associated with RP involving the corpus callous. After immunosuppressive therapy, his symptoms dramatically improved, but difficulty in performing bimanual movements with occasional diagonistic dyspraxia in his right hand remained. Because callosal signs are easily missed, especially in acute settings, it would be useful to know that RP can sometimes cause callosal disconnection syndrome. PMID:27150878

  10. [Sporadic recurrent hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Clinical-histological contributions on differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, G; Regli, F

    1976-01-01

    The authors report about an own case of recurrent sporadic hypertrophic polyneuropathy and describe the clinical course and histologic picture with reference to the literature. The disease is characterized by recurrences of subacutely occurring polyradiculoneuropathy and sequent nearly complete remission. Clinical examination discloses preferentially symmetrically and distally occurring motor paresis while sensibility in most cases is less affected. The peripheral nerves may be enlarged after a few relapses and frequently painful to pressure during the bout. Excessive increase in CSF proteins is found only during the bout. Motor nerve conduction velocity is considerably reduced. Histological pictures typically present an onion bulb formation of the Schwann cells with marked proliferation of connective tissue. There frequently younger individuals are involved; the relation female to male is 3:1. Differentiation has to be made concerning hereditary and symptomatic forms of hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Etiological factors of the disease are discussed. PMID:185690

  11. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  12. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  13. Understanding Recovery Barriers: Youth Perceptions About Substance Use Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Rachel; Anglin, M. Douglas; Beattie, Rebecca; Ong, Chris Angelo; Glik, Deborah C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To qualitatively explore how treatment-involved youth retrospectively contextualize relapse from substance use. Methods Fourteen focus groups were conducted with 118 youth (78.3% male; 66.1% Latino) enrolled in participating substance abuse treatment programs (4 young adult and 10 adolescent) throughout Los Angeles County. Transcripts were analyzed for relapse perception themes. Results Dominant relapse themes include emotional reasons (90%), life stressors (85%), cognitive factors (75%), socialization processes (65%), and environmental issues (55%). Conclusions Youth perceptions about relapse during treatment should be used to better inform clinical approaches and shape early-intervention recovery agendas for substance-abusing youth. PMID:22584088

  14. Relapsing and refractory ulcerative colitis in children.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the children with ulcerative colitis (UC) have refractory, relapsing or steroid-dependent disease. UC in children is more extensive than in adults, presents more often with severe attacks and carries a more aggressive disease course. Therefore, although a step-up approach is usually recommended in UC, aggressive therapy will often be indicated in children since steroid dependency should never be tolerated. It is vital to ensure that in every resistant case, the symptoms are truly related to the inflammatory disease activity and not to other conditions such as poor adherence to treatment, infections, adverse reactions to drugs, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, celiac disease and bacterial overgrowth. The clinician should be ready to escalate therapy in a timely manner but only after ensuring optimization of current treatments. Optimization may include, among others, appropriate dosage, utilization of assays that determine thiopurine, calcineurin inhibitors and anti-tumor necrosis factor levels, introduction of combination therapy when indicated (enemas and immunomodulators) and a long enough time for treatment to become effective. Colectomy is always a valid option and should be discussed before major treatment escalations. Experimental therapies can be considered when all else fails and the family prefers to avoid colectomy. The management of refractory and relapsing disease is particularly challenging in children, and this review summarizes the available evidence to guide treatment decisions in this setup. PMID:24969290

  15. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment....303 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section a..., entertainment, or favor for himself or another person, particularly one with whom he has family, business,...

  16. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 905.735-202 Section 905.735-202 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 905.735-202 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. Pursuant to...

  17. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., entertainment, and favors. Pursuant to paragraph (b) of 5 CFR 735.202, the following exceptions to the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 905.735-202 Section 905.735-202 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA...

  18. 12 CFR 560.110 - Most favored lender usury preemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Most favored lender usury preemption. 560.110 Section 560.110 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LENDING AND INVESTMENT Lending and Investment Provisions Applicable to all Savings Associations § 560.110 Most favored lender usury preemption. (a)...

  19. 18 CFR 706.202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.202 Section 706.202 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 706.202 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) Except as provided...

  20. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-202 Section 1203.735-202 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 1203.735-202 Gifts, entertainment, and favors....

  1. Patterns of nodal relapse after surgery and postoperative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the major and minor salivary glands: What is the role of elective neck irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Bucci, M. Kara; Eisele, David W.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of nodal relapses from carcinomas of the salivary glands among patients with clinically negative necks in an attempt to determine the potential utility of elective neck irradiation (ENI). Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 251 patients with clinically N0 carcinomas of the salivary glands were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. None of the patients had undergone previous neck dissection. Histology was: adenoid cystic (84 patients), mucoepidermoid (60 patients), adenocarcinoma (58 patients), acinic cell (21 patients), undifferentiated (11 patients), carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (7 patients), squamous cell (7 patients), and salivary duct carcinoma (3 patients); 131 patients (52%) had ENI. Median follow-up was 62 months (range, 3-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year actuarial estimates of nodal relapse were 11% and 13%, respectively. The 10-year actuarial rates of nodal failure were 7%, 5%, 12%, and 16%, for patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.11). The use of ENI reduced the 10-year nodal failure rate from 26% to 0% (p = 0.0001). The highest crude rates of nodal relapse among those treated without ENI were found in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (67%), undifferentiated carcinoma (50%), adenocarcinoma (34%), and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (29%). There were no nodal failures observed among patients with adenoid cystic or acinic cell histology. Conclusion: ENI effectively prevents nodal relapses and should be used for select patients at high risk for regional failure.

  2. Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Relapse in Ewing Sarcoma Patients Treated With Chemotherapy and R0 Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Hubert Y.; Morani, Ajaykumar; Wang, Wei-Lien; Hess, Kenneth R.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Lin, Patrick P.; Daw, Najat C.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors and patterns of relapse for patients with Ewing sarcoma who underwent chemotherapy and R0 resection without radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent surgical resection at our institution between 2000 and 2013 for an initial diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma. The associations of demographic and clinical factors with local control (LC) and patient outcome were determined by Cox regression. Time to events was measured from the time of surgery. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log-rank test. Results: A total of 66 patients (median age 19 years, range 4-55 years) met the study criteria. The median follow-up was 5.6 years for living patients. In 43 patients (65%) for whom imaging studies were available, the median tumor volume reduction was 73%, and at least partial response by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors was achieved in 17 patients (40%). At 5 years, LC was 78%, progression-free survival (PFS) was 59%, and overall survival (OS) was 65%. Poor histologic response (necrosis ≤95%) was an independent predictor of LC (hazard ratio [HR] 6.8, P=.004), PFS (HR 5.2, P=.008), and OS (HR 5.0, P=.008). Metastasis on presentation was also an independent predictor of LC (HR 6.3, P=.011), PFS (HR 6.8, P=.002), and OS (HR 6.7, P=.002). Radiologic partial response was a predictor of PFS (HR 0.26, P=.012), and postchemotherapy tumor volume was associated with OS (HR 1.06, P=.015). All deaths were preceded by distant relapse. Of the 8 initial local-only relapses, 5 (63%) were soon followed by distant relapse. Predictors of poor postrecurrence survival were time to recurrence <1 year (HR 11.5, P=.002) and simultaneous local and distant relapse (HR 16.8, P=.001). Conclusions: Histologic and radiologic response to chemotherapy were independent predictors of outcome. Additional study is needed to determine the role of adjuvant

  3. Comparative histology of pineal calcification.

    PubMed

    Vígh, B; Szél, A; Debreceni, K; Fejér, Z; Manzano e Silva, M J; Vígh-Teichmann, I

    1998-07-01

    The pineal organ (pineal gland, epiphysis cerebri) contains several calcified concretions called "brain sand" or acervuli (corpora arenacea). These concretions are conspicuous with imaging techniques and provide a useful landmark for orientation in the diagnosis of intracranial diseases. Predominantly composed of calcium and magnesium salts, corpora arenacea are numerous in old patients. In smaller number they can be present in children as well. The degree of calcification was associated to various diseases. However, the presence of calcified concretions seems not to reflect a specific pathological state. Corpora arenacea occur not only in the actual pineal tissue but also in the leptomeninges, in the habenular commissure and in the choroid plexus. Studies with the potassium pyroantimonate (PPA) method on the ultrastructural localization of free calcium ions in the human pineal, revealed the presence of calcium alongside the cell membranes, a finding that underlines the importance of membrane functions in the production of calcium deposits. Intrapineal corpora arenacea are characterized by a surface with globular structures. Meningeal acervuli that are present in the arachnoid cover of the organ, differ in structure from intrapineal ones and show a prominent concentric lamination of alternating dark and light lines. The electron-lucent lines contain more calcium than the dark ones. There is a correlation between the age of the subject and the number of layers in the largest acervuli. This suggests that the formation of these layers is connected to circannual changes in the calcium level of the organ. The histological organization of the human pineal is basically the same as that of mammalian experimental animals. Pineal concretions present in mammalian animal species are mainly of the meningeal type. Meningeal cells around acervuli contain active cytoplasmic organelles and exhibit alkaline phosphatase reaction in the rat and mink, an indication of a presumable

  4. Comparative Histology of Plasma Treated Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Kyle

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric plasmas applied in surgical settings have unique characteristics found in histological results from animal tissue studies. This is evident in both ex vivo bench tissue tests and in vivo fresh tissue. Examples of these histological features are presented as results of a comparative study between plasma treated, common medical argon coagulation, and electrosurgery.

  5. High dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cells transplantation in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphomas preliminary reports.

    PubMed

    Chang, C S; Lin, S F; Huang, S M; Liu, T C; Chen, T P; Yeh, C J

    1997-03-01

    High dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (PBSCT) has been used worldwide in the treatment of patients with various hematological malignancies and other solid tumors. It has just come into use as a salvage therapy in various malignancies in Taiwan in recent years. We report eight cases with relapsed or refractory lymphoma treated with high dose chemotherapy and PBSCT. Our results showed all cases but one achieved complete remission. The mean days of white cell recovery were 10 days to > 500/microliter (ranges, 8-16 days) and 12 days to > 1,000/microliter (ranges, 9-19 days). The mean days to platelet transfusion independent, i.e. platelet > 20,000/microliters, was 14 days. No specific side effect was noted except death in one case on D+9 during cytopenia state. Four patients relapsed and died during the follow-up after PBSCT. From our preliminary results we suggest that high dose chemotherapy with PBSCT could be used as a salvage therapy in patients with relapsed or refractory lymphomas with favorable and sustained hematological recovery. Most cases were tolerable with myeloablative chemotherapy and re-achieved remission, however, remission duration was still short and relapse remained the main problem to be overcome. The long term effects of high dose chemotherapy with PBSCT still need further study. PMID:9109301

  6. Why Koreans are More Likely to Favor "Apology," While Americans are More Likely to Favor "Thank You"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hye Eun; Park, Hee Sun

    2011-01-01

    Two studies investigated whether apologies or thanks are preferred in asking favors in the United States and Korea, and how this relates to perceptions of reduction in positive and negative face threats. In the first study (n = 224), participants composed an e-mail message where a favor was asked. In the second (n = 807), participants completed…

  7. Reproducibility of histologic classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Palli, D.; Bianchi, S.; Cipriani, F.; Duca, P.; Amorosi, A.; Avellini, C.; Russo, A.; Saragoni, A.; Todde, P.; Valdes, E.

