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Sample records for related allergic disorders

  1. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-x03B3; (IFN-x03B3;). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells - an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO∙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO∙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO∙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO∙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO∙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may

  2. Respiratory Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Woloski, Jason Raymond; Heston, Skye; Escobedo Calderon, Sheyla Pamela

    2016-09-01

    Allergic asthma refers to a chronic reversible bronchoconstriction influenced by an allergic trigger, leading to symptoms of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is a complex hypersensitivity reaction, often in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis, occurring when bronchi become colonized by Aspergillus species. The clinical picture is dominated by asthma complicated by recurrent episodes of bronchial obstruction, fever, malaise, mucus production, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a syndrome associated with lung inflammation from the inhalation of airborne antigens, such as molds and dust. PMID:27545731

  3. Meteorological conditions, climate change, new emerging factors, and asthma and related allergic disorders. A statement of the World Allergy Organization.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Holgate, Stephen T; Pawankar, Ruby; Ledford, Dennis K; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Al-Ahmad, Mona; Al-Enezi, Fatma; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Baker, David J; Bayram, Hasan; Bergmann, Karl Christian; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Buters, Jeroen T M; D'Amato, Maria; Dorsano, Sofia; Douwes, Jeroen; Finlay, Sarah Elise; Garrasi, Donata; Gómez, Maximiliano; Haahtela, Tari; Halwani, Rabih; Hassani, Youssouf; Mahboub, Basam; Marks, Guy; Michelozzi, Paola; Montagni, Marcello; Nunes, Carlos; Oh, Jay Jae-Won; Popov, Todor A; Portnoy, Jay; Ridolo, Erminia; Rosário, Nelson; Rottem, Menachem; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Sibanda, Elopy; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Vitale, Carolina; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic airway diseases such as asthma and rhinitis has increased dramatically to epidemic proportions worldwide. Besides air pollution from industry derived emissions and motor vehicles, the rising trend can only be explained by gross changes in the environments where we live. The world economy has been transformed over the last 25 years with developing countries being at the core of these changes. Around the planet, in both developed and developing countries, environments are undergoing profound changes. Many of these changes are considered to have negative effects on respiratory health and to enhance the frequency and severity of respiratory diseases such as asthma in the general population. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases, and especially carbon dioxide (CO2), in the atmosphere have already warmed the planet substantially, causing more severe and prolonged heat waves, variability in temperature, increased air pollution, forest fires, droughts, and floods - all of which can put the respiratory health of the public at risk. These changes in climate and air quality have a measurable impact not only on the morbidity but also the mortality of patients with asthma and other respiratory diseases. The massive increase in emissions of air pollutants due to economic and industrial growth in the last century has made air quality an environmental problem of the first order in a large number of regions of the world. A body of evidence suggests that major changes to our world are occurring and involve the atmosphere and its associated climate. These changes, including global warming induced by human activity, have an impact on the biosphere, biodiversity, and the human environment. Mitigating this huge health impact and reversing the effects of these changes are major challenges. This statement of the World Allergy Organization (WAO) raises the importance of this health hazard and highlights the facts on climate-related health impacts

  4. Actual therapeutic management of allergic and hyperreactive nasal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rudack, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) and hyperractive disorders of the upper airways, depending upon the type of releasing stimuli, are defined as nasal hyperreactivity, for example in the case of AR, or as non-specific nasal hyperreactivity and as idiopathic rhinitis (IR) (synonyms frequently used in the past: non-specific nasal hyperreactivity; vasomotor rhinitis) in the case of non-characterised stimuli. An early and professional therapy of allergic disorders of the upper airways is of immense importance as allergic rhinitis is detected in comorbidities such as asthma and rhino sinusitis. The therapeutic concept is influenced by new and further developments in pharmacological substance classes such as antihistamines and glucocorticosteroids. Specific immune therapy, the only causal therapy for AR, has been reviewed over the past few years in respect of the type and pattern of application. However, to date no firm recommendations on oral, sublingual and /or nasal immune therapy have yet been drawn up based on investigations of these modifications. Therapeutic management of IR is aimed at a symptom-oriented therapy of nasal hyperactivity as etiological factors relating to this form of rhinitis are not yet sufficiently known. Drug groups such as mast cell stabilizers, systemic and topic antihistamines, topic and systemic glucocorticosteroids, ipatroium bromide and alpha symphatomimetics belong to the spectrum of the therapeutics employed. PMID:22073046

  5. Skin Prick Test in Patients with Chronic Allergic Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Pooja; Dogra, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic allergic skin disorders are the inflammatory and proliferative conditions in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are among the most common chronic allergic skin disorders. These can be provoked by various food and aeroallergens. Skin prick tests (SPTs) represent the cheapest and most effective method to diagnose type I hypersensitivity. Positive skin tests with a history suggestive of clinical sensitivity strongly incriminate the allergen as a contributor to the disease process. Aims and Objectives: To determine the incidence of positive SPT in patients with chronic allergic skin disorders and to identify the various allergens implicated in positive SPT. Methods: Fifty patients of chronic allergic disorders were recruited in this study. They were evaluated by SPT with both food and aeroallergens. Results: In our study, SPT positivity in patients of CIU was 63.41% and in AD was 77.78%. Out of the 41 patients of CIU, the most common allergen groups showing SPT positivity were dust and pollen, each comprising 26.83% patients. SPT reaction was positive with food items (21.6%), insects (17.07%), fungus (12.20%), and Dermatophagoides farinae, that is, house dust mite (HDM) (7.32%). The allergen which showed maximum positivity was grain dust wheat (19.51%). Among nine patients of AD, maximum SPT positivity was seen with Dermatophagoides farinae, pollen Amaranthus spinosus, grain dust wheat, and cotton mill dust; each comprising 22.22% of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that a significant number of patients of CIU and AD showed sensitivity to dust, pollen, insects, Dermatophagoides farinae, and fungi on SPT. Thus, it is an important tool in the diagnosis of CIU and AD. PMID:25814704

  6. Allergic gastrointestinal motility disorders in infancy and early childhood.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2008-08-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, constipation and colic are among the most common disorders in infancy and early childhood. In at least a subset of infants with these functional disorders, improvement after dietary elimination of specific food proteins has been demonstrated. Gastrointestinal food allergy should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants presenting with persistent regurgitation, constipation or irritable behaviour, particularly if conventional treatment has not been beneficial. The diagnosis of food protein-induced gastrointestinal motility disorders is hampered by the absence of specific clinical features or useful laboratory markers. Gastrointestinal biopsies before commencing a hypoallergenic diet may provide the most important diagnostic clues. Early recognition is essential for the optimal management of these patients to prevent nutritional sequelae or aversive feeding behaviours. Treatment relies on hypoallergenic formulae, as well as maternal elimination diets in breast-fed infants. Further research is required to better define the pathological mechanisms and diagnostic markers of paediatric allergic gastrointestinal motility disorders. The following article will present three instructive cases followed by discussion of the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and natural history of food allergic motility disorders in infancy and early childhood. PMID:18713339

  7. Update on rupatadine in the management of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mullol, J; Bousquet, J; Bachert, C; Canonica, G W; Giménez-Arnau, A; Kowalski, M L; Simons, F E R; Maurer, M; Ryan, D; Scadding, G

    2015-01-01

    In a review of rupatadine published in 2008, the primary focus was on its role as an antihistamine, with a thorough evaluation of its pharmacology and interaction with histamine H1 -receptors. At the time, however, evidence was already emerging of a broader mechanism of action for rupatadine involving other mediators implicated in the inflammatory cascade. Over the past few years, the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) as a potent mediator involved in the hypersensitivity-type allergic reaction has gained greater recognition. Rupatadine has dual affinity for histamine H1 -receptors and PAF receptors. In view of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma group's call for oral antihistamines to exhibit additive anti-allergic/anti-inflammatory properties, further exploration of rupatadine's anti-PAF effects was a logical step forward. New studies have demonstrated that rupatadine inhibits PAF effects in nasal airways and produces a greater reduction in nasal symptoms than levocetirizine. A meta-analysis involving more than 2500 patients has consolidated the clinical evidence for rupatadine in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in adults and children (level of evidence Ia, recommendation A). Other recent advances include observational studies of rupatadine in everyday clinical practice situations and approval of a new formulation (1 mg/ml oral solution) for use in children. In this reappraisal, we revisit some key properties and pivotal clinical studies of rupatadine and examine new clinical data in more detail including studies that measured health-related quality of life and studies that investigated the efficacy and safety of rupatadine in other indications such as acquired cold urticaria, mosquito bite allergy and mastocytosis. PMID:25491409

  8. Brief Report: "Allergic Symptoms" in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. More than Meets the Eye?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelidou, Asimenia; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Asadi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Bodi; Francis, Konstantinos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2011-01-01

    Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have either family and/or personal history of "allergic symptomatology", often in the absence of positive skin or RAST tests. These symptoms may suggest mast cell activation by non-allergic triggers. Moreover, children with mastocytosis or mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a spectrum of rare…

  9. Exploiting the potential of routine data to better understand the disease burden posed by allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Anandan, C; Simpson, C R; Fischbacher, C; Sheikh, A

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Health and Scottish Executive are currently undertaking independent reviews of allergy services in England (and Wales) and Scotland. Each review will assess the disease burden posed by allergic problems, involving secondary analyses of routine National Health Service (NHS) datasets. Major suggestions for re-structuring and/or re-focusing the NHS efforts to better deal with allergic disease are anticipated. The UK has some of the best datasets of routine health data in the world, but despite their strengths, they have important limitations. These include gaps in data collection, particularly in relation to monitoring of Accident & Emergency and out-patient consultations, and in-patient prescribing, thereby resulting in considerable under-estimates of hospital workload. The current gaps in service monitoring are likely to under-estimate the burden and workload associated with allergic problems, particularly in secondary care. One major limitation of existing data sources is the general inability to link individual patient level data between different datasets. By unlocking this potential there are very considerable potential gains to be made. Data linkage techniques currently being developed in the UK offer exciting new possibilities of looking across the primary-, secondary- and tertiary-care interfaces and also assessing short-and long-term social and educational outcomes in relation to allergic disorders. The current reviews of allergy services being undertaken need to be cognisant of these inherent limitations of existing data sources and would do well to recommend strategic initiatives that could enhance the availability, accessibility and quality of these datasets. Ideally, this should include investment in central data repositories staffed by teams with the necessary technical and statistical expertise, which would also take responsibility for progressing data linkage capabilities. PMID:16839400

  10. Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kakli, Hasan A; Riley, Timothy D

    2016-09-01

    Among the atopic disorders, allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent. Patients who suffer from allergic rhinitis sustain significant morbidity and loss of productivity. Cardinal symptoms include nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, although multiple related symptoms may occur. Causes should be ruled out with a thorough history and physical examination, with particular attention to red flag or atypical symptoms. Skin testing or serum sampling can confirm diagnosis and also guide therapy. Therapy is multimodal, tailored to a particular patient's symptom burden and quality of life. PMID:27545735

  11. Rupatadine: a review of its use in the management of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Keam, Susan J; Plosker, Greg L

    2007-01-01

    Rupatadine (Rupafin, Rinialer, Rupax, Alergoliber) is a selective oral histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist that has also been shown to have platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist activity in vitro. It is indicated for use in seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR), perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) and chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) in patients aged >/=12 years. Clinical trials show that rupatadine is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment for allergic rhinitis and CIU. It has a rapid onset of action and a prolonged duration of activity. Importantly, it has no significant effect on cognition, psychomotor function or the cardiovascular system. Once-daily rupatadine significantly improves allergic rhinitis symptoms in patients with SAR, PAR or persistent allergic rhinitis (PER) compared with placebo, and provides similar symptom control to that of loratadine, desloratadine, cetirizine or ebastine. In patients with CIU, longer-term use of rupatadine improves CIU symptoms to a greater extent than placebo. It is as well tolerated as other commonly used second-generation H(1)-receptor antagonists. Thus, the introduction of rupatadine extends the range of oral agents available for the treatment of allergic disorders, including allergic rhinitis and CIU. PMID:17335300

  12. T follicular helper (Tfh ) cells in normal immune responses and in allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Varricchi, G; Harker, J; Borriello, F; Marone, G; Durham, S R; Shamji, M H

    2016-08-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh ) are located within germinal centers of lymph nodes. Cognate interaction between Tfh , B cells, and IL-21 drives B cells to proliferate and differentiate into plasma cells thereby leading to antibody production. Tfh cells and IL-21 are involved in infectious and autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiencies, vaccination, and cancer. Human peripheral blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells comprise different subsets of Tfh -like cells. Despite the importance of the IgE response in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders, little is known about the role of follicular and blood Tfh cells and IL-21 in human and experimental allergic disease. Here, we review recent advances regarding the phenotypic and functional characteristics of both follicular and blood Tfh cells and of the IL-21/IL-21R system in the context of allergic disorders. PMID:26970097

  13. Related Addictive Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Tina; Sales, Amos

    This paper provides an overview of addiction related to substance abuse. It provides basic information, prevalence, diagnostic criteria, assessment tools, and treatment issues for eating disorders, compulsive gambling, sex addictions, and work addictions. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, especially affect adolescents.…

  14. Age-Related Changes in Immunological Factors and Their Relevance in Allergic Disease Development During Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Woo-Sung; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Yoon, Dankyu; Son, Jo-Young; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Soo-Jong; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Allergic diseases are triggered by Th2-mediated immune reactions to allergens and orchestrated by various immunological factors, including immune cells and cytokines. Although many reports have suggested that childhood is the critical period in the onset of allergic diseases and aging leads to alter the susceptibility of an individual to allergic diseases, age-related changes in various immunological factors in healthy individuals as well as their difference between healthy and allergic children have not yet been established. Methods We investigated the ratio of Th1/Th2 cells and the levels of 22 allergy-related cytokines across all age groups in individuals who were classified as clinically non-atopic and healthy. We also examined their differences between healthy and allergic children to evaluate immunological changes induced by the development of allergic diseases during childhood. Results The Th1/Th2 ratio rose gradually during the growth period including childhood, reaching peak values in the twenties-thirties age group. Th1/Th2 ratios were significantly lower in allergic children than in healthy controls, whereas 14 of 22 cytokines were significantly higher in allergic children than in healthy controls. On the other hand, there were no differences in Th1/Th2 ratios and cytokines between healthy and allergic adolescents. Conclusions In this study, age-related changes in Th1/Th2 ratios were found in normal controls across all age groups, and decreases in Th1/Th2 ratio were observed with increasing of 14 cytokines in allergic children. The results of this study may be helpful as reference values for both monitoring immunological changes according to aging in healthy individuals and distinguishing between normal and allergic subjects in terms of immune cells and soluble factors. PMID:27126727

  15. Helminth-induced IgE and protection against allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Firdaus; Amoah, Abena S; van Ree, Ronald; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response against helminths and allergens is generally characterized by high levels of IgE and increased numbers of Th2 cells, eosinophils, and mast cells, yet the clinical outcome with respect to immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation is clearly not the same. High levels of IgE are seen to allergens during helminth infections; however, these IgE responses do not translate into allergy symptoms. This chapter summarizes the evidence of the association between helminth infections and allergic disorders. It discusses how helminth infection can lead to IgE cross-reactivity with allergens and how this IgE has poor biological activity. This information is important for developing new diagnostic methods and treatments for allergic disorders in low-to-middle-income countries. PMID:25553796

  16. What Are Related Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dietz syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection. Disorders related to Marfan syndrome can ... Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection MASS Phenotype Ectopia Lentis Syndrome Beals ...

  17. [Sleep related eating disorder].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichi; Komada, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Nighttime eating is categorized as either sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) or night eating syndrome (NES). Critical reviews of the literature on both disorders have suggested that they are situated at opposite poles of a disordered eating spectrum. The feeding behavior in SRED is characterized by recurrent episodes of eating after an arousal from nighttime sleep with amnesia. Conversely, NES could be considered as an abnormality in the circadian rhythm of meal timing with a normal circadian timing of sleep onset. Both conditions clearly concentrate to occur during young adulthood, and are often relentless and chronic. Misunderstanding and low awareness of SRED and NES have limited our ability to determine the exact prevalence of the two disorders. SRED is frequently associated with other sleep disorders, in particular parasomnias such as sleep walking. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is ineffective, but pharmacotherapy is very effective in controlling SRED. Especially, studies have shown that the anti-seizure medication topiramate may be an effective treatment for SRED. PMID:21077298

  18. Autism and related disorders.

    PubMed

    McPartland, James; Volkmar, Fred R

    2012-01-01

    The pervasive developmental disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that include autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, pervasive developmental disorder - not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD), and Rett's disorder. All feature childhood onset with a constellation of symptoms spanning social interaction and communication and including atypical behavior patterns. The first three disorders (autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, and PDD-NOS) are currently referred to as autism spectrum disorders, reflecting divergent phenotypic and etiological characteristics compared to Rett's disorder and CDD. This chapter reviews research and clinical information to appropriate medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22608634

  19. Autism and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, James; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    The Pervasive Developmental Disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that include Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD), and Rett’s Disorder. All feature childhood onset with a constellation of symptoms spanning social interaction and communication and including atypical behavior patterns. The first three disorders (Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, and PDD-NOS) are currently referred to as Autism Spectrum Disorders, reflecting divergent phenotypic and etiologic characteristics compared to Rett’s Disorder and CDD. This chapter reviews relevant research and clinical information relevant to appropriate medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22608634

  20. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  1. Allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder that is strongly linked to asthma and conjunctivitis. It is usually a long-standing condition that often goes undetected in the primary-care setting. The classic symptoms of the disorder are nasal congestion, nasal itch, rhinorrhea and sneezing. A thorough history, physical examination and allergen skin testing are important for establishing the diagnosis of allergic rhinitis. Second-generation oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment. Allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modulating treatment that should be recommended if pharmacologic therapy for allergic rhinitis is not effective or is not tolerated. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and appropriate management of this disorder. PMID:22166009

  2. RELATIVE POTENCY OF FUNGAL EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC ASTHMA-LIKE RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. However, relative potency of molds in the induction of allergic asthma is not clear. In this study, we tested the relative potency of fungal extracts (Metarizium anisophilae [MACA], Stachybotrys ...

  3. Latex Hypersensitivity among Allergic Egyptian Children: Relation to Parental/Self Reports

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Zeinab A.; El-Sayed, Shereen S.; Zaki, Rehab M.; Salama, Mervat A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Latex allergy is one of the major health concerns and allergic reactions to latex may be serious and fatal. Purpose. In this study, we sought to determine the frequency of latex hypersensitivity in a group of allergic Egyptian infants and children and its relation to the history provided by the patients or caregivers. Methods. We consecutively enrolled 400 patients with physician diagnosed allergic diseases. The study measurements included clinical evaluation for the site and duration of allergy, history suggestive of latex allergy, family history of allergy, and skin prick testing (SPT) using a commercial latex extract. Results. The study revealed that 16/400 (4%) patients had positive SPT; 11 of them only had positive history of sensitivity to latex. Positive latex SPT was reported in 3.4% (11/326) of patients with bronchial asthma, 5.9% (7/118) of patients with skin allergy, and 4.5% (2/44) of patients with allergic rhinitis. SPT was positive in 7.4% (4/54) of patients with concomitant respiratory and skin allergy. Latex SPT was more specific than sensitive (97.69% and 77.77%, resp.) with a negative predictive value of 99.47%. Conclusion. Although underrecognized, latex is an important allergen in the pediatric age group with a sensitization frequency of 4% among allergic children. It was observed to be especially associated with multiple allergic diseases coexisting in the same patient. Pediatric allergologists should educate their patients on latex allergy and encourage the use of latex-free products. PMID:25505988

  4. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  5. Knowledge of Surgery-Related Allergic Contact Dermatitis among Florida Dermatological Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Panta; Kirsner, Robert S.; Amado, Antoine; Fleming, Lora E.; Nouri, Keyvan

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To assess knowledge base and practice habits of dermatological surgeons regarding surgery-related allergic contact dermatitis. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. The Florida Society of Dermatologic Surgery served as the study group. Participants. Cohort of dermatological surgeons. Measurements. An anonymous, close-ended survey instrument eliciting common surgical practices as well as allergic contact dermatitis knowledge. Results. Among the 45 respondents, 87 percent reported performing surgery more than 10 times per week and only 14 percent of respondents reported using latex-free gloves in their practice. Nearly two-thirds (66%) of respondents reported diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis either among themselves, their surgical staff, and/or patients. Surgeons were noted to use the TRUE Test® to screen for adhesive allergy. While colophony can be found both in adhesive products and on the TRUE Test, the main adhesives found in perisurgical products, acrylates, cannot. Similarly, the TRUE Test does not screen for antiseptics, yet this group of respondents suspected antiseptics nearly one-fourth of the time and used the TRUE Test to screen for them. Lastly, six dermatological surgeons used the TRUE Test to screen for suture allergy. While only two used chromated cat gut (the TRUE Test screens for chromium), the other surgical components are not screened. Conclusion. Education among dermatological surgeons is needed regarding exposure to a potential allergen in the surgical setting and risk of developing allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:20725578

  6. Chorea and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bhidayasiri, R; Truong, D

    2004-01-01

    Chorea refers to irregular, flowing, non-stereotyped, random, involuntary movements that often possess a writhing quality referred to as choreoathetosis. When mild, chorea can be difficult to differentiate from restlessness. When chorea is proximal and of large amplitude, it is called ballism. Chorea is usually worsened by anxiety and stress and subsides during sleep. Most patients attempt to disguise chorea by incorporating it into a purposeful activity. Whereas ballism is most often encountered as hemiballism due to contralateral structural lesions of the subthalamic nucleus and/or its afferent or efferent projections, chorea may be the expression of a wide range of disorders, including metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, vascular, and neurodegenerative, as well as drug induced syndromes. In clinical practice, Sydenham's chorea is the most common form of childhood chorea, whereas Huntington's disease and drug induced chorea account for the majority of adult onset cases. The aim of this review is to provide an up to date discussion of this disorder, as well as a practical approach to its management. PMID:15356354

  7. Pregnancy-related liver disorders.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Jamwal, Kapil D; Ramachandran, Anup; Balasubramanian, Kunissery A; Eapen, Chundamannil E

    2014-06-01

    Pregnancy-related liver disorders accounted for 8% of all maternal deaths at our center from 1999 to 2011. Of the three pregnancy-related liver disorders (acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP), HELLP (Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome and pre-eclamptic liver dysfunction, which can lead to adverse maternal and fetal outcome, AFLP is most typically under - diagnosed. Risk of maternal death can be minimised by timely recognition and early/aggressive multi-specialty management of these conditions. Urgent termination of pregnancy remains the cornerstone of therapy for some of these life threatening disorders, but recent advancements in our understanding help us in better overall management of these patients. This review focuses on various aspects of pregnancy-related liver disorders. PMID:25755551

  8. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  9. Novel cytokines and cytokine-producing T cells in allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Julia A; Borish, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Allergic diseases reflect various pathways of T lymphocyte inflammation and largely comprise T helper (Th) 2-associated processes. Recent investigations have identified pathways involved in promoting Th2 responses. Additionally, novel T-cell subtypes, each with its own distinct cytokine profile, contribute to the heterogeneous presentations of allergic diseases. This article focuses on recent developments including novel effector (nuocytes, Th9, and Th22) and regulatory T-cell (Treg) families of lymphocytes as well as cytokines that are central in driving Th2 differentiation (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-9, IL-25, thymic stromal lymphopoietin [TSLP], and IL-33). Recent literature and investigations were reviewed. Unregulated IL-25, TSLP, and IL-33 activity results in activation of Th2 cells, mast cells, dendritic cells, eosinophils, and basophils, leading to inflammatory processes that define allergic disease. As such, these cytokines are central mediators capable of instigating the inflammatory processes responsible for allergen-mediated diseases. The previous paradigm of Th1/Th2 imbalance driving allergic disease is expanded by identification of novel T helper families (nuocytes, Th9, Th17, and Th22) with their signature cytokines, which provide alterative avenues for investigation of neutrophil-predominant asthma and other heterogeneous presentations of allergic diseases. IL-25, TSLP, and IL-33 are attractive targets for therapeutics designed to ameliorate Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Moreover, the ability to delineate novel regulatory and effector T-cell lineages among CD4(+) T cells challenges the Th1/Th2 paradigm of allergic disease and invites further avenues of investigation into the role of these cells in allergic disease. PMID:21439160

  10. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms a person feels are related to psychological factors. These symptoms can't be traced to a specific physical cause. In people who have a somatic symptom and related disorder, medical test results are either normal or don't explain ...

  11. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  12. Variation in Uteroglobin-Related Protein 1 (UGRP1) gene is associated with Allergic Rhinitis in Singapore Chinese

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Uteroglobin-Related Protein 1 (UGRP1) is a secretoglobulin protein which has been suggested to play a role in lung inflammation and allergic diseases. UGRP1 has also been shown to be an important pneumoprotein, with diagnostic potential as a biomarker of lung damage. Previous genetic studies evaluating the association between variations on UGRP1 and allergic phenotypes have yielded mixed results. The aim of this present study was to identify genetic polymorphisms in UGRP1 and investigate if they were associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis in the Singapore Chinese population. Methods Resequencing of the UGRP1 gene was conducted on 40 randomly selected individuals from Singapore of ethnic Chinese origin. The polymorphisms identified were then tagged and genotyped in a population of 1893 Singapore Chinese individuals. Genetic associations were evaluated in this population comparing 795 individuals with allergic rhinitis, 718 with asthma (of which 337 had both asthma and allergic rhinitis) and 717 healthy controls with no history of allergy or allergic diseases. Results By resequencing the UGRP1 gene within our population, we identified 11 novel and 16 known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). TagSNPs were then genotyped, revealing a significant association between rs7726552 and allergic rhinitis (Odds Ratio: 0.81, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.66-0.98, P = 0.039). This association remained statistically significant when it was analyzed genotypically or when stratified according to haplotypes. When variations on UGRP1 were evaluated against asthma, no association was observed. Conclusion This study documents the association between polymorphisms in UGRP1 and allergic rhinitis, suggesting a potential role in its pathogenesis. PMID:21410962

  13. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to, such as dust, animal dander, or pollen. Symptoms can also occur when you eat a ... article focuses on allergic rhinitis due to plant pollens. This type of allergic rhinitis is commonly called ...

  14. Relational competence and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, F; Ostuzzi, R

    2007-06-01

    Eating Disorders are very widespread within the adolescent population. A possible interpretation and the comprehension of such forms of psychopathology may revolve around the failure to develop a well-defined personal identity, an incapacity to achieve a sense of differentiation with respect to others, an incapacity to measure oneself against others, dependence on others, the fear of rejection and a sense of inadequacy. This study explores the relational styles and behaviour of individuals suffering from eating disorders and their influence on the development of the personality, with reference being made in particular to self-valuation, dependence on others and levels of differentiation. A sample population of 90 women with eating disorders was studied. The subjects were subdivided into 3 groups (30 with restricting anorexia nervosa, 30 with binge-eating/purging anorexia nervosa and 30 with bulimia nervosa), overlapping in terms of age, duration of disorders and interrelation style, using the Relational Competence Test. The most significant results of this study concern the question of the definition of an autonomous personal identity. This process seems to be in progress in young women suffering from bulimia nervosa who appear to be driven towards a "definition of the self in opposition" with the consequent tendency towards relational experiences outside their own family. In women with binge-eating/purging AN moreover an awareness of the difference between the self and others and of their state of dependence would appear to be present, however behaviour aimed at the determination of an autonomous self is not evident. In women with restricting anorexia nervosa a definition of the identity is totally absent; these women develop an omnipotent self in their 'oneness' with others. These relational aspects lead to the identification of a continuum between restricting anorexia nervosa, binge-eating/purging anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in an evolutionary

  15. [DSM-5: OCD and related disorders].

    PubMed

    Toro-Martínez, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    DSM-5 moved OCD out from under the Anxiety Disorder section, into a new category: Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders and added two new specifiers. Specifically a modification of one specifier (insight) and the addition of a new tic specifier. DSM-5 redefined obsessions and recognizes the importance of avoidance and thought stopping beyond compulsions as other strategies to deal with obsessions. OCD related disorders include: Trichotillomania, Hoarding Disorder, Skin Picking Disorder, and Body Dysmorphic Disorder. PMID:24887372

  16. Presence of other allergic disease modifies the effect of early childhood traffic-related air pollution exposure on asthma prevalence.

    PubMed

    Dell, Sharon D; Jerrett, Michael; Beckerman, Bernard; Brook, Jeffrey R; Foty, Richard G; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Marshall, Laura; Miller, J David; To, Teresa; Walter, Stephen D; Stieb, David M

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a surrogate measure of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP), has been associated with incident childhood asthma. Timing of exposure and atopic status may be important effect modifiers. We collected cross-sectional data on asthma outcomes from Toronto school children aged 5-9years in 2006. Lifetime home, school and daycare addresses were obtained to derive birth and cumulative NO2 exposures for a nested case-control subset of 1497 children. Presence of other allergic disease (a proxy for atopy) was defined as self-report of one or more of doctor-diagnosed rhinitis, eczema, or food allergy. Generalized estimating equations were used to adjust for potential confounders, and examine hypothesized effect modifiers while accounting for clustering by school. In children with other allergic disease, birth, cumulative and 2006 NO2 were associated with lifetime asthma (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; 1.37, 95% CI 1.00-1.86; and 1.60, 95% CI 1.09-2.36 respectively per interquartile range increase) and wheeze (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.10-1.89; 1.31, 95% CI 1.02-1.67; and 1.60, 95% CI 1.16-2.21). No or weaker effects were seen in those without allergic disease, and effect modification was amplified when a more restrictive algorithm was used to define other allergic disease (at least 2 of doctor diagnosed allergic rhinitis, eczema or food allergy). The effects of modest NO2 levels on childhood asthma were modified by the presence of other allergic disease, suggesting a probable role for allergic sensitization in the pathogenesis of TRAP initiated asthma. PMID:24472824

  17. Food and Natural Materials Target Mechanisms to Effectively Regulate Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    An immune hypersensitivity disorder called allergy is caused by diverse allergens entering the body via skin contact, injection, ingestion, and/or inhalation. These allergic responses may develop into allergic disorders, including inflammations such as atopic dermatitis, asthma, anaphylaxis, food allergies, and allergic rhinitis. Several drugs have been developed to treat these allergic disorders; however, long-term intake of these drugs could have adverse effects. As an alternative to these medicines, food and natural materials that ameliorate allergic disorder symptoms without producing any side effects can be consumed. Food and natural materials can effectively regulate successive allergic responses in an allergic chain-reaction mechanism in the following ways: [1] Inhibition of allergen permeation via paracellular diffusion into epithelial cells, [2] suppression of type 2 T-helper (Th) cell-related cytokine production by regulating Th1/Th2 balance, [3] inhibition of pathogenic effector CD4(+) T cell differentiation by inducing regulatory T cells (Treg), and [4] inhibition of degranulation in mast cells. The immunomodulatory effects of food and natural materials on each target mechanism were scientifically verified and shown to alleviate allergic disorder symptoms. Furthermore, consumption of certain food and natural materials such as fenugreek, skullcap, chitin/chitosan, and cheonggukjang as anti-allergics have merits such as safety (no adverse side effects), multiple suppressive effects (as a mixture would contain various components that are active against allergic responses), and ease of consumption when required. These merits and anti-allergic properties of food and natural materials help control various allergic disorders. PMID:26598817

  18. Are impulse-control disorders related to bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    McElroy, S L; Pope, H G; Keck, P E; Hudson, J I; Phillips, K A; Strakowski, S M

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed available evidence regarding a possible relationship between impulse-control disorders (ICDs) and bipolar disorder. Studies examining the phenomenology, course, comorbidity, family history, biology, and treatment response of ICDs were compared with similar studies of bipolar disorder. Although no studies directly compare a cohort of ICD patients with a cohort of mood disorder patients, available data suggest that ICDs and bipolar disorder share a number of features: (1) phenomenologic similarities, including harmful, dangerous, or pleasurable behaviors, impulsivity, and similar affective symptoms and dysregulation; (2) onset in adolescence or early adulthood and episodic and/or chronic course; (3) high comorbidity with one another and similar comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders; (4) elevated familial rates of mood disorder; (5) possible abnormalities in central serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission; and (6) response to mood stabilizers and antidepressants. However, ICDs and bipolar disorder differ in important respects. In particular, some ICDs may be more closely related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than is bipolar disorder. Although the similarities between ICDs and bipolar disorder may be coincidental, they suggest that the two conditions may be related and thus may share at least one common pathophysiologic abnormality. To explain this possible relationship, we hypothesize that impulsivity and bipolarity (or mania) are related, that compulsivity and unipolarity (or depression) are similarly related, and that each state may represent opposing poles of related, or even a single, psychological dimension. PMID:8826686

  19. Rupatadine: pharmacological profile and its use in the treatment of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Picado, César

    2006-10-01

    Rupatadine is a once-daily, non-sedating, selective and long-acting new drug with a strong antagonist activity towards both histamine H(1) receptors and platelet-activating factor receptors. The use of rupatadine is indicated in adult and adolescent patients (> 12 years of age) suffering from intermittent and persistent allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria. In the treatment of these diseases, rupatadine is at least as effective as ebastine, cetirizine, loratadine and desloratadine. A very good safety profile of rupatadine has been evidenced in various studies, including a long-term (1-year) safety study. Rupatadine does not present drug-drug interactions with azithromycin, fluoxetine and lorazepam, but should not be administered concomitantly with known CYP3A4 inhibitors. PMID:17020424

  20. Dystonia: Related and Differential Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... respond, too. What is the difference between a Parkinson's disease patient with dystonia and a dystonia patient with Parkinson's symptoms? Parkinson's disease is a neurological movement disorder ...

  1. Allergic Conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... water. This is called conjunctivitis, also known as “pink eye.” Causes & Risk Factors What causes allergic conjunctivitis? ... example, if you are allergic to pollen or mold, stay indoors when pollen and mold levels are ...

  2. Highly significant linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis and related allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brasch‐Andersen, C; Haagerup, A; Børglum, A D; Vestbo, J; Kruse, T A

    2006-01-01

    Background Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis have closely related phenotypes and often occur with atopy. They show strong familial and intra‐individual clustering, suggesting overlapping disease aetiology. Various loci and candidate genes have been suggested to underlie allergy. Many or all are still inconclusive. Following genome‐wide scans on multiple phenotypes, we previously suggested that chromosome 3q13.12–q21.2 harbours an allergy locus. Objective To identify candidate loci in the Danish population, two additional independent sets of sib‐pair families were fine‐scale mapped in candidate regions showing maximum likelihood scores (MLS) ⩾1.5 in the genome‐wide scans. Results Twenty eight microsatellite markers in a denser map on chromosome 3q were analysed in 236 allergy sib‐pair families including 125 sib pairs with rhinitis. We report significant evidence for linkage to chromosome 3q13.31 for rhinitis (MLS 5.55, identity by descent (IBD) 63.9%) and atopy (increased specific immunoglobulin E) (MLS 3.71, IBD 61.7%). We obtained an MLS of 5.1 (IBD 67.3%) at 3q13.31 when sib pairs with both rhinitis and atopy were analysed. Conclusion This study reports the first statistically significant evidence for a genetic susceptibility locus for rhinitis and to our knowledge shows the most significant evidence to date of linkage for any allergy phenotype. PMID:16525028

  3. Peptide-based allergen specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    El-Qutob, David; Reche, Pedro; Subiza, José L; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT) and environmental control are the only etiologic treatments of allergic rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. The clinical benefit of ASIT relies on the selection of the patients and the identification and administration of the allergen, or allergens. Different routes of administration have been investigated, including subcutaneous, intradermal, epicutaneous, sublingual, inhaled, or intra-lymphatic. While subcutaneous and sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy may require from 3 to 5 years of treatment, clinical efficacy with intra-lymphatic treatment can be achieved after 3 injections. The most severe side effect of ASIT is anaphylaxis. Novel approaches are being investigated to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy vaccines, maintaining immunogenicity. Peptide immunotherapy has been directed mostly against autoimmune diseases, but the use of synthetic peptides for ASIT is a promising field in basic science, applied immunology and in clinical development. Short synthetic peptides bear allergen-specific CD4 T-cell epitopes which induce tolerance by stimulating regulatory (Treg) and Th1 cells. In the present patent review, we describe new trends in allergen immunotherapy using peptides, which, from a clinical point of view, are promising. PMID:25760734

  4. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders: a comprehensive survey

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Gabrielli, Filippo; Albano, Claudio; Fornaro, Stefania; Rizzato, Salvatore; Mattei, Chiara; Solano, Paola; Vinciguerra, Valentina; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to present a comprehensive, updated survey on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive-compulsive related disorders (OCRDs) and their clinical management via literature review, critical analysis and synthesis. Information on OCD and OCRD current nosography, clinical phenomenology and etiology, may lead to a better comprehension of their management. Clinicians should become familiar with the broad spectrum of OCD disorders, since it is a pivotal issue in current clinical psychiatry. PMID:19450269

  5. GATA-related hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    The transcription factors GATA1 and GATA2 are fundamental regulators of hematopoiesis and have overlapping expression profiles. GATA2 is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and early erythroid-megakaryocytic progenitors and activates a certain set of early-phase genes, including the GATA2 gene itself. GATA2 also initiates GATA1 gene expression. In contrast, GATA1 is expressed in relatively mature erythroid progenitors and facilitates the expression of genes associated with differentiation, including the GATA1 gene itself; however, GATA1 represses the expression of GATA2. Switching the GATA factors from GATA2 to GATA1 appears to be one of the key regulatory mechanisms underlying erythroid differentiation. Loss-of-function analyses using mice in vivo have indicated that GATA2 and GATA1 are functionally nonredundant and that neither can compensate for the absence of the other. However, transgenic expression of GATA2 under the transcriptional regulation of the Gata1 gene rescues lethal dyserythropoiesis in GATA1-deficient mice, illustrating that the dynamic expression profiles of these GATA factors are critically important for the maintenance of hematopoietic homeostasis. Analysis of naturally occurring leukemias in GATA1-knockdown mice revealed that leukemic stem cells undergo functional alterations in response to exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. This mechanism may also underlie the aggravating features of relapsing leukemias. Recent hematologic analyses have suggested that disturbances in the balance of the GATA factors are associated with specific types of hematopoietic disorders. Here, we describe GATA1- and GATA2-related hematologic diseases, focusing on the regulation of GATA factor gene expression. PMID:27235756

  6. Modulation of neurological related allergic reaction in mice exposed to low-level toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Tin-Tin-Win-Shwe; Yamamoto, Shoji; Nakajima, Daisuke; Furuyama, Akiko; Fukushima, Atsushi; Ahmed, Sohel; Goto, Sumio; Fujimaki, Hidekazu . E-mail: fujimaki@nies.go.jp

    2007-07-01

    The contributing role of indoor air pollution to the development of allergic disease has become increasingly evident in public health problems. It has been reported that extensive communication exists between neurons and immune cells, and neurotrophins are molecules potentially responsible for regulating and controlling this neuroimmune crosstalk. The adverse effects of volatile organic compounds which are main indoor pollutants on induction or augmentation of neuroimmune interaction have not been fully characterized yet. To investigate the effects of low-level toluene inhalation on the airway inflammatory responses, male C3H mice were exposed to filtered air (control), 9 ppm, and 90 ppm toluene for 30 min by nose-only inhalation on Days 0, 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Some groups of mice were injected with ovalbumin intraperitoneally before starting exposure schedule and these mice were then challenged with aerosolized ovalbumin as booster dose. For analysis of airway inflammation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected to determine inflammatory cell influx and lung tissue and blood samples were collected to determine cytokine and neurotrophin mRNA and protein expressions and plasma antibody titers using real-time RT-PCR and ELISA methods respectively. Exposure of the ovalbumin-immunized mice to low-level toluene resulted in (1) increased inflammatory cells infiltration in BAL fluid; (2) increased IL-5 mRNA, decreased nerve growth factor receptor tropomyosin-related kinase A and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs in lung; and (3) increased IgE and IgG{sub 1} antibodies and nerve growth factor content in the plasma. These findings suggest that low-level toluene exposure aggravates the airway inflammatory responses in ovalbumin-immunized mice by modulating neuroimmune crosstalk.

  7. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE RELATIVE POTENCY OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES AS ADJUVANTS IN ALLERGIC AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Description: Studies have shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) worsen respiratory diseases including allergic asthma. The adjuvant effects of DEP in the airways have been widely reported; however, the precise determinants and mechanisms of these effects are ill-defined. S...

