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Sample records for relapsing polychondritis involving

  1. Relapsing polychondritis: A clinical update.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lucia; Greco, Antonio; Rea, Andrea; Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; De Virgilio, Armando; De Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare connective tissue disease in which recurrent bouts of inflammation, involve the cartilage of the ears, nose, larynx, tracheobronchial tree and cardiovascular system. RP is generally observed in the fourth and fifth decades of life and occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The cause of RP is still unknown. It is considered an immune-mediated disease, as there is an overlap between well documented RP with other rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. There is a significant association of RP with the antigen HLA-DR4. RP includes loss of basophilic staining of cartilage matrix perichondral accompanied by inflammation of the cartilage. Cells are present perivascular mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells infiltrated. The chondrocytes become vacuolated and necrotic and are replaced by fibrous tissue. Common symptoms are often absent in the early stages of the disease in almost half the cases, resulting in delay in diagnosis. The development of chondrite allows the diagnosis of RP in patients initially evaluated for joint abnormalities, ocular, cutaneous, or audio-vestibular. Diagnostic criteria for RP are based on characteristic clinical manifestations. According to Damiani and Levine, the diagnosis can be considered final when one or more of the clinical features are present in conjunction with biopsy confirmation. The course of symptoms for patients with relapsing polychondritis is often unpredictable. Patients with mild signs of acute inflammation are usually treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and small doses of prednisone. Patients with severe manifestations, such as airway compromise may require high doses of prednisone or even intravenous pulse methyl-prednisone. PMID:26876384

  2. Callosal Disconnection Syndrome Associated with Relapsing Polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toru; Kanno, Shigenori; Shijo, Tomomi; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Osamu; Kamimura, Naoto; Ishii, Tomonori; Mori, Etsuro

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the cartilagenous structures, and it sometimes involves the central nervous system. Encephalitis associated with RP causes a wide variety of symptoms according to the affected sites. We herein report the first case of 72-year-old right-handed man who developed acute meningoencephalitis associated with RP involving the corpus callous. After immunosuppressive therapy, his symptoms dramatically improved, but difficulty in performing bimanual movements with occasional diagonistic dyspraxia in his right hand remained. Because callosal signs are easily missed, especially in acute settings, it would be useful to know that RP can sometimes cause callosal disconnection syndrome. PMID:27150878

  3. Hypopyon uveitis (without scleritis) a manifestation symptom of relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Calenda, E; Nasser, Z; Benzerroug, M; Gardea, E; Muraine, M

    2009-01-01

    We report an atypical ocular symptom, hypopyon uveitis without scleritis encountered in relapsing polychondritis. Relapsing polychondritis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sterile hypopyon uveitis. PMID:20214060

  4. Relapsing Polychondritis: Inflamed Joints and Ears

    PubMed Central

    Melikoğlu, Meltem Alkan; Şenel, Kazım

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an episodic and progressive inflammatory disease of the cartilaginous structures, including elastic cartilage of the ear and nose, hyaline cartilage of the peripheral joints, fibrocartilage at axial sites, and cartilage of the tracheo-bronchial tree. The spectrum of its presentations may vary from intermittent mild episodes of chondritis to occasional organ involvement or even life-threatening manifestations. Case Report: We presented a 64 year-old male patient with bilaterally knee arthritis and discoloration of pinna. Conclusion: There is lack of awareness about this disease due to its rarity. With this case presentation, our goal was to draw attention to this disease, which could be delayed for the diagnosis. PMID:25759785

  5. Laryngotracheal stenosis requiring emergency tracheostomy as the first manifestation of childhood-relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Buscatti, Izabel M; Giacomin, Maria Fernanda A; Silva, Marco Felipe C; Campos, Lúcia M A; Sallum, Adriana M E; Silva, Clovis A

    2013-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare childhood disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by inflammatory, recurrent and destructive cartilage lesions. The chondritis could be widespread and involves generally laryngeal and auricular hyaline cartilages. We described a 9 years and 4 months old girl, who presented recurrent acute laryngotracheitis and laryngotracheal stenosis, which were the first manifestations of relapsing polychondritis, and was submitted to emergency tracheostomy. She also had ear condritis and arthritis, being treated with prednisolone and methotrexate. In conclusion, we reported a rare case of relapsing polychondritis that presented a life-threatening laryngo-tracheo-bronchial disorder requiring tracheostomy. We suggest that the diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis should be considered for patients who present recurrent acute laryngotracheitis with other types of condritis, as well as musculoskeletal manifestations. PMID:24149019

  6. Orbital Relapsing Polychondritis: A Unique Presentation, Complication, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Moore, Grant H; Rootman, Daniel B; Roybal, C Nathaniel; Goldberg, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    An 87-year-old man with a history of relapsing polychondritis presented to the emergency department after 4 days of worsening left periorbital swelling and erythema. On examination, he demonstrated clinical features consistent with orbital cellulitis and was treated with a trial of intravenous antibiotics. His condition did not improve over the next 36 hours and intravenous methylprednisolone was initiated. This led to rapid improvement in orbital symptoms and signs, and a diagnosis of specific orbital inflammation secondary to relapsing polychondritis was made. The patient was discharged on a tapering dose of prednisone. As a steroid-sparing measure, adalimumab was initiated; however, the patient developed Sweet Syndrome. Adalimumab was subsequently discontinued, steroid dose was increased, and anakinra treatment was initiated. This therapeutic course led to significant clinical improvement. Since initiating anakinra, the patient has had no recurrences of Sweet Syndrome. Anakinra may be a useful adjunct therapy for ophthalmic manifestations of relapsing polychondritis. PMID:25072220

  7. Early Stage Relapsing Polychondritis Diagnosed by Nasal Septum Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takaaki; Moody, Sandra; Komori, Masafumi; Jibatake, Akira; Yaegashi, Makito

    2015-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare inflammation of cartilaginous tissues, the diagnosis of which is usually delayed by a mean period of 2.9 years from symptom onset. We present the case of a 36-year-old man with nasal pain and fever. Physical examination of the nose was grossly unremarkable, but there was significant tenderness of the nasal bridge. Acute sinusitis was initially diagnosed due to thickened left frontal sinus mucosa on computed tomography (CT); however, there was no improvement after antibiotic intake. Repeat CT showed edematous inflammation of the nasal septum; biopsy of this site demonstrated erosion and infiltration of lymphocytes, plasma cells, eosinophils, and neutrophils in the hyaline cartilage. Relapsing polychondritis was confirmed by the modified McAdam's criteria and can be diagnosed at an early stage by nasal septum biopsy; it should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with nasal symptoms alone or persistent sinus symptoms. PMID:26843866

  8. Relapsing Polychondritis: an Update on Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, Diagnostic Tools, and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Sota, Jurgen; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Molinaro, Francesco; Messina, Mario; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis is a rare multisystemic disease widely accepted as a complex autoimmune disorder affecting proteoglycan-rich structures and cartilaginous tissues, especially the auricular pinna, cartilage of the nose, tracheobronchial tree, eyes, and heart's connective components. The clinical spectrum may vary from intermittent inflammatory episodes leading to unesthetic structural deformities to life-threatening cardiopulmonary manifestations, such as airway collapse and valvular regurgitation. The frequent association with other rheumatologic and hematologic disorders has been extensively reported over time, contributing to define its complexity at a diagnostic and also therapeutic level. Diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis is mainly based on clinical clues, while laboratory data have only a supportive contribution. Conversely, radiology is showing a relevant role in estimating the rate of systemic involvement as well as disease activity. The present review is aimed at providing an update on scientific data reported during the last 3 years about relapsing polychondritis in terms of pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and new treatment options. PMID:26711694

  9. Relapsing Polychondritis in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis Using Etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó; Galli, Natalia Bassalobre; Kleinfelder, Alais Daiane Fadini; D'Ippolito, Julia Farabolini; Gulin Tolentino, Andressa; Paiva, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation and progressive destruction of cartilaginous tissues, especially of the ears, nose, joints, and tracheobronchial tree. Its etiology is not well understood, but some studies have linked its pathophysiology with autoimmune disease and autoantibody production. We described a case of a 46-year-old male patient with ankylosing spondylitis who developed RP after the use of etanercept. Few similar cases have been described in the literature. However, they show a possible association between the use of biological inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNFα), which potentially produces autoantibodies, and the development of RP. The treatment was based on data in the literature and included the cessation of biological therapy and the addition of corticosteroids with substantial improvement. PMID:25276463

  10. A Case of Relapsing Polychondritis Initiating with Unexplained Fever

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Kosuke; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Yoshimura, Satoshi; Kurohama, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Mai; Takahata, Taichi; Oku, Ryuta; Ito, Masahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease affecting the multiple organ system. Here, we describe a case of RP initially presenting with high fever. The patient was referred to our hospital for further examination of fever of unknown origin (FUO). On admission, the patient reported dry cough in addition to fever. On physical examination, her red, swollen ears were noted, attributed on histology to inflammation with auricular perichondritis. She was diagnosed with RP and treated with oral prednisone (50 mg/day); her fever and auricular inflammation resolved. The patient no longer reported cough and body temperature returned to normal and the elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were normalized. In this case, identification of the origin of fever was a challenge because of unspecific symptoms; however, awareness of the systemic manifestations of RP may lead to the prompt diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26981127

  11. Relapsing polychondritis with different types of ocular inflammations

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Nana; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Yotsukura, Jiro; Baba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    We were presented with two cases of relapsing polychondritis (RP) associated with different types of ocular inflammation. The first case was a 35-year-old man who had bilateral hyperemic conjunctiva and ocular pain, and was referred to Chiba University Hospital with a diagnosis of episcleritis refractory. He was treated with dexamethasone eye drops. He developed tinnitus, deafness in both ears, and left auriculitis. A left auricular biopsy showed an infiltration of lymphocytes surrounding the cartilage. He was diagnosed with RP and treated with 30 mg/day oral prednisolone. After tapering the prednisolone, the scleritis in both eyes improved. The second case was a 71-year-old man who was deaf in both ears and had bilateral scleritis. At the first visit to our hospital, his left eyelid and right auricula were reddish and swollen, and he reported some pain. He was treated with intravenous antibiotics, and the left orbital cellulitis quickly improved. However, he developed right scleritis and left gonitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral posterior scleritis and right auricular perichondritis. Auricular biopsy showed an infiltration of lymphocytes into the periauricular tissue. He was diagnosed with RP, and 40 mg/day oral prednisolone was given and his symptoms improved. Although RP is rare, it is a life-threatening disease. Thus, ophthalmologists should consider RP in patients with both ocular and auricular inflammation. PMID:26425107

  12. [NERVOUS SYSTEM LESIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAPSING POLYCHONDRITIS: ANALYSIS OF ORIGINAL OBSERVATIONS].

    PubMed

    Chernyak, V I; Savel'ev A I; Men'shikova, I V; Pogromov, A P

    2016-01-01

    Three clinical cases are described including two of relapsing polychondritis with lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system (one of long-standing aseptic lymphocytic meningitis and one of cranial neuropathy of 2, 5, 7, and 8 pairs) and the third case of the optic nerve lesion with amblyopia. The two former cases were successfully treated with high doses of corticosteroids, the third one with moderate doses of the same medications. The data from the current literature concerning variants of clinical manifestations, methods for diagnostics and treatment of neurologic manifestations of relapsing polychondritis are discussed. PMID:27459759

  13. [A case of relapsing polychondritis with oculobulbar symptoms and successful treatment of respiratory failure with BiPAP].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Yamazaki, M; Takei, Y; Miyazaki, A; Hanyu, N

    1999-10-01

    A 66-year-old man developed diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, and acute respiratory failure. The initial diagnosis was myasthenia gravis and prednisolone had been administrated for three years. Because of recurrent upper respiratory infections, prednisolone was tapered off. Two months later, auricular chondritis, arthritis, and conjunctivitis appeared. He was diagnosed as having relapsing polychondritis on the basis of histological findings of the ear lobe biopsy. Reinstituted prednisolone had the effect on the auricular chondritis, arthritis, and conjunctivitis, but no effect on dysphagia, hoarseness, and respiratory failure caused by the deformity of the pharynx and airway. Tracheal collapse usually causes rapid death, so early tracheostomy and the use of endotracheal prostheses have been recommended in patients with airway obstruction from relapsing polychondritis, but such surgical management can only partially open up the large airways and has no effect on smaller airways. In this case tracheostomy and endoluminal stent placement have helped improve the patient's respiratory failure, but have had little effect on its aggravation at night in the supine position. The use of BiPAP after surgical management can be an effective treatment for airway involvement in relapsing polychondritis probably because it keeps the narrowed airways from collapsing, especially at night. PMID:10655766

  14. A nationwide study of the epidemiology of relapsing polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Anna; Páll, Nóra; Molnár, Katalin; Kováts, Tamás; Surján, György; Vicsek, Tamás; Pollner, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune inflammatory disease that attacks mainly cartilaginous structures or causes serious damage in proteoglycan-rich structures (the eyes, heart, blood vessels, inner ear). This study shows results regarding the epidemiology, progression, and associations of this highly variable disease by collecting all cases from a 124-million-person-year Central European nationwide cohort. Methods We used the Hungarian Health Care Database to identify all persons with possible RP infection. We followed patients who had International Classification of Diseases 10th edition code M94.1 at least once in their inpatient or outpatient records between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2013 in Hungary. We classified these patients into disease severity groups by their drug consumption patterns between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013. We analyzed the regional distribution of RP incidences as well. Overall maps of comorbidity are presented with network layouts. Results We identified 256 patients with RP among cumulatively 11.5 million registered inhabitants. We classified these patients into four severity classes as “extremely mild” (n=144), “mild” (n=22), “moderate” (n=41), and “severe” (n=4). Two additional groups were defined for patients without available drug data as “suspected only” (n=23) and “confirmed but unknown treatment” (n=22). The age and sex distributions of patients were similar to worldwide statistics. Indeed, the overall survival was good (95% confidence interval for 5 years was 83.6%–92.9% and for 10 years was 75.0%–88.3% which corresponds to the overall survival of the general population in Hungary), and the associations with other autoimmune disorders were high (56%) in Hungary. Almost any disease can occur with RP; however, the symptoms of chromosomal abnormalities are only incidental. Spondylosis can be a sign of the activation of RP, while Sjögren syndrome is the most frequent

  15. A RARE COMPLICATION OF A RARE DISEASE; STROKE DUE TO RELAPSING POLYCHONDRITIS.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Eda Kiliç; Xanmemmedov, Elmir; Çolak, Melek; Soysal, Aysun

    2015-11-30

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an episodic and progressive inflammatory disease of cartilaginous structures. Its diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features such as laboratory parameters, biopsy. Neurological complications occur in 3% of the cases and are classified as an important cause of death. The cranial nerve disorders are most common but hemiplegia, ataxia, myelitis, polyneuritis, seizures, confusion, hallucination and headache can also happen. The aetiology of central nervous system involvement is still unknown. Moreover stroke has rarely reported in these patients. The diagnosis of stroke is challenging because of its rarity among these patients. Perhaps vasculitis is the common underlying mechanism. Also meningitis and encephalitis can occur during the course of RP. A 44 year-old woman was admitted with uncontemplated left hemiparesis, redness, swelling, and tenderness of the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the right hand and the cartilaginous portion. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate were elevated. Vasculitis biomarkers were normal in our patient. Carotid and vertebral artery doppler ultrasonography, cranial and cervical MR Angiography were normal. Echocardiography showed a mild mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation. Our patient had the history of auricular polychondritis but she had not been diagnosed. Hemiparesis was her first neurological manifestation that led her to doctors for diagnosis. Our patient fulfilled the criteria of RP so no biopsy was needed. She was treated with oral prednisolone (80 mg/day) and aspirin (300 mg/day) and now she is on 10 mg prednisolone and 150 mg azathioprine. Two months later her physical and neurological symptoms returned to normal. PMID:26821518

  16. An uncommon presentation of an uncommon disease: relapsing polychondritis overlap with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michelle A; Rahnama-Moghadam, Sahand; Gilson, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare rheumatologic disorder in which recurrent episodes of inflammation result in destruction of cartilage of the ears and nose. The joints, eyes, audio-vestibular system, heart valves, respiratory tract, kidneys, and skin can also be involved. Skin involvement is most frequently linked to concomitant myelodysplastic syndrome and has rarely been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. A 47-year-old woman presented with violaceous, indurated, tender plaques on the bilateral cartilaginous ears with sparing of the lobes, consistent with RP. Further investigations revealed positive ANA and anti-Smith antibody, oral ulcers, a photo-distributed skin eruption, and biopsy-proven lupus nephritis, leading to a second concomitant diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The diagnosis of SLE associated with RP was made and the patient was started on oral prednisone and hydroxychloroquine. This is a rare report of SLE associated with RP. It is unclear whether RP occurring in patients with SLE represents another clinical manifestation of SLE or a coexisting disease. However, a significant ANA titer in a patient with RP strongly suggests the presence of an associated autoimmune disorder. If immunologic abnormalities usually found in SLE are detected in patients with RP, it is important to monitor patients for the development of other manifestations of SLE. PMID:27267190

  17. Efficacy of tocilizumab for psychiatric symptoms associated with relapsing polychondritis: the first case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Shengyun; Guan, Wenjuan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) rarely affected the central nervous system (CNS). If the CNS is involved, it can result in psychiatric manifestations. Patients with RP always respond well to glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants. If the therapies fail, biologics can be given, such as tocilizumab, which is a humanized monoclonal antibody against the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Until now, there have been no randomized clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of biologics, no reports of RP with psychiatric disorders as initial symptoms, and no reports of tocilizumab used for psychiatric symptoms due to RP. Here, we report a 60-year-old woman with mania, logomania, hallucinations, cognitive disorder, persecutory delusion, and violent tendency as chief complaints. The application of dexamethasone worsened her psychiatric symptoms. After the first infusion of tocilizumab, she achieved complete remission within one week. During the follow-up period, she sustained serological and psychiatric remission. Our case illustrates the safety and efficacy of tocilizumab for psychiatric symptoms of RP. PMID:27260262

  18. Relapsing polychondritis with p-ANCA associated vasculitis: Which triggers the other?

    PubMed Central

    File, Ibolya; Trinn, Csilla; Mátyus, Zsolt; Ujhelyi, László; Balla, József; Mátyus, János

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease with chronic inflammatory/destructive lesions of the cartilaginous tissues. In one third of the cases it is associated with other autoimmune disorders, mostly with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). We report three cases of RP with p-ANCA positive AAV. In the first patient RP developed 1.5 years after the onset of AAV. In the others the signs of RP were present before the onset of severe crescent glomerulonephritis. Patients responded well on steroid and cyclophosphamide. In dialysis dependent cases plasmapheresis was also used successfully. During the 2 and 1.5 years of follow up, they were symptom-free, and had stable glomerular filtration rate. The first patient died after four years of follow-up due to the complications of sudden unset pancytopenia, which raises the possibility of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. In the setting of RP or AAV physicians should always be aware of the possibility of sudden or insidious appearance of the other disease. PMID:25516870

  19. Corticosteroid Therapy for a Patient with Relapsing Polychondritis Complicated by IgG4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamasue, Mari; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Kan, Takamasa; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Ushijima, Ryoichi; Usagawa, Yuko; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare systemic disorder characterized by recurrent, widespread chondritis of the auricular, nasal, and tracheal cartilages. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic immune-mediated disease characterized by the infiltration of IgG4-bearing plasma cells into systemic organs. Although 25% to 35% of patients with RP have a concurrent autoimmune disease, coexistence of RP and IgG4-RD is rare. We herein report a case of RP complicated by IgG4-RD. A 63-year-old man developed recurrent bilateral ear pain and swelling, recurrent blurred and decreased vision, and migratory multiple joint pain, sequentially within one year. Fourteen months after the first symptom, he experienced dry cough and dyspnea with exertion. A computed tomography (CT) scan detected interstitial pneumonia, swelling of bilateral submandibular glands, bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and several nodules in bilateral kidneys. His serum levels of IgG and IgG4 were elevated. The biopsy specimen of auricular cartilage showed infiltrations of inflammatory cells and fibrosis consistent with RP. The IgG4-positive cells were not observed in auricular cartilage. The patient met the diagnostic criteria of RP, including bilateral auricular chondritis, conjunctivitis, iritis and polyarthritis. The biopsy specimens of lung and kidney revealed the significant infiltrations of IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis. We also diagnosed him as having IgG4-RD, affecting bilateral submandibular glands, hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, lungs, and kidneys. Thus, RP preceded the onset of IgG4-RD. Corticosteroid therapy improved the symptoms and CT scan findings. In conclusion, RP and IgG4-RD do coexist; however, the pathogenesis of their coexistence is unknown. PMID:27396510

  20. A Rare Case of Splenic Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Relapsing Polychondritis of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gary J.; Mendes, Bryan; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RPC) is a poorly understood phenomenon associated with cartilaginous inflammation of the ear, nose, tracheobronchial tree, and peripheral joints. Many cases of RPC respond to anti-inflammatories and resolve with no further complications. However, RPC has also been linked to more insidious conditions such as malignancies, autoimmune disorders, vasculitis, or underlying infections. Given the spectrum of associated disorders, patients with RPC may need to be monitored for more insidious underlying conditions. In this case, we report a unique case of bilateral auricular inflammation and nasal inflammation mimicking RPC as the only presenting symptom of splenic marginal zone B-cell lymphoma and we survey related cases in the literature. PMID:25544924

  1. Critical role of the major histocompatibility complex and IL-10 in matrilin-1-induced relapsing polychondritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Ann-Sofie; Johansson, Asa C M; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2004-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an autoimmune disease that affects extra-articular cartilage. Matrilin-1-induced relapsing polychondritis (MIRP) is a model for RP and is useful for studies of the pathogenic mechanisms in this disease. There are indications that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a major role in RP, since DR4+ patients are more commonly affected than controls. We have now addressed the role of the MHC region, as well as the non-MHC contribution, using congenic mouse strains. Of the MHC congenic strains, B10.Q (H2q) was the most susceptible, the B10.P (H2p) and B10.R (H2r) strains developed mild disease, while B10 strains carrying the v, b, f, or u H2 haplotypes were resistant. A slight variation of susceptibility of H2q strains (B10.Q> C3H.Q> DBA/1) was observed and the (B10.Q x DBA/1)F1 was the most susceptible of all strains. Furthermore, macrophages and CD4+ T cells were the most prominent cell types in inflammatory infiltrates of the tracheal cartilage. Macrophages are the major source of many cytokines, such as interleukin-10 (IL-10), which is currently being tested as a therapeutic agent in several autoimmune diseases. We therefore investigated B10.Q mice devoid of IL-10 through gene deletion and found that they developed a significantly more severe disease, with an earlier onset, than their heterozygous littermates. In conclusion, MHC genes, as well as non-MHC genes, are important for MIRP induction, and IL-10 plays a major suppressive role in cartilage inflammation of the respiratory tract. PMID:15380048

  2. Local Cartilage Trauma as a Pathogenic Factor in Autoimmunity (One Hypothesis Based on Patients with Relapsing Polychondritis Triggered by Cartilage Trauma)

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Carlos A.; Bonilla Abadía, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, it has been of great interest to study the binding mechanism between the innate and adaptive immune responses as interrelated processes for the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. Infection has been a well-known trigger of autoimmunity and trauma has been related as well too. Cryptogenic antigens release, recognition of pathogenic structure, and metabolic changes generated by both stimuli begin an inflammatory process which in turn activates the immune system amplifying T and B cell responses. The development of relapsing polychondritis after trauma may have a direct association with these events and in turn probably trigger autoimmune phenomena. PMID:22110903

  3. 3-D printouts of the tracheobronchial tree generated from CT images as an aid to management in a case of tracheobronchial chondromalacia caused by relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Matthew David; Laycock, Stephen David; Jayne, David; Babar, Judith; Noble, Brendon

    2013-08-01

    This report concerns a 67 year old male patient with known advanced relapsing polychondritis complicated by tracheobronchial chondromalacia who is increasingly symptomatic and therapeutic options such as tracheostomy and stenting procedures are being considered. The DICOM files from the patient's dynamic chest CT in its inspiratory and expiratory phases were used to generate stereolithography (STL) files and hence print out 3-D models of the patient's trachea and central airways. The 4 full-sized models allowed better understanding of the extent and location of any stenosis or malacic change and should aid any planned future stenting procedures. The future possibility of using the models as scaffolding to generate a new cartilaginous upper airway using regenerative medical techniques is also discussed. PMID:24421951

  4. LIMBIC ENCEPHALITIS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAPSING POLYCHONDRITIS RESPONDED TO INFLIXIMAB AND MAINTAINED ITS CONDITION WITHOUT RECURRENCE AFTER DISCONTINUATION: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    KONDO, TAKESHI; FUKUTA, MAMIKO; TAKEMOTO, AYUMU; TAKAMI, YUICHIRO; SATO, MOTOKI; TAKAHASHI, NORIYUKI; SUZUKI, TOMIO; SATO, JUICHI; ATSUTA, NAOKI; SOBUE, GEN; TAKAHASHI, YUKITOSHI; BAN, NOBUTARO

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are rare complications of relapsing polychondritis (RP). The majority of patients respond well to glucocorticoid therapy, but need to maintain it. Some patients are refractory to initial glucocorticoid therapy and to additional immunosuppressants, and end up with an outcome worse than at therapy initiation. The standardized therapeutic protocol for this condition has not been established. The effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α agents have been reported recently. We experienced a patient with RP and limbic encephalitis who was refractory to initial high-dose glucocorticoid, but subsequently responded to infliximab and did not show deterioration of signs and symptoms after stopping therapy. We report this case together with a systematic literature review. This is the first case report of RP with CNS manifestations successfully treated by an anti-TNF-α agent without recurrence after discontinuation. PMID:25741046

  5. Tracheobronchial stenosis evaluated by inspiratory and expiratory three-dimensional computed tomography and impulse oscillation with three-dimensional color imaging in a patient with relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y; Kamiyoshihara, M; Okajo, J; Ishii, Y; Takise, A

    2014-01-01

    Patients with relapsing polychondritis (RP) and airway stenosis have difficulty performing conventional spirometry that requires maximum forced expiration. We report a patient with RP who showed progressive severe bronchial stenosis on three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and impulse oscillation (IOS) with 3D color imaging using a Mostgraph®. The forced oscillation technique using IOS allows within-breath evaluation without forced expiration. A 68-year-old man who had RP presented with dyspnea due to stenosis of the trachea and left main bronchus (lt. mb). Stenting was performed twice in two years. Chest 3D-CT revealed a marked difference in the extent of bronchial collapse during expiration compared with inspiration. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1.0), reactance at 5Hz (X5), resonant frequency (Fres), and integrated low frequency reactance area (ALX) measured by IOS showed temporary improvement after placement of the first stent, but respiratory resistance at 5Hz (R5) and 20Hz (R20) remained poor. 3D color images of respiratory resistance obtained with a Mostgraph® already showed high values at the time of diagnosis, resembling the features of chronic obstructive disease (COPD). 3D color images were helpful for interpreting the changes of IOS parameters during the clinical course. In conclusion, 3D-CT in inspiration/expiration and noninvasive IOS with 3D color imaging are useful for assessing airway stenosis in RP while reducing the burden of repeated spirometry. PMID:25001664

  6. Cauda equina involvement in acute myeloid leukemia relapse.

    PubMed

    Buakhao, Jitsuda; Tansawet, Amarate

    2011-10-01

    Although central nervous system (CNS) involvement in acute myeloid leukemia has been described in about 2 to 4%, it still represents a major therapeutic problem, particularly cauda eqina involvement that is clinically significant and unusual. Here, a 22-year-old man, with underlying AML (M2-Subtype, FAB classification) and cytogenetic analysis resulted in 45, x, -y, t(8;21) (q22;q22)[15] whose presenting symptoms of low back pain and incontinence, 10 months after first remission, was reported. This was followed by peripheral and bone marrow relapse. The magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings revealed leukemic infiltration at S1-S5 of the spinal cord canal with associated soft tissue component at presacral area encasing bilateral S1-S5 exiting root with heterogeneous enhancement in bone marrow of S2-S4. The therapeutic and prognosis implications of spinal cord involvement by leukemia were discussed. Because of severe morbidity, the patient developed bone marrow failure and died from sepsis. PMID:22145515