    1991-01-01

    A panel review of histologic specimens was carried out as part of a multi-centre case-control study of gastric cancer (GC) and diet. Comparisons of diagnoses of 100 GCs by six pathologists revealed agreement in histologic classification for about 70-80% of the cancers. Concordance was somewhat higher when using the Lauren rather than the Ming or World Health Organization classification systems. Histologic types from reading biopsy tissue agreed with those derived from surgical specimens for 65-75% of the 100 tumours. Intra-observer agreement in histologic classification, assessed by repeat readings up to 3 years apart by one pathologist, was 95%. The findings indicate that, although overall concordance was good, it is important to standardise diagnoses in multi-centre epidemiologic studies of GC by histologic type. PMID:2039701

  8. Effective topical delivery systems for corticosteroids: dermatological and histological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, İpek; Azizoğlu, Erkan; Özyazıcı, Mine; Nenni, Merve; Gürer Orhan, Hande; Özbal, Seda; Tekmen, Işıl; Ertam, İlgen; Ünal, İdil; Özer, Özgen

    2016-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic and relapsing skin disease with severe eczematous lesions. Long-term topical corticosteroid treatment can induce skin atrophy, hypopigmentation and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increase. A new treatment approach was needed to reduce the risk by dermal targeting. For this purpose, Betamethasone valerate (BMV)/Diflucortolone valerate (DFV)-loaded liposomes (220-350 nm) were prepared and incorporated into chitosan gel to obtain adequate viscosity (∼13 000 cps). Drugs were localized in stratum corneum + epidermis of rat skin in ex-vivo permeation studies. The toxicity was assessed on human fibroblast cells. In point of in-vivo studies, pharmacodynamic responses, treatment efficacy and skin irritation were evaluated and compared with previously prepared nanoparticles. Liposome/nanoparticle in gel formulations produced higher paw edema inhibition in rats with respect to the commercial cream. Similar skin blanching effect with commercial creams was obtained via liposome in gels although they contain 10 times less drug. Dermatological scoring results, prognostic histological parameters and suppression of mast cell numbers showed higher treatment efficiency of liposome/nanoparticle in gel formulations in AD-induced rats. TEWL and erythema measurements confirmed these results. Overview of obtained results showed that liposomes might be an effective and safe carrier for corticosteroids in skin disease treatment. PMID:25259424

  9. Impact of Life Events on the Relapse of Schizophrenic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Hassan Ali; Jacoob, Shirooq; Sharour, Loai Abu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between stressful life events at the time of relapse in schizophrenic patients at psychiatric hospitals in Baghdad city. Methodology: A purposive (non-probability) sampling of 50 schizophrenic patients who have relapsed was involved in the present study. Data were collected through the use of the…

  10. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  11. Power2: Relapse Management with Adolescents Who Stutter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Gordon W.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for relapse management in adolescents who stutter. The package includes game-based training techniques in problem solving, communication skills, and assertiveness; coping responses for stuttering episodes; and realistic expectations for fluency and relapse. Follow-up results with…

  12. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  13. Relapse Prevention Needs More Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao," by Katie Witkiewitz and G.A. Marlatt. Stanton notes that the recent reconceptualization of relapse prevention by Witkiewitz and Marlatt enhances the model by "synthesizing recent empirical findings into a unified theory", but it does…

  14. Louseborne Relapsing Fever among East African Refugees, Italy, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lipani, Filippo; Costa, Cecilia; Scarvaglieri, Mariaelisabetta; Balbiano, Rosanna; Carosella, Sinibaldo; Calcagno, Andrea; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Dal Conte, Ivano; Caramello, Pietro; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    During June 9–September 30, 2015, five cases of louseborne relapsing fever were identified in Turin, Italy. All 5 cases were in young refugees from Somalia, 2 of whom had lived in Italy since 2011. Our report seems to confirm the possibility of local transmission of louse-borne relapsing fever. PMID:26812354

  15. Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors in a Dynamic Model of Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Relapse Prevention Needs More Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors" by Stanton which is a comment on the original article "Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao" by Katie Witkiewitz and G. Alan Marlatt. In the current comment the authors of the original article respond to…

  16. Effects of Nicotine Fading and Relapse Prevention on Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Conducted a pilot study which combined nicotine-fading and relapse prevention with smokers (N=30) and compared this program to conditions where subjects (N=46) received nicotine-fading or relapse prevention only. Results showed no difference among groups in abstinence or rate at any follow-up point. (LLL)

  17. Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Misdiagnosed as Relapsing Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Chatziralli, Irini P.; Kanonidou, Evgenia; Keryttopoulos, Petros; Papadopoulou, Dionyssia; Papazisis, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    A 59-year-old female patient presented at the outpatients’ Department of Ophthalmology with epiphora, eyelid swelling, and a foreign body feeling in the right eye. The symptoms were present for 4 months, and the patient was treated as suffering from relapsing conjunctivitis. The slit lamp examination revealed keratitis due to exposure, related with the deficient closure of the eyelids. There was a 2 mm difference in the readings with the Hertel exophthalmometry examination between the eyes. Her medical history was clear, and she was referred for computed tomography of the orbits and brain and biochemical examinations (FT3, FT4, and TSH) to investigate the presence of an intraorbital mass. FT3 was significantly increased and TSH was accordingly low, indicating the diagnosis of Graves’ disease, which presented without other signs and symptoms apart from ophthalmopathy. Computed tomography scan excluded the diagnosis of an intraorbital mass. Therefore, it is important not to underestimate the ocular manifestations of systemic diseases. PMID:21060773

  18. Relapsing Polychondritis: Inflamed Joints and Ears

    PubMed Central

    Melikoğlu, Meltem Alkan; Şenel, Kazım

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an episodic and progressive inflammatory disease of the cartilaginous structures, including elastic cartilage of the ear and nose, hyaline cartilage of the peripheral joints, fibrocartilage at axial sites, and cartilage of the tracheo-bronchial tree. The spectrum of its presentations may vary from intermittent mild episodes of chondritis to occasional organ involvement or even life-threatening manifestations. Case Report: We presented a 64 year-old male patient with bilaterally knee arthritis and discoloration of pinna. Conclusion: There is lack of awareness about this disease due to its rarity. With this case presentation, our goal was to draw attention to this disease, which could be delayed for the diagnosis. PMID:25759785

  19. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiologic mechanism of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor blockers, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic. PMID:27242697

  20. New pharmacological treatment strategies for relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer; Vengeliene, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss treatment strategies that are based on pharmacological interventions to reduce craving and relapse in alcohol-dependent patients. We will first provide a historical overview about relapse prevention strategies. We will then review the development of disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate, and nalmefene and discuss their neurobiological modes of action. Then the concept of convergent genomic analysis will be introduced for the discovery of new molecular treatment targets. Finally, we will provide convincing evidence for the use of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blockers as substitution drugs. Important conclusions of this review are: (i) learning from other addictive substances is very helpful-e.g., substitution therapies as applied to opiate addiction for decades could also be translated to alcoholics, (ii) the glutamate theory of alcohol addiction provides a convincing framework for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists as substitution drugs for alcohol-dependent patients, (iii) a combination of behavioral and pharmacological therapies may be the optimal approach for future treatment strategies-one promising example concerns the pharmacological disruption of reconsolidation processes of alcohol cue memories, (iv) given that many neurotransmitter systems are affected by chronic alcohol consumption, numerous druggable targets have been identified; consequently, a "cocktail" of different compounds will further improve the treatment situation, (v) in silico psychopharmacology, such as drug repurposing will yield new medications, and finally, (vi) the whole organism has to be taken into consideration to provide the best therapy for our patients. In summary, there is no other field in psychiatric research that has, in recent years, yielded so many novel, druggable targets and innovative treatment strategies than for alcohol addiction. However, it will still be several years before the majority of the "treatment-seeking population" will benefit

  1. Relapse Prevention and the Five Rules of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Melemis, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    There are four main ideas in relapse prevention. First, relapse is a gradual process with distinct stages. The goal of treatment is to help individuals recognize the early stages, in which the chances of success are greatest. Second, recovery is a process of personal growth with developmental milestones. Each stage of recovery has its own risks of relapse. Third, the main tools of relapse prevention are cognitive therapy and mind-body relaxation, which are used to develop healthy coping skills. Fourth, most relapses can be explained in terms of a few basic rules. Educating clients in these rules can help them focus on what is important: 1) change your life (recovery involves creating a new life where it is easier to not use); 2) be completely honest; 3) ask for help; 4) practice self-care; and 5) don’t bend the rules. PMID:26339217

  2. Studies on the Plasmodium vivax relapse pattern in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Adak, T; Sharma, V P; Orlov, V S

    1998-07-01

    A five-year epidemiologic study of patients attending a malaria clinic in Delhi was conducted to find the relapse rate of infections with Plasmodium vivax, its seasonal correlation between the primary infection and subsequent relapses, the duration of the incubation period, and the patterns of relapse. By our definition, the relapse rate ranged from 23% to 44% depending on the duration of follow-up. The relapse pattern observed in the study clearly suggests the existence of both tropical and temperate zone types of P. vivax in the population characterized by distinct incubation periods and the possible existence of P. vivax subpopulations characterized by primary long incubation periods. The implication of different incubating forms of P. vivax on the epidemiology and control of malaria is also discussed. PMID:9684649

  3. Multidisciplinary approach to breast angiosarcoma in an elderly patient: Repeated local relapses and significant objective responses.

    PubMed

    Mocerino, Carmela; Iannaci, Giuseppe; Sapere, Patrizia; Luise, Rossella; Canonico, Silvestro; Gambardella, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Angiosarcomas are malignant tumors of endovascular origin, which may be divided into primary and secondary forms. Secondary breast angiosarcomas are an increasing problem, especially in patients treated with breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy.We report a case of radiation-induced angiosarcoma of the breast in a 77-year-old woman who presented with a suspect lesion in her left breast. Excisional biopsy and subsequent immunohistochemical staining of the specimen was performed. Histological report was diagnostic for low-intermediate grade angiosarcoma. The tumor cells were diffusely positive for CD31 and CD34. We performed surgical resection with mastectomy.A multidisciplinary approach with bleomycin-based electrochemotherapy, radiation treatment, and chemotherapy with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin has been most useful to control subsequent local relapses. To date, the patient is under close observation and is performing well. No recurrence has been demonstrated after ending of chemotherapy. PMID:26872968

  4. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., entertainment, and favors. Pursuant to paragraph (b) of 5 CFR 735.202, the following exceptions to the... advertising or promotional materials, such as pens, pencils, note pads, calendars and other items of...

  5. 11 CFR 7.20 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of Special Commission Employees § 7.20 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. Except as provided at 11 CFR..., shall not receive or solicit from a person having business with the Commission anything of value such...

  6. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., entertainment, and favors. Pursuant to paragraph (b) of 5 CFR 735.202, the following exceptions to the... of value under circumstances which arise from an obvious family or personal relationship(s) (such...

  7. 36 CFR 905.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., entertainment, and favors. Pursuant to paragraph (b) of 5 CFR 735.202, the following exceptions to the... of value under circumstances which arise from an obvious family or personal relationship(s) (such...

  8. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., entertainment, loan, or any other thing of monetary value, from a person who: (1) Has, or is seeking to obtain... apply to: (1) Gifts, gratuities, favors, entertainments, loans, or any other thing of monetary...

  9. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., entertainment, loan, or any other thing of monetary value, from a person who: (1) Has, or is seeking to obtain... apply to: (1) Gifts, gratuities, favors, entertainments, loans, or any other thing of monetary...

  10. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., entertainment, loan, or any other thing of monetary value, from a person who: (1) Has, or is seeking to obtain... apply to: (1) Gifts, gratuities, favors, entertainments, loans, or any other thing of monetary...

  11. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., entertainment, loan, or any other thing of monetary value, from a person who: (1) Has, or is seeking to obtain... apply to: (1) Gifts, gratuities, favors, entertainments, loans, or any other thing of monetary...