  8. Parasitic helminth infections and the control of human allergic and autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Maizels, R M

    2016-06-01

    The profile of global health today presents a striking reciprocal distribution between parasitic diseases in many of the world's lower-income countries, and ever-increasing levels of inflammatory disorders such as allergy, autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel diseases in the more affluent societies. Attention is particularly focused on helminth worm parasites, which are associated with protection from allergy and inflammation in both epidemiologic and laboratory settings. One mechanistic explanation of this is that helminths drive the regulatory arm of the immune system, abrogating the ability of the host to expel the parasites, while also dampening reactivity to many bystander specificities. Interest has therefore heightened into whether helminth parasites, or their products, hold therapeutic potential for immunologic disorders of the developed world. In this narrative review, progress across a range of trials is discussed, together with prospects for isolating individual molecular mediators from helminths that may offer defined new therapies for inflammatory conditions. PMID:27172808

  9. Translational Mini-Review Series on Toll-like Receptors: Toll-like receptor ligands as novel pharmaceuticals for allergic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and associated signalling pathways provides a key molecular basis for our understanding of the relationship between exposure to microbial products and susceptibility to immune-mediated disorders. Indeed, ligation of TLR controls innate and adaptive immune responses by inducing synthesis of pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines and activation of effector as well as regulatory lymphocytes. TLRs are therefore considered as major targets for the development of vaccine adjuvants, but also of new immunotherapies. Herein, we review the potential of TLR ligands as a novel class of pharmaceuticals for the prevention or treatment of allergic disorders. PMID:17223960

  10. Allergy-Related Disorders in the Construction Industry

    PubMed Central

    Carino, Mauro; Romita, Paolo; Foti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Working conditions in the construction industry have improved in many industrialized countries, but heavy physical work with recurrent exposure to chemical agents, dust, and climatic influences still represents considerable risk for construction workers and may affect their health. The aim of this review is to analyze available data of the literature on allergy-related respiratory and skin disorders with emphasis on a preventive appraisal in order to produce statements and recommendations based on research evidence. The most common agents involved in the construction industry as a cause of occupational asthma (OA) in industrialized countries are isocyanates, wood dust, resins, glues, cobalt, and chromium. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an immunologic cell-mediated response to a sensitizing agent and the most common sensitizing agents associated with construction workers are epoxy resins, thiurams and thiazoles, and chromates. Medical surveillance must consider individual risk factors such as differences in individual susceptibility and sensitization to agents at workplace. Once work-related disorder is confirmed, adequate fitness for work should be assessed for the worker impaired by health condition. A reliable diagnosis of an index case is a sentinel event that may reveal risks for workers with similar exposure, leading to a revised risk assessment at the workplace that should reduce the risk and prevent further cases. PMID:24971193

  11. Relations among speech, language, and reading disorders.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Bruce F; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we critically review the evidence for overlap among three developmental disorders, namely speech sound disorder (SSD), language impairment (LI), and reading disability (RD), at three levels of analysis: diagnostic, cognitive, and etiological. We find that while overlap exists at all three levels, it varies by comorbidity subtype, and the relations among these three disorders are complex and not fully understood. We evaluate which comorbidity models can be rejected or supported as explanations for why and how these three disorders overlap and what new data are needed to better define their relations. PMID:18652545

  12. Auditory neglect and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Dykstra, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Neglect is a neurologic disorder, typically associated with lesions of the right hemisphere, in which patients are biased towards their ipsilesional - usually right - side of space while awareness for their contralesional - usually left - side is reduced or absent. Neglect is a multimodal disorder that often includes deficits in the auditory domain. Classically, auditory extinction, in which left-sided sounds that are correctly perceived in isolation are not detected in the presence of synchronous right-sided stimulation, has been considered the primary sign of auditory neglect. However, auditory extinction can also be observed after unilateral auditory cortex lesions and is thus not specific for neglect. Recent research has shown that patients with neglect are also impaired in maintaining sustained attention, on both sides, a fact that is reflected by an impairment of auditory target detection in continuous stimulation conditions. Perhaps the most impressive auditory symptom in full-blown neglect is alloacusis, in which patients mislocalize left-sided sound sources to their right, although even patients with less severe neglect still often show disturbance of auditory spatial perception, most commonly a lateralization bias towards the right. We discuss how these various disorders may be explained by a single model of neglect and review emerging interventions for patient rehabilitation. PMID:25726290

  13. Phototherapy-related ophthalmologic disorders.

    PubMed

    DePry, Jennifer; Brescoll, Jennifer; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Rambhatla, Pranita; Lim, Henry W; Cooper, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Phototherapy is an effective treatment option for a variety of dermatologic disorders, and the list of indications for its use continues to grow with advances in technology and our understanding of disease processes. Commonly used types of phototherapy include PUVA, broadband UVB, narrowband UVB, photodynamic therapy, and intense pulsed light therapy. Each therapeutic modality can have adverse acute and chronic effects on periocular and ocular structures, including the conjunctiva, cornea, crystalline lens, and retina. There are many types of protective eyewear options available, including goggles and contact lenses that can be used to prevent damage to ocular structures during phototherapy, particularly if eyelid closure is incomplete. PMID:25704945

  14. JM2, encoding a fork head–related protein, is mutated in X-linked autoimmunity–allergic disregulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatila, Talal A.; Blaeser, Frank; Ho, Nga; Lederman, Howard M.; Voulgaropoulos, Constantine; Helms, Cindy; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    X-linked autoimmunity–allergic disregulation syndrome (XLAAD) is an X-linked recessive immunological disorder characterized by multisystem autoimmunity, particularly early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus, associated with manifestations of severe atopy including eczema, food allergy, and eosinophilic inflammation. Consistent with the allergic phenotype, analysis of two kindreds with XLAAD revealed marked skewing of patient T lymphocytes toward the Th2 phenotype. Using a positional-candidate approach, we have identified in both kindreds mutations in JM2, a gene on Xp11.23 that encodes a fork head domain–containing protein. One point mutation at a splice junction site results in transcripts that encode a truncated protein lacking the fork head homology domain. The other mutation involves an in-frame, 3-bp deletion that is predicted to impair the function of a leucine zipper dimerization domain. Our results point to a critical role for JM2 in self tolerance and Th cell differentiation. This article may have been published online in advance of the print edition. The date of publication is available from the JCI website, http://www.jci.org. J. Clin. Invest. 106:R75–R81 (2000). PMID:11120765

  15. Allergic Aspergillus sinusitis and its association with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Chandramani

    2011-01-01

    Allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS) is a three decade old clinicopathologic entity in which mucoid impaction akin to that of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) occurs in the paranasal sinuses. Features such as radiographic evidence of pansinusitis, passage of nasal plugs and recurrent nasal polyposis in patients with an atopic background is suggestive of AAS. Histopathlogic confirmation from the inspissated mucus is a sine qua non for the diagnosis. Heterogeneous densities on computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses are caused by the 'allergic mucin' in the sinuses. Many patients give a history of having undergone multiple surgical procedures for symptomatic relief. The current approach to treatment appears to include an initial surgical debridement followed by postoperative oral corticosteroids for long durations. Although both ABPA and AAS are classified as Aspergillus-related hypersensitivity respiratory disorders, their co-occurrence appears to be an infrequently recognised phenomenon. This could perhaps be attributed to the fact that these two diseases are often treated by two different specialties. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnoses of ABPA and AAS. All patients with asthma and/or rhinosinusitis along with sensitisation to Aspergillus antigens are at an increased risk of developing ABPA and/or AAS. ABPA must be excluded in all patients with AAS and vice versa. Early diagnosis and initiation of appropriate therapy could plausibly alter the course of the disease processes and prevent the possible development of long term sequelae. PMID:22053309

  16. Airway Fibrinogenolysis and the Initiation of Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Mak, Garbo; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Knight, J. Morgan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    The past 15 years of allergic disease research have produced extraordinary improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of airway allergic diseases such as asthma. Whereas it was previously viewed as largely an immunoglobulin E-mediated process, the gradual recognition that T cells, especially Type 2 T helper (Th2) cells and Th17 cells, play a major role in asthma and related afflictions has inspired clinical trials targeting cytokine-based inflammatory pathways that show great promise. What has yet to be clarified about the pathogenesis of allergic inflammatory disorders, however, are the fundamental initiating factors, both exogenous and endogenous, that drive and sustain B- and T-cell responses that underlie the expression of chronic disease. Here we review how proteinases derived from diverse sources drive allergic responses. A central discovery supporting the proteinase hypothesis of allergic disease pathophysiology is the role played by airway fibrinogen, which in part appears to serve as a sensor of unregulated proteinase activity and which, when cleaved, both participates in a novel allergic signaling pathway through Toll-like receptor 4 and forms fibrin clots that contribute to airway obstruction. Unresolved at present is the ultimate source of airway allergenic proteinases. From among many potential candidates, perhaps the most intriguing is the possibility such enzymes derive from airway fungi. Together, these new findings expand both our knowledge of allergic disease pathophysiology and options for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25525732

  17. RELATIVE POTENCY OF MOLD AND HOUSE DUST MITE EXTRACTS IN INDUCING ALLERGIC RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Mold has been associated with the exacerbation of allergic asthma. However, its role in induction of allergic asthma is not clear. Using a previously developed mouse model for allergic asthma, we compared potencies of two fungal extracts (Metarhizium anisop...

  18. [Porphyrias and haem related disorders].

    PubMed

    Peoc'h, K; Martin-Schmitt, C; Talbi, N; Deybach, J-C; Gouya, L; Puy, H

    2016-03-01

    The hereditary porphyrias comprise a group of eight metabolic disorders of the haem biosynthesis pathway characterised by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions or both. Each porphyria is caused by abnormal function of a separate enzymatic step resulting in a specific accumulation of haem precursors. Seven porphyrias are the consequence of a partial enzyme deficiency while a gain of function mechanism has been recently characterised in a novel porphyria. Acute porphyrias present with severe abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, confusion and seizure, which may be life threatening. Cutaneous porphyrias can be present with either acute painful photosensitivity or skin fragility and blisters. Rare recessive porphyrias usually manifest in early childhood with either severe chronic neurological symptoms or chronic haemolysis and severe cutaneous photosensitivity. Porphyrias are still underdiagnosed, but once they are suspected, and depending on the clinical presentation, a specific and simple front line test allows the diagnosis in all symptomatic patients. Diagnosis is essential to institute as soon as possible a specific treatment. Screening families to identify presymptomatic carriers is crucial to prevent chronic complications and overt disease by counselling on avoiding potential precipitants. PMID:26774916

  19. Allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Mygind, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very frequent disease with a prevalence of 15-20%. Symptoms are most pronounced in young people while, for some unknown reason, the elderly become clinically hyposensitized. Pollen is the cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and house dust mite and animals are the main causes of perennial allergic rhinitis. Histamine is the main cause of sneezing and hypersecretion, while other mediators probably also play a role in nasal blockage. In polyposis, a local denervation is an important cause of vascular leakage, edema and polyp formation. Antihistamines have a positive effect on sneezing and hypersecretion, but not on blockage. As they have a quick onset of action they are useful in patients with mild and occasional symptoms. A nasal steroid is preferable in patients with persistent symptoms, since it is more effective on all nasal symptoms. Short-term use of a systemic steroid can be a valuable adjunct to topical treatment, especially in nasal polyposis, when there is a temporary failure of topical treatment in a blocked nose. A nasal vasoconstrictor can be added for short-term treatment, and an ipratropium spray can be beneficial in perennial non-allergic rhinitis, when watery secretion is the dominant symptom. Immunotherapy can be added in allergic rhinitis, when pharmacotherapy is insufficient. This chapter is based on the author's personal experience with allergic rhinitis, as a patient, a doctor and a researcher. Therefore, it is not a balanced review and the references will be highly selected as they largely consist of the author's own publications. As the text is mainly based on personal research, steroids are described in detail, while, with regard to immunotherapy, the reader is referred to another chapter. In addition to allergic rhinitis, nasal polyposis will be described. It was formerly believed to be an allergic disease, but we now know that it is not. However, with regard to histopathology and drug responsiveness this disease is

  20. Autoimmune thyroid disease and allergic contact dermatitis: two immune-related pathologies in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Niedziela, Marek; Bluvshteyn-Walker, Sasha

    2012-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism. She had a firm goiter (II°) and she stated that she felt constant warmth, nervousness and experienced palpitations. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism was diagnosed (TSH 0.022 mIU/L↓; fT4 21.0 pmol/L; fT3 7.5 pmol/L↑; antithyroperoxidase antibodies 1148.0 U/mL↑; antithyroglobulin antibodies 41.4 U/mL; thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies 2.3 U/L↑). Thyroid ultrasound showed multiple hypoechogenic areas with increased vascular flow. During treatment with methimazole, a small hyperpigmented and moderately irritated region was found on the right side of the umbilicus. It was not an allergic skin reaction to methimazole but the classic contact allergic dermatitis, probably a result of nickel in her belt. Two years after stopping the treatment she returned to clinics. She was euthyroid but manifested a firm goiter and ultrasonographic features of autoimmune thyroid disease. The diagnostic work-up concerning antithyroid antibodies is mandatory to confirm the ongoing autoimmune process with a long-term significance. PMID:22570947

  1. Allergic rhinitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms. Skin testing is the most common method of allergy testing. If your doctor determines you ... Others cause little or no sleepiness. Antihistamine nasal sprays work well for treating allergic rhinitis. Ask your ...

  2. Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune system identifies pollen as an invader or allergen. Your immune system overreacts by producing antibodies called ... IgE has specific "radar" for each type of allergen. That's why some people are only allergic to ...

  3. 32 Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow Levels in Children With Allergic Rhinitis and Their Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL)

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraju, Major K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis impairs the quality of life children. There is paucity of data with regards to clinical profile and health related quality of life (HRQL) of children with Allergic rhinitis in India and hence we studied the clinical profile and measured Peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) of children with allergic rhinitis in an urban population, and assessed their Quality of life. Methods Children with moderate to severe persistent Allergic rhinitis, diagnosed as per Allergic Rhinitis and Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines, in the age group of 6 to 18 years were included in this study. The quality of life questionnaire, pediatric and adolescent by Juniper et al was used. PNIF was measured by using ‘In- Check’ peak nasal inspiratory flow meter. Results Of the 100 children studied, 70 (70%) were in the age group of 6 to 11years and 30/100 (30%) were between 12 and 18 years of age. An equal distribution of sex was observed in 6 to 11 year age group, and in the 12 to 18 year age group there was a male preponderance (1.9:1). Majority (87%) of children in our study had Moderate Allergic rhinitis and 13% had severe Allergic rhinitis. Bronchial asthma, a commonly reported entity in Allergic rhinitis was seen in 19% of the cases. 66% of children in our study had PNIF values of the fifth to 50th percentile where as 24% were in the third to fifth percentile and 10% had their PNIF values less than third percentile. PNIF showed a linear correlation with severity of allergic rhinitis. HRQL assessment showed that children in the 6 to 11 year group had derangement in the activity and physical symptoms domain while children in the12 to 18 year group had predominately involvement of emotional and practical problem domains. Quality of life score worsened with decrease in PNIF. Conclusions PNIF is very useful tool to quantify the nasal obstruction in Allergic Rhinitis. PNIF is easy to administer, reproducible and correlates well with the severity of the disease. HRQL

  4. Noonan syndrome and clinically related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D.; Zenker, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common, clinically variable developmental disorder. Cardinal features include postnatally reduced growth, distinctive facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, variable cognitive deficit and skeletal, ectodermal and hematologic anomalies. Noonan syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and is genetically heterogeneous. So far, heterozygous mutations in nine genes (PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, RAF1, BRAF, SHOC2, MEK1 and CBL) have been documented to underlie this disorder or clinically related phenotypes. Based on these recent discoveries, the diagnosis can now be confirmed molecularly in approximately 75% of affected individuals. Affected genes encode for proteins participating in the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signal transduction pathway, which is implicated in several developmental processes controlling morphology determination, organogenesis, synaptic plasticity and growth. Here, we provide an overview of clinical aspects of this disorder and closely related conditions, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:21396583

  5. Movement-related event-related desynchronization in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Leocani, Letizia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) provides information on the dynamics of cortical activation during cognitive and motor tasks and has been applied in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we focus on studies concerning movement-related activity, which showed changes in amount, topography, or time course in relation to not only involvement of the motor system--such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and stroke affecting the sensorimotor (SM) pathways--but also physiological aging, degenerative dementia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). In these disorders, the extent of abnormality in the pattern of ERD/ERS is related to the severity of the underlying pathology. Moreover in MS, a correlation with the severity of brain tissue has been found. While there is consistency in changes related to ipokinetic disorders, mainly consisting of delayed appearance of ERD to movement preparation, changes occurring in other brain disorders need to be replicated or raise doubts on the specificity of changes across different diseases. Further studies are needed in order to validate the usefulness of this methodology in the assessment of the single patient for diagnosis and monitoring of the natural course of the disease and of treatment efficacy. PMID:17071242

  6. [Allergic inflammation in respiratory system].

    PubMed

    An, Lifeng; Wang, Yanshu; Li, Lin

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology of allergic disease such as asthma and allergic rhinitis tell the similar story: when the endogenous and exogenous inflammatory mechanisms occur disorder, the body may begin with inflammatory cell activation, namely through the release of cytokine and inflammatory mediator role in the corresponding target cells, activate the sensory nerve fiber, acting on the cell organ specificity effect, clinical symptoms. This article is divided into the following five parts focused on the research progress of allergic inflammatory diseases: (1) inflammatory cells; (2) staphylococcus aureus superantigen; (3) small molecules (cytokines, inflammatory mediators, lipid classes medium); (4) nerve fibers and effect cells; (5) genetic and epigenetic factors. PMID:26012309

  7. Smoking and hormone-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Spangler, J G

    1999-09-01

    Through its antiestrogenic effect, cigarette smoking is linked to a variety of hormone-related disorders, both benign and malignant. Diseases that depend on this hormone for growth and development tend to be less common among smokers, such as endometrial cancer and uterine fibroids. Some normal, estrogen-dependent physiologic processes are affected by smoking, making osteoporosis and premature menopause more common among women who smoke. In other disorders, the link between sex hormone levels, cigarette smoking, and disease development is less clear. PMID:10436284

  8. [PRRT2 gene-related paroxysmal disorders].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Mao, Xiao; Wang, Junling; Li, Nan; Tang, Beisha

    2014-10-01

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias (PKD), benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) and infantile convulsions with paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA), also causes a variety of neurological paroxysmal disorders. These diseases share the same characteristics which may be due to the same genetic defect. We therefore propose to name them as PRRT2-related paroxysmal disorders (PRPDs) in order to assist clinical diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. This paper has reviewed the clinical phenotype, common features and pathogenesis of the PRPDs. PMID:25297589

  9. A systematic review of socioeconomic position in relation to asthma and allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Eleonora; Cabieses, Báltica; Pinart, Mariona; Valdés, Macarena; Antó, Josep Maria; Wright, John

    2015-08-01

    The role of socioeconomic position (SEP) in the development of asthma and allergies is unclear, with some pointing to the risks of low SEP and other research pointing in the direction of higher SEP being associated with higher prevalence rates. The aim of this systematic review is to clarify associations between SEP and the prevalence of asthma and allergies. Out of 4407 records identified, 183 were included in the analysis. Low SEP was associated with a higher prevalence of asthma in 63% of the studies. Research on allergies, however, showed a positive association between higher SEP and illness in 66% of studies. Pooled estimates for the odds ratio of disease for the highest compared with the lowest SEP confirmed these results for asthma (unadjusted OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.37-1.39), allergies in general (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.62-0.72), atopic dermatitis (unadjusted OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.61-0.83) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (unadjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.46-0.59). Sensitivity analyses with a subsample of high-quality studies led to the same conclusion. Evidence from this systematic review suggests that asthma is associated with lower SEP, whereas the prevalence of allergies is associated with higher SEP. PMID:25537562

  10. Rupatadine in allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Mullol, J; Bousquet, J; Bachert, C; Canonica, W G; Gimenez-Arnau, A; Kowalski, M L; Martí-Guadaño, E; Maurer, M; Picado, C; Scadding, G; Van Cauwenberge, P

    2008-04-01

    Histamine is the primary mediator involved the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria, and this explains the prominent role that histamine H(1)-receptor antagonists have in the treatment of these disorders. However, histamine is clearly not the only mediator involved in the inflammatory cascade. There is an emerging view that drugs which can inhibit a broader range of inflammatory processes may prove to be more effective in providing symptomatic relief in both allergic rhinitis and chronic urticaria. This is an important consideration of the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative which provides a scientific basis for defining what are the desirable properties of an 'ideal' antihistamine. In this review of rupatadine, a newer dual inhibitor of histamine H(1)- and PAF-receptors, we evaluate the evidence for a mechanism of action which includes anti-inflammatory effects in addition to a powerful inhibition of H(1)- and PAF-receptors. We assess this in relation to the clinical efficacy (particularly the speed of onset of action) and safety of rupatadine, and importantly its longer term utility in everyday life. In clinical trials, rupatadine has been shown to be an effective and well-tolerated treatment for allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). It has a fast onset of action, producing rapid symptomatic relief, and it also has an extended duration of clinical activity which allows once-daily administration. In comparative clinical trials rupatadine was shown to be at least as effective as drugs such as loratadine, cetirizine, desloratadine and ebastine in reducing allergic symptoms in adult/adolescent patients with seasonal, perennial or persistent allergic rhinitis. Importantly, rupatadine demonstrated no adverse cardiovascular effects in preclinical or extensive clinical testing, nor negative significant effects on cognition or psychomotor performance (including a practical driving study). It improved the

  11. Treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders using GVG

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of gamma vinyl-GABA (GVG) to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders, and to reduce or eliminate behaviors associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and OCD-related disorders.

  12. Effects of sublingual immunotherapy on allergic inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Colombo, Giselda; Marcucci, Francesco; Caminati, Marco; Sensi, Laura; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Frati, Franco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2012-08-01

    The most common allergic diseases, and especially the respiratory disorders such as rhinitis and asthma, are closely related to the allergic inflammation elicited by the causative allergen. This makes inflammation the main target of anti-allergic therapies. Among the available treatments, allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has a patent effect on allergic inflammation, which persists also after its discontinuation, and is the only therapy able to modify the natural history of allergy. The traditional, subcutaneous route of administration was demonstrated to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) that in turn correct the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation and characterized by the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, and IL-32 cytokines to a Th1-type response. This immune deviation is related to an increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 production as well as to the anergy of Th2 or to tolerance, the latter being related to the generation of allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms observed during sublingual AIT with high allergen doses proved to be similar to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Data obtained from biopsies clearly indicate that the pathophysiology of the oral mucosa, with particular importance for mucosal DCs, plays a crucial role in inducing tolerance to the administered allergen. PMID:22506880

  13. Personality Disorders (and Their Relation to Syndromal Disorders).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.

    Personality disorders and their syndromal disorders may be considered in terms of their distal, phylogenetic origins, and their structures and functions. From an evolutionary standpoint, the syndromal disorders such as anxiety and depression may be viewed as preprogrammed reactions to a perceived threat or a perceived depletion of the individual's…

  14. [Sleep and autonomic function: sleep related breathing disorders in Parkinson's disease and related disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    In patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD), including obstructive and central sleep apnea, vocal cord abductor paralysis and dysrhythmic breathing pattern, are frequently observed. SRBD may have a considerable impact on variation of autonomic nervous activity during sleep. The previous studies correlated upper airway muscle dysfunction related parkinsonism with increased prevalence of SRBD in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recently, the clinical significance of SRBD and its impact on sleepiness and disease severity have been debated. In this review, we discuss sleep and autonomic function, especially, SRBD in PD and related disorders, including the previous studies from our department. PMID:25672703

  15. Relative Risk of Perinatal Complications in Common Childhood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Raymond S.; Davis, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    Perinatal complications have been associated with a myriad of later-developing behavioral, neurological, and psychological disorders. These have included school-related disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, mood and anxiety disorders, and learning disabilities. This article reviews the research that considers the…

  16. Inhibitory Effect on β -Hexosaminidase Release from RBL-2H3 Cells of Extracts and Some Pure Constituents of Benchalokawichian, a Thai Herbal Remedy, Used for Allergic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Juckmeta, Thana; Thongdeeying, Pakakrong; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Benchalokawichian (BCW), a Thai traditional herbal formulation, has long been used as antipyretic and to treat skin disorders. It comprises roots from five herbs: Ficus racemosa, Capparis micracantha, Clerodendrum petasites, Harrisonia perforata, and Tiliacora triandra. This polyherbal remedy has recently been included in the Thailand National List of Essential Medicines (Herbal Products list). Methodology. A Bioassay-guided fractionation technique was used to evaluate antiallergy activities of crude extracts, and those obtained by the multistep column chromatography isolation of pure compounds. Inhibitory effect on the release of β-hexosaminidase from RBL-2H3 cells was used to determine antiallergic activity. Results. Two pure compounds from BCW formulation showed higher antiallergic activity than crude or semipure extracts. Pectolinarigenin showed the highest antiallergic activity, followed by O-methylalloptaeroxylin, with IC50 values of 6.3 μg/mL and 14.16 μg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the highest activities of pure compounds were significantly higher than chlorpheniramine (16.2 μg/mL). Conclusions. This study provides some support for the use of BCW in reducing itching and treatment of other skin allergic disorders. The two isolated constituents exhibited high antiallergic activity and it is necessary to determine their mechanism of action. Further phytochemical and safety studies of pure compounds are required before development of these as antiallergy commercial remedies. PMID:25580152

  17. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Related Topics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Q: Do vaccines cause autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? A: Many studies that have looked at whether there is a relationship between vaccines and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To date, the studies continue to show ...

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Stress Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Arieh Y.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent anxiety disorder. PTSD typically follows a psychologically traumatic event, and thus has a recognizable point of onset. PTSD symptoms are present shortly after an exposure to a traumatic event, abate with time in the majority of those who initially express them, and leave a significant minority with chronic PTSD. PTSD may be treated with pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy. The treatment of the early expressions of disorder constitutes a separate domain of theory and research. The treatment of chronic PTSD often stabilizes the condition, but rarely produces stable remission. This chapter reviews the empirical evidence on the treatment of acute and chronic PTSD, outlines similarities and differences between PTSD and other Axis I disorders, evaluates new therapeutic approaches, and discusses the implications of current knowledge for the forthcoming DSM V. PMID:19716997

  19. Decreased Circulating Interleukin-35 Levels Are Related to Interleukin-4-Producing CD8+ T Cells in Patients with Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Ping; Yang, Jiong

    2015-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a newly discovered suppressive cytokine and has been shown to alleviate inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate immunomodulatory capacity of IL-35 in patients with allergic asthma. IL-35 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The frequencies of cytotoxic T cells (Tc)1, Tc2 and Tc17 cells were measured by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of IL-35, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The correlations between plasma IL-35 levels and Tc1, Tc2, and Tc17 cytokine production in allergic asthmatics (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 12) were analyzed by Pearson's test. IL-35 protein and mRNA expression levels were down-regulated in allergic asthmatics compared with healthy controls. The frequencies of Tc2 and Tc17 cells were significantly increased in patients with asthma, and the frequency of Tc1 cells did not differ between asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Similarly, plasma levels of IL-4 and IL-17 were significantly increased in asthmatic patients, while there was no difference in IFN-γ levels between allergic asthma patients and healthy controls. More importantly, plasma IL-35 protein levels were negatively correlated with the frequency of IL-4-producing CD8+ T (Tc2) cells and with the IL-4 level in patients with allergic asthma. Our results suggest that decreased circulating IL-35 levels could contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma by regulating CD8+ T cells. PMID:26547705

  20. Environmentally related disorders of the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.L.; Feldman, R.G.; French, J.G. )

    1990-03-01

    Specific physical and chemical agents found in the workplace and in the general environment are responsible for characteristic pathologic processes within the nervous system. It has been shown that many neurotoxic agents produce a dose-related spectrum of impairment ranging from mild slowing of nerve conducting velocity or prolongation in reaction time to neuropathy and frank encephalopathy. Clinical manifestations are determined by the agent involved, by the dose of exposure, the vulnerability of the cellular target, the ability of the organism to metabolize and excrete the agent, and the ability to repair damage. An occupational history, including evaluation of evidence of specific agents and job history, is a critical component in the clinical management of individuals with suspect neurotoxic disease. Environmentally-induced disorders can be prevented by appropriate environmental controls. Prevention of neurotoxic disease is a complex process requiring continuous involvement of public health agencies and strong scientific research.

  1. Occupational asthma and related respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Bardana, E J

    1995-03-01

    Occupational rhinitis is a common but generally underreported entity. Although it may occur alone, it is frequently associated with occupational asthma. Occupational asthma may have one of several presentations that are difficult to distinguish from non-work conditions. The respiratory tract acts as the final common pathway for all inhaled environmental pollutants, whether encountered in the home or at work. More than 200 chemicals have been incriminated as a cause of work-related asthma. It is said that about 2% of the 10 million Americans who have asthma acquired it as a result of some chemical irritant or immunogen in their work environment. A number of predisposing factors facilitate the development of work-related asthma. These include industrial conditions, climatic factors, atopic predisposition, smoking, recreational drug use, viral infection, nonspecific bronchial hyperreactivity, and a variety of miscellaneous factors. Pathogenetically, occupational asthma may be immunologic or nonimmunologic in nature. The immunologic variants involve sensitization to a variety of large-molecular-weight constituents. The major nonimmune variant is referred to as inflammatory bronchoconstriction or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). There are well-defined criteria for the diagnosis of immunologic and nonimmunologic asthma. The several clinical variations of occupational asthma can be difficult to distinguish from nonindustrial disorders. The most common presentation in practice involves the worker with preexistent asthma who has been adversely affected by work exposures. Occasionally these industrial exposures precipitate permanent impairment. It is clear, however, that occupational asthma is not a single, simple, or homogeneous entity, even when a single specific causal factor can be identified in the workplace. Therefore the physician must be aware of the patient's entire medical history and the precise occupational exposures and must have convincing

  2. Olfaction in Parkinson's disease and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is an early ‘pre-clinical’ sign of Parkinson's disease (PD). The present review is a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of such dysfunction in PD and related disorders. The olfactory bulb is implicated in the dysfunction, since only those syndromes with olfactory bulb pathology exhibit significant smell loss. The role of dopamine in the production of olfactory system pathology is enigmatic, as overexpression of dopaminergic cells within the bulb's glomerular layer is a common feature of PD and most animal models of PD. Damage to cholinergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic systems is likely involved, since such damage is most marked in those diseases with the most smell loss. When compromised, these systems, which regulate microglial activity, can influence the induction of localized brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and cytosolic disruption of cellular processes. In monogenetic forms of PD, olfactory dysfunction is rarely observed in asymptomatic gene carriers, but is present in many of those that exhibit the motor phenotype. This suggests that such gene-related influences on olfaction, when present, take time to develop and depend upon additional factors, such as those from aging, other genes, formation of α-synuclein- and tau-related pathology,or lowered thresholds to oxidative stress from toxic insults. The limited data available suggest that the physiological determinants of the early changes in PD-related olfactory function are likely multifactorial and may include the same determinants as those responsible for a number of other non-motor symptoms of PD, such as dysautonomia and sleep disturbances. PMID:22192366

  3. The role of Probiotics in allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Allergic disorders are very common in the pediatric age group. While the exact etiology is unclear, evidence is mounting to incriminate environmental factors and an aberrant gut microbiota with a shift of the Th1/Th2 balance towards a Th2 response. Probiotics have been shown to modulate the immune system back to a Th1 response. Several in vitro studies suggest a role for probiotics in treating allergic disorders. Human trials demonstrate a limited benefit for the use of probiotics in atopic dermatitis in a preventive as well as a therapeutic capacity. Data supporting their use in allergic rhinitis are less robust. Currently, there is no role for probiotic therapy in the treatment of bronchial asthma. Future studies will be critical in determining the exact role of probiotics in allergic disorders. PMID:19946408

  4. Allergic diseases and air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suh-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has been increasing rapidly, especially in developing countries. Various adverse health outcomes such as allergic disease can be attributed to rapidly increasing air pollution levels. Rapid urbanization and increased energy consumption worldwide have exposed the human body to not only increased quantities of ambient air pollution, but also a greater variety of pollutants. Many studies clearly demonstrate that air pollutants potently trigger asthma exacerbation. Evidence that transportation-related pollutants contribute to the development of allergies is also emerging. Moreover, exposure to particulate matter, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide contributes to the increased susceptibility to respiratory infections. This article focuses on the current understanding of the detrimental effects of air pollutants on allergic disease including exacerbation to the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema as well as epigenetic regulation. PMID:23956961

  5. Comorbidity of Allergic and Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Previous clinical and genetic studies have suggested autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is associated with immunological abnormalities involving cytokines, immunoglobulins, inflammation, and cellular immunity, but epidemiological reports are still limited. Patients with ASDs were identified in the National Health Insurance Database from 1996 to…

  6. Relation Between Obligatory Exercise and Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Bonnie J.; Steffen, John J.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of eating-disordered cognitions and behaviors among adolescent obligatory exercisers (those for whom exercise is the central focus of their lives). Surveys of 250 male and female adolescents indicated that obligatory exercisers had more eating-disordered attitudes and traits than did nonobligatory exercisers, sharing…

  7. Basophils and allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, Mark C; Kim, Brian S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Artis, David

    2013-10-01

    Basophils were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1879 and represent the least abundant granulocyte population in mammals. The relative rarity of basophils and their phenotypic similarities with mast cells resulted in this cell lineage being historically overlooked, both clinically and experimentally. However, recent studies in human subjects and murine systems have shown that basophils perform nonredundant effector functions and significantly contribute to the development and progression of TH2 cytokine-mediated inflammation. Although the potential functions of murine and human basophils have provoked some controversy, recent genetic approaches indicate that basophils can migrate into lymphoid tissues and, in some circumstances, cooperate with other immune cells to promote optimal TH2 cytokine responses in vivo. This article provides a brief historical perspective on basophil-related research and discusses recent studies that have identified previously unappreciated molecules and pathways that regulate basophil development, activation, and function in the context of allergic inflammation. Furthermore, we highlight the unique effector functions of basophils and discuss their contributions to the development and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation in human disease. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting basophils in preventing or alleviating the development and progression of allergic inflammation. PMID:24075190

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, B; Altamura, A C; Mundo, E; Marazziti, D; Hollander, E

    2007-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is currently recognised as one of the most common psychiatric disorders as well as one of the most disabling of all medical disorders. Obsessive-compulsive related disorders (OCRDs), often comorbid with OCD, include many distinct psychiatric conditions (i.e. some somatoform disorders, eating disorders, impulse control disorders and some neurological conditions) which have overlapping symptoms and compulsive qualities with OCD. Although effective treatments exist, OCD and related disorders are often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) represent the first-line treatment for OCD and related disorders. However, the time and the doses of the medications used in the treatment of OCD and related disorders differ from those recommended in depressive disorders. In addition, remission is not common for patients with OCD and related disorders in clinical practice, and poor responders as well as refractory cases may benefit from different treatment strategies including integrated treatment, pharmacological augmentation and brain stimulation techniques. PMID:17229184

  9. Genetics of Huntington's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Burgunder, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    Huntington's disease is the most frequent form of the hereditary choreas and has a multifaceted phenotype including cognitive and psychiatric impairment. The disorder is due to a dynamic mutation, which also influences the onset age of the disorder. Other genetic modifiers of the HD phenotypes have been suggested but often not confirmed by independent studies. Several syndromes with similar presentation have different genetic backgrounds, including the neuroacanthocytoses, mainly choreoacanthocytosis and MacLeod syndrome as a result of mutations in chorein and Kell protein, respectively, but also benign hereditary chorea, owing to mutations in NKX-2-1, and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, as a result of recently found mutations in the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2, PRRT2. Chorea can also be a major feature in other neurogenetic disorders, including the spinocerebellar ataxias and also in neurometabolic disorders. PMID:24657309

  10. Exposure to foodborne and orofecal microbes versus airborne viruses in relation to atopy and allergic asthma: epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Matricardi, Paolo M; Rosmini, Francesco; Riondino, Silvia; Fortini, Michele; Ferrigno, Luigina; Rapicetta, Maria; Bonini, Sergio

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate if markers of exposure to foodborne and orofecal microbes versus airborne viruses are associated with atopy and respiratory allergies. Design Retrospective case-control study. Participants 240 atopic cases and 240 non-atopic controls from a population sample of 1659 participants, all Italian male cadets aged 17-24. Setting Air force school in Caserta, Italy. Main outcome measures Serology for Toxoplasma gondii, Helicobacter pylori, hepatitis A virus, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus type 1; skin sensitisation and IgE antibodies to relevant airborne allergens; total IgE concentration; and diagnosis of allergic asthma or rhinitis. Results Compared with controls there was a lower prevalence of T gondii (26% v 18%, P=0.027), hepatitis A virus (30% v 16%, P=0.004), and H pylori (18% v 15%, P=0.325) in atopic participants. Adjusted odds ratios of atopy decreased with a gradient of exposure to H pylori, T gondii, and hepatitis A virus (none, odds ratio 1; one, 0.70; two or three, 0.37; P for trend=0.000045) but not with cumulative exposure to the other viruses. Conversely, total IgE concentration was not independently associated with any infection. Allergic asthma was rare (1/245, 0.4%) and allergic rhinitis infrequent (16/245, 7%) among the participants (245/1659) exposed to at least two orofecal and foodborne infections (H pylori, T gondii, hepatitis A virus). Conclusion Respiratory allergy is less frequent in people heavily exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes. Hygiene and a westernised, semisterile diet may facilitate atopy by influencing the overall pattern of commensals and pathogens that stimulate the gut associated lymphoid tissue thus contributing to the epidemic of allergic asthma and rhinitis in developed countries. PMID:10669445

  11. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  12. [Definition and clinic of the allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Spielhaupter, Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    The allergic rhinitis is the most common immune disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 24% and one of the most common chronic diseases at all--with tendency to rise. It occurs in childhood and influences the patients' social life, school performance and labour productivity. Furthermore the allergic rhinitis is accompanied by a lot of comorbidities, including conjunctivitis, asthma bronchiale, food allergy, neurodermatitis and sinusitis. For example the risk for asthma is 3.2-fold higher for adults with allergic rhinitis than for healthy people. PMID:27120868

  13. Allergic diseases: the price of civilisational progress

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Paweł; Rutkowska-Talipska, Joanna; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Rutkowski, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Atopic disorders are a major global health problem. The prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis has been increasing over the last four decades, both in the industrialized and developing countries. It seems to be related to changes in the social structure, increasing industrialization, pollution and dietary changes. Many hypotheses link the allergy epidemic to stringent hygiene, dominance of a westernized lifestyle and an accelerated pace of life. Dietary antioxidants, lipids, sodium, vitamin D seem also to be implicated. We endeavour to review the most relevant theories with a special emphasis on the hygiene, antioxidative, lipid and air pollution hypotheses. It is however important to note that none of them explains all the aspects of unprecedented rise in the prevalence of allergic disorders. A complex interplay between host's immune response, invading pathogens, diversity of environmental factors and genetic background seems to be of a particular importance. Current allergy epidemic is multifactorial and basic and epidemiologic studies are warranted to further our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:25097472

  14. Allergic diseases: the price of civilisational progress.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Sowa, Paweł; Rutkowska-Talipska, Joanna; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Rutkowski, Ryszard

    2014-05-01

    Atopic disorders are a major global health problem. The prevalence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis has been increasing over the last four decades, both in the industrialized and developing countries. It seems to be related to changes in the social structure, increasing industrialization, pollution and dietary changes. Many hypotheses link the allergy epidemic to stringent hygiene, dominance of a westernized lifestyle and an accelerated pace of life. Dietary antioxidants, lipids, sodium, vitamin D seem also to be implicated. We endeavour to review the most relevant theories with a special emphasis on the hygiene, antioxidative, lipid and air pollution hypotheses. It is however important to note that none of them explains all the aspects of unprecedented rise in the prevalence of allergic disorders. A complex interplay between host's immune response, invading pathogens, diversity of environmental factors and genetic background seems to be of a particular importance. Current allergy epidemic is multifactorial and basic and epidemiologic studies are warranted to further our understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:25097472

  15. Pregnancy and Birth-Related Brain Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Leslie

    1986-01-01

    Although it once seemed simple to say that a single event such as birth trauma or asphyxia caused brain disorders like cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and epilepsy, a recent study showed that it is nearly impossible to pinpoint a single cause and its effects. Recommendations for further research are made. (BB)

  16. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  17. Unique contributions of individual eating disorder symptoms to eating disorder-related impairment.

    PubMed

    Hovrud, Lindsey; De Young, Kyle P

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the unique contribution of individual eating disorder symptoms and related features to overall eating disorder-related impairment. Participants (N=113) from the community with eating disorders completed assessments including the Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire. A multiple linear regression analysis indicated that 58.6% of variance in the CIA was accounted for by binge eating frequency, weight and shape concerns, and depression. These findings indicate that certain eating disorder symptoms uniquely account for impairment and that depression is a substantial contributor. It is possible that purging, restrictive eating, and body mass index did not significantly contribute to impairment because these features are consistent with many individuals' weight and shape goals. The results imply that eating disorder-related impairment may be more a result of cognitive features and binge eating rather than body weight and compensatory behaviors. PMID:26026614

  18. Severe allergic reaction to Dermabond.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arthur W; Sosin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) for wound closure is increasingly popular. Problems with Dermabond are generally related to application techniques and rarely relate to the chemical nature of the adhesive. This article describes a severe allergic reaction to Dermabond following breast augmentation/mastopexy. PMID:19717065

  19. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment suppresses thymic stromal lymphopoietin-related allergic inflammatory mechanism in an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Min young; Kim, Dong Hye; Lee, Hae Jin; Choi, Eung Ho

    2015-09-01

    Congenitally or early impaired skin barrier as the first event starting the 'atopic march' in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients can increase allergen penetration that results in sensitization, even in the airways, followed by asthma and allergic rhinitis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine existing in high levels in AD skin and is considered as a novel therapeutic target for atopic disease. We generated oxazolone (Ox)-induced AD-like (Ox-AD) hairless mice and divided them into four groups according to the therapeutic challenges: topical glucocorticoid, pimecrolimus, emollient, and control (acetone-only treated). We assessed the functional studies of skin barrier, epidermal expressions of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), TSLP and antimicrobial peptides (AMP), and serum IgE in each group. Topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus treatment improved AD-like skin lesions and barrier functions, and restored the epidermal expression of differentiation markers, IL-1α, TNF-α, PAR-2, and TSLP, in Ox-AD mice. The improvement was relatively better with the glucocorticoid than pimecrolimus. Epidermal AMP expression was restored by topical glucocorticoid, but not pimecrolimus. Our result showed that topical glucocorticoid or pimecrolimus improved the AD-like skin lesions and barrier impairment by suppressing TSLP-related allergic inflammation. PMID:25786383

  20. Is season of birth related to disordered eating and personality in women with eating disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Nicole K.; Krug, Isabel; Maxwell, Millie; Pinheiro, Andrea Poyastro; Brewerton, Timothy; Thornton, Laura M.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steven; Crow, Scott; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig; Kaplan, Allan S.; Keel, Pamela; LaVia, Maria; Mitchell, James; Rotondo, Alessandro; Strober, Michael; Woodside, D. Blake; Kaye, Walter H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the relation between season of birth and eating disorder symptoms and personality characteristics in a sample of 880 women with eating disorders and 580 controls from two Price Foundation Studies. Eating disorder symptoms were assessed using Structured Interview of Anorexic and Bulimic Disorders and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Personality traits were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale. Date of birth was obtained from a sociodemographic questionnaire. No significant differences were observed 1) in season of birth across eating disorder subtypes and controls; nor 2) for any clinical or personality variables and season of birth. We found no evidence of season of birth variation in eating disorders symptoms or personality traits. Contributing to previous conflicting findings, the present results do not support a season of birth hypothesis for eating disorders. PMID:21150253

  1. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and related eosinophilic disorders.

