Science.gov

Sample records for related advocacy group

  1. New Advocacy Groups Shaking up Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of education advocacy groups has emerged to play a formidable political role in states and communities across the country. Those groups are shaping policy through aggressive lobbying and campaign activity--an evolution in advocacy that is primed to continue in the 2012 elections and beyond. Though the record of their electoral…

  2. Synchronous Conferencing by a Community Advocacy Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrni, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The previous report in this series discussed how collaborative tools can be used in the development of formal and non-formal online communities. The current report describes the specific development of an online community advocacy group.

  3. Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    SciTech Connect

    English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J.; Schweitzer, M.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

  4. Patient advocacy groups: Need and opportunity in India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kunal; Garg, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of corporate hospitals, healthcare related issues, research trials and undue attention by media in India, there is a need to focus more on patient’s rights and protection. In India, multiple agencies like regulatory bodies, scientific review committees, ethics committees, NGOs, etc. work toward patient rights and protection. However, these agencies are inadequate to cater to the general issues related to patient’s rights. There’s a need to have a separate group of people who provide advocacy to the patient, or simply, a patient advocacy group which will work explicitly in these areas to increase transparency and credibility of healthcare system in India. This group will provide special attention to patient care and protection of rights from the planning stage rather than at the troubleshooting stage. PMID:21584175

  5. Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarr, Margaret, Ed.; Varro, Tim, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue presents art advocacy as a necessary means of bringing art and art education to an elevated status in the elementary secondary curriculum and educational system. Articles include: (1) "Editor's View" (Margaret Scarr); (2) "Art Education: Why Is It Important" (Arts Education Partnership Working Group); (3) "Why Art in Education and…

  6. "Who Did What?": A Participatory Action Research Project to Increase Group Capacity for Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Iriarte, E.; Kramer, J. C.; Kramer, J. M.; Hammel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This participatory action research (PAR) project involved a collaboration with a self-advocacy group of people with intellectual disabilities that sought to build group capacity for advocacy. Materials and Methods: This study used a focus group, sustained participatory engagement and a reflexive process to gather qualitative and…

  7. Being a Member of a Self-Advocacy Group: Experiences of Intellectually Disabled People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmartin, Ann; Slevin, Eamonn

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenological methodology was used to explore the lived experiences of belonging to a self-advocacy group for people with intellectual disabilities. Thirteen persons with intellectual disabilities who attend three self-advocacy day centre based groups in a city in the west of Ireland were the sample identified for the study. Changes affected…

  8. On the Relationship Between Suicide-Prevention and Suicide-Advocacy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battin, Margaret Pabst

    Numerous advocacy groups concerned with "death with dignity" have formed in response to medical advances which extend the process of dying. Natural death legislation and the Living Will are but two examples of suicide advocacy for the terminally ill. These groups are emerging world-wide and range from conservative insistence on passive refusal of…

  9. Successful Strategies for Promoting Self-Advocacy among Students with LD: The LEAD Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pocock, Al; Lambros, Stan; Karvonen, Meagan; Test, David W.; Algozzine, Bob; Wood, Wendy; Martin, James E.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes methods used by one school district to promote self-advocacy skills for students with learning disabilities. Through multicomponent group activities, students learned about their strengths and disabilities and how to advocate for educational needs and rights. Advocacy skills were applied to leadership roles, mentoring, and…

  10. The Advocate: The Need for Advocacy; Case Advocacy; Issue Advocacy; Legislation and Regulations: Consumer Rights; Where to Find Information and Assistance Related to Child Advocacy and Social Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Advocate, 1977

    1977-01-01

    In this journal issue, the need for child advocacy and the roles of advocates are examined. The Statewide Youth Advocacy Project is explained. Case studies illustrating the role of the advocate as mediator between parent/student and school authorities are presented. The question of how parents and students secure their rights by appeal is…

  11. The internal dynamics of environmental organizations: Movement interest groups, communal advocacy groups, and the policy process

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    How do the diverse qualities that movement organizations bring to the policy process affect the representation of particular interests? This question is explored by analyzing environmental organizations across the national, state, and local levels of the American political system. This article suggests that two types of social movement organizations exist: movement interest groups and communal advocacy groups. While this article does not provide direct evidence of the different policy capabilities of the two types of movement organizations, existing research is drawn upon to consider how each type might fare in the policy process. One approach suggests that centralized organizations with incremental goals are better equipped to attain policy success, while the other stresses the need for active member involvement to engage in disruptive politics. To fully assess these divergent views, this article presents a broad review and analysis of the literature.

  12. Expert and Advocacy Group Consensus Findings on the Horizon of Public Health Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Stephen M.; Greendale, Karen; Citrin, Toby; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

    2016-01-01

    Description: Among the two leading causes of death in the United States, each responsible for one in every four deaths, heart disease costs Americans $300 billion, while cancer costs Americans $216 billion per year. They also rank among the top three causes of death in Europe and Asia. In 2012 the University of Michigan Center for Public Health and Community Genomics and Genetic Alliance, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Public Health Genomics, hosted a conference in Atlanta, Georgia to consider related action strategies based on public health genomics. The aim of the conference was consensus building on recommendations to implement genetic screening for three major heritable contributors to these mortality and cost figures: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), and Lynch syndrome (LS). Genetic applications for these three conditions are labeled with a “Tier 1” designation by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because they have been fully validated and clinical practice guidelines based on systematic review support them. Methodology: The conference followed a deliberative sequence starting with nationally recognized clinical and public health presenters for each condition, followed by a Patient and Community Perspectives Panel, working group sessions for each of the conditions, and a final plenary session. The 74 conference participants represented disease research and advocacy, public health, medicine and nursing, genetics, governmental health agencies, and industry. Participants drew on a public health framework interconnecting policy, clinical intervention, surveillance, and educational functions for their deliberations. Results: Participants emphasized the importance of collaboration between clinical, public health, and advocacy groups in implementing Tier 1 genetic screening. Advocacy groups could help with individual and institutional buy-in of Tier 1

  13. Self-Advocacy Groups: 1994-95 Directory for North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F.; Senese, Dick

    This 1994-95 directory of disability self-advocacy groups contains listings of over 700 organizations in the United States, Mexico, and Canada. The associations are organized by country and state or province. Listings typically contain the following information: the name of a contact (the name of the member who is the chair, president, or…

  14. The "Gay Comfort Level": Examining a Media Advocacy Group's Efforts to Combat Youth Homophobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachgal, Tara M.

    2011-01-01

    This article scrutinizes the efforts of a media advocacy group to redress the stigma of youth homosexuality among United States youth: a report published in 2003 by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation called, "How Youth Media Can Help Combat Homophobia Among American Teenagers." The report, authored by Rodger Streitmatter, concluded…

  15. A History of Music Education Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a history of advocacy in music education discussing when formal advocacy started as well as advocacy with government agencies, the state level, and other types of advocacy. Includes a bibliography of resources related to music advocacy. (CMK)

  16. A Survey of Self-Advocacy Groups for People with Learning Disabilities in an English Region: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The second article on a survey of self-advocacy groups for people with learning disabilities in England reports key findings that included the consistency of the issues identified as important and the willingness to engage in research. Key themes were self-advocacy, rights, day service center issues, staffing, personal relationships, complaints,…

  17. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  18. Energy efficiency advocacy groups: A study of selected interactive efforts and independent initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.; English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J.

    1994-03-01

    Non-utility groups participate in a myriad of activities--initiated by themselves and others--aimed at influencing the policies and actions of utilities and their regulators related to Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and Demand-Side Management (DSM). Some of these activities are not directed toward a particular regulatory body or utility but are designed to influence public knowledge and acceptance of IRP and DSM. Other activities involve interaction with a particular utility or regulatory body. The traditional forum for this interaction is an adversarial debate (i.e., litigation or regulatory intervention) over the merits of a utility`s plan or proposed action. However, an increasingly common forum is one in which non-utility groups and utilities cooperatively develop plans, policies, and/or programs. Arrangements of this type are referred to in this report as ``interactive efforts``. This report presents the findings derived from ten case studies of energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAG) activities to influence the use of cost-effective DSM and to promote IRP; nine of these ten cases involve some form of interactive effort and all of them also include other EEAG activities. The goal of this research is not to measure the success of individual activities of the various groups, but to glean from a collective examination of their activities an understanding of the efficacy of various types of interactive efforts and other EEAG activities and of the contextual and procedural factors that influence their outcomes.

  19. Arts Education Advocacy: The Relative Effects of School-Level Influences on Resources for Arts Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate advocacy influences that may impact school arts programs using data from the 2009-10 National Center for Education Statistics elementary and secondary school surveys on arts education. Regression models were employed to assess the relative effectiveness of variables representing community support,…

  20. Factors Related to Play Therapists' Social Justice Advocacy Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Ceballos, Peggy; Post, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    The authors used a correlational research design to examine how belief in a just world, political ideology, socioeconomic status of family of origin, and percentage of racial minority clients were related to social justice advocacy attitudes among play therapists. A multiple regression was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that belief in…

  1. Feminist Relational Advocacy: Processes and Outcomes from the Perspective of Low-Income Women with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Lisa A.; Glenn, Catherine; Bohlig, Amanda; Banyard, Victoria; Borges, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study of how low-income women who are struggling with symptoms of depression experience feminist relational advocacy, a new model that is informed by feminist, multicultural, and community psychology theories. Using qualitative content analysis of participant interviews, the authors describe the processes and…

  2. Bridging gaps, expanding outreach: Metastatic Breast Cancer Advocacy Working Group Consensus Report. January 25, 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    It is estimated that approximately one-third of women diagnosed with early breast cancer will develop metastatic breast cancer (MBC) over the course of their disease. As advances have been made in the treatment of MBC, patients' life expectancy has increased and consequently more women are living with the disease. Many report feeling isolated in terms of the availability of resources, and the attention paid to MBC compared with early stage breast cancer. In order to identify the needs of patients with MBC, a group of 16 patient advocates from seven countries (the MBC Advocacy Working Group) met to share insights on the current obstacles facing women with MBC and discuss potential solutions for better addressing their unmet needs. The group compiled their findings into a Consensus Report, and the report and its recommendations are published here. PMID:19616435

  3. Historical note: How bringing women's health advocacy groups to WHO helped change the research agenda.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Jane

    2015-05-01

    The politics of population control and its sometimes coercive methods in developing countries documented during the 1960s, 70s and 80s, gave rise to strong opposition by women's groups, and put into question the safety of contraceptive methods that were being developed and introduced into countries. In 1991, the Special Programme on Human Reproduction at the World Health Organization, a research programme focused on development of new methods and safety assessments of existing fertility regulation methods, started a process of "dialogue" meetings between scientists and women's health advocacy groups which lasted for nearly a decade. This paper describes the process of these meetings and what they achieved in terms of bringing new or different research topics into the agenda, and some of the actions taken as a result. PMID:26278829

  4. Treatments for Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Evidence, Advocacy, and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Pietro, Nina C.; Whiteley, Louise; Mizgalewicz, Ania; Illes, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The Internet is a major source of health-related information for parents of sick children despite concerns surrounding quality. For neurodevelopmental disorders, the websites of advocacy groups are a largely unexamined source of information. We evaluated treatment information posted on nine highly-trafficked advocacy websites for autism, cerebral…

  5. Group Counseling: Health Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Johnnie

    1979-01-01

    Diabetes and sickle cell anemia (SCA) are two health-related characteristics that distinguish young people from their peers. This article outlines the problems of children with diabetes and SCA and presents the goals and format for group counseling of these populations and their parents. (Author/BEF)

  6. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Sean M.; Close, Kelly L.; Liu, Nancy F.; Hood, Korey K.; Anderson, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes. PMID:26194156

  7. The views and experiences of learning disability nurses concerning their advocacy education.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Penny; Northway, Ruth

    2007-11-01

    A mixed methods project [Llewellyn, P., 2005. An investigation into the advocacy role of the learning disability nurse. University of Glamorgan, unpublished PhD Thesis] investigated the advocacy role of learning disability nurses. This paper discusses the section concerned with nurses' advocacy education. Focus groups, interviews and a questionnaire survey enabled nurses from a wide range of grades, seniority and experience to explore their received education in advocacy and their educational requirements concerning their advocacy role. Findings revealed that nurses' received education in advocacy varied according to the syllabus under which they qualified, with those whose education was influenced by the 1979 Jay Report having the highest incidence of advocacy training. Many learning disability nurses who had received theoretical education did not feel confident to advocate for their clients. Many were also unsure of their ability to access independent advocacy services and when it was permissible to do this. Nurse informants expressed a need for ongoing support and training in advocacy relating to The Human Rights Act (1998) and The Disability Discrimination Act (1995); and also specifically in relation to advocacy for clients within their own work area. Most nurses had definite ideas regarding how and by whom their advocacy education and training should be provided. PMID:17574711

  8. Nurses Practice Beyond Simple Advocacy to Engage in Relational Narratives: Expanding Opportunities for Persons to Influence the Public Space

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, N; Aquino-Russell, C

    2008-01-01

    In practicing existential and human advocacy, or engaging in a relational narrative, nurses may assist persons who experience health inequalities to clarify their values, and, in becoming more fully their authentic selves, community members who ordinarily feel powerless in the public space may act with confidence in influencing the distribution of health-care resources. In this paper, the writers describe research characterizing nurses’ advocacy practices and review the concepts of respect and self-interpretation as a foundation for arguing that nurses who engage in relational narratives with the persons they serve may encourage continuing acts of self-understanding. Investigators indicated that nurses characterized their practices as a therapeutic endeavor, and that their practices were grounded in respect. Practicing nurses may need self-awareness to habitually convey respect for human dignity, in addition, nurse educators ought to attend to the professional development of student nurses, providing opportunities for the formation of character traits or qualities. PMID:19319219

  9. Library Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Kate

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the issue of advocacy. Standing at the vanguard of literacy, library media specialists have a unique role. However, it is time for media specialists to advocate their services in a proactive way. If library media specialists cannot, both individually and collectively, put advocacy at the forefront, then students will suffer the…

  10. Advocacy Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Karen J.; Curva, Fely

    2008-01-01

    Most state professional associations promote and fund at some level, an advocacy program. These advocacy programs usually aim to support or plead for a program, policy, or proposal. They can range from simple communication to complex strategies, from daily interactions to annual productions, and from position papers to onsite, legislative visits.…

  11. Inadvertent advocacy.

    PubMed

    Wilhere, George F

    2012-02-01

    Policy advocacy is an issue regularly debated among conservation scientists. These debates have focused on intentional policy advocacy by scientists, but advocacy can also be unintentional. I define inadvertent policy advocacy as the act of unintentionally expressing personal policy preferences or ethical judgments in a way that is nearly indistinguishable from scientific judgments. A scientist may be well intentioned and intellectually honest but still inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. There are two ways to inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. First, a scientist expresses an opinion that she or he believes is a scientific judgment but it is actually an ethical judgment or personal policy preference. Second, a scientist expresses an opinion that he or she knows is an ethical judgment or personal policy preference but inadvertently fails to effectively communicate the nature of the opinion to policy makers or the public. I illustrate inadvertent advocacy with three examples: recovery criteria in recovery plans for species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a scientific peer review of a recovery plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's definition of threatened. In each example, scientists expressed ethical judgments or policy preferences, but their value judgments were not identified as such, and, hence, their value judgments were opaque to policy makers and the public. Circumstances suggest their advocacy was inadvertent. I believe conservation scientists must become acutely aware of the line between science and policy and avoid inadvertent policy advocacy because it is professional negligence, erodes trust in scientists and science, and perpetuates an ethical vacuum that undermines the rational political discourse necessary for the evolution of society's values. The principal remedy for inadvertent advocacy is education of conservation scientists in an effort to

  12. IPPF focuses on advocacy. Advocacy for reproductive health: worldwide.

    PubMed

    Puri, S; Ketting, E

    1996-01-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation has been advocating human rights since its establishment in 1952. Since the adoption of its global strategic plan, Vision 2000, it has dealt with advocacy in a more systematic manner. Advocacy aims to gain broader support for a cause. In family planning and reproductive health, advocacy is important in counteracting conservative opposition movements. Its most effective tool is high-quality information and services for meeting people's needs. Its target groups are women's groups, youth organizations, parliamentarians, media representatives, and religious leaders. Information, education, and communication (IEC) campaigns differ from advocacy, because the latter is deliberately persuasive and campaign-oriented. An Advocacy Working Group was convened by IPPF and an Advocacy Guide was produced in 1995. Advocacy is needed for the promotion of sexual and reproductive health in the face of opposition from traditional and cultural forces represented by small, vocal, well-financed and organized groups. In 1984 they succeeded in halting funding for IPPF by the United States. This made IPPF resolute in strategic planning and setting goals as contained in Vision 2000. The goals include advocacy for family planning, the prevention of unsafe abortion, women's empowerment, the involvement of youth, the responsibility of men for family life, and the improvement of the status of the female child. The IPPF's 1985 Central Council discussed new initiatives and an Issues Manual was published. The 1989 Members' Assembly held a seminar on critical issues in advocating family planning. A further 1993 resolution urged support for advocacy initiatives. A Public Response Guide was published in 1991 and Language Guidelines were also produced for correct family planning terminology. In addition, an Interregional Training Workshop was held in London in 1995 on the use of the Advocacy Guide. Recommendations were also submitted by participants for

  13. Advocacy for Health Equity: A Synthesis Review

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Linden; Marinetti, Claudia; Cavaco, Yoline Kuipers; Costongs, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Context Health inequalities are systematic differences in health among social groups that are caused by unequal exposure to—and distributions of—the social determinants of health (SDH). They are persistent between and within countries despite action to reduce them. Advocacy is a means of promoting policies that improve health equity, but the literature on how to do so effectively is dispersed. The aim of this review is to synthesize the evidence in the academic and gray literature and to provide a body of knowledge for advocates to draw on to inform their efforts. Methods This article is a systematic review of the academic literature and a fixed-length systematic search of the gray literature. After applying our inclusion criteria, we analyzed our findings according to our predefined dimensions of advocacy for health equity. Last, we synthesized our findings and made a critical appraisal of the literature. Findings The policy world is complex, and scientific evidence is unlikely to be conclusive in making decisions. Timely qualitative, interdisciplinary, and mixed-methods research may be valuable in advocacy efforts. The potential impact of evidence can be increased by “packaging” it as part of knowledge transfer and translation. Increased contact between researchers and policymakers could improve the uptake of research in policy processes. Researchers can play a role in advocacy efforts, although health professionals and disadvantaged people, who have direct contact with or experience of hardship, can be particularly persuasive in advocacy efforts. Different types of advocacy messages can accompany evidence, but messages should be tailored to advocacy target. Several barriers hamper advocacy efforts. The most frequently cited in the academic literature are the current political and economic zeitgeist and related public opinion, which tend to blame disadvantaged people for their ill health, even though biomedical approaches to health and political short

  14. Group Therapy for Abused and Neglected Youth: Therapeutic and Child Advocacy Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanlass, Janine; Moreno, J. Kelly; Thomson, Hannah M.