  12. Determinants of relapse periodicity in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of febrile illness in endemic areas of Asia, Central and South America, and the horn of Africa. Plasmodium vivax infections are characterized by relapses of malaria arising from persistent liver stages of the parasite (hypnozoites) which can be prevented only by 8-aminoquinoline anti-malarials. Tropical P. vivax relapses at three week intervals if rapidly eliminated anti-malarials are given for treatment, whereas in temperate regions and parts of the sub-tropics P. vivax infections are characterized either by a long incubation or a long-latency period between illness and relapse - in both cases approximating 8-10 months. The epidemiology of the different relapse phenotypes has not been defined adequately despite obvious relevance to malaria control and elimination. The number of sporozoites inoculated by the anopheline mosquito is an important determinant of both the timing and the number of relapses. The intervals between relapses display a remarkable periodicity which has not been explained. Evidence is presented that the proportion of patients who have successive relapses is relatively constant and that the factor which activates hypnozoites and leads to regular interval relapse in vivax malaria is the systemic febrile illness itself. It is proposed that in endemic areas a large proportion of the population harbours latent hypnozoites which can be activated by a systemic illness such as vivax or falciparum malaria. This explains the high rates of vivax following falciparum malaria, the high proportion of heterologous genotypes in relapses, the higher rates of relapse in people living in endemic areas compared with artificial infection studies, and, by facilitating recombination between different genotypes, contributes to P. vivax genetic diversity particularly in low transmission settings. Long-latency P. vivax phenotypes may be more widespread and more prevalent than currently thought. These observations have important

  13. High expression of SOX30 is associated with favorable survival in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Liu, Wenbin; Xiao, Hualiang; Dong, Yan; Sun, Lei; Mao, Chengyi; Yin, Li; Jiang, Xiao; Ao, Lin; Cui, Zhihong; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we had identified SOX30 as a novel tumor suppressor that acts through direct regulation of p53 transcription in human lung cancer. Here, we sought to determine the clinical relevance of SOX30 expression in a series of surgically-resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Analysis of SOX30 expression and clinico-pathologic features reveal a significant correlation of SOX30 expression with histological type (n = 220, P = 0.008) and clinical stage (n = 220, P = 0.024). Kaplan-Meier analysis indicates an association of high SOX30 expression with better prognosis in NSCLC patients (n = 220, P = 0.007). Via multivariate Cox-regression analysis, SOX30 expression is revealed to be an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) of NSCLC patients (n = 220, P = 0.014, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.816). In particular, SOX30 is a favorable and independent prognostic factor in one main subtype of NSCLC, lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients (n = 150, P = 0.000, HR = 0.405), but not in another main subtype of NSCLC, squamous cell carcinoma patients. Furthermore, high expression of SOX30 represents a favorable and independent factor for the prognosis of ADC patients at clinical stage II (P = 0.013), with positive lymph node (P = 0.003), at histological grade 2 (P = 0.000) or grade 3 (P = 0.025). In summary, SOX30 expression represents an important prognostic factor for survival time in ADC patients. PMID:26330328

  14. Irinotecan and capecitabine combination chemotherapy in a patient with triple-negative breast cancer relapsed after adjuvant chemotherapy with anthracycline and taxane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anna; Go, Se-Il; Lee, Won Sup; Lee, Un Seok; Kim, Moon Jin; Kang, Myoung Hee; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Kang, Jung Hun; Jeon, Kyung-Nyeo; Cho, Jae Min; Lee, Jeong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The most effective regimen for taxane- and anthracycline-refractory triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has not yet been established. Capecitabine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of advanced breast cancer and has shown efficacy in advanced breast cancer refractory to anthracyclines and taxanes. Irinotecan has synergism with 5-fluorouracil and shows efficacy in advanced breast cancer. Here we report on a patient with TNBC who relapsed with widespread bone and lung metastases shortly after adjuvant anthracycline followed by taxane chemotherapy. She achieved a metabolic complete response with irinotecan and capecitabine combination therapy and had 10 months' progression-free survival and 22 months' overall survival. She relapsed with and died of brain metastasis without any definite signs of progression of the lung and bone lesions she had had before the irinotecan and capecitabine combination therapy. To validate this favorable result, larger clinical trials are warranted in patients with metastatic or relapsed TNBC. PMID:25702650

  15. Pralatrexate in Combination with Bortezomib for Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma in 5 Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Shin; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Cho, Min-Seok; Jung, Seung-Yeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Yang, Deok-Hwan

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive lymphomas with poor prognosis. Elderly (age ≥ 65years) patients generally have impaired bone marrow function, altered drug metabolism, comorbidities, and poor functional status. Thus, treatment of elderly patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL remains a challenge for clinicians. A recent study disclosed that pralatrexate has a synergistic effect in combination with bortezomib. Weekly pralatrexate and bortezomib were administered intravenously for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle. Of 5 patients, one achieved complete response after 4 cycles which has lasted 12 months until now. Another patient attained partial response after 2 cycles. Only 1 patient experienced grade 3 thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Two patients suffered from grade 3 mucositis. Combination therapy with pralatrexate and bortezomib may be used as a salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory PTCL in the elderly with a favorable safety profile. PMID:27366017

  16. Pralatrexate in Combination with Bortezomib for Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma in 5 Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive lymphomas with poor prognosis. Elderly (age ≥ 65years) patients generally have impaired bone marrow function, altered drug metabolism, comorbidities, and poor functional status. Thus, treatment of elderly patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL remains a challenge for clinicians. A recent study disclosed that pralatrexate has a synergistic effect in combination with bortezomib. Weekly pralatrexate and bortezomib were administered intravenously for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle. Of 5 patients, one achieved complete response after 4 cycles which has lasted 12 months until now. Another patient attained partial response after 2 cycles. Only 1 patient experienced grade 3 thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Two patients suffered from grade 3 mucositis. Combination therapy with pralatrexate and bortezomib may be used as a salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory PTCL in the elderly with a favorable safety profile. PMID:27366017

  17. Correlation of ANXA1 expression with drug resistance and relapse in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuliang; Meng, Qian; Hu, Huihui; Zhang, Man

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of annexin a1 (ANXA1) in adriamycin-resistant human bladder cancer cell line (pumc-91/ADM) compared with the parental cell line (pumc-91) and its relevance to the drug resistance of bladder cancer, as well as explore the relevance of ANXA1 in recurrent bladder cancer tissues as pertinent to relapse. Methods: qRT-PCR and Western blot were implemented to research the level of ANXA1 in two cell lines (pumc-91/ADM and pumc-91). Immunohistochemistry was applied to explore ANXA1 expression in bladder cancer tissues of different intervals of relapse. The association of ANXA1 with clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Results: The expression of ANXA1 was downregulated in drug-resistant cell line pumc-91/ADM compared to pumc-91. The bladder cancer tissues recurring two years later exhibited higher ANXA1 levels. ANXA1 expression level was positively correlated with T stage, while it was not connected with histological grade strongly. The expression level and influencing factors of ANXA1 in recurrent tissues of bladder cancer were clarified for the first time. Conclusion: ANXA1 may become a promising marker to predict the recurrence and drug resistance of bladder cancer and provide guidance for surveillance. PMID:25337195

  18. Plasma HHV8 DNA predicts relapse in individuals with HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Justin; Adams, Caroline; Sanitt, Adam; Mletzko, Salvinia; Nelson, Mark; Gazzard, Brian; Newsom-Davis, Tom; Bower, Mark

    2011-07-14

    HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease (HIV-MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder caused by infection with human herpesvirus-8. The disease follows a relapsing and remitting clinical course, with marked systemic symptoms during an active attack, which can prove fatal. Its incidence is rising, and new data indicate the utility of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab at inducing remissions in both first- and second-line settings, although biomarkers associated with relapse have not been previously identified. In 52 individuals with a histologic diagnosis of HIV-MCD, we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict factors associated with an HIV-MCD attack. Although a younger age (< 50 years) was associated with an attack, the strongest association was observed with plasma levels of human herpesvirus-8 DNA. Rising levels predicted an attack (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.7), and maintenance therapy with rituximab should be considered in these individuals. PMID:21511959

  19. GALNT2 suppresses malignant phenotypes through IGF-1 receptor and predicts favorable prognosis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Meng-Yao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens such as Tn antigen is associated with malignant transformation and cancer progression. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), one of the enzymes that mediate the initial step of mucin-type O-glycosylation, is responsible for forming Tn antigen. GALNT2 is expressed differentially in nervous tissues during mouse embryogenesis; however, the role of GALNT2 in neuroblastoma (NB) remains unclear. Here we showed that increased GALNT2 expression evaluated using immunohistochemistry in NB tumor tissues correlated well with the histological grade of differentiation as well as younger age at diagnosis, early clinical stage, primary tumor originated from the extra-adrenal site, favorable INPC histology, and MYCN non-amplification. Multivariate analysis showed that GALNT2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for better survival for NB patients. GALNT2 overexpression suppressed IGF-1-induced cell growth, migration, and invasion of NB cells, whereas GALNT2 knockdown enhanced these NB phenotypes. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that GALNT2 overexpression modified O-glycans on IGF-1R, which suppressed IGF-1-triggered IGF-1R dimerization and subsequent downstream signaling events. Conversely, these properties were reversed by GALNT2 knockdown in NB cells. Our findings suggest that GALNT2 regulates malignant phenotypes of NB cells through the IGF-1R signaling pathway, suggesting a critical role for GALNT2 in the pathogenesis of NB. PMID:25362349

  20. GALNT2 suppresses malignant phenotypes through IGF-1 receptor and predicts favorable prognosis in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan-Ling; Chou, Chih-Hsing; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Meng-Yao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-12-15

    Aberrant expression of the simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens such as Tn antigen is associated with malignant transformation and cancer progression. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), one of the enzymes that mediate the initial step of mucin-type O-glycosylation, is responsible for forming Tn antigen. GALNT2 is expressed differentially in nervous tissues during mouse embryogenesis; however, the role of GALNT2 in neuroblastoma (NB) remains unclear. Here we showed that increased GALNT2 expression evaluated using immunohistochemistry in NB tumor tissues correlated well with the histological grade of differentiation as well as younger age at diagnosis, early clinical stage, primary tumor originated from the extra-adrenal site, favorable INPC histology, and MYCN non-amplification. Multivariate analysis showed that GALNT2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for better survival for NB patients. GALNT2 overexpression suppressed IGF-1-induced cell growth, migration, and invasion of NB cells, whereas GALNT2 knockdown enhanced these NB phenotypes. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that GALNT2 overexpression modified O-glycans on IGF-1R, which suppressed IGF-1-triggered IGF-1R dimerization and subsequent downstream signaling events. Conversely, these properties were reversed by GALNT2 knockdown in NB cells. Our findings suggest that GALNT2 regulates malignant phenotypes of NB cells through the IGF-1R signaling pathway, suggesting a critical role for GALNT2 in the pathogenesis of NB. PMID:25362349

  1. The Impact of Histologic Variants on FSGS Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Meliambro, Kristin; Campbell, Kirk N.

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is the most common glomerular disease leading to end-stage renal disease. The clinical course is highly variable with disparate responses to therapeutic intervention and rates of progression. Histologic variant subtype has been commonly used as a prognostic and therapeutic guide in the clinical management of FSGS. The tip lesion is widely considered to portend the most favorable prognosis and to be the most responsive to steroid therapy. Conversely, the collapsing lesion, more prevalent in patients of African descent, is associated with steroid resistance and higher risk of disease progression. In the 10 years since the Columbia classification system for FSGS was published, some retrospective and one prospective study explored the impact of histologic variants at the time of biopsy on FSGS outcomes. The results largely validate its clinical predictive value with respect to treatment response, though its utility in cases recurring after kidney transplantation is still unknown. Sampling and interpretation errors are additional sources of caution. More research is needed to fully define reproducible prognostic and therapeutic markers for this polymorphic disorder.