  7. Involving relatives in relapse prevention for bipolar disorder: a multi-perspective qualitative study of value and barriers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Managing early warning signs is an effective approach to preventing relapse in bipolar disorder. Involving relatives in relapse prevention has been shown to maximize the effectiveness of this approach. However, family-focused intervention research has typically used expert therapists, who are rarely available within routine clinical services. It remains unknown what issues exist when involving relatives in relapse prevention planning delivered by community mental health case managers. This study explored the value and barriers of involving relatives in relapse prevention from the perspectives of service users, relatives and care-coordinators. Methods Qualitative interview study nested within a randomized controlled trial of relapse prevention for individuals with bipolar disorder. The purposive sample of 52 participants comprised service users (n = 21), care coordinators (n = 21) and relatives (n = 10). Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results All parties identified benefits of involving relatives in relapse prevention: improved understanding of bipolar disorder; relatives gaining a role in illness management; and improved relationships between each party. Nevertheless, relatives were often discouraged from becoming involved. Some staff perceived involving relatives increased the complexity of their own role and workload, and some service users valued the exclusivity of their relationship with their care-coordinator and prioritized taking individual responsibility for their illness over the benefits of involving their relatives. Barriers were heightened when family relationships were poor. Conclusions Whilst involving relatives in relapse prevention has perceived value, it can increase the complexity of managing bipolar disorder for each party. In order to fully realize the benefits of involving relatives in relapse prevention, additional training and support for community care coordinators is needed. Trial registration ISRCTN41352631

  8. Hypothalamic involvement assessed by T1 relaxation time in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zellini, Francesco; Niepel, Graham; Tench, Christopher R; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2009-12-01

    Recent work in multiple sclerosis, focusing on neuropathological abnormalities, found a frequent and severe hypothalamic involvement. The possible clinical implications are disturbances in sleep and sexual activity, depression, memory impairment and fatigue. Despite this there are no magnetic resonance imaging studies focusing on in vivo hypothalamic pathology in multiple sclerosis. Our objective was to investigate magnetic resonance imaging-detectable abnormalities related to pathological changes in the hypothalamus of patients with multiple sclerosis, and to subsequently explore the relationship with fatigue. We used T1 relaxation time as a sensitive measure of pathology. Using region of interest analysis, median T1 values in the hypothalamus were measured in 44 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and in 13 healthy controls. Fatigue was assessed using the Fatigue Severity Scale, and patients were divided in two subgroups, fatigued and non-fatigued, according to Fatigue Severity Scale scores. We found a significantly higher T1 relaxation time in the hypothalamus of multiple sclerosis patients compared with controls (p = 0.027). There was a significant correlation between T1 values and fatigue severity (rho 0.437, p = 0.008), and median T1 values were different among the study groups. Our results show that pathological involvement of the hypothalamus in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is detectable using magnetic resonance imaging, and that the pathology measured by quantitative T1 might reflect fatigue. PMID:19995847

  9. The Involvement of Oxytocin in the Subthalamic Nucleus on Relapse to Methamphetamine-Seeking Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Baracz, Sarah Jane; Everett, Nicholas Adams; Cornish, Jennifer Louise

    2015-01-01

    The psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive drug of abuse. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to modulate METH-related reward and METH-seeking behaviour. Recent findings implicated the subthalamic nucleus (STh) as a key brain region in oxytocin modulation of METH-induced reward. However, it is unclear if oxytocin acts in this region to attenuate relapse to METH-seeking behaviour, and if this action is through the oxytocin receptor. We aimed to determine whether oxytocin pretreatment administered into the STh would reduce reinstatement to METH use in rats experienced at METH self-administration, and if this could be reversed by the co-administration of the oxytocin receptor antagonist desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent surgery to implant an intravenous jugular vein catheter and bilateral microinjection cannulae into the STh under isoflourane anaesthesia. Rats were then trained to self-administer intravenous METH (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) by lever press during 2-hour sessions under a fixed ratio 1 schedule for 20 days. Following extinction of lever press activity, the effect of microinjecting saline, oxytocin (0.2 pmol, 0.6 pmol, 1.8 pmol, 3.6 pmol) or co-administration of oxytocin (3.6 pmol) and desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT (3 nmol) into the STh (200 nl/side) was examined on METH-primed reinstatement (1 mg/kg; i.p.). We found that local administration of the highest oxytocin dose (3.6 pmol) into the STh decreased METH-induced reinstatement and desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT had a non-specific effect on lever press activity. These findings highlight that oxytocin modulation of the STh is an important modulator of relapse to METH abuse. PMID:26284529

  10. Multiple extramedullary relapses without bone marrow involvement after second allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Woo; Chung, Eun Jin; Kim, Sun Young; Ko, Jeong Hee; Baek, Hey Sung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Oh, Sung Hee; Jeon, Seok Cheol; Lee, Woong Soo; Park, Chan Kum; Lee, Chul Hoon

    2012-06-01

    EMR without BM involvement after allogeneic HSCT is extremely rare, especially in children; only a few cases have been reported. A two-yr-old boy was diagnosed with AML (M4) and underwent allogeneic HSCT in first complete remission with BM from HLA-matched unrelated donor without GVHD. Four yr later, he had a BM relapse and after induction and consolidation chemotherapy, he received a second HSCT from an unrelated donor using peripheral blood stem cells. His second post-transplant course was complicated by extensive chronic GVHD involving the skin, oral cavity, and lungs, which was treated with tacrolimus and corticosteroid. Two yr later, he noticed a mild swelling in the right cheek area. The BM showed a complete remission marrow and a soft tissue biopsy was compatible with granulocytic sarcoma. PET-CT showed multifocal bone involvements. He received chemotherapy, and the chloromas decreased in size. We report a case of diffuse EMR of AML without BM involvement after a second allogeneic HSCT. PMID:21923886

  11. Involvement of the appendix in a relapsed case of primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, H; Takagi, T; Tamaru, J; Sakai, C

    2000-05-01

    We report here a 20-year-old man presenting with primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma which showed an aggressive clinical course spreading to the spleen and skin despite various treatments. Eight months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, acute appendicitis with perforation occurred and the patient underwent appendectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was NK/T-cell lymphoma of the appendix. Lymphoma of the appendix is extremely rare and the majority of appendiceal lymphomas are of B-cell origin. This is the first report of involvement of appendix by nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. PMID:11042526

  12. Vaccination with collagen-pulsed dendritic cells prevents the onset and reduces the disease severity in the mouse model of spontaneous polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, M; Griffiths, M M; Bradley, D S

    2009-01-01

    Immature dendritic cells (iDCs) have a tolerogenic potential due to low expression of important co-stimulatory cell surface molecules required for antigen presentation and induction of an effective immune response. We report here that injection of iDCs pulsed with chick type II collagen (CII) delayed the onset significantly and suppressed the severity of spontaneous polychondritis (SP) in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ6αβ8αβ transgenic mouse model. Bone marrow-derived iDCs were pulsed in vitro with CII and transferred into 6-week-old HLA-DQ6αβ8αβ transgenic mice. Mice receiving CII-pulsed iDCs did not display any clinical signs of disease until 5·5 months of age, indicating the ability of the DC vaccine to delay significantly the onset of SP. Control groups receiving unpulsed iDCs or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) developed polyarthritis at 3·5 months, as we have reported previously. The severity and incidence of disease was reduced in mice injected with CII-pulsed iDCs. Proinflammatory cytokines were in low to undetectable levels in the serum and tissue in the CII-pulsed iDC mice, correlating with the protection. This is the first evidence of iDC therapy controlling SP and suggests that iDC vaccination may provide a tool to reducing clinical manifestations in human inflammatory autoimmune disease such as relapsing polychondritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19664142

  13. Mutations in epigenetic regulators are involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapse following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xiaoyu; Li, Caihua; Shi, Jimin; Tan, Yamin; Fu, Shan; Wang, Yebo; Zhu, Ni; He, Jingsong; Zheng, Weiyan; Yu, Xiaohong; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He

    2016-01-01

    Although steady improvements to chemotherapeutic treatments has helped cure 80% of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases, chemotherapy has proven to be less effective in treating the majority of adult patients, leaving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) as the primary adult treatment option. Nevertheless relapse are the leading cause of death following allo-HSCT. The genetic pathogenesis of relapse following allo-HSCT in Philadelphia chromosome- negative ALL (Ph− ALL) remains unexplored. We performed longitudinal whole-exome sequencing analysis in three adult patients with Ph− B-cell ALL (Ph− B-ALL) on samples collected from diagnosis to relapse after allo-HSCT. Based on these data, we performed target gene sequencing on 23 selected genes in 58 adult patients undergoing allo-HSCT with Ph− B-ALL. Our results revealed a significant enrichment of mutations in epigenetic regulators from relapsed samples, with recurrent somatic mutations in SETD2, CREBBP, KDM6A and NR3C1. The relapsed samples were also enriched in signaling factor mutations, including KRAS, PTPN21, MYC and USP54. Furthermore, we are the first to reveal the clonal evolution patterns during leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT. Cells present in relapsed specimens were genetically related to the diagnosed tumor, these cells therefore arose from either an existing subclone that was not eradicated by allo-HSCT therapy, or from the same progenitor that acquired new mutations. In some cases, however, it is possible that leukemia recurrence following allo-HSCT could result from a secondary malignancy with a distinct set of mutations. We identified novel genetic causes of leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT using the largest generated data set to date from adult patients with Ph− B-ALL. PMID:26527318

  14. Extended-Release Naltrexone To Prevent Relapse Among Opioid Dependent, Criminal Justice System Involved Adults: Rationale and Design of a Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua D.; Friedmann, Peter D.; Boney, Tamara Y.; Hoskinson, Randall A.; McDonald, Ryan; Gordon, Michael; Fishman, Marc; Chen, Donna T.; Bonnie, Richard J.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Nunes, Edward V.; Cornish, James W.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX, Vivitrol® Alkermes Inc.) is an injectable monthly sustained-release mu opioid receptor antagonist. XR-NTX is a potentially effective intervention for opioid use disorders and as relapse prevention among criminal justice system (CJS) populations. Methods This 5-site open-label randomized controlled effectiveness trial examines whether XR-NTX reduces opioid relapse compared with treatment as usual (TAU) among community dwelling, non-incarcerated volunteers with current or recent CJS involvement. The XR-NTX arm receives 6 monthly XR-NTX injections at Medical Management visits; the TAU group receives referrals to available community treatment options. Assessments occur every 2 weeks during a 24-week treatment phase and at 12- and 18-month follow-ups. The primary outcome is a relapse event, defined as either self-report or urine toxicology evidence of ≥10 days of opioid use in a 28-day (4 week) period, with a positive or missing urine test counted as 5 days of opioid use. Results We describe the rationale, specific aims, and design of the study. Alternative design considerations and extensive secondary aims and outcomes are discussed. Conclusions XR-NTX is a potentially important treatment and relapse prevention option among persons with opioid dependence and CJS involvement. PMID:25602580

  15. Does the Addition of Involved Field Radiotherapy to High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Improve Outcomes for Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. Results: There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p = 0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p = 0.032) and 0.383 (p = 0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p < 0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Conclusion: Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative

  16. [Relapse prevention in drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Rácz, József

    2013-12-01

    The literature review deals with methods of relapse prevention. Relapse prevention is the key in the treatment of clients with drug addictions according to the transtheoretical model of change. If relapse prevention is more effective then not only the relapse would be prevented, but the client would leave the circulus vitiosus of relapses. Among psychotherapies cognitive behavioural methods are proven effective. Shorter forms of cognitive therapies are also available: for example, cognitive bias modification. Pharmacotherapy partly decreases craving of the clients or ceases the effects of psychoactive substances. Specific pharmacotherapeutic methods prevent relapses in a non-abstinent treatment design. Here the goal is not the abstinence in a short time, but the reduction of harms associated with drug use. In this way, a new target group of drug users can be involved in treatment. PMID:24380964

  17. Central nervous system involvement at first relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy without intrathecal prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos, Pau; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Debén, Guillermo; Prates, Virginia; Tormo, Mar; Rubio, Vicente; Pérez, Inmaculada; Fernández, Isolda; Viguria, Maricruz; Rayón, Chelo; González, José; de la Serna, Javier; Esteve, Jordi; Bergua, Juan M.; Rivas, Concha; González, Marcos; González, Jose D.; Negri, Silvia; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of and risk factors for central nervous system recurrence in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia are not well established and remain a controversial matter. Design and Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 739 patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia enrolled in two consecutive trials (PETHEMA LPA96 and LPA99) received induction therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. Consolidation therapy comprised three courses of anthracycline monochemotherapy (LPA96), with all-trans retinoic acid and reinforced doses of idarubicin in patients with an intermediate or high risk of relapse (LPA99). Central nervous system prophylaxis was not given. Results Central nervous system relapse was documented in 11 patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of central nervous system relapse was 1.7% (LPA96 3.2% and LPA99 1.2%; p=0.09). The cumulative incidence was 0%, 0.8%, and 5.5% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Relapse risk score (p=0.0001) and the occurrence of central nervous system hemorrhage during induction (5-year cumulative incidence 18.7%, p=0.006) were independent risk factors for central nervous system relapse. Conclusions This study shows a low incidence of central nervous system relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia following therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline without specific central nervous system prophylaxis. Central nervous system relapse was significantly associated with high white blood cell counts and prior central nervous system hemorrhage, which emerged as independent prognostic factors. PMID:19608685

  18. Endocannabinoid regulation of relapse mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter

    2007-11-01

    Addiction involves a complex neuropharmacologic behavioural cycle, in which positive reinforcement exerted by the drug and the negative state of withdrawal drive the user to extremes to obtain the drug. Comprehensive studies have established that relapse is the most common outcome of recovery programs treating addictive behaviours. Several types of anticraving medication are available nowadays, such as naltrexone for the treatment of alcoholism, bupropion for nicotine, methadone or buprenorphine for heroin. This review focuses on recent behavioural data providing a rationale for an endocannabinoid mechanism underlying reinstatement of compulsive drug seeking. Studies supporting the contention that reinstatement of extinguished drug self-administration behaviour may be generated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and attenuated, if not blocked, by CB1 receptor antagonists, are here reviewed. In support to these findings, conditioned place preference studies substantiate the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in recidivism mechanisms by demonstrating that motivation to relapse can be triggered by CB1 receptor activation while blockade of such receptors may prevent reinstatement of place conditioning induced by either drug primings or drug-associated cues. Finally, biochemical studies evaluating changes in endocannabinoid levels, CB1 receptor density and CB1 mRNA expression during re-exposure to drug following extinction are also examined. Taken together, the evidence available has important implications in the understanding and treatment of relapsing episodes in patients undergoing detoxification. PMID:17936008

  19. Animal models of fear relapse.

    PubMed

    Goode, Travis D; Maren, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fear memories are rapidly acquired and enduring over time, extinction memories are slow to form and are susceptible to disruption. Consequently, behavioral therapies that involve extinction learning (e.g., exposure therapy) often produce only temporary suppression of fear and anxiety. This review focuses on the factors that are known to influence the relapse of extinguished fear. Several phenomena associated with the return of fear after extinction are discussed, including renewal, spontaneous recovery, reacquisition, and reinstatement. Additionally, this review describes recent work, which has focused on the role of psychological stress in the relapse of extinguished fear. Recent developments in behavioral and pharmacological research are examined in light of treatment of pathological fear in humans. PMID:25225304

  20. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. PMID:24084426

  1. Late relapses in acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Latagliata, Roberto; Carmosino, Ida; Breccia, Massimo; Minni, Antonio; Testi, Anna; Iorio, Nicol; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Petti, Maria Concetta; Mandelli, Franco; Cimino, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    From January 1988 to December 1997, among 53 acute promyelocytic leukaemia patients in 1st complete remission (CR) after 5 years from diagnosis, we observed 5 late relapses (9.4%) after 60, 61, 71, 101 and 155 months from diagnosis; 3 of those late relapses (7.7%) occurred among 39 patients previously treated with all-trans-retinoic acid. An involvement of the mastoid occurred in 3/5 patients (60%), compared with 2/32 patients (6.3%) at an early relapse (p < 0.02). As to the treatment of the late relapse, 1 patient received all-trans-retinoic acid alone followed by allogeneic transplantation and 4 patients were treated according to the GIMEMA 0191 protocol. All patients achieved a 2nd CR and are still alive: 4 in the 2nd molecular CR after 6, 33, 34 and 115 months; 1 relapsed after 15 months and is now in the 3rd CR. In conclusion, a late relapse occurred in a sizeable fraction of acute promyelocytic leukaemia patients: the high rate of ear involvement might be explained considering the ear as a 'disease sanctuary'. PMID:17135723

  2. Pathways to relapse: the neurobiology of drug- and stress-induced relapse to drug-taking.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J

    2000-01-01

    Relapse is a major characteristic of drug addiction, and remains the primary problem in treating drug abuse. Without an understanding of the factors that determine renewed drug-seeking, the urge to use drugs, and the persistent craving for them, it is unlikely that health care professionals can provide effective treatment. Using an animal model of relapse, the author and her team are studying factors that induce reinstatement of drug-taking behaviour after short and long periods of abstinence, and they are exploring the neurobiological basis of these effects. In their experiments, rats are trained to self-administer drugs intravenously by pressing 1 of 2 levers. During a subsequent period, the drug is no longer available, but the rats are free to try to obtain the drug (a period of "extinction training"). After extinction of responding, the investigators test for the ability of various events to reinitiate drug-seeking. On this background of renewed drug-seeking or relapse, the investigators search for pharmacological and neurochemical manipulations that might block or attenuate such behaviour. They have found that the 2 most effective events for reinstating responding after both short and long drug-free periods are re-exposure to the drug itself and exposure to a brief period of stress. The critical neurochemical pathways mediating drug-induced relapse are not identical to those mediating stress-induced relapse. Relapse induced by "priming" injections of heroin or cocaine involves activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, whereas relapse induced by stress involves actions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the brain, and of brain noradrenergic (NE) systems. In addition, evidence shows that CRF and NE may interact at the level of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in stress-induced relapse. By contrast, relapse induced by "priming" injections of drugs is relatively unaffected by manipulation of CRF and NE systems of the brain. PMID:10740986

  3. Understanding Recovery Barriers: Youth Perceptions About Substance Use Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Rachel; Anglin, M. Douglas; Beattie, Rebecca; Ong, Chris Angelo; Glik, Deborah C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To qualitatively explore how treatment-involved youth retrospectively contextualize relapse from substance use. Methods Fourteen focus groups were conducted with 118 youth (78.3% male; 66.1% Latino) enrolled in participating substance abuse treatment programs (4 young adult and 10 adolescent) throughout Los Angeles County. Transcripts were analyzed for relapse perception themes. Results Dominant relapse themes include emotional reasons (90%), life stressors (85%), cognitive factors (75%), socialization processes (65%), and environmental issues (55%). Conclusions Youth perceptions about relapse during treatment should be used to better inform clinical approaches and shape early-intervention recovery agendas for substance-abusing youth. PMID:22584088

  4. The Alcohol Relapse Situation Appraisal Questionnaire: Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rosemarie A.; MacKinnon, Selene M.; Johnson, Jennifer E.; Myers, Mark G.; Cook, Travis A. R.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of cognitive appraisal of the threat of alcohol relapse has received little attention. A previous instrument, the Relapse Situation Appraisal Questionnaire (RSAQ), was developed to assess cocaine users’ primary appraisal of the threat of situations posing a high risk for cocaine relapse. The purpose of the present study was to modify the RSAQ in order to measure primary appraisal in situations involving a high risk for alcohol relapse. Methods The development and psychometric properties of this instrument, the Alcohol Relapse Situation Appraisal Questionnaire (A-RSAQ), were examined with two samples of abstinent adults with alcohol abuse or dependence. Factor structure and validity were examined in Study 1 (N=104). Confirmation of the factor structure and predictive validity were assessed in Study 2 (N=161). Results Results demonstrated construct, discriminant and predictive validity and reliability of the A-RSAQ. Discussion Results support the important role of primary appraisal of degree of risk in alcohol relapse situations. PMID:21237586

  5. Impact of Life Events on the Relapse of Schizophrenic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Hassan Ali; Jacoob, Shirooq; Sharour, Loai Abu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between stressful life events at the time of relapse in schizophrenic patients at psychiatric hospitals in Baghdad city. Methodology: A purposive (non-probability) sampling of 50 schizophrenic patients who have relapsed was involved in the present study. Data were collected through the use of the…

  6. Insomnia, alcoholism and relapse.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2003-12-01

    Insomnia and alcoholism are significantly associated in community surveys and patient samples. Insomnia occurs in 36-72% of alcoholic patients and may last for weeks to months after initiating abstinence from alcohol. Some correlates of insomnia in alcoholic patients are identical to those observed in non-alcoholic insomniacs, including anxiety and depression, tobacco smoking, and the use of alcohol to aid sleep. Other studies suggest that as the severity of alcoholism increases, so does the likelihood of insomnia in alcoholic patients. In the sleep laboratory, alcoholic patients who complain of insomnia have disrupted sleep continuity when compared to alcoholic patients without insomnia complaints. Recently sober alcoholics are also more likely than non-alcoholics to have sleep-disordered breathing and increased periodic leg movements, which might contribute to insomnia in some alcoholic patients. The co-occurrence of insomnia and alcoholism is clinically significant because alcoholism can exacerbate the adverse consequences of insomnia (e.g. mood changes and performance decrements) and because insomnia among patients entering treatment for alcoholism has been significantly associated with subsequent alcoholic relapse. Baseline polysomnographic correlates of subsequent relapse include prolonged sleep latency, decreased sleep efficiency and total sleep time, increased rapid eye movement sleep pressure, and decreased slow wave sleep. Whether treatment of insomnia in alcoholic patients reduces relapse rates is unknown, but preliminary treatment guidelines that accommodate the special characteristics of alcoholic patients are provided, with a goal to reduce daytime impairment and psychological distress. PMID:15018094

  7. Relapse Prevention and the Five Rules of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Melemis, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    There are four main ideas in relapse prevention. First, relapse is a gradual process with distinct stages. The goal of treatment is to help individuals recognize the early stages, in which the chances of success are greatest. Second, recovery is a process of personal growth with developmental milestones. Each stage of recovery has its own risks of relapse. Third, the main tools of relapse prevention are cognitive therapy and mind-body relaxation, which are used to develop healthy coping skills. Fourth, most relapses can be explained in terms of a few basic rules. Educating clients in these rules can help them focus on what is important: 1) change your life (recovery involves creating a new life where it is easier to not use); 2) be completely honest; 3) ask for help; 4) practice self-care; and 5) don’t bend the rules. PMID:26339217

  8. Extinction, Relapse, and Behavioral Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral-momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  9. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  10. Relapses in patients with Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Hernández, José Luis; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; González-Vela, Maria C.; González-Lamuño, Domingo; González-López, Marcos A.; Armesto, Susana; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To further investigate into the relapses of Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), we analyzed the frequency, clinical features, and predictors of relapses in series of 417 unselected patients from a single center. After a median follow-up of 12 (interquartile range [IQR]: 2–38) years, almost one-third of the 417 patients (n = 133; 32%; 85 men/48 women) had experienced at least 1 relapse. At the time of disease diagnosis, patients who later experienced relapses had less commonly infections than those who never suffered flares (30.8% vs 41.9%; P = 0.03). In contrast, patients who experienced relapses had a longer duration of the first episode of palpable purpura than those without relapses (palpable purpura lasting >7 days; 80.0% vs 68.1%; P = 0.04). Abdominal pain (72.3% vs 62.3%; P = 0.03) and joint manifestations (27.8% vs 15.5%; P = 0.005) were also more common in patients who later developed relapses. In contrast, patients who never suffered relapses had a slightly higher frequency of fever at the time of disease diagnosis (9.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.06). At the time of disease diagnosis, corticosteroids were more frequently given to patients who later had relapses of the disease (44% vs 32% in nonrelapsing patients; P = 0.03). Relapses generally occurred soon after the first episode of vasculitis. The median time from the diagnosis of HSP to the first relapse was 1 (IQR: 1–2) month. The median number of relapses was 1 (IQR 1–3). The main clinical features at the time of the relapse were cutaneous (88.7%), gastrointestinal (27.1%), renal (24.8%), and joint (16.5%) manifestations. After a mean ± standard deviation follow-up of 18.9 ± 9.8 years, complete recovery was observed in 110 (82.7%) of the 133 patients who had relapses. Renal sequelae (persistent renal involvement) was found in 11 (8.3%) of the patients with relapses. The best predictive factors for relapse were joint and gastrointestinal manifestations at HSP diagnosis (odds ratio [OR]: 2

  11. Progressive-Relapsing MS (PRMS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease process in MS and in MRI technology. Individuals who were previously diagnosed with progressive-relapsing MS would now be ... The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? We ...

  12. [Relapse prevention in anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Giel, Katrin; Leehr, Elisabeth; Becker, Sandra; Startup, Helen; Zipfel, Stephan; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2013-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa is characterised by high relapse rates and thus there is a need for strategies that reduce reoccurrence of illness. One way of achieving this is to integrate relapse prevention into treatment, but clearly this requires identification of risk and maintenance factors. The Maudsley Model of Anorexia Nervosa Treatment in Adults (MANTRA) by Schmidt & Treasure has 5 major treatment stages. These include an initial stage of motivation and dialogue about change, an individual relapse formulation, improvement of cognitive and socio-emotional skills, work on the patient's identity and eventually a final stage of ending and parting. These treatment stages are derived from a maintenance model of AN by Schmidt & Treasure and on evidence from recovered patients and part of their objective is to prevent relapse. PMID:23592490

  13. Modeling Relapsing Disease Dynamics in a Host-Vector Community.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tammi L; Landguth, Erin L; Stone, Emily F

    2016-02-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a threat to human and wildlife populations and mathematical models provide a means to understand and control epidemics involved in complex host-vector systems. The disease model studied here is a host-vector system with a relapsing class of host individuals, used to investigate tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF). Equilibrium analysis is performed for models with increasing numbers of relapses and multiple hosts and the disease reproduction number, R0, is generalized to establish relationships with parameters that would result in the elimination of the disease. We show that host relapses in a single competent host-vector system is needed to maintain an endemic state. We show that the addition of an incompetent second host with no relapses increases the number of relapses needed for maintaining the pathogen in the first competent host system. Further, coupling of the system with hosts of differing competencies will always reduce R0, making it more difficult for the system to reach an endemic state. PMID:26910884

  14. Modeling Relapsing Disease Dynamics in a Host-Vector Community

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Emily F.