    2006-01-01

    Although group therapy for abused and neglected youth is a viable and efficacious treatment option, facilitation is challenging. Group leaders must contain intense affect, manage multiple transferences, and advocate for their clients within the larger social welfare system. Using a case study of a group for sexually abused girls, this paper…

  15. Five Ingredients for Success: Two Case Studies of Advocacy at the State Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcourt, Marcia A. B.

    2003-01-01

    A study investigated the people and actions related to two successful gifted advocacy events that included state legislative changes. Five ingredients of success represented the key characteristics common to the leaders in each advocacy group: passion, preparation, inspiration, perseverance, and the ability to take advantage of serendipity.…

  16. The story of FiZZ: an advocacy group to end the sale of sugar sweetened beverages in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Thornley, S; Sundborn, G

    2014-03-01

    FIZZ (which stands for fighting sugar in soft-drinks) is a new advocacy group started to reduce population consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks in New Zealand. The vision of FIZZ is for New Zealand to be sugary drink free by 2025. This means that sugar sweetened beverages will comprise < or = 5% of the total beverage market, and sugar free drinks will be the norm. In this paper, we outline the story of FIZZ: to reiterate why we believe the group is needed, reflect on what the group has achieved to date, consider what it aims to accomplish, and outline what methods it will seek to achieve these aims. Put simply, we believe that the epidemiological evidence that sugar intake, particularly in liquid form, causes poor physical and mental health is overwhelming. Swapping sugar sweetened drinks for sugar free alternatives, water or milk, is, in our view, an urgently needed and important step which is likely to reduce the epidemic of unhealthy weight (obesity) and its sequelae. The nutrition environment in New Zealand is now out of step with scientific evidence, with virtually unrestricted access to, and sales and marketing of, sugary drinks to both children and adults. FIZZ is seeking the implementation of local and nationwide policy, similar to those implemented for tobacco, to limit advertising, restrict marketing, raise purchase prices and ultimately curb the sales of sugary drinks in New Zealand. FIZZ is also working in communities to raise people's awareness of the harms sugary drinks pose to health. We at FIZZ also acknowledge that the beverage industry may play an important role in accomplishing this vision, and have established that there is common ground upon which FIZZ and industry can engage to reduce the sugary drink intake. PMID:25929004

  17. Advocacy Groups Deliver Guidelines for Schools Facing Sexual-Orientation Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Groups that often find themselves on opposing sides of the cultural war over gay rights have bridged their divide to draft consensus guidelines designed to help public schools address sexual-orientation issues with sensitivity and respect. Representatives from the Christian Educators Association International and the Gay, Lesbian and Straight…

  18. Patients' Rights and Advocacy: For Hispanics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Sally J., Ed.

    The monograph outlines key issues in the area of patients' rights and advocacy as they relate to Hispanic mental health clients or patients. Providing background material on patients' rights and advocacy in general, the first section includes a chronological history of major litigation, a discussion of patient advocacy, a discussion of a client's…

  19. Building Trust: The History and Ongoing Relationships Amongst DSD Clinicians, Researchers, and Patient Advocacy Groups.

    PubMed

    Lossie, A C; Green, J

    2015-05-01

    Individuals born with differences or disorders of sex development (DSD) have been marginalized by society and the health care system. Standards of care in the mid-20(th) century were based on fixing the child with a DSD, using hormonal and surgical interventions; these treatments and the diagnoses were almost never disclosed to the child, and sometimes they were not disclosed to the parents. This led to secrecy, shame, and stigma. When these children became adults and demanded access to their medical records, the realization of the depth of secrecy led to the formation of activism groups that shook the medical community. Despite precarious beginnings, advocates, health care professionals, and researchers were able to elicit changes in the standard of care. The 2006 Consensus Statement on Management of Intersex Disorders called for a multidisciplinary approach to care and questioned the evidence for many of the standard procedures. Standard of care moved from a concealment model to a patient-centered paradigm, and funding agencies put resources into determining the future paths of research on DSD. Recognition of the need to address patient priorities led to changing international standards for including patients in research design. Some challenges that remain include: the findings from the Institute of Medicine that sexual and gender minorities experience poor health outcomes; establishing trust across all parties; developing a common language and creating venues where individuals can participate in dialogue that addresses personal experiences, research design, clinical practices and intervention strategies. PMID:25868122

  20. The state of advocacy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, G Larry

    2015-12-01

    Non-profit advocacy organizations have been important in raising public awareness, promoting education, and enhancing political activism for issues related to cancer. Grassroots efforts aimed at fund-raising have substantially augmented federal funding for community outreach and research. The objective of this review was to evaluate successful accomplishments of several major non-profit organizations that are focused on cancer. A review of news media, medical literature, and financial records (using GuideStar) was performed to access the organizational structure and productivity of several successful cancer advocacy organizations. Compared to other cancer advocacy groups, the American Cancer Society is the oldest (>100years old) and worth the most with net assets of over $1.25 billion dollars and an annual total revenue of over $900 million dollars. The ACS also has the highest overhead at 41%. Most of the gynecologic cancer advocacy groups are approximately 20years old and have collective total annual revenue of over $17M dollars. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund has been the most successful at raising funds and building net assets to date while maintaining an overhead of <10%. The most active and financially successful cancer organizations tend to be older, have higher overhead, spend less on total administration, spend more on fund-raising, have more events (rather than a limited number), and use aggressive social media strategies. PMID:26325529

  1. Autonomy, Self-Realization, and Self-Advocacy and the School- and Career-Related Adjustment of Adolescent Girls with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doren, Bonnie; Kang, Hyun Ju

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify component elements of self-determination that may promote positive or buffer negative school- and career-related adjustment of adolescent girls with disabilities or with multiple risk factors. Autonomy, self-realization, and self-advocacy were examined together to ascertain both their cumulative and…

  2. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  3. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

  4. Critical analysis of science-related texts in a breastfeeding information, support, and advocacy community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottero-Perdue, Pamela S.

    This study examines the way in which women in a breastfeeding information, support, and advocacy (BISA) community of practice critically engage with written/oral science-related texts. The range of texts that these participants encounter is explored and two critical reading approaches are investigated: (1) critical science reading, or reading to assess text validity; and (2) critical science-related text analysis (CSTA), or reading to determine the way in which a text positions subjects or reality, is indicative of particular interests, or leaves out particular voices. The former has been addressed by science education research; the latter is based upon feminist poststructuralism and critical literacy literature. Participants in BISA encounter a wide range of science-related texts, and, to varying degrees, assess the validity of these texts based upon what they know about science, their own and others' experiences, and practical knowledge. Participants also engage in CSTA to greater and lesser extents. Also, experts in BISA are entrusted by participants in the organization to identify valid and trustworthy texts. Differences in critical science reading across participants and texts are discussed, as are the purposes for critical science reading and conditions in BISA that support these critical practices. This study informs both science education and critical literacy research, argues that critical science reading and CSTA are worthwhile practices of both everyday folks and students, and suggests that educators encourage engagement in these practices by presenting students with conflicting science-related texts, encouraging doubt in and epistemic distancing from science-related texts, and modeling critical engagement with science-related texts for students.

  5. Autism Advocacy: A Network Striving for Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itkonen, Tiina; Ream, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we examine the rise of autism on the policy agenda and the new generation of autism advocacy. We focus especially on interconnections between the rhetoric about autism in the media and the emergence and political effectiveness of Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism advocacy group. We portray how…

  6. Advocacy in Counseling: Counselors, Clients, & Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Judy, Ed.; Bradley, Loretta, Ed.

    The sixteen chapters in this volume were selected from advocacy theme papers written by members of the American Counseling Association. They examine the role of the counselor as advocate for different groups of people, as follows: (1) "Developing a Common Language and Framework for Understanding Advocacy in Counseling," (R. L. Toporek); (2)…

  7. Explaining variation in gun control policy advocacy tactics among local organizations.

    PubMed

    Zakocs, Ronda C; Earp, Jo Anne L

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how well four organizational characteristics (structure, resources, motivation, or political capacity) explained local organizations' use of a variety of advocacy tactics aimed at promoting state gun control laws. In 1998, 679 local organizations were identified as potentially active on state gun control issues; a questionnaire was mailed to each group's leader. Seventy-nine percent (n = 538) responded to the survey, with 81% (n = 207) of eligible organizations completing questionnaires. The four organizational characteristics explained approximately half the variation in local groups' use of a wide range of advocacy tactics. Organizations with stronger motivation to address the gun control issue and greater political capacity engaged in more diverse gun control advocacy tactics; the authors found organizational structure and resources unlikely to be related. Leaders of advocacy organizations should consider ways to encourage members' motivations on the issue while fostering greater capacity for political action. PMID:19731501

  8. [Self-Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue presents personal perspectives and approaches to self-advocacy from individuals who are deaf-blind. Individual articles are: (1) "Self-Advocacy: Attaining Personal Stature" by Michelle J. Smithdas; (2) "The American Association of the Deaf-Blind: A National Consumer Advocacy Organization" by Jeffrey S. Bohrman; (3) a description…

  9. Family health advocacy: an empowerment model for pregnant and parenting African American women in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Baffour, Tiffany D; Jones, Maurine A; Contreras, Linda K

    2006-01-01

    The model of family health advocacy built firmly upon principles of empowerment theory seeks to help individuals, families, and communities to improve their circumstances by incorporating multiple levels of intervention. The goal of family health advocacy is to improve the well-being of pregnant women and mothers of children younger than 2 years by providing social support and health education about risk factors related to infant mortality and prematurity. This program primarily targets rural African American women, a group at high risk. Advocacy and referral for needed medical and social services are provided. This article presents a comprehensive model of health advocacy, including social marketing strategies, recruitment efforts, and curriculum development. PMID:16775472

  10. Educating for advocacy: recommendations for professional preparation and development based on a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty.

    PubMed

    Radius, Susan M; Galer-Unti, Regina A; Tappe, Marlene K

    2009-01-01

    An electronic survey was used to conduct a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty to determine the extent to which advocacy instruction is present in undergraduate and graduate curricula in health education and to identify faculty members' needs and capacity to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy. An analysis of the results reveals that most undergraduate and graduate health education programs include advocacy instruction. Although faculty believe advocacy and instruction related to advocacy are important, many lack advocacy-related professional preparation and development experiences and do not participate in advocacy-related training initiatives and advocacy activities. There is wide variability in faculty confidence in their competence to provide advocacy instruction. Partnerships among professional organizations, health education practitioners, university faculty, individuals engaged in policy advocacy initiatives, and policy makers are needed to enhance the capacity of university faculty to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy. PMID:18381970

  11. Factors for success in mental health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Hann, Katrina; Pearson, Heather; Campbell, Doris; Sesay, Daniel; Eaton, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental health advocacy groups are an effective way of pushing the mental health agenda and putting pressure on national governments to observe the right to health; however, there is limited research that highlights best practices for such groups in low-resource settings. In an effort to improve the scaling up of mental health in Sierra Leone, stakeholders came together to form the country's first mental health advocacy group: the Mental Health Coalition – Sierra Leone. Since its inception, the group has worked towards raising the profile of mental health in Sierra Leone and developing as an advocacy organisation. Design The study's aim was to investigate views on enabling factors and barriers associated with mental health advocacy in a low-income country using a community-based participatory approach and qualitative methodology. Focus groups (N=9) were held with mental health stakeholders, and key informant interviews (N=15) were conducted with advocacy targets. Investigators analysed the data collaboratively using coding techniques informed by grounded theory. Results Investigators reveal viewpoints on key factors in networking, interacting with government actors, and awareness raising that enabled mental health advocacy aims of supporting policy, service delivery, service user rights, training for service delivery, and awareness raising. The investigators outline viewpoints on barriers for advocacy aims in framing the issue of mental health, networking, interacting with government actors, resource mobilization, and awareness raising. Conclusions The findings outline enabling factors, such as networking with key stakeholders, and barriers, such as lack of political will, for achieving mental health advocacy aims within a low-resource setting, Sierra Leone. Stakeholder coalitions can further key policy development aims that are essential to strengthen mental health systems in low-resource settings. PMID:26689456

  12. Community health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Loue, Sana

    2006-01-01

    Competing health needs of diverse populations and ever shrinking resources available to support these needs often serve as the impetus for the initiation of advocacy efforts to improve community health. However, perceptions of what constitutes a community differ, as do approaches to advocacy itself. This glossary addresses five key questions: (1) What is advocacy?; (2) What is meant by community?; (3) What are the different approaches to community health advocacy?; (4) How are priorities established in the face of competing health advocacy goals?; (5) How can community health advocacy efforts be evaluated?; and (6) What challenges may be encountered in advocating for community health? Each of these issues could serve as the basis for a text on that subject alone. Accordingly, this article is not meant to be comprehensive text on these issues but is, instead, intended to highlight key foundational issues. And, although advocacy efforts can be conducted by individuals, this article focuses specifically on advocacy efforts of communities, however they may be defined and characterised. PMID:16698972

  13. Improving Music Education Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Music education has always required advocacy to solidify its place in the school curriculum. Music teachers are increasingly called on to justify their existence and importance in the schools, and yet, are often unprepared to advocate on their own behalf without the use of advocacy materials that are created on the basis of questionable research,…

  14. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  15. Handbook for Rehabilitation Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rehabilitation Association, Alexandria, VA.

    This handbook is intended to help advocates for persons with disabilities organize for advocacy, build effective coalitions, frame key issues, package critical information, and use the media to advance the cause. Individual sections address the following topics: how to change public policy; myths about advocacy; what makes politicians tick;…

  16. Parliamentary advocacy in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cossey, D

    1996-01-01

    At the European Parliamentary Forum held in Brussels in May 1995 the responsibility of parliamentarians for implementing the Cairo program of action was voiced. The Danish and Finnish family planning associations are raising the awareness of parliamentarians about sexual and reproductive health and drawing attention to the commitments accepted at three international conferences on population, social development, and women's status. The British set up a parliamentary group in 1979 to deal with such issues as did the European Parliament in 1991. In 1994 and 1995 three major UN conferences were the focus of parliamentary debates to formulate national policy. In April 1994 the Danish association launched an advocacy activity in the Parliament followed by a forum on reproductive health with the goal of assisting in the drafting of national policy. In Finland collaborating with professional organizations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in seminars, meetings, and consultations has been in the forefront of the issues of population and development and reproductive health. The briefing materials for parliamentarians include a pack designed by Marie Stopes International referring to development programs. A 1995 survey of parliamentarians assessed their attitudes toward development cooperation. Building links between NGOs and parliamentarians has been another scheme in this effort including the European Parliamentary Forum for Action attended by parliamentarians from 28 European countries. In January 1995 a party of European parliamentarians visited Pakistan to see problems at the grassroots. In February 1996 a meeting was held in Madrid for parliamentarians to follow up on the Beijing and Cairo conferences. Advocacy requires perseverance to create personal contacts and networks to keep the discussion on these crucial issues alive. PMID:12291105

  17. Advocacy: exploring the concept.

    PubMed

    Mardell, A

    1996-10-01

    The concept of the nurse as the patient's advocate is one that has become popular in the last fifteen years or so in both North America and the United Kingdom, having its basis in nursing theory. The UKCC first embraced the concept, stating in the Code of Professional Conduct that nurses must; 'act always in such a manner so as to promote and safeguard the interests and well being of patients and clients'. This is a laudable principle and one that nurses cannot dispute as there are many members of our society who are weak and vulnerable and may be unable to speak up for themselves. But are nurses always in a position to be an advocate for their patients? As the nature of nursing is so diverse then the nature of advocacy will be different in the multifarious settings in which nurses practise. Can theatre nurses ever be in a position to act as an advocate for a patient who is often anaesthetised? What precisely is advocacy and is the Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of 'one who pleads for another' appropriate in the nursing context? Then there is the position of nurses in the healthcare organisation in which they practise. In advocating for their patients, nurses may find they are pleading a case for a patient, or a group of patients, that could bring the nurse into conflict with their medical colleagues or with the management of the organisation by whom they are employed. Additionally, they may not posses the skills and knowledge to advocate effectively under such circumstances. Nursing is littered with the casualties of such conflicts over the years, the most publicised of whom, in the UK, was probably Graham Pink who lost his job as a charge nurse after drawing public attention to what he considered to be an unacceptable standard of care in the hospital in which he worked. PMID:8974516

  18. Self-Advocacy. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; Ward, Nancy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This feature issue newsletter looks at issues the self-advocacy movement is raising and the contributions it is making to the lives of people with developmental disabilities. Articles by self-advocates and advisors to self-advocacy organizations talk about their self-advocacy experiences, barriers to self-advocacy, and ways to support it. Primary…

  19. Building Strategic Business and Industry Training Partnerships that Lead to Legislative Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holle, Teri L.