  2. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. [Metal implant sensitivity: clinical and histological presentation].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, D; Letulé, V; Schneider, J J; Flaig, M J

    2016-05-01

    Metal implant sensitivity (intolerance) can cause pain, reduced mobility, loosening of the implant and skin rashes. Knowledge of differential diagnoses, histology and appropriate diagnostics are essential for proper diagnosis. To outline typical clinical signs and histology in metal-implant-associated skin lesions we present three exemplary patients from our implant allergy outpatient department and give an overview of the current literature regarding metal implant sensitivity. In patients with a negative patch test the lymphocyte transformation test may reveal metal sensitization. Even "pure" titanium alloys may contain traces of nickel. The histology of implant-associated skin reactions goes from teleangiectatic postimplantation erythema to eczema and vasculitis. Based on the synopsis of history, clinical picture, allergological testing and histology, metal implant sensitivity can be diagnosed more precisely. PMID:27090521

  4. Relapses in patients with Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Hernández, José Luis; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; González-Vela, Maria C.; González-Lamuño, Domingo; González-López, Marcos A.; Armesto, Susana; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To further investigate into the relapses of Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), we analyzed the frequency, clinical features, and predictors of relapses in series of 417 unselected patients from a single center. After a median follow-up of 12 (interquartile range [IQR]: 2–38) years, almost one-third of the 417 patients (n = 133; 32%; 85 men/48 women) had experienced at least 1 relapse. At the time of disease diagnosis, patients who later experienced relapses had less commonly infections than those who never suffered flares (30.8% vs 41.9%; P = 0.03). In contrast, patients who experienced relapses had a longer duration of the first episode of palpable purpura than those without relapses (palpable purpura lasting >7 days; 80.0% vs 68.1%; P = 0.04). Abdominal pain (72.3% vs 62.3%; P = 0.03) and joint manifestations (27.8% vs 15.5%; P = 0.005) were also more common in patients who later developed relapses. In contrast, patients who never suffered relapses had a slightly higher frequency of fever at the time of disease diagnosis (9.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.06). At the time of disease diagnosis, corticosteroids were more frequently given to patients who later had relapses of the disease (44% vs 32% in nonrelapsing patients; P = 0.03). Relapses generally occurred soon after the first episode of vasculitis. The median time from the diagnosis of HSP to the first relapse was 1 (IQR: 1–2) month. The median number of relapses was 1 (IQR 1–3). The main clinical features at the time of the relapse were cutaneous (88.7%), gastrointestinal (27.1%), renal (24.8%), and joint (16.5%) manifestations. After a mean ± standard deviation follow-up of 18.9 ± 9.8 years, complete recovery was observed in 110 (82.7%) of the 133 patients who had relapses. Renal sequelae (persistent renal involvement) was found in 11 (8.3%) of the patients with relapses. The best predictive factors for relapse were joint and gastrointestinal manifestations at HSP diagnosis (odds ratio [OR]: 2

  5. Why do homosexual men relapse into unsafe sex? Predictors of resumption of unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners.

    PubMed

    de Wit, J B; van Griensven, G J; Kok, G; Sandfort, T G

    1993-08-01

    The objective was to assess predictors of relapse into unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners among homosexual men in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In the period 1984-91 1103 predominantly white, well-educated, homosexual men participated in the study. 340 participants were HIV-antibody-positive, and 763 men were HIV-antibody-seronegative. Self-reported data on sexual behavior were obtained at 12 semi-annual intervals. Mean age of the participants at wave 12 was 41.2 years, and participants had been homosexually active for an average of 23.2 years, Participants were categorized according to sexual behavior in waves 11 and 12, the interval in which an increase in unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners was observed. Participants who reported unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners at wave 12, but not at wave 11, were considered to have relapsed into unsafe sex (n=47). Men who did not report unprotected anogenital intercourse at wave 11 or at wave 12 were considered to have maintained a behavior change (n=197). Possible predictors of relapse into unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners included a large number of variables assessed from wave 9 up to wave 12. Bivariate relations between outcome measure and predictors were first assessed. Significant variables were entered in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. 4 variables were multivariately reacted to maintenance of safer sex behaviors versus relapse into unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners. The relationships found indicated that relapse was more likely to occur among participants who had less intention to avoid unprotected anal sex with casual partners (odds ratio (OR) 3.75), were less convinced that they can use condoms with casual sex partners (OR 3.54), had a less favorable attitude towards the use of condoms (OR 3.2), and were not involved in a primary relationship PMID:8397949

  6. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  7. Normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia patients with CEBPA double mutation have a favorable prognosis but no survival benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Lee, Seung-Shin; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Nan Young; Choi, Seung Hyun; Minden, Mark D; Jung, Chul Won; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hee Je; Moon, Joon Ho; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Won, Jong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (NK-AML) with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (CEBPA) mutations is known to have a more favorable prognosis. However, direct comparison of the clinical significance according to consolidation therapy has not been widely performed in patients with NK-AML. A total of 404 patients with NK-AML who received intensive induction chemotherapy were included in the present study. Diagnostic samples from the patients were evaluated for CEBPA mutations by direct sequencing. CEBPA single (sm) or double mutation (dm) was observed in 27 (6.7 %) and 51 (12.6 %) patients, respectively. CEBPA (dm) was associated with GATA2 (mut), and it was less frequently associated with FLT3-ITD(pos), NPM1 (mut), and DNMT3A (mut) in comparison with CEBPA (wild) or CEBPA (sm) (all p values <0.05). On multivariate analysis, CEBPA (dm) (p = 0.007, OR 39.593) was an independent risk factor for achievement of complete remission (CR). With a median follow-up of 40.1 months, CEBPA (dm) showed a favorable overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and lower relapse incidence (RI) in comparison with CEBPA (wild) (all p values <0.005). Comparison of clinical outcome analyses (consolidation chemotherapy vs. allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)) demonstrated the role of consolidation treatment in patients with CEBPA (dm). Allogeneic HCT was associated with lower EFS and RI and a trend of higher non-relapse mortality. However, there was no statistically significant difference in OS. In conclusion, CEBPA (dm) was associated with other molecular mutations. Consolidation chemotherapy alone may overcome higher relapse rates by reducing the treatment mortality and increasing survival after relapse events in patients with CEBPA (dm) in NK-AML. PMID:26537612

  8. Graphs and Grammars for Histology: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Prewitt, Judith M. S.

    1979-01-01

    The invention of the microscope disclosed a whole new world, that of the hitherto invisibly small. Histologic evidence as revealed by the microscope has become a cornerstone of medical diagnosis, and efforts are now being made to lay foundations so that the medical visual information processing burden can be alleviated significantly by cost-effective automation. This paper lays image processing foundations by presenting a graph-theoretic and syntactic model for the analysis of histologic patterns, and presents results to date.

  9. Active Learning: A Small Group Histology Laboratory Exercise in a Whole Class Setting Utilizing Virtual Slides and Peer Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloodgood, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Histology laboratory instruction is moving away from the sole use of the traditional combination of light microscopes and glass slides in favor of virtual microscopy and virtual slides. At the same time, medical curricula are changing so as to reduce scheduled time for basic science instruction as well as focusing on student-centered learning…

  10. Clinical characteristics and outcome of isolated extramedullary relapse in acute leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a single-center analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Min; Meng, Xiao-Jian; Luo, Yi; Tan, Ya-Min; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Gao-Feng; He, Jing-Song; Zheng, Wei-Yan; Xie, Wan-Zhuo; Li, Li; Ye, Xiu-Jin; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Zhen; Lin, Mao-Fang; Huang, He

    2013-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse (EMR) of acute leukemia (AL) is a rare occurrence. However, it appears to be more common after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). To characterize what has been observed in isolated EMR, we investigated 287 consecutive AL patients (144 acute myeloid leukemia; 138 acute lymphocytic leukemia; 5 acute mixed-lineage leukemia) who underwent allo-SCT. Twelve cases experienced relapse at extramedullary sites without concomitant involvement of the bone marrow (BM). The onset to relapse after allo-SCT was longer in extramedullary sites than in the BM (median, 10 months versus 5.5 months). EMR sites varied widely and included the central nervous system, skin, bone, pelvis and breasts. Univariate analysis demonstrated that cytogenetic abnormalities were correlated significantly with the onset of isolated EMR (P=0.001). The prognosis for patients who develop EMR remained poor but was relatively better than that after BM relapse (overall survival, 10 versus 18 months). Compared with local or single therapy, patients treated with systemic treatment in combination with local treatment could yield a favorable prognosis. In conclusion, we observed a significant number of isolated cases of EMR in AL patients after allo-SCT, cytogenetic abnormalities were correlated significantly with the onset of isolated EMR. We found that intensive approaches combining local and systemic therapy could produce favorable responses which may cure a proportion of these patients. PMID:23347901

  11. [A case of relapsing polychondritis with oculobulbar symptoms and successful treatment of respiratory failure with BiPAP].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Yamazaki, M; Takei, Y; Miyazaki, A; Hanyu, N

    1999-10-01

    A 66-year-old man developed diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, and acute respiratory failure. The initial diagnosis was myasthenia gravis and prednisolone had been administrated for three years. Because of recurrent upper respiratory infections, prednisolone was tapered off. Two months later, auricular chondritis, arthritis, and conjunctivitis appeared. He was diagnosed as having relapsing polychondritis on the basis of histological findings of the ear lobe biopsy. Reinstituted prednisolone had the effect on the auricular chondritis, arthritis, and conjunctivitis, but no effect on dysphagia, hoarseness, and respiratory failure caused by the deformity of the pharynx and airway. Tracheal collapse usually causes rapid death, so early tracheostomy and the use of endotracheal prostheses have been recommended in patients with airway obstruction from relapsing polychondritis, but such surgical management can only partially open up the large airways and has no effect on smaller airways. In this case tracheostomy and endoluminal stent placement have helped improve the patient's respiratory failure, but have had little effect on its aggravation at night in the supine position. The use of BiPAP after surgical management can be an effective treatment for airway involvement in relapsing polychondritis probably because it keeps the narrowed airways from collapsing, especially at night. PMID:10655766

  12. CEBPA single mutation can be a possible favorable prognostic indicator in NPM1 and FLT3-ITD wild-type acute myeloid leukemia patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of CEBPA single mutation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk. CEBPA single and double mutations were detected in 11 (9.7%) and 17 (15.1%) of 113 NPM1 wild-type patients, but no CEBPA mutations were detected in a group of 44 NPM1 mutated patients. Among patients with NPM1/FLT3-ITD wild-type, those with CEBPA double mutations (P=0.013 and 0.007 for overall survival and relapse-free survival, respectively) or a single mutation (P=0.039 and 0.020 for overall survival and relapse-free survival, respectively) demonstrated a favorable prognosis compared with CEBPA wild-type patients. Subsequent multivariate analysis confirmed the favorable prognostic impact of CEBPA single and double mutations. Despite the low statistical power of this study due to the small number of patients, our preliminary data suggest that CEBPA single mutation may be associated with favorable clinical outcomes in NPM1/FLT3-ITD wild-type AML patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk. PMID:24054719

  13. Conservatism in least favorable response analysis and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, T L

    1980-01-01

    In order to assure that mechanical structures can meet design requirements it is desirable to test a structure using an input which is conservative but not a severe overtest. One method available for the specification of shock tests is the method of least favorable response. This method can be used analytically or in the laboratory and is guaranteed to provide tests which are conservative, at least in one sense. When the impulse response function, or equivalently the frequency response function, is available between a point of interest on a structure and the input point of the structure, and when we know the real function which envelops the modulus of the Fourier transform of all possible inputs which might excite the structure, then the method of least favorable response can be used to find an upper bound on the response which the point of interest on the structure can realize. We use this in the analysis of structural peak response. In the laboratory the least favorable response is generated experimentally, for example, by testing the structural unit on a shake table. If the structure survives the laboratory test, then we assume that it could survive any input in the class of inputs whose Fourier transform moduli are enveloped by the function used in the analysis. The objective of this study was to analyze the inherent conservatism of the method of least favorable response. A technique that can be used to do this is demonstrated. First, the method of least favorable response is reviewed and how it is used analytically and experimentally is demonstrated. Next the technique used to measure the conservatism in a least favorable response test is developed. Finally, the method is applied in some numerical examples where the degree of conservatism in the tests of some specific structures is measured. (LCL)

  14. Individualized relapse prediction: personality measures and striatal and insular activity during reward-processing robustly predict relapse*

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Joshua L.; Ball, Tali M.; Wittmann, Marc; Tapert, Susan F.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nearly half of individuals with substance use disorders relapse in the year after treatment. A diagnostic tool to help clinicians make decisions regarding treatment does not exist for psychiatric conditions. Identifying individuals with high risk for relapse to substance use following abstinence has profound clinical consequences. This study aimed to develop neuroimaging as a robust tool to predict relapse. Methods 68 methamphetamine-dependent adults (15 female) were recruited from 28-day inpatient treatment. During treatment, participants completed a functional MRI scan that examined brain activation during reward processing. Patients were followed 1 year later to assess abstinence. We examined brain activation during reward processing between relapsing and abstaining individuals and employed three random forest prediction models (clinical and personality measures, neuroimaging measures, a combined model) to generate predictions for each participant regarding their relapse likelihood. Results 18 individuals relapsed. There were significant group by reward-size interactions for neural activation in the left insula and right striatum for rewards. Abstaining individuals showed increased activation for large, risky relative to small, safe rewards, whereas relapsing individuals failed to show differential activation between reward types. All three random forest models yielded good test characteristics such that a positive test for relapse yielded a likelihood ratio 2.63, whereas a negative test had a likelihood ratio of 0.48. Conclusions These findings suggest that neuroimaging can be developed in combination with other measures as an instrument to predict relapse, advancing tools providers can use to make decisions about individualized treatment of substance use disorders. PMID:25977206