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a threat to human and wildlife populations and mathematical models provide a means to understand and control epidemics involved in complex host-vector systems. The disease model studied here is a host-vector system with a relapsing class of host individuals, used to investigate tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF). Equilibrium analysis is performed for models with increasing numbers of relapses and multiple hosts and the disease reproduction number, R0, is generalized to establish relationships with parameters that would result in the elimination of the disease. We show that host relapses in a single competent host-vector system is needed to maintain an endemic state. We show that the addition of an incompetent second host with no relapses increases the number of relapses needed for maintaining the pathogen in the first competent host system. Further, coupling of the system with hosts of differing competencies will always reduce R0, making it more difficult for the system to reach an endemic state. PMID:26910884

  15. Late relapsing childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vora, A; Frost, L; Goodeve, A; Wilson, G; Ireland, R M; Lilleyman, J; Eden, T; Peake, I; Richards, S

    1998-10-01

    Childhood lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is usually assumed to have been permanently eradicated in patients in long-term remission, but occasionally can recur after many years. To learn more about the problem, we studied a group of children whose leukemia had been in remission for 10 or more years before relapse and tried to determine whether they had true recurrences or second malignancies. We studied children treated on Medical Research Council ALL protocols between 1970 and 1984 and followed up by the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford. Detailed clinical and laboratory data was collected from the centers concerned on all who were reported to have had a recurrence of their leukemia after 10 or more years from the time of achieving first complete remission (CR1). To prove that the relapse was a true recurrence rather than a second or secondary leukemia, DNA extracted from archived marrow smears was subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of an identical Ig heavy chain (IgH) or T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement at initial diagnosis and subsequent relapse. A total of 1,134 of 2,746 children had survived 10 years or more (range, 10 to 24 years) in CR1 and of those, 12 (approximately 1%) had subsequently relapsed. Relapse blast cells were shown to express the common ALL antigen (CD 10) in all cases and an identical clonal IgH or TCR gene rearrangement was found on PCR analysis of DNA from diagnosis and relapse in all eight cases where DNA extraction was successful. A further program of therapy was successful in inducing a second CR in all patients, four of whom have succumbed to a second relapse after 12 to 27 months. The remaining eight are in continuing CR2 at a follow-up of 12 to 108 months (median, 52) from relapse. Although the risk of relapse of childhood ALL after 10 years in remission appears to be small (around 1%), it persists. This raises questions about how blasts can survive quiescent for so long and when we can

  16. Relapse prevention for addictive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Relapse Prevention (RP) model has been a mainstay of addictions theory and treatment since its introduction three decades ago. This paper provides an overview and update of RP for addictive behaviors with a focus on developments over the last decade (2000-2010). Major treatment outcome studies and meta-analyses are summarized, as are selected empirical findings relevant to the tenets of the RP model. Notable advances in RP in the last decade include the introduction of a reformulated cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, the application of advanced statistical methods to model relapse in large randomized trials, and the development of mindfulness-based relapse prevention. We also review the emergent literature on genetic correlates of relapse following pharmacological and behavioral treatments. The continued influence of RP is evidenced by its integration in most cognitive-behavioral substance use interventions. However, the tendency to subsume RP within other treatment modalities has posed a barrier to systematic evaluation of the RP model. Overall, RP remains an influential cognitive-behavioral framework that can inform both theoretical and clinical approaches to understanding and facilitating behavior change. PMID:21771314

  17. Novel therapies for relapsed myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A Keith

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of myeloma relapse needs to be individualized to reflect the effectiveness and toxicities of prior therapies, with consideration given to pragmatic issues such as the tempo of relapse, age of the patient, access to drugs and patient preference. In general, combination therapies have been associated with higher response rates and improved progression-free survival and may be preferable when a rapid response is required. Nevertheless, in a slower-tempo relapse it is unclear at this juncture whether sequencing of drugs or multi-agent combinations offer superior overall survival results. Fortunately, active novel agents that offer further possibilities for some myeloma patients have become available in clinical trials. In this review we will describe the various classes of novel drugs being tested and the pros and cons of preclinical testing, and will particularly focus on two agents with single-agent activity in myeloma: carfilzomib, a proteasome inhibitor, and pomalidomide, a member of the immunomodulatory class of drugs. PMID:20008242

  18. Relapsing Fever Borreliae in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The study of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa has long suffered from the use of non-specific laboratory tools for the direct detection of these spirochetes in clinical and vector specimens. Accordingly, Borrelia hispanica, Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis have traditionally been distinguished on the basis of geography and vector and the unproven hypothesis that each species was exclusive to one vector. The recent sequencing of three relapsing fever Borrelia genomes in our laboratory prompted the development of more specific tools and a reappraisal of the epidemiology in Africa. Five additional potential species still need to be cultured from clinical and vector sources in East Africa to further assess their uniqueness. Here, we review the molecular evidence of relapsing fever borreliae in hosts and ectoparasites in Africa and explore the diversity, geographical distribution, and vector association of these pathogens for Africans and travelers to Africa. PMID:23926141

  19. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  20. Preventing Relapse Following Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Susan E.; Witkiewitz, Katie; Kirouac, Megan; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide. Long-term smoking cessation can drastically reduce people’s risk for developing smoking-related disease. The research literature points to a need for clearer operationalization and differentiation between smoking cessation and relapse prevention interventions and outcomes. That said, extensive meta-analyses and research studies have indicated that there are various efficacious smoking interventions that can both support smoking cessation and relapse prevention efforts. Specifically, behavioral treatments, relapse prevention psychotherapy, pharmacologic interventions, motivational enhancement, smoking reduction to quit, brief advice, alternative intervention modes (telephone, Internet, computer), self-help, and tailored treatments can help prepare smokers for longer-term abstinence. Although these methods vary on reach, they are relatively efficacious, particularly in combined formats. PMID:26550097

  1. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in the backbone of ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapse B-ALL cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early on-treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially prior to clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol can effectively abrogate PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. Overall these results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of de novo purine pathway in thiopurine resistance, and offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  2. Periplasmic Flagellar Export Apparatus Protein, FliH, Is Involved in Post-Transcriptional Regulation of FlaB, Motility and Virulence of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Guyard, Cyril; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Dahlstrom, Eric; Sturdevant, Daniel; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Martens, Craig; Hayes, Stanley F.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hansen, Bryan T.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s) that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant’s genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB. PMID:24009690

  3. Understanding Recovery Barriers: Youth Perceptions about Substance Use Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Anglin, M. Douglas; Beattie, Rebecca; Ong, Chris Angelo; Glik, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To qualitatively explore how treatment-involved youth retrospectively contextualize relapse from substance use. Methods: Fourteen focus groups were conducted with 118 youth (78.3% male; 66.1% Latino) enrolled in participating substance abuse treatment programs (4 young adult and 10 adolescent) throughout Los Angeles County. Transcripts…

  4. A Protocol for Reducing Juvenile Recidivism through Relapse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roget, Nancy A.; Fisher, Gary L.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    The connection between alcohol and other drug use and juvenile crime activities is well established. The source of this connection and specific interventions with juvenile offenders involved in alcohol and drug use is unclear. Reviews existing literature and presents an adolescent-specific relapse-prevention protocol that provides a structure for…

  5. Survival After Relapse of Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Bloom, Karina; Upadhyaya, Santhosh; Geyer, J Russell; Leary, Sarah E S

    2016-05-01

    Survival after recurrence of medulloblastoma has not been reported in an unselected cohort of patients in the contemporary era. We reviewed 55 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma between 2000 and 2010, and treated at Seattle Children's Hospital to evaluate patterns of relapse treatment and survival. Fourteen of 47 patients (30%) over the age of 3 experienced recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma after standard therapy. The median time from diagnosis to recurrence was 18.0 months (range, 3.6 to 62.6 mo), and site of recurrence was metastatic in 86%. The median survival after relapse was 10.3 months (range, 1.3 to 80.5 mo); 3-year survival after relapse was 18%. There were trend associations between longer survival and having received additional chemotherapy (median survival 12.8 vs. 1.3 mo, P=0.16) and radiation therapy (15.4 vs. 5.9 mo, P=0.20). Isolated local relapse was significantly associated with shorter survival (1.3 vs. 12.8 mo, P=0.009). Recurrence of medulloblastoma is more likely to be metastatic than reported in previous eras. Within the limits of our small sample, our data suggest a potential survival benefit from retreatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation even in heavily pretreated patients. This report serves as a baseline against which to evaluate novel therapy combinations. PMID:26907655

  6. Borrelia hispanica Relapsing Fever, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Sarih, M’hammed; Garnier, Martine; Boudebouch, Najma; Bouattour, Ali; Rihani, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Gern, Lise; Postic, Danièle

    2009-01-01

    We found that 20.5% of patients with an unexplained fever in northwestern Morocco had tick-borne relapsing fever. Molecular detection specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified Borrelia hispanica. The noncoding intergenic spacer sequence domain showed high sensitivity and good resolution for this species. PMID:19861058

  7. Borrelia hispanica relapsing fever, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Sarih, M'hammed; Garnier, Martine; Boudebouch, Najma; Bouattour, Ali; Rihani, Abdelaziz; Hassar, Mohammed; Gern, Lise; Postic, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel

    2009-10-01

    We found that 20.5% of patients with an unexplained fever in northwestern Morocco had tick-borne relapsing fever. Molecular detection specific for the 16S rRNA gene identified Borrelia hispanica. The noncoding intergenic spacer sequence domain showed high sensitivity and good resolution for this species. PMID:19861058

  8. Excessive Cytolytic Responses Predict Tuberculosis Relapse After Apparently Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Jacqueline M.; Cho, Jang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Ronacher, Katharina; King, Elizabeth C.; van Helden, Paul; Walzl, Gerhard; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Currently, there are no tools to accurately predict tuberculosis relapse. This study aimed to determine whether patients who experience tuberculosis relapse have different immune responses to mycobacteria in vitro than patients who remain cured for 2 years. Methods. Patients with an initial episode of pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited in South Africa. Diluted blood, collected at diagnosis and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment, was cultured with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis for 6 days, and cellular RNA was frozen. Gene expression in samples from 10 patients who subsequently experienced relapse, confirmed by strain genotyping, was compared to that in samples from patients who remained cured, using microarrays. Results. At diagnosis, expression of 668 genes was significantly different in samples from patients who experienced relapse, compared with expression in patients who remained successfully cured; these differences persisted for at least 4 weeks. Gene ontology and biological pathways analyses revealed significant upregulation of genes involved in cytotoxic cell-mediated killing. Results were confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in a wider patient cohort. Conclusions. These data show that patients who will subsequently experience relapse exhibit altered immune responses, including excessively robust cytolytic responses to M. tuberculosis in vitro, at the time of diagnosis, compared with patients who will achieve durable cure. Together with microbiological and clinical indices, these differences could be exploited in drug development. PMID:26351358

  9. Determinants of Relapse Following Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul M.

    Although research has been conducted on who will relapse after having quit smoking in clinics, little has been done to determine the immediate precipitants of recidivism. A telephone hotline, manned by four experienced interviewers, was set up to receive calls from ex-smokers who had relapsed or who felt at high risk for relapse. A structured…

  10. Survival of pediatric patients after relapsed osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Sarah E. S.; Wozniak, Amy W.; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; McPherson, Valerie; Neel, Michael D.; Rao, Bhaskar N.; Daw, Najat C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy has improved the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, but its role in relapsed disease is unclear. Methods We reviewed the records of all patients who were treated for relapsed high-grade osteosarcoma at our institution between 1970 and 2004. Post-relapse event-free survival (PREFS) and post-relapse survival (PRS) were estimated, and outcome comparisons were made using the exact log-rank test. Results The 10-year PREFS and PRS of the 110 patients were 11.8% ± 3.5% and 17.0% ± 4.3%, respectively. Metastasis at initial diagnosis (14%), and relapse in lung only (75%) were not significantly associated with PREFS or PRS. Time from initial diagnosis to first relapse (RL1) ≥18 months (43%), surgery at RL1 (76%), and ability to achieve second complete remission (CR2, 56%) were favorably associated with PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0002). In patients without CR2, chemotherapy at RL1 was favorably associated with PREFS (p=0.01) but not with PRS. In patients with lung relapse only, unilateral relapse and number of nodules (≤3) were associated with better PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0005); no patients with bilateral relapse survived 10 years. The median PREFS after treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide was 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.1-5.2) and median PRS 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.2-15.1). Conclusions Late relapse, surgical resection, and unilateral involvement (in lung relapse only) favorably impact outcome after relapse. Surgery is essential for survival; chemotherapy may slow disease progression in patients without CR2. These data are useful for designing clinical trials that evaluate novel agents. PMID:23625626

  11. Late Relapse of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Matthew J; Feldman, Darren R; Carver, Brett S; Sheinfeld, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Germ cell tumors of the testis have an overall survival rate greater than 90% as a result of a successful multidisciplinary approach to management. Late relapse affects a subset of patients however, and tends to be chemorefractory and the overall prognosis is poor. Surgery is the mainstay in management of late relapse but salvage chemotherapy can be successful. In this review, the clinical presentation and detection of late relapse, clinical outcomes, and predictors of survival in late relapse and the importance of a multidisciplinary treatment approach for successful management of late relapse are discussed. PMID:26216823

  12. Helping Adults to Stay Physically Fit: Preventing Relapse Following Aerobic Exercise Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Long-term adherence to an aerobic exercise regime is a major problem among exercise program graduates. This article discusses the steps involved in developing relapse prevention treatment strategies for aerobic exercise programs. (JMK)

  13. Why do patients with ulcerative colitis relapse?

    PubMed

    Riley, S A; Mani, V; Goodman, M J; Lucas, S

    1990-02-01

    To determine the factors responsible for ulcerative colitis relapse a cohort of 92 patients (18 to 78 years, 50 men) with clinically inactive disease have been followed for over 48 weeks. At 12 weekly intervals patients were asked, by means of standardised questionnaires, about infections, compliance with maintenance medication, new drug treatment, dietary changes, episodes of non-bloody diarrhoea, life stresses, and feelings of anxiety and depression. Thirty five patients (38%) relapsed (median interval 17 weeks, range three to 46 weeks). Patients who relapsed had a higher previous relapse rate than non-relapsers (p less than 0.001) and a shorter time from previous relapse to trial entry (p less than 0.05). Other clinical characteristics were equally matched in the two groups. Between and within group comparisons revealed that upper respiratory tract symptoms, antibiotic ingestion, analgesic intake, diarrhoeal episodes and stressful life events were no more common in the four weeks before relapse than before routine attendance. Anxiety and depression ratings were also similar in the two groups. The timing of ulcerative colitis relapse showed a clear seasonal pattern with 26 patients relapsing from August to January and only nine from January to July (p less than 0.001). In addition, a retrospective case note analysis revealed significant seasonality of onset of ulcerative colitis. We conclude that seasonal factors may contribute to both onset and relapse of ulcerative colitis. PMID:2311975

  14. Lymphoma relapse presenting as neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, My; Awad, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare neurological manifestation of lymphoma characterized by malignant lymphoma cells infiltrating cranial or peripheral nerve, or their roots. We present the first reported Australian case of a patient whose initial presentation of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma was NL. Our case highlights that clinical and imaging findings of NL often mimic other neuropathies, and hence presents unique challenges that may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. We emphasize the importance of considering NL in the differential diagnosis and combining imaging with other diagnostic modalities such as lumbar puncture (LP) to aid in the diagnosis of NL particularly where there is acute neurological deterioration. PMID:26889293

  15. Prefrontal cortical regulation of drug seeking in animal models of drug relapse.

    PubMed

    Lasseter, Heather C; Xie, Xiaohu; Ramirez, Donna R; Fuchs, Rita A

    2010-01-01

    Prefrontal cortical dysfunction is thought to underlie maladaptive behaviors displayed by chronic drug users, most notably the high propensity for relapse that severely impedes successful treatment of drug addiction. In animal models of drug relapse, exposure to drug-associated stimuli, small amounts of drug, and acute stressors powerfully reinstate drug seeking by critically engaging the prefrontal cortex, with the anterior cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, and orbitofrontal subregions making distinct contributions to drug seeking. Hence, from an addiction treatment perspective, it is necessary to fully explicate the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in drug relapse. PMID:21161751

  16. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. PMID:25817451

  17. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  18. Preventing Adolescent Relapse: Concepts, Theories and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shitala P.; Ressler, Robert A.

    This chapter discusses adolescent drug abuse relapse prevention. It presents the following four conclusions regarding the efficacy of prevention programs. First, more controlled studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of relapse prevention strategies with adolescents in reducing factors such as cravings and increasing their…

  19. Adjuvant steroids and relapse of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Cooles, P

    1986-10-01

    In a retrospective study, relapse after non-severe acute typhoid fever was highly significantly related to the use of adjuvant steroid in the initial illness. The steroid was given late and in small doses when compared with other studies. Caution should be observed when using steroids in this way as relapse though often mild may be a severe illness. PMID:3795323

  20. Relapse Crises and Coping among Dieters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined situational antecedents of dieting relapse crises and dieters'attempts to cope with temptations to overeat among obese type II diabetics (N=57). Found three categories of relapse crises: mealtime, low-arousal, and emotional upset situations. Found upset situations most frequently produced negative outcome while strong cognitive and…

  1. Modelling intervention effects after cancer relapses

    PubMed Central

    González, Juan R.; Peña, Edsel A.; Slate, Elizabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This article addresses the problem of incorporating information regarding the effects of treatments or interventions into models for repeated cancer relapses. In contrast to many existing models, our approach permits the impact of interventions to differ after each relapse. We adopt the general model for recurrent events proposed by Peña and Hollander, in which the effect of interventions is represented by an effective age process acting on the baseline hazard rate function. To accommodate the situation of cancer relapse, we propose an effective age function that encodes three possible therapeutic responses: complete remission, partial remission, and null response. The proposed model also incorporates the effect of covariates, the impact of previous relapses, and heterogeneity among individuals. We use our model to analyse the times to relapse for 63 patients with a particular subtype of indolent lymphoma and compare the results to those obtained using existing methods. PMID:16320269

  2. Mutations driving CLL and their evolution in progression and relapse.

    PubMed

    Landau, Dan A; Tausch, Eugen; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N; Stewart, Chip; Reiter, Johannes G; Bahlo, Jasmin; Kluth, Sandra; Bozic, Ivana; Lawrence, Mike; Böttcher, Sebastian; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Mertens, Daniel; Sougnez, Carrie L; Rosenberg, Mara; Hess, Julian M; Edelmann, Jennifer; Kless, Sabrina; Kneba, Michael; Ritgen, Matthias; Fink, Anna; Fischer, Kirsten; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S; Nowak, Martin A; Döhner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Neuberg, Donna; Getz, Gad; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Wu, Catherine J

    2015-10-22

    Which genetic alterations drive tumorigenesis and how they evolve over the course of disease and therapy are central questions in cancer biology. Here we identify 44 recurrently mutated genes and 11 recurrent somatic copy number variations through whole-exome sequencing of 538 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and matched germline DNA samples, 278 of which were collected in a prospective clinical trial. These include previously unrecognized putative cancer drivers (RPS15, IKZF3), and collectively identify RNA processing and export, MYC activity, and MAPK signalling as central pathways involved in CLL. Clonality analysis of this large data set further enabled reconstruction of temporal relationships between driver events. Direct comparison between matched pre-treatment and relapse samples from 59 patients demonstrated highly frequent clonal evolution. Thus, large sequencing data sets of clinically informative samples enable the discovery of novel genes associated with cancer, the network of relationships between the driver events, and their impact on disease relapse and clinical outcome. PMID:26466571

  3. Factors Mediating Alcohol Craving and Relapse: Stress, Compulsivity, and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Rodd, Zachary A.; Anstrom, Kristin K; Knapp, Darin J.; Racz, Ildiko; Zimmer, Andreas; Serra, Salvatore; Bell, Richard L.; Woodward, Donald J.; Breese, George R.; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2004 annual meeting of the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism in Heidelberg, Germany. The symposium was organized by Zachary A. Rodd and Giancarlo Colombo. The presentations were (1) Pharmacological reversal of cycled withdrawal-sensitized or stress-sensitized withdrawal anxiety and enhanced ethanol drinking, by Darin J. Knapp and George R. Breese, (2) Alcohol craving and relapse in rats genetically selected for high alcohol preference, by Zachary A. Rodd and Richard L. Bell, (3) Exposure to stress increases dopaminergic burst firing in awake rats, by Kristin Anstrom and Donald J. Woodward, (4) Involvement of cannabinoid CB1 and GABAB receptors in the control of relapse-like drinking in alcohol-preferring Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats by Giancarlo Colombo and Salvatore Serra, and (5) Stress-induced ethanol drinking in CB1−/−, POMC, and PENK knockout mice, by Idiko Racz and Andreas Zimmer. PMID:16088996

  4. Mutations driving CLL and their evolution in progression and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Dan A.; Tausch, Eugen; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N; Stewart, Chip; Reiter, Johannes G.; Bahlo, Jasmin; Kluth, Sandra; Bozic, Ivana; Lawrence, Mike; Böttcher, Sebastian; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Mertens, Daniel; Sougnez, Carrie; Rosenberg, Mara; Hess, Julian M.; Edelmann, Jennifer; Kless, Sabrina; Kneba, Michael; Ritgen, Matthias; Fink, Anna; Fischer, Kirsten; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric; Nowak, Martin A.; Döhner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Neuberg, Donna; Getz, Gad; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Wu, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Which genetic alterations drive tumorigenesis and how they evolve over the course of disease and therapy are central questions in cancer biology. We identify 44 recurrently mutated genes and 11 recurrent somatic copy number variations through whole-exome sequencing of 538 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and matched germline DNA samples, 278 of which were collected in a prospective clinical trial. These include previously unrecognized cancer drivers (RPS15, IKZF3) and collectively identify RNA processing and export, MYC activity and MAPK signaling as central pathways involved in CLL. Clonality analysis of this large dataset further enabled reconstruction of temporal relationships between driver events. Direct comparison between matched pre-treatment and relapse samples from 59 patients demonstrated highly frequent clonal evolution. Thus, large sequencing datasets of clinically informative samples enable the discovery of novel cancer genes and the network of relationships between the driver events and their impact on disease relapse and clinical outcome. PMID:26466571

  5. Stress Enhancement of Craving During Sobriety: A Risk for Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Breese, George R.; Chu, Kathleen; Dayas, Christopher V.; Funk, Douglas; Knapp, Darin J.; Koob, George F.; Lê, Dzung Anh; O'Dell, Laura E.; Overstreet, David H.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sinha, Rajita; Valdez, Glenn R.; Weiss, Friedbert

    2010-01-01

    This report of the proceedings of a symposium presented at the 2004 Research Society on Alcoholism Meeting provides evidence linking stress during sobriety to craving that increases the risk for relapse. The initial presentation by Rajita Sinha summarized clinical evidence for the hypothesis that there is an increased sensitivity to stress-induced craving in alcoholics. During early abstinence, alcoholics who were confronted with stressful circumstances showed increased susceptibility for relapse. George Breese presented data demonstrating that stress could substitute for repeated withdrawals from chronic ethanol to induce anxiety-like behavior. This persistent adaptive change induced by multiple withdrawals allowed stress to induce an anxiety-like response that was absent in animals that were not previously exposed to chronic ethanol. Subsequently, Amanda Roberts reviewed evidence that increased drinking induced by stress was dependent on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). In addition, rats that were stressed during protracted abstinence exhibited anxiety-like behavior that was also dependent on CRF. Christopher Dayas indicated that stress increases the reinstatement of an alcohol-related cue. Moreover, this effect was enhanced by previous alcohol dependence. These interactive effects between stress and alcohol-related environmental stimuli depended on concurrent activation of endogenous opioid and CRF systems. A.D. Lê covered information that indicated that stress facilitated reinstatement to alcohol responding and summarized the influence of multiple deprivations on this interaction. David Overstreet provided evidence that restraint stress during repeated alcohol deprivations increases voluntary drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats that results in withdrawal-induced anxiety that is not observed in the absence of stress. Testing of drugs on the stress-induced voluntary drinking implicated serotonin and CRF involvement in the sensitized response

  6. Management of relapsed ovarian cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Giornelli, Gonzalo H

    2016-01-01

    Around 70 % of ovarian cancer patients relapse after primary cytoreductive surgery and standard first-line chemotherapy. The biology of relapse remains unclear, but cancer stem cells seem to play an important role. There are still some areas of controversy on how to manage these relapses and or progressions that occur almost unavoidably in the course of this disease with shorter intervals between them as the natural history of this disease develops. The goal of treatments investigated in this neoplasm has shifted to maintenance therapy, trying to extend the progression free intervals in a disease that is becoming more and more protracted. PMID:27516935

  7. Improving reporting of multiple sclerosis relapse.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Megan; Lush, Tessa; Pohorely, John

    Many people with multiple sclerosis do not report a relapse. When it is reported, it is not always recorded in their notes. This can mean patients do not always have the most appropriate treatment. This article reviews some of the reasons why relapse reports are lacking and how the problem could be addressed. As a result, the decision was made to develop an app that patients could use to record their symptoms and wellbeing over time, to help identify and record relapses. Information could then be passed to their health professional via email, if desired. PMID:26775329

  8. Binary logistic regression modelling: Measuring the probability of relapse cases among drug addict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Alias, Siti Nor Shadila

    2014-07-01

    For many years Malaysia faced the drug addiction issues. The most serious case is relapse phenomenon among treated drug addict (drug addict who have under gone the rehabilitation programme at Narcotic Addiction Rehabilitation Centre, PUSPEN). Thus, the main objective of this study is to find the most significant factor that contributes to relapse to happen. The binary logistic regression analysis was employed to model the relationship between independent variables (predictors) and dependent variable. The dependent variable is the status of the drug addict either relapse, (Yes coded as 1) or not, (No coded as 0). Meanwhile the predictors involved are age, age at first taking drug, family history, education level, family crisis, community support and self motivation. The total of the sample is 200 which the data are provided by AADK (National Antidrug Agency). The finding of the study revealed that age and self motivation are statistically significant towards the relapse cases..