    2012-01-01

    Organization is essential to just about every sort of operation, but it is especially important in advocacy work. Without organization, an advocacy group may be nothing more than several individuals who agree on some large issue and try to react to threats to what they believe in. A well-functioning advocacy group has to have common goals and a…

  20. Effects of a promotor training on local school wellness advocacy capacity.

    PubMed

    Jara, Eddy A; Ritterman Weintraub, Miranda; Clifton-Hawkins, Nancy; Martinez, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    There is gap between the enactment and implementation of local school wellness policies. Building the capacity of promotores to engage parents in strengthening local school wellness policy implementation is an innovative strategy. This evaluation study examines the effects of 6 hours of promotor advocacy training to improve local school wellness policy implementation. Consistent with psychological empowerment theory, the training and the related toolkit were designed to increase promotores' knowledge and self-efficacy to engage parents in advocating for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Pre-post training questionnaires (n = 74), five posttraining participant focus groups, and four staff member focus groups explored changes in promotor and participating organization capacity. Findings show increased participant self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes to advocate for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Participating organizations reported intention to continue supporting promotor local school wellness policy advocacy. Findings illuminate strategies to strengthen promotor capacity to engage parents in local school wellness policy advocacy. PMID:23182862

  1. Readings in Minority-Group Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, David L., Jr., Ed.

    The primary objectives of this book are to provide a background on how minority group members adapt and accommodate to various types of organizational circumstances, and to help the reader understand the differences in behaviors and job-related outcomes for white and nonwhite group members. The book is stated to be designed for present and…

  2. Using Focus Group Research in Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunig, Larissa A.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes a recent instance of focus group research applied to a public relations case (rather than a marketing case). Reviews the advantages and disadvantages of this qualitative method, and describes the case of a county department of mental health relying on focus group research to help plan a program aimed at reducing the stigma of mental…

  3. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-07-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  4. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... Don’t Miss the 2016 BCAN ... Click here for more details Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network 4915 St. Elmo Avenue, Suite 202 Bethesda, Maryland ...

  5. Advocacy and technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  6. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O’Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health. PMID:21867956

  7. What Is Self-Advocacy? NRC Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mair

    2010-01-01

    Self-advocacy is about independent groups of people with disabilities working together for justice by helping each other take charge of their lives and fight discrimination. The seeds of the self-advocacy movement go back to 1968 when a Swedish parent's organization held a meeting for people with developmental disabilities. Today, the…

  8. Advocacy and Accessibility Standards in the New "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldmann, Ashley K.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the changes in the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification's 2010 "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors" as they relate to Section C: Advocacy and Accessibility. Ethical issues are identified and discussed in relation to advocacy skills and to advocacy with, and on behalf of, the client; to…

  9. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J.

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  10. Social Justice Advocacy: Community Collaboration and Systems Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.; Paylo, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the community collaboration and systems advocacy domains of the ACA (American Counseling Association) Advocacy Competencies (J. A. Lewis, M. S. Arnold, R. House, & R. L. Toporek, 2002). A case illustration is presented, and the 8 Advocacy Competencies within each domain are applied to the case study.

  11. Social Justice Advocacy in Rural Communities: Practical Issues and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Joshua M.; Werth, James L., Jr.; Hastings, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    The professional literature related to social justice has increased, but there has been little discussion of the practical issues and implications associated with social advocacy. However, adding new roles will result in new considerations for counseling psychologists. The need to be attuned to how the practical aspects of advocacy intersect with…

  12. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  13. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  14. From Preservice Leaders to Advocacy Leaders: Exploring Intersections in Standards for Advocacy in Educational Leadership and School Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Emily R.; Arnold, Noelle Witherspoon; Brown, Andre

    2014-01-01

    In this empirically based paper, we discuss educational leadership preparation as it relates to social justice, the concept of advocacy and the standards that guide leadership and counselling, respectively. To reveal how preservice leaders conceptualize advocacy as understood in professional standards, we draw on our research with 11 preservice…

  15. Public health and media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns. PMID:24328989

  16. Self-Advocacy Skills: A Portfolio Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Cathryn S.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how an educator used a portfolio approach to teach self-advocacy skills to four middle school students with visual impairments. Students wrote about their visual impairment and learning needs, compiled lists of specific words and definitions related to their individual impairments, and wrote letters to their ninth-grade…

  17. Perspective of an advocate: best practices for Community Outreach Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Kandusi, Emmanuel J

    2013-07-15

    Of all the different types of advocacy, Community Outreach Advocacy (COA) is the best methodology. This methodology is the prolegomena to the achievement of all other advocacies including political, fundraising, research, support and education. This is because the outcome of COA awareness work is an informed group of people. Such people can comprehend and tackle any other initiatives in addressing the issue at stake and so prevent and control unnecessary suffering and deaths caused by cancer! At the end of the day, the African Cancer Advocates Consortium (ACAC) will achieve its mission to "Make Cancer a Top Priority in Africa" through informed people. PMID:23902606

  18. Self-Advocacy and Cancer: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Teresa L.; Donovan, Heidi S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of self-advocacy among individuals with cancer to clarify its meaning, to differentiate this meaning with related concepts and to unify understanding of the concept in cancer research and practice. Background Cancer survivors are increasingly required to assume an active role in their healthcare. A thorough analysis of how survivors advocate for themselves is a crucial aspect in supporting survivors’ ability to engage and manage their care throughout all stages of cancer survivorship. Design Walker and Avant’s eight-step process of conducting a concept analysis was used. Data Sources PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched for articles, reviews, editorials and gray literature directly addressing self-advocacy. Review Methods A broad inquiry into the literature from 1960 – 2012 that produces a definition of self-advocacy. Model and contrary cases of self-advocacy demonstrate the concept’s application and intricacies. Results Antecedents to self-advocacy include particular personal characteristics, learned skills and attainable support. The essential element of self-advocacy and what differentiates it from related concepts, is the internalization of these antecedent resources into self-advocacy thoughts and actions while incorporating personal values and priorities in a way that upholds the survivors’ goals and beliefs. A full realization of self-advocacy facilitates a cancer survivor attaining a strong self-concept, sense of control and adaptation to a life with cancer. Conclusions Self-advocacy is a process of internalizing skills and resources to act in a way that supports survivors’ needs and goals. PMID:23347224

  19. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  20. Media Advocacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Media advocacy is an environmental strategy that can be used to support alcohol and other drug prevention and policy development efforts. It helps shift the focus from understanding public health issues as individual problems to understanding them as social conditions that require collective behavior changes. Successful media advocacy uses the…

  1. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes. PMID:27398397

  2. Continuity of care in addictions treatment: the role of advocacy and coordination in case management.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Timney, C B; Bois, C; Wedgerfield, K

    1995-11-01

    Although advocacy and coordination are recognized as important aspects of the addictions treatment process, little research has been done in these areas. The present study examined advocacy and coordination at two programs where the mandate was assessment, referral, and case management. Both programs spent a similar proportion of client-related effort on advocacy and/or coordination (about 25% of contact time, accounting for about half of contacts made regarding clients). The majority of advocacy and coordination contacts were with other agencies about clients (the remainder with family and friends of clients). A framework for advocacy and coordination was developed that allowed contacts to be categorized into mutually exclusive advocacy or coordination activities. Advocacy was defined as any activity undertaken to obtain something for clients; coordination involved the giving or receiving of information regarding specific clients. Sources of variability in the provision of advocacy and coordination were found between the programs that could be attributed to differences between the systems within which the programs operated, as well as differences in program clientele. In terms of client characteristics, it was found that females were more likely than males to receive advocacy; those over 65 years were most likely to receive both advocacy and coordination; those who were referred by school or employer or by corrections were most likely to receive coordination; those with no prior treatment were most likely to receive advocacy; and self-referrals and those who had had prior treatment were most likely to receive neither advocacy nor coordination. Receiving advocacy or coordination was not found to reduce the need by clients for other case management services, such as supportive counseling. The findings are discussed in terms of the need for knowledge regarding highly variable aspects of treatment such as advocacy and coordination. New research approaches (as taken in

  3. The Effects of Advocacy Advertising and Situational Crisis on Perceptions of Social Responsibility, Potential Supportive Behavior and Attitudes Toward Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozby, Jeanie G.; And Others

    Data were collected from 176 college students in a study of the effects of corporate advocacy advertising in crisis situations. The subjects read one of two sets of oil company advertisements, one set using a low advocacy and the other set using a high advocacy approach to explain company activities in relation to current events and social issues.…

  4. Academia, advocacy, and industry: a collaborative method for clinical research advancement.

    PubMed

    Vanzo, Rena J; Lortz, Amanda; Calhoun, Amy R U L; Carey, John C

    2014-07-01

    Professionals who work in academia, advocacy, and industry often carry out mutually exclusive activities related to research and clinical care. However, there are several examples of collaboration among such professionals that ultimately allows for improved scientific and clinical understanding. This commentary recounts our particular experience (a collaboration between geneticists at the Universities of Minnesota and Utah, the 4p- Support Group, and Lineagen, Inc) and reviews other similar projects. We formally propose this collaborative method as a conduit for future clinical research programs. Specifically, we encourage academicians, directors of family/advocacy/support groups, and members of industry to establish partnerships and document their experiences. The medical community as a whole will benefit from such partnerships and, specifically, families will teach us lessons that could never be learned in a laboratory or textbook. PMID:24700599

  5. Group Learning as Relational Economic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Eisuke; Atencio, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss group learning in line with economic perspectives of embeddedness and integration emanating from the work of Karl Polanyi. Polanyi's work defines economy as a necessary interaction among human beings for survival; the economy is considered inextricably linked from broader society and social relations…

  6. The Teen Photovoice Project: A Pilot Study to Promote Health Through Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Necheles, Jonathan W.; Chung, Emily Q.; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Ryan, Gery W.; Williams, La’Shield B.; Holmes, Heidi N.; Wells, Kenneth B.; Vaiana, Mary E.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinicians, public health practitioners, and policymakers would like to understand how youth perceive health issues and how they can become advocates for health promotion in their communities. 1,2 Traditional research methods can be used to capture these perceptions, but are limited in their ability to activate (excite and engage) youth to participate in health promotion activities. Objectives To pilot the use of an adapted version of photovoice as a starting point to engage youth in identifying influences on their health behaviors in a process that encourages the development of health advocacy projects. Methods Application of qualitative and quantitative methods to a participatory research project that teaches youth the photovoice method to identify and address health promotion issues relevant to their lives. Participants included 13 students serving on a Youth Advisory Board (YAB) of the UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion working in four small groups of two to five participants. Students were from the Los Angeles, California, metropolitan area. Results Results were derived from photograph sorting activities, analysis of photograph narratives, and development of advocacy projects. Youth frequently discussed a variety of topics reflected in their pictures that included unhealthy food choices, inducers of stress, friends, emotions, environment, health, and positive aspects of family. The advocacy projects used social marketing strategies, focusing on unhealthy dietary practices and inducers of stress. The youths’ focus on obesity-related issues have contributed to the center’s success in partnering with the Los Angeles Unified School District on a new community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. Conclusion Youth can engage in a process of identifying community-level health influences, leading to health promotion through advocacy. Participants focused their advocacy work on selected issues addressing the types of unhealthy food

  7. Advocacy and AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In May 1982, the AGU Council approved the following policy on the Union's role in advocacy on public issues.The American Geophysical Union is an association of scientists, scholars, and interested lay public for the purpose of advancing geophysical science. The Union shares a collateral sense of responsibility to assure that the results of geophysical research are made available to benefit all mankind. The Union encourages its members to exercise their individual sense of responsibility in addressing political and social issues. Should they choose to act collectively on such issues, other organizations exist for such purposes. The American Geophysical Union, as a society, should preserve its unique position as an objective source of analysis and commentary for the full spectrum of geophysical science. Accordingly, the following policies should guide the American Geophysical Union's role as an advocate:

  8. The personal challenge of advocacy.

    PubMed

    Rocklage, M R

    1992-04-01

    Advocacy is the embracing of a cause or issue, a conversion to a mission that makes a very real claim on the advocate. It is the activity of altering structures, of changing the status quo. Like prophetic ministry, the task of advocacy is to nurture, nourish, and evoke consciousness of different ways of considering and doing things, to champion new models of organization. Effective advocacy entails three distinct steps: envisioning an alternative, challenging the status quo, and energizing persons and communities. It is characterized by the emergence of an alternative community concerned with different issues and different ways of doing things. It also involves the integration of advocacy into our daily lives and a penetration of the numbness of life. How will we know when we are truly serving as advocates of the Church's healing ministry? We will have an inkling that we are on the right track when we move from charity to justice. PMID:10116739

  9. Management, Leadership, and User Control in Self-Advocacy: An English Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive…

  10. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy. PMID:26058653

  11. Interpersonal Perception in Group Therapy: A Social Relations Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, David K.; Holahan, William

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation in which participants in time-limited group therapy reported impressions of fellow group members via Impact Message Inventory. Social relations analysis of data indicated that subjects' perceptions included both assimilation and consensus. Suggests results demonstrate utility of social relations model for group therapy…

  12. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  13. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  14. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  15. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relations with community groups. 705.22 Section... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a) Naval commands will cooperate with and assist community groups within their capabilities, to the...

  16. Between-group competition, intra-group cooperation and relative performance

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Juan C.; Mantilla, César

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a new public goods experiment with an intra-group cooperation dilemma and inter-group competition. In our design subjects receive information about their relative individual and group performance after each round with non-incentivized and then incentivized group competition. We found that, on average, individuals with low relative performance reduce their contributions to the public good, but groups with low performance increase theirs. With incentivized competition, where the relative ranking of the group increases individual payoffs, the reaction to relative performance is larger with individuals contributing more to the group; further, we observe that the variance of strategies decreases as individual and group rankings increase. These results offer new insights on how social comparison shapes similar reactions in games with different incentives for group performance and how competition and cooperation can influence each other. PMID:25741258

  17. An approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Wang, Z.; Li, J.

    2013-06-01

    Direction relations between object groups play an important role in qualitative spatial reasoning, spatial computation and spatial recognition. However, none of existing models can be used to compute direction relations between object groups. To fill this gap, an approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups is proposed in this paper, which is theoretically based on Gestalt principles and the idea of multi-directions. The approach firstly triangulates the two object groups; and then it constructs the Voronoi Diagram between the two groups using the triangular network; after this, the normal of each Vornoi edge is calculated, and the quantitative expression of the direction relations is constructed; finally, the quantitative direction relations are transformed into qualitative ones. The psychological experiments show that the proposed approach can obtain direction relations both between two single objects and between two object groups, and the results are correct from the point of view of spatial cognition.

  18. An approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Wang, Z.; Li, J.

    2013-09-01

    Direction relations between object groups play an important role in qualitative spatial reasoning, spatial computation and spatial recognition. However, none of existing models can be used to compute direction relations between object groups. To fill this gap, an approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups is proposed in this paper, which is theoretically based on gestalt principles and the idea of multi-directions. The approach firstly triangulates the two object groups, and then it constructs the Voronoi diagram between the two groups using the triangular network. After this, the normal of each Voronoi edge is calculated, and the quantitative expression of the direction relations is constructed. Finally, the quantitative direction relations are transformed into qualitative ones. The psychological experiments show that the proposed approach can obtain direction relations both between two single objects and between two object groups, and the results are correct from the point of view of spatial cognition.