  15. A controlled field trial of group versus individual cognitive-behavioural training for relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Annis, H M; Brett, P J; Venesoen, P

    1996-08-01

    Results are presented of a randomized field trial comparing two aftercare regimes, namely individual versus group delivery of a structured relapse prevention approach. Two addictions treatment programs (one a 12-Step 26-day residential program, the other an evening group counselling program) implemented structured relapse prevention in either group or individual format as part of the first three months of aftercare. Process measures (e.g. attendance, client satisfaction) indicated that both group and individual formats were delivered very successfully at both sites. Follow-up rate at 12 months across both programs was 74%, and drinking and drug use at the 12-month follow-up was substantially less than use at entry into treatment. However, there were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group delivery on any of the alcohol or drug use measures. Only one psychosocial outcome measure (social support from friends at 12-month follow-up) showed a significant difference for format and it favored the group format. These findings suggest some important directions for future research. PMID:8828241

  16. Glatiramer acetate: long-term safety and efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boster, Aaron L; Ford, Corey C; Neudorfer, Orit; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi

    2015-06-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is approved for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in 57 countries worldwide, with more than 2 million patient-years of exposure and over 20 years of continuous clinical use without new safety concerns. GA has an overall favorable risk-benefit profile: 30% reduced annual relapse rate and decreased brain lesion activity. In clinically definite MS or clinically isolated syndrome, GA slows brain atrophy, which may be related to its unique anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective mechanisms of action. Early treatment with GA delays the onset of clinically definite MS more effectively than late treatment in clinically isolated syndrome. GA is not associated with immunosuppression, autoimmune disease, infections or development of neutralizing antibodies. A new three-times-weekly formulation of GA is available to potentially reduce the incidence of injection-related side effects. Other safety advantages of GA include its pregnancy rating (Category B) and limited uncontrolled data suggesting that tolerability is similar in children with MS. PMID:25924547

  17. Novel treatment strategies for patients with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Adam; Younes, Anas

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), especially those who relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation, remains challenging. Patients with HL whose disease relapses after stem cell transplantation are rarely cured with current treatment modalities, and have a median survival is less than 3 years. With no new drugs have been approved by the FDA for HL in more than three decades, there is a clear unmet medical need for drug development for this patients population. New treatment strategies that are based on targeting oncogenic signaling pathways are currently explored. This review will focus on emerging new treatment modalities that are currently under investigation for patients with relapsed classical HL. PMID:20828898

  18. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  19. Three-Drug Combination for Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of Interim results from an international, randomized phase III trial that suggest that adding carfilzomib (Kyprolis®) to a standard treatment improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma whose cancer has relapsed.

  20. Treatment of a relapsing facial pyoderma gangrenosum (malignant pyoderma).

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Lucia; Zauli, Stefania; Sarno, Oriele; Querzoli, Patrizia; Corazza, Monica; Virgili, Annarosa

    2013-06-01

    A case of rapidly relapsing pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) of the left preauricular area with no undermined borders is described. This might be considered a case of malignant pyoderma (PM), a rare variety of PG. Five months after complete healing obtained with systemic corticosteroids, the preauricular lesion of PG relapsed. As retreatment with oral methylprednisolone induced glucose intolerance and high arterial pressure, sulfa drugs were initially employed with a transitory recovery of the skin lesion. A successive prolonged course with minocycline induced a new complete resolution. To date, at six months' follow-up, the patient is relapse-free. This case confirms that sulfa drugs and minocycline may also be considered alternative therapies in PM. PM is a variety of PG characterized by specific morphological features, a higher tendency to relapse, and poor responsiveness to treatment. PMID:23330662

  1. Tyrosinemia type 1: metastatic hepatoblastoma with a favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Jenkner, Alessandro; Francalanci, Paola; Castellano, Aurora; Holme, Elisabeth; Callea, Francesco; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    The clinical course of tyrosinemia type 1 is characterized by acute liver failure in infancy or chronic liver dysfunction and renal Fanconi syndrome in late-presenting cases. Dietary treatment may improve liver function but does not prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in late childhood. A new treatment strategy that uses 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC), which prevents the production of toxic/carcinogenic metabolites, has dramatically changed the outcome of the disease by reducing the occurrence of liver cancer, especially in patients who start this treatment before the age of 2 years. We report here the case of a patient with a diagnosis of tyrosinemia type 1 at 5 months of age who was treated with NTBC and dietary restriction and in whom a liver neoplasm with lung metastases, histologically determined to be HCC, was found at the age of 15 months. A conservative approach that consisted of chemotherapy and partial hepatectomy resulted in a 12-year disease-free period. The excellent postchemotherapy course, in sharp contrast to the expected course of HCC, led to histologic reevaluation with reclassification of the neoplasm as hepatoblastoma. A diagnosis of hepatoblastoma would no longer be a mandate for a liver transplant for patients with tyrosinemia type 1 undergoing NTBC treatment. We encourage clinicians to perform more accurate evaluation of liver histology, because a neoplastic mass in a child with tyrosinemia type 1 is not the same as HCC. PMID:20547648

  2. Tick-borne relapsing fever in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, D

    1985-09-01

    Relapsing fever is caused by the Borrelia species of spirochetes. Louse-born epidemics of the disease may occur but the endemic disease is usually transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected tick (Ornithodorus). Transplacental infection was suggested more than 75 years ago (1) but has been rarely documented (2). We describe a case of neonatal relapsing fever where maternal infection was the probable cause of the premature delivery and infection in the infant. PMID:2415056

  3. Recrudescence and relapse of meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P E; Thelle, T; Tvede, M

    1995-03-01

    Three cases of recrudescence and relapse of Neisseria meningitidis group B meningitis and septicaemia are reported. The recrudescence and relapses could not be explained by infectious foci, increased bacterial penicillin resistance or immunological defects. As a supplement to antibiotic treatment, all three patients received corticosteroids for the initial 2 days of treatment, and this may have contributed to the unusual course of the disease in our patient. PMID:7780262

  4. Histological types of polypoid cutaneous melanoma II.

    PubMed

    Knezević, Fabijan; Duancić, Vjekoslav; Sitić, Sanda; Horvat-Knezević, Anica; Benković, Vesna; Ramić, Snjezana; Kostović, Kresimir; Ramljak, Vesna; Vrdoljak, Danko Velemir; Stanec, Mladen; Bozović, Angelina

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which histological types of melanoma can clinically and morphologically appear as polypoid melanomas. In 645 cases of primary cutaneous melanoma we have analyzed criteria for diagnosis of polypoid cutaneous melanoma and afterwards we have analyzed growth phase in each polypoid melanoma, histological type of atypical melanocytes, the number of epidermal ridges which are occupied by atypical melanocytes, and distribution according to age, sex and location, as well as the disease free survival. According to the criteria for polypoid melanomas we have found 147 (22.8%) polypoid cutaneous melanomas. Analyzing the growth phases, histological types of atypical melanocytes and the number of affected epidermal ridges in the group of polypoid melanomas we have ascertained 2 (1.4%) ALMs, 4 (2.8%) LMMs, 42 (28.6%) SSMs and 99 (67.2%) NMs. Our conclusion is that polypoid cutaneous melanomas are morphological forms of various histological melanoma types (ALM, LMM, SSM and NM) and they can all display polypoid morphological form. Polypoid cutaneous melanomas are most often of nodular histological type. PMID:18217457

  5. [Gastritis from a histological point of view].

    PubMed

    Vieth, M; Stolte, M

    2006-06-01

    Since the rediscovery of spiral-shaped gastric bacteria in 1983 by Warren and Marshal numerous detailed facts have enlarged our knowledge base for a better understanding of gastritis. The WHO classified Helicobacter as a class 1 carcinogen. Helicobacter plays a role in many diseases of the upper GI tract (gastric and duodenal ulcer, MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer). Knowledge of the interaction between bacterium and host led to an improvement of the diagnosis of gastritis. Unfortunately endoscopy, histology, and patient's symptoms do not correlate with each other. Therefore, gastritis is a purely histological diagnosis. A histological diagnosis always needs to be accompanied by an etiological cause of the inflammation. Only when this information is given a clinical consequence can be drawn from a histological diagnosis. In Germany the so-called ABCD scheme of gastritis is widely used (A: autoimmune gastritis, B: bacterial gastritis, C: chemical reactive gastritis, D: other forms of gastritis). At least two antrum and two corpus biopsies (matrix diagnostics) are necessary to reach representative tissue with an acceptable probability. If less than these four (minimal standard) biopsies are taken, the histological diagnosis will remain uncertain. PMID:16612608

  6. Comprehensive histological evaluation of bone implants.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Claudia; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Manthey, Suzanne; Rentsch, Barbe; Rammelt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate and assess bone regeneration in sheep in combination with new implant materials classical histological staining methods as well as immunohistochemistry may provide additional information to standard radiographs or computer tomography. Available published data of bone defect regenerations in sheep often present none or sparely labeled histological images. Repeatedly, the exact location of the sample remains unclear, detail enlargements are missing and the labeling of different tissues or cells is absent. The aim of this article is to present an overview of sample preparation, staining methods and their benefits as well as a detailed histological description of bone regeneration in the sheep tibia. General histological staining methods like hematoxylin and eosin, Masson-Goldner trichrome, Movat's pentachrome and alcian blue were used to define new bone formation within a sheep tibia critical size defect containing a polycaprolactone-co-lactide (PCL) scaffold implanted for 3 months (n = 4). Special attention was drawn to describe the bone healing patterns down to cell level. Additionally one histological quantification method and immunohistochemical staining methods are described. PMID:24504113

  7. Comprehensive histological evaluation of bone implants

    PubMed Central

    Rentsch, Claudia; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Manthey, Suzanne; Rentsch, Barbe; Rammelt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate and assess bone regeneration in sheep in combination with new implant materials classical histological staining methods as well as immunohistochemistry may provide additional information to standard radiographs or computer tomography. Available published data of bone defect regenerations in sheep often present none or sparely labeled histological images. Repeatedly, the exact location of the sample remains unclear, detail enlargements are missing and the labeling of different tissues or cells is absent. The aim of this article is to present an overview of sample preparation, staining methods and their benefits as well as a detailed histological description of bone regeneration in the sheep tibia. General histological staining methods like hematoxylin and eosin, Masson-Goldner trichrome, Movat’s pentachrome and alcian blue were used to define new bone formation within a sheep tibia critical size defect containing a polycaprolactone-co-lactide (PCL) scaffold implanted for 3 months (n = 4). Special attention was drawn to describe the bone healing patterns down to cell level. Additionally one histological quantification method and immunohistochemical staining methods are described. PMID:24504113

  8. Filtering the Net in Libraries: The Case (Mostly) in Favor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Examines issues and decision-making involved in restricting Internet access in libraries, for the most part favoring filtering devices. Questions to consider when selecting a filtering program are provided. Some of the better filtering programs are described, and Web addresses are included for each. Security risks associated with Java and…

  9. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.303 Section 706.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Government Employees §...

  10. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.303 Section 706.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Government Employees §...

  11. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.303 Section 706.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Government Employees §...

  12. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  13. 18 CFR 706.303 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.303 Section 706.303 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Government Employees §...