  9. Norepinephrine at the nexus of arousal, motivation and relapse.

    PubMed

    España, Rodrigo A; Schmeichel, Brooke E; Berridge, Craig W

    2016-06-15

    Arousal plays a critical role in cognitive, affective and motivational processes. Consistent with this, the dysregulation of arousal-related neural systems is implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, including addiction. Noradrenergic systems exert potent arousal-enhancing actions that involve signaling at α1- and β-noradrenergic receptors within a distributed network of subcortical regions. The majority of research into noradrenergic modulation of arousal has focused on the nucleus locus coeruleus. Nevertheless, anatomical studies demonstrate that multiple noradrenergic nuclei innervate subcortical arousal-related regions, providing a substrate for differential regulation of arousal across these distinct noradrenergic nuclei. The arousal-promoting actions of psychostimulants and other drugs of abuse contribute to their widespread abuse. Moreover, relapse can be triggered by a variety of arousal-promoting events, including stress and re-exposure to drugs of abuse. Evidence has long-indicated that norepinephrine plays an important role in relapse. Recent observations suggest that noradrenergic signaling elicits affectively-neutral arousal that is sufficient to reinstate drug seeking. Collectively, these observations indicate that norepinephrine plays a key role in the interaction between arousal, motivation, and relapse. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26773688

  10. Pharmacotherapy for Alcohol Dependence: Anticraving Medications for Relapse Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young-Chul

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a chronic disorder that results from a variety of genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors. Relapse prevention for alcohol dependence has traditionally involved psychosocial and psychotherapeutic interventions. Pharmacotherapy, however, in conjunction with behavioral therapy, is generating interest as another modality to prevent relapse and enhance abstinence. Naltrexone and acamprosate are at the forefront of the currently available pharmacological options. Naltrexone is an opioid receptor antagonist and is thought to reduce the rewarding effect of alcohol. Acamprosate normalizes the dysregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated glutamatergic excitation that occurs in alcohol withdrawal and early abstinence. These different mechanisms of action and different target neurotransmitter systems may endow the two drugs with efficacy for different aspects of alcohol use behavior. Since not all patients seem to benefit from naltrexone and acamprosate, there are ongoing efforts to improve the treatment outcomes by examining the advantages of combined pharmacotherapy and exploring the variables that might predict the response of the medications. In addition, novel medications are being investigated to assess their efficacy in preventing relapse and increasing abstinence. PMID:16642544

  11. Relapse Prevention with Substance Abusers: Clinical Issues and Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Dennis C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems of relapse with alcoholics and other drug abusers from three perspectives: client-related variables, common erroneous beliefs and myths held by professionals regarding relapse, and treatment system problems that may contribute to relapse. Offers proposed solutions and describes a relapse prevention model. (Author/ABB)

  12. Perivascular M2 Macrophages Stimulate Tumor Relapse after Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Russell; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Rowan, Charlotte; Muthana, Munitta; Keklikoglou, Ioanna; Olson, Oakley C.; Tazzyman, Simon; Danson, Sarah; Addison, Christina; Clemons, Mark; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Joyce, Johanna A.; De Palma, Michele; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Lewis, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor relapse after chemotherapy-induced regression is a major clinical problem, because it often involves inoperable metastatic disease. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are known to limit the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy in preclinical models of cancer. Here, we report that an alternatively activated (M2) subpopulation of TAMs (MRC1+TIE2HiCXCR4Hi) accumulate around blood vessels in tumors after chemotherapy, where they promote tumor revascularization and relapse, in part, via VEGF-A release. A similar perivascular, M2-related TAM subset was present in human breast carcinomas and bone metastases after chemotherapy. Although a small proportion of M2 TAMs were also present in hypoxic tumor areas, when we genetically ablated their ability to respond to hypoxia via hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2, tumor relapse was unaffected. TAMs were the predominant cells expressing immunoreactive CXCR4 in chemotherapy-treated mouse tumors, with the highest levels expressed by MRC1+ TAMs clustering around the tumor vasculature. Furthermore, the primary CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12, was upregulated in these perivascular sites after chemotherapy, where it was selectively chemotactic for MRC1+ TAMs. Interestingly, HMOX-1, a marker of oxidative stress, was also upregulated in perivascular areas after chemotherapy. This enzyme generates carbon monoxide from the breakdown of heme, a gas known to upregulate CXCL12. Finally, pharmacologic blockade of CXCR4 selectively reduced M2-related TAMs after chemotherapy, especially those in direct contact with blood vessels, thereby reducing tumor revascularization and regrowth. Our studies rationalize a strategy to leverage chemotherapeutic efficacy by selectively targeting this perivascular, relapse-promoting M2-related TAM cell population. PMID:26269531

  13. Culture and social class as intervening variables in relapse prevention with chemically dependent women.

    PubMed

    Weiner, H D; Wallen, M C; Zankowski, G L

    1990-01-01

    Craving and relapse are complex, poorly understood phenomena. A distinctive and baffling characteristic of the disease of chemical dependency is the continuing impulse to use alcohol and/or other drugs, even after lengthy periods of sobriety. This article discusses relapse prevention, focusing on public-sector chemically dependent women. Relapse among these women must be seen in the total context of their lives. Poverty and social disorganization do not directly cause relapse, but problems related to daily life under such conditions represent significant risk factors. The Eagleville Hospital treatment model and relapse prevention programs are described, and it is noted that public-sector women typically present with problems related to being raised in addicted households, residing in drug-saturated inner-city environments, deficits in child-rearing skills, destructive (often abusive) relationships with men, social interactions involving other substance abusers, few (if any) work skills, minimal educational achievement, low self-esteem, and poor self-image. A case study illustrates the course of treatment and relapse prevention efforts with a typical public-sector chemically dependent woman. PMID:2374071

  14. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2015-06-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 gene (PRPS1), which encodes a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapsed childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL) cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early during treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially before clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy-resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol effectively abrogated PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. These results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of the de novo purine synthesis pathway in thiopurine resistance, and they offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and thiopurine-resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  15. Quantifying Benefit of Autologous Transplantation for Relapsed Follicular Lymphoma Patients via Instrumental Variable Analysis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Danielle H; Li, Haocheng; Duan, Qiuli; Villa, Diego; Peters, Anthea; Chua, Neil; Owen, Carolyn J; Connors, Joseph M; Stewart, Douglas A

    2016-05-01

    The role of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma (FL) remains controversial because of a lack of proven overall survival (OS) benefit versus nontransplant strategies. We conducted a comparative effectiveness research study involving 3 tertiary Canadian cancer centers to determine whether the ASCT-based approach used at 1 center improved OS relative to non-ASCT approaches used at the other centers. Of 1082 consecutive patients aged 18 to 60 years and diagnosed with FL from 2001 to 2010, the study population included 355 patients who experienced relapse from chemotherapy (center A = 96, center B = 84, center C = 175). Data were analyzed according to the instrumental variable of treatment center to control for confounding factors. The frequency of using ASCT at first or second relapse was significantly different between the centers (A = 58%, B = 7%, C = 5%, P < .001). With a median follow-up of 69.1 months, the actuarial 5-year OS rates after first chemotherapy relapse were 89%, 60%, and 60% for centers A, B, and C respectively (log rank P < .0001). Based on instrumental variable analysis, the use of ASCT at relapse 1 or 2 significantly decreased the risk of death from first relapse (HR .127, P = .004) and from initial diagnosis (HR .116, P = .004). In conclusion, for FL patients who relapse after chemotherapy, these results strongly support more frequent use of ASCT at first or second relapse. PMID:26785331

  16. Risk Factors for Relapse of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Moulana, Zahra; Afshar, Zeinab Mohseni; Ebrahimpour, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Background & Propose: Brucellosis is serious disease around the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. Relapse is major problem in therapy of brucellosis. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors of relapse after treatment in patients. Methods: It is a descriptive-analytic study from 1990 to 2014, in Ayatolla Rohani hospital in Babol, Iran. We studied 980 patients with brucellosis. The studied community included patients infected with brucellosis and the required information was gathered based on their hospital files. The base for recognizing Malta fever were clinical symptoms and Para-clinical sign congruent with infection like as, titer SAT>1:320 and 2-ME>1:160. Patients with relapse and patients without relapse were placed separately in two groups. The data were statistically compared with Spss 16, by Chi-square and Cox–regression tests. Results: Based on this study, treatment regimen is a preventive factor (P=0.000). Moreover, Based on some statistical methods, regimens no. 3 and 4 were introduce preventive factors (P=0.001) and (P=0.004). It should also be noted that findings the same statistical model, factors like gender, age, residence, professional contacts, complications and delay in treatment were also analyzed but none of them are considered as preventive factors. Conclusion: Based our finding, we suggest aminoglycosides (gentamicin or streptomycin with doxycycline) are associated with lower rate of relapse in brucellosis.

  17. Relapse prevention with intellectually disabled sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Jenny A; Rose, John L

    2005-10-01

    The adaptation of relapse prevention theory to sexual offending (W. D. Pithers, J. K. Marques, C. C. Gibat, & G. A. Marlatt, 1983) has represented an important movement in cognitive-behavioural treatment for sexual offenders. However, this model of relapse prevention has been criticised for its limited view and oversimplification of the relapse prevention process (R. K. Hanson, 2000; T. Ward & S. M. Hudson, 1996). As a result, T. Ward and S. M. Hudson (2000a) have developed a multiple pathway model of the relapse prevention process based on self-regulation theory. Although this model continues to be empirically validated on sexual offenders (J. A. Bickley & A. R. Beech, 2002; T. Ward, S. M. Hudson, & J. C. McCormick, 1999), there has been no empirical research regarding the application of this theory to intellectually disabled sexual offenders. This paper discusses whether the characteristics of offenders in each of the relapse offence pathways, as described by T. Ward and S. M. Hudson (2000a), may be similar to the characteristics of intellectually disabled sexual offenders. From a review of the literature, it appears that the intellectually disabled sexual offender may be most likely to offend via the approach-automatic pathway or the avoidant-passive pathway. The potential treatment implications of the self-regulation model for intellectually disabled sexual offenders is discussed, as well as the need for empirical evaluation with regards to the application of this model to the intellectually disabled sexual offender population. PMID:16341602

  18. Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Ivana; Stavraka, Chara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Borley, Jane; Hopkins, Thomas Glass; Gabra, Hani; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Huson, Les; Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to construct a prognostic index that predicts risk of relapse in women who have completed first-line treatment for ovarian cancer (OC). Methods A database of OC cases from 2000 to 2010 was interrogated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade and histological subtype of cancer, preoperative and posttreatment CA-125 level, presence or absence of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery and on postchemotherapy computed tomography scan, and time to progression and death. The strongest predictors of relapse were included into an algorithm, the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse (ROVAR) score. Results Three hundred fifty-four cases of OC were analyzed to generate the ROVAR score. Factors selected were preoperative serum CA-125, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade of cancer, and presence of residual disease at posttreatment computed tomography scan. In the validation data set, the ROVAR score had a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 61%, respectively. The concordance index for the validation data set was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.96). The score allows patient stratification into low (<0.33), intermediate (0.34–0.67), and high (>0.67) probability of relapse. Conclusions The ROVAR score stratifies patients according to their risk of relapse following first-line treatment for OC. This can broadly facilitate the appropriate tailoring of posttreatment care and support. PMID:25647256

  19. Pathological gambling: understanding relapses and dropouts.

    PubMed

    Aragay, Núria; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Ramos-Grille, Irene; Cardona, Sara; Garrido, Gemma; Anisul Islam, Mohammed; Menchón, José M; Vallès, Vicenç

    2015-02-01

    There is little available information on the factors that influence relapses and dropouts during therapy for pathological gambling (PG). The aim of this study was to determine socio-demographic, clinical, personality, and psychopathological predictors of relapse and dropout in a sample of pathological gamblers seeking treatment. A total of 566 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with PG according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were included. All patients underwent an individualized cognitive-behavioral treatment program. We analyzed predictors of relapse during 6months of treatment and during the subsequent 6months of follow-up, and predictors of dropout over the entire therapeutic program. Eighty patients (14.1%) experienced at least one relapse during the entire follow-up of the study: 50 (8.8%) within the treatment period and 12 (2.1%) during the subsequent 6-month follow-up period. The main predictors of relapse were single marital status, spending less than 100euros/week on gambling, active gambling behavior at treatment inclusion, and high scores on the TCI-R Harm Avoidance personality dimension. One hundred fifty-seven patients (27.8%) missed 3 or more therapeutic sessions over the entire therapeutic program. The main predictors of dropout were single marital status, younger age, and high scores on the TCI-R Novelty Seeking personality dimension. The presence of these factors at inclusion should be taken into account by physicians dealing with PG patients. PMID:25434846

  20. Anti-relapse medications: Preclinical models for drug addiction treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yahyavi-Firouz-Abadi, Noushin; See, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease and treatment of relapse to drug-seeking is considered the most challenging part of treating addictive disorders. Relapse can be modeled in laboratory animals using reinstatement paradigms, whereby behavioral responding for a drug is extinguished and then reinstated by different trigger factors, such as environmental cues or stress. In this review, we first describe currently used animal models of relapse, different relapse triggering factors, and the validity of this model to assess relapse in humans. We further summarize the growing body of pharmacological interventions that have shown some promise in treating relapse to psychostimulant addiction. Moreover, we present an overview on the drugs tested in cocaine or methamphetamine addicts and examine the overlap of existing preclinical and clinical data. Finally, based on recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of relapse and published preclinical data, we highlight the most promising areas for future anti-relapse medication development. PMID:19683019

  1. An Interpersonal Model of Addiction Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Leach, David; Kranzler, Henry R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on interpersonal stress and rejection sensitivity and examine how these factors increase the risk of relapse in individuals with alcohol or drug dependence. We begin by considering the constructs of social pain and social threat, examining their evolutionary origins and their neuroanatomical, neuropsychological and neurophysiological dimensions. Together, these perspectives provide insight into the role of interpersonal stress as a powerful and oftentimes destructive factor that affects individuals in recovery from substance dependence. We then review the empirical evidence showing that intrapersonal traits and interpersonal environments interact to increase an addict’s risk of relapse. We conclude by proposing that substance-dependent individuals with high trait rejection sensitivity and a critical interpersonal environment are particularly vulnerable to relapse to substance use. PMID:24489485

  2. Bortezomib-related neuropathy may mask CNS relapse in multiple myeloma: A call for diligence

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Muhammad Bilal; De Mel, Sanjay; Abid, Muhammad Abbas; Tan, Kong Bing; Chng, Wee Joo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Neuropathy is a common adverse effect of bortezomib. Isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse in MM remains exceedingly rare and carries a dismal prognosis. We present an unusual case of bortezomib related neuropathy masking a CNS relapse of MM. Case presentation: A 57-year-old female was diagnosed with standard-risk MM with clinical and cytogenetic features not typically associated with CNS involvement. She was treated with 4 cycles of bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone (VCD) and achieved a VGPR, after which she underwent an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) followed by bortezomib maintenance. Six months after ASCT she developed symptoms suggestive of peripheral neuropathy which was attributed to bortezomib. However the symptoms persisted despite discontinuation of bortezomib. Imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis subsequently confirmed a CNS relapse. Discussion: CNS involvement in MM (CNS-MM) is uncommon and is considered an aggressive disease. Recently published literature has reported biomarkers with prognostic potential. However, isolated CNS relapse is even less common; an event which carries a very poor prognosis. Given the heterogeneous neurologic manifestations associated with MM, clinical suspicion may be masked by confounding factors such as bortezomib-based therapy. The disease may further remain incognito if the patient does not exhibit any of the high risk features and biomarkers associated with CNS involvement. Conclusion: In the era of proteasome inhibitor (PtdIns)/immunomodulator (IMID)-based therapy for MM which carries neurologic adverse effects, it is prudent to consider CNS relapse early. This case further highlights the need for more robust biomarkers to predict CNS relapse and use of newer novel agents which demonstrate potential for CNS penetration. PMID:27105248

  3. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  4. The School Counselor's Role in Relapse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gary L.; Harrison, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that most individuals who receive treatment for alcohol or other drug problems fail to maintain abstinence. Sees it as essential that school counselors be aware of relapse prevention strategies and use these strategies proactively when adolescents complete treatment. Discusses strategies, adapted from work using cognitive-behavioral…

  5. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  6. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemia causing relapsing altered mental status

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwada, Binod; Holbrook, Christopher; Ekeh, Ifeoma Sylvia; Uzoka, Chukwuemeka; Ikwu, Isaac; Upadhyay, Bishwas

    2015-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a recognized cause of encephalopathy. However, it is commonly seen in patients with liver disease. The clinical entity of noncirrhotic hyperammonemia is now being increasingly recognized. We report a man who presented to our hospital with relapsing altered mental status later diagnosed as noncirrhotic hyperammonemia. PMID:26424945

  7. Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's Research supports immediate drug treatment after bowel surgery for ... Crohn's disease patients will have relapses after bowel surgery, new research suggests. The study included 240 Crohn's disease patients ...

  8. Multidisciplinary correction of anterior open bite relapse and upper airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Alessandro; Siviero, Laura; Bonetti, Giulio Alessandri; Cocilovo, Francesco; Stellini, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented an anterior open bite relapse. He had low tongue posture positioned anteriorly at rest and during swallowing and reported chronic difficulty in nose breathing. Head cone-beam computed tomography revealed nasal septum deviation, right turbinate hypertrophy, and left maxillary sinus congestion, which were thought to contribute to the breathing problem, encourage the improper tongue posture, and thereby cause the relapse. Multidisciplinary treatment involving an otorhinolaryngologist, an orthodontist, and a periodontist resolved the upper airway obstruction and corrected the malocclusion. The follow-up examination after 3 years 5 months demonstrated stable results. PMID:25667917

  9. Strategies to Reduce Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Raya; Lionberger, Jack M.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is expected to increase in conjunction with our ageing population. Although it is proving to be a heterogeneous disease process, the only treatment with proven survival benefit for poor risk AML remains allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Although this is presumed to be a curative strategy, many patients relapse after transplant, prompting us to examine various ways that we can improve outcomes. These efforts involve every step of AML diagnostics and therapy, including the intricate processes of conditioning, graft manipulation and immunomodulation. The hope is that improvement in these steps will ultimately improve survival and decrease relapse rates for AML patients after transplant. PMID:23456518

  10. [Explanation and forecast: relapse of juvenile offenders].

    PubMed

    Giebel, S M

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of n=82 juvenile offenders from a prison for juvenile offenders in Rheinland Pfalz the model of the logistic regression is compared with a procedure from the family of the neural nets in its efficiency to explain and predict "relapse" in form of a renewed imprisonment or prosecution /police search after dismissal. The group which can be examined is limited by the population of the prison for juvenile offenders and the explaining variables for "relapse" as "addicted to drugs" present non-metric scaling. For the explanation only probabilities for "relapse" can be indicated in this connection. By means of this probability it is possible to classify the individual case. The forecast is simulated by coincidental dividing of the data: the first part of the data is used for the explanation, the second for the forecast. With the comparison of the logistic regression with the neural nets, the superiority of neural nets in the explanation of "relapse" can be shown, since the neural nets are able to consider dependence between the explaining variables and according to that they offer a differentiated explanation. Their efficiency to predict "relapse" depends on the comparability of the distribution in the two coincidentally provided samples, the training data record for determining the explanation and the test case for the use of the explanation regarding the forecast. For optimal explanation and forecast neural nets are to be preferred to the logistic regression, since in the model with the better explanation also includes the potential for a usable better forecast. Moreover the model of the logistic regression is in fact a special case of the neural net, with a reduced complexity of the net. PMID:17124800

  11. Relapse of pemphigus vulgaris after topical application of ingenol mebutate.

    PubMed

    Russo, I; Ferrazzi, A; Alaibac, M

    2016-08-01

    Ingenol mebutate is a recently approved topical agent for the treatment of actinic keratosis. Its most common adverse effects are transient local skin reactions. We report a 63-year-old white man who presented with a red-brownish crusted plaque involving the dorsum of his nose and an eroded area on his lower lip, which appeared soon after topical application of ingenol mebutate gel. Clinical, histological and immunopathological features were consistent with a diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris (PV). To our knowledge, this is the first report of relapse of PV after topical application of ingenol mebutate gel. The temporal relationship between the application of the drug and the outbreak of PV supports the involvement of this agent in triggering the disease. It is plausible that ingenol mebutate may have induced the disease by its action on the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27381839

  12. Antipsychotic withdrawal-induced relapse predicts future relapses in institutionalized adults with severe intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, David S; Barnhill, L Jarrett; Khalid, Abdul S; Davis, John M

    2008-08-01

    Severe intellectual and developmental disabilities are frequently associated with aggression toward self and others, destruction of property, and disruption. Antipsychotic medications are a mainstay of treatment of such behaviors. National and state guidelines suggest stopping these medications or decreasing their dosages when possible if patients have maintained stability. The current study evaluated the likelihood of future antipsychotic drug withdrawal-induced relapses in those individuals where such a relapse had occurred previously. Subjects were 57 institutionalized adults with severe or profound intellectual disability. Between 1990 and 2000, each had experienced an initial activation of maladaptive aggressive behaviors after an attempt at antipsychotic drug withdrawal and/or termination. Quarterly behavioral reports were evaluated to determine whether subsequent antipsychotic drug withdrawal attempts were also associated with future relapses. Initial relapse was followed by subsequent antipsychotic drug withdrawal attempts in 49 of the 57 individuals. Between 1990 and 2005, 28.6% of these 49 subjects had experienced 1, 38.7% had 2, 20.4% had 3, and 8.2% had 4 additional relapses. Two (4.1%) had not relapsed. Eight individuals remained on antipsychotic agents without a subsequent withdrawal attempt. By the end of 2005, only 4 (7%) of the 57 individuals had become antipsychotic drug free, 22.8% were receiving first-generation antipsychotic agents alone, 45.6% were receiving second-generation antipsychotic agents alone, and 24.6% were receiving a combination of first- and second-generation antipsychotic agents. Thus, if relapse occurs after an antipsychotic drug withdrawal attempt, subsequent attempts at withdrawal are also very likely to lead to further relapses. PMID:18626266

  13. The Role of Family Atmosphere in the Relapse Behavior of Iranian Opiate Users: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Peyrovi, Hamid; Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Jalali, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many Iranian opiate users live with family members and family atmosphere can be influential on reducing such social behaviors of opiate users as substance use and relapses. This paper reports the impact of family atmosphere on relapse behavior as a part of the findings of a larger study that explored the relapse process among Iranian opiate users. Methods: In this qualitative research, we selected 17 participants (5 women and 12 men). The questions were been asked through semi-structured interviews. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using content analysis method. Results: "Family atmosphere" with three sub-themes (family and tribes' interaction, family challenges and family structure) was been found as determinants of relapse behavior. The quality of the family atmosphere could be in harmony with or against the willingness or motivation of the opiate user towards the relapse. Conclusion Health care providers should reinforce involvement of the family members in the treatment and rehabilitation of opiate users. The opiate user's family and even relatives may benefit from learning how to manage their own feelings and attitude towards the client and being supportive during interactions. PMID:26464835

  14. Ocular rosacea: an underdiagnosed cause of relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Sergio Umberto; Cecchin, Emanuela; De Marchi, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis are among the most common ocular disease in elderly patients. In these cases the search for causes is difficult and frustrating. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman with a long history of red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis caused by ocular rosacea. In this patient the proper diagnosis was performed after 10 years of ocular disease, and repeated evaluations by general practitioners and clinical specialists, only after the appearance of facial signs of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. Adequate therapy with oral doxycycline led to the improvement of the clinical picture that previously had shown a poor response to several topical treatments. The possibility of ocular rosacea should be considered in evaluating an elderly patient with persistent red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis. Making the proper diagnosis is crucial because ocular rosacea does not respond as expected to topical therapy and may lead to severe corneal involvement. PMID:25239991

  15. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  16. The role of neuroadaptations in relapse to drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2005-11-01

    One of the most difficult problems in treating addiction is not withdrawing addicts from drugs, but preventing relapse. Persistent neuroadaptations are thought to underlie aspects of addiction, including relapse. This commentary assesses the degree to which these neuroadaptations, primarily identified in preclinical studies on cocaine, induce relapse. PMID:16251983

  17. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Crossed two relapse prevention conditions (skills training-vs-discussion control) with two levels of aversive smoking in volunteer subjects (N=123). Results indicated that relapse-prevention skill training did prevent relapse among cigarette smokers. Lighter smokers were more favorably influenced. (LLL)

  18. Relapse Prevention Model of Behavioral Maintenance: Implications for Alcohol Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Colley, Mary; Cinelli, Bethann

    1992-01-01

    Describes Relapse Prevention as therapeutic modality, based on Social Learning Theory, used to prevent relapse for individuals who have completed treatment for substance abuse behaviors. Outlines relapse prevention theory and suggests various components of model be incorporated into alcohol education curricula. Outlines teaching strategies to…

  19. Relapsed or poorly responsive nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents - a report from the United Kingdom's Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Study Group.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Ananth G; Kirkwood, Amy A; Depani, Sarita; Bianchi, Eleonora; Hayward, Janis; Ramsay, Alan D; Hall, Georgina W

    2016-05-01

    There is a paucity of data on the treatment outcome in children with relapsed or poorly responsive nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (nLPHL). This retrospective report evaluates the treatment outcome in a national cohort of children with relapsed or poorly responsive nLPHL. A total of 37 patients, 22 with relapsed and 15 with poorly responding disease, are the subjects of this report. Of the 22 patients with relapsed nLPHL, 11 had relapsed after primary excision biopsy, 10 after chemotherapy and 1 after chemotherapy and involved field radiotherapy. The majority had localized disease at relapse. The median time to relapse was 8 months after chemotherapy and 11 months after excision biopsy. Seven of the 15 patients with poorly responding nLPHL had variant histology. Three patients with initial poor response did not receive any further treatment and have had no disease progression. Transformation to diffuse large B cell lymphoma, in addition to evolution from typical to variant nLPHL occurred in one patient each. Thirty-four patients have been successfully re-treated with second chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Multiple relapses were uncommon but treatable. Relapse or poorly responsive nLPHL is fully salvageable with either additional chemotherapy and or radiotherapy. PMID:26996288

  20. Predicting Post-External Beam Radiation Therapy PSA Relapse of Prostate Cancer Using Pretreatment MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsjaeger, Michael H.; Pucar, Darko; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Zhang Zhigang; Mo Qianxing; Ben-Porat, Leah S.; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Wang Liang; Reuter, Victor E.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pretreatment endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can predict biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and January 2002, 224 patients (median age, 69 years; age range, 45-82 years) with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent endorectal MRI before high-dose ({>=}81Gy) EBRT. The value of multiple clinical and MRI variables in predicting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse at 5 years was determined by use of univariate and multivariate stepwise Cox regression. Clinical variables included pretreatment PSA, clinical T stage, Gleason score, use of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, and radiation dose. Magnetic resonance imaging variables, derived from retrospective consensus readings by two radiologists, were used to measure intraprostatic and extraprostatic tumor burden. Results: After a median follow-up of 67 months, PSA relapse developed in 37 patients (16.5%). The significant predictors of PSA relapse on univariate analysis were pretreatment PSA, clinical T stage, and multiple MRI variables, including MRI TN stage score; extracapsular extension (ECE) status; number of sextants involved by ECE, all lesions, or index (dominant) lesion; apical involvement; and diameter and volume of index lesion. Pretreatment PSA and ECE status were the only significant independent predictors on multivariate analysis (p < 0.05 for both). Extracapsular extension status was associated with the highest hazard ratio, 3.04; 5-year PSA relapse rates were 7% for no ECE, 20% for unilateral ECE, and 48% for bilateral ECE. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging findings can be used to predict post-EBRT PSA relapse, with ECE status on MRI and pretreatment PSA being significant independent predictors of this endpoint.