  19. Using women advocacy groups to enhance knowledge and home management of febrile convulsion amongst mothers in a rural community of Sokoto State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oche, Oche Mansur; Onankpa, Oloche Ben

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Febrile convulsions (FC) are a common paediatric problem worldwide. Between 1 and 4% of children will have a febrile convulsion with about 4% of cases arising before the age of six months. Although FC is benign and does not cause death, brain damage or learning disorders, it is quite frightening to observers and parents who witness an episode of FC, would think the child is going to die. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study (a pre and post-test interventional, one group), aimed at assessing the impact of health education on knowledge and home management of febrile convulsion amongst mothers in a rural community in North Western Nigeria. A one in three samples of fifty mothers that met the eligibility criteria where selected using systematic random sampling. Structured interviewer administered questionnaire with close and open-ended questions was administered to obtain data at pre- and post intervention. Results The ages of the mothers ranged from 18-47 with a mean age of 33 ± 7.14years. The perceived causes of febrile convulsion included fever (28%), witch craft (80%) with majority (98%) of the mothers administering traditional medications. Proportion of study subjects with adequate knowledge of febrile convulsion at baseline and post intervention were 4% (mean knowledge score of 35.3± 9.48) and 96.0% (mean knowledge score of 77.69 ± 10.75) respectively (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Although inadequate knowledge and inappropriate home practices about FC were rampant in the study community, using community members to teach and sensitize the mothers on FC improved their knowledge base significantly. The use of effective educational intervention programmes and parental support groups will go a long way in reducing the incidence of FC among children in our communities. PMID:23560132

  20. The Ethics of Evaluation Neutrality and Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datta, Lois-ellin

    1999-01-01

    Examines arguments for and against evaluation advocacy in terms of the American Evaluation Association's "Guiding Principles for Evaluators" and other statements on advocacy and neutrality. Suggests revision of the "Guiding Principles." (Author/SLD)

  1. College Student Narratives about Learning and Using Self-Advocacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly-Cano, Meada; Vaccaro, Annemarie; Newman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Self-advocacy is the ability to communicate one's needs and wants and to make decisions about the supports needed to achieve them (Stodden, Conway, & Chang, 2003). Research shows self-advocacy skills are related to academic performance and successful adaptation to college (Adams & Proctor, 2010; Getzel & Thoma, 2008; Hadley, 2006;…

  2. Whistle-Blowing as a Form of Advocacy: Guidelines for the Practitioner and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Annette D.; Latting, Jean Kantambu

    2004-01-01

    Advocacy has been an inherent component of social work since the mid-1800s. The NASW Code of Ethics explicitly promotes advocacy as an ethical stance against inhumane conditions. Whistle-blowing, on the other hand, occurs mostly in the business and public administration disciplines and is relatively unknown in the social work profession. Using…

  3. The Perceived Status of the Professional School Counselor's Advocacy Role, Training, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Darla Janene

    2012-01-01

    Although professionals and organizations in counseling and related fields have identified advocacy as an important role of the professional school counselor, researchers have failed to provide data on how practicing school counselors actually perceive and practice advocacy. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to address how school…

  4. Weber's Critique of Advocacy in the Classroom: Critical Thinking and Civic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the four aspects of Max Weber's argument against including advocacy in the political science classroom. Believes that Weber's critique is a useful starting point for considering the issue in relation to contemporary education. Describes two models, critical thinking and civic education, that present advocacy in the political science…

  5. Every Voice Matters: The Importance of Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royea, Amber J.; Appl, Dolores J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the years parents, professionals, and politicians have come together to advocate on behalf of children's rights. Advocacy can occur individually, collectively, or a combination of both. Although some advocacy efforts are more successful than others, it is the process of the advocacy and voices behind it that matter most. In this guest…

  6. Self-Advocacy, Feature Issue of IMPACT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue gives people with disabilities the opportunity to educate others about self-advocacy. Twelve of its 17 articles are by individuals with disabilities who are self-advocates, or by other representatives of self-advocacy organizations. It includes information on self-advocacy strategies and examples of its impact on lives.…

  7. Approaches to Advocacy for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Beverly Saxton, Ed.; Brown, Kelli McCormack, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This monograph provides a collection of articles on health educators' approaches to advocacy: "The Role of Health Education Advocacy in Removing Disparities in Health Care" (John P. Allegrante, Donald E. Morisky, and Behjat A. Sharif); "The Role of Health Education Associations in Advocacy" (M. Elaine Auld and Eleanor Dixon-Terry); "What…

  8. Cooperative Learning Contingencies: Unrelated versus Related Individual and Group Contingencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Erin; Williams, Robert L.; Hautau, Briana

    2006-01-01

    College students operating under related cooperative contingencies (students had to earn individual credit before being considered for group credit) showed more consistent individual and group improvement on exam performance than students operating under unrelated contingencies (individual credit and group credit were independently determined). A…

  9. Evaluating Human Rights Advocacy on Criminal Justice and Sex Work.

    PubMed

    Amon, Joseph; Wurth, Margaret; McLemore, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Between October 2011 and September 2013, we conducted research on the use, by police and/or prosecutors, of condom possession as evidence of intent to engage in prostitution-related offenses. We studied the practice in five large, geographically diverse cities in the U.S. To facilitate our advocacy on this issue, conducted concurrent to and following our research, we developed an advocacy framework consisting of six dimensions: (1) raising awareness, (2) building and engaging coalitions, (3) framing debate, (4) securing rhetorical commitments, (5) reforming law and policy, and (6) changing practice. Using a case study approach, we describe how this framework also provided a basis for the evaluation of our work, and discuss additional considerations and values related to the measurement and evaluation of human rights advocacy. PMID:26204588

  10. Morbidity Related Groups (MRG) for Epidemiological Analysis in Outpatient Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Reinhard; Emcke, Timo; von Arnstedt, Eva; Heidbreder, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Each patient in outpatient treatment is assigned per quarter and corresponding physician to a case group that is strongly related to the morbidity (Morbidity Related Group, MRG). MRG is defined by the drug group on a four character level in the international anatomic-therapeutic-chemical (ATC) classification with the largest costs as an indicator for the severity of the drug treatment. Using severity levels we get a risk adjustment with respect to age and polypharmacy as an indicator for multimorbidity and treatment intensity. By application of MRG groups we generate a patient type classification in relation to physicians and a distance structure of the medical disciplines. PMID:27577493

  11. Applying Buddhist Practices to Advocacy: The Advocacy-Serving Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane; Klepper, Konja K.; Lambert, Serena; Nunez, Johnna; Williams, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Creating and retaining empathic connections with the most disenfranchised among us can take a toll on the wellness of counselor advocates. The Advocacy-Serving Model is introduced as a creative approach to strengthening the ability of advocates to serve through enhancing awareness, focusing actions, and connecting to community. The model…

  12. Patient activation and advocacy: which literacy skills matter most?

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurie T; Schonlau, Matthias; Haas, Ann; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rosenfeld, Lindsay; Buka, Stephen L; Rudd, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Attention to the effect of a patient's literacy skills on health care interactions is relatively new. So, too, are studies of either structural or personal factors that inhibit or support a patient's ability to navigate health services and systems and to advocate for their own needs within a service delivery system. Contributions of the structural environment, of interpersonal dynamics, and of a variety of psychological and sociological factors in the relationship between patients and providers have long been under study. Less frequently examined is the advocacy role expected of patients. However, the complex nature of health care in the United States increasingly requires a proactive stance. This study examined whether four literacy skills (reading, numeracy, speaking, and listening) were associated with patient self-advocacy--a component of health literacy itself--when faced with a hypothetical barrier to scheduling a medical appointment. Although all literacy skills were significantly associated with advocacy when examined in isolation, greater speaking and listening skills remained significantly associated with better patient advocacy when all four skills were examined simultaneously. These findings suggest that speaking and listening skills and support for such skills may be important factors to consider when developing patient activation and advocacy skills. PMID:21951251

  13. Newspaper Advocacy Advertising: A Medium for Discussing Public Issues?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fram, Eugene H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Content analysis of 288 advocacy ads in the "Washington Post" and 373 in the "New York Times" showed that (1) for-profit organizations place such ads more frequently, although nonprofit groups are increasing their use; (2) 3 organizations placed a quarter of all the ads; (3) economic and social welfare issues predominated; and (4) primary…

  14. Women's Advocacy: A Dramatistic Analysis of the YWCA Imperative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yingling, Julie M.

    Although many women presently reject traditional roles, they continue to serve as advocates for various cultural groups that lack power. The phenomenon of "new volunteerism" may be an example of the advocacy that is emerging from the rejection of the caretaker role. The "new" volunteer may serve as board member, committee chair, and so on for…

  15. Advocacy: "On the Cutting Edge..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Nancy B.

    2003-01-01

    This case study details the circumstances that led to a revised policy on gifted education in a large suburban school district. It discusses factors that affected advocacy efforts and emphasizes the importance of key individuals, commitment, tenacity, and the necessity of a system being in place for change to occur. (Contains references.)…

  16. Teacher Advocacy in Bilingual Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubetz, Nancy E.; de Jong, Ester J.

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of changes in federal and state policies in education, educators who believe in the value and importance of bilingualism find themselves in a contested environment where their notions of best practices for emergent bilinguals contradict those espoused in such policies. In this context, acts of advocacy that support bilingual…

  17. Internal Process of Corporate Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    Focuses on the preliminary process of corporate advocacy, which provides direction for issues management. Provides insights into: (1) the degree to which organizational spokespersons are willing to express a position on a variety of issues; (2) how such positions come to be advocated through organizational communication; and (3) how organizational…

  18. CEC Special Education Advocacy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook, for individuals working with people who have disabilities, is designed to empower them to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work. It is designed to help in channeling one's strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The…

  19. Engaging health professionals in advocacy against gun violence.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals have long been involved with advocacy around the social determinants of health, including protesting against war and mitigating the production, trade and use of specific weapon systems. Small arms and light weapons are a key area on which to focus, as they are responsible for the majority of injuries and deaths in war and their availability is related to increased levels of crime and suicide. Challenges for health professionals hoping to engage in such advocacy include a lack of adequate data, the need to confront political questions and the gun-lobby, and difficulty in measuring the effectiveness of campaigns. This article discusses some examples of successful advocacy and suggests future directions for health professionals in this area. PMID:19065869

  20. In delicate balance: stem cells and spinal cord injury advocacy.

    PubMed

    Parke, Sara; Illes, Judy

    2011-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major focus for stem cell therapy (SCT). However, the science of SCT has not been well matched with an understanding of perspectives of persons with SCI. The online advocacy community is a key source of health information for primary stakeholders and their caregivers. In this study, we sought to characterize the content of SCI advocacy websites with respect to their discussion of SCT and stem cell tourism. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SCI advocacy websites identified through a web search and verified by expert opinion. Two independent researchers coded the information for major themes (e.g., scientific & clinical facts, research & funding, policy, ethics) and valence (positive, negative, balanced, neutral). Of the 40 SCI advocacy websites that met inclusion criteria, 50% (N=20) contained information about SCT. Less than 18% (N=7) contained information on stem cell tourism. There were more than ten times as many statements about SCT with a positive valence (N=67) as with a negative valence (N=6). Ethics-related SCT information comprised 20% (N=37) of the total content; the largest proportion of ethics-related content was devoted to stem cell tourism (80%, N=30 statements). Of those, the majority focused on the risks of stem cell tourism (N=16). Given the still-developing science behind SCT, the presence of cautionary information about stem cell tourism at advocacy sites is ethically appropriate. The absence of stem cell tourism information at the majority of advocacy sites represents a lost educational opportunity. PMID:21161442

  1. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere. PMID:27199148

  2. The principles and practices of nutrition advocacy: evidence, experience and the way forward for stunting reduction.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David; Haider, Rukhsana; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Mangasaryan, Nune; Mwadime, Robert; Sarkar, Satyajit

    2013-09-01

    Advocacy represents an intervention into complex, dynamic and highly contextual socio-political systems, in which strategies and tactics must be adjusted on a continual basis in light of rapidly changing conditions, reactions from actors and feedback. For this reason, the practice of advocacy is often considered more art than science. However, capacities and practices for advocacy can be strengthened by sharing and analysing experiences in varying contexts, deriving general principles and learning to adapt these principles to new contexts. Nutrition is a particular context for advocacy, but to date, there has been little systematic analysis of experiences. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and draw lessons from the practice of nutrition advocacy, especially in relation to stunting and complementary feeding, and suggest ways to strengthen capacities and practices in the future. The strategies and tactics, achievements and lessons learnt are described for three case studies: Uganda, Vietnam and Bangladesh. These cases, and experience from elsewhere, demonstrate that concerted, well-planned and well-implemented advocacy can bring significant achievements, even in short period of time. In light of the global and national attention being given to stunting reduction through the SUN (Scaling Up Nutrition) movement and other initiatives, there is now a need for much stronger investments in strategic and operational capacities for advocacy, including the human, organisational and financial resources for the advocacy and strategic communication themselves, as well as for monitoring and evaluation, supportive research and institutional capacity-building. PMID:24074320

  3. A case study in teaching tobacco policy advocacy at a Historically Black university.

    PubMed

    Jolly, David H; Wigfall, Patricia M; Scott, Sheryl A; Richardson, Rosalind C; Ray, Kenneth

    2009-10-01

    Policy advocacy is increasingly recognized as a crucial component of the training provided to health educators but relatively few universities offer advocacy training as part of their professional preparation programs for health educators. Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) represent a natural setting for creating strong Black leaders in tobacco policy advocacy. This case study focuses on experiential education at an HBCU to develop advocacy skills around tobacco issues among Black college students. The authors describe the structure and content of two tobacco policy courses, their efforts to evaluate these courses, and the lessons they learned planning and conducting them. They believe their experience can prove useful to others developing curricula for teaching policy advocacy skills to health education students. PMID:19098262

  4. Impact of Diagnosis Related Groups of Hospital Social Service Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patchner, Michael A.; Wattenberg, Shirley H.

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 19 hospital social service administrators to examine the impact of Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs). Results indicated increased recognition and increased scrutiny, and changes in discharge planning procedures. (JAC)

  5. The Impact of Women Teachers on Girls' Education. Advocacy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The recruitment of women teachers can have a positive impact on girls' enrollments in school. This advocacy brief promotes the recruitment of women teachers which is currently held back as a result of gender disparities. The publication explains how recruitment of women teachers could relate to girls' education, stating some current issues facing…

  6. Corporate Advocacy: A Selected Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionisopoulos, George N.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    This paper provides a selected review of the literature pertaining to corporate advocacy (non-product advertising by corporations, addressing political or social issues). More specifically, the paper examines research from the communication, business, public relations, and advertising literature dealing with justifications for the practice of…

  7. Contemporary group treatment of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, George

    2007-01-01

    The contemporary group treatment of veterans from the Vietnam War to the present who suffer from combat-related PTSD is reviewed in light of the dynamic understanding of combat trauma developed during and since World War II. Both dynamic and cognitive behavioral group therapies are explored. The common features of all group treatments of combat PTSD involve the development of trust and the communalization of trauma within a cohesive group. Further research is needed to increase our understanding of effectiveness, mediating factors, and relationships between childhood experience and combat trauma. PMID:17480188

  8. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    PubMed

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described. PMID:26009558

  9. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences. PMID:25846573

  10. Uncertainty relations, zero point energy and the linear canonical group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The close relationship between the zero point energy, the uncertainty relations, coherent states, squeezed states, and correlated states for one mode is investigated. This group-theoretic perspective enables the parametrization and identification of their multimode generalization. In particular the generalized Schroedinger-Robertson uncertainty relations are analyzed. An elementary method of determining the canonical structure of the generalized correlated states is presented.

  11. The Relational-Cultural Model: A Framework for Group Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Dana L.; Duffey, Thelma; St. George, Holly

    2002-01-01

    The relational-cultural model of psychotherapy has been evolving for the past 20 years. Within this model, difficult group dynamics are conceptualized as the playing out of the central relational paradox. This paradox recognizes that an individual may yearn for connection but, out of a sense of fear, simultaneously employ strategies that restrict…

  12. MADD rates the states: a media advocacy event to advance the agenda against alcohol-impaired driving.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, A; Voas, R B; Dejong, W; Chaloupka, M

    1995-01-01

    The "Rating the States" (RTS) Program of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is designed to bring public attention to the status of State government efforts to combat alcohol-impaired driving. MADD's 1993 report, which evaluated each State with a grade from A to D, brought renewed visibility to MADD's fight for new prevention policies and helped to advance key State legislation. Because of MADD's national press conference and other media activities, more than 60 million Americans saw or heard a news story related to the program. This article outlines the program's objectives and methodology, efforts to publicize the results, and what was achieved in terms of news media coverage and in advancing public policy change. The RTS Program is a proven media advocacy strategy for prompting State legislatures and Governors to enact new policies. The article concludes with guidelines for other public health advocacy groups that may want to emulate this strategy. PMID:7610210

  13. Mississippi front-line recovery work after Hurricane Katrina: an analysis of the intersections of gender, race, and class in advocacy, power relations, and health.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lynn; Hilfinger Messias, Deanne K

    2012-06-01

    By disrupting the routine practices and social structures that support social hierarchy, disasters provide a unique opportunity to observe how gender, race, and class power relations are enacted and reconstituted to shape health inequities. Using a feminist intersectional framework, we examine the dynamic relationships among a government/corporate alliance, front-line disaster recovery workers, and disadvantaged residents in Mississippi Gulf Coast communities in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which struck in August, 2005. Data were collected between January 2007 and October 2008 through field observations, public document analysis, and in-depth interviews with 32 front-line workers representing 27 non-governmental, nonprofit community-based organizations. Our analysis reveals how power relationships among these groups operated at the macro-level of the political economy as well as in individual lives, increasing health risks among both the disadvantaged and the front-line workers serving and advocating on their behalf. Socially situated as outsiders-within, front-line recovery workers operated in the middle ground between the disadvantaged populations they served and the powerful alliance that controlled access to essential resources. From this location, they both observed and were subject to the processes guiding the allocation of resources and their unequal outcomes. Following a brief period of hope for progressive change, recovery workers became increasingly stressed and fatigued, particularly from lack of communication and coordination, limited resources, insufficient capacity to meet overwhelming demands, and gendered and racialized mechanisms of marginalization and exclusion. The personal and collective health burdens borne by these front-line recovery workers--predominantly women and people of color - exemplify the ways in which the social relations of power and control contribute to health and social inequities. PMID:21978634

  14. Dams and transnational advocacy: Political opportunities in transnational collective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Teng

    Possible arguments to explain the gradual decline in big dam development and its site transferring from developed to developing countries include technical, economic, and political factors. This study focuses on the political argument---the rise of transnational anti-dam advocacy and its impact on state policy-making. Under what conditions does transnational anti-dam advocacy matter? Under what conditions does transnational advocacy change state dam policies (delay, scale down, or cancel)? It examines the role of transnational anti-dam actors in big dam building in a comparative context in Asia. Applying the social movement theory of political opportunity structure (POS) and using the qualitative case-study method, the study provides both within-case and cross-case analyses. Within-case analysis is utilized to explain the changing dynamics of big dam building in China (Three Gorges Dam and proposed Nu/Salween River dam projects), and to a lesser extent, Sardar Sarovar Project in India and Nam Theun 2 Dam in Laos. Different domestic and international POS (DPOS and IPOS) impact the strategies and outcomes of anti-dam advocacies in these countries. The degree of openness of the POS directly affects the capacity of transnational efforts in influencing state dam policies. The degree of openness or closure is measured by specific laws, institutions, discourse, or elite allies (or the absence of these) for the participation of non-state actors on big dam issues at a particular moment. This degree of openness is relative, varying over time, across countries and regions. This study finds that the impact of transnational anti-dam activism is most effective when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively open. Transnational anti-dam advocacy is least effective in influencing state dam policies when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively closed. Under a relatively open DPOS and closed IPOS, transnational anti-dam advocacy is more likely to successfully change state dam policies and even

  15. Reciprocal Relativity of Noninertial Frames and the Quaplectic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Stephen G.