    PubMed

    Prussin, Calman

    2014-06-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) represents one member within the spectrum of diseases collectively referred to as eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, which includes eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), gastritis, enteritis, and colitis. EGE is less common than EoE and involves a different site of disease but otherwise shares many common features with EoE. The clinical manifestations of EGE are protean and can vary from nausea and vomiting to protein-losing enteropathy or even bowel obstruction requiring surgery. Although systemic corticosteroids are an effective treatment for EGE, their use results in substantial corticosteroid toxicity. Accordingly, there is a great need for improved therapies for these patients. PMID:24813518

  2. Eosinophilic Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Possa, Samantha S.; Leick, Edna A.; Prado, Carla M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modulation of immune response, induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, characteristic features of asthma. Various types of promising treatments for reducing asthmatic response are related to reduction in eosinophil counts both in human and experimental models of pulmonary allergic inflammation, showing that the recruitment of these cells really plays an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases such asthma. PMID:23616768

  3. Severe chronic allergic (and related) diseases: a uniform approach--a MeDALL--GA2LEN--ARIA position paper.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Demoly, P; Schünemann, H J; Togias, A; Akdis, M; Auffray, C; Bachert, C; Bieber, T; Bousquet, P J; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cruz, A A; Keil, T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Maurer, M; Ohta, K; Papadopoulos, N G; Roman Rodriguez, M; Samolinski, B; Agache, I; Andrianarisoa, A; Ang, C S; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ballester, F; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Basagaña, X; Bateman, E D; Bel, E H; Bedbrook, A; Beghé, B; Beji, M; Ben Kheder, A; Benet, M; Bennoor, K S; Bergmann, K C; Berrissoul, F; Bindslev Jensen, C; Bleecker, E R; Bonini, S; Boner, A L; Boulet, L P; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J L; Bush, A; Busse, W W; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Carr, W; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chiriac, A M; Costa, D J; Cox, L; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Darsow, U; Didi, T; Dolen, W K; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; El-Meziane, A; Fonseca, J A; Fokkens, W J; Fthenou, E; Gamkrelidze, A; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gerth van Wijk, R; Gimeno-Santos, E; Guerra, S; Haahtela, T; Haddad, H; Hellings, P W; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Hohmann, C; Howarth, P; Hourihane, J O; Humbert, M; Jacquemin, B; Just, J; Kalayci, O; Kaliner, M A; Kauffmann, F; Kerkhof, M; Khayat, G; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kogevinas, M; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Larenas, D; Lavi, I; Le, L T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Mahboub, B; Makela, M J; Martin, F; Martinez, F D; Marshall, G D; Mazon, A; Melen, E; Meltzer, E O; Mihaltan, F; Mohammad, Y; Mohammadi, A; Momas, I; Morais-Almeida, M; Mullol, J; Muraro, A; Naclerio, R; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Nawijn, M C; Nyembue, T D; Oddie, S; O'Hehir, R E; Okamoto, Y; Orru, M P; Ozdemir, C; Ouedraogo, G S; Palkonen, S; Panzner, P; Passalacqua, G; Pawankar, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Pinart, M; Pison, C; Popov, T A; Porta, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Ratomaharo, J; Reitamo, S; Rezagui, D; Ring, J; Roberts, R; Roca, J; Rogala, B; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Sheikh, A; Simons, F E R; Siroux, V; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P D; Smit, H A; Sooronbaev, T; Stein, R T; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Terreehorst, I; Toskala, E; Tremblay, Y; Valenta, R; Valeyre, D; Vandenplas, O; van Weel, C; Vassilaki, M; Varraso, R; Viegi, G; Wang, D Y; Wickman, M; Williams, D; Wöhrl, S; Wright, J; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zidarn, M; Zhong, N; Zuberbier, T

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of disease severity, activity, control and responsiveness to treatment are linked but different. Severity refers to the loss of function of the organs induced by the disease process or to the occurrence of severe acute exacerbations. Severity may vary over time and needs regular follow-up. Control is the degree to which therapy goals are currently met. These concepts have evolved over time for asthma in guidelines, task forces or consensus meetings. The aim of this paper is to generalize the approach of the uniform definition of severe asthma presented to WHO for chronic allergic and associated diseases (rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis) in order to have a uniform definition of severity, control and risk, usable in most situations. It is based on the appropriate diagnosis, availability and accessibility of treatments, treatment responsiveness and associated factors such as comorbidities and risk factors. This uniform definition will allow a better definition of the phenotypes of severe allergic (and related) diseases for clinical practice, research (including epidemiology), public health purposes, education and the discovery of novel therapies. PMID:22382913

  4. Agoraphobia Related to Unassertiveness in Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Levitan, Michelle Nigri; Simoes, Pedro; Sardinha, Aline G; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-05-01

    Despite developments in panic disorder (PD) research, a significant percentage of patients do not benefit from conventional treatments. Interpersonal factors have been identified as potential predictors of treatment failures. We aimed to evaluate assertiveness in a sample of patients with PD and its implications for treatment. Forty-six symptomatic patients with PD and 46 college students responded to assessment scales regarding assertiveness and clinical data. Seventy-five percent of the patients had a secondary diagnosis of agoraphobia. We found that the PD group was characterized as nonassertive and slightly less assertive than control subjects. Furthermore, the deficit in the level of assertiveness correlated with the severity of the PD. The diagnosis of agoraphobia was correlated with unassertiveness (p < 0.05). Agoraphobia predisposes individuals to dependency and insecurity about their ability to overcome anxiogenic situations. These data demonstrate the importance of managing assertiveness in patients with PD accompanied by agoraphobia. PMID:26915016

  5. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and related eosinophilic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prussin, Calman

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) represents one member within the spectrum of diseases collectively referred to as eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs), which includes eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), gastritis, enteritis, and colitis. EGE is less common than EoE and involves a different site of disease, but otherwise shares many common features with EoE. The clinical manifestations of EGE are protean and can vary from nausea and vomiting to protein losing enteropathy or even bowel obstruction requiring surgery. Although systemic corticosteroids are an effective treatment for EGE, their use over the chronic course of the disease results in substantial corticosteroid toxicity. Accordingly, there is a great need for improved therapies for these patients. PMID:24813518

  6. [Allergic inflamation of the lower airways in patients with allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Stefanović, Lj; Balaban, J; Stosović, R; Mitrović, N; Djurasinović, M; Tanurdzić, S

    1994-01-01

    Reporting two of our cases we wanted to point to a great dilemma related to the final diagnosis. Recently, such cases have been more frewuently seen, since in all patients with allergic rhinitis conditions of the lower airways is examined before the administration of the specific immunotherapy. Therefore, we may see patients who are still free of pulmonary sings, despite of positive specific and/or non specific bronchoprovocative tests. The presented cases with evidenced allergic rhinitis are probably in the phase of development of allergic bronchial asthma, the phase of "allergic inflammation" of the lower airways, not clinically manifested yet. PMID:18173213

  7. The Genetics of Stress-Related Disorders: PTSD, Depression, and Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of psychopathology has largely focused on two broad etiologic factors: genetic vulnerability and environmental stressors. An important role for familial/heritable factors in the etiology of a broad range of psychiatric disorders was established well before the modern era of genomic research. This review focuses on the genetic basis of three disorder categories-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and the anxiety disorders-for which environmental stressors and stress responses are understood to be central to pathogenesis. Each of these disorders aggregates in families and is moderately heritable. More recently, molecular genetic approaches, including genome-wide studies of genetic variation, have been applied to identify specific risk variants. In this review, I summarize evidence for genetic contributions to PTSD, MDD, and the anxiety disorders including genetic epidemiology, the role of common genetic variation, the role of rare and structural variation, and the role of gene-environment interaction. Available data suggest that stress-related disorders are highly complex and polygenic and, despite substantial progress in other areas of psychiatric genetics, few risk loci have been identified for these disorders. Progress in this area will likely require analysis of much larger sample sizes than have been reported to date. The phenotypic complexity and genetic overlap among these disorders present further challenges. The review concludes with a discussion of prospects for clinical translation of genetic findings and future directions for research. PMID:26321314

  8. Genetics Home Reference: MYH9-related disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... and clouding of the lens of the eyes ( cataracts ). The bleeding problems in people with MYH9 -related ... stage renal disease (ESRD). Some affected individuals develop cataracts in early adulthood that worsen over time. Not ...

  9. The molecular genetics of Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, P N; Arteaga‐Solis, E; Baldock, C; Collod‐Béroud, G; Booms, P; De Paepe, A; Dietz, H C; Guo, G; Handford, P A; Judge, D P; Kielty, C M; Loeys, B; Milewicz, D M; Ney, A; Ramirez, F; Reinhardt, D P; Tiedemann, K; Whiteman, P; Godfrey, M

    2006-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the gene for fibrillin‐1 (FBN1). The leading cause of premature death in untreated individuals with MFS is acute aortic dissection, which often follows a period of progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta. Recent research on the molecular physiology of fibrillin and the pathophysiology of MFS and related disorders has changed our understanding of this disorder by demonstrating changes in growth factor signalling and in matrix‐cell interactions. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the molecular biology of fibrillin and fibrillin‐rich microfibrils. Mutations in FBN1 and other genes found in MFS and related disorders will be discussed, and novel concepts concerning the complex and multiple mechanisms of the pathogenesis of MFS will be explained. PMID:16571647

  10. Psychosocial Factors Related to Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Judith S.; Lee, Jung Yeon; Finch, Stephen J.; Koppel, Jonathan; Brook, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the association between psychosocial risk and protective factors and cannabis use disorders (CUDs) in a cohort of African American and Puerto Rican young adults. A representative sample (N=838) from the East Harlem area of New York City was assessed at four points in time (at mean ages 14.1, 19.2, 24.5, and 29.2). The psychosocial measures came from six domains: personality attributes, family, peer, work, neighborhood, and substance use The psychosocial measures were assessed at each of the first three waves of the study, and CUDs were assessed at the fourth and final wave of the study. Multivariate logistic regression and a cumulative risk analysis were conducted. Increased psychological symptoms (OR=1.21; 95% CI, 1.05–1.39; p<.01), problems resulting from cannabis use (OR=2.69; 95% CI, 1.33–5.46; p<.01), frequent arguments with one’s partner (OR=1.84; 95% CI, 1.09–3.10; p<.05), high levels of deviance (OR=1.81; 95% CI, 1.21–2.71; p<.01), and frequent acts of violence directed toward the participant (OR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.01–1.42; p<.05) were all associated with an increased risk for CUDs. An increase in the number of risks was associated with an increase in the probability of having CUDs at the fourth wave (again, at a mean age of 29.2). A decrease in the number of risk factors may lead to a decrease in CUDs. PMID:22014255

  11. [Negative symptoms in schizophrenia and substance-related disorders].

    PubMed

    Simon, N; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and substance-related disorders is common in psychiatric practice. Epidemiologic studies and report have established that the risk of a substance-related disorder was 4 to 5 times higher in a population of psychiatric patients than in the general population. However, little is known on the reason of this relationship and the treatments required. It's well known that a family history of psychosis is a risk factor of schizophrenia. Similarly a family history of substance use disorders increases the risk of using substances. Because the two disorders often occurred together, it could be hypothesized that a genetic risk factor is common. However, recent studies did not confirm this hypothesis and it seems that their genetic risks factor would be unrelated. Evidence now exists describing the different profiles of patients whether they used substance or not. Concerning negative symptoms clinical studies and meta-analyses have described fewer symptoms in schizophrenia patients with a substance use disorder. Among the different explanations that have been addressed, it seems that a lower capability of obtaining the substance could partly explain this relationship. Perhaps because patients with social withdrawal have more difficulties to find and spend the time required to obtain abused substances. At the opposite some products such as cocaine may relieve some symptoms especially anhedonia and alogia. However the link between substance-related disorders and negative symptoms is weak and decreases in more recent studies, probably because negative symptoms as well as addiction disorders are better characterized. Considering that treating psychiatric symptoms may not always lead to a decrease in the substance-related disorders but that patients who give up substances improve their psychotic symptoms, a therapeutic strategy should be planned for these dual disorders patients combining psychiatry and addiction interventions. PMID:26776388

  12. Bipolar and related disorders in DSM-5 and ICD-10.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, Alexander; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried

    2016-08-01

    Bipolar disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders with profound negative impact on affected patients. Even if their symptomatology has long been recognized, diagnostic criteria have changed over time and diagnosis often remains difficult. The Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), issued in May 2013, comprises several changes regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorders compared to the previous edition. Diagnostic categories and criteria for bipolar disorders show some concordance with the internationally also widely used Tenth Edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10). However, there are also major differences that are worth highlighting. The aim of the following text is to depict and discuss those. PMID:27378177

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome: relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders.

    PubMed

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-05-28

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of "interface disorders" to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  14. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts’ analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. Results No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general. PMID:27489610

  15. [Epidemiology of allergic diseases in the Tampico-Ciudad Madero- Altamira metropolitan area].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Nava, F; Govea Gómez, C

    1992-01-01

    There is a need to know the epidemiology behavior of health problem, with the purpose of creating the supporting basis for all action to its concern. In the cities Tampico, Madero and Altamira, a systematic exploration of the prevalent situation of allergic disorders did not exist: now, there is a study of 730 people selected at random, by means of questionnaire including 55 items applied to the population as a whole that live in the different zones of this area. It has been found that 54% show an allergic illness, it must be observed that in 66% of them a familial allergic history existed, whereas 45% has seasoning crisis environmental-related. PMID:1514011

  16. Neuroimaging in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Other Stress-related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Traumatic stress has a broad range of effects on the brain. Brain areas implicated in the stress response include the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Studies in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychiatric disorders related to stress have replicated findings in animal studies by finding alterations in these brain areas. Brain regions implicated in PTSD also play an important role in memory function, highlighting the important interplay between memory and the traumatic stress response. Abnormalities in these brain areas are hypothesized to underlie symptoms of PTSD and other stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:17983968

  17. The characteristics of indoor and outdoor fungi and their relation with allergic respiratory diseases in the southern region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arikoglu, Tugba; Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Coşkun, Taner; Otag, Feza; Yildirim, Didem Derici; Kuyucu, Semanur

    2016-06-01

    Indoor and outdoor fungal exposure has been shown to be associated with the development of allergic respiratory diseases. The aim of the study was to investigate the types and concentrations of airborne fungi inside and outside homes and evaluate the association between fungal levels and allergic diseases in the southern region of Turkey. A total of 61 children admitted with respiratory complaints to the pediatric allergy clinic between September 2007 and November 2008 were included in this study. The air samples were obtained using the Air IDEAL volumetric air sampler longitudinally for 1 year. A comprehensive questionnaire was used for medical history and housing conditions. Skin prick test was performed to determine fungal sensitivity and spirometric indices were employed. The predominant indoor fungal species were Cladosporium (69.3 %), Penicillium (18.9 %), Aspergillus (6.5 %), and Alternaria (3.1 %). A strong correlation between indoor and outdoor fungal levels was detected for the Cladosporium species (p < 0.001, r = 0.72) throughout the year. Living in a detached home (p = 0.036) and the presence of cockroaches (p = 0.005) were associated with total indoor fungal levels. The presence of cockroaches (aOR 3.5; 95 % CI 0.95-13.10, p = 0.059) was also associated with fungal sensitization at the edge of significance. The statistical cutoff values of indoor and outdoor Cladosporium levels to predict symptomatic asthma were found to be >176 CFU/m(3) (p = 0.003, AUC 0.696; sensitivity 65.5 %; specificity 68.7 %) and >327 CFU/m(3) (p = 0.038; AUC 0.713; sensitivity 66.6 %; specificity 76.9 %), respectively. Children with respiratory symptoms are exposed to a considerable level of fungi inside and outside their homes. The prevention of fungal exposure may provide valuable intervention for respiratory diseases. PMID:27236446

  18. [Advice for allergic travellers].

    PubMed

    Sonneville, A

    1999-09-01

    Business and tourist journeys by air contribute to exposure of the body to multiple environments. The allergic patient, considered rightly to be a sentry of the environment, has many reasons to care about his journeys and to take precautions that are adapted to his case under the impetus of advice and information from his physician and his specialist. Some advice falls within a simple logic that is enough to remember when planning the journey while the others measures must follow a correct preventative strategy for allergy risks as much as those that concern the modalities before leaving as a drive taken on the ground. It is important therefore to know how to give advice and information on the different risks linked to the allergic condition and to the field of allergy and help the patient to orientate his choice of place of the journey, the methods of lodging, of transport and the programme of the journey. The advice should also include the preventative measures as a function of the known pathology under the form of medical equipment before, during the stay and on return. Finally some advice relative to medical equipment for prevention and cure would appear to be judicious. PMID:10524269

  19. [Sleep related eating disorders as a side effect of zolpidem].

    PubMed

    Valiensi, Stella Maris; Cristiano, Edgardo; Martínez, Oscar A; Reisin, Ricardo C; Alvarez, Florencia

    2010-01-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic drug used in sleep disorders. It binds selectively to alpha 1 subunit of the GABA A benzodiazepine receptor. Zolpidem reduces sleep latency, number of arousals and increases the total time of sleep. However, it is considered that it may increase phase 3 of non rapid eye movement sleep, where somnambulism can take place. Our aim is to report 8 cases of sleep related eating disorders associated with the use of this drug. We have evaluated the medical history of 8 patients who had received zolpidem for sleeping disorders and who have presented sleep related eating disorders. Eight patients (6 women, 2 men) aged between 32 to 72 years old, which received 10 mg of zolpidem/night except 1 that received 12.5 mg, were presented. They have referred strange eating behavior compatible to sleep related eating disorder. Symptoms appeared at a mean of 39.8 days after starting the medication. The numbers of nocturnal episodes recorded by the family or by the patient were 1 to 8 episodes of nocturnal eating per night. The morning after, patients found leftovers from the night before which they did not recall to have eaten. The remission was complete after discontinuing zolpidem. Zolpidem may induce sleep related eating disorder in about 1% of patients, although we consider there may be a subdiagnosis of this phenomenon. It will be important to bear in mind and look for this side effect because all the episodes could easily be controlled by withdrawing the drug. PMID:20529770

  20. Abnormal brain activation and connectivity to standardized disorder-related visual scenes in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Carina Yvonne; Feldker, Katharina; Neumeister, Paula; Zepp, Britta Maria; Peterburs, Jutta; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Straube, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of altered emotional processing in social anxiety disorder (SAD) is hampered by a heterogeneity of findings, which is probably due to the vastly different methods and materials used so far. This is why the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated immediate disorder-related threat processing in 30 SAD patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) with a novel, standardized set of highly ecologically valid, disorder-related complex visual scenes. SAD patients rated disorder-related as compared with neutral scenes as more unpleasant, arousing and anxiety-inducing than HC. On the neural level, disorder-related as compared with neutral scenes evoked differential responses in SAD patients in a widespread emotion processing network including (para-)limbic structures (e.g. amygdala, insula, thalamus, globus pallidus) and cortical regions (e.g. dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and precuneus). Functional connectivity analysis yielded an altered interplay between PCC/precuneus and paralimbic (insula) as well as cortical regions (dmPFC, precuneus) in SAD patients, which emphasizes a central role for PCC/precuneus in disorder-related scene processing. Hyperconnectivity of globus pallidus with amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) additionally underlines the relevance of this region in socially anxious threat processing. Our findings stress the importance of specific disorder-related stimuli for the investigation of altered emotion processing in SAD. Disorder-related threat processing in SAD reveals anomalies at multiple stages of emotion processing which may be linked to increased anxiety and to dysfunctionally elevated levels of self-referential processing reported in previous studies. PMID:26806013

  1. Functional associations among trauma, PTSD, and substance-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S H; Pihl, R O; Conrod, P J; Dongier, M

    1998-01-01

    This review article presents several potential functional pathways which may explain the frequent co-occurrence of PTSD and substance abuse disorders in traumatized individuals. Emerging empirical studies which have examined these potential pathways are reviewed, including studies on relative order of onset, PTSD patients' perceptions of various drug effects, comparisons of PTSD patients with and without comorbid substance use disorders, and correlational studies examining the relations between severity of specific PTSD symptom clusters and substance disorder symptoms. Research on the acute and chronic effects of alcohol and other drugs on cognitive and physiological variables relevant to PTSD intrusion and arousal symptoms is reviewed to highlight ways in which these two sets of PTSD symptoms might be functionally interrelated with substance abuse. Finally, based on these findings, recommendations are made for the treatment of individuals with comorbid PTSD-substance use disorders. PMID:9801717

  2. Management of Rhinitis: Allergic and Non-Allergic

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nguyen P; Vickery, John

    2011-01-01

    Rhinitis is a global problem and is defined as the presence of at least one of the following: congestion, rhinorrhea, sneezing, nasal itching, and nasal obstruction. The two major classifications are allergic and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR). Allergic rhinitis occurs when an allergen is the trigger for the nasal symptoms. NAR is when obstruction and rhinorrhea occurs in relation to nonallergic, noninfectious triggers such as change in the weather, exposure to caustic odors or cigarette smoke, barometric pressure differences, etc. There is a lack of concomitant allergic disease, determined by negative skin prick test for relevant allergens and/or negative allergen-specific antibody tests. Both are highly prevalent diseases that have a significant economic burden on society and negative impact on patient quality of life. Treatment of allergic rhinitis includes allergen avoidance, antihistamines (oral and intranasal), intranasal corticosteroids, intranasal cromones, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and immunotherapy. Occasional systemic corticosteroids and decongestants (oral and topical) are also used. NAR has 8 major subtypes which includes nonallergic rhinopathy (previously known as vasomotor rhinitis), nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilia, atrophic rhinitis, senile rhinitis, gustatory rhinitis, drug-induced rhinitis, hormonal-induced rhinitis, and cerebral spinal fluid leak. The mainstay of treatment for NAR are intranasal corticosteroids. Topical antihistamines have also been found to be efficacious. Topical anticholinergics such as ipratropium bromide (0.03%) nasal spray are effective in treating rhinorrhea symptoms. Adjunct therapy includes decongestants and nasal saline. Investigational therapies in the treatment of NAR discussed include capsaicin, silver nitrate, and acupuncture. PMID:21738880

  3. [Vitamin B12 and related genetic disorders].

    PubMed

    Guéant, Jean-louis; Coelho, David; Nicolas, Jean-Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Vitamin B12 (B12, cobalamin (Cbl)) is a water-soluble vitamin that requires complex mechanisms for its assimilation, blood transport and intracellular metabolism. Three proteins, intrinsic factor (IF), haptocorrin (HC), and transcobalamin (TC), and their specific receptors are involved in B12 absorption and transport. Acquired and inherited deficiencies can result in megaloblastic anemia and neurological manifestations. Several genetic diseases are linked to these two steps, namely inherited deficits in FI and TC, and Imerslund-Gräsbeck disease. In mammalian cells, only two enzymes depend on vitamin B12: L-methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (EC 5.4.99.2) in mitochondria, and methionine synthase (EC 2.1.1.13) in cytoplasm. Direct metabolic consequences of impaired B12 absorption and metabolism are the accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and of homocysteine (HCy), respectively. More than a dozen genes are involved in the intracellular metabolism of B12, and their defects result in several diseases designated cblA through cblJ This article reviews the steps involved in vitamin B12 absorption, transport and intracellular metabolism, and the main related genetic defects. PMID:26983191

  4. Myelin, myelin-related disorders, and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mighdoll, Michelle I; Tao, Ran; Kleinman, Joel E; Hyde, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The neuropathological basis of schizophrenia and related psychoses remains elusive despite intensive scientific investigation. Symptoms of psychosis have been reported in a number of conditions where normal myelin development is interrupted. The nature, location, and timing of white matter pathology seem to be key factors in the development of psychosis, especially during the critical adolescent period of association area myelination. Numerous lines of evidence implicate myelin and oligodendrocyte function as critical processes that could affect neuronal connectivity, which has been implicated as a central abnormality in schizophrenia. Phenocopies of schizophrenia with a known pathological basis involving demyelination or dysmyelination may offer insights into the biology of schizophrenia itself. This article reviews the pathological changes in white matter of patients with schizophrenia, as well as demyelinating diseases associated with psychosis. In an attempt to understand the potential role of dysmyelination in schizophrenia, we outline the evidence from a number of both clinically-based and post-mortem studies that provide evidence that OMR genes are genetically associated with increased risk for schizophrenia. To further understand the implication of white matter dysfunction and dysmyelination in schizophrenia, we examine diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which has shown volumetric and microstructural white matter differences in patients with schizophrenia. While classical clinical-neuropathological correlations have established that disruption in myelination can produce a high fidelity phenocopy of psychosis similar to schizophrenia, the role of dysmyelination in schizophrenia remains controversial. PMID:25449713

  5. Pre- and Postnatal Risk Factors in Relation to Allergic Rhinitis in School-Aged Children in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youjin; Jiang, Yanrui; Li, Shenghui; Shen, Xiaoming; Liu, Jinfen; Jiang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between prenatal and postnatal risk factors and the prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) in Chinese children of specific ages. Study Design This study was a cross-sectional survey. Students from 8 metropolitan cities in China were studied in November and December, 2005. There were 20,803 elementary-school Chinese children (49.6% boys, mean age, 9.19 years) enrolled. Questions from the standard questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children were completed to enable us to examine the pattern of current AR. The potential confounders and pre-and postnatal risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression. Results The overall prevalence of AR was found in this study to be 9.8%. After adjusting for several likely confounders, there was a higher likelihood of AR in school-aged children who were not exclusively breastfed in the first 4 months of their lives (odds ratio [OR]: 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16–1.41), children who were born post-term (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.12–1.60), children delivered by cesarean section (OR: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.00–1.19), or children born to mothers who experienced depressive symptoms during the pre- and postnatal periods (OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.15–1.42). Conclusions AR in school-aged children was found to be associated with pre- and postnatal events. These findings indicate that strategies to reduce exposure to risk factors during pre- and postnatal periods for childhood allergies might be warranted. PMID:25647669

  6. Familial recurrences of FOXG1-related disorder: Evidence for mosaicism.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kelly Q; Papandreou, Apostolos; Ma, Mandy; Barry, Brenda J; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Dobyns, William B; Scott, Richard H; Trump, Natalie; Kurian, Manju A; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2015-12-01

    FOXG1-related disorders are caused by heterozygous mutations in FOXG1 and result in a spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes including postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability with absent speech, epilepsy, chorea, and corpus callosum abnormalities. The recurrence risk for de novo mutations in FOXG1-related disorders is assumed to be low. Here, we describe three unrelated sets of full siblings with mutations in FOXG1 (c.515_577del63, c.460dupG, and c.572T > G), representing familial recurrence of the disorder. In one family, we have documented maternal somatic mosaicism for the FOXG1 mutation, and all of the families presumably represent parental gonadal (or germline) mosaicism. To our knowledge, mosaicism has not been previously reported in FOXG1-related disorders. Therefore, this report provides evidence that germline mosaicism for FOXG1 mutations is a likely explanation for familial recurrence and should be considered during recurrence risk counseling for families of children with FOXG1-related disorders. PMID:26364767

  7. Association of Allergic Rhinitis in Female University Students with Socio-economic Factors and Markers of Estrogens Levels.

    PubMed

    Wronka, I; Kliś, K; Jarzebak, K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association of allergic rhinitis in female university students with socio-economic factors and sex-hormone markers, including age at menarche, menstrual disorders, and selected anthropometrics indexes. The research was conducted among 640 female university students, aged 19-25 years. The measurements of body height, body mass, waist and hip circumference were taken. Each person completed a questionnaire. The occurrence of allergy was determined on the basis of answers to the questions whether the allergy and its allergens were defined on the basis of medical workup. We found that a significantly larger number of cases of allergic rhinitis were recorded in the university students coming from families of high socio-economic level than those from lower level. Allergic rhinitis also was more frequent in the students who spent their childhood in cities than in those who lived in the countryside. The prevalence of allergic rhinitis was inversely correlated to the number of siblings. There were no differences in the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in relation to the birth order. The estrogen level seemed unassociated with rhinitis. However, there were slightly more allergic among females with an earlier age of menarche. PMID:26453067

  8. Sex Differences in Stress-Related Psychiatric Disorders: Neurobiological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bangasser, Debra A.; Valentino, Rita J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is associated with the onset and severity of several psychiatric disorders that occur more frequently in women than men, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Patients with these disorders present with dysregulation of several stress response systems, including the neuroendocrine response to stress, corticolimbic responses to negatively valenced stimuli, and hyperarousal. Thus, sex differences within their underlying circuitry may explain sex biases in disease prevalence. This review describes clinical studies that identify sex differences within the activity of these circuits, as well as preclinical studies that demonstrate cellular and molecular sex differences in stress responses systems. These studies reveal sex differences from the molecular to the systems level that increase endocrine, emotional, and arousal responses to stress in females. Exploring these sex differences is critical because this research can reveal the neurobiological underpinnings of vulnerability to stress-related psychiatric disorders and guide the development of novel pharmacotherapies. PMID:24726661

  9. Sex differences in stress-related psychiatric disorders: neurobiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bangasser, Debra A; Valentino, Rita J

    2014-08-01

    Stress is associated with the onset and severity of several psychiatric disorders that occur more frequently in women than men, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Patients with these disorders present with dysregulation of several stress response systems, including the neuroendocrine response to stress, corticolimbic responses to negatively valenced stimuli, and hyperarousal. Thus, sex differences within their underlying circuitry may explain sex biases in disease prevalence. This review describes clinical studies that identify sex differences within the activity of these circuits, as well as preclinical studies that demonstrate cellular and molecular sex differences in stress responses systems. These studies reveal sex differences from the molecular to the systems level that increase endocrine, emotional, and arousal responses to stress in females. Exploring these sex differences is critical because this research can reveal the neurobiological underpinnings of vulnerability to stress-related psychiatric disorders and guide the development of novel pharmacotherapies. PMID:24726661

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome: Relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of “interface disorders” to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  11. Management of allergic Olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Fitch, K D

    1984-05-01

    Twenty percent of the recent Australian Olympic athletes have had an allergic disorder. Because of the ban on all sympathomimetic drugs except some beta 2-agonists. Olympic team physicians have a major responsibility to ensure that no competitor is disqualified for infringing on the antidoping rules of the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee. Inadvertent contravention of these regulations may occur because numerous banned sympathomimetics are available to athletes and their coaches without medical prescription and are frequently contained in combination preparations. The unbroken 24 yr in which asthmatics have won Olympic medals have been both before and after the introduction of drug tests. Currently a comprehensive range of preventive and therapeutic medications are available for asthmatics to compete with minimal respiratory disadvantage. It was, however, during a period of unnecessary restriction that an American swimmer forfeited his gold medal because of prerace ingestion of a banned sympathomimetic agent. Should adverse air quality be encountered during the Los Angeles Olympics, allergic competitors will be among the most inconvenienced . Athletes with allergic rhinitis and sinusitis will be the most disadvantaged because sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors remain banned. It is strongly recommended that the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee meet with an appropriate body of experts (i.e., the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology) to review this ban on vasoconstrictor agents. PMID:6715736

  12. Potential therapeutic strategy to treat substance abuse related disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sulie L

    2013-12-01

    The "Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Substance Abuse Related Disorders" session was chaired by Dr. Sulie Chang, director of NeuroImmune Phamacology at Seton University. The four presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Wen-zhe Ho (Miniway to stop HIV/HCV), Dr. Ru-Band Lu (Low dose of memantine in the treatment of opioid dependence in human), Dr. Ping Zhang (Treatment of alcohol-related disorders-Learning from stem/progenitor cell), and Chia-Hsiang Chen (Treatment of methamphetamine abuse: an antibody-based immunotherapy approach). PMID:25267886

  13. Steroids in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Webb, D R

    1981-09-01

    From the experience above, it may be concluded that corticosteroid therapy in allergic disease has become more effective than ever before. The expected variations in usage of new important pharmacologic agents is seen with special clarity in the use of corticosteroids. The wide acclaim for the "miracle drug of the 1950's", which followed penicillin of the 1940's, soon gave away to anguish about side-effects that threatened to abolish its use entirely in the late 1950's. The 1960's brought alternate day therapy for chronic usage and recognition that short term usage was relatively safe. The 1970's saw proliferation of topically active steroids similar to those so important to the practice of Dermatology in the previous decade. Results in treating asthma and nasal diseases have been excellent and extensive research for adverse effects has been largely unrevealing. PMID:6793795

  14. Gender-related clinical differences in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bogetto, F; Venturello, S; Albert, U; Maina, G; Ravizza, L

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the gender-related differences of clinical features in a sample of obsessive-compulsive (OCD) patients. One hundred and sixty outpatients with a principal diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (DSM-IV, Y-BOCS = 16) were admitted. Patients were evaluated with a semi-structured interview covering the following areas: socio-demographic data, Axis I diagnoses (DSM-IV), OCD clinical features (age at onset of OC symptoms and disorder, type of onset, life events and type of course). For statistical analysis the sample was subdivided in two groups according to gender. We found an earlier age at onset of OC symptoms and disorder in males; an insidious onset and a chronic course of illness were also observed in that group of patients. Females more frequently showed an acute onset of OCD and an episodic course of illness; they also reported more frequently a stressful event in the year preceding OCD onset. A history of anxiety disorders with onset preceding OCD and hypomanic episodes occurring after OCD onset was significantly more common among males, while females showed more frequently a history of eating disorders. We found three gender-related features of OCD: males show an earlier age at onset with a lower impact of precipitant events in triggering the disorder; OCD seems to occur in a relative high proportion of males who already have phobias and/or tic disorders; and a surfeit of chronic course of the illness in males in comparison with females. PMID:10683629

  15. Halting the allergic march.

    PubMed

    Van Bever, Hugo P; Samuel, Sudesh T; Lee, Bee Wah

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of childhood allergic diseases, such as allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis, has increased exponentially. In Singapore, the prevalence of asthma at all ages exceeds 20%, and around 50% of Singaporean children show features of an underlying allergy. The exact environmental causes for the increase of allergic diseases have not yet been identified, but most researchers agree that a decreased bacterial load in young children may be one of the reasons for the increase. However, the causes of allergy are multiple, and the development of an allergic disease is the result of complex interactions between genetic constitution and environmental factors. In this review article, different aspects of allergic sensitization are covered, including prenatal and postnatal sensitization. The phenomenon of the "allergic march" (switching from one clinical expression of allergy to another) and its underlying mechanisms are discussed. The last part of this review article is on prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, including the role of bacterial products (probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics) and the role of immunotherapy, including sublingual immunotherapy. PMID:23283392

  16. Review: Axon pathology in age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Adalbert, R; Coleman, M P

    2013-02-01

    'Dying back' axon degeneration is a prominent feature of many age-related neurodegenerative disorders and is widespread in normal ageing. Although the mechanisms of disease- and age-related losses may differ, both contribute to symptoms. Here, we review recent advances in understanding axon pathology in age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and glaucoma. In particular, we highlight the importance of axonal transport, autophagy, traumatic brain injury and mitochondrial quality control. We then place these disease mechanisms in the context of changes to axons and dendrites that occur during normal ageing. We discuss what makes ageing such an important risk factor for many neurodegenerative disorders and conclude that the processes of normal ageing and disease combine at the molecular, cellular or systems levels in a range of disorders to produce symptoms. Pathology identical to disease also occurs at the cellular level in most elderly individuals. Thus, normal ageing and age-related disease are inextricably linked and the term 'healthy ageing' downplays the important contributions of cellular pathology. For a full understanding of normal ageing or age-related disease we must study both processes. PMID:23046254

  17. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed. PMID:23568771

  18. Epigenomics and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, Gabrielle A; Patil, Veeresh K; Soto-Ramírez, Nelís; Ziyab, Ali H; Holloway, John W; Karmaus, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Allergic disease development is affected by both genes and the environment, and epigenetic mechanisms are hypothesized to mediate these environmental effects. In this article, we discuss the link between the environment, DNA methylation and allergic disease, as well as questions of causality inherent to analyses of DNA methylation. From the practical side, we describe characteristics of allergic phenotypes and contrast different epidemiologic study designs used in epigenetic research. We examine methodological considerations, how best to conduct preprocessing and analysis of DNA methylation data sets, and the latest methods, technologies and discoveries in this rapidly advancing field. DNA methylation and other epigenetic marks are firmly entwined with allergic disease, a link that may hold the basis for future allergic disease diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24283882

  19. Factors Related to Sleep Disorders among Male Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with sleep disorders in male firefighters working in a metropolitan city in South Korea. Methods Self-administered questionnaires including the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, Korean Occupational Stress Scale-Short Form, Psychosocial Well-Being Index-Short Form, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, and Beck-Depression Inventory-2 as well as surveys collecting socio-demographic characteristics and work-related factors were given to 730 male firefighters. After exclusion for missing data, 657 male firefighters were included, and logistic regression analysis adjusted for the work-related factors, psychosocial factors, and general risk factors were used to assess the relationship between sleep disorders and associated factors. Results The prevalence of sleep disorders was 48.7%. Shift work (adjusted OR 1.58, 95% CI = 1.02-2.45), musculoskeletal symptoms (adjusted OR 2.89, 95% CI = 2.02-4.14), and depression (adjusted OR 7.04 95% CI = 4.03-12.30) were associated with sleep disorders. Conclusions Musculoskeletal symptoms, shift work, and depression are associated with sleep disorders. Integrated health management is needed to promote good sleep quality among firefighters. PMID:24864191

  20. Weight-related other evaluation in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Trottier, K; McFarlane, T; Olmsted, M; Polivy, J

    2005-12-01

    Weight-related self-evaluation has been described as the fundamental maladaptive cognitive feature of disordered eating. It is not clear, however, whether the process of determining personal-worth based on an evaluation of body size is specific to the self, or whether it is relevant to the evaluation of people in general. Thirty-three eating disordered patients and 54 undergraduates read an article about a woman who was described as either overweight or slender and evaluated the woman on several dimensions. Both undergraduates and eating disordered patients rated the heavy woman as less attractive than the thin woman. However, the patients' evaluation of the overweight target's attractiveness was significantly more negative than the undergraduates'. Patients also rated the overweight woman as less popular and claimed that they liked the overweight woman less than the thin woman. These effects were not present among the undergraduate students. Finally, the eating disorder participants rated the overweight woman as more overweight and less intelligent than did the undergraduate students. The results suggest that weight-related evaluation in eating disorders extends beyond the self to include the evaluation of other people. PMID:16755170

  1. Relational Aggression in Children with Preschool-Onset Psychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belden, Andy C.; Gaffrey, Michael S.; Luby, Joan L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of preschool-onset (PO) psychiatric disorders as correlates and/or risk factors for relational aggression during kindergarten or first grade was tested in a sample of 146 preschool-age children (age 3 to 5.11 years). Method: Axis-I diagnoses and symptom scores were derived using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment.…

  2. Spatial Relative Risk Patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six, and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. Each ASD case was gender-matched to…

  3. Factors Related to Eating Disorders in Young Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele, Jill; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Identified factors related to eating disorders in young adolescent girls. Findings revealed significant differences among the girls based on intact versus broken family; subjects' actual and preferred weight; whether the family ate meals together; average grades; age and grade in school; fathers' occupation; future career plans; place of…

  4. Research Progress in Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum and Related Ectopic Mineralization Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoli; Arányi, Tamás; Váradi, András; Terry, Sharon F.; Uitto, Jouni

    2015-01-01

    Heritable ectopic mineralization disorders represent a phenotypically diverse group of conditions characterized by deposition of calcium phosphate complexes in soft connective tissues. The prototype of such conditions is pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), and related conditions with overlapping clinical features include generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) and arterial calcification due to CD73 deficiency (ACDC). Molecular genetic investigations have revealed mutations in the genes physiologically involved in generation of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and phosphate (Pi), and the findings suggest a unifying pathomechanism relating to reduced PPi/Pi ratio. This hypothesis is based on the notion that PPi serves as a powerful inhibitor of mineralization while Pi is a pro-mineralization factor, and an appropriate PPi/Pi ratio is critical for prevention of ectopic mineralization under homeostatic conditions. PXE International, the premiere patient support organization, advocating on behalf of patients and families with PXE, sponsors regular research meetings evaluating the progress in this and related ectopic mineralization disorders. The latest meetings were held in September 2014 in Bethesda, MD and in September 2015 in Budapest, Hungary. This report summarizes the latest progress in research on PXE and related ectopic mineralization disorders, based on presentations and discussions in these meetings, with pharmacologic implications for currently intractable disorders. PMID:26902123

  5. Sleep Related Breathing Disorders in Adults with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resta, Onofrio; Barbaro, Maria Pia Foschino; Giliberti, Tiziana; Caratozzolo, Gennaro; Cagnazzo, Maria Grazia; Scarpelli, Franco; Nocerino, Maria Cristina

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated sleep-related breathing disorders in six adults with Down syndrome. Five were found to have respiratory events justifying the diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome. Results suggest that the nocturnal respiratory pattern of adults with Down syndrome depends on several pathogenetic factors such as age, severity of upper airway…

  6. Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Pregnancy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asthma and allergic disorders can affect the course and outcome of pregnancy. Pregnancy itself may also affect the course of asthma and related diseases. Optimal management of these disorders during pregnancy is vital to ensure the welfare of the mother and the baby. Specific pharmacological agents for treatment of asthma or allergic diseases must be cautiously selected and are discussed here with respect to safety considerations in pregnancy. Although most drugs do not harm the fetus, this knowledge is incomplete. Any drug may carry a small risk that must be balanced against the benefits of keeping the mother and baby healthy. The goals and principles of management for acute and chronic asthma, rhinitis, and dermatologic disorders are the same during pregnancy as those for asthma in the general population. Diagnosis of allergy during pregnancy should mainly consist of the patient's history and in vitro testing. The assured and well-evaluated risk factors revealed for sensitization in mother and child are very limited, to date, and include alcohol consumption, exposure to tobacco smoke, maternal diet and diet of the newborn, drug usage, and insufficient exposure to environmental bacteria. Consequently, the recommendations for primary and secondary preventive measures are also very limited in number and verification. PMID:21151812

  7. Otorhinolaryngological aspects of sleep-related breathing disorders

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) are disorders within a wide spectrum of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD). Given the obesity epidemic, these conditions will become increasingly prevalent and continue to serve as a large economic burden. A thorough clinical evaluation and appropriate investigations will allow stratification of patients into appropriate treatment groups. A multidisciplinary team is required to manage these patients. Patient selection is critical in ensuring successful surgical and non-surgical outcomes. A wide range of options are available and further long term prospective studies, with standardised data capture and outcome goals, are required to evaluate the most appropriate techniques and long term success rates. PMID:26904262

  8. Eosinophilic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and play a role in your body's immune response. They can also build up and cause inflammation. ... Your body may produce more of them in response to Allergic disorders Skin conditions Parasitic and fungal ...