  1. ITAREPS: information technology aided relapse prevention programme in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Spaniel, Filip; Vohlídka, Pavel; Hrdlicka, Jan; Kozený, Jirí; Novák, Tomás; Motlová, Lucie; Cermák, Jan; Bednarík, Josef; Novák, Daniel; Höschl, Cyril

    2008-01-01

    ITAREPS presents a mobile phone-based telemedicine solution for weekly remote patient monitoring and disease management in schizophrenia and psychotic disorders in general. The programme provides health professionals with home telemonitoring via a PC-to-phone SMS platform that identifies prodromal symptoms of relapse, to enable early intervention and prevent unnecessary hospitalizations. Its web-based interface offers the authorized physician a longitudinal analysis of the dynamics and development of possible prodromes. This work presents preliminary findings from a one-year mirror-design follow-up evaluation of the programme's clinical effectiveness in 45 patients with psychotic illness. There was a statistically significant 60% decrease in the number of hospitalizations during the mean 283.3+/-111.9 days of participation in the ITAREPS, compared to the same time period before the ITAREPS entry (sign test, p<0.004). Variables significantly influencing the number of hospitalizations after the ITAREPS entry (medication compliance along with factors intrinsic to the ITAREPS, i.e. adherence to the programme and involvement of a family member) suggest a critical role of the programme in controlling the number of relapses and subsequent hospitalizations in psychosis. PMID:17920245

  2. Targeting heparanase overcomes chemoresistance and diminishes relapse in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vishnu C; Zhan, Fenghuang; He, Jianbo; Barbieri, Paola; Noseda, Alessandro; Tricot, Guido; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-12

    In most myeloma patients, even after several rounds of intensive therapy, drug resistant tumor cells survive and proliferate aggressively leading to relapse. In the present study, gene expression profiling of tumor cells isolated from myeloma patients after sequential rounds of chemotherapy, revealed for the first time that heparanase, a potent promoter of myeloma growth and progression, was elevated in myeloma cells that survived therapy. Based on this clinical data, we hypothesized that heparanase was involved in myeloma resistance to drug therapy. In several survival and viability assays, elevated heparanase expression promoted resistance of myeloma tumor cells to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, this enhanced survival was due to heparanase-mediated ERK signaling. Importantly, use of the heparanase inhibitor Roneparstat in combination with chemotherapy clearly diminished the growth of disseminated myeloma tumors in vivo. Moreover, use of Roneparstat either during or after chemotherapy diminished regrowth of myeloma tumors in vivo following therapy. These results provide compelling evidence that heparanase is a promising, novel target for overcoming myeloma resistance to therapy and that targeting heparanase has the potential to prevent relapse in myeloma and possibly other cancers. PMID:26624982

  3. Relapsing CD8+ encephalitis-looking for a solution.

    PubMed

    Salam, Sharfaraz; Mihalova, Tatiana; Ustianowski, Andrew; McKee, David; Siripurapu, Rehka

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ encephalitis (CD8+E) is an emerging and incompletely understood HIV-associated neurological syndrome, typically presenting as a steroid-responsive subacute encephalopathy with prominent white matter changes in patients with apparently well-controlled HIV infection. Some cases can be associated with the phenomenon of 'viral escape' (disproportionate replication within the cerebrospinal fluid), but the most important pathophysiology of CD8+E is thought to involve an attack on HIV-infected CD4+ lymphocytes by autoreactive CD8+ cells. We report a case of CD8+E where the initial positive response to steroid treatment was followed by several relapses on withdrawal. This led to the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as a long-term steroid-sparing agent, which is the first time this approach has been reported in the literature. The patient has now been on treatment with MMF for 10 months and it has been possible to taper the steroids down to a minimal maintenance dose without further relapse. PMID:27335359

  4. Tickborne Relapsing Fever, Bitterroot Valley, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua; Fischer, Robert J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In July 2013, a resident of the Bitterroot Valley in western Montana, USA, contracted tickborne relapsing fever caused by an infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. The patient’s travel history and activities before onset of illness indicated a possible exposure on his residential property on the eastern side of the valley. An onsite investigation of the potential exposure site found the vector, Ornithodoros hermsi ticks, and 1 chipmunk infected with spirochetes, which on the basis of multilocus sequence typing were identical to the spirochete isolated from the patient. Field studies in other locations found additional serologic evidence and an infected tick that demonstrated a wider distribution of spirochetes circulating among the small mammal populations. Our study demonstrates that this area of Montana represents a previously unrecognized focus of relapsing fever and poses a risk for persons of acquiring this tickborne disease. PMID:25625502

  5. Craving and relapse measurement in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, A S; Deckers, F; Geerlings, P

    1999-01-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the measurement of craving with four different craving instruments and to relate this to definitions and measurement of relapse. The definitions of relapse may vary between studies and researchers, but are usually well defined. Five commonly used methods to measure relapse are: (1) quantity/frequency of drinking; (2) cumulative duration of abstinence (CDA); (3) post-withdrawal abstinent period; (4) stable recovery period; (5) the time line follow-back method. The definition of craving is much less clear and is mostly described as an emotional-motivational state or as obsessive-compulsive behaviour. Four self-rating instruments are briefly discussed and compared: the Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale, OCDS, the Lübeck Craving Scale, LCRR, the Alcohol Craving Questionnaire, ACQ-Now-SF-R, and ordinal scales (e.g. visual analogue, Likert, or verbal descriptive scales). These instruments measure different aspects or dimensions of craving over different periods. The different dimensions measured suggest that there is still a need to conceptualize a standard interpretation of the word craving. There is a need also to measure an emotional-motivational dimension, a cognitive-behavioural dimension, expectancies, and effects on positive and negative reinforcement with different instruments or with one multidimensional instrument. It is suggested that different patients are expected to have different craving profiles. PMID:10344785

  6. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analogue approved in pediatric leukemia, has shown activity in adult acute leukemias including ALL and acute myeloid leukemia. The role of pegaspargase in adult ALL requires further investigation. The benefit of matched related-donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation is significant for standard-risk ALL but not for high-risk ALL. Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL. PMID:20425428

  7. Treatment of relapsed and refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    von Tresckow, Bastian; Moskowitz, Craig H

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high first-line cure rates in patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) still 10%-20% of patients suffer from relapsed or refractory disease. High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is standard of care for suitable patients with relapsed or refractory HL and allows for cure in approximately 50%. Due to the poor prognosis of high-risk patients even with HDCT and ASCT, consolidation strategies have been evaluated to improve the cure rates. For patients with recurrence after HDCT and ASCT, treatment is palliative in most cases. The anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin (BV) has been shown to induce high response rates in these patients; however, durable responses were reported in a small percentage of patients only. For carefully selected patients with multiple relapses, dose-reduced allogeneic transplant (RICallo) is a potentially curative option. The role of RICallo will have to be re-evaluated in the era of anti-programmed death-1 (PD1) antibodies. PMID:27496309

  8. Predictors of Relapse and Dropout During a 12-Week Relapse Prevention Program for Methamphetamine Users.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chih; Chen, Chih-Ken; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the possible neuropsychological predictors of relapse and dropout of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Participants were 42 MA users sentenced by the judicial system to take part in an out-patient relapse prevention program for MA abuse and dependence that employs a CBT model once a week over the course of 12 weeks. Baseline neuropsychological functions were evaluated with the Conners' Continuous Performance Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Iowa Gambling Task, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. All participants had to submit to urine drug tests every week. Of the 42 participants, 69.0% had a MA positive urine screening result at least once throughout the program (relapse), while 40.5% dropped out of the treatment program prior to its completion. Short duration of MA abstinence at baseline and poor attention predicted relapse. Predictors of dropout included being unmarried and having risky decision making. Findings may be helpful for clinicians, who can screen for the aforementioned risk factors and provide strategies for high-risk patients to help prevent relapse and dropout among MA users in treatment programs. PMID:26267045

  9. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever in the Pacific Northwest: An Underdiagnosed Illness?

    PubMed Central

    Fihn, Stephan; Larson, Eric B.

    1980-01-01

    Some 30 cases of tick-borne relapsing fever due to Borrelia are known to have occurred between 1965 and 1978 in the Pacific Northwest. This disease was found more frequently in young men with a history of wilderness exposure during the summer months. Recurrent fever was the most common symptom with temperatures reaching higher than 39.5° C (103.1° F) in all cases, and many patients had three or more febrile episodes. Splenomegaly was the second most common finding reported. Diagnosis of relapsing fever was made in 20 cases by identifying spirochetes on peripheral blood smears. In ten remaining cases the diagnosis was made on clinical and epidemiologic grounds. Information regarding therapy was available in 21 cases. Ten patients received a tetracycline drug and all had a prompt response without relapse. Two of the patients died, a 68-year-old woman with possible myocardial involvement and a newborn infant with infection acquired in utero and meningeal involvement. The diagnosis was often delayed in spite of outpatient evaluation and admittance to hospital, probably because borreliosis was not considered in the differential diagnosis. Because tick-borne relapsing fever is eventually a self-limited disease in most patients, it is probably not recognized often enough. Awareness of this disease and examination of the peripheral blood smear for spirochetes will lead to earlier diagnosis. Prompt initiation of tetracycline therapy should reduce morbidity associated with borreliosis. ImagesFigure 3. PMID:7415171

  10. New patterns of relapse in multiple myeloma: a case of "light chain escape" in which FLC predicted relapse earlier than urine and serum immunofixation.

    PubMed

    Caldini, Anna; Nozzoli, Chiara; Terreni, Alessandro; Staderini, Michela; Berardi, Margherita; Biagioli, Tiziana; Brogi, Marco; Bosi, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized, in about 80% of cases, by the production of monoclonal intact immunoglobulin and more than 95% of them have elevated concentrations of involved (i.e. of the same class of intact immunoglobulin) free light chain (FLC). The introduction of novel therapeutic strategies has changed the natural history of the disease, leading to new manifestations of relapse. Light chain escape (LCE) is a pattern of relapse in which the FLC increase is not accompanied by a concomitant raise of the original monoclonal component (MC). Here we present a case of a 55-year-old man with an IgG kappa MM stage III diagnosed in September 2007. At presentation an IgG kappa MC and urine Bence Jones protein (BJP) kappa were present. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) showed the presence of 80% monotypic kappa plasma cells (PCs). The patient received bortezomib, thalidomide, dexamethasone before undergoing a double autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in October 2008 and April 2009. In May 2011 he relapsed showing the same pattern of presentation and treatment with lenalidomide and dexamethasone was started. ln May 2013 serum and urine immunofixation and FLC became negative. In September 2014, an increase of kappa FLC was observed, while serum and urine immunofixations remained negative until January 2015, when urine immunofixation became positive. Eventually, in February 2015, serum immunofixation revealed the presence of a free kappa MC. After a new BMB showing 80% of monotypic kappa PCs, a LCE relapse was diagnosed and the patient started the treatment with bendamustine, bortezomib and dexamethasone. In the present case, the increase of kappa FLC has indicated relapse 4 and 5 months earlier than urine and serum IFE, respectively. Our observation confirms that it is advisable to routinely perform FLC or BJP during follow up of MM patients undergoing ASCT and/or treatment with biological drugs to ensure that LCE is not missed. PMID:26581069

  11. Adversity-induced relapse of fear: neural mechanisms and implications for relapse prevention from a study on experimentally induced return-of-fear following fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Scharfenort, R; Menz, M; Lonsdorf, T B

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of current treatments for anxiety disorders is limited by high relapse rates. Relapse of anxiety disorders and addiction can be triggered by exposure to life adversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. Seventy-six healthy adults were a priori selected for the presence or absence of adverse experiences during childhood (CA) and recent past (RA; that is, past 12 months). Participants underwent fear conditioning (day 1) and fear extinction and experimental return-of-fear (ROF) induction through reinstatement (a model for adversity-induced relapse; day 2). Ratings, autonomic (skin conductance response) and neuronal activation measures (functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) were acquired. Individuals exposed to RA showed a generalized (that is, not CS- specific) fear recall and ROF, whereas unexposed individuals showed differential (that is, CS+ specific) fear recall and ROF on an autonomic level despite no group differences during fear acquisition and extinction learning. These group differences in ROF were accompanied by corresponding activation differences in brain areas known to be involved in fear processing and differentiability/generalization of ROF (that is, hippocampus). In addition, dimensional measures of RA, CA and lifetime adversity were negatively correlated with differential skin conductance responses (SCRs) during ROF and hippocampal activation. As discriminating signals of danger and safety, as well as a tendency for overgeneralization, are core features in clinically anxious populations, these deficits may specifically contribute to relapse risk following exposure to adversity, in particular to recent adversity. Hence, our results may provide first and novel insights into the possible mechanisms mediating enhanced relapse risk following exposure to (recent) adversity, which may guide the development of effective pre- and intervention programs. PMID:27434492

  12. Central nervous system relapse in patients with untreated HER2-positive esophageal or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Harry H; Lewis, Mark A; Foster, Nathan R; Sukov, William R; Khan, Maliha; Sattler, Christopher A; Wiktor, Anne E; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Jenkins, Robert B; Sinicrope, Frank A

    2016-10-01

    Although HER2-positive breast cancers demonstrate a propensity for central nervous system (CNS) metastasis, it is unknown whether other HER2-positive tumors, including adenocarcinomas of the esophagus/gastroesophageal junction (EAC), share this characteristic. Insight into this association may inform the development of HER2-targeted therapies that penetrate the blood-brain barrier. We examined HER2 overexpression and gene amplification in 708 patients with EAC who underwent curative-intent surgery during a time period (1980-1997) when no patient received HER2-targeted therapy. We identified patients whose site of first cancer recurrence was CNS and those who had a CNS relapse at any time. After a median follow-up of 61.2 months, 3.4% (24/708) of patients developed CNS relapse (all involved the brain). Patients with HER2-positive (vs -negative) primary tumors showed a higher 5-year cumulative incidence of CNS relapse as first recurrence (5.8% vs. 1.2%; p = 0.0058) and at any time (8.3% vs. 2.4%; p = 0.0062). In a multivariable model that included covariates previously associated with HER2 or with CNS relapse in breast cancer, HER2 positivity was the only variable that was statistically significantly associated with shorter time to CNS relapse as first recurrence (p = 0.0026) or at any time (hazard ratio 4.3 [95% confidence interval 1.8 to 10.3]; p = 0.001). These are the first data in a non-breast cancer to demonstrate an association between HER2 positivity and higher CNS relapse risk after surgery, and suggest that HER2-positive EACs have a predilection for CNS metastases. PMID:27198655

  13. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J.; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W.; Smedby, Karin E.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  14. Trends and tenets in relapsing and progressive opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D

    2016-05-01

    Despite advances in inducing remission in pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS), relapse remains a challenge. By definition, relapse is not a characteristic of monophasic OMS, but occurs at any time in the course of multiphasic OMS. Due to variability and heterogeneity, patients are best approached and treated on a case-by-case basis, using precepts derived from clinical and scientific studies. Treatment of provocations, such as infection or immunotherapy tapering, is the short-term goal, but discovering unresolved neuroinflammation and re-configuring disease-modifying agents is crucial in the long-term. The working hypothesis is that much of the injury in OMS results from neuroinflammation involving dysregulated B cells, which may cause loss of tolerance and autoantibody production. Biomarkers of disease activity include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cell frequency, oligoclonal bands (OCB), B cell attractants (CXCL13) and activating factors (BAFF). Measuring these markers comprises modern detection and characterization of neuroinflammation or verifies 'no evidence of disease activity'. The decision making process is three-tiered: deciding if the relapse is bone fide, identifying its etiology, and formulating a therapeutic plan. Relapsing-remitting OMS is treatable, and combination multimodal/multi-mechanistic immunotherapy is improving the outcome. However, some patients progress to a refractory state with cognitive impairment and disability from failure to go into remission, multiple relapses, or more aggressive disease. This report provides new insights on underappreciated risks and pitfalls inherent in relapse, pro-active efforts to avoid progression, the need for early and sufficient treatment beyond corticosteroids and immunoglobulins, and utilization of disease activity biomarkers to identify high-risk patients and safely withdraw immunotherapy. PMID:26786246

  15. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W; Smedby, Karin E; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-02-25

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  16. Central nervous system relapse in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma: analysis of the risk factors and proposal of a new prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Kanemasa, Yusuke; Shimoyama, Tatsu; Sasaki, Yuki; Tamura, Miho; Sawada, Takeshi; Omuro, Yasushi; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Maeda, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an uncommon event, and the outcome of patients with CNS relapse is poor. However, no reliable prediction models for CNS relapse have been developed. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive de novo DLBCL patients referred to our department between September 2004 and August 2015 and treated with R-CHOP or R-CHOP-like regimens. Of 413 patients analyzed in this study, a total of 27 patients (6.5 %) eventually developed CNS relapse. The 5-year probability of CNS relapse was 8.4 %. The median time from diagnosis of DLBCL to CNS relapse was 15 months, and the median survival after CNS relapse was 7 months. In univariate analysis, the risk factors significantly associated with CNS relapse were Ann Arbor stage 3 or 4, albumin level <3.2 mg/L, number of extranodal sites >1, and involvement of retroperitoneal lymph node. We developed a new prognostic model consisting of these four factors. The 5-year probability of CNS relapse was significantly higher in patients with at least three of these four factors than in those with two or fewer factors (26.4 vs. 3.0 %, P < 0.001). Using this model, we evaluated the incidence and the risk factors of CNS relapse in DLBCL patients. The new risk model consisting of the four factors demonstrated good risk stratification for CNS relapse, and could help to identify high-risk patients for whom CNS prophylaxis is warranted. PMID:27370993

  17. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. PMID:25997994

  18. New Findings on Biological Factors Predicting Addiction Relapse Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Relapse is a highly prevalent phenomenon in addiction. This paper examines the new research on identifying biological factors that contribute to addiction relapse risk. Prospective studies examining relapse risk are reviewed, and clinical, biological, and neural factors that predict relapse risk are identified. Clinical factors, patient-related factors, and subjective and behavioral measures such as depressive symptoms, stress, and drug craving all predict future relapse risk. Among biological measures, endocrine measures such as cortisol and cortisol/corticotropin (ACTH) ratio as a measure of adrenal sensitivity and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also predictive of future relapse risk. Among neural measures, brain atrophy in the medial frontal regions and hyperreactivity of the anterior cingulate during withdrawal were identified as important in drug withdrawal and relapse risk. Caveats pertaining to specific drug abuse type and phase of addiction are discussed. Finally, significant implications of these findings for clinical practice are presented, with a specific focus on determining biological markers of relapse risk that may be used to identify those individuals who are most at risk of relapse in the clinic. Such markers may then be used to assess treatment response and develop specific treatments that will normalize these neural and biological sequelae so as to significantly improve relapse outcomes. PMID:21792580

  19. Global map of physical interactions among differentially expressed genes in multiple sclerosis relapses and remissions.

    PubMed

    Tuller, Tamir; Atar, Shimshi; Ruppin, Eytan; Gurevich, Michael; Achiron, Anat

    2011-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system autoimmune inflammatory T-cell-mediated disease with a relapsing-remitting course in the majority of patients. In this study, we performed a high-resolution systems biology analysis of gene expression and physical interactions in MS relapse and remission. To this end, we integrated 164 large-scale measurements of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients in relapse or remission and healthy subjects, with large-scale information about the physical interactions between these genes obtained from public databases. These data were analyzed with a variety of computational methods. We find that there is a clear and significant global network-level signal that is related to the changes in gene expression of MS patients in comparison to healthy subjects. However, despite the clear differences in the clinical symptoms of MS patients in relapse versus remission, the network level signal is weaker when comparing patients in these two stages of the disease. This result suggests that most of the genes have relatively similar expression levels in the two stages of the disease. In accordance with previous studies, we found that the pathways related to regulation of cell death, chemotaxis and inflammatory response are differentially expressed in the disease in comparison to healthy subjects, while pathways related to cell adhesion, cell migration and cell-cell signaling are activated in relapse in comparison to remission. However, the current study includes a detailed report of the exact set of genes involved in these pathways and the interactions between them. For example, we found that the genes TP53 and IL1 are 'network-hub' that interacts with many of the differentially expressed genes in MS patients versus healthy subjects, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a 'network-hub' in the case of MS patients with relapse versus remission. The statistical approaches employed in this study enabled us

  20. Recent developments in animal models of drug relapse.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Nathan J; Li, Xuan; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-08-01

    Drug craving and relapse to drug use during abstinence are defining features of addiction. Evidence indicates that drug craving and relapse in humans are often provoked by acute exposure to the self-administered drug, drug-associated cues, or stress. During the last two decades, this clinical scenario has been primarily studied at the preclinical level using the classical reinstatement model. However, a single preclinical model cannot capture the complicated nature of human drug relapse. Therefore, more recently, we and others have developed several other models to study different facets of human drug relapse. In this review, we introduce and discuss recent findings from these other relapse models, including incubation of drug craving, reacquisition and resurgence models, and punishment-based and conflict-based relapse models. PMID:23374536

  1. Relapsing Fever Borreliae: A Global Review.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Sally J

    2015-12-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae were notorious and feared infectious agents that earned their place in history through their devastating impact as causes of both epidemic and endemic infection. They are now considered more as an oddity, and their burden of infection is largely overshadowed by other infections such as malaria, which presents in a similar clinical way. Despite this, they remain the most common bacterial infection in some developing countries. Transmitted by soft ticks or lice, these fascinating spirochetes have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to survive within their diverse environments. PMID:26593261

  2. Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. An autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lublin, F D

    1985-01-01

    R-EAE is a valuable model for human MS. Table 2 outlines the similarities between R-EAE and MS. The clinical course and pathologic changes seen in this model accurately reflect the pattern of MS. The immunologic changes seen in animals with R-EAE also are similar to those seen in MS. Therefore, the clinicopathologic features of MS can be duplicated with a purely autoimmune model. Although this is of considerable pathogenic significance in understanding MS, we do not know what the inciting event is in MS that would be the equivalent of immunizing an animal with neural antigen. Despite this, R-EAE has and should continue to provide experimental data of considerable importance to an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the evolution of inflammatory demyelination. Other important models of MS utilize viral-induced demyelination. Although the clinical picture of most of the chronic demyelinating viral infections does not show as clear a relapsing or remitting pattern as seen in R-EAE, viral etiologies better fit the epidemiology of MS [16]. Several studies have demonstrated development of an acute EAE-like disease with sensitization to neural antigens following viral infection [12, 30, 56]. Thus, one can hypothesize an initial viral illness causing sensitization of the host to a neural antigen (?MBP) with a subsequent immunopathogenic course similar to that seen in R-EAE. Whether this will in fact be the case remains unproven as yet. Our understanding of the immunopathogenic mechanisms underlying inflammatory demyelination has been enlarged through studies of R-EAE. It is now clear that the minimal myelin antigen necessary for production of the disease is MBP, although this may differ in some species. The relapsing nature of this disorder is mediated in part through lymphocytes, as demonstrated in transfer studies, and thus does not require persistent antigenic depots. There is a genetic susceptibility to development of the CNS autoimmune state, and we speculate

  3. Cerebellopontine angle facial schwannoma relapsing towards middle cranial fossa

    PubMed Central

    Nishizaki, Takafumi; Ikeda, Norio; Nakano, Shigeki; Sakakura, Takanori; Abiko, Masaru; Okamura, Tomomi

    2011-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas involving posterior and middle fossas are quite rare. Here, we report an unusual case of cerebellopontine angle facial schwannoma that involved the middle cranial fossa, two years after the first operation. A 53-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of a progressive left side hearing loss and 6-month history of a left facial spasm and palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed 4.5 cm diameter of left cerebellopontine angle and small middle fossa tumor. The tumor was subtotally removed via a suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. The tumor relapsed towards middle cranial fossa within a two-year period. By subtemporal approach with zygomatic arch osteotomy, the tumor was subtotally removed except that in the petrous bone involving the facial nerve. In both surgical procedures, intraoperative monitoring identified the facial nerve, resulting in preserved facial function. The tumor in the present case arose from broad segment of facial nerve encompassing cerebellopontine angle, meatus, geniculate/labyrinthine and possibly great petrosal nerve, in view of variable symptoms. Preservation of anatomic continuity of the facial nerve should be attempted, and the staged operation via retrosigmoid and middle fossa approaches using intraoperative facial monitoring, may result in preservation of the facial nerve. PMID:24765294

  4. Relapsing encephalopathy with cerebellar ataxia related to an ATP1A3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Dard, Rodolphe; Mignot, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Lesca, Gaetan; Sanlaville, Damien; Roze, Emmanuel; Mochel, Fanny

    2015-12-01

    ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3-subunit of the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase pump, has been involved in four clinical neurological entities: (1) alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC); (2) rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP); (3) CAPOS (cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss) syndrome; and (4) early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we report on a 34-year-old female presenting with a new ATP1A3-related entity involving a relapsing encephalopathy characterized by recurrent episodes of cerebellar ataxia and altered consciousness during febrile illnesses. The term RECA is suggested - relapsing encephalopathy with cerebellar ataxia. The phenotype of this patient, resembling mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defects, emphasizes the possible role of brain energy deficiency in patients with ATP1A3 mutations. Rather than multiple overlapping syndromes, ATP1A3-related disorders might be seen as a phenotypic continuum. PMID:26400718

  5. Relapsing and refractory ulcerative colitis in children.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the children with ulcerative colitis (UC) have refractory, relapsing or steroid-dependent disease. UC in children is more extensive than in adults, presents more often with severe attacks and carries a more aggressive disease course. Therefore, although a step-up approach is usually recommended in UC, aggressive therapy will often be indicated in children since steroid dependency should never be tolerated. It is vital to ensure that in every resistant case, the symptoms are truly related to the inflammatory disease activity and not to other conditions such as poor adherence to treatment, infections, adverse reactions to drugs, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, celiac disease and bacterial overgrowth. The clinician should be ready to escalate therapy in a timely manner but only after ensuring optimization of current treatments. Optimization may include, among others, appropriate dosage, utilization of assays that determine thiopurine, calcineurin inhibitors and anti-tumor necrosis factor levels, introduction of combination therapy when indicated (enemas and immunomodulators) and a long enough time for treatment to become effective. Colectomy is always a valid option and should be discussed before major treatment escalations. Experimental therapies can be considered when all else fails and the family prefers to avoid colectomy. The management of refractory and relapsing disease is particularly challenging in children, and this review summarizes the available evidence to guide treatment decisions in this setup. PMID:24969290

  6. Assessment of neuroactive steroids in cerebrospinal fluid comparing acute relapse and stable disease in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orefice, Ns; Carotenuto, A; Mangone, G; Bues, B; Rehm, R; Cerillo, I; Saccà, F; Calignano, A; Orefice, G

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have reported an involvement of neuroactive steroids as neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS); an analysis of their profile during a specific clinical phase of MS is largely unknown. The pregnenolone (PREG), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and allopregnanolone (ALLO) profile was evaluated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients as well as those in patients affected by non-inflammatory neurological (control group I) and without neurological disorders (control group II). An increase of PREG and DHEA values was shown in CSF of male and female RR-MS patients compared to those observed in both control groups. The ALLO values were significantly lower in female RR-MS patients than those found in male RR-MS patients and in female without neurological disorder. During the clinical relapse, we observed female RR-MS patients showing significantly increased PREG values compared to female RR-MS patients in stable phase, while their ALLO values showed a significant decrease compared to male RR-MS patients of the same group. Male RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed PREG and DHEA values higher than those found in female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Similary, male RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed PREG and DHEA values higher than male without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed DHEA values higher than those found in female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Male and female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed ALLO values higher than those found in respective gender groups without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. ALLO values were lower in male than in female RR-MS patients without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Considering the pharmacological properties of neuroactive steroids and the observation that neurological

  7. Ibrutinib (Imbruvica). Relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and mantle cell lymphoma: uncertain impact on survival.