    2006-04-01

    Newtonian mechanics has the concept of an absolute inertial rest frame. Special relativity eliminates the absolute rest frame but continues to require the absolute inertial frame. General relativity solves this for gravity by requiring particles to have locally inertial frames on a curved position-time manifold. The problem of the absolute inertial frame for other forces remains. We look again at the transformations of frames on an extended phase space with position, time, energy and momentum degrees of freedom. Under nonrelativistic assumptions, there is an invariant symplectic metric and a line element dt^2. Under special relativistic assumptions the symplectic metric continues to be invariant but the line elements are now -dt^2+dq^2/c^2 and dp^2-de^2/c^2. Max Born conjectured that the line element should be generalized to the pseudo- orthogonal metric -dt^2+dq^2/c^2+ (1/b^2)(dp^2-de^2/c^2). The group leaving these two metrics invariant is the pseudo-unitary group of transformations between noninertial frames. We show that these transformations eliminate the need for an absolute inertial frame by making forces relative and bounded by b and so embodies a relativity that is 'reciprocal' in the sense of Born. The inhomogeneous version of this group is naturally the semidirect product of the pseudo-unitary group with the nonabelian Heisenberg group. This is the quaplectic group. The Heisenberg group itself is the semidirect product of two translation groups. This provides the noncommutative properties of position and momentum and also time and energy that are required for the quantum mechanics that results from considering the unitary representations of the quaplectic group.

  16. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Cristi C.; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively. PMID:26041036

  17. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    PubMed

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively. PMID:26041036

  18. A beginner’s guide to getting involved in science advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Ruppersburg, Chelsey Chandler; York, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Every scientist in the United States likely has a story of how the federal funding crisis for biomedical research has affected him or her personally. The sharing of these powerful anecdotes will enable policy makers to fully grasp the extent to which the decline in federal funding has negatively affected the scientific community. However, many scientists do not know where to begin or are uncertain that their advocacy efforts will have an impact. In an effort to encourage more scientists to become involved in science advocacy, we describe how to form and maintain a student science advocacy group. PMID:27079651

  19. Drinking group characteristics related to willingness to engage in protective behaviors with the group at nightclubs.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Hilary F; Miller, Brenda A; Bourdeau, Beth; Johnson, Mark B; Voas, Robert B

    2016-03-01

    Electronic music dance events (EMDEs) in nightclubs are settings where young adults tend to engage in high-risk behaviors, such as heavy alcohol and drug use. Consequences of these behaviors may be prevented if young adults engage in protective strategies with their drinking group. It is important to identify drinking group characteristics that predict willingness to intervene with peers. Objectives of this study were to (a) examine whether young adults at EMDEs would be willing to intervene with members of their drinking group and (b) identify both individual and group characteristics of drinking groups that predict willingness to intervene. Nightclub patrons (N = 215 individuals; 80 groups) were surveyed anonymously as they entered clubs. Individual- and group-level characteristics were measured in relation to willingness to intervene with peers. Mixed-model regressions were conducted, accounting for nesting by drinking group. Analyses show that participants were willing to intervene with their peers. Groups that knew each other well and had lower expectations for members' drinking were more willing to intervene. Women, younger, and older participants were also more willing to intervene. Findings show that club patrons are willing to intervene with their drinking groups to protect them from harmful consequences of heavy drinking and drug use. Findings indicate characteristics of both individuals and drinking groups that could be targeted in interventions among young adults largely not being reached by college interventions. PMID:26999349

  20. Astronomical and related knowledge of Venezuelan indigeneous groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, D.

    2009-05-01

    This work comprises the research (1990-2005) by the author in relation with the astronomical knowledge of the aboriginal ethnic groups living in Venezuela. Essentially it is a resume of the three books by the author titled Astronomy of the Arawaks from Venezuela, Astronomy of the Caribs from Venezuela, and Astronomy of the Bari (Chibchan) and Isolated ethnic groups from Venezuela. The research has been guided mainly by the cosmogonic and cosmological concepts of each one of the more than twenty ethnic groups living in Venezuela, included in the above mentioned books, and also with the relations they have between the cosmos and climate, habitat conditions, mythology and their daily work, their life and culture. Due to the fact that this research covers very different human groups, obviously, we will find several ways in the description of origins and organization of the cosmos.

  1. Climate Change: On Scientists and Advocacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    Last year, I asked a crowd of a few hundred geoscientists from around the world what positions related to climate science and policy they would be comfortable publicly advocating. I presented a list of recommendations that included increased research funding, greater resources for education, and specific emission reduction technologies. In almost every case, a majority of the audience felt comfortable arguing for them. The only clear exceptions were related to geo-engineering research and nuclear power. I had queried the researchers because the relationship between science and advocacy is marked by many assumptions and little clarity. This despite the fact that the basic question of how scientists can be responsible advocates on issues related to their expertise has been discussed for decades most notably in the case of climate change by the late Stephen Schneider.

  2. Consumer-centric advocacy: its connection to nursing frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bramlett, M H; Gueldner, S H; Sowell, R L

    1990-01-01

    The concept of advocacy is redefined here as consumer-centric advocacy and its essential attributes are identified. Theoretical linkages between advocacy and selected nursing models are described. Specifically, the construct of advocacy is considered as it is operationalized within the theoretical frameworks of King, Newman, Orem, and Rogers. The health care system in the United States is in a state of unrest and undergoing nearly continuous change and reorganization. This reorganization has been hastened by tightened resources within the health care financing system, a growing number of elderly and indigent needing care, and the advent of care intensive disease processes such as AIDS and substance addicted newborns. In addition, the general public has become better informed concerning health and is seeking new approaches to the delivery of health care services. As changes in the health care system continue to occur, the role of nurses, the largest group of health care providers also is changing. In a system in which there is both a shortage of registered nurses and a growing demand for their services, nurses must develop strategies to maximize their impact on the health care system to meet the needs of consumers as well as protect their own professional integrity. The development of such strategies within nursing frameworks may be facilitated by closer scrutiny and clarification of the nurse's traditional role as advocate. PMID:2250834

  3. The ACA Advocacy Competencies: A Social Justice Advocacy Framework for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratts, Manivong J.; DeKruyf, Lorraine; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2007-01-01

    The recent endorsement of the advocacy competencies by the American Counseling Association signals their relevance to the school counseling profession. This article outlines the importance of being a social change agent, the value of advocacy in K-12 schools, and how school counselors can use the advocacy competencies as a framework for promoting…

  4. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  5. 78 FR 73586 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project..., Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  6. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee scheduled for... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  7. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  8. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... cancellation of the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee..., Acting Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  9. [Group psychoeducational intervention in relatives of patients suffering from schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Palli, A; Kalantzi-Azizi, A; Ploumpidis, D N; Kontoangelos, K; Economou, M

    2015-01-01

    The present research paper aims at assessing the effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention in relatives' groups of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. It examines the possible influence of the intervention on family members as well as on the course of the patient illness. Of a total of 131 relatives, 83 consisted the experimental group and 48 the control group. The relatives of the experimental group were divided into 5 groups and attended 18 psychoeducational sessions. Their patients as well s the patients and the relatives of the control group attended no specific intervention and continued their routine care. The psychoeducational intervention included education about the illness, communication skills training and training in problem-solving. It combined educational and psychotherapeutic techniques. The psychometric tools administered were: The Family Burden Scale, The Family Rituals Scale, The General Health Questionnaire GHQ-28, the Center for Epidemiological studies - Depression Scale (CES-D), the Opinions about Mental Illness Scale OMI, two scales concerning the knowledge about the illness, two questionnaires concerning expectations and feedback about the group process and questionnaires regarding sociodemographic characteristics of the sample and information about the illness. The number of hospitalizations of patients (n=91) during the research year was investigated. An interaction between group and measurement was found. While patient hospitalizations of both research groups did not differ significantly at the year before the study with X2=0.54, p=0.46), they differed when measured a year after the intervention, where patients in the intervention group had statistically significant fewer hospitalizations compared to the patients in the control group (x2=4.58, significant at p=0.032). As to the "compliance" in the medication, two statistical tests were conducted, taking into consideration that "compliance" by patients starting

  10. Divisions Iv-V / Working Group ap & Related Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathys, Gautier; Cunha, Margarida; Dworetsky, Michael; Kochukhov, Oleg; Kupka, Friedrich; LeBlanc, Francis; Monier, Richard; Paunzen, Ernst; Pintado, Olga; Piskunov, Nikolai; Ziznovsky, Jozef

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the Working Group on Ap and Related Stars (ApWG) is to promote and facilitate research about stars in the spectral type range from B to early F that exhibit surface chemical peculiarities and related phenomena. This is a very active field of research, in which a wide variety of new developments have taken place since 2009, as illustrated by the following selected highlights.

  11. ["Family groups" for relatives of patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Brunswick, Astrid; Guy-Rubin, Aurore; Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa affects mainly young adults. During care, caregivers seek alliance with patients' friends and family to be able to relate to the patients' symptoms and also their environment. Collaborative work with families helps build confidence. The "family group" is an example of well-intended partnership. PMID:27157194

  12. Relative Deprivation and Health: Which Reference Groups Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangyo, Eiji; Park, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We examine the extent to which self-reported health and psychosocial health are affected by relative economic status in China, for the first time examining the importance of reference groups not defined by geographic location or demographic characteristics. We propose a methodology to address potential bias from subjective reporting biases and…

  13. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.22 Relations with community groups. (a... in general are the responsibility of the officer in command, with the assistance of his public... Information) and from the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs). (3) Commands will maintain the...

  14. Choice Consistency of Interpersonal Relations: Diversified Task-Oriented Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, W. Jack; Beeland, James L.

    1980-01-01

    Investigates seven task-oriented groups which examine consistency of social choice across a range of behavioral criteria (friendship, leadership, followship, and evaluation criteria of social interaction). Results suggest that some criteria of interpersonal relations are interdependent: acceptance and rejection choices are not opposite ends of…

  15. Relative Yetter-Drinfeld modules and comodules over braided groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haixing E-mail: haxing.zhu@njfu.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    Let H{sub 1} be a quantum group and f : H{sub 1}⟶H{sub 2} a Hopf algebra homomorphism. Assume that B is some braided group obtained by Majid’s transmutation process. We first show that there is a tensor equivalence between the category of comodules over the braided group B and that of relative Yetter-Drinfeld modules. Next, we prove that the Drinfeld centers of the two categories mentioned above are equivalent to the category of modules over some quantum double, namely, the category of ordinary Yetter-Drinfeld modules over some Radford’s biproduct Hopf algebra. Importantly, the above results not only hold for a finite dimensional quantum group but also for an infinite dimensional one.

  16. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority. PMID:26200573

  17. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  18. The Tully-Fisher relations for Hickson compact group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Flores, S.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Plana, H.; Amram, P.; Epinat, B.

    2013-07-01

    We used K-band photometry, maximum rotational velocities derived from Fabry-Perot data and H I observed and predicted masses to study, for the first time, the K band, stellar and baryonic Tully-Fisher relations for galaxies in Hickson compact groups. We compared these relations with the ones defined for galaxies in less dense environments from the Gassendi HAlpha survey of Spirals and from a sample of gas-rich galaxies. We find that most of the Hickson compact group galaxies lie on the K-band Tully-Fisher relation defined by field galaxies with a few low-mass outliers, namely HCG 49b and HCG 96c, which appear to have had strong recent burst of star formation. The stellar Tully-Fisher relation for compact group galaxies presents a similar dispersion to that of the K-band relation, and it has no significant outliers when a proper computation of the stellar mass is done for the strongly star-forming galaxies. The scatter in these relations can be reduced if the gaseous component is taken into account, i.e. if a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is considered. In order to explain the positions of the galaxies off the K-band Tully-Fisher relation, we favour a scenario in which their luminosities are brightened due to strong star formation or AGN activity. We argue that strong bursts of star formation can affect the B- and K-band luminosities of HCG 49b and HCG 96c and in the case of the latter also AGN activity may affect the K-band magnitude considerably, without affecting their total masses.

  19. Infants use relative numerical group size to infer social dominance.

    PubMed

    Pun, Anthea; Birch, Susan A J; Baron, Andrew Scott

    2016-03-01

    Detecting dominance relationships, within and across species, provides a clear fitness advantage because this ability helps individuals assess their potential risk of injury before engaging in a competition. Previous research has demonstrated that 10- to 13-mo-old infants can represent the dominance relationship between two agents in terms of their physical size (larger agent = more dominant), whereas younger infants fail to do so. It is unclear whether infants younger than 10 mo fail to represent dominance relationships in general, or whether they lack sensitivity to physical size as a cue to dominance. Two studies explored whether infants, like many species across the animal kingdom, use numerical group size to assess dominance relationships and whether this capacity emerges before their sensitivity to physical size. A third study ruled out an alternative explanation for our findings. Across these studies, we report that infants 6-12 mo of age use numerical group size to infer dominance relationships. Specifically, preverbal infants expect an agent from a numerically larger group to win in a right-of-way competition against an agent from a numerically smaller group. In addition, this is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate that infants 6-9 mo of age are capable of understanding social dominance relations. These results demonstrate that infants' understanding of social dominance relations may be based on evolutionarily relevant cues and reveal infants' early sensitivity to an important adaptive function of social groups. PMID:26884199

  20. Infants use relative numerical group size to infer social dominance

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Anthea; Birch, Susan A. J.; Baron, Andrew Scott

    2016-01-01

    Detecting dominance relationships, within and across species, provides a clear fitness advantage because this ability helps individuals assess their potential risk of injury before engaging in a competition. Previous research has demonstrated that 10- to 13-mo-old infants can represent the dominance relationship between two agents in terms of their physical size (larger agent = more dominant), whereas younger infants fail to do so. It is unclear whether infants younger than 10 mo fail to represent dominance relationships in general, or whether they lack sensitivity to physical size as a cue to dominance. Two studies explored whether infants, like many species across the animal kingdom, use numerical group size to assess dominance relationships and whether this capacity emerges before their sensitivity to physical size. A third study ruled out an alternative explanation for our findings. Across these studies, we report that infants 6–12 mo of age use numerical group size to infer dominance relationships. Specifically, preverbal infants expect an agent from a numerically larger group to win in a right-of-way competition against an agent from a numerically smaller group. In addition, this is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate that infants 6–9 mo of age are capable of understanding social dominance relations. These results demonstrate that infants’ understanding of social dominance relations may be based on evolutionarily relevant cues and reveal infants’ early sensitivity to an important adaptive function of social groups. PMID:26884199

  1. Scaling Relations of Galaxy Groups and PoorClusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming

    Galaxy groups and poor clusters are ideal systems to study baryonic physics, which is important for both using clusters for precision cosmology and understanding galaxy formation and evolution. Over the last decade, our understanding of the ICM properties of galaxy groups and poor clusters has greatly improved. However, there are still many unresolved problems. We propose to study the X-ray scaling relations of galaxy groups and poor clusters with XMM data in the archive. The study of a large sample is important to address significant systematic uncertainties. The rich XMM archive on low-mass systems is of great value, as they are selected by the cluster, galaxy, and AGN panels with different effective selection functions. Our sample includes about 100 groups and poor clusters with sufficient XMM data. The state-of-the-art method to model the local X-ray background will be applied, which is key for deriving X-ray gas properties at low surface brightness. The important scaling relations including M-T, M-Y_X, f_gas-T, entropy-M, L-T, L-Y_X, L-M and abundance-M will be derived. The scatter of in these relations will also be examined, as well as their connection to other group properties. This project represents a significant improvement over previous work. The final results will greatly improve our understanding of baryon physics in clusters and groups, especially when combined with the active efforts in simulation and analytic theory which are currently ongoing.