  9. The immunobiology of Tourette's disorder, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with Streptococcus, and related disorders: a way forward.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Tanya K; Kurlan, Roger; Leckman, James

    2010-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related conditions including Tourette's disorder (TD) are chronic, relapsing disorders of unknown etiology associated with marked impairment and disability. Associated immune dysfunction has been reported and debated in the literature since the late 80s. The immunologic culprit receiving the most interest has been Group A Streptococcus (GAS), which began to receive attention as a potential cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms, following the investigation of the symptoms reported in Sydenham's chorea (SC) and rheumatic fever, such as motor tics, vocal tics, and both obsessive-compulsive and attention deficit/hyperactivity symptoms. Young children have been described as having a sudden onset of these neuropsychiatric symptoms temporally associated with GAS, but without supporting evidence of rheumatic fever. This presentation of OCD and tics has been termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS). Of note, SC, OCD, and TD often begin in early childhood and share common anatomic areas--the basal ganglia of the brain and the related cortical and thalamic sites--adding support to the possibility that these disorders might share a common immunologic and/or genetic vulnerability. Relevant manuscripts were identified through searches of the PsycINFO and MedLine databases using the following keywords: OCD, immune, PANDAS, Sydenham chorea, Tourette's disorder Group A Streptococcus. Articles were also identified through reference lists from research articles and other materials on childhood OCD, PANDAS, and TD between 1966 and December 2010. Considering the overlap of clinical and neuroanatomic findings among these disorders, this review explores evidence regarding the immunobiology as well as the relevant clinical and therapeutic aspects of TD, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:20807070

  10. Anxiety disorders and control related beliefs: the exemplar of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Moulding, Richard; Kyrios, Michael

    2006-09-01

    Beliefs about control have been postulated to be important to anxiety and mood disorders. In particular, the phenomenology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) suggests that it may be an exemplar of an anxiety disorder where control issues related to the self (behavior and thoughts) and world (the external environment) are particularly important. However, only beliefs concerning the need to control thoughts have been incorporated into contemporary theories of OCD. This article summarizes the theoretical and empirical research relevant to control-related beliefs in OCD. It is suggested that discrepancies between an individual's desired level of control and their perceived level of control could contribute to OCD symptoms, and exacerbate the tendency for individuals with OCD to engage in magical ideation and superstitious rituals. Overall, this review demonstrates how consideration of control cognitions could enhance our understanding of OCD and further improve its treatment. PMID:16647173

  11. Personality Disorder Symptoms Are Differentially Related to Divorce Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Krystle L.; Weinstein, Yana; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Divorce is associated with a multitude of outcomes related to health and well-being. Data from a representative community sample (N = 1,241) of St. Louis residents (ages 55–64) were used to examine associations between personality pathology and divorce in late midlife. Symptoms of the 10 DSM–IV personality disorders were assessed with the Structured Interview for DSM–IV Personality and the Multisource Assessment of Personality Pathology (both self and informant versions). Multiple regression analyses showed Paranoid and Histrionic personality disorder symptoms to be consistently and positively associated with number of divorces across all three sources of personality assessment. Conversely, Avoidant personality disorder symptoms were negatively associated with number of divorces. The present paper provides new information about the relationship between divorce and personality pathology at a developmental stage that is understudied in both domains. PMID:23244459

  12. Personality disorder symptoms are differentially related to divorce frequency.

    PubMed

    Disney, Krystle L; Weinstein, Yana; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2012-12-01

    Divorce is associated with a multitude of outcomes related to health and well-being. Data from a representative community sample (N = 1,241) of St. Louis residents (ages 55-64) were used to examine associations between personality pathology and divorce in late midlife. Symptoms of the 10 DSM-IV personality disorders were assessed with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality and the Multisource Assessment of Personality Pathology (both self and informant versions). Multiple regression analyses showed Paranoid and Histrionic personality disorder symptoms to be consistently and positively associated with number of divorces across all three sources of personality assessment. Conversely, Avoidant personality disorder symptoms were negatively associated with number of divorces. The present paper provides new information about the relationship between divorce and personality pathology at a developmental stage that is understudied in both domains. PMID:23244459

  13. [The amygdala and its relation to autism, behavioural disorders and other neurodevelopmental disorders].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L

    2014-02-24

    The amygdala is related with the recognition of the emotional meaning of stimuli, long-term memory, the orientation of social stimuli and the perception of gaze orientation. It plays a fundamental role in the recognition of faces, especially those expressing fear, and makes it possible to comprehend different emotional states, which will facilitate an appropriate social cognition. Dysfunctions of the amygdala have been associated to a number of different neurodevelopmental disorders as well as neurocognitive and behavioural disorders in specific neurogenetic entities. A number of studies focused on the amygdalic complex have allowed researchers to understand many pathophysiological aspects and to formulate new hypotheses regarding their origins. Given that the disorders or conditions in which the role of the amygdala has been evoked are becoming increasingly more extensive, this article refers the reader to those that have aroused the most interest in recent years. Thus, they can be divided into two groups: developmental and behavioural disorders (autism, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, alexithymia and anorexia nervosa) and specific neurogenetic entities (fragile X, Rett, Prader-Willi and Williams syndromes), in which structural or dysfunctional alterations have been observed that may be related with their neurocognitive and behavioural symptoms. It is important to remember that the amygdala is a highly connected structure that forms truly functional networks and has been associated to different disorders with varied explanations and includes several different pathophysiological phenomena. Its role must not, therefore, be simplified in a reductionistic manner, but also placed upon a hierarchy of dysfunctions in other areas that interact with it. PMID:25252660

  14. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality. PMID:26900847

  15. Gender-related features of persistent delusional disorders.

    PubMed

    Wustmann, Tobias; Pillmann, Frank; Marneros, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents gender-related features of Delusional Disorder. It is part of the Halle Delusional Syndromes Study (HADES-Study). All inpatients fulfilling the DSM-IV/ICD-10 criteria of Delusional Disorder/Persistent Delusional Disorder (DD) during a 14-year period were included and followed up for an average of 10.8 years. Gender distribution was almost equal, women became ill significantly later than men, and almost all women had a stable diagnosis-in contrast to men. The great majority of women, at the end of the follow-up period, had an unremitted DD. Women more frequently had low social functioning at admission, but then were more compliant and received more frequently pharmacological medication. There were no differences in the delusional topic and no differences regarding long-term disability and autarky. In spite of previous reports, the HADES-Study found no gender difference in the frequency of DD. However, men tended more frequently to change into schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. In these cases, the DD might have been a prodrome of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, which manifests later in life. Although in both female and male DD patients, the majority remained unremitted, almost none of them lost their autarky (independent living). While women more frequently received psychopharmacological medication, their DD was usually found to be unremitted. PMID:20700601

  16. Factors Related to Social Support in Neurological and Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kamenov, Kaloyan; Cabello, Maria; Caballero, Francisco Félix; Cieza, Alarcos; Sabariego, Carla; Raggi, Alberto; Anczewska, Marta; Pitkänen, Tuuli; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge body of research on social support, literature has been primarily focused on its beneficial role for both physical and mental health. It is still unclear why people with mental and neurological disorders experience low levels of social support. The main objective of this study was to explore what are the strongest factors related to social support and how do they interact with each other in neuropsychiatric disorders. The study used cross-sectional data from 722 persons suffering from dementia, depression, epilepsy, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, and substance use disorders. Multiple linear regressions showed that disability was the strongest factor for social support. Extraversion and agreeableness were significant personality variables, but when the interaction terms between personality traits and disability were included, disability remained the only significant variable. Moreover, level of disability mediated the relationship between personality (extraversion and agreeableness) and level of social support. Moderation analysis revealed that people that had mental disorders experienced lower levels of support when being highly disabled compared to people with neurological disorders. Unlike previous literature, focused on increasing social support as the origin of improving disability, this study suggested that interventions improving day-to-day functioning or maladaptive personality styles might also have an effect on the way people perceive social support. Future longitudinal research, however, is warranted to explore causality. PMID:26900847

  17. Acupuncture and moxibustion for stress-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture and moxibustion, which medical doctors are licensed by the government of Japan to perform, can improve the psychological relationship between doctors and patients, especially when it is disturbed by a “game”, a dysfunctional interpersonal interaction that is repeated unintentionally. This advantage is due to the essential properties of acupuncture and moxibustion. Acupuncture and moxibustion are helpful in treating somatoform disorders, especially musculoskeletal symptoms. In Japan, a holistic acupuncture and moxibustion therapy called Sawada-style has been developed. This is based on fundamental meridian points that are considered to have effects on central, autonomic nervous, immune, metabolic, and endocrine systems to regulate the whole body balance. In addition, some of the fundamental points have effects on Qi, blood, and water patterns associated with major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, eating disorders, and somatoform disorders. The fixed protocol of Sawada-style would be suitable for large-scale, randomized, controlled studies in the future. Recent systematic reviews indicate that electroacupuncture would be a useful addition to antidepressant therapy for some symptoms accompanying fibromyalgia. Acupuncture and moxibustion are also recommended for irritable bowel syndrome, instead of Western drug therapy. Surprisingly, the dorsal prefrontal cerebral cortex, which is associated with a method of scalp acupuncture applied for gastrointestinal disorders, has been found to be activated in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. It is quite possible that regulation of this cortical area is related to the effect of scalp acupuncture. This acupuncture method can be effective not only for irritable bowel syndrome but also for other stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:24456818

  18. Current and future biomarkers in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zissler, U M; Esser-von Bieren, J; Jakwerth, C A; Chaker, A M; Schmidt-Weber, C B

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis early in life, sensitization, asthma endotypes, monitoring of disease and treatment progression are key motivations for the exploration of biomarkers for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. The number of genes related to allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma increases steadily; however, prognostic genes have not yet entered clinical application. We hypothesize that the combination of multiple genes may generate biomarkers with prognostic potential. The current review attempts to group more than 161 different potential biomarkers involved in respiratory inflammation to pave the way for future classifiers. The potential biomarkers are categorized into either epithelial or infiltrate-derived or mixed origin, epithelial biomarkers. Furthermore, surface markers were grouped into cell-type-specific categories. The current literature provides multiple biomarkers for potential asthma endotypes that are related to T-cell phenotypes such as Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and Tregs and their lead cytokines. Eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma endotypes are also classified by epithelium-derived CCL-26 and osteopontin, respectively. There are currently about 20 epithelium-derived biomarkers exclusively derived from epithelium, which are likely to innovate biomarker panels as they are easy to sample. This article systematically reviews and categorizes genes and collects current evidence that may promote these biomarkers to become part of allergic rhinitis or allergic asthma classifiers with high prognostic value. PMID:26706728

  19. [Borderline personality disorder: the patients and their relatives].

    PubMed

    Apfelbaum, Sergio; Gagliesi, Pablo

    This present paper reviews the current theories about the borderline personality disorder and their relations with their families and significant others. The biosocial theory states that the relationship between emotional vulnerability and the interactions with family relations seems to explain the problems with DLP clients. This disorder is defined then as an interaction disease. Relatives and significant others usually have symptoms, beliefs, and emotions produced by this interaction. A list of general strategies for the assistance of these clients and their families is introduced: The transformation of the complaint into a problem, the psycho education, the reduction of expressed emotions, the acceptance and the training in different abilities. At the end, the experience with psycho education approach workshops is commented, as well as the use of a psycho educational manual. PMID:15597126

  20. [Workplace-related anxiety, workplace phobia and disorders of participation].

    PubMed

    Muschalla, B; Linden, M

    2009-06-01

    Work is an important domain of life. It is therefore clear that problems at the workplace and mental disorders will have negative interactions. Job-related anxieties are of special importance as any workplace causes or intensifies anxiety by its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general and workplace-related anxieties in particular is workplace phobia. Similarly to agoraphobia, it is characterised by panic when approaching or even thinking of the stimulus, in this case the workplace. Workplace phobia has serious negative consequences for the further course of illness. It impairs the ability to work, and can lead to sick leave and early retirement. It requires special therapeutic interventions. This paper describes workplace-related anxieties and workplace phobia and gives a conceptual framework for their understanding. PMID:19544717

  1. Allergic host defences.

    PubMed

    Palm, Noah W; Rosenstein, Rachel K; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2012-04-26

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macroparasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity has an important role in host defence against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, haematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  2. Clinical and diagnostic aspects of gluten related disorders.

    PubMed

    Tovoli, Francesco; Masi, Chiara; Guidetti, Elena; Negrini, Giulia; Paterini, Paola; Bolondi, Luigi

    2015-03-16

    Gluten is one of the most abundant and widely distributed components of food in many areas. It can be included in wheat, barley, rye, and grains such as oats, barley, spelt, kamut, and triticale. Gluten-containing grains are widely consumed; in particular, wheat is one of the world's primary sources of food, providing up to 50% of the caloric intake in both industrialized and developing countries. Until two decades ago, celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders were believed to be exceedingly rare outside of Europe and were relatively ignored by health professionals and the global media. In recent years, however, the discovery of important diagnostic and pathogenic milestones led CD from obscurity to global prominence. In addition, interestingly, people feeding themselves with gluten-free products greatly outnumber patients affected by CD, fuelling a global consumption of gluten-free foods with approximately $2.5 billion in United States sales each year. The acknowledgment of other medical conditions related to gluten that has arisen as health problems, providing a wide spectrum of gluten-related disorders. In February 2011, a new nomenclature for gluten-related disorders was created at a consensus conference in London. In this review, we analyse innovations in the field of research that emerged after the creation of the new classification, with particular attention to the new European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines for CD and the most recent research about non-celiac gluten sensitivity. PMID:25789300

  3. Clinical and diagnostic aspects of gluten related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tovoli, Francesco; Masi, Chiara; Guidetti, Elena; Negrini, Giulia; Paterini, Paola; Bolondi, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Gluten is one of the most abundant and widely distributed components of food in many areas. It can be included in wheat, barley, rye, and grains such as oats, barley, spelt, kamut, and triticale. Gluten-containing grains are widely consumed; in particular, wheat is one of the world’s primary sources of food, providing up to 50% of the caloric intake in both industrialized and developing countries. Until two decades ago, celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders were believed to be exceedingly rare outside of Europe and were relatively ignored by health professionals and the global media. In recent years, however, the discovery of important diagnostic and pathogenic milestones led CD from obscurity to global prominence. In addition, interestingly, people feeding themselves with gluten-free products greatly outnumber patients affected by CD, fuelling a global consumption of gluten-free foods with approximately $2.5 billion in United States sales each year. The acknowledgment of other medical conditions related to gluten that has arisen as health problems, providing a wide spectrum of gluten-related disorders. In February 2011, a new nomenclature for gluten-related disorders was created at a consensus conference in London. In this review, we analyse innovations in the field of research that emerged after the creation of the new classification, with particular attention to the new European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines for CD and the most recent research about non-celiac gluten sensitivity. PMID:25789300

  4. Chlorination products: emerging links with allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A

    2007-01-01

    Exposure of the human population to chlorination products has considerably increased during the 20(th) century especially after the 1960s with the development of public and leisure pools. The present article summarizes current knowledge regarding the human exposure to chlorination products and reviews studies suggesting that these chemicals might be involved in the development or exacerbation of allergic diseases. Populations regularly in contact with chlorination products such as swimmers, lifeguards or workers using chlorine as cleaning or bleaching agent show increased risks of allergic diseases or of respiratory disorders frequently associated with allergy. Experimental evidence suggests that chlorination products promote allergic sensitization by compromising the permeability or the immunoregulatory function of epithelial barriers. These findings led to the chlorine hypothesis proposing that the rise of allergic diseases could result less from the declining exposure to microbial agents (the hygiene hypothesis) than from the increasing and largely uncontrolled exposure to products of chlorination, the most widely used method to achieve hygiene in the developed world. Giving the increasing popularity of water recreational areas, there is an obvious need to assess the effects of chlorine-based oxidants on human health and their possible implication in the epidemic of allergic diseases. PMID:17627515

  5. Trauma-related obsessive–compulsive disorder: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dykshoorn, Kristy L.

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a highly researched and conceptualized disorder, and yet it remains one of the most debilitating, widespread, and expensive disorders one can be afflicted with [Real, E., Labad, J., Alonso, P., Segalas, C., Jimenez-Murcia, S., Bueno, B., … Menchon, J. M. (2011). Stressful life events at onset of obsessive–compulsive disorder are associated with a distinct clinical pattern. Depression and Anxiety, 28, 367–376. doi:10.1002/da.20792]. Exposure treatments and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) have been largely accepted as best practice for those with OCD, and yet there are still many who are left with “treatment-resistant OCD” [Rowa, K., Antony, M., & Swinson, R. (2007). Exposure and response prevention. In C. Purdon, M. Antony, & L. J. Summerfeldt (Eds.), Psychological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder: Fundamentals and beyond (pp. 79–109). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association; Foa, E. B. (2010). Cognitive behavioural therapy of obsessive–compulsive disorder. Dialogues of Clinical Neuroscience, 12, 199–207]. Similarly, exposure treatments and CBT have been accepted as best practice for trauma-related distress (i.e. post-traumatic stress disorder; Foa, E. B., Keane, T. M., Friedman, M. J., & Cohen, J. A. (2009). Effective treatments for PTSD: Practice guidelines from the international society for traumatic studies (2nd ed.). New York, NY: The Guilford Press). From a literature review, evidence has been provided that demonstrates a high prevalence rate (30–82%) of OCD among individuals with a traumatic history in comparison to the prevalence rate of the general population (1.1–1.8%; [Cromer, K. R., Schmidt, N. B., & Murphy, D. L. (2006). An investigation of traumatic life events and obsessive–compulsive disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 45, 1683–1691. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2006.08.018; Fontenelle, L. F., Cocchi, L., Harrison, B. J., Shavitt, R. G., do Rosario, M. C

  6. Delineation of differential temporal relations between specific eating and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Julia D; Silgado, Jose; Lewinsohn, Peter M

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the temporal sequencing of eating and anxiety disorders to delineate which anxiety disorders increase eating disorder risk and whether individuals with eating disorders are at greater risk for particular anxiety disorders. The sample was drawn from the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project. Temporal relations between specific eating and anxiety disorders were examined after controlling for relevant variables (e.g., mood disorders, other anxiety disorders) over 14 years. After excluding those with anorexia nervosa (AN) in adolescence (T1), OCD was the only T1 anxiety disorder to predict AN by age 30 (T4). No T1 anxiety disorder was associated with T4 bulimia nervosa (BN). Although T1 AN did not increase risk of any T4 anxiety disorder, T1 BN appeared to increase risk for social anxiety and panic disorders. Evidence that eating disorders may have differential relations to particular anxiety disorders could inform prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:20185151

  7. Internet gaming disorder, social network disorder and laterality: handedness relates to pathological use of social networks.

    PubMed

    Bouna-Pyrrou, Polyxeni; Mühle, Christiane; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lenz, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    The internet age bears new challenges that include health risks. It is agreed that excessive internet use may reach pathological levels. However, the concept of internet addiction lacks specificity and, therefore, warrants studies on its diagnostic and etiologic classification. This study was conducted to characterize the novel DSM-5 criteria for internet gaming disorder and the adapted criteria for the "social network disorder". Based on the established association of handedness and substance use disorders, we also explored whether internet use related to laterality. For this study, 3,287 volunteers participated in the online survey and gave particulars concerning their internet use in general, internet gaming and use of social networks, laterality markers (hand, foot, eye, ear, rotational preference in gymnastics, and head turning asymmetry) and health status. Of the participants, 1.1 % fulfilled the criteria for internet gaming disorder, and 1.8 % fulfilled the criteria for social network disorder. The applied criteria were highly correlated with the time spent on the respective internet activities (p < 4 × 10(-56)). The analyses of comorbidity and working hours support the thresholds of 5/9 criteria and ≥30 h/week spent on the internet for the classification as pathological (p < 5 × 10(-2)). Moreover, we found that left-handedness related to more affirmed criteria and longer times spent on social networks (p ≤ 4 × 10(-2)). The provided criteria proved to be user-friendly, comprehensible and well accepted. The results contribute to a better understanding of pathological internet gaming and social network use and provide evidence that biological markers of substance use disorders are involved in internet addiction. PMID:25576300

  8. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  9. Management of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Sausen, Verra O.; Marks, Katherine E.; Sausen, Kenneth P.; Self, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common chronic childhood disease. Reduced quality of life is frequently caused by this IgE-mediated disease, including sleep disturbance with subsequent decreased school performance. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm are commonly seen concurrently with allergic rhinitis, and poorly controlled allergic rhinitis negatively affects asthma outcomes. Nonsedating antihistamines or intranasal azelastine are effective agents to manage allergic rhinitis, often in combination with oral decongestants. For moderate to severe persistent disease, intranasal corticosteroids are the most effiective agents. Some patients require concomitant intranasal corticosteroids and nonsedating antihistamines for optimal management. Other available agents include leukotriene receptor antagonists, intranasal cromolyn, intranasal ipratropium, specific immunotherapy, and anti-IgE therapy. PMID:23118635

  10. Allergic Rhinitis Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic conjunctivitis (eye allergy). Is it true that mold spores can trigger eye allergy symptoms? True False ... allergy) are seasonal allergens such as pollen and mold spores. Indoor allergens such as dust mites and ...

  11. Allergic rhinitis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    During pregnancy, the first-choice drugs for allergic rhinitis are nasal or oral "non-sedating" antihistamines without antimuscarinic activity, in particular cetirizine, or loratadine after the first trimester. PMID:27186624

  12. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of allergic contact dermatitis include nickel, chromates, rubber chemicals, and topical antibiotic ointments and creams. Frequent ... construction workers who are in contact with cement. Rubber chemicals are found in gloves, balloons, elastic in ...

  13. Allergic Rhinitis: Antihistamines

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Allergic Rhinitis | Antihistamines What are antihistamines? Antihistamines are medicines that help stop allergy symptoms, such as itchy eyes, sneezing and a runny nose. Sometimes, an antihistamine ...

  14. Eating disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder: A dimensional approach to purported relations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin D

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the specificity of purported relations between symptoms of eating disorders (ED) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Whereas most research has focused on diagnostic comorbidity or between-groups analyses, this study took a dimensional approach to investigate specific relations among symptoms of anorexia, bulimia, and OCD, as well as panic, depression, and general distress in a student sample (N=465). Results were that all symptoms showed significant zero-order correlations, including all ED-OCD pairings. After removing general distress variance, however, none of three OCD scales significantly predicted anorexia; only compulsive washing among OCD scales significantly predicted bulimia. Hierarchical multiple regression demonstrated that panic and depression out-performed OCD in predicting bulimia symptoms. Overall, symptoms of ED and OCD did not show unique relations at the level of core dimensions of each construct. A possible link between bulimia and compulsive washing is worth further study. PMID:18396006

  15. [Antihistamines in allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Antihistamines are the first line of pharmacotherapy in allergic diseases, especially in allergic rhinitis. The article also presents the interesting 2005-2007 publications on the use of antihistamine in practical point of view, especially the newly introduced ones (desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine) and those which are to be introduced soon (rupatadine). The efficacy in skin histamine provocation model and various clinical model were discussed. PMID:18260244

  16. [Therapy of allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Klimek, Ludger; Sperl, Annette

    2016-03-01

    If the avoidance of the provoking allergen is insufficient or not possible, medical treatment can be tried. Therapeutics of the first choice for the treatment of the seasonal and persistent allergic rhinitis are antihistamines and topical glucocorticoids. Chromones are less effective so they should only be used for adults with a special indication, for example during pregnancy. Beside the avoidance of the allergen the immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:27120870

  17. Genetics of Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Romina A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    The allergic diseases are complex phenotypes for which a strong genetic basis has been firmly established. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been widely employed in the field of allergic disease, and to date significant associations have been published for nearly 100 asthma genes/loci, in addition to multiple genes/loci for AD, AR and IgE levels, for which the overwhelming number of candidates are novel and have given a new appreciation for the role of innate as well as adaptive immune-response genes in allergic disease. A major outcome of GWAS in allergic disease has been the formation of national and international collaborations leading to consortia meta-analyses, and an appreciation for the specificity of genetic associations to sub-phenotypes of allergic disease. Molecular genetics has undergone a technological revolution, leading to next generation sequencing (NGS) strategies that are increasingly employed to hone in on the causal variants associated with allergic diseases. Unmet needs in the field include the inclusion of ethnically and racially diverse cohorts, and strategies for managing ‘big data’ that is an outcome of technological advances such as sequencing. PMID:25459575

  18. Shame in the obsessive compulsive related disorders: A conceptual review

    PubMed Central

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Theoretical and anecdotal support for the role of shame in obsessive compulsive related disorders (OCRDs) is prominent. Developing our understanding of shame’s role in OCRDs is important to building knowledge about this new diagnostic category. This review aims to consolidate our understanding of shame in each OCRD, through summarizing existing clinical, conceptual, and empirical work. Methods We provide an overview of shame, its measurement considerations, and a full review of 110 articles addressing shame in OCRDs. Results General shame and shame about having a mental illness are the broadest types of shame relevant to OCRDs; symptom-based shame and body shame may be more specific to OCRDs. In OCD, violent, sexual, or blasphemous obsessions may trigger symptom-based shame. In trichotillomania (TTM) and skin picking (SP), symptom-based shame may be related to pulling, picking, and post-pulling/picking behaviors. In hoarding disorder, symptom-based shame may accompany beliefs about being defective due to living with clutter. Body shame appears inherent to body dysmorphic disorder, while in TTM and SP it may arise as a secondary response to damage resulting from body focused repetitive behaviors. Limitations Much of the current knowledge on shame in OCRDs comes from anecdotal, case, and conceptual work. Empirical studies do not always assess specific types of shame, instead assessing shame as a general construct. Conclusions Shame is closely related to OCRDs. Clinical and research recommendations drawing from the literature are provided. PMID:25299438

  19. Targeting the endocannabinoid system to treat anxiety-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Korem, Nachshon; Zer-Aviv, Tomer Mizrachi; Ganon-Elazar, Eti; Abush, Hila; Akirav, Irit

    2016-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in the control of emotions, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders. The most common self-reported reason for using cannabis is rooted in its ability to reduce feelings of stress, tension, and anxiety. Nevertheless, there are only few studies in controlled clinical settings that confirm that administration of cannabinoids can benefit patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). There are considerable encouraging preclinical data to suggest that endocannabinoid-targeted therapeutics for anxiety disorders should continue. In this review, we will describe data supporting a role for the endocannabinoid system in preventing and treating anxiety-like behavior in animal models and PTSD patients. Cannabinoids have shown beneficial outcomes in rat and mouse models of anxiety and PTSD, but they also may have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including anxiogenic effects. Hence, clinical and preclinical research on the endocannabinoid system should further study the effects of cannabinoids on anxiety and help determine whether the benefits of using exogenous cannabinoids outweigh the risks. In general, this review suggests that targeting the endocannabinoid system represents an attractive and novel approach to the treatment of anxiety-related disorders and, in particular, PTSD. PMID:26426887

  20. Myasthenia and related disorders of the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Spillane, Jennifer; Beeson, David J; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of transmission at the neuromuscular junction has increased greatly in recent years. We now recognise a wide variety of autoimmune and genetic diseases that affect this specialised synapse, causing muscle weakness and fatigue. These disorders greatly affect quality of life and rarely can be fatal. Myasthenia gravis is the most common disorder and is most commonly caused by autoantibodies targeting postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors. Antibodies to muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) are detected in a variable proportion of the remainder. Treatment is symptomatic and immunomodulatory. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is caused by antibodies to presynaptic calcium channels, and approximately 50% of cases are paraneoplastic, most often related to small cell carcinoma of the lung. Botulism is an acquired disorder caused by neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, impairing acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft. In addition, several rare congenital myasthenic syndromes have been identified, caused by inherited defects in presynaptic, synaptic basal lamina and postsynaptic proteins necessary for neuromuscular transmission. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:20547629

  1. Work-Related Upper Limb Disorders: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stoyneva, Zlatka Borisova; Dermendjiev, Svetlan; Dermendjiev, Tihomir; Dobrev, Hristo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the complex interrelationship between physical factors, job stress, lifestyle and genetic factors on symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs is demonstrated by a case report and discussion of the literature. A 58 year old woman with long lasting complaints of the upper limbs with increasing intensity and duration, generalisation, combined with skin thickness, Raynaud’s phenomenon, joint disorders, arterial and pulmonary hypertension, metabolic lipid dysfunctions is presented. Occupational history proves continuous duration of service at a job with occupational physical static load with numerous repetitive monotonous systematic motions of fingers and hands as a weaver of Persian rugs followed by work at an automated loom and variable labour activities. Though the complaints dated since the time she was a manual weaver, the manifestations of generalized joint degenerative changes, system sclerosis with Raynaud’s phenomenon with similar upper extremities signs and symptoms discount upper limbs musculoskeletal disorder as caused only or mainly by occupational risk factors. The main principles and criteria for occupational diagnosis of musculoskeletal upper limb disorders and legislative requirements for their reglamentation are discussed.

  2. [The Marfan syndrome and related connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Siepe, Matthias; Löffelbein, Florian

    2009-06-01

    The Marfan syndrome is an inherited disorder of the connective tissue which is mainly caused by a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The defect in the connective tissue protein can lead to several organ dysfunctions. For the life expectancy, the cardiovascular aspect is of paramount importance. Patients with Marfan syndrome may develop aortic aneurysms and valvular heart defects. The risk of aortic aneurysms consists in the development of aortic dissection or rupture with their fatal consequences. Besides the cardiovascular manifestation, the skeletal and ocular system can also be affected. The skeletal manifestation is often characterised by long limbs, arachnodactyly, and abnormal joint flexibility along with other signs. Patients may also have dislocated lenses, ectasia of the dural sac, stretch marks, spontaneous pneumothorax, recurrent hernia, or a family history suspicious for Marfan. During the past years, other related connective tissue disorders with analogous organ manifestation have been described (e.g., Loeys-Dietz syndrome). In this article we present the basic knowledge about these connective tissue disorders, and we mention new insights in the recently explored pathophysiology of the disorder which is a possible target for future medical treatment options. Furthermore, recent new concepts for the prophylactic treatment of the aortic manifestation are explained. PMID:19554831

  3. HIV-related posttraumatic stress disorder: investigating the traumatic events.

    PubMed

    Theuninck, Anthony C; Lake, Nick; Gibson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between the experience of various HIV-related events (receiving the diagnosis, receiving treatment, experiencing physical symptoms, self-disclosing HIV positive status, and witnessing HIV-related death) and posttraumatic stress symptoms in a sample of 100 gay men living with HIV. Self-report data revealed that 65% met criteria for having experienced a traumatic event in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criterion A. The experience of shame, humiliation, or guilt during an event was measured but not found to be a significant indicator of having been traumatized. A total of 33% qualified for a PTSD diagnosis. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that receiving medical treatment, experiencing physical symptoms, and witnessing HIV-related death were most associated with HIV-related PTSD symptoms. Given that multiple HIV-related events are potentially traumatic, the screening, assessment and treatment for HIV-related PTSD may need to be considered by HIV services. PMID:20632886

  4. Inhibition of mediator release in RBL-2H3 cells by some H1-antagonist derived anti-allergic drugs: relation to lipophilicity and membrane effects.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M J; Paulussen, J J; Horbach, D A; Roelofsen, E P; van Miltenburg, J C; de Mol, N J; Janssen, L H

    1995-02-01

    In a model for mucosal mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells) a set H1-antagonist derived anti-allergic drugs containing a diphenylmethyl piperazinyl moiety was examined for their ability to inhibit release of the mediator beta-hexosaminidase. Cells were activated with antigen or the calcium ionophore A23187, whether or not in combination with the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Oxatomide, hydroxyzine and cetirizine inhibit the antigen induced beta-hexosaminidase release. The release triggered by A23187, whether or not in combination with TPA is hardly influenced by the compounds. A biphasic dependence of the inhibition of exocytosis in RBL cells on lipophilicity is observed with the optimum at log P is 5-6. The extremely lipophilic compounds meclozine and buclizine are not active in this model. pH dependence of the effect of the drugs shows that especially the uncharged species are active in inhibiting exocytosis. The investigated compounds show an effect on phase transitions in L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl liposomes as assayed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). For the less extremely lipophilic compounds the induced changes in the phospholipid membranes increased with lipophilicity. The relation between structural features of the drug and the interaction with phospholipids is discussed in view of the DSC results. We conclude that location of the active drugs at the membrane or the membrane/protein interface is important for the inhibiting activity on exocytosis. This could affect several membrane related processes, which are abundant in the early phases of the IgE-mediated signal transduction process. PMID:7655991

  5. Sleep-related eating disorder secondary to zolpidem

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Ferreira, Ligia; Peralta, Rita; Bentes, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) is characterised by eating episodes during the first period of the night sleep with partial loss consciousness, and amnesia. It can rarely be induced by some drugs, including zolpidem. We present a video report of a patient with a 1-year history of SRED caused by zolpidem causing important repercussions in the sleep structure and life quality. The night eating episodes ceased promptly with discontinuation of zolpidem. Upon the follow-up, the sleep structure improved and the daily consequences disappeared. As in few reported cases of zolpidem-induced SRED, our patient was suffering from the parasomnia for a long time before the diagnosis. Active exclusion of symptoms suggestive of SRED in patients under zolpidem treatment can avoid the deleterious effect of the sleep disorder. PMID:23436890

  6. Evaluating suspected work-related neurologic disorders (clinical diagnosis).

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marcello; Aminoff, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of work-related neurologic disorders is essentially one of exclusion because symptoms and signs are often nonspecific. The clinical reasoning requires a three-step approach: (1) establish the characteristics of the presenting disease; (2) ascertain that observed clinical features are consistent with those caused by the suspected agent(s); and (3) assess occupational exposures. A detailed history is of paramount importance in evaluating patients with suspected work-related neurologic disorders as it is in other clinical contexts, especially because in some circumstances it may represent the only criterion to establish causality. Thus, besides characterization of neurologic symptoms, including their location, quality, timecourse, and possible other associated symptoms, the work environment of the patient should be understood in full detail. In this respect, when a neurotoxin is suspected, then the history collection can be guided by the knowledge of the likely syndromes it produces. Similarly, physical examination should be directed to the target of toxicity/entrapment based on information from the work history. Although specific sites and elements of the nervous system may be affected depending on the offending agent, most neurotoxic disorders are characterized by generalized rather than focal neurologic abnormalities. Laboratory toxicologic tests have limited application for the etiologic diagnosis of neurotoxic disorders, except in cases of acute poisoning and in patients exposed to neurotoxic chemicals with prolonged half-life. In most cases examination takes place after the end of exposure, when the offending chemical is no longer detectable in body fluids. Electrophysiologic studies, in particular evoked potentials, electromyography, and conduction velocities, are important to confirm the organic basis of symptoms, particularly to detect subclinical or early neurologic involvement and to reduce the number of disorders to be considered in

  7. Inhibitory Effect on β-Hexosaminidase Release from RBL-2H3 Cells of Extracts and Some Pure Constituents of Benchalokawichian, a Thai Herbal Remedy, Used for Allergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Juckmeta, Thana; Thongdeeying, Pakakrong; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Benchalokawichian (BCW), a Thai traditional herbal formulation, has long been used as antipyretic and to treat skin disorders. It comprises roots from five herbs: Ficus racemosa, Capparis micracantha, Clerodendrum petasites, Harrisonia perforata, and Tiliacora triandra. This polyherbal remedy has recently been included in the Thailand National List of Essential Medicines (Herbal Products list). Methodology. A Bioassay-guided fractionation technique was used to evaluate antiallergy activities of crude extracts, and those obtained by the multistep column chromatography isolation of pure compounds. Inhibitory effect on the release of β-hexosaminidase from RBL-2H3 cells was used to determine antiallergic activity. Results. Two pure compounds from BCW formulation showed higher antiallergic activity than crude or semipure extracts. Pectolinarigenin showed the highest antiallergic activity, followed by O-methylalloptaeroxylin, with IC50 values of 6.3 μg/mL and 14.16 μg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the highest activities of pure compounds were significantly higher than chlorpheniramine (16.2 μg/mL). Conclusions. This study provides some support for the use of BCW in reducing itching and treatment of other skin allergic disorders. The two isolated constituents exhibited high antiallergic activity and it is necessary to determine their mechanism of action. Further phytochemical and safety studies of pure compounds are required before development of these as antiallergy commercial remedies. PMID:25580152

  8. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jenny L.

    2010-01-01

    Epicutaneous patch testing is the gold standard method for the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Despite this knowledge, many clinical dermatologists do not offer patch testing in their offices or offer testing with only a limited number of allergens. Introduced in 1995, the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test originally contained 23 allergens and one control. In 2007, five additional allergens were added. This United States Food and Drug Administration-approved patch testing system made patch testing more convenient, and after its introduction, more dermatologists offered patch testing services. However, the number of allergens in the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test remains relatively low. Every two years, the North American Contact Dermatitis Group collects and reports the data from patch testing among its members to a standardized series of allergens. In 2005-2006, the Group used a series of 65 allergens. Of the top 30 allergens reported in 2005-2006, 10 were not included in the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test. Knowledge of and testing for additional allergens such as these may increase patch testing yield. PMID:20967194

  9. Multidimensional Examination of Impulsivity in Relation to Disordered Gambling

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly-used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, four latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All four latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal four generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  10. Hoarding and its relation to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin D; Watson, David

    2005-07-01

    Although hoarding is observed in some patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), it has not been shown to share a specific relation with OCD. Across two studies, we found that (a) whereas the classic OCD symptoms of checking, rituals, and contamination intercorrelated consistently strongly with one another, hoarding related only moderately to both these OCD symptoms and to depression; (b) OCD patients were distinguished from both other patients and non-patients by classic OCD symptoms, but not by hoarding; and (c) whereas OCD symptoms showed consistent relations with Negative Affect, hoarding largely was uncorrelated with this dimension. These results do not support a specific OCD-hoarding relation but rather call into question the trend of considering it a specific symptom of OCD. PMID:15896286

  11. Multidimensional examination of impulsivity in relation to disordered gambling.

    PubMed

    Mackillop, James; Miller, Joshua D; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E; Campbell, W Keith; Goodie, Adam S

    2014-04-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, 4 latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All 4 latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal 4 generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  12. Nasal irrigation for chronic sinus symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma and nasal polyposis: a hypothesis generating study

    PubMed Central

    Rabago, David P.; Guerard, Emily; Bukstein, Don

    2009-01-01

    Background Rhinosinusitis is a common, expensive disorder with a significant impact on patients' quality-of-life. Chronic sinus symptoms are associated with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and nasal polyposis. Saline nasal irrigation is an adjunctive therapy for rhinosinusitis and sinus symptoms. Prior studies suggest that HSNI may be effective for symptoms associated with allergy, asthma and nasal polyposis. Objective To assess the degree to which subjects using nasal irrigation for chronic sinus symptoms also reported improvements in symptoms related to allergy, asthma or nasal polyposis. Design Qualitative study using in-depth long interviews. Participants 28 participants in a prior qualitative nasal irrigation study. Intervention Daily nasal irrigation. Outcome Qualitative transcripts Results Transcripts of interviews were systematically examined. Twelve of 21 subjects with allergic rhinitis spontaneously reported that HSNI improved symptoms. Two of seven subjects with asthma and one of two subjects with nasal polyposis reported a positive association between HSNI use and asthma or nasal polyposis symptoms. Transcript content was organized into themes which included: 1) HSNI resulted in improvement of allergic rhinitis and asthma symptoms, and 2) HSNI should be used for symptoms of allergic rhinitis. Conclusions This hypothesis generating study offers suggestive qualitative evidence that in patients with frequent rhinosinusitis and daily sinus symptoms, symptoms of concomitant allergic rhinitis, asthma or polyposis may also improve with HSNI. The parent studies offer strong evidence that HSNI is an effective adjunctive treatment for symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Larger prospective studies are needed in patients with these diagnoses. PMID:18593081

  13. Parental educational practices in relation to children's anxiety disorder-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Mellon, Robert C; Moutavelis, Adrianos G

    2011-08-01

    Schoolchildren reported their parents' use of aversive control and positive reinforcement contingencies in their educational interventions, as well as parental non-responsiveness to their requests for educational assistance. They also reported their own levels of six dimensions of anxiety disorder-related phenomena. Both parental use of aversive control and non-responsiveness were directly related to overall levels of child anxiety disorder-related behavior; these correlations were more robust than those observed in previous investigations of more diffuse dimensions of parenting style and trait anxiety. Panic disorder/agoraphobia and Generalized anxiety disorder were the dimensions most strongly correlated with both parental aversive control and non-responsiveness, while Compulsive behavior was uniquely uncorrelated with parental non-responsiveness and uniquely correlated with parental use of positive reinforcement contingencies. Differences in the magnitudes of correlations between anxiety disorder-related dimensions and parental educational practices are interpreted in terms of the probable differential effectiveness of their constituent behaviors in terminating parent-mediated negative reinforcers. PMID:21565462

  14. Broncho-Vaxom Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation by Restoring GSK3β-Related T Regulatory Cell Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hua; Yu, Dehong; Zeng, Xianping; Deng, Mengxia; Sun, Yueqi; Wen, Weiping; Li, Huabin

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral administration of bacterial extracts (eg, Broncho-Vaxom (BV)) has been proposed to attenuate asthma through modulating Treg cells. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully characterized. This study sought to assess the effects of oral administration of BV on GSK-3β expression and Treg cells in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthmatic mice models. Method Asthmatic mice models were established with OVA challenge and treated with oral administration of BV. Next, infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophil and neutrophils, mucous metaplasia, levels of Th1/Th2/Treg-typed cytokines and expression of GSK3β and Foxp3 were examined in asthmatic mice models by histological analysis, Bio-Plex and western blot, respectively. Moreover, the frequencies of Treg cells were evaluated in cultured splenocytes by flow cytometry in the presence of BV or GSK3β siRNA interference. Results We found significant decrease of infiltrated inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in asthmatic mice models after oral administration of BV. Oral administration of BV was shown to significantly suppress mucus metaplasia, Th2-typed cytokine levels and GSK3β expression while increasing Foxp3 production in asthmatic mice models. Moreover, BV significantly enhanced GSK3β-related expansion of Treg cells in cultured spleen cells in vitro. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence that oral administration of BV is capable of attenuating airway inflammation in asthmatic mice models, which may be associated with GSK3β-related expansion of Treg cells. PMID:24667347

  15. The burden of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Although formerly regarded as a nuisance disease, allergic rhinitis (AR) has a considerable effect on quality of life and can have significant consequences if left untreated. The total burden of this disease lies not only in impaired physical and social functioning but also in a financial burden made greater when considering evidence that AR is a possible causal factor in comorbid diseases such as asthma or sinusitis. Compared with matched controls, patients with AR have an approximate twofold increase in medication costs and 1.8-fold the number of visits to health practitioners. Hidden direct costs include the treatment of comorbid asthma, chronic sinusitis, otitis media, upper respiratory infection, and nasal polyposis. Nasal congestion, the most prominent symptom in AR, is associated with sleep-disordered breathing, a condition that can have a profound effect on mental health, including increased psychiatric disorders, depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, sleep-disordered breathing in childhood and adolescence is associated with increased disorders of learning performance, behavior, and attention. In the United States, AR results in 3.5 million lost workdays and 2 million lost schooldays annually. Patients struggle to alleviate their misery, frequently self-adjusting their treatment regimen of over-the-counter and prescription medications because of lack of efficacy, deterioration of efficacy, lack of 24-hour relief, and bothersome side effects. Ironically, health care providers overestimate patient satisfaction with therapy. Therefore, improvement in patient-practitioner communication may enhance patient adherence with prescribed regimens. PMID:17390749

  16. Toxoplasma gondii infection modulate systemic allergic immune response in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, Ignacio M; Sánchez, Vanesa R; Soto, Ariadna S; Picchio, Mariano S; Martin, Valentina; Goldman, Alejandra

    2015-07-01

    The increased prevalence of allergies in developed countries has been attributed to a reduced exposure to some microbes. In agreement with epidemiological studies, we previously showed that Toxoplasma gondii infection prevents allergic airway inflammation. The mechanisms would be related to the strong Th1 response induced by the parasite and to regulatory cell induction. Herein we further characterized whether T. gondii allergy modulation extents to a systemic level or if it is limited to the lung. Parasite infection before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished Th2 cytokine response and, when sensitized during acute infection, an increased in TGF-β production was detected. Allergen specific T cell proliferation was also reduced. Sensitization during both acute and chronic phases of infection resulted in a decreased anaphylaxis reaction. Our results extend earlier work and show that, in addition to lung airway inflammation, T. gondii infection can suppress allergic responses at systemic level. These results open the possibility that this protozoan infection could modulate other allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis or oral allergies. Understanding the mechanisms by which different microorganisms regulate inflammation may potentially lead to the development of strategies aimed to control atopic diseases. PMID:25888245

  17. Clinical and molecular features of Joubert syndrome and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Melissa A.