    PubMed

    January

    2016-04-01

    codynamic interactions are also likely in view of its adverse effect profile. There is no consensus on the treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed mantle cell lymphoma, or for patients with relapsed or possibly refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Ibrutinib inhibits an enzyme involved in regulating B lymphocyte activity. It has been authorised in the European Union for these conditions. Clinical evaluation of ibrutinib in mantle cell lymphoma is based on a single non-comparative trial in 111 patients, in which the median overall survival time was 22.5 months. Clinical evaluation of ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia is based on two randomised trials. One unblinded trial compared ibrutinib versus ofatumumab and involved 391 patients, most of whom were sufficiently fit to receive anticancer combination therapy. Ibrutinib was more effective than ofatumumab, but the choice of this comparator might not have been appropriate for most of the patients who received it. The other double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involved 578 patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Ibrutinib was added to the bendamustine + rituximab combination. No significant difference in mortality was observed between the two groups. The main adverse effects of ibrutinib were: gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhoea; life-threatening infections and bleeding disorders; and cardiac disorders, including atrial fibrillation. Ibrutinib carries a risk of multiple pharmacokinetic interactions. Pharmacodynamic interactions are also likely in view of its adverse effect profile. PMID:27183765

  8. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  9. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  10. Power2: Relapse Management with Adolescents Who Stutter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Gordon W.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for relapse management in adolescents who stutter. The package includes game-based training techniques in problem solving, communication skills, and assertiveness; coping responses for stuttering episodes; and realistic expectations for fluency and relapse. Follow-up results with…

  11. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  12. Relapse Prevention Needs More Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao," by Katie Witkiewitz and G.A. Marlatt. Stanton notes that the recent reconceptualization of relapse prevention by Witkiewitz and Marlatt enhances the model by "synthesizing recent empirical findings into a unified theory", but it does…

  13. Louseborne Relapsing Fever among East African Refugees, Italy, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lipani, Filippo; Costa, Cecilia; Scarvaglieri, Mariaelisabetta; Balbiano, Rosanna; Carosella, Sinibaldo; Calcagno, Andrea; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Dal Conte, Ivano; Caramello, Pietro; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    During June 9–September 30, 2015, five cases of louseborne relapsing fever were identified in Turin, Italy. All 5 cases were in young refugees from Somalia, 2 of whom had lived in Italy since 2011. Our report seems to confirm the possibility of local transmission of louse-borne relapsing fever. PMID:26812354

  14. Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors in a Dynamic Model of Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Marlatt, G. Alan

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Relapse Prevention Needs More Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors" by Stanton which is a comment on the original article "Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao" by Katie Witkiewitz and G. Alan Marlatt. In the current comment the authors of the original article respond to…

  15. Effects of Nicotine Fading and Relapse Prevention on Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Conducted a pilot study which combined nicotine-fading and relapse prevention with smokers (N=30) and compared this program to conditions where subjects (N=46) received nicotine-fading or relapse prevention only. Results showed no difference among groups in abstinence or rate at any follow-up point. (LLL)

  16. Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Misdiagnosed as Relapsing Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Chatziralli, Irini P.; Kanonidou, Evgenia; Keryttopoulos, Petros; Papadopoulou, Dionyssia; Papazisis, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    A 59-year-old female patient presented at the outpatients’ Department of Ophthalmology with epiphora, eyelid swelling, and a foreign body feeling in the right eye. The symptoms were present for 4 months, and the patient was treated as suffering from relapsing conjunctivitis. The slit lamp examination revealed keratitis due to exposure, related with the deficient closure of the eyelids. There was a 2 mm difference in the readings with the Hertel exophthalmometry examination between the eyes. Her medical history was clear, and she was referred for computed tomography of the orbits and brain and biochemical examinations (FT3, FT4, and TSH) to investigate the presence of an intraorbital mass. FT3 was significantly increased and TSH was accordingly low, indicating the diagnosis of Graves’ disease, which presented without other signs and symptoms apart from ophthalmopathy. Computed tomography scan excluded the diagnosis of an intraorbital mass. Therefore, it is important not to underestimate the ocular manifestations of systemic diseases. PMID:21060773

  17. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiologic mechanism of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor blockers, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic. PMID:27242697

  18. New pharmacological treatment strategies for relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer; Vengeliene, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Here we discuss treatment strategies that are based on pharmacological interventions to reduce craving and relapse in alcohol-dependent patients. We will first provide a historical overview about relapse prevention strategies. We will then review the development of disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate, and nalmefene and discuss their neurobiological modes of action. Then the concept of convergent genomic analysis will be introduced for the discovery of new molecular treatment targets. Finally, we will provide convincing evidence for the use of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blockers as substitution drugs. Important conclusions of this review are: (i) learning from other addictive substances is very helpful-e.g., substitution therapies as applied to opiate addiction for decades could also be translated to alcoholics, (ii) the glutamate theory of alcohol addiction provides a convincing framework for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists as substitution drugs for alcohol-dependent patients, (iii) a combination of behavioral and pharmacological therapies may be the optimal approach for future treatment strategies-one promising example concerns the pharmacological disruption of reconsolidation processes of alcohol cue memories, (iv) given that many neurotransmitter systems are affected by chronic alcohol consumption, numerous druggable targets have been identified; consequently, a "cocktail" of different compounds will further improve the treatment situation, (v) in silico psychopharmacology, such as drug repurposing will yield new medications, and finally, (vi) the whole organism has to be taken into consideration to provide the best therapy for our patients. In summary, there is no other field in psychiatric research that has, in recent years, yielded so many novel, druggable targets and innovative treatment strategies than for alcohol addiction. However, it will still be several years before the majority of the "treatment-seeking population" will benefit

  19. Studies on the Plasmodium vivax relapse pattern in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Adak, T; Sharma, V P; Orlov, V S

    1998-07-01

    A five-year epidemiologic study of patients attending a malaria clinic in Delhi was conducted to find the relapse rate of infections with Plasmodium vivax, its seasonal correlation between the primary infection and subsequent relapses, the duration of the incubation period, and the patterns of relapse. By our definition, the relapse rate ranged from 23% to 44% depending on the duration of follow-up. The relapse pattern observed in the study clearly suggests the existence of both tropical and temperate zone types of P. vivax in the population characterized by distinct incubation periods and the possible existence of P. vivax subpopulations characterized by primary long incubation periods. The implication of different incubating forms of P. vivax on the epidemiology and control of malaria is also discussed. PMID:9684649

  20. Alcoholics Anonymous and Relapse Prevention as Maintenance Strategies After Conjoint Behavioral Alcohol Treatment for Men: 18-Month Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrady, Barbara S.; Epstein, Elizabeth E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety men with alcohol problems and their female partners were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 outpatient conjoint treatments: alcohol behavioral couples therapy (ABCT), ABCT with relapse prevention techniques (RP/ABCT), or ABCT with interventions encouraging Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) involvement (AA/ABCT). Couples were followed for 18 months after…

  1. Determinants of relapse periodicity in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of febrile illness in endemic areas of Asia, Central and South America, and the horn of Africa. Plasmodium vivax infections are characterized by relapses of malaria arising from persistent liver stages of the parasite (hypnozoites) which can be prevented only by 8-aminoquinoline anti-malarials. Tropical P. vivax relapses at three week intervals if rapidly eliminated anti-malarials are given for treatment, whereas in temperate regions and parts of the sub-tropics P. vivax infections are characterized either by a long incubation or a long-latency period between illness and relapse - in both cases approximating 8-10 months. The epidemiology of the different relapse phenotypes has not been defined adequately despite obvious relevance to malaria control and elimination. The number of sporozoites inoculated by the anopheline mosquito is an important determinant of both the timing and the number of relapses. The intervals between relapses display a remarkable periodicity which has not been explained. Evidence is presented that the proportion of patients who have successive relapses is relatively constant and that the factor which activates hypnozoites and leads to regular interval relapse in vivax malaria is the systemic febrile illness itself. It is proposed that in endemic areas a large proportion of the population harbours latent hypnozoites which can be activated by a systemic illness such as vivax or falciparum malaria. This explains the high rates of vivax following falciparum malaria, the high proportion of heterologous genotypes in relapses, the higher rates of relapse in people living in endemic areas compared with artificial infection studies, and, by facilitating recombination between different genotypes, contributes to P. vivax genetic diversity particularly in low transmission settings. Long-latency P. vivax phenotypes may be more widespread and more prevalent than currently thought. These observations have important

  2. Genomic, immunophenotypic, and NPM1/FLT3 mutational studies on 17 patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (AML) followed by aberrant karyotype AML at relapse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eunice S; Sait, Sheila N J; Gold, David; Mashtare, Terry; Starostik, Petr; Ford, Laurie Ann; Wetzler, Meir; Nowak, Norma J; Deeb, George

    2010-10-15

    Normal karyotype (NK) is the most common cytogenetic group in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) diagnosis; however, up to 50% of these patients at relapse will have aberrant karyotype (AK) AML. To determine the etiology of relapsed AK AML cells, we evaluated cytogenetic, immunophenotypic, and molecular results of 17 patients with diagnostic NK AML and relapsed AK AML at our institute. AK AML karyotype was diverse, involving no favorable and largely (8 of 17) complex cytogenetics. Despite clear cytogenetic differences, immunophenotype and NPM1/FLT3 gene mutation status did not change between presentation and relapse in 83% (10 of 12) and 94% (15 of 16) cases, respectively. High-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) performed via paired aCGH on NK AML and AK AML samples from the same patient confirmed cytogenetic aberrations only in the relapse sample. Analysis of 16 additional diagnostic NK AML samples revealed no evidence of submicroscopic aberrations undetected by conventional cytogenetics in any case. These results favor evolution of NK AML leukemia cells with acquisition of novel genetic changes as the most common etiology of AK AML relapse as opposed to secondary leukemogenesis. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether AK AML cells represent selection of rare preexisting clones below aCGH detection and to further characterize the molecular lesions found at time of AK AML relapse. PMID:20875872

  3. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of Maxilla – A Case Report of Late Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Medikonda Suresh; Chandragiri, Anuradha; Amarnath, Konda

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphomas (DLBCL) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors that together constitute the commonest of all Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and the proclivity of DLBCL to oral cavity is unknown. They mostly arise from soft tissues as asymptomatic lesions, mostly without ‘B’ symptoms and involvement of jaw bones is uncommon. Most studies and case reports of oral DLBCL’s are based on, manifestation of primary extra-nodal disease or a component of a disseminated disease process involving regional lymph nodes. Many investigators have proposed that patients with this cell type who maintain a complete response for 24 consecutive months are cured because late relapses seldom occur. With advances in treatment modalities, many patients with NHL become long-term survivors and the risk of relapses or second tumors are of growing concern. We present a case of DLBCL which relapsed after five years of initial lesion in a 41 year old female patient and presented as a nonspecific bilateral anterior maxillary radiolucency. DLBCL usually express pan-B markers with small percentage expressing T-cell markers. Few rare cases of DLBCL have shown CD3 expression, which is a most sensitive T-cell marker which was focally expressed in the present case. PMID:27190967

  4. IL-12Rβ2 has a protective role in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chong; Ciric, Bogoljub; Yu, Shuo; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-01-01

    IL-12Rβ2 participates in the receptors of IL-12 and IL-35, two cytokines that are involved in a variety of immune responses. In this study we evaluate the role of IL-12Rβ2 in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE). We found that the IL-12Rβ2 deficient SJL/J EAE mice presented more severe symptoms and had more frequent, more severe relapses compared with wild type controls. IL-12Rβ2 deficient EAE mice also had more infiltrating mononuclear cells in the central nervous system, as well as higher splenic proliferative capacity and decreased IFN-γ production at the periphery. These findings suggest a protective role of IL-12Rβ2 in RR-EAE, an animal model of RR-MS, the most prevalent form of MS. PMID:26857496

  5. Interferon beta-1b modulates MCP-1 expression and production in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iarlori, Carla; Reale, Marcella; De Luca, Giovanna; Di Iorio, Angelo; Feliciani, Claudio; Tulli, Antonio; Conti, Pio; Gambi, Domenico; Lugaresi, Alessandra

    2002-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We found that in unstimulated (PHA(-)) and PHA-stimulated (PHA(+)) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), MCP-1 and TNFalpha levels are higher in stable untreated MS patients. Interferon gamma (IFNgamma) is higher in relapsing patients in PHA(-) cultures and in stable patients in PHA(+) cultures. Chronic IFNbeta-1b treatment down-regulates TNFalpha, IFNgamma and MCP-1 production except for TNFalpha in relapsing patients. IFNbeta-1b, in vitro, increases MCP-1, TNFalpha and IFNgamma spontaneous production in all patients. Multivariate analysis suggests that MCP-1 production is dependent from clinical status and not from TNFalpha and IFNgamma production. Logistic regression analysis shows that MCP-1 production is significantly modified by treatment. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of MCP-1 in MS. PMID:11880161

  6. Glioblastoma following treatment with fingolimod for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sharim, Justin; Tashjian, Randy; Golzy, Nima; Pouratian, Nader

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an uncommon and aggressive primary brain tumor with incidence of 3 per 100,000 annually. We report a 50-year-old woman diagnosed with glioblastoma within threeyears of induction of fingolimod therapy for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Fingolimod, an immunomodulating agent used in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, has also been suggested to impart a cardioprotective role in heart failure and arrhythmia via activation of P21-activated kinase-1 (Pak1). In the brain, Pak1 activation has been shown to correlate with decreased survival time amongst patients with glioblastoma. A molecular mechanism underlying a link between fingolimod use and glioblastoma development may involve activation of Pak1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a potential association between fingolimod use and glioblastoma development. PMID:26970935

  7. Androgen receptor antagonists compromise T cell response against prostate cancer leading to early tumor relapse.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yang; Xu, Meng; Liang, Yong; Yang, Kaiting; Guo, Yajun; Yang, Xuanming; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Surgical and medical androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a cornerstone for prostate cancer treatment, but relapse usually occurs. We herein show that orchiectomy synergizes with immunotherapy, whereas the more widely used treatment of medical ADT involving androgen receptor (AR) antagonists suppresses immunotherapy. Furthermore, we observed that the use of medical ADT could unexpectedly impair the adaptive immune responses through interference with initial T cell priming rather than in the reactivation or expansion phases. Mechanistically, we have revealed that inadvertent immunosuppression might be potentially mediated by a receptor shared with γ-aminobutyric acid. Our data demonstrate that the timing and dosing of antiandrogens are critical to maximizing the antitumor effects of combination therapy. This study highlights an underappreciated mechanism of AR antagonist-mediated immunosuppression and provides a new strategy to enhance immune response and prevent the relapse of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27053771

  8. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  10. Late Isolated Central Nervous System Relapse from Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    de Castria, Tiago Biachi; Rodrigues, Sylvia Regina Quintanilha; Diz, Maria del Pilar Estevez

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by ovarian serous adenocarcinoma is rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman that developed brain metastasis as isolated site of relapse 4.5 years after a complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy for a stage Ic disease. She proceeded to a craniotomy with resection of the lesion and, subsequently, to a whole brain radiotherapy. Nineteen months later, she developed carcinomatous meningitis as isolated site of recurrence. Patient was submitted to intrathecal chemotherapy with methotrexate; however, she died from progressive neurologic involvement disease few weeks later. PMID:25506007

  11. [A case of anti-aquaporin 4 antibody-positive Sjögren syndrome associated with a relapsed myelitis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Jun; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Inoue, Hirosato; Baba, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    It is known that pregnancy influences the relapsing rate of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, interaction between pregnancy and relapse of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a distinct disease from MS, remains unclear. A 34-year-old woman who 1 year previously had clinical history of Sjögren syndrome complicated by myelitis with the presence of anti-AQP4 antibody in her serum, although there was no optic neuritis involvement, was neurologically normal at time of becoming pregnant. In the 22nd week of her pregnancy, however, she developed abdominal belt-shaped numbness and sensory impairment followed by weakness of bilateral lower limb leading to difficulty of her gait. MR imaging revealed hyperintense lesions within the spinal cord extending from C2 to T2 vertebral level with marked spinal cord swelling, indicating relapse of myelitis associated with anti-AQP4 antibody. She was treated with intravenous corticosteroid with marked benefits for her neurological status; she was able to walk without assistance after the treatment. However, in the 30th week she relapsed with myelitis at T2 to T9 vertebral level on MR imaging. Intravenous steroid administration again elicited improvement. She delivered a baby via Caesarean section at 34 weeks of pregnancy. After delivery, she started taking oral corticosteroid as preventive therapy for further relapse of myelitis; thus far she has had no relapse at 7 months of follow-up. There are few reports regarding the influence of pregnancy on anti-AQP4 antibody-positive myelitis. Although further investigation should be done to clarify the difference of immunological changes during pregnancy between NMO and conventional MS, our case together with previous reports indicate increased risk of relapse during pregnancy in NMO. It is necessary to remain vigilant against possible risk of relapse during pregnancy in patients with NMO and/or positive anti-AQP4 antibody. Intravenous steroid administration seems safe and effective against relapse of

  12. SncRNA (microRNA &snoRNA) opposite expression pattern found in multiple sclerosis relapse and remission is sex dependent.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Sepúlveda, Lucía; López de Munain, Adolfo; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common inflammatory and degenerative disease that causes neurological disability. It affects young adults and its prevalence is higher in women. The most common form is manifested as a series of acute episodes of neurological disability (relapses) followed by a recovery phase (remission). Recently, non-coding RNAs have emerged as new players in transcriptome regulation, and in turn, they could have a significant role in MS pathogenesis. In this context, our aim was to investigate the involvement of microRNAs and snoRNAs in the relapse-remission dynamics of MS in peripheral blood leucocytes, to shed light on the molecular and regulatory mechanisms that underlie this complex process. With this approach, we found that a subset of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) is altered in relapse and remission, revealing unexpected opposite changes that are sex dependent. Furthermore, we found that a relapse-related miRNA signature regulated general metabolism processes in leucocytes, and miRNA altered in remission are involved in the regulation of innate immunity. We observed that sncRNA dysregulation is different in relapse and remission leading to differences in transcriptome regulation, and that this process is sex dependent. In conclusion, relapse and remission have a different molecular background in men and women. PMID:26831009

  13. SncRNA (microRNA & snoRNA) opposite expression pattern found in multiple sclerosis relapse and remission is sex dependent

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Sepúlveda, Lucía; López de Munain, Adolfo; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common inflammatory and degenerative disease that causes neurological disability. It affects young adults and its prevalence is higher in women. The most common form is manifested as a series of acute episodes of neurological disability (relapses) followed by a recovery phase (remission). Recently, non-coding RNAs have emerged as new players in transcriptome regulation, and in turn, they could have a significant role in MS pathogenesis. In this context, our aim was to investigate the involvement of microRNAs and snoRNAs in the relapse-remission dynamics of MS in peripheral blood leucocytes, to shed light on the molecular and regulatory mechanisms that underlie this complex process. With this approach, we found that a subset of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) is altered in relapse and remission, revealing unexpected opposite changes that are sex dependent. Furthermore, we found that a relapse-related miRNA signature regulated general metabolism processes in leucocytes, and miRNA altered in remission are involved in the regulation of innate immunity. We observed that sncRNA dysregulation is different in relapse and remission leading to differences in transcriptome regulation, and that this process is sex dependent. In conclusion, relapse and remission have a different molecular background in men and women. PMID:26831009

  14. Individualized relapse prediction: personality measures and striatal and insular activity during reward-processing robustly predict relapse*

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Joshua L.; Ball, Tali M.; Wittmann, Marc; Tapert, Susan F.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nearly half of individuals with substance use disorders relapse in the year after treatment. A diagnostic tool to help clinicians make decisions regarding treatment does not exist for psychiatric conditions. Identifying individuals with high risk for relapse to substance use following abstinence has profound clinical consequences. This study aimed to develop neuroimaging as a robust tool to predict relapse. Methods 68 methamphetamine-dependent adults (15 female) were recruited from 28-day inpatient treatment. During treatment, participants completed a functional MRI scan that examined brain activation during reward processing. Patients were followed 1 year later to assess abstinence. We examined brain activation during reward processing between relapsing and abstaining individuals and employed three random forest prediction models (clinical and personality measures, neuroimaging measures, a combined model) to generate predictions for each participant regarding their relapse likelihood. Results 18 individuals relapsed. There were significant group by reward-size interactions for neural activation in the left insula and right striatum for rewards. Abstaining individuals showed increased activation for large, risky relative to small, safe rewards, whereas relapsing individuals failed to show differential activation between reward types. All three random forest models yielded good test characteristics such that a positive test for relapse yielded a likelihood ratio 2.63, whereas a negative test had a likelihood ratio of 0.48. Conclusions These findings suggest that neuroimaging can be developed in combination with other measures as an instrument to predict relapse, advancing tools providers can use to make decisions about individualized treatment of substance use disorders. PMID:25977206

  15. Novel treatment strategies for patients with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Adam; Younes, Anas

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), especially those who relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation, remains challenging. Patients with HL whose disease relapses after stem cell transplantation are rarely cured with current treatment modalities, and have a median survival is less than 3 years. With no new drugs have been approved by the FDA for HL in more than three decades, there is a clear unmet medical need for drug development for this patients population. New treatment strategies that are based on targeting oncogenic signaling pathways are currently explored. This review will focus on emerging new treatment modalities that are currently under investigation for patients with relapsed classical HL. PMID:20828898

  16. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  17. Three-Drug Combination for Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of Interim results from an international, randomized phase III trial that suggest that adding carfilzomib (Kyprolis®) to a standard treatment improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma whose cancer has relapsed.

  18. Treatment of a relapsing facial pyoderma gangrenosum (malignant pyoderma).

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Lucia; Zauli, Stefania; Sarno, Oriele; Querzoli, Patrizia; Corazza, Monica; Virgili, Annarosa

    2013-06-01

    A case of rapidly relapsing pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) of the left preauricular area with no undermined borders is described. This might be considered a case of malignant pyoderma (PM), a rare variety of PG. Five months after complete healing obtained with systemic corticosteroids, the preauricular lesion of PG relapsed. As retreatment with oral methylprednisolone induced glucose intolerance and high arterial pressure, sulfa drugs were initially employed with a transitory recovery of the skin lesion. A successive prolonged course with minocycline induced a new complete resolution. To date, at six months' follow-up, the patient is relapse-free. This case confirms that sulfa drugs and minocycline may also be considered alternative therapies in PM. PM is a variety of PG characterized by specific morphological features, a higher tendency to relapse, and poor responsiveness to treatment. PMID:23330662

  19. Tick-borne relapsing fever in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, D

    1985-09-01

    Relapsing fever is caused by the Borrelia species of spirochetes. Louse-born epidemics of the disease may occur but the endemic disease is usually transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected tick (Ornithodorus). Transplacental infection was suggested more than 75 years ago (1) but has been rarely documented (2). We describe a case of neonatal relapsing fever where maternal infection was the probable cause of the premature delivery and infection in the infant. PMID:2415056

  20. Recrudescence and relapse of meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P E; Thelle, T; Tvede, M

    1995-03-01

    Three cases of recrudescence and relapse of Neisseria meningitidis group B meningitis and septicaemia are reported. The recrudescence and relapses could not be explained by infectious foci, increased bacterial penicillin resistance or immunological defects. As a supplement to antibiotic treatment, all three patients received corticosteroids for the initial 2 days of treatment, and this may have contributed to the unusual course of the disease in our patient. PMID:7780262

  1. Female Ex-Offender Perspectives on Drug Initiation, Relapse, and Desire to Remain Drug Free.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Srivastava, Neha; Salem, Benissa E; Wall, Sarah; Kwon, Jordan; Ekstrand, Maria; Hall, Elizabeth; Turner, Susan F; Faucette, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently released homeless women residing in temporary residential drug treatment (RDT) programs are at a critical juncture in the process of recovery, transition, and reentry. The purpose of this study was to explore factors influencing initial use of drugs and relapse triggers among a sample of incarcerated women exiting jails and prisons, residing in an RDT program, and preparing for reentry into their communities. Among this population, relapse to drug use and recidivism are common. A qualitative study was conducted utilizing focus groups to understand the perspectives of formerly incarcerated, currently homeless women residing in an RDT program. Content analysis generated the development of three broad categories: (a) factors associated with first drug use, (b) factors involved in relapse, and (c) factors influencing desire to remain drug free. A discussion follows highlighting the importance of targeted interventions at RDT sites that integrate physical, psychological, and social needs to optimize reentry into communities. This includes a focus on building self-esteem and life skills and providing access to resources such as housing, employment, and healthcare. PMID:27195929

  2. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse.

    PubMed

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  3. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A.; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  4. The reinstatement model and relapse prevention: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Kenzie L

    2005-01-01

    Objectives This commentary assesses the degree to which the reinstatement model is homologous to the human experience of relapse. Results A review of the literature suggests that the relationship is less clear than is often assumed, largely due to a lack of prospective data on the precipitants and process of relapse (especially relapse to heroin or cocaine abuse). However, reinstatement does not need to resemble relapse to have immediate clinical value; predictive validity as a medication screen would be sufficient. Whether the model has predictive validity is unknown, because, to date, very few clinical trials have tested medications that are effective in the reinstatement model, and even fewer have used designs comparable to those of reinstatement experiments. A clinical trial comparable to a reinstatement experiment would enroll participants who are already abstinent, and its main outcome measure would be propensity to undergo a specific type of relapse (e.g., relapse induced by stress or cues). Conclusions Until clinical and preclinical work are more comparable, criticisms of the reinstatement model’s presumed shortcomings are premature. PMID:12721778

  5. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations

    PubMed Central

    Eleveld, Thomas F.; Oldridge, Derek A.; Bernard, Virginie; Koster, Jan; Daage, Leo Colmet; Diskin, Sharon J.; Schild, Linda; Bentahar, Nadia Bessoltane; Bellini, Angela; Chicard, Mathieu; Lapouble, Eve; Combaret, Valérie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Michon, Jean; Pugh, Trevor J.; Hart, Lori S.; Rader, JulieAnn; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Wei, Jun S.; Zhang, Shile; Naranjo, Arlene; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Smith, Malcolm A.; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Zwijnenburg, Danny A.; Ebus, Marli E.; van Sluis, Peter; Hakkert, Anne; van Wezel, Esther; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Schulte, Johannes H.; Tytgat, Godelieve A.; Dolman, M. Emmy M.; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Caron, Huib N.; Delattre, Olivier; Khan, Javed; Versteeg, Rogier; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Molenaar, Jan J.; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of neuroblastoma patients have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion of patients will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapsed neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. Seven events were detected only in the relapse tumor while the others showed clonal enrichment. In neuroblastoma cell lines we also detected a high frequency of activating mutations in the RAS-MAPK pathway (11/18, 61%) and these lesions predicted for sensitivity to MEK inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide the rationale for genetic characterization of relapse neuroblastoma and show that RAS-MAPK pathway mutations may function as a biomarker for new therapeutic approaches to refractory disease. PMID:26121087

  6. Aggressive chemotherapy for acute leukemia relapsed after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; D'Onofrio, G; Etuk, B; Leone, G

    1994-09-01

    Bone marrow transplantation procedure has emerged as an effective treatment for hematological malignancies. However, recurrence of leukemia is still the major cause of treatment failure. Subsequent treatment in this category of patients, generally considered incurable, has not been yet standardized. At our institution, 13 patients, 7 with acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL) and 6 with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), were treated at relapse after bone marrow transplantation either autologous or allogeneic (AuBMT 8, ABMT 4) performed in complete remission (CR). The interval between BMT and relapse was less than 9 months in 6 patients (2 ABMT and 4 AuBMT) and more than 9 months in 7 patients. Early relapsed patients showed no response to treatment and died at a median of 5.5 months (range 1-13) after relapse. Late relapse after BMT was characterized by a high percentage of response (5 CR and 1 PR), particularly after intensive chemotherapy and by a longer survival (median 14 months; range 2-36). Chemotherapy after transplantation should be carefully evaluated in patients relapsed after BMT in order to select a population that can achieve long term disease free survival. PMID:7858490

  7. Relapse and rehospitalization: comparing oral and depot antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Nina R

    2003-01-01

    A review of studies that compared conventional oral and depot antipsychotic medications highlighted the following points. Mirror-image studies in which patients served as their own controls provided evidence of substantial benefit for depot injectable medications. The randomized clinical trials did not, in general, support the findings of significant decrease in relapse rates between these 2 routes of administration. Across the studies reviewed, the 1-year relapse rate for long-acting depot medication was 27% compared with 42% for patients who received oral medication. The 27% risk of relapse in patients who received guaranteed depot medication suggests that relapse is not always driven by noncompliance. In the only study that lasted for 2 years, the risk of relapse decreased substantially in the depot-treated patients, suggesting that risk of noncompliance may be a more important factor in relapse over extended periods of time. A recent formal meta-analytic review of depot medications concluded that this route of administration resulted in clinical advantages in terms of global outcome. PMID:14680414

  8. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations.