  2. University-Based Planning: Faculty Advocacy Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, William M.; Thagard, Aubrey

    2001-01-01

    Supports the involvement of university planning faculty in advocacy roles as change agents in urban inner city communities, discussing several roles for urban design professionals in the academic context as advocates or contractors (i.e., planner advocacy in community development, in environmental affairs, and in urban design). (SM)

  3. School Board Advocacy: Ready, Aim, Inspire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Karen

    2010-01-01

    It is said that "all politics are local," and the same can be said about advocacy and school boards. Advocacy is essential for retaining the progress that's been made in the past, and for building a foundation and network for the future. Advocating for preferred programs, curricula and initiatives has always been important. As a starting point,…

  4. Building Evidence for Music Education Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorner-Johnson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The economic challenges facing public schools and music education are immense. In this context, music teachers and supporters will need to engage in persuasive advocacy to protect resource allocations to music programs. It is worthwhile to consider the model of music education advocacy that allowed music to be adopted into the Boston Public…

  5. CAEA Art Education Advocacy in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Dwaine; Tolladay, Kay

    1979-01-01

    The California Art Education Association has developed a statewide advocacy effort to counteract declines in art education brought about by financial pressures and the basic skills movement. This article describes the advocacy program's publicity efforts and commitments to work with the entire arts community in a "comprehensive arts" campaign.…

  6. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  7. Advocacy: AASL Puts the Puzzle Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Sara Kelly

    2007-01-01

    School librarians work with people of all ages, abilities, and personalities; those people are the puzzle pieces that make advocacy for libraries effective. School librarians contribute to and use the resources of their state and national organizations' advocacy efforts. The completed picture of the puzzle is an excellent program with…

  8. Broadening the Discussion about Evaluator Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This issue of "American Journal of Evaluation" presents commentaries by evaluation leaders, George Grob and Rakesh Mohan, which draw upon their wealth of practical experience to address questions about evaluator advocacy, including What is meant by the word "advocacy"? Should evaluators ever advocate? If so, when and how? What…

  9. Effective Advocacy and Communication with Legislators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Counseling Association, Office of Public Policy and Information, Alexandria, VA.

    This pamphlet attempts to make communicating with legislators easy. Each section includes a brief paragraph and several bullet points that present techniques or advice for simplifying communication. It begins with "Rules for Effective Advocacy," which presents a core set of basic advocacy principles, followed by "What Makes Politicians Tick?" and…

  10. Political Advocacy Handbook: Activating Grassroots Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.; Warger, Cynthia L.

    This handbook is designed to assist special education advocates in developing the capacity to mount an effective advocacy campaign at the state and federal levels. It is divided into the following four separate training modules: (1) "Introduction to Advocacy"; (2) "Understanding the Governmental Process"; (3) "Changing Public Policy"; and (4)…

  11. Advocacy is scientists' responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstadt, Gene

    In reading S. Fred Singer's comments in Forum (Eos, May 21, 1991) on the earlier letter by Kaula and Anderson on AGU's proper role in society (Eos, April 9, 1991), I find myself entirely in agreement with his admonition that AGU positions, in this case specifically on global warming, must add “a certain amount of political sophistication.” But while I cannot disagree with the view that geophysicists should confine their advice to matters in which they have expertise, I also wonder if any of us deserves criticism when, noting the difficulty political leaders have in connecting causes with effects, we yield occasionally to the temptation to stray beyond mere facts and spell out potentially unfavorable connections. Early linking of complex but subtly related phenomena is one of the areas in which we have some credibility, is it not?Even as scientists we are, after all, compelled to share destinies with the other passengers crammed into the stairwells of the national vehicle, a bus tailgating an oil tanker careening right and left at high speed down the global highway, driven by a crew of politicians drunk on paleozoic distillate and trained in the Alfred E. Newman College of Navigation, where the principal graduation requirement is an intense desire to sit in front and steer.

  12. Extraction of a group-pair relation: problem-solving relation from web-board documents.

    PubMed

    Pechsiri, Chaveevan; Piriyakul, Rapepun

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to extract a group-pair relation as a Problem-Solving relation, for example a DiseaseSymptom-Treatment relation and a CarProblem-Repair relation, between two event-explanation groups, a problem-concept group as a symptom/CarProblem-concept group and a solving-concept group as a treatment-concept/repair concept group from hospital-web-board and car-repair-guru-web-board documents. The Problem-Solving relation (particularly Symptom-Treatment relation) including the graphical representation benefits non-professional persons by supporting knowledge of primarily solving problems. The research contains three problems: how to identify an EDU (an Elementary Discourse Unit, which is a simple sentence) with the event concept of either a problem or a solution; how to determine a problem-concept EDU boundary and a solving-concept EDU boundary as two event-explanation groups, and how to determine the Problem-Solving relation between these two event-explanation groups. Therefore, we apply word co-occurrence to identify a problem-concept EDU and a solving-concept EDU, and machine-learning techniques to solve a problem-concept EDU boundary and a solving-concept EDU boundary. We propose using k-mean and Naïve Bayes to determine the Problem-Solving relation between the two event-explanation groups involved with clustering features. In contrast to previous works, the proposed approach enables group-pair relation extraction with high accuracy. PMID:27540498

  13. The relation between visualization size, grouping, and user performance.

    PubMed

    Gramazio, Connor C; Schloss, Karen B; Laidlaw, David H

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we make the following contributions: (1) we describe how the grouping, quantity, and size of visual marks affects search time based on the results from two experiments; (2) we report how search performance relates to self-reported difficulty in finding the target for different display types; and (3) we present design guidelines based on our findings to facilitate the design of effective visualizations. Both Experiment 1 and 2 asked participants to search for a unique target in colored visualizations to test how the grouping, quantity, and size of marks affects user performance. In Experiment 1, the target square was embedded in a grid of squares and in Experiment 2 the target was a point in a scatterplot. Search performance was faster when colors were spatially grouped than when they were randomly arranged. The quantity of marks had little effect on search time for grouped displays ("pop-out"), but increasing the quantity of marks slowed reaction time for random displays. Regardless of color layout (grouped vs. random), response times were slowest for the smallest mark size and decreased as mark size increased to a point, after which response times plateaued. In addition to these two experiments we also include potential application areas, as well as results from a small case study where we report preliminary findings that size may affect how users infer how visualizations should be used. We conclude with a list of design guidelines that focus on how to best create visualizations based on grouping, quantity, and size of visual marks. PMID:26356909

  14. Introducing diagnosis-related groups: is the information system ready?

    PubMed

    Jian, Weiyan; Lu, Ming; Han, Wei; Hu, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis-related group (DRG) system is a classification system widely used in health managements, the foundation of which lies in the medical information system. A large effort had been made to improve the quality of discharge data before the introduction of DRGs in Beijing. We extract discharge data from 108 local hospitals spanning 4 years before and after standardization to evaluate the impact of standardization on DRG grouping performance. The data was grouped on an annual basis in accordance with Beijing's local DRG system. Proportion of ungrouped data, coefficient of variation (CV) and reduction in variance (RIV) were used to measure the performance of the DRG system. Both the descriptive and regression analysis indicate a significant reduction in terms of ungrouped data and CV for expenditure, increase of RIV for expenditure and length of stay. However, when there was no intervention, that is, between 2005 and 2006 and between 2008 and 2009, changes in these indicators were all insignificant. Therefore, the standardization of discharge data did improve data quality and consequently enhanced the performance of DRGs. Developing countries with a relatively weak information infrastructure should strengthen their medical information system before the introduction of the DRG system. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25111893

  15. Succeeding in Postsecondary Ed through Self-Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Robin H.; Layton, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of self-advocacy for postsecondary students with learning disabilities considers learning characteristics, self-advocacy as a critical transition skill, identification of intrinsic processing abilities, developing a self-advocacy plan, and the increasing need for postsecondary accommodations. Insets include a sample self-advocacy plan,…

  16. Emergency contraception for sexual assault victims: an advocacy coalition framework.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Mavis N

    2005-11-01

    A bill was introduced into the Tennessee legislature in the 2005 session that would require emergency departments to offer and dispense emergency contraception to sexual assault survivors who are at risk of pregnancy. Several advocacy groups collaborated to form the Women's Health Safety Network for the purpose of communicating as one voice. The advocacy coalition framework of policy development is applied to the political system and is used as a model to discuss issues impacting policy development for this particular bill. Key actors, proponents, and opponents to this bill are presented along with constraints to policy acceptance. The challenge for emergency contraception advocates on a state and national level is to keep the focus on public health science, the health and well-being of women, and out of the abortion debate. PMID:16443990

  17. Whistle-blowing as a form of advocacy: guidelines for the practitioner and organization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Annette D; Latting, Jean Kantambu

    2004-04-01

    Advocacy has been an inherent component of social work since the mid-1800s. The NASW Code of Ethics explicitly promotes advocacy as an ethical stance against inhumane conditions. Whistle-blowing, on the other hand, occurs mostly in the business and public administration disciplines and is relatively unknown in the social work profession. Using facts from composite cases of whistle-blowing incidents, the purpose of this article is to review the social work profession's current stance on advocacy to protect clients' rights, define and describe theoretical and practical knowledge about whistle-blowing based on a literature review, explain whistle-blowing as a special form of advocacy, and offer guidance to potential whistle-blowers and their organizations on how to handle situations in which whistle-blowing is likely to be considered an option. PMID:15124962

  18. Coleman Advocates for Children And Youth: a pioneering child advocacy organization (1974-2008).

    PubMed

    Carnochan, Sarah; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Coleman Advocates for Youth and Children is a pioneering 30-year-old child advocacy organization founded by several affluent community members and children's service professionals to stop housing abused and neglected children in juvenile hall. Today, low-income youth and parents in families of color are now assuming leadership in developing a unique hybrid approach that integrates community organizing with more traditional child advocacy strategies and focuses on increasing affordable housing and improving the city's educational system. The strategies employed by Coleman have also evolved, shifting from insider advocacy with administrative officials to public campaigns targeting the city budget process, to local initiative campaigns, and most recently to electoral politics. This organizational history features the issues mission and structure, leadership, managing issues, advocacy strategies and community relations, and funding. PMID:21416432

  19. Reimbursement under diagnosis-related groups: The Medicaid experience

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, Fred J.

    1986-01-01

    The implementation of the Medicare prospective payment system has sparked the growth of similar Medicaid systems. Eight State Medicaid agencies now employ a system based on diagnosis-related groups (DRG's), and another four State Medicaid agencies are planning to implement such systems in the near future. The eight DRG-based systems in existence in 1986 are examined in this article. Preliminary evidence presented herein indicates that Medicaid DRG-based systems have experienced reduced rates of increase in expenditures for hospital services and that hospital admission rates have not increased under these systems. PMID:10312011

  20. [Why are diagnosis-related groups unpopular in Colombia?].

    PubMed

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Cortés, Ariel; Agudelo, Sandra; Yepes, Francisco J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the determinants of non-implementation of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) by hospitals in Colombia. A qualitative case was carried out to analyze the directors' perceptions in six hospitals with and without DRGs in Bogotá. The interviews are based on the Innovation Diffusion Theory. The directors had similar perceptions of the determinates. DRGs were seen as positive, but encountered organizational and institutional obstacles. Without a targeted public policy, the likelihood of implementing DRGs in Colombia is slight. PMID:26578026

  1. Framing of AIDS in Africa: press-state relations, HIV/AIDS news, and journalistic advocacy in four sub-Saharan Anglophone newspapers.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paul; Pollock, John C; Kiernicki, Kristen; Shaw, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This study offers the first systematic analysis of the impact of press-state relations, or media systems, on the HIV/AIDS news agenda in African news coverage. The premise is that media systems play a determining role in the degree to which journalists can independently advocate for social change when covering HIV/AIDS. Drawing on comparative research, four sub-Saharan countries were categorized into two media systems: Contained Democratic (South Africa, Nigeria) and Repressive Autocratic (Zimbabwe, Kenya). A sample of HIV/AIDS stories (n = 393) published from 2002-2007 in each country's leading Anglophone newspaper was content analyzed. Across all coverage, the topic of social costs was framed more for the responsibility borne by nongovernmental agents than governmental agents. In Contained Democratic media systems, however, story emphasis shifted toward government agents taking responsibility for addressing the social costs of HIV/AIDS. Prevention campaigns were framed more as progress than decline across all newspapers; however, campaigns were reported as being more efficacious in Contained Democratic systems than in Repressive Autocratic systems. No impact of media system on framing of medical developments was found. Results show the value of comparative analysis in understanding the agenda-setting process: with greater emphasis on positive efficacy and government initiative, the news agenda in Contained Democratic media systems can facilitate stronger positive societal-level responses than the news agenda in Repressive Autocratic media systems. PMID:24697635

  2. Elliptical galaxies kinematics within general relativity with renormalization group effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Davi C.

    2012-09-01

    The renormalization group framework can be applied to Quantum Field Theory on curved space-time, but there is no proof whether the beta-function of the gravitational coupling indeed goes to zero in the far infrared or not. In a recent paper [1] we have shown that the amount of dark matter inside spiral galaxies may be negligible if a small running of the General Relativity coupling G is present (δG/G{sub 0}∼<10{sup −7} across a galaxy). Here we extend the proposed model to elliptical galaxies and present a detailed analysis on the modeling of NGC 4494 (an ordinary elliptical) and NGC 4374 (a giant elliptical). In order to compare our results to a well known alternative model to the standard dark matter picture, we also evaluate NGC 4374 with MOND. In this galaxy MOND leads to a significative discrepancy with the observed velocity dispersion curve and has a significative tendency towards tangential anisotropy. On the other hand, the approach based on the renormalization group and general relativity (RGGR) could be applied with good results to these elliptical galaxies and is compatible with lower mass-to-light ratios (of about the Kroupa IMF type)

  3. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  4. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  5. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  6. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  7. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  8. A media advocacy intervention linking health disparities and food insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Melanie J.; McIntyre, Lynn; Persaud, Steven A.; Thomas, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Media advocacy is a well-established strategy for transmitting health messages to the public. This paper discusses a media advocacy intervention that raised issues about how the public interprets messages about the negative effects of poverty on population health. In conjunction with the publication of a manuscript illustrating how income-related food insecurity leads to disparities related to the consumption of a popular food product across Canada (namely, Kraft Dinner®), we launched a media intervention intended to appeal to radio, television, print and Internet journalists. All the media coverage conveyed our intended message that food insecurity is a serious population health problem, confirming that message framing, personal narratives and visual imagery are important in persuading media outlets to carry stories about poverty as a determinant of population health. Among politicians and members of the public (through on-line discussions), the coverage provoked on-message as well as off-message reactions. Population health researchers and health promotion practitioners should anticipate mixed reactions to media advocacy interventions, particularly in light of new Internet technologies. Opposition to media stories regarding the socio-economic determinants of population health can provide new insights into how we might overcome challenges in translating evidence into preventive interventions. PMID:21685402

  9. The voice of Florence Nightingale on advocacy.

    PubMed

    Selanders, Louise C; Crane, Patrick C

    2012-01-01

    Modern nursing is complex, ever changing, and multi focused. Since the time of Florence Nightingale, however, the goal of nursing has remained unchanged, namely to provide a safe and caring environment that promotes patient health and well being. Effective use of an interpersonal tool, such as advocacy, enhances the care-giving environment. Nightingale used advocacy early and often in the development of modern nursing. By reading her many letters and publications that have survived, it is possible to identify her professional goals and techniques. Specifically, Nightingale valued egalitarian human rights and developed leadership principles and practices that provide useful advocacy techniques for nurses practicing in the 21st century. In this article we will review the accomplishments of Florence Nightingale, discuss advocacy in nursing and show how Nightingale used advocacy through promoting both egalitarian human rights and leadership activities. We will conclude by exploring how Nightingale's advocacy is as relevant for the 21st century as it was for the 19th century. PMID:22320877

  10. Advocacy evaluation: challenges and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Devlin-Foltz, David; Fagen, Michael C; Reed, Ehren; Medina, Robert; Neiger, Brad L

    2012-09-01

    Devising, promoting, and implementing changes in policies and regulations are important components of population-level health promotion. Whether advocating for changes in school meal nutrition standards or restrictions on secondhand smoke, policy change can create environments conducive to healthier choices. Such policy changes often result from complex advocacy efforts that do not lend themselves to traditional evaluation approaches. In a challenging fiscal environment, allocating scarce resources to policy advocacy may be particularly difficult. A well-designed evaluation that moves beyond inventorying advocacy activities can help make the case for funding advocacy and policy change efforts. Although it is one thing to catalog meetings held, position papers drafted, and pamphlets distributed, it is quite another to demonstrate that these outputs resulted in useful policy change outcomes. This is where the emerging field of advocacy evaluation fits in by assessing (among other things) strategic learning, capacity building, and community organizing. Based on recent developments, this article highlights several challenges advocacy evaluators are currently facing and provides new resources for addressing them. PMID:22773623

  11. Classroom Segregation: Where Do Students Sit and How Is This Related to Group Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Shelley; Stringer, Maurice; Cairns, Ed

    2016-01-01

    With increasing ethnic and racial diversity in the classroom, understanding classroom dynamics and the use of space has become increasingly important. In particular, when theoretical perspectives, such as that offered by intergroup contact research, promotes the importance of contact between competing groups to improve relations. Adopting a…

  12. The Effect of Group Projects on Content-Related Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2005-01-01

    Business schools often assign student group projects to enhance student learning of course content and to build teamwork skills. However, the characteristics of effective collaborative learning tasks, including group goals and individual accountability, are often not found in student group projects assigned in business classes. The current…

  13. Constraints on supersymmetric soft phases from renormalization group relations

    SciTech Connect

    Garisto, R.; Wells, J.D.