  14. Preschoolers Reduce Inequality While Favoring Individuals with More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Vivian; Spitzer, Brian; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Inequalities are everywhere, yet little is known about how children respond to people affected by inequalities. This article explores two responses--minimizing inequalities and favoring those who are advantaged by them. In Studies 1a (N = 37) and 1b (N = 38), 4- and 5-year-olds allocated a resource to a disadvantaged recipient, but judged…

  15. Interstitial granulomatous drug reaction with a histological pattern of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Perrin, C; Lacour, J P; Castanet, J; Michiels, J F

    2001-08-01

    The interstitial granulomatous drug reaction (IGDR) is a novel drug-associated entity, characterized by violaceous plaques with a predilection for skin fold areas. Light microscopically, it resembles the incipient diffuse interstitial phase of granuloma annulare. Differentiating light microscopic features include the absence of complete collagen necrobiosis, the presence of interface dermatitis, and variable lymphoid atypia. The lack of vasculitis rules out the extravascular necrotizing granuloma (Winkelmann granuloma) associated with systemic disease. The differential diagnosis with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis as defined by Ackerman et al. has not been studied until now. Our aim was to determine the histologic criteria allowing us to differentiate IGDR without interface dermatitis and lymphoid atypia from interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. We report three patients with IGDR triggered, in two cases by respectively angiotensin convertin enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and furosemide, and in one case by the association of an ACE inhibitor, furosemide, and fluindione. Histologic examination showed a histological pattern of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. We found a dense, diffuse histiocytic infiltrate distributed interstitially and in palisaded array within the reticular dermis. Eosinophils and some neutrophils were scattered throughout the infiltrate. In some tiny foci, enveloped by histiocytes, thick collagen bundles associated with basophilic nuclear debris or "flame figures" were seen. Vasculitis, interface dermatitis, or lymphoid atypia were absent. Our study allowed us to expand the histological spectrum of IGDR including a histological pattern similar to interstitial granulomatous dermatitis. The lack of degenerated collagen could be a subtle clue in favor of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis triggered by a drug. PMID:11481519

  16. Modeling Relapsing Disease Dynamics in a Host-Vector Community.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tammi L; Landguth, Erin L; Stone, Emily F

    2016-02-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a threat to human and wildlife populations and mathematical models provide a means to understand and control epidemics involved in complex host-vector systems. The disease model studied here is a host-vector system with a relapsing class of host individuals, used to investigate tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF). Equilibrium analysis is performed for models with increasing numbers of relapses and multiple hosts and the disease reproduction number, R0, is generalized to establish relationships with parameters that would result in the elimination of the disease. We show that host relapses in a single competent host-vector system is needed to maintain an endemic state. We show that the addition of an incompetent second host with no relapses increases the number of relapses needed for maintaining the pathogen in the first competent host system. Further, coupling of the system with hosts of differing competencies will always reduce R0, making it more difficult for the system to reach an endemic state. PMID:26910884

  17. The reinstatement model and relapse prevention: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Kenzie L

    2005-01-01

    Objectives This commentary assesses the degree to which the reinstatement model is homologous to the human experience of relapse. Results A review of the literature suggests that the relationship is less clear than is often assumed, largely due to a lack of prospective data on the precipitants and process of relapse (especially relapse to heroin or cocaine abuse). However, reinstatement does not need to resemble relapse to have immediate clinical value; predictive validity as a medication screen would be sufficient. Whether the model has predictive validity is unknown, because, to date, very few clinical trials have tested medications that are effective in the reinstatement model, and even fewer have used designs comparable to those of reinstatement experiments. A clinical trial comparable to a reinstatement experiment would enroll participants who are already abstinent, and its main outcome measure would be propensity to undergo a specific type of relapse (e.g., relapse induced by stress or cues). Conclusions Until clinical and preclinical work are more comparable, criticisms of the reinstatement model’s presumed shortcomings are premature. PMID:12721778

  18. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations

    PubMed Central

    Eleveld, Thomas F.; Oldridge, Derek A.; Bernard, Virginie; Koster, Jan; Daage, Leo Colmet; Diskin, Sharon J.; Schild, Linda; Bentahar, Nadia Bessoltane; Bellini, Angela; Chicard, Mathieu; Lapouble, Eve; Combaret, Valérie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Michon, Jean; Pugh, Trevor J.; Hart, Lori S.; Rader, JulieAnn; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Wei, Jun S.; Zhang, Shile; Naranjo, Arlene; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Smith, Malcolm A.; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Zwijnenburg, Danny A.; Ebus, Marli E.; van Sluis, Peter; Hakkert, Anne; van Wezel, Esther; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Schulte, Johannes H.; Tytgat, Godelieve A.; Dolman, M. Emmy M.; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Caron, Huib N.; Delattre, Olivier; Khan, Javed; Versteeg, Rogier; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Molenaar, Jan J.; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of neuroblastoma patients have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion of patients will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapsed neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Seven events were detected only in the relapse tumor while the others showed clonal enrichment. In neuroblastoma cell lines we also detected a high frequency of activating mutations in the RAS-MAPK pathway (11/18, 61%) and these lesions predicted for sensitivity to MEK inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide the rationale for genetic characterization of relapse neuroblastoma and show that RAS-MAPK pathway mutations may function as a biomarker for new therapeutic approaches to refractory disease. PMID:26121087

  19. Aggressive chemotherapy for acute leukemia relapsed after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; D'Onofrio, G; Etuk, B; Leone, G

    1994-09-01

    Bone marrow transplantation procedure has emerged as an effective treatment for hematological malignancies. However, recurrence of leukemia is still the major cause of treatment failure. Subsequent treatment in this category of patients, generally considered incurable, has not been yet standardized. At our institution, 13 patients, 7 with acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL) and 6 with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), were treated at relapse after bone marrow transplantation either autologous or allogeneic (AuBMT 8, ABMT 4) performed in complete remission (CR). The interval between BMT and relapse was less than 9 months in 6 patients (2 ABMT and 4 AuBMT) and more than 9 months in 7 patients. Early relapsed patients showed no response to treatment and died at a median of 5.5 months (range 1-13) after relapse. Late relapse after BMT was characterized by a high percentage of response (5 CR and 1 PR), particularly after intensive chemotherapy and by a longer survival (median 14 months; range 2-36). Chemotherapy after transplantation should be carefully evaluated in patients relapsed after BMT in order to select a population that can achieve long term disease free survival. PMID:7858490

  20. Relapse and rehospitalization: comparing oral and depot antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Nina R

    2003-01-01

    A review of studies that compared conventional oral and depot antipsychotic medications highlighted the following points. Mirror-image studies in which patients served as their own controls provided evidence of substantial benefit for depot injectable medications. The randomized clinical trials did not, in general, support the findings of significant decrease in relapse rates between these 2 routes of administration. Across the studies reviewed, the 1-year relapse rate for long-acting depot medication was 27% compared with 42% for patients who received oral medication. The 27% risk of relapse in patients who received guaranteed depot medication suggests that relapse is not always driven by noncompliance. In the only study that lasted for 2 years, the risk of relapse decreased substantially in the depot-treated patients, suggesting that risk of noncompliance may be a more important factor in relapse over extended periods of time. A recent formal meta-analytic review of depot medications concluded that this route of administration resulted in clinical advantages in terms of global outcome. PMID:14680414

  1. Modeling Relapsing Disease Dynamics in a Host-Vector Community

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Emily F.

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a threat to human and wildlife populations and mathematical models provide a means to understand and control epidemics involved in complex host-vector systems. The disease model studied here is a host-vector system with a relapsing class of host individuals, used to investigate tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF). Equilibrium analysis is performed for models with increasing numbers of relapses and multiple hosts and the disease reproduction number, R0, is generalized to establish relationships with parameters that would result in the elimination of the disease. We show that host relapses in a single competent host-vector system is needed to maintain an endemic state. We show that the addition of an incompetent second host with no relapses increases the number of relapses needed for maintaining the pathogen in the first competent host system. Further, coupling of the system with hosts of differing competencies will always reduce R0, making it more difficult for the system to reach an endemic state. PMID:26910884

  2. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations.

    PubMed

    Eleveld, Thomas F; Oldridge, Derek A; Bernard, Virginie; Koster, Jan; Daage, Leo Colmet; Diskin, Sharon J; Schild, Linda; Bentahar, Nadia Bessoltane; Bellini, Angela; Chicard, Mathieu; Lapouble, Eve; Combaret, Valérie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Michon, Jean; Pugh, Trevor J; Hart, Lori S; Rader, JulieAnn; Attiyeh, Edward F; Wei, Jun S; Zhang, Shile; Naranjo, Arlene; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Hogarty, Michael D; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Smith, Malcolm A; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M; Watkins, Thomas B K; Zwijnenburg, Danny A; Ebus, Marli E; van Sluis, Peter; Hakkert, Anne; van Wezel, Esther; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Westerhout, Ellen M; Schulte, Johannes H; Tytgat, Godelieve A; Dolman, M Emmy M; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gerhard, Daniela S; Caron, Huib N; Delattre, Olivier; Khan, Javed; Versteeg, Rogier; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Molenaar, Jan J; Maris, John M

    2015-08-01

    The majority of patients with neuroblastoma have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole-genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapse neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor, with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK pathway. Seven of these events were detected only in the relapse tumor, whereas the others showed clonal enrichment. In neuroblastoma cell lines, we also detected a high frequency of activating mutations in the RAS-MAPK pathway (11/18; 61%), and these lesions predicted sensitivity to MEK inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide a rationale for genetic characterization of relapse neuroblastomas and show that RAS-MAPK pathway mutations may function as a biomarker for new therapeutic approaches to refractory disease. PMID:26121087

  3. Adoptive transfer of murine relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lublin, F D

    1985-02-01

    Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune disorder resembling multiple sclerosis, has been produced by inoculating SJL/J mice with spinal cord or myelin basic protein in appropriate adjuvants. To determine whether initially sensitized lymphocytes or the persistence of antigen depots in the animal were responsible for the relapsing episodes of inflammatory demyelination, adoptive transfer studies were undertaken utilizing lymphocytes from relapsing EAE-immunized donors transferred directly or after in vitro culture. In direct-transfer studies donor lymphocytes produced clinical and pathological signs of relapsing EAE in 3 of 7 recipients of lymph node lymphocytes and 1 of 5 recipients of splenic lymphocytes. In vitro culture of lymphocytes in myelin basic protein or T cell growth factor prior to transfer increased both the incidence of disease and the number of animals having relapses, and allowed transfer with fewer lymphocytes. Because all animals had delayed onset of disease, this study demonstrates that the ability to develop relapsing inflammatory demyelination is transferable with lymphocytes and does not require the presence of antigen. PMID:3977301

  4. The International Histological Classification of Tumours*

    PubMed Central

    Sobin, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews the development of the WHO project on the histological classification of tumours, which has included the establishment of several collaborating centres and has involved more than 300 pathologists in over 50 countries. The project has resulted in the publication, over the last 14 years, of 25 volumes in the first series of the International Histological Classification of Tumours (IHCT), each giving a classification of tumours specific to a certain site. The classifications are based primarily on the microscopic characteristics of the tumours and are concerned with morphologically identifiable cell types and histological patterns as seen by means of light microscopy and conventional staining techniques. The article also describes the relationship between IHCT and other classification and coding systems and assesses possible future developments that may result from new approaches to diagnosis. PMID:6978190

  5. Appendicitis in Dar es Salaam, histological pattern.

    PubMed

    Mbembati, N A; Lema, L E; Mwakyoma, H A; Ussiri, E V

    1996-03-01

    Histology of 378 appendicectomy specimens submitted to the Histopathology Department of Muhimbili Medical Centre from its surgical wards over a 10 year period (1985 to 1994) were reviewed. There were 185 cases (48.9 pc) of acute appendicitis, 101 cases (26.7 pc) of chronic appendicitis, 74 (19.6 pc) normal appendices and 13 cases (3.5 pc) schistosomal appendicitis. There were two cases of tuberculous appendicitis and two cases of mucocele of the appendix. Apart from the high frequency of chronic appendicitis the histological findings in this study compare well with findings reported from other studies. PMID:8653771