    2009-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS; OMIM 213300) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a specific congenital malformation of the hindbrain and a broad spectrum of other phenotypic findings that is now known to be caused by defects in the structure and/or function of the primary cilium. The complex hindbrain malformation that is characteristic of JBTS can be identified on axial magnetic resonance imaging and is known as the molar tooth sign (MTS); other diagnostic criteria include intellectual disability, hypotonia, and often, abnormal respiratory pattern and/or abnormal eye movements. In addition, a broad spectrum of other anomalies characterize Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD), and may include retinal dystrophy, ocular coloboma, oral frenulae and tongue tumors, polydactyly, cystic renal disease (including cystic dysplasia or juvenile nephronophthisis), and congenital hepatic fibrosis. The clinical course can be variable, but most children with this condition survive infancy to reach adulthood. At least 8 genes cause JSRD, with some genotype-phenotype correlations emerging, including the association between mutations in the MKS3 gene and hepatic fibrosis characteristic of the JSRD subtype known as COACH syndrome. Several of the causative genes for JSRD are implicated in other ciliary disorders, such as juvenile nephronophthisis and Meckel syndrome, illustrating the close association between these conditions and their overlapping clinical features that reflect a shared etiology involving the primary cilium. PMID:19876931

  18. PRIMARY NOCTURNAL ENURESIS IN CHILDREN WITH ALLERGIC RHINITIS AND SEVERE ADENOTONSILLAR HYPERTROPHY: A SINGLE CENTER PILOT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Chimenz, R; Manti, S; Fede, C; Stroscio, G; Visalli, C; Nicotera, A; Di Rosa, G; Romeo, A C; Salpietro, V; Cuppari, C

    2015-01-01

    Nocturnal enuresis is defined as intermittent urinary incontinence during sleep that occurs at least twice a week for three consecutive months. There is no unifying etiology for nocturnal enuresis in the pediatric population and the disorder is likely to be multifactorial. We aimed to investigate the relationship between primary nocturnal enuresis, allergic rhinitis, and related complications in a paediatric case series from a single Center. We retrospectively reviewed and prospectively followed-up at our Institution (i) 32 children (14 females, 18 males; mean age 6.31±1.21 yrs) affected by allergic rhinitis with adenoidal hypertrophygrade I-II (group A) and (ii) 27 children (11 females, 16 males; mean age 6.52±1.33 yrs) affected by allergic rhinitis with adenoidal hypertrophy grade III-IV (group B). Allergic rhinitis was diagnosed on the basis of (a) typical nasal symptoms due to atopic sensitization (e.g., rhinorrhea , itching, sneezing fits, and nasal congestion and obstruction) and (b) positive skin prick testing and/or increased level of total serum IgE. We identified discrepancies between group A and group B in terms of risk of primary nocturnal enuresis. In fact, only 1 child of group A (3.12%) reported uncomplicated primary nocturnal enuresis; conversely, 6 children of group B (22.22%) showed a history of uncomplicated primary nocturnal enuresis (p=0.040). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of atopic sensitization and serum total IgE levels (p=0.43). Allergic rhinitis may potentially influence the onset and the natural history of nocturnal enuresis in some children. Children with allergic rhinitis and more severe respiratory manifestations, seem to be more prone to developing primary nocturnal enuresis, likely due to potential multi-factorial causes (e.g., sleep disorders, chronic phlogosis, immune deregulation). PMID:26634591

  19. Recent Patents and Emerging Therapeutics in the Treatment of Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gyan P.; Tamboli, Viral; Jwala, Jwala; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular allergy is an inflammatory response of the conjunctival mucosa that also affects the cornea and eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis includes seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). In general, allergic conditions involve mast cell degranulation that leads to release of inflammatory mediators and activation of enzymatic cascades generating pro-inflammatory mediators. In chronic ocular inflammatory disorders associated with mast cell activation such as VKC and AKC constant inflammatory response is observed due to predominance of inflammatory mediators such as eosinophils and Th2-generated cytokines. Antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of acute and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years newer drug molecules have been introduced in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews recent patents and emerging therapeutics in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:21171952

  20. Clinician Experiences Assessing Work Disability Related to Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dewa, Carolyn S.; Hees, Hiske; Trojanowski, Lucy; Schene, Aart H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medical certification is one of the basic administrative mechanisms used by social policies aimed at income protection. The assessment of work disability is central to the income protection application. Yet, there is evidence suggesting that determining work disability related to mental disorders is challenging. Although essential to the disability application process, few studies have looked at physician and other clinician experiences with the process. However, this type of information is critical to developing processes to support providers who participate in the assessments. This purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of physicians and other clinicians assessing public long-term work disability related to mental disorders. Methods This is an exploratory and descriptive study using qualitative methods. Clinician input was gathered through focus groups and individual in-depth interviews. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed to identify recurrent and significant themes that arose during the focus groups and individual interviews. Results Many of the experiences that the clinicians in this sample discussed related to the difficulty of trying to fill the roles of advocate and medical expert as well as the challenge of determining the impact of functional capacity and work ability. The findings also highlight the current gap in knowledge about the factors that affect successful functioning in general and at work in particular. Conclusions Given the challenges created by the current state of knowledge, it may be useful to consider a category of “partial disability”. In addition, the fact that work disability depends on the interaction between the experience of the mental disorder and specific job requirements and the fact that people applying for public long-term disability are not working, it might be helpful to offer a clear description and guidelines of the meaning of work ability. PMID:25789478

  1. Inorganic dust pneumonias: the metal-related parenchymal disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, P; Pacheco, K; Newman, L S

    2000-01-01

    In recent years the greatest progress in our understanding of pneumoconioses, other than those produced by asbestos, silica, and coal, has been in the arena of metal-induced parenchymal lung disorders. Inhalation of metal dusts and fumes can induce a wide range of lung pathology, including airways disorders, cancer, and parenchymal diseases. The emphasis of this update is on parenchymal diseases caused by metal inhalation, including granulomatous disease, giant cell interstitial pneumonitis, chemical pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis, among others. The clinical characteristics, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of disorders arising from exposure to aluminum, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, and nickel are presented in detail. Metal fume fever, an inhalation fever syndrome attributed to exposure to a number of metals, is also discussed. Advances in our knowledge of antigen-specific immunologic reactions in the lung are particularly evident in disorders secondary to beryllium and nickel exposure, where immunologic mechanisms have been well characterized. For example, current evidence suggests that beryllium acts as an antigen, or hapten, and is presented by antigen-presenting cells to CD4+ T cells, which possess specific surface antigen receptors. Other metals such as cadmium and mercury induce nonspecific damage, probably by initiating production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, genetic susceptibility markers associated with increased risk have been identified in some metal-related diseases such as chronic beryllium disease and hard metal disease. Future research needs include development of biologic markers of metal-induced immunologic disease, detailed characterization of human exposure, examination of gene alleles that might confer risk, and association of exposure data with that of genetic susceptibility. PMID:10931787

  2. Characteristics of binge eating disorder in relation to diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Wilfley, Denise E; Citrome, Leslie; Herman, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the evidentiary basis for binge eating disorder (BED) with reference to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for BED. A PubMed search restricted to titles and abstracts of English-language reviews, meta-analyses, clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, journal articles, and letters using human participants was conducted on August 7, 2015, using keywords that included "binge eating disorder," DSM-5, DSM-IV, guilt, shame, embarrassment, quantity, psychological, behavior, and "shape and weight concerns." Of the 257 retrieved publications, 60 publications were considered relevant to discussions related to DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and were included in the current review, and 20 additional references were also included on the basis of the authors' knowledge and/or on a review of the reference lists from relevant articles obtained through the literature search. Evidence supports the duration/frequency criterion for BED and the primary importance of loss of control and marked distress in identifying individuals with BED. Although overvaluation of shape/weight is not a diagnostic criterion, its relationship to the severity of BED psychopathology may identify a unique subset of individuals with BED. Additionally, individuals with BED often exhibit a clinical profile consisting of psychiatric (eg, mood, obsessive-compulsive, and impulsive disorders) and medical (eg, gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes) comorbidities and behavioral profiles (eg, overconsumption of calories outside of a binge eating episode and emotional eating). Future revisions of the BED diagnostic criteria should consider the inclusion of BED subtypes, perhaps based on the overvaluation of shape/weight, and an evidence-based reassessment of severity criteria. PMID:27621631

  3. Characteristics of binge eating disorder in relation to diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wilfley, Denise E; Citrome, Leslie; Herman, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the evidentiary basis for binge eating disorder (BED) with reference to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for BED. A PubMed search restricted to titles and abstracts of English-language reviews, meta-analyses, clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, journal articles, and letters using human participants was conducted on August 7, 2015, using keywords that included “binge eating disorder,” DSM-5, DSM-IV, guilt, shame, embarrassment, quantity, psychological, behavior, and “shape and weight concerns.” Of the 257 retrieved publications, 60 publications were considered relevant to discussions related to DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and were included in the current review, and 20 additional references were also included on the basis of the authors’ knowledge and/or on a review of the reference lists from relevant articles obtained through the literature search. Evidence supports the duration/frequency criterion for BED and the primary importance of loss of control and marked distress in identifying individuals with BED. Although overvaluation of shape/weight is not a diagnostic criterion, its relationship to the severity of BED psychopathology may identify a unique subset of individuals with BED. Additionally, individuals with BED often exhibit a clinical profile consisting of psychiatric (eg, mood, obsessive–compulsive, and impulsive disorders) and medical (eg, gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes) comorbidities and behavioral profiles (eg, overconsumption of calories outside of a binge eating episode and emotional eating). Future revisions of the BED diagnostic criteria should consider the inclusion of BED subtypes, perhaps based on the overvaluation of shape/weight, and an evidence-based reassessment of severity criteria. PMID:27621631

  4. Cognition and daytime functioning in sleep-related breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Howard, Mark E; Barnes, Maree

    2011-01-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders encompass a range of disorders in which abnormal ventilation occurs during sleep as a result of partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway, altered respiratory drive, abnormal chest wall movement, or respiratory muscle function. The most common of these is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), occurring in both adults and children, and causing significant cognitive and daytime dysfunction and reduced quality of life. OSA patients experience repetitive brief cessation of breathing throughout the night, which causes intermittent hypoxemia (reductions in hemoglobin oxygen levels) and fragmented sleep patterns. These nocturnal events result in excessive daytime sleepiness, and changes in mood and cognition. Chronic excessive sleepiness during the day is a common symptom of sleep-related breathing disorders, which is assessed in sleep clinics both subjectively (questionnaire) and objectively (sleep latency tests). Mood changes are often reported by patients, including irritability, fatigue, depression, and anxiety. A wide range of cognitive deficits have been identified in untreated OSA patients, from attentional and vigilance, to memory and executive functions, and more complex tasks such as simulated driving. These changes are reflected in patient reports of difficulty in concentrating, increased forgetfulness, an inability to make decisions, and falling asleep at the wheel of a motor vehicle. These cognitive changes can also have significant downstream effects on daily functioning. Moderate to severe cases of the disorder are at a higher risk of having a motor vehicle accident, and may also have difficulties at work or school. A number of comorbidities may also influence the cognitive changes in OSA patients, including hypertension, diabetes, and stroke. These diseases can cause changes to neural vasculature and result in neural damage, leading to cognitive impairments. Examination of OSA patients using neuroimaging techniques such

  5. Epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics of asthma and allergic disease is a field that has expanded greatly in the last decade. Previously thought only in terms of cell differentiation, it is now evident the epigenetics regulate many processes. With T cell activation, commitment toward an allergic phenotype is tightly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications at the Th2 locus control region. When normal epigenetic control is disturbed, either experimentally or by environmental exposures, Th1/Th2 balance can be affected. Epigenetic marks are not only transferred to daughter cells with cell replication but they can also be inherited through generations. In animal models, with constant environmental pressure, epigenetically determined phenotypes are amplified through generations and can last up to 2 generations after the environment is back to normal. In this review on the epigenetic regulation of asthma and allergic diseases we review basic epigenetic mechanisms and discuss the epigenetic control of Th2 cells. We then cover the transgenerational inheritance model of epigenetic traits and discuss how this could relate the amplification of asthma and allergic disease prevalence and severity through the last decades. Finally, we discuss recent epigenetic association studies for allergic phenotypes and related environmental risk factors as well as potential underlying mechanisms for these associations. PMID:24932182

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder among bereaved relatives of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Elklit, Ask; Reinholt, Nina; Nielsen, Louise Hjort; Blum, Alon; Lasgaard, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and predictors of PTSD in individuals who experienced the loss of a close relative to cancer. A total of 251 bereaved relatives ages 14 to 76 (M = 41.3, SD = 16.8) were recruited at a counseling service for cancer patients and their relatives. The prevalence of current probable PTSD was 40% in the bereaved sample. A hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that full-time employment, perceived control, and a secure attachment style moderated the risk for PTSD. Moreover, a long period of caretaking, high levels of somatization, and dissociation were all associated with an increased risk of PTSD. PMID:20623415

  7. Allergic rhinitis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... in something you are allergic to, such as dust mites, animal dander, or pollen. Allergic rhinitis is ... your or your child's exposure to them. Reduce dust and dust mites in the home. Control molds ...

  8. Oleanolic Acid Controls Allergic and Inflammatory Responses in Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Carmen; Martín, Rubén; Gallego-Muñoz, Patricia; Hernández, Marita; Nieto, María L.

    2014-01-01

    Pollen is the most common aeroallergen to cause seasonal conjunctivitis. The result of allergen exposure is a strong Th2-mediated response along with conjunctival mast cell degranulation and eosinophilic infiltration. Oleanolic acid (OA) is natural a triterpene that displays strong anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties being an active anti-allergic molecule on hypersensitivity reaction models. However, its effect on inflammatory ocular disorders including conjunctivits, has not yet been addressed. Hence, using a Ragweed pollen (RWP)-specific allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) mouse model we study here whether OA could modify responses associated to allergic processes. We found that OA treatment restricted mast cell degranulation and infiltration of eosinophils in conjunctival tissue and decreased allergen-specific Igs levels in EAC mice. Th2-type cytokines, secreted phospholipase A2 type-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), and chemokines levels were also significantly diminished in the conjunctiva and serum of OA-treated EAC mice. Moreover, OA treatment also suppressed RWP-specific T-cell proliferation. In vitro studies, on relevant cells of the allergic process, revealed that OA reduced the proliferative and migratory response, as well as the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators on EoL-1 eosinophils and RBL-2H3 mast cells exposed to allergic and/or crucial inflammatory stimuli such as RWP, sPLA2-IIA or eotaxin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the beneficial activity of OA in ocular allergic processes and may provide a new intervention strategy and potential therapy for allergic diseases. PMID:24699261

  9. Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Alice E W; Borish, Larry; Gurrola, José; Payne, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the history of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and the clinical, pathologic, and radiographic criteria necessary to establish its diagnosis and differentiate this disease from other types of chronic rhinosinusitis. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis is a noninvasive fungal form of sinus inflammation characterized by an often times unilateral, expansile process in which the typical allergic "peanut-butter-like" mucin contributes to the formation of nasal polyps, hyposmia/anosmia, and structural changes of the face. IgE sensitization to fungi is a necessary, but not sufficient, pathophysiologic component of the disease process that is also defined by microscopic visualization of mucin-containing fungus and characteristic radiological imaging. This article expounds on these details and others including the key clinical and scientific distinctions of this diagnosis, the pathophysiologic mechanisms beyond IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that must be at play, and areas of current and future research. PMID:27393774

  10. Gene Risk Factors for Age-Related Brain Disorders May Affect Immune System Function

    MedlinePlus

    ... for age-related brain disorders may affect immune system function June 17, 2014 Scientists have discovered gene ... factors for age-related neurological disorders to immune system functions, such as inflammation, offers new insights into ...

  11. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. PMID:27083105

  12. Automatic Neural Processing of Disorder-Related Stimuli in Social Anxiety Disorder: Faces and More

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Claudia; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Straube, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with automatic information processing biases resulting in hypersensitivity to signals of social threat such as negative facial expressions. However, the nature and extent of automatic processes in SAD on the behavioral and neural level is not entirely clear yet. The present review summarizes neuroscientific findings on automatic processing of facial threat but also other disorder-related stimuli such as emotional prosody or negative words in SAD. We review initial evidence for automatic activation of the amygdala, insula, and sensory cortices as well as for automatic early electrophysiological components. However, findings vary depending on tasks, stimuli, and neuroscientific methods. Only few studies set out to examine automatic neural processes directly and systematic attempts are as yet lacking. We suggest that future studies should: (1) use different stimulus modalities, (2) examine different emotional expressions, (3) compare findings in SAD with other anxiety disorders, (4) use more sophisticated experimental designs to investigate features of automaticity systematically, and (5) combine different neuroscientific methods (such as functional neuroimaging and electrophysiology). Finally, the understanding of neural automatic processes could also provide hints for therapeutic approaches. PMID:23745116

  13. Mutation spectrum of Joubert syndrome and related disorders among Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Al-Shamsi, Aisha M; Gleeson, Joseph G; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2014-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare autosomal recessive (AR), neurological condition characterized by dysgenesis of the cerebellar vermis with the radiological hallmark of molar tooth sign, oculomotor apraxia, recurrent hyperventilation and intellectual disability. Most cases display a broad spectrum of additional features, including polydactyly, retinal dystrophy and renal abnormalities, which define different subtypes of JS-related disorders (JSRDs). To date, 23 genes have been shown to cause JSRDs, and although most of the identified genes encode proteins involved in cilia function or assembly, the molecular mechanisms associated with ciliary signaling remain enigmatic. Arab populations are ethnically diverse with high levels of consanguinity (20–60%) and a high prevalence of AR disorders. In addition, isolated communities with very-high levels of inbreeding and founder mutations are common. In this article, we review the 70 families reported thus far with JS and JSRDs that have been studied at the molecular level from all the Arabic countries and compile the mutations found. We show that JS and the related JSRDs are genetically heterogeneous in Arabs, with 53 mutations in 15 genes. Thirteen of these mutations are potentially founder mutations for the region. PMID:27081510

  14. Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders: 25 Years of Gene Discovery.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, Aline; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder, presenting with skeletal, ocular, skin, and cardiovascular symptoms. Significant clinical overlap with other systemic connective tissue diseases, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS), and the MASS phenotype, has been documented. In MFS and LDS, the cardiovascular manifestations account for the major cause of patient morbidity and mortality, rendering them the main target for therapeutic intervention. Over the past decades, gene identification studies confidently linked the aforementioned syndromes, as well as nonsyndromic aneurysmal disease, to genetic defects in proteins related to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, greatly expanding our knowledge on the disease mechanisms and providing us with novel therapeutic targets. As a result, the focus of the developing pharmacological treatment strategies is shifting from hemodynamic stress management to TGF-β antagonism. In this review, we discuss the insights that have been gained in the molecular biology of MFS and related disorders over the past 25 years. PMID:26919284

  15. Multicomponent Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Combat-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Trauma Management Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Samuel M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe and chronic mental disorder that is highly prevalent within Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers. A severe psychiatric disorder, combat-related PTSD is typically accompanied by multiple comorbid psychiatric disorders, symptom chronicity, and extreme social maladjustment. Thus, PTSD is a complex…

  16. Do mouse models of allergic asthma mimic clinical disease?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    Experimental mouse models of allergic asthma established almost 10 years ago offered new opportunities to study disease pathogenesis and to develop new therapeutics. These models focused on the factors governing the allergic immune response, on modeling clinical behavior of allergic asthma, and led to insights into pulmonary pathophysiology. Although mouse models rarely completely reproduce all the features of human disease, after sensitization and respiratory tract challenges with antigen, wild-type mice develop a clinical syndrome that closely resembles allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), increased IgE, mucus hypersecretion, and eventually, airway remodeling. There are, however, differences between mouse and human physiology that threaten to limit the value of mouse models. Three examples of such differences relate to both clinical manifestations of disease and underlying pathogenesis. First, in contrast to patients who have increased methacholine-induced AHR even when they are symptom-free, mice exhibit only transient methacholine-induced AHR following allergen exposure. Second, chronic allergen exposure in patients leads to chronic allergic asthma, whereas repeated exposures in sensitized mice causes suppression of disease. Third, IgE and mast cells, in humans, mediate early- and late-phase allergic responses, though both are unnecessary for the generation of allergic asthma in mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that mouse models of allergic asthma are not exact replicas of human disease and thus, question the validity of these models. However, observations from mouse models of allergic asthma support many existing paradigms, although some novel discoveries in mice have yet to be verified in patients. This review presents an overview of the clinical aspects of disease in mouse models of allergic asthma emphasizing (1). the factors influencing the pathophysiological responses during

  17. [Genetic study of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Luo

    2012-09-01

    Allergic diseases mentioned in this review is regarding to I type allergic inflammation induced by an IgE-mediated reaction, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and food allergy. It is convinced that allergic diseases belong to multiple genes diseases and are controlled by both genetic and environmental factors. Meanwhile there exists gene-gene as well as gene-environment interactions during the development of the disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the toolkit, advance, inherent difficulties and future clinical application prospect in genetic studies of allergic disease. PMID:23214325

  18. Diagnosing Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Glenis K; Scadding, Guy W

    2016-05-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is the most common immunologic disease in industrialized societies and has a significant impact on quality of life. Most asthmatics also have rhinitis. AR may present with comorbidities, including chronic otitis media with effusion, cough, and pollen-food cross-reactivity. AR may occur in isolation or be part of a mixed rhinitis. PMID:27083100

  19. Religious Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alina; Matiz, Catalina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Henna, derived from a combination of natural leaves and coloring additives, is a common decorative dye traditionally used in many Islamic religious celebrations. Para-phenylenediamine (PPD), a major component of black henna tattoo, is a strong sensitizer and common allergen. We report a case of severe connubial allergic contact dermatitis after black henna heterotransfer in a girl. PMID:25968562

  20. Cortical morphology in children with alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rajaprakash, Meghna; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Lerch, Jason P; Rovet, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction It is well established that individuals exposed to alcohol in utero have reduced cortical grey matter volumes. However, the candidate determinants of these reductions, cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA), have not been investigated exclusively in alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND), the most prevalent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder subgroup that lacks the characteristic facial dysmorphology. Methods T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained from 88 participants (8–16 years), 36 diagnosed with ARND and 52 typically developing controls. Scans were submitted to the CIVET pipeline (version 1.1.10). Deformable models were used to construct the inner white matter surfaces and pial surfaces from which CT and SA measures were derived. Group differences in cortical volume, CT, and SA were computed using a general linear model covaried for age, sex, and handedness. Results Global cortical volume reductions in ARND did not reflect CT, which did not differ between groups. Instead, volume decreases were consistent with global SA reductions in bilateral frontal and temporal as well as right occipital regions. Local reductions in SA were observed in the right superior temporal gyrus and the right occipital-temporal region. Conclusion Results suggest that in ARND, prenatal alcohol exposure perturbs global SA to a greater degree than CT, particularly in the right temporal lobe. PMID:24653953

  1. The Castleman's Disease and Related Disorders--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Khan, M K; Talukder, R H; Kamruzzaman, M

    2016-01-01

    Castleman's disease is a rare primary disease of the lymph nodes. Little is known about the management of the disease. Surgical treatment gives a very good result. What other modalities of treatment could be done is not yet established. The role of surgery gives good result and follow up evaluation is satisfactory. We found a solitary intra-abdominal mass of lymphoid hyperplasia with a histological diagnosis of Castlemans disease identified in the pathological data base. Unicentric disease was defined as it was a solitary mass. Clinical, Radiological and Laboratory data were analysed to evaluate treatment response. The patient also has related disorders as Acanthosis nigricans, Myoneuronal disorder as-MG and bronchiolitis. The patient diagnosed as angiofollicular hyperplasia (Castleman's disease). After evaluation patient under went surgical treatment, partial excision of tumor mass due to morbid adhesion with inferior vena cava. The patient becomes symptom free and lump disappears within 60 days of treatment. There was no recurrence of the disease after further evaluation. The author recommends that in Unicentric variant of Castlemans disease surgical resection of the tumor is curative. The unicentric tumour may be hyaline-vascular or hyaline-vascular/ plasma cell type. Partial resection, Radiotherapy or observation alone may avoid excessive aggressive therapy. PMID:26931270

  2. Impulse control and related disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Daniel; Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as compulsive gambling, buying, sexual behavior, and eating, are a serious and increasingly recognized complication of dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). Other impulsive-compulsive behaviors have been linked to dopaminergic medications; these include punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors) and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS; compulsive medication overuse). ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), particularly at higher dosages; in contrast, DDS is primarily associated with shorter-acting, higher-potency dopaminergic medications, such as apomorphine and levodopa. Risk factors for ICDs may include male sex; younger age; younger age at PD onset; a pre-PD history of ICD(s); personal or family history of substance abuse; bipolar disorder; gambling problems; and impulsive personality traits. The primary treatment of ICDs in PD is discontinuation of DA therapy. Not all patients can tolerate this, however, due to worsening motor symptoms and/or DA withdrawal syndrome (a severe, stereotyped drug withdrawal syndrome similar to that of other psychostimulants). While psychiatric medications are frequently used to treat ICDs in the general population, there is no empirical evidence to suggest that they are effective in PD. Given the paucity of treatment options and potentially serious consequences of ICDs in PD, it is critical for patients to be monitored closely for their development. As empirically validated treatments for ICDs emerge, it will also be important to examine their efficacy and tolerability in individuals with comorbid PD. PMID:23038208

  3. Identification of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Mining

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Eric; Pollard, Jonisha P.

    2016-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) prevention measures have been studied in great depth throughout various industries. While the nature and causes of these disorders have been characterized in many industries, WMSDs occurring in the U.S. mining sector have not been characterized for several years. In this report, MSHA accident/injury/illness data from 2009 to 2013 were characterized to determine the most frequently reported WMSDs in the U.S. mining sector. WMSDs were most frequently reported in workers with less than 5 years or more than 20 years of mining experience. The number of days lost from work was the highest for shoulder and knee injuries and was found to increase with worker age. Underground and surface coal, surface stone and stone processing plants experienced the greatest number of WMSDs over the period studied. WMSDs were most commonly caused by an employee suffering from an overexertion, falls or being struck by an object while performing materials handling, maintenance and repair tasks, getting on or off equipment or machines, and walking or running. The injury trends presented should be used to help determine the focus of future WMSD prevention research in mining. PMID:27294012

  4. A Systematic Review on the Development of Asthma and Allergic Diseases in Relation to International Immigration: The Leading Role of the Environment Confirmed

    PubMed Central

    Cabieses, Báltica; Uphoff, Eleonora; Pinart, Mariona; Antó, Josep Maria; Wright, John

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases is rising worldwide. Evidence on potential causal pathways of asthma and allergies is growing, but findings have been contradictory, particularly on the interplay between allergic diseases and understudied social determinants of health like migration status. This review aimed at providing evidence for the association between migration status and asthma and allergies, and to explore the mechanisms between migration status and the development of asthma and allergies. Methods and Findings Systematic review on asthma and allergies and immigration status in accordance with the guidelines set by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The pooled odds ratio (OR) of the prevalence of asthma in immigrants compared to the host population was 0.60 (95% CI 0.45–0.84), and the pooled OR for allergies was 1.01 (95% CI 0.62–1.69). The pooled OR for the prevalence of asthma in first generation versus second generation immigrants was 0.37 (95% CI 0.25–0.58). Comparisons between populations in their countries of origin and those that emigrated vary depending on their level of development; more developed countries show higher rates of asthma and allergies. Conclusions Our findings suggest a strong influence of the environment on the development of asthma and allergic diseases throughout the life course. The prevalence of asthma is generally higher in second generation than first generation immigrants. With length of residence in the host country the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases increases steadily. These findings are consistent across study populations, host countries, and children as well as adults. Differences have been found to be significant when tested in a linear model, as well as when comparing between early and later age of migration, and between shorter and longer time of residence. PMID:25141011

  5. The Relation between Anger Management Style and Organ System-Related Somatic Symptoms in Patients with Depressive Disorders and Somatoform Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joong Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to examine the relation between anger management style and organ system-related somatic symptoms in depressive disorder and somatoform disorder patients. Materials and Methods The subjects included 73 patients with depressive disorders and 47 with somatoform disorders. Anger management styles were assessed by the Anger Expression Scale, while the severity of organ system-related somatic symptoms was evaluated using the Somatic Stress Response Scale (SSRS). The severity of depression and hostility was assessed by the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) depression and hostility subscales. Results The results of multiple regression analyses showed that, in depressive disorder patients, the level of anger expression was significantly associated with the severity of somatic symptoms related to neuromuscular, cardiorespiratory and gastrointestinal systems. However, in these patients, the level of anger suppression was not significantly associated with the severity of somatic symptoms related to any specific organ systems. In patients with somatoform disorders, there was no significant association between the level of anger suppression or anger expression and the severity of the somatic symptoms related to any specific organ systems. Conclusion These results suggest that, in depressive disorder patients, anger expression is likely to be predominantly involved in the neuromuscular, cardiorespiratory and gastrointestinal organ systems. However, in each of depressive disorder and somatoform disorder patients, anger suppression is not likely to be associated with any specific organ systems. PMID:18306468

  6. Olfaction in allergic rhinitis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Boris A; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a key symptom in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). Despite the implications for quality of life, relatively few articles have tested olfactory function in their investigations. The current systematic review aimed to investigate the following 2 questions: (1) What does AR do to human olfaction? (2) How effective is the treatment of AR in restoring the sense of smell? A comprehensive literature search was performed, and human studies of any design were included. A total of 420 articles were identified, and 36 articles were considered relevant. Data indicate that the frequency of olfactory dysfunction increases with the duration of the disorder, and most studies report a frequency in the range of 20% to 40%. Although olfactory dysfunction does not appear to be very severe in patients with AR, its presence seems to increase with the severity of the disease. There is very limited evidence that antihistamines improve olfactory function. In addition, there is limited evidence that topical steroids improve the sense of smell, especially in patients with seasonal AR. This is also the case for specific immunotherapy. However, many questions remain unanswered because randomized controlled trials are infrequent and only a few studies rely on quantitative measurement of olfactory function. PMID:26409662

  7. Abnormal IgG4 antibody response to aeroallergens in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, P; Delneste, Y; Tillie-Leblond, I; Wallaert, B; carlier, A; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B

    1994-01-01

    Various studies have suggested the involvement of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) antibodies (Ab) in the physiopathology of allergic disorders. Recently, an abnormal IgG4 Ab production in response to immunization has been reported in some atopic patients. Thus, in order to evidence in allergic patients, a potential abnormal IgG4 Ab response to aeroallergens following natural exposure, we compared, in 34 patients sensitive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and in 16 healthy subjects, the IgG4 Ab response to D. pteronyssinus, grass pollen and cat dander, using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Since some patients were also sensitive to grass pollen and/or to cat dander, we analyzed, in all patients, the IgG4 Ab responses both towards the allergen(s) they were sensitive to (sensitizing allergen) or not (unrelated allergen). The results showed that 90% of the patients produced levels of antisensitizing allergen(s) IgG4 Ab significantly higher than the controls; this IgG4 Ab response was correlated with the corresponding specific IgE Ab level. In addition, among these patients, around 40% presented high levels of IgG4 Ab to the unrelated allergen(s). Thus, in allergic patients, while specific IgE Ab define the nature of the sensitizing allergen, the presence of IgG4 Ab directed against various allergens seems in relation with an abnormal isotype regulation associated with atopic disorders. PMID:8199463

  8. Restless Eating, Restless Legs, and Sleep Related Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) often presents with a primary complaint of sleep initiation difficulty with only ambiguous allusions to motor symptoms. This may result in the condition being misdiagnosed as a psychophysiological insomnia. Further, nocturnal eating is common in RLS and like the classic motor symptoms, patients will describe an inability to initiate sleep until their urge (to eat) is addressed. Restless nocturnal eating arises, intensifies, and subsides in parallel to motor symptoms. Once misdiagnosed as psychophysiological insomnia, RLS patients are frequently treated with benzodiazepine receptor agonists. The CNS actions of these sedating agents, suppression of memory and executive function, unleash predisposed amnestic behaviors. In the case of RLS this would be expected to include the inappropriate ambulatory and eating behaviors of sleep related eating disorder (SRED). The evidence and implications of a link between the restless eating of RLS and SRED is presented here. PMID:26626472

  9. [Prevention of allergic diseases in childhood: from theory to reality].

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Allergic diseases have an increasing worldwide prevalence and a great impact on the health related costs. The research is focused on the study of etiological and risk factors of allergic diseases that can potentially be modified with primary, secondary and tertiary prevention strategies. Many of these measures do not have a definitively proven effect taking place in a controlled context different to what happens in real life. This paper aims to review the latest evidence on prevention of allergic diseases considering certainties and unresolved issues and focuses mainly on environmental, dietary, pharmacological and immunological preventive strategies for different levels of prevention. It is imperative to have a better understanding of genetic and environmental factors that cause allergic diseases to optimize preventive measures that are effective in reversing the increasing trend in the prevalence of allergic illnesses in childhood. PMID:27164342

  10. Work organization, job stress, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Carayon, P; Smith, M J; Haims, M C

    1999-12-01

    Recent studies indicate potential links among work organization, job stress, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs). In this paper we propose several pathways for a theoretical relationship between job stress and WRMDs. These pathways highlight the physiological, psychological, and behavioral reactions to stress that can affect WRMDs directly and indirectly. One model stipulates that psychosocial work factors (e.g., work pressure, lack of control), which can cause stress, might also influence or be related to ergonomic factors such as force, repetition, and posture that have been identified as risk factors for WRMDs. In order to fully understand the etiology of WRMDs, it is important to examine both physical ergonomic and psychosocial work factors simultaneously. Smith and Carayon-Sainfort (1989) have proposed a model of the work system for stress management that provides a useful framework for conceptualizing the work-related factors that contribute to WRMDs. Practical applications of this research include practitioners taking into account psychosocial work factors and job stress in their efforts to reduce and control WRMDs. PMID:10774134

  11. Sleep-Related Problems in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Lack, Caleb W.; Geffken, Gary R.; Jacob, Marni L.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2008-01-01

    Although attention has been given to presence of sleep related problems (SRPs) in children with psychiatric conditions, little has been reported on SRPs in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Sixty-six children and adolescents with OCD were administered the Children’s Yale Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and completed the Children’s Depression Inventory and Multidimensional Anxiety Scale. Their parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist and Children’s Obsessive-Compulsive Impact Scale. A subset of youth (n = 41) completed a trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Frequency of eight specific SRPs was examined in relation to age, gender, OCD symptom severity, child-rated symptoms of depression and anxiety, parent-proxy ratings of internalizing and externalizing problems, and functional impairment. Ninety-two percent of youth experienced at least one SRP, with 27.3% reporting five or more SRPs. Total SRPs were positively associated with OCD symptom severity, child-rated anxiety, and parent-proxy ratings of internalizing problems. Total and several specific SRPs were reduced following cognitive-behavioral treatment. These results suggest that SRPs are relatively common in youth with OCD, are associated with symptom severity, and warrant attention during assessment and treatment. PMID:17951025

  12. 123I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine Myocardial Scintigraphy in Lewy Body-Related Disorders: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Joo; Kim, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Lewy body-related disorders are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, which have abnormal aggregations of α-synuclein in the nigral and extranigral areas, including in the heart. 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy is a well-known tool to evaluate cardiac sympathetic denervation in the Lewy body-related disorders. MIBG scintigraphy showed low uptake of MIBG in the Lewy body-related disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, pure autonomic failure and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review summarizes previous results on the diagnostic applications of MIBG scintigraphy in Lewy body-related disorders. PMID:26090077

  13. Carnosine and Related Peptides: Therapeutic Potential in Age-Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cararo, José H; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patricia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C

    2015-09-01

    Imidazole dipeptides (ID), such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine), are compounds widely distributed in excitable tissues of vertebrates. ID are also endowed of several biochemical properties in biological tissues, including antioxidant, bivalent metal ion chelating, proton buffering, and carbonyl scavenger activities. Furthermore, remarkable biological effects have been assigned to such compounds in age-related human disorders and in patients whose activity of serum carnosinase is deficient or undetectable. Nevertheless, the precise biological role of ID is still to be unraveled. In the present review we shall discuss some evidences from clinical and basic studies for the utilization of ID as a drug therapy for age-related human disorders. PMID:26425391

  14. Carnosine and Related Peptides: Therapeutic Potential in Age-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cararo, José H; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patricia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C

    2015-01-01

    Imidazole dipeptides (ID), such as carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine), are compounds widely distributed in excitable tissues of vertebrates. ID are also endowed of several biochemical properties in biological tissues, including antioxidant, bivalent metal ion chelating, proton buffering, and carbonyl scavenger activities. Furthermore, remarkable biological effects have been assigned to such compounds in age-related human disorders and in patients whose activity of serum carnosinase is deficient or undetectable. Nevertheless, the precise biological role of ID is still to be unraveled. In the present review we shall discuss some evidences from clinical and basic studies for the utilization of ID as a drug therapy for age-related human disorders. PMID:26425391

  15. Knowledge of Social Anxiety Disorder Relative to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Among Educational Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, James D.; Crittenden, Kia; Dalrymple, Kristy L.

    2004-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD), the 3rd most common psychiatric disorder in the United States, follows a chronic and unremitting course, often resulting in severe impairments in multiple areas of functioning. Despite a typical age of onset in early adolescence, the disorder is rarely recognized and treated in adolescent populations. Given its early…

  16. [Obscene telephone calls--relations to paraphilias, paraphilia related disorders and stalking].

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Hill, Andreas; Nika, Evangelia; Berner, Wolfgang

    2005-09-01

    Little is known about the aetiology, course and therapy of obscene telephone calls as a paraphilic behaviour. Overlaps to other paraphilias like voyeurism, paraphilia related disorders and the concept of stalking are reported in the literature. In case reports we describe the paraphilic development and course with a focus on the relationship to the victim. We discuss this on the background of different concepts regarding risk assessment and therapy. PMID:16094556

  17. Increased Risk of Dementia Among Sleep-Related Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Chieh; Chou, Chung-Hsing; Fan, Yu-Ming; Yin, Jiu-Haw; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Chien, Wu-Chien; Sung, Yueh-Feng; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Lin, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yu-Kai; Lee, Jiunn-Tay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sleep-related movement disorders (SRMD) are sleep disorders. As poor sleep quality is associated with cognitive impairment, we hypothesized that SRMD patients were exposed to a great risk for developing dementia. The present study was aimed to retrospectively examine the association of SRMD and dementia risk. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted using the data obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID) in Taiwan. The study cohort enrolled 604 patients with SRMD who were initially diagnosed and 2416 patients who were randomly selected and age/gender matched with the study group. SRMD, dementia, and other confounding factors were defined according to International Classification of Diseases Clinical Modification Codes. Cox proportional-hazards regressions were employed to examine adjusted hazard ratios (HR) after adjusting with confounding factors. Our data revealed that patients with SRMD had a 3.952 times (95% CI = 1.124–4.767) higher risk to develop all-cause dementia compared with individuals without SRMD. The results showed that SRMD patients aged 45 to 64 exhibited highest risk of developing all-cause dementia (HR: 5.320, 95% CI = 1.770–5.991), followed by patients age ≥65 (HR: 4.123, 95% CI = 2.066–6.972) and <45 (HR: 3.170, 95% CI = 1.050–4.128), respectively. Females with SRMD were at greater risk to develop all-cause dementia (HR: 4.372, 95% CI = 1.175–5.624). The impact of SRMD on dementia risk was progressively increased by various follow-up time intervals (<1 year, 1–2 years, and ≥2 years). The results suggest that SRMD is linked to an increased risk for dementia with gender-dependent and time-dependent characteristics. PMID:26705224

  18. [Age-related factors of psychopathology of impulse control disorders].