    PubMed

    Eleveld, Thomas F; Oldridge, Derek A; Bernard, Virginie; Koster, Jan; Daage, Leo Colmet; Diskin, Sharon J; Schild, Linda; Bentahar, Nadia Bessoltane; Bellini, Angela; Chicard, Mathieu; Lapouble, Eve; Combaret, Valérie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Michon, Jean; Pugh, Trevor J; Hart, Lori S; Rader, JulieAnn; Attiyeh, Edward F; Wei, Jun S; Zhang, Shile; Naranjo, Arlene; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Hogarty, Michael D; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Smith, Malcolm A; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M; Watkins, Thomas B K; Zwijnenburg, Danny A; Ebus, Marli E; van Sluis, Peter; Hakkert, Anne; van Wezel, Esther; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Westerhout, Ellen M; Schulte, Johannes H; Tytgat, Godelieve A; Dolman, M Emmy M; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gerhard, Daniela S; Caron, Huib N; Delattre, Olivier; Khan, Javed; Versteeg, Rogier; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Molenaar, Jan J; Maris, John M

    2015-08-01

    The majority of patients with neuroblastoma have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole-genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapse neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor, with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK pathway. Seven of these events were detected only in the relapse tumor, whereas the others showed clonal enrichment. In neuroblastoma cell lines, we also detected a high frequency of activating mutations in the RAS-MAPK pathway (11/18; 61%), and these lesions predicted sensitivity to MEK inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide a rationale for genetic characterization of relapse neuroblastomas and show that RAS-MAPK pathway mutations may function as a biomarker for new therapeutic approaches to refractory disease. PMID:26121087

  9. Adoptive transfer of murine relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lublin, F D

    1985-02-01

    Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune disorder resembling multiple sclerosis, has been produced by inoculating SJL/J mice with spinal cord or myelin basic protein in appropriate adjuvants. To determine whether initially sensitized lymphocytes or the persistence of antigen depots in the animal were responsible for the relapsing episodes of inflammatory demyelination, adoptive transfer studies were undertaken utilizing lymphocytes from relapsing EAE-immunized donors transferred directly or after in vitro culture. In direct-transfer studies donor lymphocytes produced clinical and pathological signs of relapsing EAE in 3 of 7 recipients of lymph node lymphocytes and 1 of 5 recipients of splenic lymphocytes. In vitro culture of lymphocytes in myelin basic protein or T cell growth factor prior to transfer increased both the incidence of disease and the number of animals having relapses, and allowed transfer with fewer lymphocytes. Because all animals had delayed onset of disease, this study demonstrates that the ability to develop relapsing inflammatory demyelination is transferable with lymphocytes and does not require the presence of antigen. PMID:3977301

  10. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years. PMID:27097818

  11. High-dose chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma patients: a reappraisal of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Cocorocchio, E; Peccatori, F; Vanazzi, A; Piperno, G; Calabrese, L; Botteri, E; Travaini, L; Preda, L; Martinelli, G

    2013-03-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) has a consolidated role in the treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We report clinical results of 97 HL patients who underwent HDCT for refractory (62 patients) or relapsed (35 patients) diseases in Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, from 1995 to 2009. Treatment included high-dose carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan in 84 patients and high-dose idarubicin and melphalan in 13 patients with subsequent peripheral hemopoietic stem cells transplant. Outcomes were evaluated in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In order to identify prognostic factors for outcome, a multivariate analysis for age, sex, disease status (refractory/relapsed), disease stage, B symptoms, presence of extranodal involvement, bulky disease, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, number of previous chemotherapy lines, remission status before transplant, 18F-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography ((18) FDG-PET) status before and after transplant was done. A clinical response was achieved in 91% of patients, with complete remissions in 76/97 patients. With a median follow-up of 45 months (range 1-164 months), 5-year PFS and OS were 64% and 71%, respectively. Remission status after induction therapy, 18F-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography status before and after transplant were the most important prognostic factors for PFS and OS in univariate or multivariate analyses. HDCT is able to induce a high remission rate and a prolonged PFS in more than 50% of the patients with refractory and relapsed HL. PMID:22473680

  12. The effect of N-acetylcysteine in the nucleus accumbens on neurotransmission and relapse to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Kupchik, Yonatan M.; Moussawi, Khaled; Tang, Xing-Chun; Wang, Xiusong; Kalivas, Benjamin C.; Kolokithas, Rosalia; Ogburn, Katelyn B.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Relapse to cocaine-seeking has been linked with low glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) causing potentiation of synaptic glutamate transmission from prefrontal cortex (PFC) afferents. Systemic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been shown to restore glutamate homeostasis, reduce relapse to cocaine-seeking and depotentiate PFC-NAcore synapses. Here we examine the effects of NAC applied directly to the NAcore on relapse and neurotransmission in PFC-NAcore synapses, as well as the involvement of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR2/3 and mGluR5. Methods Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine for 2 weeks and following extinction received either intra-accumbens NAC or systemic NAC 30 or 120 minutes, respectively, prior to inducing reinstatement with a conditioned cue or a combined cue and cocaine injection. We also recorded postsynaptic currents using in vitro whole cell recordings in acute slices and measured cystine and glutamate uptake in primary glial cultures. Results NAC microinjection into the NAcore inhibited the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. In slices, a low concentration of NAC reduced the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic synaptic currents in the NAcore in a mGluR2/3-dependent manner, while high doses of NAC increased amplitude in a mGluR5-dependent manner. Both effects depended on NAC uptake through cysteine transporters and activity of the cysteine/glutamate exchanger. Finally, we showed that by blocking mGluR5 the inhibition of cocaine-seeking by NAC was potentiated. Conclusions The effect of NAC on relapse to cocaine-seeking depends on the balance between stimulating mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 in the NAcore, and the efficacy of NAC can be improved by simultaneously inhibiting mGluR5. PMID:22137594

  13. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    PubMed

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory. PMID

  14. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  15. Identifying patients with a high risk of relapse in quiescent Crohn's disease. The GETAID Group. The Groupe d'Etudes Thérapeutiques des Affections Inflammatoires Digestives.

    PubMed Central

    Sahmoud, T; Hoctin-Boes, G; Modigliani, R; Bitoun, A; Colombel, J F; Soule, J C; Florent, C; Gendre, J P; Lerebours, E; Sylvester, R

    1995-01-01

    No reliable identification of quiescent Crohn's disease (CD) patients with a high risk of relapse is available. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic index to identify those patients. Untreated adult patients with quiescent disease (not induced by surgery) included in three phase III clinical trials were analysed retrospectively with respect to time to relapse. Nineteen factors related to biology, disease history, and topography were investigated. A relapse was defined as either a CD Activity Index (CDAI) > or = 200, a CDAI > or = 150 but over the baseline value by more than 100, or acute complications requiring surgery. The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 178 patients. The median follow up was 23 months. The Cox model retained the following bad prognostic factors: age < or = 25 years, interval since first symptoms > 5 years, interval since previous relapse < or = 6 months, and colonic involvement (p < 0.001). Bootstrapping confirmed the variable selection. Patients were classified into three groups with an increasing risk of relapse (p < 0.001). The worst risk group was composed of patients presenting at least three of the four bad prognostic factors. These results make possible the design of clinical trials in quiescent CD patients with a high risk of relapse. PMID:8537053

  16. PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  17. Dimethyl Fumarate: A Review in Relapsing-Remitting MS.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-02-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera(®)) is an oral disease-modifying agent indicated for the twice-daily treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). It displays immunomodulating and neuroprotective properties, both of which may contribute to its efficacy in these settings. In two phase III trials of 2 years' duration (DEFINE and CONFIRM), twice-daily dimethyl fumarate reduced clinical relapse (both the proportion of patients with MS relapse and the annualized relapse rate), as well as MRI measures of disease activity, versus placebo in adults with RRMS; the drug also reduced disability progression relative to placebo in one of the two studies (DEFINE). Dimethyl fumarate had an acceptable tolerability profile in these trials, with the most common tolerability issues being flushing and gastrointestinal events, which appear to be largely manageable. In the DEFINE and CONFIRM extension (ENDORSE), a minimum of 5 years of treatment with the drug was associated with continued benefit and no new/worsening tolerability signals. Although additional active comparator data are needed, dimethyl fumarate is an effective twice-daily treatment option for use in adults with RRMS, with the convenience of oral administration and an acceptable long-term tolerability profile. PMID:26689201

  18. Multiple myeloma: from front-line to relapsed therapies.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe; Touzeau, Cyrille

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) have led to improvements in response rates and to increased survival. A major advance in the last decade has been the introduction of the novel agents thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide as part of front-line treatment in both the transplant and nontransplant settings. However, disease relapse is inevitable for the majority of patients and myeloma typically recurs more aggressively with each relapse, eventually leading to the development of treatment-refractory disease. Several phase II and III trials have demonstrated the efficacy of recently approved agents in the setting of relapsed and relapsed and refractory MM, including pomalidomide and carfilzomib. Ixazomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor, and multiple other novel classes of agents are being investigated. These include monoclonal antibodies and histone deacetylase inhibitors, which may further add to the therapeutic armamentarium for this malignancy. Therefore, in a disease characterized by multiple relapses, the optimal sequencing of the different effective options is an important consideration in attempting to prolong survival. PMID:25993216

  19. Relapse prevention. An overview of Marlatt's cognitive-behavioral model.

    PubMed

    Larimer, M E; Palmer, R S; Marlatt, G A

    1999-01-01

    Relapse prevention (RP) is an important component of alcoholism treatment. The RP model proposed by Marlatt and Gordon suggests that both immediate determinants (e.g., high-risk situations, coping skills, outcome expectancies, and the abstinence violation effect) and covert antecedents (e.g., lifestyle factors and urges and cravings) can contribute to relapse. The RP model also incorporates numerous specific and global intervention strategies that allow therapist and client to address each step of the relapse process. Specific interventions include identifying specific high-risk situations for each client and enhancing the client's skills for coping with those situations, increasing the client's self-efficacy, eliminating myths regarding alcohol's effects, managing lapses, and restructuring the client's perceptions of the relapse process. Global strategies comprise balancing the client's lifestyle and helping him or her develop positive addictions, employing stimulus control techniques and urge-management techniques, and developing relapse road maps. Several studies have provided theoretical and practical support for the RP model. PMID:10890810

  20. Natural History of CNS Relapse in Patients With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A 20-Year Follow-Up Analysis of SWOG 8516—The Southwest Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven H.; Unger, Joseph M.; LeBlanc, Michael; Friedberg, Jonathan; Miller, Thomas P.; Fisher, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence, natural history, and risk factors predictive of CNS relapse in patients with de novo aggressive lymphomas and to evaluate the efficacy of CNS prophylaxis in patients with initial bone marrow (BM) involvement. Patients and Methods We conducted an analysis of CNS events from 20-year follow-up data on 899 eligible patients with aggressive lymphoma treated on Southwest Oncology Group protocol 8516, a randomized trial of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone), MACOP-B (methotrexate, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and bleomycin), ProMACE (prednisone, methotrexate, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide)-CytaBOM (cytarabine, bleomycin, vincristine, methotrexate), and m-BACOD (methotrexate, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide). Patients with BM involvement randomly assigned to receive ProMACE-CytaBOM (63 patients) or m-BACOD (58 patients) were to receive CNS prophylaxis, whereas those randomly assigned to receive CHOP or MACOP-B did not. Results CNS relapse is uncommon (25 of 899 patients), with a cumulative incidence of 2.8%. CNS relapse occurs early (median time to relapse, 5.4 months from diagnosis). Indeed, 20 of 25 patients with CNS relapse relapsed during chemotherapy, or within 6 months of completion. The number of extranodal sites and the International Prognostic Index were predictive of CNS relapse. There was no significant benefit of CNS prophylaxis in patients with BM involvement at diagnosis; however, given the small number of events, the power of this analysis is limited. Conclusion The early occurrence of CNS events suggests that these patients had subclinical disease at initial diagnosis. As such, strategies to better detect and treat patients with subclinical CNS disease at diagnosis would be anticipated to result in a decrease in the incidence of CNS relapse, without subjecting those patients not destined for CNS relapse to unnecessary and potentially toxic

  1. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm(3), despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated. PMID:26744591

  2. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm3, despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated. PMID:26744591

  3. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    drugs in development, and it is likely that BG-12 will be licensed this year. This has been licensed for psoriasis so there are good safety data in humans that may also hold true in MS; however, its three times daily dosage will probably impact on patient compliance. Laquinimod has lower efficacy than BG-12 but appears safe and could find a place as a first-line agent. Teriflunomide has just been licensed by the US FDA and may challenge the current injectable first-line therapies as it has a similar efficacy but the advantage of being taken orally. However, risk of teratogenicity may caution against its use in some women of child-bearing potential. This review will examine drugs that have been recently approved as well as those that are in late phase 2 or 3 development as treatment for relapsing MS, highlighting their mechanism of action as well as the clinical trial and safety data before discussing their potential for success in an increasingly florid and complex DMT armamentarium. PMID:23609782

  4. Variation in relapse frequency and the transmission potential of Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael T.; Shirreff, George; Karl, Stephan; Ghani, Azra C.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    There is substantial variation in the relapse frequency of Plasmodium vivax malaria, with fast-relapsing strains in tropical areas, and slow-relapsing strains in temperate areas with seasonal transmission. We hypothesize that much of the phenotypic diversity in P. vivax relapses arises from selection of relapse frequency to optimize transmission potential in a given environment, in a process similar to the virulence trade-off hypothesis. We develop mathematical models of P. vivax transmission and calculate the basic reproduction number R0 to investigate how transmission potential varies with relapse frequency and seasonality. In tropical zones with year-round transmission, transmission potential is optimized at intermediate relapse frequencies of two to three months: slower-relapsing strains increase the opportunity for onward transmission to mosquitoes, but also increase the risk of being outcompeted by faster-relapsing strains. Seasonality is an important driver of relapse frequency for temperate strains, with the time to first relapse predicted to be six to nine months, coinciding with the duration between seasonal transmission peaks. We predict that there is a threshold degree of seasonality, below which fast-relapsing tropical strains are selected for, and above which slow-relapsing temperate strains dominate, providing an explanation for the observed global distribution of relapse phenotypes. PMID:27030414

  5. Counseling Women on Smoking Relapse Prevention During Postpartum.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Ann; Britton, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Many women who quit smoking after learning they are pregnant revert back to smoking after birth of their baby. The high rate of recidivism suggests that women need education about risk of relapse and effective strategies to remain smoke free even before they are discharged from the hospital. Despite evidence that smoking cessation and relapse prevention counseling is effective during early postpartum, many nurses do not provide their patients with this important information, perhaps because they feel inadequately prepared to do so. Helping Women Stop Smoking in Pregnancy and Beyond is an education program designed to help perinatal nurses inform women of negative risks of smoking and offer women strategies to avoid the high probability of resuming smoking after birth. It includes evidence-based interventions that can be used by nurses to provide effective smoking relapse prevention counseling to women during postpartum. PMID:27537087

  6. Neuropsychological and neurological outcome after relapse of lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Christie, D; Battin, M; Leiper, A D; Chessells, J; Vargha-Khadem, F; Neville, B G

    1994-04-01

    Fourteen children who relapsed after initial remission of leukaemia were studied. Six received a second course of cranial radiotherapy, while the remaining eight children were given total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation. The postirradiation somnolence syndrome was common after cranial radiotherapy. All children had mild/soft neurological signs, mostly of coordination. None had a major motor disability. All but the youngest child had cataracts; two children required an operation for these. All children were growth hormone deficient. Verbal IQ, attention, and concentration were selectively reduced (with respect to normative levels). The time between the two treatments, age at relapse, and higher doses of radiotherapy all correlated with cognitive outcome, with girls showing greater impairments than boys. Only two children were performing at age appropriate levels on measures of academic achievement. It is concluded that neurological and neuropsychological morbidity is significantly increased by the current treatments prescribed after the relapse of leukaemia. PMID:7514391

  7. Current strategies for treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Laubach, Jacob P; Voorhees, Peter M; Hassoun, Hani; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Lonial, Sagar; Richardson, Paul G

    2014-02-01

    In spite of significant advances in the management of multiple myeloma (MM), the disease remains incurable and nearly all patients ultimately relapse and require salvage chemotherapy. As such, relapsed and relapsed-refractory MM remains a critical area of research pertaining to biological mechanisms of progression and chemotherapy resistance, as well as to the development of new pharmacologic agents and immunologic approaches for the disease. The immunomodulatory agents and proteasome inhibitors represent the cornerstone of treatment in this setting, with combination regimens incorporating these drugs demonstrating encouraging rates and duration of response, including the newer agents, pomalidomide and carfilzomib. In addition, novel drug classes have shown promising activity in RR MM, including the orally-administered proteasome inhibitors ixazomib and oprozomib; monoclonal antibodies such as the anti-CS1 monoclonal antibody elotuzumab and anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab; and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as panobinostat and rocilinostat. PMID:24471924

  8. A focus group study of predictors of relapse in electronic gaming machine problem gambling, part 1: factors that 'push' towards relapse.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J; Pols, R; Battersby, M; Lawn, S; Pulvirenti, M; Smith, D

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to develop an empirically based description of relapse in Electronic Gaming Machine problem gambling. In this paper the authors describe part one of a two part, linked relapse process: the 'push' towards relapse. In this two-part process, factors interact sequentially and simultaneously within the problem gambler to produce a series of mental and behavioural events that ends with relapse when the 'push' overcomes 'pull' (part one); or as described in part two, continued abstinence when 'pull' overcomes 'push'. In the second paper, the authors describe how interacting factors 'pull' the problem gambler away from relapse. This study used four focus groups comprising thirty participants who were gamblers, gamblers' significant others, therapists and counsellors. The groups were recorded, recordings were then transcribed and analysed using thematic, textual analysis. With the large number of variables considered to be related to relapse in problem gamblers, five key factors emerged that 'push' the gambler towards relapse. These were urge, erroneous cognitions about the outcomes of gambling, negative affect, dysfunctional relationships and environmental gambling triggers. Two theories emerged: (1) each relapse episode comprised a sequence of mental and behavioural events, which evolves over time and was modified by factors that 'push' this sequence towards relapse and (2) a number of gamblers develop an altered state of consciousness during relapse described as the 'zone' which prolongs the relapse. PMID:21901457

  9. Why do homosexual men relapse into unsafe sex? Predictors of resumption of unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners.

    PubMed

    de Wit, J B; van Griensven, G J; Kok, G; Sandfort, T G

    1993-08-01

    The objective was to assess predictors of relapse into unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners among homosexual men in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In the period 1984-91 1103 predominantly white, well-educated, homosexual men participated in the study. 340 participants were HIV-antibody-positive, and 763 men were HIV-antibody-seronegative. Self-reported data on sexual behavior were obtained at 12 semi-annual intervals. Mean age of the participants at wave 12 was 41.2 years, and participants had been homosexually active for an average of 23.2 years, Participants were categorized according to sexual behavior in waves 11 and 12, the interval in which an increase in unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners was observed. Participants who reported unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners at wave 12, but not at wave 11, were considered to have relapsed into unsafe sex (n=47). Men who did not report unprotected anogenital intercourse at wave 11 or at wave 12 were considered to have maintained a behavior change (n=197). Possible predictors of relapse into unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners included a large number of variables assessed from wave 9 up to wave 12. Bivariate relations between outcome measure and predictors were first assessed. Significant variables were entered in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. 4 variables were multivariately reacted to maintenance of safer sex behaviors versus relapse into unprotected anogenital intercourse with casual partners. The relationships found indicated that relapse was more likely to occur among participants who had less intention to avoid unprotected anal sex with casual partners (odds ratio (OR) 3.75), were less convinced that they can use condoms with casual sex partners (OR 3.54), had a less favorable attitude towards the use of condoms (OR 3.2), and were not involved in a primary relationship PMID:8397949

  10. A phase 2 trial of lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wanling; Jagannath, Sundar; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Lonial, Sagar; Raje, Noopur S.; Alsina, Melissa; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Schlossman, Robert L.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Mazumder, Amitabha; Vesole, David H.; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Colson, Kathleen; McKenney, Mary; Lunde, Laura E.; Feather, John; Maglio, Michelle E.; Warren, Diane; Francis, Dixil; Hideshima, Teru; Knight, Robert; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Weller, Edie; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, multicenter, phase 2 study, 64 patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM) received up to 8 21-day cycles of bortezomib 1.0 mg/m2 (days 1, 4, 8, and 11), lenalidomide 15 mg/day (days 1-14), and dexamethasone 40/20 mg/day (cycles 1-4) and 20/10 mg/day (cycles 5-8) (days of/after bortezomib dosing). Responding patients could receive maintenance therapy. Median age was 65 years; 66% were male, 58% had relapsed and 42% had relapsed and refractory MM, and 53%, 75%, and 6% had received prior bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide, respectively. Forty-eight of 64 patients (75%; 90% confidence interval, 65-84) were alive without progressive disease at 6 months (primary end point). The rate of partial response or better was 64%; median duration of response was 8.7 months. Median progression-free and overall survivals were 9.5 and 30 months, respectively (median follow-up: 44 months). Common treatment-related toxicities included sensory neuropathy (53%), fatigue (50%), and neutropenia (42%); common grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities included neutropenia (30%), thrombocytopenia (22%), and lymphopenia (11%). Grade 3 motor neuropathy was reported in 2 patients. Lenalidomide-bortezomib-dexamethasone appears effective and tolerable in patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory MM, demonstrating substantial activity among patients with diverse prior therapies and adverse prognostic characteristics. This trial is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00378209. PMID:24429336

  11. Relapse frequency in transitioning from natalizumab to dimethyl fumarate: assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Jonathan; Flinn, Ashley; Sklover, Lindsay; Sloane, Jacob A

    2016-08-01

    Risk of relapse after natalizumab (NAT) cessation and switch to dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is unknown. The objective of this paper is to identify the risk and associated risk factors for relapse after switching from NAT to DMF in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Patients (n = 30) were treated with NAT for ≥12 months and then switched to DMF in a mean of 50 days. Patient age, annualized relapse rates (ARR), Expanded Disability Status Scale scores (EDSS), and lymphocyte counts were assessed. Overall, eight patients (27 %) had relapses after switching to DMF. Five patients (17 %) suffered severe relapses with multifocal clinical and radiological findings. New lesions by MRI (T2 hyperintense or enhancing) were observed in 35 % of patients. Relapses occurred at a mean of 3.5 months after NAT cessation. Patient age and elevated ARR prior to NAT use were significantly associated with risk of relapse after switch to DMF. Once on DMF for 4 months prior to relapse, lymphocyte count decreased more significantly in patients without relapses than those with relapses. Switching from NAT to DMF correlated with increased relapses. Young patient age, high ARR and stability of lymphocyte counts were risk factors for relapse after transition from NAT to DMF. PMID:27193310

  12. NIDA-Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS) Relapse as a Function of Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenthaler, Stephen J.; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R.; Giordano, John; Thompson, Ben; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Madigan, Margaret A.; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Waite, Roger L.; Gold, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The connection between religion/spirituality and deviance, like substance abuse, was first made by Durkheim who defined socially expected behaviors as norms. He explained that deviance is due in large part to their absence (called anomie), and concluded that spirituality lowers deviance by preserving norms and social bonds. Impairments in brain reward circuitry, as observed in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS), may also result in deviance and as such we wondered if stronger belief in spirituality practice and religious belief could lower relapse from drugs of abuse. Methods The NIDA Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study data set was used to examine post hoc relapse rates among 2,947 clients who were interviewed at 12 months after intake broken down by five spirituality measures. Results Our main findings strongly indicate, that those with low spirituality have higher relapse rates and those with high spirituality have higher remission rates with crack use being the sole exception. We found significant differences in terms of cocaine, heroin, alcohol, and marijuana relapse as a function of strength of religious beliefs (x2 = 15.18, p = 0.028; logistic regression = 10.65, p = 0.006); frequency of attending religious services (x2 = 40.78, p < 0.0005; logistic regression = 30.45, p < 0.0005); frequency of reading religious books (x2 = 27.190, p < 0.0005; logistic regression = 17.31, p < 0.0005); frequency of watching religious programs (x2 = 19.02, p = 0.002; logistic regression = ns); and frequency of meditation/prayer (x2 = 11.33, p = 0.045; logistic regression = 9.650, p = 0.002). Across the five measures of spirituality, the spiritual participants reported between 7% and 21% less alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana use than the non-spiritual subjects. However, the crack users who reported that religion was not important reported significantly less crack use than the spiritual participants. The strongest association between remission and spirituality

  13. Doctors’ views of disulfiram and their response to relapse in alcohol-dependent patients, Free State, 2009

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Disulfiram is the oldest and best known drug to prevent relapse after detoxification from alcohol. Effective use of the drug is dependent on stringent monitoring and high levels of external motivation. Doctors’ perceptions about the drug have not been investigated extensively. Aim We investigated the perceptions and practices of doctors involved in relapse prevention in alcoholics with regard to disulfiram and their response to relapse. Setting The study population consisted of 60 doctors from the Free State Province, involved in the follow-up of alcoholics across various work settings. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used, and data collection involved the use of a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Quantitative results are presented in figures and percentages to provide a background for the qualitative findings that are clustered in themes. Results A quarter of participants did not prescribe disulfiram, another quarter prescribed disulfiram routinely after detoxification, and half of them prescribed it for selected cases only. Subject to affordability, selection of disulfiram was mainly determined by the perceived level of the patient’s motivation. External motivation sometimes took the form of threats of bodily harm or death caused by drinking. Some participants regarded relapse as confirmation of poor motivation and even a valid reason for terminating the doctor-patient relationship. Conclusion Doctors perceive disulfiram as a psychological tool to induce motivation through creating fear of drinking. Failure and success are perceived as related to the level of motivation. These perceptions could be unfair as biological factors in inter-patient variability in response are ignored. PMID:27380787

  14. Endemic Foci of the Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia crocidurae in Mali, West Africa, and the Potential for Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, Tom G.; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Lopez, Job E.; Fischer, Robert J.; Raffel, Sandra J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Safronetz, David; Sogoba, Nafomon; Maïga, Ousmane; Traoré, Sékou F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes are maintained in endemic foci that involve a diversity of small mammals and argasid ticks in the genus Ornithodoros. Most epidemiological studies of tick-borne relapsing fever in West Africa caused by Borrelia crocidurae have been conducted in Senegal. The risk for humans to acquire relapsing fever in Mali is uncertain, as only a few human cases have been identified. Given the high incidence of malaria in Mali, and the potential to confuse the clinical diagnosis of these two diseases, we initiated studies to determine if there were endemic foci of relapsing fever spirochetes that could pose a risk for human infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated 20 villages across southern Mali for the presence of relapsing fever spirochetes. Small mammals were captured, thin blood smears were examined microscopically for spirochetes, and serum samples were tested for antibodies to relapsing fever spirochetes. Ornithodoros sonrai ticks were collected and examined for spirochetal infection. In total, 11.0% of the 663 rodents and 14.3% of the 63 shrews tested were seropositive and 2.2% of the animals had active spirochete infections when captured. In the Bandiagara region, the prevalence of infection was higher with 35% of the animals seropositive and 10% infected. Here also Ornithodoros sonrai were abundant and 17.3% of 278 individual ticks tested were infected with Borrelia crocidurae. Fifteen isolates of B. crocidurae were established and characterized by multi-locus sequence typing. Conclusions/Significance The potential for human tick-borne relapsing fever exists in many areas of southern Mali. PMID:23209863

  15. Lord Byron's death: a case of late malarial relapse?

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, Costas; Piperaki, Evangelia Theophano; Kalantzis, George; Poulakou Rebelakou, Effie; Tompros, Nikolaos; Thalassinou, Eleni; Spilipoulou, Chara; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2015-09-01

    The study examines the pathological circumstances related to Byron's death, the primary issue being malaria. Lord Byron died during the Greek War of Independence against the Ottoman Empire, in Messolonghi on 19 April 1824. Byron's medical profile consists of recurrent onsets of fever, which gave rise to the issue of malaria relapses. According to Byron's letters he reported crises of fever in Greece (1810), Malta (1811), Italy (1817-1819) and England. Evidence from Byron's autopsy, specifically the absence of hepatosplenomegaly, does not support a hypothetical diagnosis of malaria. Nonetheless, the relapsing fevers cannot be ignored and the same applies to the possibility of malaria relapse or re-infection in line with the endemic nature of the Messolonghi area. Our research on the chronologies of Byron's reported fevers found that new attacks occurred at intervals of 540 days on average. Moreover, the most outstanding feature of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale is their ability to form dormant forms of hypnozoites in the liver which, when reactivated (110-777 days), cause true relapses of clinical disease. Of course, an ex post facto diagnosis is under debate, because the diagnosis is not clinical but microscopic. Byron's example raises alarm over a current medical problem, i.e. the diagnosis of unexplained fevers, and the need for a detailed travel or immigration history, which will include malaria in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26397304

  16. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  17. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  18. Does Extended Telephone Callback Counselling Prevent Smoking Relapse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segan, C. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether extended callback counselling that proactively engaged ex-smokers with the task of embracing a smoke-free lifestyle (four to six calls delivered 1-3 months after quitting, i.e. when craving levels and perceived need for help had declined) could reduce relapse compared with a revised version of…

  19. A Qualitative Exploration of Drug Abuse Relapse Following Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Manirul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Taro; Alam, Faruq; Rabbani, Golam

    2012-01-01

    Drug use is an alarming issue in Bangladesh. Most drug users return to drugs after treatment, in what becomes a vicious cycle of treatment and relapse. This study explored why they return and what pathways they follow. We carried out 5 key informant interviews, 10 in-depth interviews, 2 focus group discussions, 3 case studies, 8 observations, and…

  20. Quantification of Clonal Circulating Plasma cells in Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Wilson I; Morice, William G; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Gupta, Vinay; Timm, Michael M; Dispenzieri, Angela; Buadi, Francis K; Lacy, Martha Q; Singh, Preet P; Kapoor, Prashant; Gertz, Morie A; Kumar, Shaji K