  6. Prognostic significance of host immune status in patients with late relapsing renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Buti, Sebastiano; Conti, Alessandro; Porta, Camillo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Sternberg, Cora N; Bracarda, Sergio; Basso, Umberto; De Giorgi, Ugo; Rizzo, Mimma; Derosa, Lisa; Ortega, Cinzia; Massari, Francesco; Milella, Michele; Bersanelli, Melissa; Cerbone, Linda; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Burattini, Luciano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Santini, Daniele; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to assess the prognostic role of pretreatment neutrophilia, lymphocytopenia, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in patients treated with vascular endothelial growth factor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) for late relapsing (>5 years) metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Data were collected from 13 Italian centers involved in the treatment of metastatic RCC. Late relapse was defined as >5 years after initial radical nephrectomy. One hundred fifty-one patients were included in this analysis. Among them, MSKCC risk score was favorable in 68 %, intermediate in 29 %, and poor in 3 %. Fifty-six patients (37 %) had NLR ≥3 at the start of VEGFR-TKI therapy (group A), while 95 had lower NLR (63 %, group B). The median overall survival (OS) was 28.8 months in group A and 68.7 months (95 % confidence interval (CI) 45.3-NA) in group B (p < 0.001). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 15.8 months in group A and 25.1 months in group B (p = 0.03). At multivariate analysis, MSKCC risk group and NLR were independent prognostic factors for both OS and PFS. Pretreatment NLR is an independent prognostic factor for patients with late relapsing mRCC treated with first-line VEGFR-TKIs. A better characterization of baseline immunological impairment may optimize the management of this RCC subpopulation. PMID:25559290

  7. A long survivor with local relapse of hilar cholangiocarcinoma after R1 surgery treated with chemoradiotherapy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Hirohisa; Chikamoto, Akira; Maruno, Masataka; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Imai, Katsunori; Taki, Katsunobu; Arima, Kota; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Itoh, Shinji; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    The treatment outcome of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma remains insufficient because it is difficult to obtain accurate diagnosis of tumor spreading and effective treatment agent is quite limited in spite of substantial current efforts, all of which have been unsuccessful except for gemcitabine plus cisplatin. The patient was a 60-year-old female who had developed hilar cholangiocarcinoma and underwent extrahepatic bile duct resection. Although it was conceivable that it would be the R1 resection, the patient wanted to receive limited resection to avoid postoperative complication mainly because she was depressed. In histology, interstitial spreading of tumor was appreciated at the surgical margin of bile duct. The patient did not accept to receive the additional treatment after the surgery and hardly visited the hospital to take the periodical test for monitoring the residual cancer cells. As expected, the local relapse of tumor was appreciated 1 year after the R1 surgery. She chose radiotherapy and agreed with subsequent S-1 treatment for 26 months. Consequently, elevated CA19-9 was decreased, and local relapse has been successfully controlled for more than 7 years after the relapse of tumor. Here, we report quite a rare case in terms of long survivor after chemoradiotherapy on locally relapsed unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27376654

  8. Design integration of favorable geometry, structural support and containment

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, J.A.; McGehee, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    In designs for fissile processes at Savannah River site, different approaches have been used to provide engineered margins of safety for criticality with containment and seismic resistance as additional requirements. These requirements are frequently at odds in engineered systems. This paper proposes a plan to take advantage of vessels with favorable geometry to provide seismic resistance and to support a glovebox for containment. Thin slab tanks, small diameter pencil tanks, annular tanks, and other novel designs have been used for criticality safety. The requirement for DBE seismic resistance and rigid control of dimensions leads the designer to consider annular tanks for meeting these requirements. The high strength of annular tanks may logically be used to support secondary containment. Hands-on access to all instruments, piping etc. within containment can be provided through gloveports, thus a specialized glovebox. This paper examines the advantages of using an annular tank design to provide favorable geometry, structural support and containment.

  9. Factorization Tests with Cabibbo-Favored Hadronic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, Richard; Honscheid, K.; Pedlar, T.; von Toerne, E.; Wilksen, T.

    2002-04-01

    Based on a data sample of 9.7 million Υ(4s)arrow B barB decays recorded with CLEO II and II.V we present new measurements of cabibbo-favored, hadronic B meson decays. Precise measurements of these decays provide tests of the factorization hypothesis and allow us to examine the theoretical models which are used to constrain the unitarity triangle. Isospin relations in B arrow D(*) π decays permit the investigation of final state interactions.

  10. Psammomatous Melanotic Schwannoma: A Challenging Histological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Merat, Rastine; Szalay-Quinodoz, Ildiko; Laffitte, Emmanuel; Kaya, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS) is a rare pigmented tumor that can be part of the Carney complex. Here, we describe the case of a 35-year-old female patient presenting an isolated subcutaneous PMS. Histopathological analysis could not formally exclude the malignant nature of the tumor. The challenging histological diagnosis and consequently the management of the patient are described. PMID:27047937

  11. Histology. Notes for Students of Animal Husbandry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Charles J.; Reed, Josephine E.

    This document approaches the subject of Histology by way of simple independent unicellular organisms through the lower levels of cell organization and specialization to a detailed study of the highly complex tissues of vertebrate animals. Emphasis is placed on structure, but function is explained in some detail. The relationships between tissues…

  12. Wilms Tumor 1 rs16754 predicts favorable clinical outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia patients in South Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Yu; Yan, Han; Cao, Shan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Lin; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2015-06-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16754 in WT1 shows a clinical implication in Caucasus population. However, the results were not reproducible in different population cohorts. We evaluated the clinical significance of rs16754 for 205 de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in South Chinese population, 188 healthy volunteers were recruited as healthy controls. WT1 mRNA expression was investigated in 81 pretreatment bone marrow specimens. WT1(GA/AA) patients showed better overall survival (OS, P=0.006) and relapse-free survival (RFS, P=0.025) as compared with WT1(GG) patients, and the favorable clinical outcomes were most prominent in older patients with superior OS (P=0.001) and RFS (P=0.003). In multivariable analysis, rs16754 was still associated with favorable OS (HR=1.533, P=0.042). The WT1(GG) patients showed significantly higher WT1 mRNA expression than the WT1(GA/AA) patients (P=0.01). In summary, WT1 rs16754 may serve as an independent biomarker in AML patients from South Chinese. PMID:25841655

  13. New Colors for Histology: Optimized Bivariate Color Maps Increase Perceptual Contrast in Histological Images

    PubMed Central

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Schuster, Alexander K.; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate evaluation of immunostained histological images is required for reproducible research in many different areas and forms the basis of many clinical decisions. The quality and efficiency of histopathological evaluation is limited by the information content of a histological image, which is primarily encoded as perceivable contrast differences between objects in the image. However, the colors of chromogen and counterstain used for histological samples are not always optimally distinguishable, even under optimal conditions. Methods and Results In this study, we present a method to extract the bivariate color map inherent in a given histological image and to retrospectively optimize this color map. We use a novel, unsupervised approach based on color deconvolution and principal component analysis to show that the commonly used blue and brown color hues in Hematoxylin—3,3’-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) images are poorly suited for human observers. We then demonstrate that it is possible to construct improved color maps according to objective criteria and that these color maps can be used to digitally re-stain histological images. Validation To validate whether this procedure improves distinguishability of objects and background in histological images, we re-stain phantom images and N = 596 large histological images of immunostained samples of human solid tumors. We show that perceptual contrast is improved by a factor of 2.56 in phantom images and up to a factor of 2.17 in sets of histological tumor images. Context Thus, we provide an objective and reliable approach to measure object distinguishability in a given histological image and to maximize visual information available to a human observer. This method could easily be incorporated in digital pathology image viewing systems to improve accuracy and efficiency in research and diagnostics. PMID:26717571

  14. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  15. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  16. Dimethyl Fumarate: A Review in Relapsing-Remitting MS.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-02-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera(®)) is an oral disease-modifying agent indicated for the twice-daily treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). It displays immunomodulating and neuroprotective properties, both of which may contribute to its efficacy in these settings. In two phase III trials of 2 years' duration (DEFINE and CONFIRM), twice-daily dimethyl fumarate reduced clinical relapse (both the proportion of patients with MS relapse and the annualized relapse rate), as well as MRI measures of disease activity, versus placebo in adults with RRMS; the drug also reduced disability progression relative to placebo in one of the two studies (DEFINE). Dimethyl fumarate had an acceptable tolerability profile in these trials, with the most common tolerability issues being flushing and gastrointestinal events, which appear to be largely manageable. In the DEFINE and CONFIRM extension (ENDORSE), a minimum of 5 years of treatment with the drug was associated with continued benefit and no new/worsening tolerability signals. Although additional active comparator data are needed, dimethyl fumarate is an effective twice-daily treatment option for use in adults with RRMS, with the convenience of oral administration and an acceptable long-term tolerability profile. PMID:26689201

  17. Multiple myeloma: from front-line to relapsed therapies.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe; Touzeau, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) have led to improvements in response rates and to increased survival. A major advance in the last decade has been the introduction of the novel agents thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide as part of front-line treatment in both the transplant and nontransplant settings. However, disease relapse is inevitable for the majority of patients and myeloma typically recurs more aggressively with each relapse, eventually leading to the development of treatment-refractory disease. Several phase II and III trials have demonstrated the efficacy of recently approved agents in the setting of relapsed and relapsed and refractory MM, including pomalidomide and carfilzomib. Ixazomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor, and multiple other novel classes of agents are being investigated. These include monoclonal antibodies and histone deacetylase inhibitors, which may further add to the therapeutic armamentarium for this malignancy. Therefore, in a disease characterized by multiple relapses, the optimal sequencing of the different effective options is an important consideration in attempting to prolong survival. PMID:25993216

  18. Relapse prevention. An overview of Marlatt's cognitive-behavioral model.

    PubMed

    Larimer, M E; Palmer, R S; Marlatt, G A

    1999-01-01

    Relapse prevention (RP) is an important component of alcoholism treatment. The RP model proposed by Marlatt and Gordon suggests that both immediate determinants (e.g., high-risk situations, coping skills, outcome expectancies, and the abstinence violation effect) and covert antecedents (e.g., lifestyle factors and urges and cravings) can contribute to relapse. The RP model also incorporates numerous specific and global intervention strategies that allow therapist and client to address each step of the relapse process. Specific interventions include identifying specific high-risk situations for each client and enhancing the client's skills for coping with those situations, increasing the client's self-efficacy, eliminating myths regarding alcohol's effects, managing lapses, and restructuring the client's perceptions of the relapse process. Global strategies comprise balancing the client's lifestyle and helping him or her develop positive addictions, employing stimulus control techniques and urge-management techniques, and developing relapse road maps. Several studies have provided theoretical and practical support for the RP model. PMID:10890810

  19. Excessive Cytolytic Responses Predict Tuberculosis Relapse After Apparently Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Cho, Jang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Ronacher, Katharina; King, Elizabeth C.; van Helden, Paul; Walzl, Gerhard; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently, there are no tools to accurately predict tuberculosis relapse. This study aimed to determine whether patients who experience tuberculosis relapse have different immune responses to mycobacteria in vitro than patients who remain cured for 2 years. Methods. Patients with an initial episode of pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited in South Africa. Diluted blood, collected at diagnosis and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, was cultured with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis for 6 days, and cellular RNA was frozen. Gene expression in samples from 10 patients who subsequently experienced relapse, confirmed by strain genotyping, was compared to that in samples from patients who remained cured, using microarrays. Results. At diagnosis, expression of 668 genes was significantly different in samples from patients who experienced relapse, compared with expression in patients who remained successfully cured; these differences persisted for at least 4 weeks. Gene ontology and biological pathways analyses revealed significant upregulation of genes involved in cytotoxic cell-mediated killing. Results were confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in a wider patient cohort. Conclusions. These data show that patients who will subsequently experience relapse exhibit altered immune responses, including excessively robust cytolytic responses to M. tuberculosis in vitro, at the time of diagnosis, compared with patients who will achieve durable cure. Together with microbiological and clinical indices, these differences could be exploited in drug development. PMID:26351358

  20. Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast: A Single Institution's Experience of a Favorable Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Boyan, William; Shea, Brian; Farr, Michael; Kohli, Manpreet; Ginalis, Ernest