    1997-02-01

    By using relations derived from renormalization group equations (RGEs), we find that strong indirect constraints can be placed on the top squark mixing phase in A{sub t} from the electric dipole moment of the neutron (d{sub n}). Since m{sub t} is large, any GUT-scale phase in A{sub t} feeds into other weak scale phases through RGEs, which in turn contribute to d{sub n}. Thus CP-violating effects due to a weak-scale A{sub t} are strongly constrained. We find that {vert_bar}ImA{sub t}{sup EW}{vert_bar} must be smaller than or of order {vert_bar}ImB{sup EW}{vert_bar}, making the electric dipole moment of the top quark unobservably small in most models. Quantitative estimates of the contributions to d{sub n} from A{sub u}, A{sub d}, and B show that substantial fine-tuning is still required to satisfy the experimental bound on d{sub n}. While the low energy phases of the A{close_quote}s are not as strongly constrained as the phase of B{sup EW}, we note that the phase of a universal A{sup GUT} induces large contributions in the phase of B{sup EW} through RGEs, and is thus still strongly constrained in most models with squark masses below a TeV. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. A New Movement in an Old Bureaucracy: The Development of Self-Advocacy in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siska, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper I describe how self-advocacy has grown in the Czech Republic. First, I talk about how services for people with learning disabilities have begun to change in the last few years. This is because voluntary groups have lobbied and campaigned for change. I learned about self-advocacy during a visit to the UK in the 1990s. I went back to…

  15. Towards a global framework for capacity building for non-communicable disease advocacy in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Trevor; Champagne, Beatriz; Blanchard, Claire; Ibarra, Lorena; Kasesmup, Vijj

    2013-12-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent an increasing proportion of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Sustained advocacy, carried out by a skilled workforce, is an important strategy to realize the political will and implement the policy changes necessary to reduce the global burden of NCDs. Competencies for effective advocacy include a combination of scientific and technical as well as communication-based skills. Recognizing the need to build local capacity for NCD advocacy in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the InterAmerican Heart Foundation joined efforts to conduct two pilot advocacy courses, one in Thailand and one in Colombia. A Global Advisory Group engaged a Local Organizing Committee in each country to ensure the courses would meet the needs of the local stakeholders. While both courses contained a set of key competencies and helped participants develop joint strategies for moving forward with consensus advocacy targets, the courses differed in content and participant background depending on the local context. A key goal of the courses was to determine and describe the lessons learned and make recommendations for a framework to be used for future advocacy capacity-building activities in LMIC. The planning and execution of each course generated lessons in the following five areas that informed the development of a global framework for capacity building for NCD advocacy: 1) using a comprehensive theoretical framework to teach advocacy competencies, 2) engaging key stakeholders, 3) meeting local needs and priorities, 4) planning local logistics, and 5) ensuring the skills obtained through training are applied to sustained advocacy for NCDs. PMID:24722739

  16. The Northland fluoridation advocacy programme: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Sunitha; Thomas, David R

    2008-12-01

    On 20 July 2006, the Far North District Council resolved to fluoridate Kaitaia and Kaikohe. This was the first such initiative by any Territorial Local Authority (TLA) in New Zealand for 23 years, and resulted from a fluoridation advocacy programme. This paper describes the programme implementation, assesses its consistency with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and critically examines the collaboration between the fluoride advocate and the key stakeholders. Process evaluation identified three main categories of programme implementation: policy advocacy, community action projects, and media advocacy. The collaboration of iwi, Maori health providers and the community suggests that the programme was consistent with the principles (partnership, participation and protection) ofthe Treaty ofWaitangi. Media advocacy played an important role in reflecting and engaging community views on fluoridation, and it influenced decision-making by the Far North District Council. The simultaneous, combined 'top-down and bottom-up' approach was an effective and successful strategy for fluoridation advocacy in the community. Less integrated approaches implemented on their own (such as the 'top down' approach in Whangarei and the 'bottom-up' approach in Dargaville) were not effective. PMID:19180864

  17. Science, policy advocacy, and marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Gray, Noella J; Campbell, Lisa M

    2009-04-01

    Much has been written in recent years regarding whether and to what extent scientists should engage in the policy process, and the focus has been primarily on the issue of advocacy. Despite extensive theoretical discussions, little has been done to study attitudes toward and consequences of such advocacy in particular cases. We assessed attitudes toward science and policy advocacy in the case of marine protected areas (MPAs) on the basis of a survey of delegates at the First International Marine Protected Areas Congress. Delegates were all members of the international marine conservation community and represented academic, government, and nongovernmental organizations. A majority of respondents believed science is objective but only a minority believed that values can be eliminated from science. Respondents showed only partial support of positivist principles of science. Almost all respondents supported scientists being integrated into MPA policy making, whereas half of the respondents agreed that scientists should actively advocate for particular MPA policies. Scientists with a positivist view of science supported a minimal role for scientists in policy, whereas government staff with positivist beliefs supported an advocacy or decision-making role for scientists. Policy-making processes for MPAs need to account for these divergent attitudes toward science and advocacy if science-driven and participatory approaches are to be reconciled. PMID:19016824

  18. Public health advocacy to change corporate practices: implications for health education practice and research.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2005-06-01

    Corporate practices, such as advertising, public relations, lobbying, litigation, and sponsoring scientific research, have a significant impact on the health of the people in the United States. Recently, health professionals and advocates have created a new scope of practice that aims to modify corporate practices that harm health. This article describes how corporate policies influence health and reviews recent health campaigns aimed at changing corporate behavior in six industries selected for their central role in the U.S. economy and their influence on major causes of mortality and morbidity. These are the alcohol, automobile, food, gun, pharmaceutical, and tobacco industries. The article defines corporate disease promotion and illustrates the range of public health activities that have emerged to counter such corporate behaviors. It analyzes the role of health professionals, government, and advocacy groups in these campaigns and assesses the implications of this domain for health education practice and research. PMID:15851541

  19. Group Supervision of Supervision: A Relational Approach for Training Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMino, John L.; Risler, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The issue of training psychologists to become competent supervisors has only been clearly articulated in the past two decades. In this article a rationale for training supervisors in a group format is given. Then, a supervision of supervision group is presented that the authors co-led with two successive cohorts of four predoctoral interns in a…

  20. Predictors and a Framework for Fostering Community Advocacy as a Community Health Worker Core Function to Eliminate Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Maia; Reinschmidt, Kerstin M.; Schachter, Kenneth; Jacobs, Laurel; Guernsey de Zapien, Jill; Robinson, Laurie; Carvajal, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Using a mixed-method, participatory research approach, we investigated factors related to community health worker (CHW) community advocacy that affect social determinants of health. Methods. We used cross-sectional survey data for 371 CHWs to assess demographics, training, work environment, and leadership qualities on civic, political, and organizational advocacy. We present advocacy stories to further articulate CHW activities. The data reported are from the recently completed National Community Health Workers Advocacy Study. Results. CHWs are involved in advocacy that is community-focused, although advocacy differs by intrinsic leadership, experience, training, and work environment. We propose a framework to conceptualize, support, and evaluate CHW advocacy and the iterative processes they engage in. These processes create opportunities for community voice and action to affect social and structural conditions that are known to have wide-ranging health effects on communities. Conclusions. The framework presented may have utility for CHWs, their training programs, and their employers as well as funders and policymakers aiming to promote health equity. PMID:23678904

  1. Gender and advocacy in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ray-ross, S

    1997-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) and the Indonesian Midwives Association (IBI) have developed a two-phase training program regarding gender issues for the association's midwives. The first phase focuses on the leadership, management, and advocacy skills necessary to articulate program needs and to take part in making decisions regarding family planning and reproductive health. The second phase concerns the integration of gender into project design. Proposals developed by the midwives include the following: 1) to improve counseling services for women in a district where 70% of the women using contraception do not decide for themselves which methods to use; 2) to reduce maternal mortality in a district where it has increased by 20% and where women have died while waiting for husbands or fathers-in-law to make the decision to bring them to hospitals; 3) to develop gender-sensitive materials concerning HIV/AIDS; and 4) to expand gender training to all levels of IBI, to provide follow-up technical support, and to integrate gender into the mission statement of the organization. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi (member of Parliament and vice chair of the Global Commission on Women's Health), Dr. Widyastuti Wibisana (director of community participation in the Ministry of Health), Dr. Kokila Vaidya (WHO Medical Officer), Carla Bianpoen (gender specialist with the World Bank), and Titi Sumbung (director of the Melati Foundation) helped to develop and to conduct the program. IBI, which has 65,000 members, provides family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health services throughout Indonesia. PMID:12292791

  2. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  3. Enhancing family advocacy networks: an analysis of the roles of sponsoring organizations.

    PubMed

    Briggs, H E; Koroloff, N M

    1995-08-01

    Family participation in shaping system reforms in children's mental health has increased over the past ten years. In 1990 the National Institute of Mental Health funded the development and enhancement of 15 statewide advocacy organizations that were to be controlled and staffed by families of children who have serious emotional disorders. These family advocacy organizations had three major goals: to establish support networks, to advocate for service system reforms, and to develop statewide family advocacy networks. Seven family advocacy networks worked with sponsoring organizations because they needed assistance and/or could not receive funding directly. State and local chapters of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and the National Mental Health Association served in this capacity. Because there were no guidelines to educate sponsoring organizations about their interorganizational roles and responsibilities, staff of some sponsoring organizations used approaches that were supportive and effective, while staff in other organizations used methods that were counterproductive. The information and recommendations discussed in this paper are based on evaluation data and observations of the relationships between seven sponsoring organizations and family advocacy groups over a three-year period. This paper proposes a conceptual framework that includes: (1) a clear definition of the sponsoring organization's roles, and (2) an analysis of the advantages, limitations, and critical issues for the sponsoring organization. PMID:7587153

  4. Development and Assessment of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Linnemeyer, Rachel M.; Bahner, Angela D.; Misialek, Leah Hanson

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and the initial psychometric evaluation of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale in two studies. In the first study, an exploratory factor analysis (n = 278) revealed a four-factor scale, accounting for 71.4% of the variance, measuring different aspects of social issue advocacy: Political and Social Advocacy,…

  5. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  6. 76 FR 75951 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and Wednesday.... ] Dated: November 30, 2011. Shawn Collins, Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  7. Promoting Self-Advocacy among Minority Students in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astramovich, Randall L.; Harris, Katrina R.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents self-advocacy competencies developed to promote the academic, career, and personal/social success of minority students. The authors discuss challenges faced by minority students in today's educational environment and review principles of self advocacy. Competencies for developing self-advocacy awareness, knowledge, and skills…

  8. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self-Employed Decreasing Non-Filers Project... meeting is cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER...

  9. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Burden Reduction Project Committee scheduled... cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Audrey...

  10. Brief Report: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Advocacy Program for Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Burke, Meghan M; Magaña, Sandra; Garcia, Marlene; Mello, Maria P

    2016-07-01

    Latino, Spanish-speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face unique barriers in special education advocacy. Although advocacy programs are becoming more common in the United States, none of these programs target Latino families. This is a pilot study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of an advocacy program for Latino families of children with ASD. Using a quasi-experimental design, 40 Latino family members of children with ASD participated in this study. Results demonstrated consistent attendance, low attrition, and high participant satisfaction. Intervention (versus control) group participants demonstrated significantly increased empowerment and special education knowledge, and stronger family-school partnerships. Findings provide preliminary support for advocacy programs for Latino families of children with ASD. PMID:26944592

  11. Circus monkeys or change agents? Civil society advocacy for HIV/AIDS in adverse policy environments.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Neil; Harmer, Andrew; Aleshkina, Julia; Bogdan, Daryna; Chkhatarashvili, Ketevan; Murzalieva, Gulgun; Rukhadze, Natia; Samiev, Arnol; Walt, Gill

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the factors enabling and undermining civil society efforts to advocate for policy reforms relating to HIV/AIDS and illicit drugs in three countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine. It examines how political contexts and civil society actors' strengths and weaknesses inhibit or enable advocacy for policy change - issues that are not well understood in relation to specific policy areas such as HIV/AIDS, or particular regions of the world where national policies are believed to be major drivers of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The study is based on in-depth interviews with representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs) (n = 49) and national level informants including government and development partners (n = 22). Our policy analysis identified a culture of fear derived from concerns for personal safety but also risk of losing donor largesse. Relations between CSOs and government were often acrimonious rather than synergistic, and while we found some evidence of CSO collective action, competition for external funding - in particular for HIV/AIDS grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was often divisive. Development partners and government tend to construct CSOs as service providers rather than advocates. While some advocacy was tolerated by governments, CSO participation in the policy process was, ultimately, perceived to be tokenistic. This was because there are financial interests in maintaining prohibitionist legislation: efforts to change punitive laws directed at the behaviors of minority groups such as injecting drug users have had limited impact. PMID:22036298

  12. Advocacy and IEC strategies. Getting the most from the experience of others in promoting adolescent reproductive and sexual health.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Regional Clearing House on Population Education has commissioned a series of case studies on the promotion of adolescent reproductive and sexual health, with emphasis placed on advocacy and information, education and communication (IEC). The case studies will document the experiences of Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The advocacy activities include programs to gain the support of lawmakers and policymakers, the mass media and other influential groups. IEC activities, on the other hand, reach out to the youth, counselors, teachers and trainers, extension workers and motivators, and health personnel. Advocacy and IEC also differ in strategies. Political lobbying, high level meetings, seminars, mass media campaigns, and advocacy skills training are typical advocacy strategies; while, individual counseling, research, non-governmental organization involvement in communities, youth camps are of IEC strategies. The case studies also examine national policies, program responses and strategies, and factors that have contributed to best practices, and innovative approaches to advocacy and IEC. The impact of the target groups of the case studies will be evaluated and those with successful outcomes will be identified. PMID:12158254

  13. Separation and Relating in a Parent-Toddler Group Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navridi, Evanthia; Navridis, Klimis; Midgley, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Parent-toddler groups constitute a primary intervention programme whose target is to support and encourage the parent-toddler relationship. Toddlerhood is a developmental period when major, crucial changes take place regarding how children function, as well as their relationship to their parents (especially to their mother). The present paper…

  14. Factors Related to Attendance Rates in Obesity-Treatment-Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, Eugene R.; Popler, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Examines personal, psychological, physical, and social characteristics of persons seeking group treatment for obesity and correlates these variables with their subsequent attendance. The best candidates for continuing in treatment have completed more schooling, have been obese longer, and are less depressed, more self-sufficient, and less…

  15. The Structure of Positive Interpersonal Relations in Small Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James A.; Leinhardt, Samuel

    The authors sought to test Homans' proposition that small groups inevitably generate a social structure which combines subgroups (cliques) and a ranking system. We present a graph theoretical model of such a structure and prove that a necessary and sufficient condition for its existence is the absence of seven particular triad types. Expected…

  16. Presentation for Panel on "Policy Advocacy for the Right To Learn of All Women and Men."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Maria Lourdes Almazan

    2001-01-01

    In the Asia-Pacific region, innovations in nonformal adult education rarely become mainstream policy and practice. Effective adult education policy advocacy requires assertion of a lifelong view and a common position of advancing learning for the most marginal groups. (SK)

  17. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  18. Advocacy: the role of health professional associations.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2014-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health was developed on the premise that organizational capacity strengthening in eight low- and middle-income countries would result in improved ability of member associations to take a leadership role in engaging a range of stakeholders in the health sector to discuss evidence and facilitate policy change and clinical practice in maternal and newborn health. Definitions of relevant terms, principles, and a framework for an advocacy plan are presented. The term advocacy is typically not well understood by health professionals, nor generally thought to be part of their role as a clinician, researcher, or educator. "Influence" based on expertise is often more consonant with a clinician's reality, especially where advocacy is perceived as a more political process that may present a barrier in some countries. The organizational capacity development of the FIGO member associations was integral to their ability to exert influence based on evidence, both internally in their associations and with other stakeholders, including the Ministry of Health. Examples of advocacy from each of the eight LOGIC countries are provided, noting that evaluation of impact can be challenging. PMID:25174787

  19. Child Care Advocacy: Making a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Working for Change, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This journal issue highlights examples of state and local child care advocacy strategies that have resulted in positive legislative change or increased funding for low-income child care. Legal constraints on lobbying by nonprofit or public agencies due to limitations imposed by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and public and private funding…

  20. Organizing Your Parents for Effective Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    In today's world of restrictive school budgets and increasing property taxes, it is an unfortunate reality that many school districts will be faced with a budget crunch crisis that unenlightened school boards may try to solve by cutting or eliminating funds for music. At the crisis stage, it is often only the effective advocacy of an organized…

  1. Parental Advocacy for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclift, Coriann

    2010-01-01

    Students attending schools in the United States who have autism would benefit from increased parental involvement to enhance their learning. There is a lack of research regarding parental advocacy on behalf of students with autism. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the lived experiences and perceptions of parents who have…

  2. The Dance of Leadership and Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Leadership and advocacy often resemble a dance more than a straight-line march toward a goal. At times the leader advocate must work the process and lead the dance; at other times, the leader must stand back and let the process work, always ready to add a step or two to the dance when necessary. In this article, the author describes how librarians…

  3. Electronic Advocacy and Social Welfare Policy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Sung Seek; DeWeaver, Kevin L.