    PubMed

    Shiurkute, A

    1999-01-01

    15 children and adolescents with impulse control disorders (mean age 12.9 years) were examined. These disorders were presented as dromomania, kleptomania, aggressive-sadistic actions, tricholillomania, pyromania; a combination of different types was observed in some cases. Schizophrenia was diagnosed in 7 cases, affective disorders--in 8 patients. Independently of the nosologic unity of the disease, development of the impulse control disorders took place in affective disorders which manifested either by monopolar course (depression) (11 cases), or by bypolar attacks with unclear outlines of the phases (4 patients). Psychopathology of impulse control disorders in children and juveniles was analogous to that of the adults, however, their structure wasn't so complex and development of the phases wasn't so clear. PMID:11530454

  19. A review of pharmacogenetic studies of substance-related disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jermaine D.; Comer, Sandra D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Substance-related disorders (SRDs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Family, twin, and adoption studies have demonstrated the substantial heritability of SRDs. To determine the impact of genetic variation on risk for SRD and the response to treatment, researchers have conducted a number of secondary data analyses and quasi-experimental studies that target one or more candidate gene variants. Methods This review examines studies in which candidate polymorphisms were examined as mediator variables to identify pharmacogenetic effects on subjective responses to drug administration or cues or outcomes of medication trials for SRDs. Efforts to use a meta-analytic approach to quantify these effects are premature because the number of available studies using similar methods and outcomes is limited, so the present review is qualitative. Results Findings from these studies provide preliminary evidence of clinically relevant pharmacogenetic effects. However, independent replication of these findings has been sparse. Conclusions Although this growing body of literature has produced conflicting results, improved statistical controls may help to clarify the findings. Additionally, the use of empirically derived sub-phenotypes (i.e., which serve to differentiate distinct groups of affected individuals) may also help to identify genetic mediators of pharmacologic response in relation to SRDs. The identification of genetic mediators can inform clinical care both by identifying risk factors for SRDs and predicting adverse events and therapeutic outcomes associated with specific pharmacotherapies. PMID:25819021

  20. Pycnogenol® in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Om P

    2015-07-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological actions of Pycnogenol® in the treatment of metabolic syndrome and related disorders such as obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and hypertension. Pycnogenol® is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. Subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, antiinflammatory, endothelium-dependent vasodilator activity, and also its anti-thrombotic effects make it appropriate for targeting the multifaceted pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, blood pressure in mild to moderate hypertensive patients, and waist circumference, and improve lipid profile, renal and endothelial functions in metabolic syndrome. This review highlights the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and related clinical research findings on the safety and efficacy of Pycnogenol®. The results of clinical research studies performed with Pycnogenol® are discussed using an evidence-based, target-oriented approach following the pathophysiology of individual components as well as in metabolic syndrome overall. PMID:25931421

  1. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Quality of smartphone apps related to panic: smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD) and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life), and evidence-based content quality. The Brief DISCERN score and the criteria of the "Health on the Net" label were also used as content quality indicators as well as the number of downloads. Of 247 apps identified, 52 met all inclusion criteria. The content quality and self-help scores of these PD apps were poor. None of the assessed indicators were associated with payment status or number of downloads. Multiple linear regressions showed that the Brief DISCERN score significantly predicted the content quality and self-help scores. Poor content quality and self-help scores of PD smartphone apps highlight the gap between their technological potential and the overall quality of available products. PMID:26236242

  2. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders among Indian tabla players.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Wricha; De, Amitabha; Gangopadhyay, Somnath; Chandra, Ananga M

    2013-06-01

    Playing a percussion instrument demands great force and effort, which may make percussionists prone to playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMDs). Of all of the percussion instruments in India, tabla is the most popular. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of discomforts among professional tabla players. Eighty-five professional tabla players voluntarily participated in the study. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire and visual analog scale were administered to all the participants. Demographic details, music-related activities, and symptoms of discomfort were also recorded. It was found that prone anatomical areas were the low back, right shoulder, neck, left shoulder, upper back, and knees. The frequency of discomfort was found to be mostly weekly for the shoulders and monthly for neck, low back, and knees. There was an association between visual analog scale and prevalence of self-reported discomforts in some body parts. It can be said that the prolonged, unsupported, folded-knee sitting posture may be the cause of discomforts. PMID:23752286

  3. Curcumin: a novel treatment for skin-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Friedman, Adam J

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin, or diferuloylmethane, is a crystalline compound which gives the East Asian spice turmeric its bright yellow color. The medicinal properties of this spice have been referenced in numerous countries and cultures throughout the world. Today, there is growing scientific evidence suggesting curcumin's utility in the treatment of chronic pain, inflammatory dermatoses, acceleration of wound closure, skin infections, as well as cosmetic ailments such as dyspigmentation. In addition, curcumin may have a protective role against various pollutants and cytotoxic agents, indicating that it may be beneficial in a mitigational or prophylaxis role. Although turmeric has been used for thousands of years in alternative medicine, curcumin has yet to emerge as a component of our mainstream dermatologic therapeutic armamentarium. Interestingly, curcumin provides an ideal alternative to current therapies because of its relative safety profile even at high doses. Although the advantageous properties of curcumin in medicine are well established, its therapeutic potential thus far has been limited because of its poor oral bioavailablity. Topical administration of curcumin can directly deliver it to the affected tissue making it useful in treating skin-related disorders. However, limitations still exist such as the cosmetically unpleasing bright yellow-orange color, its poor solubility, and its poor stability at a high pH. Here the current literature detailing the potential and current use of curcumin in dermatology is reviewed. PMID:24085048

  4. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Quality of smartphone apps related to panic: smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD) and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life), and evidence-based content quality. The Brief DISCERN score and the criteria of the “Health on the Net” label were also used as content quality indicators as well as the number of downloads. Of 247 apps identified, 52 met all inclusion criteria. The content quality and self-help scores of these PD apps were poor. None of the assessed indicators were associated with payment status or number of downloads. Multiple linear regressions showed that the Brief DISCERN score significantly predicted the content quality and self-help scores. Poor content quality and self-help scores of PD smartphone apps highlight the gap between their technological potential and the overall quality of available products. PMID:26236242

  5. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years. PMID:25000234

  6. [Pseudotumoral allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Otero González, I; Montero Martínez, C; Blanco Aparicio, M; Valiño López, P; Verea Hernando, H

    2000-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) develops as the result of a hypersensitivity reaction to fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Clinical and radiological presentation can be atypical, requiring a high degree of suspicion on the part of the physician who treats such patients. We report the cases of two patients with APBA in whom the form of presentation--with few asthma symptoms, images showing lobar atelectasia and hilar adenopathy--led to an initial suspicion of lung cancer. PMID:10932345

  7. The Hyaluronic Acid–HDAC3–miRNA Network in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmi; Eom, Sangkyung; Park, Deokbum; Kim, Hyuna; Jeoung, Dooil

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the anti-allergic effect of high molecular weight form of hyaluronic acid (HMW-HA). In doing so, HA targets CD44 and inhibits FcεRI signaling and cross-talk between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and FcεRI. We previously reported the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in allergic inflammation and allergic inflammation-promoted enhanced tumorigenic potential. We reported regulatory role of HA in the expression of HDAC3. In this review, we will discuss molecular mechanisms associated with anti-allergic effect of HA in relation with HDACs. The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in allergic inflammation has been reported. We will also discuss the role of miRNAs in allergic inflammation in relation with HA-mediated anti-allergic effects. PMID:25983734

  8. Occurrence of Common Allergic Diseases in Children with Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chang-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Shen, Te-Chun; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical and immunological studies have consistently shown a possible link between atopy and idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, whether allergic diseases occur after INS develops is unknown. Methods From Taiwan’s National Health Insurance database, 1340 children with newly diagnosed INS and 5360 non-INS matched controls were identified in 2000–2007. By the end of 2008, the incidences and hazard ratios of four allergic diseases (allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma) were calculated. Results The incidence rates of all four allergic diseases were greater in the INS cohort than in the non-INS cohort in all age groups and decreased sharply as age increased in both cohorts. Children with INS had the highest adjusted hazard ratio (4.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.50–6.83) for atopic dermatitis and the lowest adjusted hazard ratio (1.71; 95% CI, 1.39–2.09) for allergic rhinitis. Most of the allergic diseases appeared within 2–6 months after INS developed, and the incidences declined with increasing follow-up duration. Conclusions Allergic disorders are common in children with INS, especially within the first year after diagnosis. The role of INS in the development of allergic disorders should be elucidated to establish innovative disease intervention programs. PMID:25843432

  9. Allergic inflammation--innately homeostatic.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Laurence E; Locksley, Richard M

    2015-03-01

    Allergic inflammation is associated closely with parasite infection but also asthma and other common allergic diseases. Despite the engagement of similar immunologic pathways, parasitized individuals often show no outward manifestations of allergic disease. In this perspective, we present the thesis that allergic inflammatory responses play a primary role in regulating circadian and environmental inputs involved with tissue homeostasis and metabolic needs. Parasites feed into these pathways and thus engage allergic inflammation to sustain aspects of the parasitic life cycle. In response to parasite infection, an adaptive and regulated immune response is layered on the host effector response, but in the setting of allergy, the effector response remains unregulated, thus leading to the cardinal features of disease. Further understanding of the homeostatic pressures driving allergic inflammation holds promise to further our understanding of human health and the treatment of these common afflictions. PMID:25414367

  10. Conceptual Relations between Anxiety Disorder and Fearful Temperament

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Coplan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Fearful temperaments have been identified as a major risk factor for anxiety disorders. However, descriptions of fearful temperament and several forms of anxiety disorder show strong similarities. This raises the question whether these terms may simply refer to different aspects of the same underlying construct. The current review examines…

  11. Review of the possible relationship and hypothetical links between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the simple sleep related movement disorders, parasomnias, hypersomnias, and circadian rhythm disorders.

    PubMed

    Walters, Arthur S; Silvestri, Rosalia; Zucconi, Marco; Chandrashekariah, Ranju; Konofal, Eric

    2008-12-15

    Recent evidence has been accumulating that the sleep of individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is not only disrupted in a nonspecific way but that ADHD has an increased association with simple sleep related movement disorders such as restless legs syndrome/periodic limb movements in sleep (RLS/PLMS), rhythmic movement disorder (body rocking and head banging), and parasomnias, such as disorders of partial arousal (sleep walking, sleep terrors, and confusional arousals). In addition increased associations have been reported between ADHD and hypersomnias such as narcolepsy and sleep apnea as well as circadian rhythm disorders, such as delayed sleep phase syndrome. These relationships are reviewed and the implications for such associations are explored. Patients with sleep disorders should be queried about the symptoms of ADHD and vice versa. PMID:19110891

  12. Health Related Quality of Life in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Clinical and Demographic Related Factors in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Sezen; Erermis, Serpil; Ozturk, Onder; Ozbaran, Burcu; Demiral, Nagehan; Bildik, Tezan; Aydin, Cahide

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the Health Related Quality of Life and related clinical variables (HRQoL) of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). We included 102 children with ASD (46 with autism, 38 with pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and 18 with Asperger's syndrome (AS)) and 39 typically developing children…

  13. Work related upper limb disorders in telecommunication workers in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, G D; Noor Hassim, I

    1999-06-01

    A total of 323 workers from 5 different occupational groups in the telecommunication industry were studied in this cross sectional study, which sought to determine the prevalence of Work Related Upper Limb Disorders (WRULD) in 5 occupational groups; operators using the Video Display Terminals, switchboard operators, clerks, data entry processors and the supervisors. WRULD was also studied with regard to factors such as sex, race, height, age, stress and the discomfort perceived due to the work station design. The possibility of WRULD was determined from a self-administered questionnaire and confirmed by history and physical examination. Psychological stress and the discomfort due to the workstation were measured from the questionnaire. The overall prevalence was found to be 31.2% and the prevalence among the various occupations differed with it being the highest in the switchboard operators and data processors and the lowest in the supervisors. The older workers and the female workers were found to have higher prevalences of WRULD. It was also found that a higher stress score and a higher score of discomfort perceived at the work station were associated with higher prevalences of WRULD. PMID:10972037

  14. Electrocardiographic features of patients with earthquake related posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Erkan; Kaplan, Abdullah; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Biteker, Murat; Karabulut, Evindar; Işıklı, Serhan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze electrocardiographic features of patients diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the Van-Erciş earthquake, with a shock measuring 7.2 on the Richter scale that took place in Turkey in October 2011. METHODS: Surface electrocardiograms of 12 patients with PTSD admitted to Van Erciş State Hospital (Van, Turkey) from February 2012 to May 2012 were examined. Psychiatric interviews of the sex and age matched control subjects, who had experienced the earthquake, confirmed the absence of any known diagnosable psychiatric conditions in the control group. RESULTS: A wide range of electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters, such as P-wave dispersion, QT dispersion, QT interval, Tpeak to Tend interval, intrinsicoid deflection durations and other traditional parameters were similar in both groups. There was no one with an abnormal P wave axis, short or long PR interval, long or short QT interval, negative T wave in lateral leads, abnormal T wave axis, abnormal left or right intrinsicoid deflection duration, low voltage, left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, left posterior hemiblock, left or right axis deviation, left ventricular hypertrophy, right or left atrial enlargement and pathological q(Q) wave in either group. CONCLUSION: The study showed no direct effect of earthquake related PTSD on surface ECG in young patients. So, we propose that PTSD has no direct effect on surface ECG but may cause electrocardiographic changes indirectly by triggering atherosclerosis and/or contributing to the ongoing atherosclerotic process. PMID:23538549

  15. Prevention and management of work-related cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) constitute a major burden for health of working populations throughout the world with as much as 50% of all causes of death and at least 25% of work disability. There are some changes in CVD risk factors among occupational classes. This is mainly due to the new types of work-related causes of morbidity associated with the recent developments in global work life, particularly in the industrialized countries. Meanwhile, in the developing countries or those in transition (e.g., in Eastern Europe), CVD mortality is increasing due to major socioeconomic changes, the demographic transition and rapid industrialisation and urbanisation, all leading to growing challenges to cardiovascular health. Better control of known risk factors (i.e., smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose) is effective to prevent CVD incidence. But the expected improvement has not been achieved. The obstacles of achieving such impact are due to lack of awareness, lack of policies and their implementation into practice and shortage of infrastructures and human resources. These are needed for wide-scale and long-term programme implementation. Considering the WHO Global Strategy on Occupational Health for All, the WHO Global Action Plan on Workers' Health, the WHO Programme on Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases and the ILO Decent Work agenda, the 6th ICOH International Conference on Work Environment and Cardiovascular Diseases adopted the Tokyo Declaration. PMID:26159941

  16. Work-Related Health Disorders among Saudi Computer Users

    PubMed Central

    Jomoah, Ibrahim M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and eye and vision complaints among the computer users of King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SAUDIA), and Saudi Telecom Company (STC). Stratified random samples of the work stations and operators at each of the studied institutions were selected and the ergonomics of the work stations were assessed and the operators' health complaints were investigated. The average ergonomic score of the studied work station at STC, KAU, and SAUDIA was 81.5%, 73.3%, and 70.3, respectively. Most of the examined operators use computers daily for ≤ 7 hours, yet they had some average incidences of general complaints (e.g., headache, body fatigue, and lack of concentration) and relatively high level of incidences of eye and vision complaints and musculoskeletal complaints. The incidences of the complaints have been found to increase with the (a) decrease in work station ergonomic score, (b) progress of age and duration of employment, (c) smoking, (d) use of computers, (e) lack of work satisfaction, and (f) history of operators' previous ailments. It has been recommended to improve the ergonomics of the work stations, set up training programs, and conduct preplacement and periodical examinations for operators. PMID:25383379

  17. Work-related health disorders among Saudi computer users.

    PubMed

    Jomoah, Ibrahim M

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and eye and vision complaints among the computer users of King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SAUDIA), and Saudi Telecom Company (STC). Stratified random samples of the work stations and operators at each of the studied institutions were selected and the ergonomics of the work stations were assessed and the operators' health complaints were investigated. The average ergonomic score of the studied work station at STC, KAU, and SAUDIA was 81.5%, 73.3%, and 70.3, respectively. Most of the examined operators use computers daily for ≤ 7 hours, yet they had some average incidences of general complaints (e.g., headache, body fatigue, and lack of concentration) and relatively high level of incidences of eye and vision complaints and musculoskeletal complaints. The incidences of the complaints have been found to increase with the (a) decrease in work station ergonomic score, (b) progress of age and duration of employment, (c) smoking, (d) use of computers, (e) lack of work satisfaction, and (f) history of operators' previous ailments. It has been recommended to improve the ergonomics of the work stations, set up training programs, and conduct preplacement and periodical examinations for operators. PMID:25383379

  18. The Relation between Body Dissatisfaction and Eating Disorder Symptomatology: An Analysis of Moderating Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylka, Tracy L.

    2004-01-01

    Although body dissatisfaction is a strong predictor of disordered eating among women, a majority of women report substantial body dissatisfaction but do not concomitantly report severe levels of eating disorder symptomatology. Third variables, then, may interact with body dissatisfaction to influence its relation to eating disorder symptomatology.…

  19. Female sexual dysfunction in patients with substance-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Alessandra; da Silva, Rosiane Lopes; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction symptoms and the associated risk factors in a sample of patients with substance-related disorders admitted to a specialized in-patient care unit. METHODS: This study used a cross-section design, with eight months of data collection, conducted with substance-dependent women using structured questionnaires to collect socio-demographic data and identify their drug of choice. The Drug Abuse Screening Test, Short Alcohol Dependence Data questionnaire, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale were also administered. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 105 women who had a mean age of 34.8 years (SD = 12.1, range = 18-65) and were predominantly heterosexual (74.3%), single (47.6%), Caucasian (50.5%), catholic (36.2%), and educated only to the level of primary education (40%), with a monthly family income of up to one minimum salary (37.5%). In 42.9% of the patients, crack was the drug of choice; 47.6% of the sample qualified for the Drug Abuse Screening Test (substantial problems related to drugs), 43.8% exhibited Short Alcohol Dependence Data (moderate or severe dependency), 47.6% exhibited Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (high or very high nicotine dependence). The prevalence of sexual dysfunction symptoms was 34.2% (95% CI = [25.3, 44.1]), and a high level of nicotine dependence and low income increased the chances of having sexual dysfunction by 2.72-fold and 2.54 fold, respectively. An association was also observed between female sexual dysfunction symptoms and schooling and levels of drug dependence. CONCLUSIONS: Female sexual dysfunction symptoms were common among this sample and primarily associated with high levels of nicotine use. PMID:23525317

  20. Ligaments: a source of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M

    2004-02-01

    The mechanical and neurological properties of ligaments are reviewed and updated with recent development from the perspective which evaluates their role as a source of neuromusculoskeletal disorders resulting from exposure to occupational activities. Creep, tension-relaxation, hysteresis, sensitivity to strain rate and strain/load frequency were shown to result not only in mechanical functional degradation but also in the development of sensory-motor disorders with short- and long-term implication on function and disability. The recently exposed relationships between collagen fibers, applied mechanical stimuli, tissue microdamage, acute and chronic inflammation and neuromuscular disorders is delineated with special reference to occupational stressors. PMID:14759750

  1. Allergic reaction to platinum in silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Arepalli, Sambasiva R; Bezabeh, Shewit; Brown, S Lori

    2002-01-01

    Platinum is used as a catalyst in the manufacture of silicone breast implants. Because platinum is recognized as a potent sensitizer in certain circumstances, some have expressed concern that women with silicone breast implants are exposed to platinum, which is causing allergic reactions. We searched the literature for information on the level of platinum in breast implants and reports of sensitization that clearly related to platinum in women with breast implants. We found no published report with convincing evidence that platinum causes allergic reactions in women with breast implants or that women with breast implants are any more likely to have allergic reactions than women without breast implants. PMID:12627791

  2. Relation between Amygdala Structure and Function in Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Jessica H.; Wang, Fei; Chepenik, Lara G.; Womer, Fay Y.; Jones, Monique M.; Pittman, Brian; Shah, Maulik P.; Martin, Andres; Constable, R. Todd; Blumberg, Hilary P.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents with bipolar disorder showed decreased amygdala volume and increased amygdala response to emotional faces. Amygdala volume is inversely related to activation during emotional face processing.

  3. Error-Related Negativity and Tic History in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Gregory L.; Carrasco, Melisa; Harbin, Shannon M.; Nienhuis, Jenna K.; LaRosa, Christina E.; Chen, Poyu; Fitzgerald, Kate D.; Gehring, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential after an incorrect response, which is often increased in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the relation of the ERN to comorbid tic disorders has not been examined in patients with OCD. This study compared ERN amplitudes…

  4. Meta-Analysis of the Relations of Anxiety Sensitivity to the Depressive and Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naragon-Gainey, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    There is a substantial literature relating the personality trait "anxiety sensitivity" (AS; tendency to fear anxiety-related sensations) and its lower order dimensions to the mood and anxiety (i.e., internalizing) disorders. However, particularly given the disorders' high comorbidity rates, it remains unclear whether AS is broadly related to these…

  5. Disordered Eating-Related Cognition and Psychological Flexibility as Predictors of Psychological Health among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuda, Akihiko; Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L.; Wendell, Johanna W.

    2010-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study investigated the relation among disordered eating-related cognition, psychological flexibility, and poor psychological outcomes among a nonclinical college sample. As predicted, conviction of disordered eating-related cognitions was positively associated with general psychological ill-health and emotional distress…

  6. Myasthenia gravis and related disorders: Pathology and molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ha, James C; Richman, David P

    2015-04-01

    Disorders affecting the presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic portions of the neuromuscular junction arise from various mechanisms in children and adults, including acquired autoimmune or toxic processes as well as genetic mutations. Disorders include autoimmune myasthenia gravis associated with acetylcholine receptor, muscle specific kinase or Lrp4 antibodies, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, nerve terminal hyperexcitability syndromes, Guillain Barré syndrome, botulism, organophosphate poisoning and a number of congenital myasthenic syndromes. This review focuses on the various molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms of these disorders, characterization of which has been crucial to the development of treatment strategies specific for each pathogenic mechanism. In the future, further understanding of the underlying processes may lead to more effective and targeted therapies of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25486268

  7. The relation between eating disorder symptoms and impairment.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Paul E; Rienecke, Renee D; Conley, Colleen S; Meyer, Caroline; Blissett, Jacqueline M

    2015-06-01

    Although a number of studies have looked at what factors might mediate the relationship between symptoms and quality of life (QoL) in a number of psychiatric disorders, little research has addressed this issue in eating disorders. In the current study, female undergraduates (N = 339) completed questionnaires assessing eating disorder symptoms, social support, coping, QoL, and psychosocial impairment. Perceived family support and levels of substance misuse as a way of coping were identified as mediators of the symptom-impairment relationship and, in addition, maladaptive coping also mediated the relationship with QoL. These results highlight the role of coping and social support in impairment resulting from eating disorder symptoms. PMID:25974054

  8. Disorders Related to (And Sometimes Confused with) OCD

    MedlinePlus

    ... have thoughts and behaviors that focus on contamination violent/sexual themes checking, etc. Try to stop their ... Strange or bizarre thoughts. Thoughts that include sexual violent or religious themes People with Psychotic Disorders/Schizophrenia: ...

  9. Treatment strategies designed to minimize medical complications of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Fireman, P

    1997-01-01

    Perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis affect many million Americans and account for close to $2 billion annually in medical costs and lost productivity. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and pruritus are, at best, very annoying and may be quite debilitating in some patients, causing irritability, insomnia, and fatigue. Moreover, allergic rhinitis is often not self-limiting and can contribute to serious medical complications such as sinusitis and otitis. Aggressive medical management of allergic rhinitis is important in the therapy for chronic sinusitis and otitis media and may prevent progression to more serious disease. Accurate diagnosis and initiation of environmental control measures to reduce exposure to causative factors should accompany initiation of pharmacotherapy. Antihistamines form the cornerstone of pharmacologic therapy, and use of the newer nonsedating antihistamines such as loratadine, terfenadine, and astemizole is not associated with the sedation produced by the classic antihistamines. Both loratadine and terfenadine are available in combination with a decongestant. Topical intranasal corticosteroids are another important component of pharmacologic management of allergic rhinitis. Allergen immunotherapy (hyposensitization) is used in those patients not adequately managed with pharmacotherapy. The relative safety and convenient dosing schedule of the newer medications should be accompanied by enhanced patient compliance and, hence, better control of allergic symptoms, halting progression of allergic rhinitis to serious medical complications. PMID:9129750

  10. Anxiety and Related Disorders and Concealment in Sexual Minority Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey M; Blasey, Christine; Barr Taylor, C; Weiss, Brandon J; Newman, Michelle G

    2016-01-01

    Sexual minorities face greater exposure to discrimination and rejection than heterosexuals. Given these threats, sexual minorities may engage in sexual orientation concealment in order to avoid danger. This social stigma and minority stress places sexual minorities at risk for anxiety and related disorders. Given that three fourths of anxiety disorder onset occurs before the age of 24, the current study investigated the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression in sexual minority young adults relative to their heterosexual peers. Secondarily, the study investigated sexual orientation concealment as a predictor of anxiety and related disorders. A sample of 157 sexual minority and 157 heterosexual young adults matched on age and gender completed self-report measures of the aforementioned disorders, and indicated their level of sexual orientation concealment. Results revealed that sexual minority young adults reported greater symptoms relative to heterosexuals across all outcome measures. There were no interactions between sexual minority status and gender, however, women had higher symptoms across all disorders. Sexual minority young women appeared to be at the most risk for clinical levels of anxiety and related disorders. In addition, concealment of sexual orientation significantly predicted symptoms of social phobia. Implications are offered for the cognitive and behavioral treatment of anxiety and related disorders in this population. PMID:26763500

  11. iPS cells to model CDKL5-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Amenduni, Mariangela; De Filippis, Roberta; Cheung, Aaron Y L; Disciglio, Vittoria; Epistolato, Maria Carmela; Ariani, Francesca; Mari, Francesca; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Hayek, Youssef; Renieri, Alessandra; Ellis, James; Meloni, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurologic disorder representing one of the most common causes of mental retardation in females. To date mutations in three genes have been associated with this condition. Classic RTT is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, whereas variants can be due to mutations in either MECP2 or FOXG1 or CDKL5. Mutations in CDKL5 have been identified both in females with the early onset seizure variant of RTT and in males with X-linked epileptic encephalopathy. CDKL5 is a kinase protein highly expressed in neurons, but its exact function inside the cell is unknown. To address this issue we established a human cellular model for CDKL5-related disease using the recently developed technology of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated in vitro into many different cell types, including neurons. These features make them the ideal tool to study disease mechanisms directly on the primarily affected neuronal cells. We derived iPSCs from fibroblasts of one female with p.Q347X and one male with p.T288I mutation, affected by early onset seizure variant and X-linked epileptic encephalopathy, respectively. We demonstrated that female CDKL5-mutated iPSCs maintain X-chromosome inactivation and clones express either the mutant CDKL5 allele or the wild-type allele that serve as an ideal experimental control. Array CGH indicates normal isogenic molecular karyotypes without detection of de novo CNVs in the CDKL5-mutated iPSCs. Furthermore, the iPS cells can be differentiated into neurons and are thus suitable to model disease pathogenesis in vitro. PMID:21750574

  12. White Matter Neuron Alterations in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Caroline M; Crawford, Benjamin C; Akbarian, Schahram

    2010-01-01

    Increased density and altered spatial distribution of subcortical white matter neurons (WMN) represents one of the more well replicated cellular alterations found in schizophrenia and related disease. In many of the affected cases, the underlying genetic risk architecture for these WMN abnormalities remains unknown. Increased density of neurons immunoreactive for Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 (MAP2) and Neuronal Nuclear Antigen (NeuN) have been reported by independent studies, though there are negative reports as well; additionally, group differences in some of the studies appear to be driven by a small subset of cases. Alterations in markers for inhibitory (GABAergic) neurons have also been described. For example, downregulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) in inhibitory WMN positioned at the gray/white matter border, as well as altered spatial distribution, have been reported. While increased density of WMN has been suggested to reflect disturbance of neurodevelopmental processes, including neuronal migration, neurogenesis, and cell death, alternative hypotheses—such as an adaptive response to microglial activation in mature CNS, as has been described in multiple sclerosis—should also be considered. We argue that larger scale studies involving hundreds of postmortem specimens will be necessary in order to clearly establish the subset of subjects affected. Additionally, these larger cohorts could make it feasible to connect the cellular pathology to environmental and genetic factors implicated in schizophrenia and some cases with bipolar disorder or autism. These could include the 22q11 deletion (Velocardiofacial/ DiGeorge) syndrome, which in some cases is associated with neuronal ectopias in white matter. PMID:20691252

  13. Arrest types and co-occurring disorders in persons with schizophrenia or related psychoses.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Patrick J; Christopher, Paul P; Druhn, Nicholas; Roy-Bujnowski, Kristen M; Grudzinskas, Albert J; Fisher, William H

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the patterns of criminal arrest and co-occurring psychiatric disorders among individuals with schizophrenia or related psychosis that were receiving public mental health services and had an arrest history. Within a 10-year period, 65% of subjects were arrested for crimes against public order, 50% for serious violent crimes, and 45% for property crimes. The presence of any co-occurring disorder increased the risk of arrest for all offense categories. For nearly all offense types, antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders conferred the greatest increase in risk for arrest. Among anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with a greater risk of arrest for serious violent crimes but not other offense types. Criminal risk assessments and clinical management in this population should focus on co-occurring antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders in addition to other clinical and non-clinical factors. PMID:22270830

  14. The first 2-year home environment in relation to the new onset and remission of asthmatic and allergic symptoms in 4246 preschool children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijin; Norback, Dan; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Xin; Shi, Jingjin; Kan, Haidong; Zhao, Zhuohui

    2016-05-15

    The home environment can influence childhood allergies and respiratory health but there is little information on associations between early life exposure at home and new onset and remission of the asthmatic or allergic symptoms in preschool children. A questionnaire survey was performed in a random cluster sample of 4246 preschool children in Urumqi, China. Information on the home environment (perceptions of odors and indicators of pollution sources) and children's health (wheeze, rhinitis and eczema) was collected for the first 2 years of life and the last year (before answering the questionnaire) from one of the parents or another guardian of the child. Associations between the home environment the first 2 years of life and new onset and remission of childhood symptoms were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Home environment factors reported for the first 2 years of life were consistently positively associated with new onset of symptoms and negatively associated with remission of symptoms. Visible mold (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.12-1.90), moldy odor (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.45-3.18), air dryness (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.08-1.59), stuffy odor (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.54) and parental smoking (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.13-1.65) were associated with new onset of symptoms. These factors were negatively associated with the remission of symptoms. In conclusion, mold contamination at home (moldy odor/visible mold), poor indoor air quality (stuffy odor, air dryness) and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the first 2 years of life can increase the incidence of asthmatic and allergic symptoms and decrease the remission from these symptoms in preschool children. PMID:26925732

  15. Immunophenotyping in multiple myeloma and related plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Kimlinger, Teresa; Morice, William

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasma cell disorders form a spectrum ranging from the asymptomatic presence of small monoclonal populations of plasma cells to conditions like plasma cell leukemia and multiple myeloma, in which the bone marrow can be replaced by the accumulation of neoplastic plasma cells. Immunophenotyping has become an invaluable tool in the management of hematological malignancies and is increasingly finding a role in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell disorders. Multiparameter flow cytometry has evolved considerably during the past decade with an increasing ability to screen large numbers of events and to detect multiple antigens at the same time. This, along with a better understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity of the clonal plasma cells in different disorders, has made immunophenotyping an indispensible tool in the diagnosis, prognostic classification and management of plasma cell disorders. This book chapter addresses the approaches taken to evaluate monoclonal plasma cell disorders, and the different markers and techniques that are important for the study of these diseases. PMID:21112041

  16. Probing disorder in isometric pyrochlore and related complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamblin, Jacob; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Finkeldei, Sarah; Bosbach, Dirk; Zhou, Haidong; Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2016-05-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding the energetics of structures with unconventional ordering (for example, correlated disorder that is heterogeneous across different length scales). In particular, compounds with the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, can adopt a disordered, isometric fluorite-type structure, (A, B)4O7, under extreme conditions. Despite the importance of the disordering process there exists only a limited understanding of the role of local ordering on the energy landscape. We have used neutron total scattering to show that disordered fluorite (induced intrinsically by composition/stoichiometry or at far-from-equilibrium conditions produced by high-energy radiation) consists of a local orthorhombic structural unit that is repeated by a pseudo-translational symmetry, such that orthorhombic and isometric arrays coexist at different length scales. We also show that inversion in isometric spinel occurs by a similar process. This insight provides a new basis for understanding order-to-disorder transformations important for applications such as plutonium immobilization, fast ion conduction, and thermal barrier coatings.

  17. Probing disorder in isometric pyrochlore and related complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Shamblin, Jacob; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg; Tracy, Cameron L; Zhang, Fuxiang; Finkeldei, Sarah; Bosbach, Dirk; Zhou, Haidong; Ewing, Rodney C; Lang, Maik

    2016-05-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding the energetics of structures with unconventional ordering (for example, correlated disorder that is heterogeneous across different length scales). In particular, compounds with the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, can adopt a disordered, isometric fluorite-type structure, (A, B)4O7, under extreme conditions. Despite the importance of the disordering process there exists only a limited understanding of the role of local ordering on the energy landscape. We have used neutron total scattering to show that disordered fluorite (induced intrinsically by composition/stoichiometry or at far-from-equilibrium conditions produced by high-energy radiation) consists of a local orthorhombic structural unit that is repeated by a pseudo-translational symmetry, such that orthorhombic and isometric arrays coexist at different length scales. We also show that inversion in isometric spinel occurs by a similar process. This insight provides a new basis for understanding order-to-disorder transformations important for applications such as plutonium immobilization, fast ion conduction, and thermal barrier coatings. PMID:26928636

  18. Competitiveness as a moderator of the relation between appearance-related factors and disordered eating behaviors.

    PubMed

    Schleien, Jenna L; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined competitiveness as a moderator of the relationships between appearance-related factors (i.e., thin-ideal internalization, appearance contingent self-worth) and disordered eating behaviors (i.e., dieting, excessive exercise). Participants were 441 undergraduate females for cross-sectional analyses, with 237 also contributing data longitudinally, 1 year later. Results showed that, in a model including thin-ideal internalization and appearance contingent self-worth and their interactions with competitiveness, thin-ideal internalization (but not appearance contingent self-worth) interacted with competitiveness to identify concurrent levels of both dieting and excessive exercise. Individuals high in both thin-ideal internalization and competitiveness exhibited the highest levels of concurrent dieting and excessive exercise. After controlling for baseline levels of the dependent variables, neither appearance-related factor interacted with competitiveness to predict dieting or excessive exercise. These findings suggest that individuals who are both competitive and accept and strive to achieve the thin ideal may be at risk for disordered eating behaviors. PMID:26922697

  19. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  20. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, John M; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A; Milner, Joshua D; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; McMurray, John S; Corry, David B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  1. [The immunological mechanisms contributing to the clinical efficacy of allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) in allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Asher, Ilan; Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Sthoeger, Zev

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases has increased dramatically in the western world. In the last 2 decades, the frequency of asthma and allergic rhinitis has doubled. Allergen specific immunotherapy [SIT] has been used successfully for more than 100 years for the treatment of allergic disorders. Allergen SIT provides not only symptomatic relief, but it is potentially curative. The immunologic mechanisms of allergen SIT include all parts of the immune system. Regulatory T cells (TR1, Treg), have a major pivotal role in the success of immunotherapy. Along with the regulatory T cells, elevated suppressor cytokines (IL-10), suppression of TH2 cells, increasing titer of specific IgG4 and gradual decline in the number and function of basophils and mast cells also contribute to the success of the treatment (SIT). The above immune mechanisms are connected and related to each other acting at different times with the treatment with SIT. In this review we focused on the current knowledge and understanding of the different immune mechanisms which are involved in the success of SIT. PMID:24364093

  2. Sleep in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Milena K; Allen, Rebecca M; Dworetzky, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), a form of functional neurological symptom disorder (FNSD), are very rarely seen in genuine, electroencephalography (EEG)-confirmed sleep. However, they are more commonly reported as a nocturnal occurrence, likely from a state that is misidentified as sleep (termed by some as "pseudosleep"). Sleep state can be helpful to distinguish FNSD from other neurological disorders. Pseudo-cataplexy, a form of "psychogenic" narcolepsy, "pseudo-parasomnia" and PNES can have a similar presentation. PNES and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently share previously experienced psychological trauma, and therefore the sleep abnormalities found in PTSD may be similarly present in PNES. Future research should use EEG monitoring to evaluate the sleep physiology of patients with FNSD such as PNES, as insights into sleep abnormalities may enable further understanding of the etiology and manifestations of PNES. PMID:25534169

  3. The neuropsychiatry of Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Edward C

    2004-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with classical Parkinsonian features that respond to dopaminergic therapy. Neuropsychiatric sequelae include dementia, major depression, dysthymia, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, and sexual disorders. Panic attacks are particularly common. With treatment, visual hallucinations, paranoid delusions, mania, or delirium may evolve. Psychosis is a key factor in nursing home placement, and depression is the most significant predictor of quality of life. Clozapine may be the safest treatment for psychotic features, but more research is needed to establish the efficacy of antidepressant treatments. Dementia with Lewy bodies, the second most common dementia in the elderly, may present in association with systematized delusions, depression, or RBD. Early evidence suggests the utility of rivastigmine, donepezil, low-dose olanzapine, and quetiapine in treating DLB. Parkinson-plus syndromes generally lack a good response to dopaminergic treatment and evidence additional features, including dysautonomia, cerebellar and pontine features, eye signs, and other movement disorders. MSA is associated with dysautonomia and RBD. SND (MSA-P) is associated with frontal cognitive impairments, but dementia, psychosis, and mood disorders have not been strikingly apparent unless additional pathological findings are present. In SDS (MSA-A), impotence is almost ubiquitous; urinary incontinence is frequent; depression is occasional, and sleep apnea should be treated to avoid sudden death during sleep. OPCA neuropsychiatric correlates await further definition. Progressive supranuclear palsy neuropsychiatric features include apathy, subcortical dementia, pathological emotionality, mild depression and anxiety, and lack of appreciable response to donepezil. CBD usually is recognized by early frontal dementia with ideomotor apraxia, often in the right upper extremity, attended later by poorly responsive unilateral Parkinsonism, with additional signs including

  4. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder--review of actual findings about mental disorders related to menstrual cycle and possibilities of their therapy.

    PubMed

    Zukov, I; Ptácek, R; Raboch, J; Domluvilová, D; Kuzelová, H; Fischer, S; Kozelek, P

    2010-01-01

    It is known that mood disorders in women explicitly relates to estrogen production. Except for these findings phenomenon as Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, directly connected to menstrual cycle in women, is widely discussed. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a set of subjectively unpleasant mental and somatic symptoms. It appears in luteal phase of ovarian cycle. During menstruation it remits and disappears up to one week from its termination. DSM IV classified PMDD into the category of "Other specific depressive disorders" and further revision DSM IV-TR classifies PMDD as a separate strictly defined psychiatric diagnosis. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) does not include any specific category as PMDD or similar. The closest category F38.8 does not represent the core of the phenomenon because it relates only to general depressive symptomatology and does not give specific diagnostic criteria to menstrual cycle related mood disorders (Grady-Weliky, 2003). In the presented article, possible effectivity of PMDD treatment with the focus to antidepressants of SSRI type (Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors) is discussed. In spite of interesting and significant findings, the treatment of PMDD and accordingly PMS is above all multidisciplinary question and it must be treated like that. PMID:20359434

  5. Key Mediators in the Immunopathogenesis of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is described as a chronic inflammatory disorder of the conducting airways. It is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, eosinophil and Th2 infiltration, airway hyper-responsiveness and airway remodeling. Our findings to date have largely been dependent on work done using animal models, which have been instrumental in broadening our understanding of the mechanism of the disease. However, using animals to model a uniquely human disease is not without its drawbacks. This review aims to examine some of the key mediators and cells of allergic asthma learned from animal models and shed some light on emerging mediators in the pathogenesis allergic airway inflammation in acute and chronic asthma. PMID:24933589

  6. Non-pulmonary allergic diseases and inflammatory bowel disease: A qualitative review

    PubMed Central

    Kotlyar, David S; Shum, Mili; Hsieh, Jennifer; Blonski, Wojciech; Greenwald, David A

    2014-01-01

    While the etiological underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highly complex, it has been noted that both clinical and pathophysiological similarities exist between IBD and both asthma and non-pulmonary allergic phenomena. In this review, several key points on common biomarkers, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and nutritional and probiotic interventions for both IBD and non-pulmonary allergic diseases are discussed. Histamine and mast cell activity show common behaviors in both IBD and in certain allergic disorders. IgE also represents a key immunoglobulin involved in both IBD and in certain allergic pathologies, though these links require further study. Probiotics remain a critically important intervention for both IBD subtypes as well as multiple allergic phenomena. Linked clinical phenomena, especially sinonasal disease and IBD, are discussed. In addition, nutritional interventions remain an underutilized and promising therapy for modification of both allergic disorders and IBD. Recommending new mothers breastfeed their infants, and increasing the duration of breastfeeding may also help prevent both IBD and allergic diseases, but requires more investigation. While much remains to be discovered, it is clear that non-pulmonary allergic phenomena are connected to IBD in a myriad number of ways and that the discovery of common immunological pathways may usher in an era of vastly improved treatments for patients. PMID:25170192

  7. Attachment and social cognition in borderline personality disorder: Specificity in relation to antisocial and avoidant personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Beeney, Joseph E; Stepp, Stephanie D; Hallquist, Michael N; Scott, Lori N; Wright, Aidan G C; Ellison, William D; Nolf, Kimberly A; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    Theory and research point to the role of attachment difficulties in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Attachment insecurity is believed to lead to chronic problems in social relationships, attributable, in part, to impairments in social cognition, which comprise maladaptive mental representations of self, others, and self in relation to others. However, few studies have attempted to identify social-cognitive mechanisms that link attachment insecurity to BPD and to assess whether such mechanisms are specific to the disorder. For the present study, empirically derived indices of mentalization, self-other boundaries, and identity diffusion were tested as mediators between attachment style and personality disorder symptoms. In a cross-sectional structural equation model, mentalization and self-other boundaries mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety and BPD. Mentalization partially mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety and antisocial personality disorder (PD) symptoms, and self-other boundaries mediated the relationship between attachment anxiety. PMID:25705979

  8. Are child anxiety and somatization associated with pain in pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated individual and incremental contributions of somatization and trait anxiety to pain report in children with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. Eighty children (7-10 years) with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders completed the State-Trait Anxiet...