    2016-06-01

    Tubular carcinoma is a subtype of invasive breast cancer that comprises 1 to 4 per cent of invasive breast cancers. Prior studies show nearly 100 per cent 15 year survival rate for tubular carcinoma compared to the 89.2 per cent five year survival of all breast cancers. These encouraging statistics beg the question should tubular cancers be treated as other invasive cancers, or can some patients be spared an invasive procedure or the side effects of adjuvant therapy? Fifty-seven cases of tubular carcinoma over 16 years were analyzed. All relevant aspects of the patient's history, treatment, and outcomes were documented. The aim was compare treatment outcomes of tubular breast cancer outcomes to that of all invasive breast cancers. Of the 57 patients, local recurrence was seen in two patients (3.5%) only one of which recurred as a tubular carcinoma (1.75%). There were no cancer-related mortalities. A look into our institution's data supported the notion that tubular carcinoma of the breast is a less aggressive histological type. Of our 57 cases, only two recurrences (3.5%) were noted and there were no cancer-related mortalities. Interestingly only one patient (1.75%) recurred as tubular carcinoma. Without controlling for adjuvant therapy, recommendations cannot be made for a less aggressive treatment plan at this point. Future randomized controlled trials may lead to a less aggressive treatment plan for this favorable subtype. On the basis of this study and others like it, physicians can give evidenced-based favorable prognosis with a diagnosis of tubular carcinoma of the breast. PMID:27305881

  1. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    drugs in development, and it is likely that BG-12 will be licensed this year. This has been licensed for psoriasis so there are good safety data in humans that may also hold true in MS; however, its three times daily dosage will probably impact on patient compliance. Laquinimod has lower efficacy than BG-12 but appears safe and could find a place as a first-line agent. Teriflunomide has just been licensed by the US FDA and may challenge the current injectable first-line therapies as it has a similar efficacy but the advantage of being taken orally. However, risk of teratogenicity may caution against its use in some women of child-bearing potential. This review will examine drugs that have been recently approved as well as those that are in late phase 2 or 3 development as treatment for relapsing MS, highlighting their mechanism of action as well as the clinical trial and safety data before discussing their potential for success in an increasingly florid and complex DMT armamentarium. PMID:23609782

  2. Variation in relapse frequency and the transmission potential of Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael T.; Shirreff, George; Karl, Stephan; Ghani, Azra C.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    There is substantial variation in the relapse frequency of Plasmodium vivax malaria, with fast-relapsing strains in tropical areas, and slow-relapsing strains in temperate areas with seasonal transmission. We hypothesize that much of the phenotypic diversity in P. vivax relapses arises from selection of relapse frequency to optimize transmission potential in a given environment, in a process similar to the virulence trade-off hypothesis. We develop mathematical models of P. vivax transmission and calculate the basic reproduction number R0 to investigate how transmission potential varies with relapse frequency and seasonality. In tropical zones with year-round transmission, transmission potential is optimized at intermediate relapse frequencies of two to three months: slower-relapsing strains increase the opportunity for onward transmission to mosquitoes, but also increase the risk of being outcompeted by faster-relapsing strains. Seasonality is an important driver of relapse frequency for temperate strains, with the time to first relapse predicted to be six to nine months, coinciding with the duration between seasonal transmission peaks. We predict that there is a threshold degree of seasonality, below which fast-relapsing tropical strains are selected for, and above which slow-relapsing temperate strains dominate, providing an explanation for the observed global distribution of relapse phenotypes. PMID:27030414

  3. Counseling Women on Smoking Relapse Prevention During Postpartum.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Ann; Britton, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Many women who quit smoking after learning they are pregnant revert back to smoking after birth of their baby. The high rate of recidivism suggests that women need education about risk of relapse and effective strategies to remain smoke free even before they are discharged from the hospital. Despite evidence that smoking cessation and relapse prevention counseling is effective during early postpartum, many nurses do not provide their patients with this important information, perhaps because they feel inadequately prepared to do so. Helping Women Stop Smoking in Pregnancy and Beyond is an education program designed to help perinatal nurses inform women of negative risks of smoking and offer women strategies to avoid the high probability of resuming smoking after birth. It includes evidence-based interventions that can be used by nurses to provide effective smoking relapse prevention counseling to women during postpartum. PMID:27537087

  4. Neuropsychological and neurological outcome after relapse of lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Christie, D; Battin, M; Leiper, A D; Chessells, J; Vargha-Khadem, F; Neville, B G

    1994-04-01

    Fourteen children who relapsed after initial remission of leukaemia were studied. Six received a second course of cranial radiotherapy, while the remaining eight children were given total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation. The postirradiation somnolence syndrome was common after cranial radiotherapy. All children had mild/soft neurological signs, mostly of coordination. None had a major motor disability. All but the youngest child had cataracts; two children required an operation for these. All children were growth hormone deficient. Verbal IQ, attention, and concentration were selectively reduced (with respect to normative levels). The time between the two treatments, age at relapse, and higher doses of radiotherapy all correlated with cognitive outcome, with girls showing greater impairments than boys. Only two children were performing at age appropriate levels on measures of academic achievement. It is concluded that neurological and neuropsychological morbidity is significantly increased by the current treatments prescribed after the relapse of leukaemia. PMID:7514391

  5. Current strategies for treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Laubach, Jacob P; Voorhees, Peter M; Hassoun, Hani; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Lonial, Sagar; Richardson, Paul G

    2014-02-01

    In spite of significant advances in the management of multiple myeloma (MM), the disease remains incurable and nearly all patients ultimately relapse and require salvage chemotherapy. As such, relapsed and relapsed-refractory MM remains a critical area of research pertaining to biological mechanisms of progression and chemotherapy resistance, as well as to the development of new pharmacologic agents and immunologic approaches for the disease. The immunomodulatory agents and proteasome inhibitors represent the cornerstone of treatment in this setting, with combination regimens incorporating these drugs demonstrating encouraging rates and duration of response, including the newer agents, pomalidomide and carfilzomib. In addition, novel drug classes have shown promising activity in RR MM, including the orally-administered proteasome inhibitors ixazomib and oprozomib; monoclonal antibodies such as the anti-CS1 monoclonal antibody elotuzumab and anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab; and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as panobinostat and rocilinostat. PMID:24471924

  6. Orbital Relapsing Polychondritis: A Unique Presentation, Complication, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Moore, Grant H; Rootman, Daniel B; Roybal, C Nathaniel; Goldberg, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    An 87-year-old man with a history of relapsing polychondritis presented to the emergency department after 4 days of worsening left periorbital swelling and erythema. On examination, he demonstrated clinical features consistent with orbital cellulitis and was treated with a trial of intravenous antibiotics. His condition did not improve over the next 36 hours and intravenous methylprednisolone was initiated. This led to rapid improvement in orbital symptoms and signs, and a diagnosis of specific orbital inflammation secondary to relapsing polychondritis was made. The patient was discharged on a tapering dose of prednisone. As a steroid-sparing measure, adalimumab was initiated; however, the patient developed Sweet Syndrome. Adalimumab was subsequently discontinued, steroid dose was increased, and anakinra treatment was initiated. This therapeutic course led to significant clinical improvement. Since initiating anakinra, the patient has had no recurrences of Sweet Syndrome. Anakinra may be a useful adjunct therapy for ophthalmic manifestations of relapsing polychondritis. PMID:25072220

  7. [Rapidly evolving diabetic mononeuritis multiplex. Favorable outcome after immunosuppressive treatment].

    PubMed

    Awada, A; Dehoux, E; al Jumah, M; al Ayafi, H

    2001-11-01

    A 61 year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with an extremely rapid and aggressive mononeuritis multiplex. Four months after onset, he had severe postural hypotension and at least 6 cranial nerves and 4 somatic nerves were involved. Extensive work-up failed to discover any etiology for the neuropathy apart from diabetes. Treatment with corticosteroids, i.v. immunoglobulins and cyclosporin was followed by progressive but sustained improvement. This case and few other published ones suggest that some particularly aggressive forms of diabetic neuropathy have an immune mechanism and may be treated favorably with immunosuppressor drugs. PMID:11924012

  8. Hodgkin's lymphoma: biology and treatment strategies for primary, refractory, and relapsed disease.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Volker; Stein, Harald; Hummel, Michael; Zollinger, Raphael; Connors, Joseph M

    2003-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphomas belong to the most curable tumor diseases in adults. About 80% of patients in all anatomical stages and of all histological subtypes can be cured with modern treatment strategies. In spite of the great clinical progress, the pathogenesis of this peculiar lymphoproliferative entity has not been elucidated completely up until now. In Section I Drs. Stein, Hummel, and Zollinger describe the different pro-proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways and molecules involved in the transformation of the germinal center B-lymphocyte to the malignant Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cell. They use a comprehensive gene expression profiling (Affymetrix gene chip U133A) on B- and T-Hodgkin cell lines and state that the cell of origin is not the dominant determinant of the Hodgkin cell phenotype, but the transforming event. H-RS cells lack specific functional markers (B-T-cell receptors) and physiologically should undergo apoptosis. Why they do not is unclear and a matter of intensive ongoing research. In Section II Dr. Diehl summarizes the commonly used primary treatment strategies adapted to prognostic strata in early, intermediate and advanced anatomical stages using increasing intensities of chemotherapy (two, four, eight courses of chemotherapy such as ABVD) and additive radiation with decreased doses and field size. ABVD is without doubt the gold standard for early and intermediate stages, but its role as the standard regimen for advanced stages is challenged by recent data with time- and dose-intensified regimens such as the escalated BEACOPP, demonstrating superiority over COPP/ABVD (equivalent to ABVD) for FFTF and OS in all risk strata according to the International Prognostic Score. In Section III, Dr. Connors states that fortunately there is a considerably decreased need for salvage strategies in Hodgkin's lymphomas since primary treatment results in a more than 80% tumor control. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients experience either a tumor

  9. A focus group study of predictors of relapse in electronic gaming machine problem gambling, part 1: factors that 'push' towards relapse.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J; Pols, R; Battersby, M; Lawn, S; Pulvirenti, M; Smith, D

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to develop an empirically based description of relapse in Electronic Gaming Machine problem gambling. In this paper the authors describe part one of a two part, linked relapse process: the 'push' towards relapse. In this two-part process, factors interact sequentially and simultaneously within the problem gambler to produce a series of mental and behavioural events that ends with relapse when the 'push' overcomes 'pull' (part one); or as described in part two, continued abstinence when 'pull' overcomes 'push'. In the second paper, the authors describe how interacting factors 'pull' the problem gambler away from relapse. This study used four focus groups comprising thirty participants who were gamblers, gamblers' significant others, therapists and counsellors. The groups were recorded, recordings were then transcribed and analysed using thematic, textual analysis. With the large number of variables considered to be related to relapse in problem gamblers, five key factors emerged that 'push' the gambler towards relapse. These were urge, erroneous cognitions about the outcomes of gambling, negative affect, dysfunctional relationships and environmental gambling triggers. Two theories emerged: (1) each relapse episode comprised a sequence of mental and behavioural events, which evolves over time and was modified by factors that 'push' this sequence towards relapse and (2) a number of gamblers develop an altered state of consciousness during relapse described as the 'zone' which prolongs the relapse. PMID:21901457

  10. Interleukin-33 Expression Indicates a Favorable Prognosis in Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rössle, Matthias; Cathomas, Gieri; Bonapace, Laura; Sachs, Melanie; Dehler, Silvia; Storz, Martina; Huber, Gerhard; Moch, Holger; Junt, Tobias; Mertz, Kirsten D

    2016-08-01

    The cytokine interleukin-33 (IL-33) is abundantly expressed in epithelial barrier tissues such as salivary glands. Here, we characterized nuclear IL-33 protein expression by immunohistochemistry in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors and associated it with disease outcome. Most benign salivary gland tumors expressed IL-33, and all Warthin's tumors showed strong and consistent IL-33 expression in the basally oriented cells of their bilayered epithelium. In the malignant group of neoplasms, nuclear IL-33 expression was limited to specific tumor entities-for example, to epithelial-myopepithelial carcinomas (n = 9/11), acinic cell carcinomas (n = 13/27), and oncocytic carcinomas (n = 2/2). IL-33 expression in the combined group of malignant salivary gland neoplasms was significantly associated with favorable histological parameters, lack of metastasis, and longer overall survival, compared with IL-33-negative tumors. We conclude that IL-33 expression is a novel prognostic marker for malignant salivary gland tumors with potential use in clinical diagnostics. PMID:26912475