    2005-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of low-cost computers, the proliferation of user-friendly software, and the development of electronic networks have created the "informatics era." The Internet is a rapidly growing communication resource that is becoming mainstream in the American society. Computer-based electronic political advocacy by social…

  4. Enhancing Advocacy Skills of Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Melissa A.; Herrera, Socorro G.

    2009-01-01

    This case study explores the dynamics of enhancing the capacities of teacher candidates in the Bilingual/Bicultural Education Students Interacting to Obtain Success (BESITOS) recruitment and retention program to advocate for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students. Herrera and Murry's advocacy framework provides the theoretical…

  5. Educational Expertise, Advocacy, and Media Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malin, Joel R.; Lubienski, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of many advocacy organizations to advance their preferred policies despite conflicting evidence of the effectiveness of these policies raise questions about factors that shape successful policy promotion. While many may like to think that expertise on an issue in question is an essential prerequisite for influence in public policy…

  6. Composite Indicators between Analysis and Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltelli, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    We explore to what extent composite indicators, capable of aggregating multi-dimensional processes into simplified, stylised concepts, are up to the task of underpinning the development of data-based narratives for political advocacy. A recent OECD working paper (Nardo et al., 2005, Handbook on constructing composite indicators: methodology and…

  7. Strengthening Music Programs While Avoiding Advocacy Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Chad; Clauhs, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article examines ways in which music education advocacy efforts have become disconnected from the unified visions and declarations of music educators espoused in the Tanglewood and Housewright declarations and are thus reifying the disconnect between what we value and what we say we value. We first analyze the policies posited by the recently…

  8. CEC Handbook for Strengthening Grassroots Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook is designed: (1) to empower individuals working with people who have disabilities to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work; and (2) to help them to channel their strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The handbook…

  9. The African cancer advocacy consortium: shaping the path for advocacy in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although there is significant evidence of a cancer epidemic in Africa, there is limited awareness about cancer in most African countries. By partnering with international organizations and institutions such as the University of Florida and the Prostate Net, the African Organisation for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) is committed to improving cancer advocacy in Africa. This paper presents some of the recent efforts on cancer advocacy in Africa, including the results of a SWOT analysis conducted for the cancer advocacy workshop and the guidelines developed by cancer advocates on best practices for cancer advocacy in Africa. One of the outcomes of these efforts is the African Cancer Advocates Consortium (ACAC) founded by cancer advocates in Africa to, “Make Cancer a Top Priority in Africa”. While we have started the work to strengthen cancer advocacy in Africa, we still have a long way to go. Our goal of making cancer a priority in Africa can mainly be achieved by: (1) increasing the manpower for cancer advocacy through education and training; and (2) strengthening the network of cancer advocates across the continent. PMID:23902674

  10. Endorsement of Growth Factors and Its Relation to Stage of Group Development in Experiential Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation utilized critical incidents methodology to examine participants' endorsement of twelve primary growth factors during a Master's level group counseling class. Additionally, the study examined whether some factors are more salient than others at each stage of development (i.e., forming, storming, norming, performing) as defined by…

  11. Recognizing new opportunities: reconceptualizing policy advocacy in everyday organizational practice.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    Policy advocacy is a concept that is of both practical and historical importance to the profession of social work. To keep up with developments in how advocacy is practiced at the ground level, however, social work research on advocacy needs to expand in scope. Changes in government contracting and public management practices have reshaped the opportunity structure for policy advocacy, incentivizing a kind of advocacy that is routine, professionalized, and collaborative. At the same time, these practices have raised questions about democratic representation and the degree to which social work advocacy adequately reflects client concerns. This article presents a model for how policy advocacy can be usefully reconceptualized to account for changes in the policy and funding environment and concludes by suggesting ways that social work research and theory can better reflect practice realities. PMID:24032304

  12. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making. PMID:24919733

  13. Individual and Peer Group Normative Beliefs about Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Nicole E.; Hill, Laura G.

    2010-01-01

    Studies show that children who use relational aggression process social information in unique ways; however, findings have been inconsistent and limited by methodological weaknesses. This short-term longitudinal study examined developmental changes in 245 (49% female; ages 8-13) 3rd through 8th graders' normative beliefs about relational…

  14. The history of breast cancer advocacy.

    PubMed

    Braun, Susan

    2003-01-01

    There have been four key steps in the advent of breast cancer advocacy: priming the market, engaging consumers, establishing political advocacy, and taking the advocacy mainstream. Breast cancer was surrounded by secrecy until the 1980s, when brave individuals such as former First Ladies Betty Ford and Nancy Reagan, and founder of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Nancy Brinker (Susan Komen's sister), began speaking publicly about the personal impact of the disease, which increased awareness of breast cancer and made it more acceptable to talk about it openly. At the same time, statistics about breast cancer were presented in new ways that the public could understand. Public health advocates played a key role in the second step, engaging consumers, when they established guidelines in the 1980s that encouraged women to perform breast self-examinations (BSEs) and have screening mammograms and clinical breast examinations (CBEs). Other events that helped engage consumers were increased media coverage of breast cancer issues, the founding of the Komen Race for the Cure in 1983, and the establishment of other programs that both educated the public and raised funds. Funds from these efforts enabled advocates to hold educational forums and produce educational materials in different media and tailored to different audiences and to become active in the funding of research. The third step, political action, became possible when breast cancer advocates joined together in the 1980s and 1990s to work toward legislative, regulatory, and funding changes, such as passage of the Mammography Quality Standards Act and increased funding for the National Cancer Institute. These efforts contributed to a more than quadrupling of federal funding for breast cancer research in the 1990s. Going mainstream, the final step in the advocacy process, entailed establishing a solid base of support to ensure that the message about breast cancer stays strong and fresh. This has been achieved by engaging

  15. Attitude Certainty and Attitudinal Advocacy: The Unique Roles of Clarity and Correctness.

    PubMed

    Cheatham, Lauren; Tormala, Zakary L

    2015-11-01

    When and why do people advocate on behalf of their attitudes? Past research suggests that attitude certainty is one important determinant. The current research seeks to provide more nuanced insight into this relationship by (a) exploring the unique roles of attitude clarity and attitude correctness, and (b) mapping clarity and correctness onto different forms of advocacy (sharing intentions and persuasion intentions). Across four studies, we find that correctness but not clarity plays an important role in promoting persuasion intentions, whereas both correctness and clarity help shape sharing intentions. Thus, this research unpacks the certainty-advocacy relation and helps identify experimental manipulations that uniquely drive persuasion and sharing intentions. PMID:26338853

  16. Focus Group Study Exploring Factors Related to Frequent Sickness Absence

    PubMed Central

    van Rhenen, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Research investigating frequent sickness absence (3 or more episodes per year) is scarce and qualitative research from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves is lacking. The aim of the current study is to explore awareness, determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves. Methods We performed a qualitative study of 3 focus group discussions involving a total of 15 frequent absentees. Focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Results were analyzed with the Graneheim method using the Job Demands Resources (JD–R) model as theoretical framework. Results Many participants were not aware of their frequent sickness absence and the risk of future long-term sickness absence. As determinants, participants mentioned job demands, job resources, home demands, poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Managing these factors and improving communication (skills) were regarded as solutions to reduce frequent sickness absence. Conclusions The JD–R model provided a framework for determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence. Additional determinants were poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Frequent sickness absence should be regarded as a signal that something is wrong. Managers, supervisors, and occupational health care providers should advise and support frequent absentees to accommodate job demands, increase both job and personal resources, and improve health rather than express disapproval of frequent sickness absence and apply pressure regarding work attendance. PMID:26872050

  17. 45 CFR 146.145 - Special rules relating to group health plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules relating to group health plans. 146.145 Section 146.145 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET Preemption and Special Rules § 146.145 Special rules relating to group...

  18. Strong advocacy led to successful implementation of smokefree Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, Eric; Sebrié, Ernesto M; Glantz, Stanton A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the approval process and implementation of the 100% smokefree law in Mexico City and a competing federal law between 2007 and 2010. Methods Reviewed smokefree legislation, published newspaper articles and interviewed key informants. Results Strong efforts by tobacco control advocacy groups and key policymakers in Mexico City in 2008 prompted the approval of a 100% smokefree law following the WHO FCTC. As elsewhere, the tobacco industry utilised the hospitality sector to block smokefree legislation, challenged the City law before the Supreme Court and promoted the passage of a federal law that required designated smoking areas. These tactics disrupted implementation of the City law by causing confusion over which law applied in Mexico City. Despite interference, the City law increased public support for 100% smokefree policies and decreased the social acceptability of smoking. In September 2009, the Supreme Court ruled in favour of the City law, giving it the authority to go beyond the federal law to protect the fundamental right of health for all citizens. Conclusions Early education and enforcement efforts by tobacco control advocates promoted the City law in 2008 but advocates should still anticipate continuing opposition from the tobacco industry, which will require continued pressure on the government. Advocates should utilise the Supreme Court’s ruling to promote 100% smokefree policies outside Mexico City. Strong advocacy for the City law could be used as a model of success throughout Mexico and other Latin American countries. PMID:21059606

  19. Small wins matter in advocacy movements: giving voice to patients.

    PubMed

    Jason, Leonard A

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the various players are delineated in a story of a contested illness and patient advocacy, played out within the corridors of federal power. It is suggested that the mistreatment and negative attitudes that health care providers and others have towards those with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is possibly due to the social construction of this illness as being a "Yuppie flu" disease. Institutional factors are identified that created these norms and attributions, as well as the multiple stakeholders and constituent groups invested in exerting pressure on policy makers to effect systemic change. This article also provides examples of how the field of Community Psychology, which is fundamentally committed to/based on listening to and giving voice to patients, is broadly relevant to patient activism communities. This approach focused, over time, on epidemiological studies, the name, the case definition, and ultimately the change in CFS leadership at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Keys to this "small wins" approach were coalition building, use of "oppositional experts" (professionals in the scientific community who support patient advocacy goals) to challenge federal research, and taking advantage of developing events/shifts in power. Ultimately, this approach can result in significant scientific and policy gains, and changes in medical and public perception of an illness. PMID:21858612

  20. Self-Advocacy and Perceptions of College Readiness among Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamp, Lucy; Banerjee, Manju; Brown, Franklin C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined issues related to college adjustment and self-advocacy from the perspective of students diagnosed with a primarily inattentive presentation of Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) who were unable to meet minimum academic expectations in their first attempt at college. Data were gathered from 12 students with ADHD who,…

  1. Relationship between a Belief in a Just World and Social Justice Advocacy Attitudes of School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Post, Phyllis; Flowers, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how belief in a just world (BJW), political ideology, religious ideology, socioeconomic status of origin, and race relate to social justice advocacy attitudes among school counseling professionals. A sequential multiple regression indicated that political ideology and BJW were statistically significant…

  2. The Personal Is Political: School Counselors' Use of Self in Social Justice Advocacy Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahan, Eleanor H.; Singh, Anneliese A.; Urbano, Alessandra; Haston, Meg

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the aspects of "self" school counselors (N = 16) described as central to advocating for social justice in their school systems. Using grounded theory, this study explored racial, feminist, and advocacy identity development in relation to the personhood of the counselor, and how these elements coalesced around action…

  3. Educators' Reports on Incidence of Harassment and Advocacy toward LGBTQ Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragowski, Eliza A.; McCabe, Paul C.; Rubinson, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on a national survey investigation of 968 educators, who reported the incidence of LGBTQ harassment in schools, and their advocacy efforts on behalf of this population. LGBTQ-related knowledge, attitudes, norms, and perceived ability to advocate were also assessed. Ninety percent of educators reported observing LGBTQ harassment…

  4. Disability advocacy and reproductive choice: engaging with the expressivist objection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Madelyn

    2012-02-01

    This professional issues paper outlines the experience and value of engagement with disability advocates, philosophy scholars and bioethicists for spirited debate of issues such as modern eugenics, the expressivist objection and reproductive choice. This process for one group of individuals, undoubtedly prompted deeper examination and questioning of some long held personal and professional views, for all participants. For this author, engagement in the "Disability Rights-Genetic Counseling Interest Group" over a full year resulted in several positive changes in genetic counselling practice as well as the development of meaningful, robust philosophical defence of the dual roles in genetic counseling; advocacy for those with disabilities, and facilitation of a full range of reproductive choices. PMID:22037896

  5. 360 Degree advocacy: a model for high impact advocacy in a rapidly changing healthcare marketplace.

    PubMed

    Postal, Karen S; Wynkoop, Timothy F; Caillouet, Beth; Most, Randi; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa; Westerveld, Michael; Puente, Antonio; Pliskin, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    In an era of rapid changes in the healthcare marketplace the specialty of clinical neuropsychology faces a substantial increase in advocacy challenges. These include maintaining both access to services and a favorable practice climate as new healthcare structures and payment models evolve. The issue of regional variability complicates an effective response to these challenges from national professional organizations. One response to the challenge of regional variability is to strengthen our national organizations' capacity to engage in coordinated and effective advocacy, and to partner with state and regional neuro/psychological associations. The Inter-Organizational Practice Committee (IOPC) was formed in 2012 to meet this need. The IOPC has developed a model of 360 Degree Advocacy that coordinates local, regional, and national resources for high-impact, efficient advocacy. This paper describes the 360 Degree Advocacy model, and walks readers through an example of the model in action, successfully responding to a threat to patient access and practice climate with a regional Medicare carrier. PMID:24528167

  6. The Impact of Integrating Community Advocacy Into Community Health Worker Roles on Health-Focused Organizations and Community Health Workers in Southern Arizona.

    PubMed

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Ingram, Maia; Schachter, Kenneth; Sabo, Samantha; Verdugo, Lorena; Carvajal, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Organizational environments may encourage community health workers (CHWs) to engage community members in improving their communities. We conducted open-ended interviews and focus groups to explore how participation in the Acción intervention, which trained CHWs in community advocacy, affected organizational capacity to support their CHWs. Supervisors described improved organizational recognition and trust of CHWs. Organizational leaders reported organizational benefits and increased appreciation of CHW leadership. Both expressed increased interest in future advocacy trainings. Limiting factors included organizational mission, CHW position descriptions, and funding. Findings indicate that, with training and funding, CHW community advocacy can be integrated into organizations with congruent missions. PMID:26049654

  7. Extrapolation of Group Proximity from Member Relations Using Embedding and Distribution Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Hideaki; Horio, Keiichi; Morotomi, Nobuo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi

    In the present paper, we address the problem of extrapolating group proximities from member relations, which we refer to as the group proximity problem. We assume that a relational dataset consists of several groups and that pairwise relations of all members can be measured. Under these assumptions, the goal is to estimate group proximities from pairwise relations. In order to solve the group proximity problem, we present a method based on embedding and distribution mapping, in which all relational data, which consist of pairwise dissimilarities or dissimilarities between members, are transformed into vectorial data by embedding methods. After this process, the distributions of the groups are obtained. Group proximities are estimated as distances between distributions by distribution mapping methods, which generate a map of distributions. As an example, we apply the proposed method to document and bacterial flora datasets. Finally, we confirm the feasibility of using the proposed method to solve the group proximity problem.

  8. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community. PMID:19061060

  9. Iranian Nurses' Attitudes and Perception towards Patient Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Motamed-Jahromi, Mohadeseh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Borhani, Fariba; Zaher, Homa

    2012-01-01

    Patient advocacy is an inherent component of professional nursing ethics; in other words, nurses' enough knowledge would be essential to gain a positive attitude towards nursing advocacy. Using a descriptive-analytic design, this study aimed to assess the correlation between nurses' perception and attitudes towards patient advocacy, amongst 385 nurses in Kerman, Iran; hence, a three-part questionnaire was applied: part I, a demographic data sheet, part II, attitude measuring instrument, and part III, perception measuring instrument in nursing advocacy. The results implied that fairly positive attitudes and perception were found amongst the participants, and nurses' attitudes, in general, were positively correlated to their perception toward nursing advocacy. This means that with an improvement in perception, the attitude would also improve. In addition to our findings, it seems that these nurses needed more advocacy educational programs and support from responsible employers. PMID:23326680

  10. Relational-Cultural Theory: A Framework for Relational Competencies and Movement in Group Work with Female Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Kristi B.; Hammer, Tonya R.; Reicherzer, Stacee; Gilliam, Billie J.

    2012-01-01

    Relational-cultural theory (RCT) is an evolving feminist model of human development that places emphasis on growth-fostering relationships as building blocks for wellness. This article demonstrates the use of RCT in addressing relational aggression, including cyberbullying, in counseling a group of adolescent girls. The group counselor's…