    2014-01-01

    The presence of clonal circulating plasma cells (cPCs) remains a marker of high-risk disease in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, its prognostic utility in MM patients with previously treated disease is unknown. We studied 647 consecutive patients with previously treated MM seen at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester who had their peripheral blood evaluated for cPCs by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Of these patients, 145 had actively relapsing disease while the remaining 502 had disease that was in a plateau and included 68 patients in complete remission (CR) and 434 patients with stable disease. Patients with actively relapsing disease were more likely to have clonal cPCs than those in a plateau (P < 0.001). None of the patients in CR had any clonal cPCs detected. Among patients whose disease was in a plateau, the presence of clonal cPCs predicted for a worse median survival (22 months vs. not reached; P=0.004). Among actively relapsing patients, the presence of ≥100 cPCs predicted for a worse survival after flow cytometry analysis (12 months vs. 33 months; P<0.001). Future studies are needed to determine the role of these findings in developing a risk-adapted treatment approach in MM patients with actively relapsing disease. PMID:25113422

  1. Schizophrenia relapse, patient considerations, and potential role of lurasidone

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    When treating persons with schizophrenia, delaying time to relapse is a main goal. Antipsychotic medication has been the primary treatment approach, and there are a variety of different choices available. Lurasidone is a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agent that is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar depression. Three long-term studies of lurasidone have examined time to relapse in persons with schizophrenia, including a classic placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal study and two 12-month active comparator studies (vs risperidone and vs quetiapine extended-release). Lurasidone 40–80 mg/d evidenced superiority over placebo (number needed to treat [NNT] vs placebo for relapse, 9). Lurasidone 40–160 mg/d was noninferior to quetiapine extended-release 200–800 mg/d on the outcome of relapse, and was superior on the outcome of avoidance of hospitalization (NNT 8) and the outcome of remission (NNT 7). Lurasidone demonstrated a lower risk for long-term weight gain than the active comparators. Demonstrated differences in tolerability profiles among the different choices of antipsychotics make it possible to attempt to match up an individual patient to the best choice for such patient based on past history of tolerability, comorbidities, and personal preferences, potentially improving adherence. PMID:27563237

  2. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    Although smoking cessation techniques have been effective, few programs have long term results. To investigate the effectiveness of a tobacco dependence relapse prevention program, 123 adult smokers (51 male, 72 female) voluntarily participated in one of four small group treatment conditions (6 or 30 second aversive smoking plus skill training, or…

  3. Second autologous stem cell transplant for multiply relapsed Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, T S; Avalos, B R; Penza, S L; Marcucci, G; Elder, P J; Copelan, E A

    2002-05-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with Hodgkin's disease who relapse after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support are limited. Salvage chemotherapy is not curative, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in this setting is associated with mortality rates of 40-65%. We report our institution's experience with second autologous transplants in this patient population. Five patients (median age 36) with relapsed Hodgkin's disease underwent a second autologous stem cell transplant at a median of 66 months after first transplant. Four patients received CBV, and one patient received BuCy as conditioning. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred by days +10 and +16, respectively. All patients achieved a complete response, and no relapses have occurred after a median follow-up of 42 months. All four patients who received CBV developed interstitial pneumonitis, and two patients died of pulmonary complications 37 and 48 months following second transplant. Three patients remain alive and disease-free 41, 42 and 155 months after second transplant. These data indicate that second autologous transplantation should be considered for selected patients who relapse after a prolonged response to first autologous transplant. However, BCNU pneumonitis is the major toxicity in patients who have undergone previous mantle radiation and received busulfan with first transplant. PMID:12040474

  4. An Ecological Momentary Assessment of Relapse Crises in Dieting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carels, Robert A.; Douglass, Olivia M.; Cacciapaglia, Holly M.; O'Brien, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the research on relapse crises in dieting has focused on isolated lapse events and relied heavily on retrospective self-report data. The present study sought to overcome these limitations by using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) techniques to examine situations of dietary temptation and lapse with a sample of obese, formerly…

  5. Social Resource Characteristics and Adolescent Substance Abuse Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vik, Peter W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined social resource network characteristics of adolescent substance abusers (n=19). Perceived similarity to one's social network emerged as important moderator of whether social network provided support to remain abstinent or elevated risk for relapse. Increased perceived support predicted continued posttreatment abstinence when recovering…

  6. Couples Relapse Prevention Sessions as a Maintenance Strategy for Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Henry S. G.; And Others

    This study evaluated whether alcoholics who receive relapse prevention (RP) sessions in the year after a short-term behavioral marital therapy (BMT) do better at long-term follow-up than do those not receiving the additional RP. Sixty couples with an alcoholic husband, after participating in 10 weekly BMT couples group sessions, were assigned…

  7. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma with relapses in the lacrimal glands

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, Rita; Proença, Helena; Pinto, Filomena; Fonseca, Ana; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report an unusual case of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with repeated relapse in the lacrimal glands, in spite of complete remission for several years after treatment. Methods: A 78-year-old male with small lymphocytic B cell NHL, stage IV disease (lung invasion), was submitted to surgery and chemotherapy in 2001, with complete remission of the disease. In 2003 he developed a nodular lesion in the right lacrimal fossa. Pathology results revealed a local relapse of NHL. Radiation and chemotherapy were initiated and complete remission was again achieved. In 2012 the patient developed a new nodular lesion located in the left lacrimal fossa, resulting in diplopia, ptosis and proptosis of the left eye. Orbital computerized tomography (CT), ocular ultrasound and incisional biopsy were performed. Results: Orbital CT revealed a lesion infiltrating the left lacrimal gland and encircling the globe. Biopsy results confirmed a local relapse of B cell NHL. The patient was submitted to local radiation therapy with progressive resolution of ptosis, proptosis and diplopia. Response to treatment was monitored with ocular ultrasound. Conclusions: Patients with NHL diagnosis should be immediately investigated if ophthalmic or orbital symptoms develop. NHL extension to the orbit and adnexa is infrequent (5% of NHL cases) but may occur at any stage of the disease, including as a relapse site. In such cases, radiation and chemotherapy achieve good results, inducing long periods of remission.

  8. Schizophrenia relapse, patient considerations, and potential role of lurasidone.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    When treating persons with schizophrenia, delaying time to relapse is a main goal. Antipsychotic medication has been the primary treatment approach, and there are a variety of different choices available. Lurasidone is a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agent that is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar depression. Three long-term studies of lurasidone have examined time to relapse in persons with schizophrenia, including a classic placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal study and two 12-month active comparator studies (vs risperidone and vs quetiapine extended-release). Lurasidone 40-80 mg/d evidenced superiority over placebo (number needed to treat [NNT] vs placebo for relapse, 9). Lurasidone 40-160 mg/d was noninferior to quetiapine extended-release 200-800 mg/d on the outcome of relapse, and was superior on the outcome of avoidance of hospitalization (NNT 8) and the outcome of remission (NNT 7). Lurasidone demonstrated a lower risk for long-term weight gain than the active comparators. Demonstrated differences in tolerability profiles among the different choices of antipsychotics make it possible to attempt to match up an individual patient to the best choice for such patient based on past history of tolerability, comorbidities, and personal preferences, potentially improving adherence. PMID:27563237

  9. [Relapsing fever: an almost forgotten disease in focus again].

    PubMed

    Wieser, Andreas; Löscher, Thomas; Schunk, Mirjam; Seilmaier, Michael; Balzer, Lukas; Margos, Gabriele; von Both, Ulrich; Schulzki, Thomas; Kopf, Sabine; Hoch, Martin; Sing, Andreas; Fingerle, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Introduction | Relapsing fevers, transmitted by arthropods, are rarely encountered in Germany, thus they are often not considered as differential diagnosis in febrile patients. In the last months, more than fourty cases of louse-borne relapsing fever were diagnosed in asylum seekers in Germany. Some of the patients had to be admitted to intensive care units, one patient died despite therapy. Pathogen, disease and diagnosis | The causative agents are spirochetes of the genus borrelia, which can reach high densities in patient blood. Depending on the vector and the region, different species are prevalent worldwide. For diagnosis, appropriate techniques include direct detection by microscopy or PCR from EDTA-blood. Ordering such tests should not be delayed when there is suspicion for relapsing fever. Besides, malaria can also be excluded with microscopy of blood smears. Therapy | First-line antibiotics include tetracyclines and penicillin, acquired resistance has not yet been observed. Frequently patients develop a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction shortly after initiation of therapy, requiring hospitalization or intensive care treatment. Managing the treatment exclusively in an outpatient setting is not recommended. Especially in migrants with febrile illness, relapsing fever is an important differential diagnosis. PMID:27404930

  10. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'hooghe, M B; Nagels, G; Bissay, V; De Keyser, J

    2010-07-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and tetanus appear to be safe. Surgery, general and epidural anaesthesia, and physical trauma are not associated with an increased risk of relapses. Factors that have been associated with a reduced relapse rate are pregnancy, exclusive breastfeeding, sunlight exposure and higher vitamin D levels. A number of medications, including hormonal fertility treatment, seem to be able to trigger relapses. Factors that may worsen progression of disability include stressful life events, radiotherapy to the head, low levels of physical activity and low vitamin D levels. Strong evidence suggests that smoking promotes disease progression, both clinically and on brain magnetic resonance imaging. There is no evidence for an increased progression of disability following childbirth in women with multiple sclerosis. Moderate alcohol intake and exercise might have a neuroprotective effect, but this needs to be confirmed. PMID:20483884

  11. Prediction of Risk Factors of Frequent Relapse Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jahan, I; Hanif, M; Ali, M A; Hoque, M M

    2015-10-01

    This case control study was aimed to identify the predictive risk factors for frequent relapse idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) and conducted in Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka and at Renal and Dialysis Unit of Dhaka Shishu Hospital and Bangladesh Institute of Child Health (BICH), Dhaka, from January 2006 to December 2006. We examined retrospectively the clinical course of fifty cases of frequent relapse nephrotic syndrome (FRNS) as cases and fifty cases of infrequent relapse nephrotic syndrome (IRNS) as control who met the predefined enrollment criteria, followed for at least one year after initial onset of disease. After enrollment following parameters were studied as predictors of frequent relapse: i) Socio-demographic variables: age, sex, socio-economic condition, number of living room ii) Disease related variables i.e. age of onset, duration of illness, frequency of relapse within the 1st year, regimen of initial steroid therapy, total cumulative dose of steroid for remission, day of remission after starting steroid, association with atopy and infection, concomitant upper respiratory illness iii) Biochemical and pathological variables (at the time of initial attack) i.e. Serum albumin, serum cholesterol, blood urea, 24 hours urinary protein, serum creatinine, complete blood count, urine RBC, urine pus cell, urine culture. The test statistics used to analyses the data were descriptive statistics, Chi-square probability test, Student's t-test and Binary logistic regression analysis for Odds ratio. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age of onset (P<0.001, OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.85-0.95), poor socioeconomic status (P<0.034, OR=0.5.8, 95% CI=1.14-29.5) and low serum albumin level at the time of initial presentation (P<0.022, OR=0.8, 95% CI=0.65-0.97) were independent predictors of frequent relapse nephrotic syndrome. In conclusion, we demonstrated that age at onset, poor socioeconomic condition and low

  12. [Extending therapeutic possibilities in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: dimethyl fumarate].

    PubMed

    Matolcsi, Judit; Rózsa, Csilla

    2015-01-30

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a novel oral therapy that has recently been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Dimethyl fumarate shows anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties that are thought to be mediated primarily via activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2- Nrf2 transcriptional pathway, which up-regulates the genes involved in the cellular response to oxidative stress. The drug was evaluated in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, multicentric, multinational, 2-year, phase III clinical trials. The DEFINE and CONFIRM trials, conducted with over 2600 adult patients suffering from RRMS, unequivocally confirmed the efficacy of DMF (2 x 240 mg daily) in reducing the annualized relapse rate (ARR) and reducing the proportion of patients with MS relapse at 2 years. Significantly reduced sustained disability progression was observed with the drug versus placebo in DEFINE, while the same tendency was seen in CONFIRM. The MRI results of the studies were also convincing: DMF significantly reduced the number of new/enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions and the number of Gd-enhancing lesions compared to placebo. Dimethyl fumarate was generally well tolerated and no safety concern has been raised. Adverse events that occurred most frequently included flushing and gastrointestinal events. The long-term efficacy and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate is currently being investigated in the ENDORSE trial, with interim results demonstrating the same results as the two previous studies. In conclusion, although further, mostly comparative data are needed to fully establish the relative efficacy and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate compared with other therapies, dimethyl-fumarate is a valuable addition to the therapeutic options available for RRMS. PMID:25842911

  13. African Relapsing Fever Borreliae Genomospecies Revealed by Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Pontarotti, Pierre; Yoosuf, Niyaz; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Relapsing fever borreliae are vector-borne bacteria responsible for febrile infection in humans in North America, Africa, Asia, and in the Iberian Peninsula in Europe. Relapsing fever borreliae are phylogenetically closely related, yet they differ in pathogenicity and vectors. Their long-term taxonomy, based on geography and vector grouping, needs to be re-apprised in a genomic context. We therefore embarked into genomic analyses of relapsing fever borreliae, focusing on species found in Africa. Results: Genome-wide phylogenetic analyses group Old World Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia hispanica, B. duttonii, and B. recurrentis in one clade, and New World Borrelia turicatae and Borrelia hermsii in a second clade. Accordingly, average nucleotide identity is 99% among B. duttonii, B. recurrentis, and B. crocidurae and 96% between latter borreliae and B. hispanica while the similarity is 86% between Old World and New World borreliae. Comparative genomics indicates that the Old World relapsing fever B. duttonii, B. recurrentis, B. crocidurae, and B. hispanica have a 2,514-gene pan genome and a 933-gene core genome that includes 788 chromosomal and 145 plasmidic genes. Analyzing the role that natural selection has played in the evolution of Old World borreliae species revealed that 55 loci were under positive diversifying selection, including loci coding for membrane, flagellar, and chemotaxis proteins, three categories associated with adaption to specific niches. Conclusion: Genomic analyses led to a reappraisal of the taxonomy of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa. These analyses suggest that B. crocidurae, B. duttonii, and B. recurrentis are ecotypes of a unique genomospecies, while B. hispanica is a distinct species. PMID:25229054

  14. Predicting relapse following medical therapy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Wilson, R.; Pearson, D.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Jenkins, C.; Caine, S.; Thomson, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 40 patients with Graves' disease (35 female, 5 male; mean age at presentation = 38 yrs) the authors examined the ability of thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake and serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobins (TSI) to identify patients who would relapse after a course of medical therapy. Serum TSI and 20 minute thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake were estimated every 3 months during a 12 month course of carbimazole and tri iodothyronine. TSI levels were estimated by inhibition of receptor binding and expressed as an index (normal value <25). 17 patients (Group 1) remained biochemically euthyroid for at least 1 year after cessation of therapy. 23 (Group II) developed recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid hormone level did not differ between Groups I and II at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake did not differ significantly in the two groups at presentation and overlap of values persisted throughout therapy. 3 patients had undetectable TSI levels at presentation and throughout follow-up. In the remaining 37, TSI levels at presentation were significantly higher in Group II and all 7 patients with initial values >80 relapsed. After 12 months therapy a TSI level of >25 was present in 1 Group I patient and 16 Group II patients who had detectable TSI at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake was a poor predictor of relapse of thyrotoxicosis. A very high TSI level at presentation (>80) was associated with relapse. An abnormal TSI on completion of 12 months medical therapy had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 94% for prediction of relapse of thyrotoxicosis in the subsequent year.

  15. PDL Progenitor-Mediated PDL Recovery Contributes to Orthodontic Relapse.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Yang, R; Liu, D; Wang, X; Song, Y; Cao, H; He, D; Gan, Y; Kou, X; Zhou, Y

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) is subjected to mechanical force during physiologic activities. PDL stem /: progenitor cells are the main mesenchymal stem cells in PDL. However, how PDL progenitors participate in PDL homeostasis upon and after mechanical force is largely unknown. In this study, force-triggered orthodontic tooth movement and the following relapse were used as models to demonstrate the response of PDL progenitors and their role in PDL remodeling upon and after mechanical force. Upon orthodontic force, PDL collagen on the compression side significantly degraded, showing a broken and disorganized pattern. After force withdrawal, the degraded PDL collagen recovered during the early stage of relapse. Correspondingly, increased CD90(+) PDL progenitors with suppressed expression of type I collagen (Col-I) were observed upon orthodontic force, whereas these cells accumulated at the degradation regions and regained Col-I expression after force withdrawal during early relapse. Our results further showed that compressive force altered cell morphology and repressed collagen expression in cultured PDL progenitors, which both recovered after force withdrawal. Force withdrawal-induced recovery of collagen expression in cultured PDL progenitors could be regulated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a key molecule for tissue homeostasis and extracellular matrix remodeling. More interesting, inhibiting the regained Col-I expression in CD90(+) PDL progenitors by blocking TGF-β interrupted PDL collagen recovery and partially inhibited the early relapse. These data suggest that PDL progenitors can respond to mechanical force and may process intrinsic stability to recover to original status after force withdrawal. PDL progenitors with intrinsic stability are required for PDL recovery and consequently contribute to early orthodontic relapse, which can be regulated by TGF-β signaling. PMID:27161015

  16. Microbiome interaction with sugar plays an important role in relapse of childhood caries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Qin, Man; Ma, Wenli; Xia, Bin; Xu, He; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Feng

    Childhood caries have a high relapse rate after full mouth therapy. This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between the microbiome, sugar, and the relapse of childhood caries after therapy. A total of 24 children aged 2-4 years who underwent one caries treatment session participated in this study. Supragingival plaque was collected before therapy and 1 and 7 months after therapy, then sequenced using the 16S rRNA high-throughput approach. We found 11 phyla, 140 genera, and 444 species in 72 samples. The children were divided into relapse-free (n = 13) and relapse (n = 11) groups according to whether they relapsed 7 months after therapy. The bacterial community richness, diversity, structure, and relative abundance of bacterial taxa were significantly different between the two groups 7 months after therapy. The two groups also differed in the relative abundance of bacterial taxa, both before and 1 month after therapy. Bacterial community richness and diversity were lower in the relapse-free group 1 month after therapy. Using different operational taxonomic units between the relapse-free and relapse groups 1 month after therapy, a relapse-risk assessment model was built with 75% accuracy, 0.1905 out-of-bag error, and 66.67% validation accuracy. Patients in the relapse group had higher sugar intake frequencies than those in the relapse-free group during follow-up. Interactions between the microbiome and sugar intake frequency were found through co-occurrence networks. We conclude that the microbiome is significantly different between the relapse-free and relapse groups at the time of relapse. Supragingival plaque collected immediately after therapy can be used to predict the risk of relapse. Furthermore, the correlation between sugar intake frequency and microbiome is associated with the relapse. PMID:26505801

  17. Sex as a determinant of relapse incidence and progressive course of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas; Vivek, Vino; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'maison, Francois; Hupperts, Raymond; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Iuliano, Gerardo; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Amato, Maria Pia; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Fiol, Marcela; Spitaleri, Daniele La; Cristiano, Edgardo; Gray, Orla; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Herbert, Joseph; Vucic, Steve; Needham, Merilee; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Rio, Maria Edite; Barnett, Michael; Flechter, Shlomo; Moore, Fraser; Singhal, Bhim; Bacile, Elizabeth Alejandra; Saladino, Maria Laura; Shaw, Cameron; Skromne, Eli; Poehlau, Dieter; Vella, Norbert; Spelman, Timothy; Liew, Danny; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of multiple sclerosis relapses; assess the relationship between sex and primary progressive disease course; and compare effects of age and disease duration on relapse incidence. Annualized relapse rates were calculated using the MSBase registry. Patients with incomplete data or <1 year of follow-up were excluded. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis were only included in the sex ratio analysis. Relapse incidences over 40 years of multiple sclerosis or 70 years of age were compared between females and males with Andersen-Gill and Tweedie models. Female-to-male ratios stratified by annual relapse count were evaluated across disease duration and patient age and compared between relapse-onset and primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The study cohort consisted of 11 570 eligible patients with relapse-onset and 881 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Among the relapse-onset patients (82 552 patient-years), 48,362 relapses were recorded. Relapse frequency was 17.7% higher in females compared with males. Within the initial 5 years, the female-to-male ratio increased from 2.3:1 to 3.3:1 in patients with 0 versus ≥4 relapses per year, respectively. The magnitude of this sex effect increased at longer disease duration and older age (P < 10(-12)). However, the female-to-male ratio in patients with relapse-onset multiple sclerosis and zero relapses in any given year was double that of the patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Patient age was a more important determinant of decline in relapse incidence than disease duration (P < 10(-12)). Females are predisposed to higher relapse activity than males. However, this difference does not explain the markedly lower female-to-male sex ratio in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Decline in relapse activity over time is more closely related to patient age than disease duration. PMID:24142147

  18. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The majority of patients with neuroblastoma have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole-genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapse neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor, with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK pathway.

  19. A phase 1 study of IPI-504 (retaspimycin hydrochloride) in patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Siegel, David; Jagannath, Sundar; Vesole, David H; Borello, Ivan; Mazumder, Amitabha; Mitsiades, Constantine; Goddard, Jill; Dunbar, Joi; Normant, Emmanuel; Adams, Julian; Grayzel, David; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Abstract A phase 1 study of IPI-504 (retaspimycin hydrochloride) administered intravenously twice weekly for 2 weeks at 22.5, 45, 90, 150, 225, 300 or 400 mg/m(2) followed by 10 days off-treatment was conducted to determine the safety and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of IPI-504 in patients with relapsed or relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Anti-tumor activity and pharmacokinetics were also evaluated. Eighteen patients (mean age 60.5 years; median 9 prior therapies) were enrolled. No dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported for IPI-504 doses up to 400 mg/m(2). The most common treatment-related adverse event was grade 1 infusion site pain (four patients). All other treatment-related events were assessed as grade 1 or 2 in severity. The area under the curve (AUC) increased with increasing dose, and the mean half-life was approximately 2-4 h for IPI-504 and its metabolites. Four patients had stable disease, demonstrating modest single-agent activity in relapsed or relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:21851215

  20. A content analysis of self-reported barriers and facilitators to preventing postpartum smoking relapse among a sample of current and former smokers in an underserved population

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuang-Yi; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Belton, Tanisha D.; Baman, Jayson; Kilby, Linda; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the barriers and facilitators thatprevent postpartum relapse and maintain smoking abstinence among a socioeconomically underserved population, recruited through Philadelphia-area women, infants, and children clinics, in-person interviews were conducted with 30 women who had quit smoking for one or more pregnancies in the past 3 years to retrospectively describe their attempts to remain abstinent during the postpartum period. Responses were analysed using the constructs from the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing model, which identifies the cognitive, affective and behavioral factors involved in goal-oriented self-regulatory actions, in the context of a vulnerable population of women. Motherhood demands were a significant source of relapse stress. Stresses associated with partner and family relationships also contributed to relapse. The presence of other smokers in the environment was mentioned by many women in our sample as affecting their ability to remain smoke-free postpartum. Participants reported four main strategies that helped them to successfully cope with postpartum cravings and relapses, including being informed of smoking risks, maintaining goal-oriented thoughts, focusing on their concerns about the baby’s health and receiving positive social support from families and friends. Results provide guidance for the design of smoking relapse interventions that may address the unique stressors reported by underserved postpartum women. PMID:25099776

  1. A content analysis of self-reported barriers and facilitators to preventing postpartum smoking relapse among a sample of current and former smokers in an underserved population.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kuang-Yi; Miller, Suzanne M; Roussi, Pagona; Belton, Tanisha D; Baman, Jayson; Kilby, Linda; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    To characterize the barriers and facilitators thatprevent postpartum relapse and maintain smoking abstinence among a socioeconomically underserved population, recruited through Philadelphia-area women, infants, and children clinics, in-person interviews were conducted with 30 women who had quit smoking for one or more pregnancies in the past 3 years to retrospectively describe their attempts to remain abstinent during the postpartum period. Responses were analysed using the constructs from the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing model, which identifies the cognitive, affective and behavioral factors involved in goal-oriented self-regulatory actions, in the context of a vulnerable population of women. Motherhood demands were a significant source of relapse stress. Stresses associated with partner and family relationships also contributed to relapse. The presence of other smokers in the environment was mentioned by many women in our sample as affecting their ability to remain smoke-free postpartum. Participants reported four main strategies that helped them to successfully cope with postpartum cravings and relapses, including being informed of smoking risks, maintaining goal-oriented thoughts, focusing on their concerns about the baby's health and receiving positive social support from families and friends. Results provide guidance for the design of smoking relapse interventions that may address the unique stressors reported by underserved postpartum women. PMID:25099776

  2. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  3. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  5. Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Marlatt, Alan G.

    2004-01-01

    Relapse prevention, based on the cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, has become an adjunct to the treatment of numerous psychological problems, including (but not limited to) substance abuse, depression, sexual offending, and schizophrenia. This article provides an overview of the efficacy and effectiveness of relapse prevention in the…

  6. The Relationship between Relapse Prevention Treatment Outcome and Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Peggy J.; And Others

    The majority of alcoholics and drug addicts relapse after treatment, with many substance abusers developing a chronic relapse pattern. For this study, 43 patients, who went through a 3-week inpatient relapse prevention program, answered the Situational Confidence Questionnaire (a measure of self-efficacy for alcohol-related, high-risk situations)…

  7. Relapse Prevention in Health Promotion: Strategies and Long-Term Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gintner, Gary G.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the efficacy of maintenance enhancement procedures to prevent relapse in smoking cessation, weight control, and exercise programs. Presents models of maintenance enhancement, reviews studies that have used relapse prevention strategies, and discusses ways of incorporating relapse prevention techniques into health promotion programs.…

  8. Retrospective and Prospective Reports of Precipitants to Relapse in Pathological Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgins, David C.; el-Guebaly, Nady

    2004-01-01

    A prospective design was used to explore the precipitants of relapse in a naturalistic sample of pathological gamblers (N = 101) who had recently quit gambling. Relapse rates were high; only 8% were entirely free of gambling during the 12-month follow-up. Relapses were highly variable but occurred most frequently in the evening, when the person…

  9. Comparison of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA Epitope Specificity upon Disease Relapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Relapse is a major clinical problem in ANCA vasculitis that causes increased morbidity and mortality. Compared to MPO-ANCA patients, patients with PR3-ANCA run a significantly increased risk of experiencing relapses. We hypothesized that a relapsing patient is produ...

  10. A focus group study of predictors of relapse in electronic gaming machine problem gambling, part 2: factors that 'pull' the gambler away from relapse.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J; Pols, R; Battersby, M; Lawn, S; Pulvirenti, M; Smith, D

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to develop an empirically based description of relapse in Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) problem gambling (PG) by describing the processes and factors that 'pull' the problem gambler away from relapse contrasted with the 'push' towards relapse. These conceptualisations describe two opposing, interacting emotional processes occurring within the problem gambler during any relapse episode. Each relapse episode comprises a complex set of psychological and social behaviours where many factors interact sequentially and simultaneously within the problem gambler to produce a series of mental and behaviour events that end (1) with relapse where 'push' overcomes 'pull' or (2) continued abstinence where 'pull' overcomes 'push'. Four focus groups comprising thirty participants who were EGM problem gamblers, gamblers' significant others, therapists and counsellors described their experiences and understanding of relapse. The groups were recorded, recordings were then transcribed and analysed using thematic textual analysis. It was established that vigilance, motivation to commit to change, positive social support, cognitive strategies such as remembering past gambling harms or distraction techniques to avoid thinking about gambling to enable gamblers to manage the urge to gamble and urge extinction were key factors that protected against relapse. Three complementary theories emerged from the analysis. Firstly, a process of reappraisal of personal gambling behaviour pulls the gambler away from relapse. This results in a commitment to change that develops over time and affects but is independent of each episode of relapse. Secondly, relapse may be halted by interacting factors that 'pull' the problem gambler away from the sequence of mental and behavioural events, which follow the triggering of the urge and cognitions to gamble. Thirdly, urge extinction and apparent 'cure' is possible for EGM gambling. This study provides a qualitative, empirical model for