  9. Sleep-Related Problems among Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfano, Candice A.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kingery, Julie Newman

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined sleep-related problems (SRPs) among a large sample (n = 128) of youth with anxiety disorders (i.e., generalized, separation, and social). The frequency of eight specific SRPs was examined in relation to age, gender, type of anxiety disorder, anxiety severity, and functional impairment. The impact of…

  10. The Relation between Anxiety Disorder and Experiential Avoidance in Inpatient Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venta, Amanda; Sharp, Carla; Hart, John

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the relation between experiential avoidance and anxiety disorders, as well as the usefulness of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y; Greco, Lambert, & Baer, 2008) in detecting anxiety disorder in a sample of adolescent inpatients. First, the relation between experiential avoidance and anxiety…

  11. Epigenetic and genetic alterations of the imprinting disorder Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Hidenobu; Higashimoto, Ken

    2013-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that leads to parent-specific differential expression of a subset of genes. Most imprinted genes form clusters, or imprinting domains, and are regulated by imprinting control regions. As imprinted genes have an important role in growth and development, aberrant expression of imprinted genes due to genetic or epigenetic abnormalities is involved in the pathogenesis of human disorders, or imprinting disorders. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a representative imprinting disorder characterized by macrosomia, macroglossia and abdominal wall defects, and exhibits a predisposition to tumorigenesis. The relevant imprinted chromosomal region in BWS is 11p15.5, which consists of two imprinting domains, IGF2/H19 and CDKN1C/KCNQ1OT1. BWS has five known causative epigenetic and genetic alterations: loss of methylation (LOM) at KvDMR1, gain of methylation (GOM) at H19DMR, paternal uniparental disomy, CDKN1C mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. Opposite methylation defects, GOM and LOM, at H19DMR are known to cause clinically opposite disorders: BWS and Silver-Russell syndrome, respectively. Interestingly, a recent study discovered that loss of function or gain of function of CDKN1C also causes clinically opposite disorders, BWS and IMAGe (intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genital anomalies) syndrome, respectively. Furthermore, several clinical studies have suggested a relationship between assisted reproductive technology (ART) and the risk of imprinting disorders, along with the existence of trans-acting factors that regulate multiple imprinted differentially methylated regions. In this review, we describe the latest knowledge surrounding the imprinting mechanism of 11p15.5, in addition to epigenetic and genetic etiologies of BWS, associated childhood tumors, the effects of ART and multilocus hypomethylation disorders. PMID:23719190

  12. Narrative Therapy to Prevent Illness-Related Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Suni; Bull, Carolyn; Propst, Olivia; Dettinger, Sara; Detwiler, Laura

    2005-01-01

    More than 94% of cancer patients described the experience as the most traumatic event they have ever faced and 13% have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath. Empirical evidence demonstrates that certain behaviors lead to more positive health outcomes. Although many patients automatically engage in these behaviors, many others do…

  13. Obsessive-compulsive disorder apparently related to abortion.

    PubMed

    McCraw, R K

    1989-04-01

    This case study presents a young woman who developed a severe obsessive-compulsive disorder after a routine medical procedure. It is suggested that this procedure brought back repressed guilt from three abortions and thus led to the onset of symptoms. The case is discussed in relationship to available research and theory. PMID:2751012

  14. Bioengineering solutions for hearing loss and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Koch, Dawn Burton; Staller, Steve; Jaax, Kristen; Martin, Elizabeth

    2005-04-01

    Advances in digital signal processing, microelectronics, and power technology have produced devices that have contributed significantly to the quality of life and communication abilities of individuals with hearing impairment and tinnitus. Future technological developments will expand the benefits of current devices and offer new treatments for otologic disorders. PMID:15823592

  15. [Argentine consensus on sleep-related respiratory disorders].

    PubMed

    Sala, H; Nigro, C; Rabec, C; Guardia, A S; Smurra, M

    2001-01-01

    Due to the increased interest of the medical community in sleep disorders an experts meeting was called to establish common criteria for diagnosis, treatment and management of these disorders. Adult prevalence of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SA/HS) is about 2-4% and increases in the elderly. Snoring and excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) are habitual symptoms. Increased risk to cardiovascular disorders and traffic accidents are the major complications. Increased upper airways resistance syndrome is a recently described syndrome which also involves EDS. A standardized questionnaire was developed and its use was recommended in order to evaluate patients with respiratory sleep disorders (RSD). Polysomnography was established as gold standard in the diagnosis of RSD. Minimal requirement of split night studies and screening studies was also standardized and specific indications were summarized. Medical treatment of obesity in relationship to RSD was analyzed. Nasal continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) was established as the first choice treatment of SA/HS. Titration of CPAP was standardized. Oral appliances with mandibular advancement could be considered in the treatment of snoring patients without SA/HS and in patients with increased upper airways resistance syndrome. Uvulopalatopharingoplasty can only be performed in snoring patients in whom the presence of SA/HS has been dismissed by polysomnography. Management of patients must include periodic clinical control. EDS must be determined by Epworth test. In order to evaluate CPAP compliance the use of time-controlled devices is highly recommended. PMID:11474886

  16. Temporal Changes in Glutaredoxin 1 and Protein S-Glutathionylation in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Kanako; Nagai, Katsura; Suzuki, Masaru; Inomata, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, involving oxidative stress. Upon oxidative stress, glutathione covalently binds to protein thiols to protect them against irreversible oxidation. This posttranslational modification, known as protein S-glutathionylation, can be reversed by glutaredoxin 1 (Glrx1) under physiological condition. Glrx1 is known to increase in the lung tissues of a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. However, the temporal relationship between levels of Glrx1, protein S-glutathionylation, and glutathione in the lungs with allergic airway inflammation is not clearly understood. Methods BALB/c mice received 3 aerosol challenges with ovalbumin (OVA) following sensitization to OVA. They were sacrificed at 6, 24, 48, or 72 h, or 8 days (5 mice per group), and the levels of Glrx1, protein S-glutathionylation, glutathione, and 25 cytokines/chemokines were evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and/or lung tissue. Results Levels of Glrx1 in BALF were significantly elevated in the OVA 6 h (final challenge) group compared to those in the control, with concurrent increases in protein S-glutathionylation levels in the lungs, as well as total glutathione (reduced and oxidized) and oxidized glutathione in BALF. Protein S-glutathionylation levels were attenuated at 24 h, with significant increases in Glrx1 levels in lung tissues at 48 and 72 h. Glrx1 in alveolar macrophages was induced after 6 h. Glrx1 levels concomitantly increased with Th2/NF-κB-related cytokines and chemokines in BALF. Conclusions The temporal relationships of Glrx1 with protein S-glutathionylation, glutathione, and cytokines/chemokines were observed as dynamic changes in lungs with allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that Glrx1 and protein–SSG redox status may play important roles in the development of allergic airway inflammation. PMID:25874776

  17. Rupatadine for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria.

    PubMed

    Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Allergies are a widespread group of diseases of civilization and most patients are still undertreated. Since histamine is considered to be the most important mediator in allergies such as allergic rhinitis and urticaria, the most commonly used drugs to treat these disorders are antihistamines acting on the histamine 1 (H1) receptor. The currently available antihistamines, however, have significant differences in their effects and safety profiles. Furthermore, the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma initiative calls for additional desirable properties of antihistamines. Here, we review the profile of rupatadine, a new dual platelet-activating factor and H1-receptor antagonist that fulfils these criteria and therefore offers an excellent option for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:21162645

  18. Salvinorin a and related compounds as therapeutic drugs for psychostimulant-related disorders.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, R G; Crippa, J A S; Machado-de-Sousa, J P; Hallak, J E C

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological treatments are available for alcohol, nicotine, and opioid dependence, and several drugs for cannabis-related disorders are currently under investigation. On the other hand, psychostimulant abuse and dependence lacks pharmacological treatment. Mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons mediate the motivation to use drugs and drug-induced euphoria, and psychostimulants (cocaine, amphetamine, and methamphetamine) produce their effects in these neurons, which may be modulated by the opioid system. Salvinorin A is a κ-opioid receptor agonist extracted from Salvia divinorum, a hallucinogenic plant used in magico-ritual contexts by Mazateca Indians in México. Salvinorin A and its analogues have demonstrated anti-addiction effects in animal models using psychostimulants by attenuating dopamine release, sensitization, and other neurochemical and behavioral alterations associated with acute and prolonged administration of these drugs. The objective of the present article is to present an overview of the preclinical evidence suggesting anti-addictive effects of salvinorin A and its analogues. PMID:25563442

  19. Whiplash-associated disorder: musculoskeletal pain and related clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the physical and psychological processes associated with whiplash-associated disorders. There is now much scientific data available to indicate the presence of disturbed nociceptive processing, stress system responses, muscle and motor changes as well as psychological factors in both acute and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Some of these factors seem to be associated with the transition from acute to chronic pain and have demonstrated prognostic capacity. Further investigation is required to determine if these processes can be modified and if modification will lead to improved outcomes for this condition. The burden of whiplash injuries, the high rate of transition to chronicity, and evidence of limited effects of current management on transition rates demand new directions in evaluation and management. The understanding of processes underlying this condition is improving and this lays the foundation for the development of more effective management approaches. PMID:23115472

  20. Craniofacial syndromes and sleep-related breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Abel, François; Gozal, David

    2016-06-01

    Children with craniofacial syndromes are at risk of sleep disordered breathing, the most common being obstructive sleep apnea. Midface hypoplasia in children with craniosynostosis and glossoptosis in children with Pierre Robin syndrome are well recognized risk factors, but the etiology is often multifactorial and many children have multilevel airway obstruction. We examine the published evidence and explore the current management strategies in these complex patients. Some treatment modalities are similar to those used in otherwise healthy children such as adenotonsillectomy, positive pressure ventilation and in the refractory cases, tracheostomy. However, there are some distinct approaches such as nasopharyngeal airways, tongue lip adhesion, mandibular distraction osteogenesis in children with Pierre Robin sequence, and midface advancement in children with craniosynostoses. Clinicians should have a low threshold for referral for evaluation of sleep-disordered-breathing in these patients. PMID:26454241

  1. Epidemiology and costs of hypertension-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Leone, Aldo; Landini, Linda; Leone, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological surveys demonstrate undoubtedly that cardiovascular disorders caused or associated with hypertension are at a high risk of non-fatal or fatal events and occurring with a great rate. Ischaemic heart disease with effort angina and myocardial infarction, often unrecognized myocardial infarction, stroke and transient ischaemic attack may be observed more frequently than other cardiovascular disorders in hypertensive patients. Large-scale trials do not support the hypothesis that effective benefits are reached by current non-pharmacological or pharmacological prevention which need enormous costs to public health. Lowering blood pressure is the main target to reach in an attempt to reduce cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients. Therefore, the costs-benefit ratio, which estimates public health costs, needs yet marked improvement since the public health expenses are heaviest with results that do not support the economic effort. Statistically, quantitative measures to modify the current regimen need to better evaluate both public health costs and reached benefits. PMID:21861839

  2. Epigenetic RELN Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Related Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, Alessandro; Grayson, Dennis R.; Caruncho, Hector J.

    2016-01-01

    REELIN (RELN) is a large (420 kDa) glycoprotein that in adulthood is mostly synthesized in GABAergic neurons of corticolimbic structures. Upon secretion in the extracellular matrix (ECM), RELN binds to VLDL, APOE2, and α3β2 Integrin receptors located on dendritic shafts and spines of postsynaptic pyramidal neurons. Reduced levels of RELN expression in the adult brain induce cognitive impairment and dendritic spine density deficits. RELN supplementation recovers these deficits suggesting a trophic action for RELN in synaptic plasticity. We and others have shown that altered RELN expression in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients is difficult to reconcile with classical Mendelian genetic disorders and it is instead plausible to associate these disorders with altered epigenetic homeostasis. Support for the contribution of altered epigenetic mechanisms in the down-regulation of RELN expression in corticolimbic structures of psychotic patients includes the concomitant increase of DNA-methyltransferases and the increased levels of the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). It is hypothesized that these conditions lead to RELN promoter hypermethylation and a reduction in RELN protein amounts in psychotic patients. The decreased synthesis and release of RELN from GABAergic corticolimbic neurons could serve as a model to elucidate the epigenetic pathophysiological mechanisms acting at pyramidal neuron dendrites that regulate synaptic plasticity and cognition in psychotic and non-psychotic subjects. PMID:27092053

  3. A new look at borderline personality disorder and related disorders: hyper-reactivity in the limbic system and lower centers.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) has been often described recently as a condition characterized by emotional dysregulation. Several other conditions share this attribute; namely, Bipolar Disorder (BD), Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED), and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The dysregulation is not always in the same direction: BPD, BD, ADHD, and IED, for example, show over-reactivity or "hyperactivity" of emotional responses, whereas patients with MDD show emotional sluggishness and underactivity. At the clinical/descriptive level the "over-reactive" conditions appear separate and distinct. BPD constitutes a large domain within the psychopathological arena, appearing to contain within it a variety of etiologically diverse subtypes. Among the latter is a type of BPD linked closely with Bipolar Disorder; family studies of either condition show an overrepresentation of both: BPD patients with bipolar relatives; Bipolar patients with BPD relatives. A significant percentage of children with ADHD go on to develop either BPD or BD as they approach adulthood. If one shifts the spotlight to neurophysiology, as captured by MRI studies, however, it emerges that an important subtype of BPD, and also BD, ADHD, and IED-share common features of abnormalities and peculiarities in the limbic system and in the cortex, especially the prefrontal cortex. Deeper subcortical regions such as the periaqueductal gray may also be implicated in strong emotional reactions. The diversity of clinical "over-reactive" conditions appear to harken back to a kind of unity at the brain-change level. There are therapeutic implications here, such as the advisability of mood stabilizers in many cases of BPD, not just for Bipolar Disorder. PMID:24001165

  4. Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Distinct or Related Disorders across Measurement Levels?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeyens, Dieter; Roeyers, Herbert; Walle, Johan Vande

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this literature review is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding differences and similarities between the inattentive (IA) and combined (C) subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in order to detail challenges concerning further conceptualization, diagnostics, and treatment. The literature on ADHD-IA and…

  5. [Trauma and stressor-related disorders: diagnostic conceptualization in DSM-5].

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, H P

    2014-05-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5) includes a distinct diagnostic group of trauma and stressor-related disorders that has been set apart from anxiety disorders. From a perspective of adult psychiatry this new disorder category includes posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), acute stress disorder (ASD), and adjustment disorders. The PTSD is based on narrower trauma criteria that focus on acute life-threatening situations, serious injury, or sexual violence by way of direct confrontation, witnessing or indirect confrontation. Indirect confrontation, however, is reserved only for violent or accidental events that occurred to close family members or friends. The former A2 criterion of an intense emotional reaction to trauma has been removed. A deliberately broad approach to clinical PTSD phenomenology has created an empirically driven new cluster of persistent negative alterations in cognition and mood due to experiencing traumatic events. The ASD has been reconceptualized as an intense stress syndrome with a clear need of acute treatment during the early course after traumatic exposure. Adjustment disorders continue to emphasize maladaptive emotional and behavioral responses to unspecific, non-traumatic stressors in an intensity that is beyond social or cultural norms. Neither complex PTSD nor prolonged grief disorders have received an independent diagnostic status within DSM-5. With respect to stress-related disorders major divergences between DSM-5 and the future International Classification of Diseases 11 (ICD-11) are to be expected. PMID:24728766

  6. Examining affect and perfectionism in relation to eating disorder symptoms among women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Mason, Tyler B; Utzinger, Linsey M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined personality and affective variables in relation to eating disorder symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN). Women (N=118) with DSM-IV AN completed baseline questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) and interviews (Eating Disorder Examination, Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale), followed by two weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involving multiple daily reports of affective states and eating disorder behaviors. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted using eating disorder symptoms as dependent variables (i.e., EMA binge eating, EMA self-induced vomiting, eating disorder rituals, eating disorder preoccupations, dietary restraint). Predictor variables were maladaptive perfectionism (baseline), depressive symptoms (baseline), and affect lability (EMA). Results revealed that affect lability was independently associated with binge eating, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with self-induced vomiting. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with eating disorder rituals, whereas both depressive symptoms and maladaptive perfectionism were independently associated with eating disorder preoccupations. Finally, maladaptive perfectionism and affect lability were both independently associated with dietary restraint. This pattern of findings suggests the importance of affective and personality constructs in relation to eating disorder symptoms in AN and may highlight the importance of targeting these variables in the context of treatment. PMID:27208513

  7. Role and clinical implications of atypical antipsychotics in anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trauma-related, and somatic symptom disorders: a systematized review.

    PubMed

    Albert, Umberto; Carmassi, Claudia; Cosci, Fiammetta; De Cori, David; Di Nicola, Marco; Ferrari, Silvia; Poloni, Nicola; Tarricone, Ilaria; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotics (AAs) may play a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and trauma-related disorders. No reviews on their differential use in these different disorders have been performed recently. The aim of this systematized review was to obtain data on efficacy and comparative effectiveness of AAs as a treatment of anxiety disorders, OCD, and trauma-related disorders to provide guidance for clinicians on when and which AA to use. We searched on PubMed, Psychnet, and Cochrane Libraries from inception to July 2015. Search results were limited to randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adult patients. Evidence of efficacy was considered the presence of positive results in two or more double-blind placebo-controlled studies. Our systematized search identified 1298 papers, of which 191 were subjected to a full-text review and 56 were included. Quetiapine extended-release showed a role in both acute and maintenance treatment of uncomplicated generalized anxiety disorder, whereas more studies are needed before drawing practical recommendations on the use of olanzapine and risperidone; aripiprazole and risperidone are effective in resistant OCD as augmentation treatments. Risperidone and olanzapine add-on may have a role in resistant or chronic post-traumatic stress disorder patients, although only risperidone addition can be recommended on the basis of the criterion of two or more positive placebo-controlled trials. This systematized review supports the evidence that only a few AAs are effective in only a minority of the off-label conditions in which they are currently used and confirms that AAs are not all the same. Their use should be on the basis of a balance between efficacy and side effects, and the characteristics as well as the preference of the patient. PMID:26974213

  8. The Classification of Hysteria and Related Disorders: Historical and Phenomenological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    North, Carol S.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the history of the conceptualization of dissociative, conversion, and somatoform syndromes in relation to one another, chronicles efforts to classify these and other phenomenologically-related psychopathology in the American diagnostic system for mental disorders, and traces the subsequent divergence in opinions of dissenting sectors on classification of these disorders. This article then considers the extensive phenomenological overlap across these disorders in empirical research, and from this foundation presents a new model for the conceptualization of these disorders. The classification of disorders formerly known as hysteria and phenomenologically-related syndromes has long been contentious and unsettled. Examination of the long history of the conceptual difficulties, which remain inherent in existing classification schemes for these disorders, can help to address the continuing controversy. This review clarifies the need for a major conceptual revision of the current classification of these disorders. A new phenomenologically-based classification scheme for these disorders is proposed that is more compatible with the agnostic and atheoretical approach to diagnosis of mental disorders used by the current classification system. PMID:26561836

  9. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Oxidative Stress and Intestinal Lipid Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleme, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disorder in the Caucasian people. It is due to the mutation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene located on the long arm of the chromosome 7, which encodes for CFTR protein. The latter, an adenosine triphosphate binding cassette, is a transmembrane chloride channel that is also involved in glutathione transport. As glutathione/glutathione disulfide constitutes the most important pool of cellular redox systems, CFTR defects could thus disrupt the intracellular redox balance. Resulting multisystemic diseases are essentially characterized by a chronic respiratory failure, a pancreatic insufficiency, an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), and inadequate levels of antioxidant vitamins. Recent Advances: The pathophysiology of CF is complex; however, several mechanisms are proposed, including oxidative stress (OxS) whose implication is recognized and has been clearly demonstrated in CF airways. Critical Issues: Little is known about OxS intrinsic triggers and its own involvement in intestinal lipid disorders. Despite the regular administration of pancreatic supplements, high-fat high-calorie diets, and antioxidant fat-soluble vitamins, there is a persistence of steatorrhea, EFAD, and harmful OxS. Intriguingly, several trials with elevated doses of antioxidant vitamins have not yielded significant improvements. Future Directions: The main sources and self-maintenance of OxS in CF should be clarified to improve treatment of patients. Therefore, this review will discuss the potential sources and study the mechanisms of OxS in the intestine, known to develop various complications, and its involvement in intestinal lipid disorders in CF patients. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 614–631. PMID:25611180

  10. [Alert symptoms and related disorders in gifted children].

    PubMed

    Robert, G; Kermarrec, S; Guignard, J-H; Tordjman, S

    2010-09-01

    Numerous questions on widely called "gifted" children remain unanswered. Based on our clinical experience in the first national center for high ability children and adolescents with difficulties, this article examines, after defining some terms and concepts, clinical signs associated with high ability children and psychopathological disorders frequently described in this population. The assessment of cognitive, socioemotional and conative profiles should allow to go beyond the simples/singles IQ measures, in order to provide a global scholastic, familial and social care tailored to the needs of the child and his or her environment. PMID:20663649

  11. Distinct pattern of P3a event-related potential in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Meares, Russell; Melkonian, Dmitriy; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne

    2005-02-28

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials to auditory stimuli were recorded for 17 unmedicated patients with borderline personality disorder, 17 matched healthy controls and 100 healthy control participants spanning five decades. Using high-resolution fragmentary decomposition for single-trial event-related potential analysis, distinctive disturbances in P3a in borderline personality disorder patients were found: abnormally enhanced amplitude, failure to habituate and a loss of temporal locking with P3b. Normative age dependencies from 100 controls suggest that natural age-related decline in P3a amplitude is reduced in borderline personality disorder patients and is likely to indicate failure of frontal maturation. On the basis of the theories of Hughlings Jackson, this conceptualization of borderline personality disorder is consistent with an aetiological model of borderline personality disorder. PMID:15706238

  12. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  13. Allergic reactions to medication (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A true allergy to a medication is different than a simple adverse reaction to the drug. The allergic reaction occurs when the immune system, having been exposed to the drug before, creates antibodies to ...

  14. Event-Related Potentials in Adolescents with Combined ADHD and CD Disorder: A Single Stimulus Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jing; Li, Jianming; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Qianjin; Livesley, W. John; Jang, Kerry L.; Wang, Kai; Wang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Some studies of the event-related potentials demonstrated a reduction of the voluntary component P3 (P300 or P3b) in youngsters with the attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or in conduct disorders (CD), and a reduction of the automatic processing component, mismatch negativity, in patients with both ADHD and CD (ADHD+CD). Recently, a…

  15. Commentary on the Inclusion of Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder in DSM-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boelen, Paul A.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    The DSM-5 Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Posttraumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group has proposed criteria for Persistent Complex Bereavement-Related Disorder (PCBRD) for inclusion in the appendix of DSM-5. The authors feel that it is important that dysfunctional grief will become a formal condition in DSM-5 because that would…

  16. Voice Disorders in Teachers and Their Associations with Work-Related Factors: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutiva, Lady Catherine Cantor; Vogel, Ineke; Burdorf, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a quantitative assessment of the occurrence of voice disorders among teachers and to identify associated work-related and individual factors in the teaching profession. Method: A systematic review was conducted using three computerized databases on the occurrence of voice disorders among teachers and their associations with…

  17. Mechanisms of Anxiety Related Attentional Biases in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Tamara; Cornish, Kim; Rinehart, Nicole J.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have high levels of anxiety. It is unclear whether they exhibit threat-related attentional biases commensurate with anxiety disorders as manifest in non-ASD populations, such as facilitated attention toward, and difficulties disengaging engaging from, threatening stimuli. Ninety children, 45 cognitively…

  18. Threat Related Selective Attention Predicts Treatment Success in Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Kallen, Victor L.; Dieleman, Gwen C.; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Threat-related selective attention was found to predict the success of the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders through administering a pictorial dot-probe task to 131 children with anxiety disorders prior to cognitive behavioral therapy. The diagnostic status of the subjects was evaluated with a semistructured clinical interview at both pre-…

  19. A Relational Cultural Approach to Working with Clients with Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trepal, Heather C.; Boie, Ioana; Kress, Victoria E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examine eating disorders through the conceptual framework of relational cultural theory (RCT). Taking into account the importance of relationships and connection, it is suggested that RCT may be a useful lens for conceptualizing and working with people who are experiencing eating disorders. Ways that RCT can be applied to enhance…

  20. Autophagy-related intrinsically disordered proteins in intra-nuclear compartments.

    PubMed

    Na, Insung; Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-08-16

    Recent analyses indicated that autophagy can be regulated via some nuclear transcriptional networks and many important players in the autophagy and other forms of programmed cell death are known to be intrinsically disordered. To this end, we analyzed similarities and differences in the intrinsic disorder distribution of nuclear and non-nuclear proteins related to autophagy. We also looked at the peculiarities of the distribution of the intrinsically disordered autophagy-related proteins in various intra-nuclear organelles, such as the nucleolus, chromatin, Cajal bodies, nuclear speckles, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies, nuclear lamina, nuclear pores, and perinucleolar compartment. This analysis revealed that the autophagy-related proteins constitute about 2.5% of the non-nuclear proteins and 3.3% of the nuclear proteins, which corresponds to a substantial enrichment by about 32% in the nucleus. Curiously, although, in general, the autophagy-related proteins share similar characteristics of disorder with a generic set of all non-nuclear proteins, chromatin and nuclear speckles are enriched in the intrinsically disordered autophagy proteins (29 and 37% of these proteins are disordered, respectively) and have high disorder content at 0.24 and 0.27, respectively. Therefore, our data suggest that some of the nuclear disordered proteins may play important roles in autophagy. PMID:27377881

  1. Learning Processes Associated with Panic-Related Symptoms in Families with and without Panic Disordered Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Albuquerque, Jiske E. G.; Munsch, Simone; Margraf, Jurgen; Schneider, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared learning processes associated with panic-related symptoms in families with and without panic disordered mothers. Using a multi-informant approach, 86 mothers [of whom 58 had a primary diagnosis of panic disorder (PD)], their partners and teenage children (mean age, 16.67 years) reported about parents' behavior (modeling…

  2. Exploring Parents' Self-Blame in Relation to Adolescents' Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tally

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether parents of adolescents diagnosed with mental disorders self-blame for their child's disorders; their reasons for self-blame; and the relationships between parental self-blame and lower psychological well-being, perceived stigmatization, social support, potential hereditary factors related to adolescents' mental…

  3. Zinc oxide and related compounds: order within the disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, R.; Pereira, Luisa; Barquinha, P.; Ferreira, I.; Prabakaran, R.; Goncalves, G.; Goncalves, A.; Fortunato, E.

    2009-02-01

    This paper discusses the effect of order and disorder on the electrical and optical performance of ionic oxide semiconductors based on zinc oxide. These materials are used as active thin films in electronic devices such as pn heterojunction solar cells and thin-film transistors. Considering the expected conduction mechanism in ordered and disordered semiconductors the role of the spherical symmetry of the s electron conduction bands will be analyzed and compared to covalent semiconductors. The obtained results show p-type c-Si/a-IZO/poly-ZGO solar cells exhibiting efficiencies above 14%, in device areas of about 2.34 cm2. Amorphous oxide TFTs based on the Ga-Zn-Sn-O system demonstrate superior performance than the polycrystalline TFTs based on ZnO, translated by ION/IOFF ratio exceeding 107, turn-on voltage below 1-2 V and saturation mobility above 25 cm2/Vs. Apart from that, preliminary data on p-type oxide TFT based on the Zn-Cu-O system will also be presented.

  4. Transcription factors in late megakaryopoiesis and related platelet disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tijssen, M R; Ghevaert, C

    2013-01-01

    Cell type-specific transcription factors regulate the repertoire of genes expressed in a cell and thereby determine its phenotype. The differentiation of megakaryocytes, the platelet progenitors, from hematopoietic stem cells is a well-known process that can be mimicked in culture. However, the efficient formation of platelets in culture remains a challenge. Platelet formation is a complicated process including megakaryocyte maturation, platelet assembly and platelet shedding. We hypothesize that a better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of this process will allow us to influence it such that sufficient numbers of platelets can be produced for clinical applications. After an introduction to gene regulation and platelet formation, this review summarizes the current knowledge of the regulation of platelet formation by the transcription factors EVI1, GATA1, FLI1, NFE2, RUNX1, SRF and its co-factor MKL1, and TAL1. Also covered is how some platelet disorders including myeloproliferative neoplasms, result from disturbances of the transcriptional regulation. These disorders give us invaluable insights into the crucial role these transcription factors play in platelet formation. Finally, there is discussion of how a better understanding of these processes will be needed to allow for efficient production of platelets in vitro. PMID:23311859

  5. Fibrillin abnormalities and prognosis in Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, T.; Furthmayr, H.; Francke, U.; Gasner, C.

    1995-08-28

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem autosomal-dominant disorder, is characterized by mutations of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene and by abnormal patterns of synthesis, secretion, and matrix deposition of the fibrillin protein. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of fibrillin protein abnormalities in the diagnosis of MFS, we studied dermal fibroblasts from 57 patients with classical MFS, 15 with equivocal MFS, 8 with single-organ manifestations, and 16 with other connective tissue disorders including homocystinuria and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism was identified in 70 samples that were classified into four different groups based on quantitation of fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition. Significant correlations were found for phenotypic features including arachnodactyly, striae distensae, cardiovascular manifestations, and fibrillin groups II and IV, which included 70% of the MFS patients. In addition, these two groups were associated with shortened {open_quotes}event-free{close_quotes} survival and more severe cardiovascular complications than groups I and III. The latter included most of the equivocal MFS/single manifestation patients with fibrillin abnormalities. Our results indicate that fibrillin defects at the protein level per se are not specific for MFS, but that the drastically reduced fibrillin deposition, caused by a dominant-negative effect of abnormal fibrillin molecules in individuals defined as groups II and IV, is of prognostic and possibly diagnostic significance. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. An Overlook to the Characteristics and Roles Played by Eotaxin Network in the Pathophysiology of Food Allergies: Allergic Asthma and Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Zahra; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Zainodini, Nahid; Koochakzadeh, Leila

    2016-06-01

    Investigations revealed substantial parts accomplished by chemokines specifically eotaxins and their specific receptors. They are functionally involved in the modulation of the pathologic state of tissue inflammation which is as a result of allergic reactions. Chemokines as small proteins with approximately 8-10 kDa molecular weight are considered and fit in the bigger family of cytokines, containing basic heparin-binding polypeptide mediators. Chemokines actively interfere in the processes of selective, oriented leukocyte (including eosinophil) recruitment. As eminent from their name, more specifically, eotaxins are specialized for eosinophils' oriented locomotion toward allergic inflamed regions. To date, three members are defined for eotaxin subfamily as follows: eotaxin-1 (CCL11), eotaxin-2 (CCL24), and eotaxin-3 (CCL26), all of them bind to and activate CCR3 but have a low level of homology and appear to exhibit different physiological potentials. Allergy is described as a clinical state in which a pathologic hypersensitivity reaction is always initiated throughout an immunologic mechanism; similar to other immunologic reactions, an allergic reaction could also either be antibody or cell mediated. This type of allergic reactions occurs in all age groups and damages several different organs, having a significant impact on the emotional and social health of patients and their families and relatives. Concerning introductory comments introduced above, the authors of the present review attempted to collect and provide the latest evidences and information regarding the correlation between expression of eotaxin family members and allergy, in a wider extent, in two important allergic disorders: atopic asthma (AA) and atopic dermatitis (AD). Overall, concerning the most recent articles published within the database in the life sciences literature regarding the fundamental role(s) played by eotaxins in the pathogenesis of AA and AD, the authors of the current article

  7. Objectified Body Consciousness in Relation to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Ellen E.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Kelly, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    In Western society, the feminine body has been positioned as an object to be looked at and sexually gazed upon; thus, females often learn to view themselves as objects to be observed (i.e., objectified body consciousness (OBC)). This study examined the relation between OBC and eating disorder recovery by comparing its components across non-eating disorder controls, fully recovered, partially recovered, and active eating disorder cases. Results revealed that non-eating disorder controls and fully recovered individuals had similarly low levels of two components of OBC, body surveillance and body shame. Partially recovered individuals looked more similar to those with an active eating disorder on these constructs. The third component of OBC, control beliefs, and a conceptually similar construct, weight/shape self-efficacy, did not differ across groups. Results provide support for the importance of measuring aspects of self-objectification, particularly body surveillance and body shame, across the course of an eating disorder. PMID:22051364

  8. Negative affective experiences in relation to stages of eating disorder recovery.

    PubMed

    Harney, Megan B; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Maldonado, Christine R; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a collection of negative affect symptoms in relation to stages of eating disorder recovery. Depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, loneliness, and perceived stress are known to be present in individuals with eating disorders; however, less is known about the presence of such constructs throughout the recovery process. Does this negative affect fog continue to linger in individuals who have recovered from an eating disorder? Female participants seen at some point for an eating disorder at a primary care clinic were categorized into one of three groups using a stringent definition of eating disorder recovery based on physical, behavioral, and psychological criteria: active eating disorder (n=53), partially recovered (n=15; psychological criteria not met), and fully recovered (n=20; all recovery criteria met). Additionally, data were obtained from 67 female controls who had no history of an eating disorder. Self-report data indicated that controls and women fully recovered from an eating disorder scored significantly lower than partially recovered and active eating disorder groups in perceived stress, depression, and anxiety. Controls and the fully recovered group were statistically indistinguishable from each other in these domains, as were the partially recovered and active eating disorder groups, suggesting an interesting divide depending on whether psychological criteria (e.g., normative levels of weight/shape concern) were met. In contrast, controls and fully recovered and partially recovered groups all reported feeling significantly less lonely relative to those with an active eating disorder suggesting that improved perceptions of interpersonal functioning and social support may act as a stepping stone toward more comprehensive eating disorder recovery. Future research may want to longitudinally determine if an increase in actual or perceived social support facilitates the movement toward full recovery and whether this

  9. Allergic rhinitis and asthma in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Christopher C

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of allergic rhinitis and asthma in the recreational and elite athlete are discussed in this study. There is an increased prevalence of allergic rhinitis and asthma in the elite athlete related to the enhanced ventilation with entrainment of inhalants including allergens as well as irritants such as pollutants in the urban athlete, chlorine in the swimmer, and cold air in the hockey player in the training environment. The history as well as objective exercise challenge and skin-prick tests to inhalants or in vitro allergen testing are essential in conjunction with a comprehensive physical exam to diagnosis of allergic rhinitis and/or asthma in the athlete. This is particularly necessary for the elite or competitive athlete who often has poor insight into the symptoms. Management is with appropriate inhaled steroids and/or leukotriene antagonists for the upper (nasal) and lower airways with avoidance of inhaled allergens and/or appropriate immunotherapy where relevant. The optimal management of the athlete results in minimum medication with minimum adverse side effects and optimal outcome. Proper adherence to antidoping regulations and application for use exemption in competitive athletes is recommended. The athlete should be encouraged to pursue the selected sports activity without limitations. PMID:16724626

  10. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+) and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin) and storage (myoglobin) and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes) in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis. PMID:26557657

  11. Combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in older men.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A; Schnurr, P P; Aldwin, C M

    1994-03-01

    Nearly 25% of U.S. men aged 55 or older served in combat, yet its impact on aging is unknown. The relationship of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms to combat exposure was examined in 1,210 veterans of World War II (WWII) and the Korean War, who were participants in the Normative Aging Study. Over 54% of WWII and 19% of Korean veterans reported combat experience. The relationship between combat exposure and PTSD symptoms was stronger in the WWII cohort. The sample prevalence of PTSD by combat exposure ranged from 0% to 12.4%, differing by the PTSD measure. WWII veterans exposed to moderate or heavy combat had 13.3 times greater risk of PTSD symptoms measured 45 years later, compared with noncombat veterans. It is suggested that military service in general, and combat exposure in particular, is a "hidden variable" in the study of aging men. PMID:8185864

  12. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies of Glutamate-Related Abnormalities in Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Cagri; Öngür, Dost

    2010-01-01

    In mood disorders there is growing evidence for glutamatergic abnormalities derived from peripheral measures of glutamatergic metabolites in patients, postmortem studies on glutamate related markers, and animal studies on the mechanism of action of available treatments. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the potential to corroborate and extend these findings with the advantage of in vivo assessment of glutamate-related metabolites in different disease states, in response to treatment, and in relation with functional imaging data. In this article we first review the biological significance of glutamate, glutamine, and Glx (composed mainly of glutamate and glutamine). Next we review the MRS literature in mood disorders examining these glutamate-related metabolites. Here, we find a highly consistent pattern of Glx level reductions in major depressive disorder and elevations in bipolar disorder. In addition, studies of depression regardless of diagnosis provide suggestive evidence for reduced glutamine/glutamate ratio, and in mania for elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio. These patterns suggest that the glutamate-related metabolite pool (not all of it necessarily relevant to neurotransmission) is constricted in major depressive disorder and expanded in bipolar disorder. Depressive and manic episodes may be characterized by modulation of the glutamine/glutamate ratio in opposite directions, possibly suggesting reduced vs. elevated glutamate conversion to glutamine by glial cells, respectively. We discuss the implications of these results for the pathophysiology of mood disorders, and suggest future directions for MRS studies. PMID:20728076

  13. Nutritional aspects of Noonan syndrome and Noonan-related disorders.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Fernanda Marchetto; Jorge, Alexander Augusto; Malaquias, Alexandra; da Costa Pereira, Alexandre; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Kim, Chong Ae; Bertola, Debora

    2016-06-01

    Rasopathies are a group of rare disorders characterized by neurocardiofaciocutaneous involvement, and caused by mutations in several genes of the RAS/MAPK pathway. In the present study, we characterized growth parameters, body composition, and nutritional aspects of children and adults (n = 62) affected by these disorders, mainly Noonan syndrome, using an indirect method-anthropometry-and a 24-hr recall questionnaire. The growth parameters in our cohort showed short stature, especially in individuals with RAF1 and SHOC2 mutations, lower obesity rates compared to the control population, and BMI scores highest in individuals with BRAF mutations and lowest in individuals with SHOC2. Body composition showed a compromise in the upper arm muscle circumference, with a statistically significant difference in the z-score of triceps skinfold (P = 0.0204) and upper arm fat area (P = 0.0388) between BRAF and SHOC2 groups and in the z-score of triceps skinfold between RAF1 and SHOC2 (P = 0.0218). The pattern of macronutrient consumption was similar to the control population. Our study is the first to address body composition in RASopathy individuals and the data indicate a compromise not only in adipose tissue, but also in muscle mass. Studies using different techniques, such as dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry or imaging studies, which give a more precise delineation of fat and non-fat mass, are required to confirm our results, ultimately causing an impact on management strategies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038324

  14. Increased Error-Related Brain Activity Distinguishes Generalized Anxiety Disorder With and Without Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Anna; Klein, Daniel N.; Hajcak, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are so frequently comorbid that some have suggested that the 2 should be collapsed into a single overarching “distress” disorder. Yet there is also increasing evidence that the 2 categories are not redundant. Neurobehavioral markers that differentiate GAD and MDD would be helpful in ongoing efforts to refine classification schemes based on neurobiological measures. The error-related negativity (ERN) may be one such marker. The ERN is an event-related potential component presenting as a negative deflection approximately 50 ms following an erroneous response and reflects activity of the anterior cingulate cortex. There is evidence for an enhanced ERN in individuals with GAD, but the literature in MDD is mixed. The present study measured the ERN in 26 GAD, 23 comorbid GAD and MDD, and 36 control participants, all of whom were female and medication-free. Consistent with previous research, the GAD group was characterized by a larger ERN and an increased difference between error and correct trials than controls. No such enhancement was evident in the comorbid group, suggesting comorbid depression may moderate the relationship between the ERN and anxiety. The present study further suggests that the ERN is a potentially useful neurobiological marker for future studies that consider the pathophysiology of multiple disorders in order to construct or refine neurobiologically based diagnostic phenotypes. PMID:22564180

  15. A conceptual model for work-related neck and upper-limb musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T J; Buckle, P; Fine, L J; Hagberg, M; Jonsson, B; Kilbom, A; Kuorinka, I A; Silverstein, B A; Sjogaard, G; Viikari-Juntura, E R

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model for the pathogenesis of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The model contains sets of cascading exposure, dose, capacity, and response variables, such that response at one level can act as dose at the next. Response to one or more doses can diminish or increase the capacity for responding to successive doses. The model is used as a framework for discussing the development of work-related muscle, tendon, and nerve disorders. It is intended as a beginning, to be modified to explain new findings as they become available. In research, it can help to identify areas needing additional data for the development and expression of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Researchers can use it to design laboratory and field studies. In practice, it demonstrates the relationship between common exposure factors and different responses. This information can be used to evaluate and design jobs for the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:8316782

  16. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberger, Paul A.; Bush, Robert K.; Demain, Jeffrey G.; Luong, Amber; Slavin, Raymond G.; Knutsen, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    There remains lack of agreement on diagnostic criteria and approaches to treatment of patients with Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). The results of a survey of AAAAI members regarding these 2 issues are presented and compared for concordance with published recommendations. The literature was reviewed for pertinent reports and an electronic survey was conducted of AAAAI members and fellows regarding diagnostic criteria, numbers of patients evaluated for ABPA, and treatment approaches. From 508 respondents to the survey sent to 5155 U. S. physicians in the AAAAI database of members and fellows, 245 (48%) health professionals had treated at least 1 patient with ABPA in the previous year. For the diagnosis of ABPA, there was a difference in the threshold concentration of total serum IgE as 44.9% used ≥ 417 kU/L whereas 42.0% used ≥ 1000 kU/L. These findings suggest that ABPA might be underdiagnosed. Regarding pharmacotherapy, oral steroids were recommended for 97.1% of patients and oral steroids + inhaled corticosteroids + anti-fungal agent were utilized in 41.2% of patients. The armamentarium for treatment of ABPA includes oral corticosteroids as the initial treatment with inhaled corticosteroids used for management of persistent asthma. Azoles remain adjunctive. Published experience with omalizumab has been limited. PMID:25439360

  17. The allergic emergency--management of severe allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Werner-Busse, Alexandra; Zuberbier, Torsten; Worm, Margitta

    2014-05-01

    Anaphylaxis is characterized by the sudden onset of acute allergic symptoms involving two or more organ systems. An acute allergic emergency is a challenge for physicians due to its life-threatening potential. The incidence of anaphylactic reactions has increased in recent years. Most frequent elicitors of mast cell and primarily histamine dependent anaphylactic reactions are food, insect venom or drugs. Allergic -reactions are graded into four groups according to the classification by Ring and Messmer; grade I is defined by the onset of cutaneous symptoms only whereas grade IV is characterized by cardiovascular shock as well as cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. The treatment of allergic reactions should be guided by the severity of the reaction. Initially an intramuscular epinephrine injection into the lateral thigh should be given if cutaneous, mucosal and cardiovascular/respiratory symptoms occur. Additionally, the patient should receive intravenous antihistamines and corticosteroids. For self-treatment in the case of an allergic emergency, oral antihistamines and corticosteroids should be prescribed to the patient. PMID:24673732

  18. Conductance of single microRNAs chains related to the autism spectrum disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. I. N.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Sarmento, R. G.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The charge transport properties of single-stranded microRNAs (miRNAs) chains associated to autism disorder were investigated. The computations were performed within a tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, with ionization energies and hopping parameters obtained by quantum chemistry method. Current-voltage (I× V) curves of twelve miRNA chains related to the autism spectrum disorders were calculated and analysed. We have obtained both semiconductor and insulator behavior, and a relationship between the current intensity and the autism-related miRNA bases sequencies, suggesting that a kind of electronic biosensor can be developed to distinguish different profiles of autism disorders.

  19. Allergic fungal otomastoiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiung-Ming; Chiang, Ching-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Allergic mucin is described as thick, peanut butter-like mucus impacted in the paranasal sinuses of patients with allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. The presence of allergic mucin in the middle ear has never been reported. We encountered a 65-year-old female with allergic mucin found impacted in her left middle ear and mastoid cavity during revised tympanoplasty surgery at our institute. Bilateral endoscopic sinus surgery performed 3 months later showed no evidence of fungal infection or allergic mucin in her paranasal sinuses. We report the case herein and propose the term allergic fungal otomastoiditis for this disease entity. PMID:22825725

  20. The Assessment of Object Relations Phenomena in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Eric Wayne

    Recent attempts to empirically validate psychoanalytic theory and its contemporary object relational constructs have turned to measuring the concepts with a variety of recently developed assessment scales. This paper reviews the 27 research studies which utilize instruments designed to assess object relations phenomena in subjects diagnosed with…

  1. Risk of metabolic syndrome and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon; Mitchell, Alex J; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are highly predictive of cardiovascular diseases. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, comparing subjects with different disorders and taking into account demographic variables and psychotropic medication use. The secondary aim was to compare the MetS prevalence in persons with any of the selected disorders versus matched general population controls. The pooled MetS prevalence in people with severe mental illness was 32.6% (95% CI: 30.8%-34.4%; N = 198; n = 52,678). Relative risk meta-analyses established that there was no significant difference in MetS prevalence in studies directly comparing schizophrenia versus bipolar disorder, and in those directly comparing bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder. Only two studies directly compared people with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, precluding meta-analytic calculations. Older age and a higher body mass index were significant moderators in the final demographic regression model (z = −3.6, p = 0.0003, r2 = 0.19). People treated with all individual antipsychotic medications had a significantly (p<0.001) higher MetS risk compared to antipsychotic-naïve participants. MetS risk was significantly higher with clozapine and olanzapine (except vs. clozapine) than other antipsychotics, and significantly lower with aripiprazole than other antipsychotics (except vs. amisulpride). Compared with matched general population controls, people with severe mental illness had a significantly increased risk for MetS (RR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.35-1.86; p<0.001) and all its components, except for hypertension (p = 0.07). These data suggest that the risk for MetS is similarly elevated in the diagnostic subgroups of severe mental illness. Routine screening and

  2. Risk of metabolic syndrome and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon; Mitchell, Alex J; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are highly predictive of cardiovascular diseases. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, comparing subjects with different disorders and taking into account demographic variables and psychotropic medication use. The secondary aim was to compare the MetS prevalence in persons with any of the selected disorders versus matched general population controls. The pooled MetS prevalence in people with severe mental illness was 32.6% (95% CI: 30.8%-34.4%; N = 198; n = 52,678). Relative risk meta-analyses established that there was no significant difference in MetS prevalence in studies directly comparing schizophrenia versus bipolar disorder, and in those directly comparing bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder. Only two studies directly compared people with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, precluding meta-analytic calculations. Older age and a higher body mass index were significant moderators in the final demographic regression model (z = -3.6, p = 0.0003, r(2)  = 0.19). People treated with all individual antipsychotic medications had a significantly (p<0.001) higher MetS risk compared to antipsychotic-naïve participants. MetS risk was significantly higher with clozapine and olanzapine (except vs. clozapine) than other antipsychotics, and significantly lower with aripiprazole than other antipsychotics (except vs. amisulpride). Compared with matched general population controls, people with severe mental illness had a significantly increased risk for MetS (RR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.35-1.86; p<0.001) and all its components, except for hypertension (p = 0.07). These data suggest that the risk for MetS is similarly elevated in the diagnostic subgroups of severe mental illness. Routine screening and

  3. Psychosocial Factors and Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders among Southeastern Asian Female Workers Living in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyunmi; Park, Chang Gi; Kim, Sun Jung; Moon, Sun Hye

    2011-01-01

    Objectives A rapid increase in the population of migrant workers in Korea has brought new challenges regarding the possible effects of acculturation on health. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of acculturation- and work-related psychosocial factors on work-related musculoskeletal disorders among migrant female workers living in Korea. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used. A translated, structured questionnaire was administrated to 156 southeastern Asian female full-time workers living in Korea. Results About 35% of the participants experienced some type(s) of work-related musculoskeletal disorder(s), which were more prevalent in Vietnamese women than in Thai and Filipino women. Women who preferred to maintain their own heritage and to reject the host country heritage were at risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusion Acculturation strategy and nationality were found to be significant factors associated with work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Health professionals need to accommodate acculturation contexts into risk assessment and intervention development for work-related musculoskeletal disorders separately for different nationalities. PMID:22953201

  4. Peripheral neuropathies of rheumatologic disease and gluten-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Reda, Haatem; Chin, Russell L

    2014-09-01

    Peripheral nervous system disease is a common and often debilitating feature of many systemic rheumatologic disorders. Such involvement takes many forms, reflecting the variety of underlying pathophysiology, though most patients present with painful multifocal neuropathy (usually vasculitic) or a distal sensory more than motor peripheral neuropathy (sometimes vasculitic and nearly always axonal). The presence of peripheral nervous system involvement is often an early signal of the generalization of inflammatory disease in blood vessels or extravascular tissues, though peripheral neuropathy is not itself an independent predictor of mortality. Nonetheless, progressive multifocal neuropathy, motor neuropathy, small fiber neuropathy, and sensory neuronopathy should be treated early and aggressively with immunosuppression (or the gluten-free diet in appropriate situations) to limit morbidity. Given the rapidly evolving therapeutic landscape, partnership with a rheumatologist is essential. Treatment is usually sustained for 1 to 2 years, and remission is possible in many cases within 6 to 12 months, with variable rates of relapse and treatment resistance. Patients should be meticulously monitored for relapse with serial laboratory testing, electrodiagnostic studies, and clinical examination. Functional rating scores, such as the neuropathy impairment scale and the total neuropathy score are useful for longitudinal assessment. PMID:25369437

  5. Neural melanocortin receptors in obesity and related metabolic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Girardet, Clemence; Butler, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a global health issue, as it is associated with increased risk of developing chronic conditions associated with disorders of metabolism such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A better understanding of how excessive fat accumulation develops and causes diseases of the metabolic syndrome is urgently needed. The hypothalamic melanocortin system is an important point of convergence connecting signals of metabolic status with the neural circuitry that governs appetite and the autonomic and neuroendocrine system controling metabolism. This system has a critical role in the defense of body weight and maintenance of homeostasis. Two neural melanocortin receptors, melanocortin 3 and 4 receptors (MC3R and MC4R), play crucial roles in the regulation of energy balance. Mutations in the MC4R gene are the most common cause of monogenic obesity in humans, and a large literature indicates a role in regulating both energy intake through the control of satiety and energy expenditure. In contrast, MC3Rs have a more subtle role in energy homeostasis. Results from our lab indicate an important role for MC3Rs in synchronizing rhythms in foraging behavior with caloric cues and maintaining metabolic homeostasis during periods of nutrient scarcity. However, while deletion of the Mc3r gene in mice alters nutrient partitioning to favor accumulation of fat mass no obvious role for MC3R haploinsufficiency in human obesity has been reported. PMID:23680515

  6. [Guideline-oriented treatment of alcohol-related disorders].

    PubMed

    Mann, K; Hoch, E; Batra, A; Bonnet, U; Günthner, A; Reymann, G; Soyka, M; Wodarz, N; Schäfer, M

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (e.g. abuse and dependence) account for a plethora of consequences for affected individuals and for a substantial proportion of the overall burden of disease for the community. To date, existing treatment options are either poorly known by doctors or they are not fully applied and only approximately 15% of potential patients are treated with a mean latent period of 10 years between early symptoms and the first intervention. So-called S3 treatment guidelines were recently developed to close this gap. Representatives of more than 50 learned societies, families and patients were involved. A systematic literature search from 2005 to 2012 was performed and more than 120 recommendations were made. Financing came exclusively from those societies and the academic and treatment institutes involved.This article summarizes the recommendations pertinent for psychiatrists and include early detection and intervention, acute withdrawal and long-term psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. Classical and new treatment goals are discussed. If the new guidelines were properly applied an increase in patients receiving treatment to 30-40% could be expected, which would improve the quality of lives of affected persons and their families and in Germany would save several thousand lives per year. PMID:26670021

  7. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S.; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM‐MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM‐MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM‐MS data of two IDPs; α‐Synuclein (α‐Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C‐II (ApoC‐II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC‐II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α‐Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC‐II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM‐MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  8. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-08-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM-MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM-MS data of two IDPs; α-Synuclein (α-Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC-II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α-Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC-II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM-MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  9. Ear pruritus: a new otologic finding related to temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito; Barbosa, Lívia Mirelle; Barbalho, Jimmy Charles Melo; Araújo, Gabriela Madeira; Melo, Auremir Rocha; Santos, Lucas Alexandre de Morais

    2016-01-01

    This prospective clinical study evaluated the correlation among temporomandibular disorder (TMD), otologic manifestations, and parafunctional habits in a sample of 100 patients with TMD. The subjects were evaluated by clinical examination, use of a simplified anamnestic questionnaire for TMD diagnosis, and the investigation of otologic manifestations and parafunctional habits of the stomatognathic system. The prevalence of TMD and correlations with otologic manifestations and parafunctional habits were calculated. Patients ranged in age from 13 to 70 years, and 79.0% of the patients were between the ages of 30 and 59 years. Women represented 88.0% of the sample. Otologic manifestations were found in 92.0% of patients with TMD. Sex showed a significant correlation with severity of TMD (P = 0.024). A significant correlation was observed between female patients and both otalgia (P = 0.036) and ear pruritus (P < 0.001). Otalgia showed a significant association with the symptoms of TMD (P = 0.003). Significant correlations between severe TMD and otalgia (P < 0.001), tinnitus (P = 0.010), ear pruritus (P < 0.001), and aural fullness (P = 0.014) were also observed. Ear pruritus, otalgia, and aural fullness are the most common otologic manifestations in patients with TMD, showing a significant correlation with the female sex, severity of TMD, and frequency of TMD symptoms. PMID:27599280

  10. Adjustment Disorders as a Stress-Related Disorder: A Longitudinal Study of the Associations among Stress, Resources, and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Kocalevent, Rüya-Daniela; Mierke, Annett; Danzer, Gerhard; Klapp, Burghard F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Adjustment disorders are re-conceptualized in the DSM-5 as a stress-related disorder; however, besides the impact of an identifiable stressor, the specification of a stress concept, remains unclear. This study is the first to examine an existing stress-model from the general population, in patients diagnosed with adjustment disorders, using a longitudinal design. Methods The study sample consisted of 108 patients consecutively admitted for adjustment disorders. Associations of stress perception, emotional distress, resources, and mental health were measured at three time points: the outpatients’ presentation, admission for inpatient treatment, and discharge from the hospital. To evaluate a longitudinal stress model of ADs, we examined whether stress at admission predicted mental health at each of the three time points using multiple linear regressions and structural equation modeling. A series of repeated-measures one-way analyses of variance (rANOVAs) was performed to assess change over time. Results Significant within-participant changes from baseline were observed between hospital admission and discharge with regard to mental health, stress perception, and emotional distress (p<0.001). Stress perception explained nearly half of the total variance (44%) of mental health at baseline; the adjusted R2 increased (0.48), taking emotional distress (i.e., depressive symptoms) into account. The best predictor of mental health at discharge was the level of emotional distress (i.e., anxiety level) at baseline (β = −0.23, R2corr = 0.56, p<0.001). With a CFI of 0.86 and an NFI of 0.86, the fit indices did not allow for acceptance of the stress-model (Cmin/df = 15.26; RMSEA = 0.21). Conclusions Stress perception is an important predictor in adjustment disorders, and mental health-related treatment goals are dependent on and significantly impacted by stress perception and emotional distress. PMID:24825165

  11. ["NPAs": a new allergic risk?].

    PubMed

    Dutau, G; Rancé, F

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, to the list of classic pet animals (dogs and cats) as allergens we must now add the "new pet animals" (NPAs). This group of animals, referred to by the Anglo-Saxons as "pets", includes both those previously recognized (rabbit, guinea pig, hamster, birds) and the "truly new NPAs"; by general agreement "NPA" will include all animals other than cats and dogs. Some rather rare animals are regularly added to this list. The emergence of "NPAs" can be related to a social phenomenon, in particular, to the fashion and need for the exotic (http://www.aquadesign.be). They are a very diverse group: warm-blooded animals, spiders, batrachia (frogs, toads, salamanders, etc.) and reptiles. Besides the physical risks from their natural aggressive behaviour, the "NPAs" can be an allergic risk factor and this risk has a tendency to increase. Allergists and paediatricians have a role to play in the diagnosis and prevention of these allergies by giving advice on the choice of pet animals. This review concerns allergies to rodents, reptiles, batrachians, spiders, etc. PMID:19195854

  12. Traffic exposure associated with allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis in adults. A cross-sectional study in southern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Anna; Stroh, Emilie; Nihlén, Ulf; Montnémery, Peter; Axmon, Anna; Jakobsson, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Background There is conflicting evidence that traffic-related air pollution is a risk factor for allergic conditions. Few studies have investigated this in adults. In adults, a high proportion of asthma, rhinitis and eczema is triggered by non-allergic factors. We investigated traffic as a risk factor for allergic versus non-allergic asthma and rhinitis, and eczema, in adults. A questionnaire from 2000 (n = 9319, 18–77 years) provided individual data about disease outcome and self-reported traffic exposure. Additional exposure assessments were obtained using Geographical Informations Systems (GIS). Residential addresses were linked to the national Swedish Road Database and to a pollutant database with modelled annual means of NOx (Nitrogen Oxids). Results Living within 100 m from a road with a traffic intensity of >10 cars/min (24 hour mean) was associated with prevalence of current asthma reported to be triggered by allergic factors (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.23–2.72) and with allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.30, 95%CI = (1.05–1.61). No relation was seen with asthma or rhinitis triggered by other factors. Living within 100 m of a road with >10 cars/min was also associated with hand-eczema during the last 12 months (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.19–2.23), but not with allergic eczema or diagnosed hand-eczema. Consistent results were seen using self-reported traffic, but the associations with NOx were less consistent. Conclusion Exposure to traffic was associated with a higher prevalence of allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis, but not with asthma or rhinitis triggered by non-allergic factors. This difference was suggested by the overall pattern, but only clear using GIS-measured traffic intensity as a proxy for traffic exposure. An association was also found with hand-eczema during the last 12 months. We suggest that asthma and rhinitis should not be treated as homogenous groups when estimating effects from traffic in adults. PMID:19419561

  13. DSM-V diagnostic criteria for bereavement-related disorders in children and adolescents: developmental considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaplow, Julie B; Layne, Christopher M; Pynoos, Robert S; Cohen, Judith A; Lieberman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Two bereavement-related disorders are proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V): Adjustment Disorder Related to Bereavement, to be located in the main body of the text as an official diagnostic entity; and Bereavement-Related Disorder, including a Traumatic Death Specifier, to be located in the Appendix as an invitation for further research. These diagnoses currently do not include developmentally informed criteria, despite the importance of developmental processes in the ways children and adolescents grieve. In this article, we draw upon a selective review of the empirical literature and expert clinical knowledge to recommend developmentally informed modifications and specifiers of the proposed criteria for both bereavement disorders and strategies to improve future research. This article is derived from an invited report submitted to the DSM-V Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and Dissociative Disorders Sub-Work Group, and suggested modifications have received preliminary approval to be incorporated into the DSM-V at the time of this writing. Adoption of these proposals will have far-reaching consequences, given that DSM-V criteria will influence both critical treatment choices for bereaved youth and the next generation of research studies. PMID:22913501

  14. Thermoregulatory disorders and illness related to heat and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2016-04-01

    Thermoregulation is a vital function of the autonomic nervous system in response to cold and heat stress. Thermoregulatory physiology sustains health by keeping body core temperature within a degree or two of 37°C, which enables normal cellular function. Heat production and dissipation are dependent on a coordinated set of autonomic responses. The clinical detection of thermoregulatory impairment provides important diagnostic and localizing information in the evaluation of disorders that impair thermoregulatory pathways, including autonomic neuropathies and ganglionopathies. Failure of neural thermoregulatory mechanisms or exposure to extreme or sustained temperatures that overwhelm the body's thermoregulatory capacity can also result in potentially life-threatening departures from normothermia. Hypothermia, defined as a core temperature of <35.0°C, may present with shivering, respiratory depression, cardiac dysrhythmias, impaired mental function, mydriasis, hypotension, and muscle dysfunction, which can progress to cardiac arrest or coma. Management includes warming measures, hydration, and cardiovascular support. Deaths from hypothermia are twice as frequent as deaths from hyperthermia. Hyperthermia, defined as a core temperature of >40.5°C, may present with sweating, flushing, tachycardia, fatigue, lightheadedness, headache, and paresthesia, progressing to weakness, muscle cramps, oliguria, nausea, agitation, hypotension, syncope, confusion, delirium, seizures, and coma. Mental status changes and core temperature distinguish potentially fatal heat stroke from heat exhaustion. Management requires the immediate reduction of core temperature. Ice water immersion has been shown to be superior to alternative cooling measures. Avoidance of thermal risk and early recognition of cold or heat stress are the cornerstones of preventive therapy. PMID:26794588

  15. Delayed sleep phase syndrome is related to seasonal affective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heon-Jeong; Rex, Katharine M.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Kelsoe, John R.; Kripke, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Both delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) and seasonal affective disorder (SAD) may manifest similar delayed circadian phase problems. However, the relationships and co-morbidity between the two conditions have not been fully studied. The authors examined the comorbidity between DSPS and SAD. Methods We recruited a case series of 327 DSPS and 331 controls with normal sleep, roughly matched for age, gender, and ancestry. Both DSPS and controls completed extensive questionnaires about sleep, the morningness-eveningness trait, depression, mania, and seasonality of symptoms, etc. Results The prevalences of SAD and subsyndromal SAD (S-SAD) were higher in DSPS compared to controls (χ2=12.65, p=0.002). DSPS were 3.3 times more likely to report SAD (odds ratio, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.41–7.93) compared to controls as defined by the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Correspondingly, DSPS showed significantly higher seasonality scores compared to controls in mood, appetite, and energy level subscores and the global seasonality score (t=3.12, t=0.002; t=2.04, p=0.041; t=2.64, p=0.008; and t=2.15, p=0.032, respectively). Weight fluctuation during seasons and winter-summer sleep length differences were also significantly higher in DSPS than controls (t=5.16, p<0.001 and t=2.64, p=0.009, respectively). SAD and S-SAD reported significantly higher eveningness, higher depression self-ratings, and more previous mania symptoms compared to non-seasonal subjects regardless of whether they were DSPS or controls. Conclusions These cases suggested that DSPS is partially comorbid with SAD. These data support the hypothesis that DSPS and SAD may share a pathophysiological mechanism causing delayed circadian phase. PMID:21601293

  16. [Oxidation phenotype as a risk factor for development of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Niewiński, P; Orzechowska-Juzwenko, K; Patkowski, J; Wolańczyk-Medrala, A; Nittner-Marszalska, M; Rzemisławska, Z

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between genetically determined polymorphic metabolism and susceptibility to allergic diseases has aroused much interest. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether patients with allergic diseases, like atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis differ from healthy persons in their ability to oxidize sparteine as a model drug. The study was completed by 200 persons, 40 patients with allergic diseases--20 with atopic asthma and 20 with allergic rhinitis and 160 healthy volunteers as a control group. The results of our study revealed a predominance of very extensive metabolizers of sparteine among patients with allergic diseases in comparison with healthy volunteers. The difference in the oxidation metabolic ratio (MR) frequency distribution between patients with allergic diseases and healthy persons was statistically significant. Relative risk (odds ratio) of development of atopic asthma was 3.29 times higher, and that of allergic rhinitis 2.94 times higher for persons with very extensive oxidation phenotype. Our results represent some evidence for a possible relationship between extensive, rapid oxidation phenotype and the higher susceptibility to development of atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:10592724

  17. Behavioral Response Inhibition in Psychotic Disorders: Diagnostic Specificity, Familiality and Relation to Generalized Cognitive Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Ethridge, Lauren E.; Soilleux, Melanie; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reilly, James L.; Hill, S. Kristian; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Gershon, Elliot S.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Sweeney, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Difficulty inhibiting context-inappropriate behavior is a common deficit in psychotic disorders. The diagnostic specificity of this impairment, its familiality, and its degree of independence from the generalized cognitive deficit associated with psychotic disorders remain to be clarified. Schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar patients with history of psychosis (n=523), their available first-degree biological relatives (n=656), and healthy participants (n=223) from the multi-site B-SNIP study completed a manual Stop Signal task. A nonlinear mixed model was used to fit logistic curves to success rates on Stop trials as a function of parametrically varied Stop Signal Delay. While schizophrenia patients had greater generalized cognitive deficit than bipolar patients, their deficits were similar on the Stop Signal task. Further, only bipolar patients showed impaired inhibitory control relative to healthy individuals after controlling for generalized cognitive deficit. Deficits accounted for by the generalized deficit were seen in relatives of schizophrenia and schizoaffective patients, but not in relatives of bipolar patients. In clinically stable patients with psychotic bipolar disorder, impaired inhibitory behavioral control was a specific cognitive impairment, distinct from the generalized neuropsychological impairment associated with psychotic disorders. Thus, in bipolar disorder with psychosis, a deficit in inhibitory control may contribute to risk for impulsive behavior. Because the deficit was not familial in bipolar families and showed a lack of independence from the generalized cognitive deficit in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, it appears to be a trait related to illness processes rather than one tracking familial risk factors. PMID:25261042

  18. Diagnosis of gluten related disorders: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Tomba, Carolina; Villalta, Danilo; Norsa, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Francesca; Roncoroni, Leda; Bardella, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cereal crops and cereal consumption have had a vital role in Mankind’s history. In the recent years gluten ingestion has been linked with a range of clinical disorders. Gluten-related disorders have gradually emerged as an epidemiologically relevant phenomenon with an estimated global prevalence around 5%. Celiac disease, wheat allergy and non-celiac gluten sensitivity represent different gluten-related disorders. Similar clinical manifestations can be observed in these disorders, yet there are peculiar pathogenetic pathways involved in their development. Celiac disease and wheat allergy have been extensively studied, while non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a relatively novel clinical entity, believed to be closely related to other gastrointestinal functional syndromes. The diagnosis of celiac disease and wheat allergy is based on a combination of findings from the patient’s clinical history and specific tests, including serology and duodenal biopsies in case of celiac disease, or laboratory and functional assays for wheat allergy. On the other hand, non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still mainly a diagnosis of exclusion, in the absence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria. A multimodal pragmatic approach combining findings from the clinical history, symptoms, serological and histological tests is required in order to reach an accurate diagnosis. A thorough knowledge of the differences and overlap in clinical presentation among gluten-related disorders, and between them and other gastrointestinal disorders, will help clinicians in the process of differential diagnosis. PMID:26109797

  19. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  20. New therapies for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Braido, Fulvio; Sclifò, Francesca; Ferrando, Matteo; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2014-04-01

    Because of its burden on patient's lives and its impact on asthma, allergic rhinitis must be treated properly with more effective and safer treatments. According to guidelines by Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), the classification, pathogenesis, and treatment of allergic rhinitis are well defined. Currently, second-generation antihistamines and inhaled steroids are considered the cornerstone of first-line therapy. However, new formulations of available drugs (e.g., loratadine and rupatadine oral solution, ebastine fast-dissolving tablets, and the combination of intranasal fluticasone propionate and azelastine hydrochloride), recently discovered molecules (e.g., ciclesonide, bilastine, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), immunologic targets (e.g., omalizumab), and unconventional treatments (e.g., homeopathic treatments) are currently under investigation and represent a new frontier in modern medicine and in allergic rhinitis management. The aim of this review is to provide an update on allergic rhinitis treatment, paying particular attention to clinical trials published within the past 20 months that assessed the efficacy and safety of new formulations of available drugs or new molecules. PMID:24504526

  1. A pilot investigation of the relation of perceived mutuality to eating disorders in women.

    PubMed

    Sanftner, Jennifer L; Tantillo, Mary; Seidlitz, C S Larry

    2004-01-01

    Relational theory predicts that lack of mutuality in important relationships leads to the development of psychological problems, including eating disorders. We sought to explore the association between perceived mutuality in relationships with partners and friends and eating disorders. Participants were 74 women, 35 with an eating disorder diagnosis and 39 non-psychiatric controls. The eating disorder group reported lower perceived mutuality than controls for both partners and friends. The negative aspects of perceived mutuality were particularly important in differentiating between groups. These findings held when depression was included as a covariate for friends only. Results suggest that the disconnecting aspects of relationships may play a powerful role in the phenomenology of eating disorders. PMID:15002884

  2. Health disorders related to learning the welding trade: assessment of approaches to risk communication 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonow, Clarice Alves; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; da Silva, Lauro Roberto Witt; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Turik, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the identification of health disorders as self-reported by apprentices of welding and to analyze the strength of the relationship between age and time of experience with self-reported health disorders before and after a socio-environmental nursing intervention. Method this quasi-experimental, non-randomized, before-and-after study was conducted with 86 welding apprentices from a private entity. Results the results show a significant difference for the pre- and post-test means and an increase in the post-test mean score for the cardiovascular, respiratory and cutaneous systems. There was also a negative correlation between the apprentices' ages and the identification of health disorders. Conclusion the socio-environmental nursing intervention enabled obtaining information on health disorders related to welding. In turn, such information enabled the apprentices to assess information and self-report health disorders. PMID:24553702

  3. Obsessive compulsive and related disorders: comparing DSM-5 and ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Marras, Anna; Fineberg, Naomi; Pallanti, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been recognized as mainly characterized by compulsivity rather than anxiety and, therefore, was removed from the anxiety disorders chapter and given its own in both the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the Beta Draft Version of the 11th revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). This revised clustering is based on increasing evidence of common affected neurocircuits between disorders, differently from previous classification systems based on interrater agreement. In this article, we focus on the classification of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs), examining the differences in approach adopted by these 2 nosological systems, with particular attention to the proposed changes in the forthcoming ICD-11. At this stage, notable differences in the ICD classification are emerging from the previous revision, apparently converging toward a reformulation of OCRDs that is closer to the DSM-5. PMID:27401060

  4. Glutamatergic treatment strategies for age-related memory disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Scheuer, K; Stoll, S

    1994-01-01

    Age-related changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been found in cortical areas and in the hippocampus of many species. On the basis of a variety of experimental observations it has been suggested that the decrease of NMDA receptor density might be one of the causative factors of the cognitive decline with aging. Based on these findings several strategies have been developed to improve cognition by compensating the NMDA receptor deficits in aging. The most promising approaches are the indirect activation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by agonists of the glycine site or the restoration of the age-related deficit of receptor density by several nootropics. PMID:7997073

  5. Subtypes of Disordered Gamblers: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    PubMed Central

    Nower, Lia; Martins, Silvia S.; Lin, Keng-Han; Blanco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Aims To derive empirical subtypes of problem gamblers based on etiological and clinical characteristics described in the Pathways Model, using data from a nationally representative survey of U.S. adults. Design & Measurement Data were collected from structured diagnostic face-to-face interviews using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule DSM-IV version IV (AUDADIS-IV). Setting The study utilized data from U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Participants All disordered gambling participants (N = 581) from a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of civilian non-institutionalized adults aged 18 years or older. Findings Latent class analyses indicated the best-fitting model was a three-class solution. Those in the largest class (Class 1: 51%, n=295) reported the lowest overall levels of psychopathology including gambling problem severity and mood disorders. In contrast, respondents in Class 2 (20%, n=117) had a high probability of endorsing past-year substance use disorders, moderate probabilities of having parents with alcohol/drug problems and of having a personality disorder, and the highest probability for past-year mood disorders. Respondents in Class 3 (29%, n=169) had the highest probabilities of personality and prior-to-past year mood disorders, substance use disorders, separation/divorce, drinking-related physical fights, and parents with alcohol/drug problems and/or a history of ASPD. Conclusions Three subtypes of disordered gamblers can be identified, roughly corresponding to the sub-types of the Pathways Model, ranging from a subgroup with low levels of gambling severity and psychopathology to one with high levels of gambling problem severity and comorbid psychiatric disorders. PMID:23072599

  6. Assessment of Allergic Rhinitis Websites in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon Young; Han, Doo Hee; Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Seung-Tae; Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Chul Hee; Min, Yang-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The internet has become an important source of medical information and a great amount of information related to allergic rhinitis (AR) is available on the internet. However, the quality of this information is still a matter of debate. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the AR-related information on Korean websites. Methods The key word "allergic rhinitis" was entered into 4 popular search engines, and this led to identifying 40 websites. After being categorized according to authorship, the informational value of these websites was evaluated using 4 different assessment tools such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmarks, the DISCERN questionnaire, the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) 2008 Update and the Health On the Net (HON) code. Results The 40 websites containing AR-related information were categorized according to their authorship as Western physician: 20, Oriental physician: 14, commercial: 1, and others: 5. The mean citation frequencies of the JAMA benchmarks and the ARIA 2008 Update concepts was 1.23 out of 4 and 4.33 out of 8, respectively, while the mean DISCERN score was 1.92 out of 5. When the websites were evaluated based on the type of authorship, the mean citation frequencies of the ARIA 2008 Update concepts were Western physician: 5.35, Oriental physician: 2.64. Additionally, three websites authored by Western physicians and 13 authored by Oriental physicians contained unreliable information. Among these 16 websites, only 3 websites met the requirements for the HON code "Justification". Conclusion AR-related information available on Korean websites is of variable quality and not all of the information provided is justifiable. Thus, performing surveillance of the medical information on these websites is necessary. Furthermore, common criteria that can be used to evaluate the websites created by both Western and Oriental physicians are also needed. PMID:20379400

  7. Allergen-encoded signals that control allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Hui-Ying; Landers, Cameron; Li, Evan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose is to review the important recent advances made in how innate immune cells, microbes, and the environment contribute to the expression of allergic disease, emphasizing the allergen-related signals that drive allergic responses. Recent findings The last few years have seen crucial advances in how innate immune cells such as innate lymphoid cells group 2 and airway epithelial cells and related molecular pathways through organismal proteinases and innate immune cytokines, such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-25, and IL-33 contribute to allergy and asthma. Simultaneously with these advances, important progress has been made in our understanding of how the environment, and especially pathogenic organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, helminths, and especially fungi derived from the natural and built environments, either promote or inhibit allergic inflammation and disease. Of specific interest are how lipopolysaccharide mediates its antiallergic effect through the ubiquitin modifying factor A20 and the antiallergic activity of both helminths and protozoa. Summary Innate immune cells and molecular pathways, often activated by allergen-derived proteinases acting on airway epithelium and macrophages as well as additional unknown factors, are essential to the expression of allergic inflammation and disease. These findings suggest numerous future research opportunities and new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. PMID:26658015

  8. [A Case with Multiple Comorbidities of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders].

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Ayako; Mito, Hironori; Motoyama, Mikuni; Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Hayashida, Kazuhisa; Maebayashi, Kensei; Matsunaga, Hisato

    2015-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) have been introduced in a revision to DSM-5 as a novel category that is distinct from other anxiety disorders in DSM-IV. OCRDs consist of 5 primary disorders: obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), hoarding disorder (HD), skin picking disorder (SPD), and hair pulling disorder (HPD), which share core clinical features such as preoccupation or recurrent thoughts and/or repetitive behaviors. Repetitive behaviors in BDD and HD can be differentially characterized by the presence of cognitive components associated with preceding anxiety from those in SPD or HPD, which are only observed as motoric components that regulate emotions or alleviate tension. Thus, the validity of the OCRD category and specific interrelationships between each OCRD remain uncertain. In the present study, therefore, we presented a case of multiple comorbidities of OCRDs in order to discuss the nature of the OCRD category. Our patient was a 20-year-old female university student. At the age of 11 years old, she started picking at acne on her face. The psychopathological, and treatment features observed in this case indicated possible interrelationships among OCRDs, especially between cognitive and motoric OCRDs, which supported the clinical utility and continuous nature of this category. PMID:26901889

  9. Weight-related abuse: Perceived emotional impact and the effect on disordered eating.

    PubMed

    Salwen, Jessica K; Hymowitz, Genna F; Bannon, Sarah M; O'Leary, K Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate theories that (1) weight-related abuse (WRA) plays a unique role in the development of disordered eating, above and beyond general childhood verbal abuse and weight-related teasing, and (2) the perceived emotional impact of WRA mediates the relationship between WRA and current disordered eating. Self-report questionnaires on childhood trauma, weight-related teasing, WRA, and current eating behaviors were administered to a total of 383 undergraduate students. In initial regressions, WRA significantly predicted binge eating, emotional eating, night eating, and unhealthy weight control. WRA continued to significantly predict all 4 forms of disordered eating following the introduction of measures of weight-related teasing and childhood verbal abuse into the regression. Latent variable analysis confirmed that perceived emotional impact of WRA mediated the relationship between WRA and disordered eating, and tests for indirect effects yielded a significant indirect effect of WRA on disordered eating through perceived emotional impact. In sum, WRA is a unique construct and the content of childhood or adolescent maltreatment is important in determining eventual psychopathology outcomes. These findings support the necessity of incorporating information on developmental history and cognitive factors into assessment and treatment of individuals with disordered eating. PMID:25636523

  10. Update on local allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Altıntoprak, Niyazi; Kar, Murat; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Oktemer, Tugba; Ipci, Kagan; Birdane, Leman; Aricigil, Mitat; Senturk, Mehmet; Bafaqeeh, Sameer Ali; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-08-01

    We here provide an update on the literature regarding local allergic rhinitis (LAR). In reviewing LAR, we have included an updated definition, classifications, mechanisms, comorbidities, and recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for LAR, as well as the defined research areas for future evidence-based studies. LAR is a localised nasal allergic response in the absence of systemic atopy characterised by local production of specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies, a TH2 pattern of mucosal cell infiltration during natural exposure to aeroallergens, and a positive nasal allergen provocation test response, with the release of inflammatory mediators. The localised allergic response of LAR is an important topic for the study of allergies. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of LAR. PMID:27368453

  11. Complementary Therapies in Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Ibrahim; Cingi, Cemal; Baykal, Bahadir

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of herbal treatment of allergic rhinitis. Methods. In this prospective study, patients who were diagnosed with perennial allergic rhinitis were questioned about their use of natural products/herbal therapies for their symptoms. Results. In total, 230 patients were enrolled. Overall, 37.3% of the patients stated that they had used natural products/herbal therapies at least once. Women were more likely than men to use herbal supplements (38.3% versus 32.4%). Ten different types of herbal supplements were identified, with stinging nettle (Urtica dioicath), black elderberry (Sambucus nigra), and Spirulina being the most common (12.6%, 6.1%, and 5.7%, resp.). Conclusion. This study found a high prevalence of herbal treatment usage for the relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms in Turkey. The herbal products identified in this study and in the literature are discussed. PMID:24324897

  12. Spatial relative risk patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Bilder, Deborah; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William

    2015-01-01

    Heightened areas of spatial relative risk for ASD, or ASD hotspots, in Utah were identified using adaptive kernel density functions. Children ages four, six and eight with ASD from multiple birth cohorts were identified by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities (URADD). Each ASD case was gender-matched to 20 birth cohort controls. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of children born inside versus outside ASD hotspots were compared. ASD hotspots were found in the surveillance area for all but one birth cohort and age group sample; maximum relative risk in these hotspots ranged from 1.8 to 3.0. Associations were found between higher socioeconomic status (SES) and birth residence in an ASD hotspot in five out of six birth cohort and age group samples. PMID:25241009

  13. Factors related to depression and eating disorders: self-esteem, body image, and attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Grubb, H J; Sellers, M I; Waligroski, K

    1993-06-01

    To test hypotheses that women suffering from some form of eating disorder would experience lower self-esteem and higher depression and that women with lower self-esteem and greater depression would rate their attractiveness lower and see themselves as heavier than less depressed individuals, 42 college undergraduate women were individually administered the Eating Disorders Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory, and a Body Image/Attractiveness Perception Scale. A Pearson correlation indicated a substantial relation between scores on depression and scores on eating disorders, but nonsignificant values between self-esteem scores and scores on either eating disorders or on depression. Depression scores correlated significantly with rated body size, but not attractiveness, while self-esteem scores were significantly correlated with rated attractiveness, not body size. These results contradict literature on the relation between self-esteem and depression. Directions for additional research are discussed. PMID:8332667

  14. Cognitive disruptions in stress-related psychiatric disorders: A role for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF).

    PubMed

    Bangasser, Debra A; Kawasumi, Yushi

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Stress is a potential etiology contributor to both post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and major depression. One stress-related neuropeptide that is hypersecreted in these disorders is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Dysregulation of CRF has long been linked to the emotion and mood symptoms that characterize PTSD and depression. However, the idea that CRF also mediates the cognitive disruptions observed in patients with these disorders has received less attention. Here we review literature indicating that CRF can alter cognitive functions. Detailed are anatomical studies revealing that CRF is poised to modulate regions required for learning and memory. We also describe preclinical behavioral studies that demonstrate CRF's ability to alter fear conditioning, impair memory consolidation, and alter a number of executive functions, including attention and cognitive flexibility. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of the cognitive impairments observed in stress-related psychiatric disorders are described. PMID:25888454

  15. Emotional disorders and smoking: relations to quit attempts and cessation strategies among treatment-seeking smokers.

    PubMed

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Farris, Samantha G; Leventhal, Adam M; Ditre, Joseph W; Schmidt, Norman B

    2015-01-01

    The cross-sectional associations between lifetime emotional disorder status (anxiety/depressive disorders) among smokers in relation to historical quit processes were examined. Adult treatment-seeking daily cigarette smokers (n=472) received structured psychiatric interviews and completed a survey that included in-depth questions on cessation history. Having a lifetime emotional disorder was significantly associated with a greater number of prior quit attempts and cessation strategies used, including increased use of both non-pharmacological and pharmacological quit methods. These smokers may still require complimentary specialty care to address their specific affective vulnerabilities given that their use of commonly-applied strategies did not result in lifetime abstinence. PMID:25260199

  16. Emotional Disorders and Smoking: Relations to Quit Attempts and Cessation Strategies among Treatment-seeking Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Zvolensky, Michael J.; Farris, Samantha G.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Ditre, Joseph W.; Schmidt, Norman B.

    2014-01-01

    The cross-sectional associations between lifetime emotional disorder status (anxiety/depressive disorders) among smokers in relation to historical quit processes were examined. Adult treatment-seeking daily cigarette smokers (n=472) received structured psychiatric interviews and completed a survey that included in-depth questions on cessation history. Having a lifetime emotional disorder was significantly associated with greater number of quit prior attempts and cessation strategies used, including increased use of both non-pharmacological and pharmacological quit methods. These smokers may still require complimentary specialty care to address their specific affective vulnerabilities given that their use of commonly-applied strategies did not result in lifetime abstinence. PMID:25260199

  17. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive–compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Moya, Pablo R.; Fox, Meredith A.; Rubenstein, Liza M.; Wendland, Jens R.; Timpano, Kiara R.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  18. CDKL5-Related Disorders: From Clinical Description to Molecular Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Bahi-Buisson, N.; Bienvenu, T.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been described in girls with Rett-like features and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy including infantile spasms. To date, with more than 80 reported cases, the phenotype of CDKL5-related encephalopathy is better defined. The main features consist of early-onset seizures starting before 5 months of age, severe mental retardation with absent speech and Rett-like features such as hand stereotypies and deceleration of head growth. On the other hand, neuro-vegetative signs and developmental regression are rare in CDKL5 mutation patients. The CDKL5 gene encodes a serine threonine kinase protein which is characterized by a catalytic domain and a long C-terminal extension involved in the regulation of the catalytic activity of CDKL5 and in the sub-nuclear localization of the protein. To our knowledge, more than 70 different point mutations have been described including missense mutations within the catalytic domain, nonsense mutations causing the premature termination of the protein distributed in the entire open reading frame, splice variants, and frameshift mutations. Additionally, CDKL5 mutations have recently been described in 7 males with a more severe epileptic encephalopathy and a worse outcome compared to female patients. Finally, about 23 male and female patients have been identified with gross rearrangements encompassing all or part of the CDKL5 gene, with a phenotype reminiscent of CDKL5-related encephalopathy combined with dysmorphic features. Even if recent data clearly indicate that CDKL5 plays an important role in brain function, the protein remains largely uncharacterized. Phenotype-genotype correlation is additionally hampered by the relatively small number of patients described. PMID:22670135

  19. Contemporary group treatment of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, George

    2007-01-01

    The contemporary group treatment of veterans from the Vietnam War to the present who suffer from combat-related PTSD is reviewed in light of the dynamic understanding of combat trauma developed during and since World War II. Both dynamic and cognitive behavioral group therapies are explored. The common features of all group treatments of combat PTSD involve the development of trust and the communalization of trauma within a cohesive group. Further research is needed to increase our understanding of effectiveness, mediating factors, and relationships between childhood experience and combat trauma. PMID:17480188

  20. Therapeutic strategies for allergic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    1999-11-01

    Many drugs are now in development for the treatment of atopic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. These treatments are based on improvements in existing therapies or on a better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in atopic diseases. Although most attention has been focused on asthma, treatments that inhibit the atopic disease process would have application to all atopic diseases, as they often coincide. Most of the many new therapies in development are aimed at inhibiting components of the allergic inflammatory response, but in the future there are real possibilities for the development of preventative and even curative treatments.

  1. Probiotics and prebiotics: immunological and clinical effects in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mimi L K

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in immune development and may play a role in the development of allergic disorders. Manipulation of the intestinal microbiota may therefore offer an approach to the prevention or treatment of allergic diseases. Probiotics and prebiotics, used alone or together (synbiotics), can influence the intestinal microbiota and modulate immune responses in vitro and in vivo. Clinical studies suggest a potential role for selected probiotics (alone or in combination with prebiotics) in the prevention of atopic eczema. A prenatal component of treatment appears important for beneficial effects. Effects are dependent upon the specific bacteria and characteristics of the study population. One study reported beneficial effects for prebiotics in the prevention of eczema in high-risk infants, however, further studies are required to confirm this. The use of probiotics in the treatment of allergic disease is less promising. A Cochrane meta-analysis concluded that probiotics are not effective for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Probiotic effects in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis are conflicting. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics offer potential treatments for the prevention of atopic eczema; however, there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend their use in clinical practice. Studies to clarify the optimal dose, bacterial species/strains, whether there is added benefit with synbiotics, the optimal timing for intervention, and the patient populations who would benefit most from such therapies are warranted. PMID:19710525

  2. Emotion regulation strategies in trauma-related disorders: pathways linking neurobiology and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Del Río-Casanova, Lucía; González, Anabel; Páramo, Mario; Van Dijke, Annemiek; Brenlla, Julio

    2016-06-01

    Emotion regulation impairments with traumatic origins have mainly been studied from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) models by studying cases of adult onset and single-incident trauma exposure. The effects of adverse traumatic experiences, however, go beyond the PTSD. Different authors have proposed that PTSD, borderline personality, dissociative, conversive and somatoform disorders constitute a full spectrum of trauma-related conditions. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the neurobiological findings covering this posttraumatic spectrum is needed in order to develop an all-encompassing model for trauma-related disorders with emotion regulation at its center. The present review has sought to link neurobiology findings concerning cortico-limbic function to the field of emotion regulation. In so doing, trauma-related disorders have been placed in a continuum between under- and over-regulation of affect strategies. Under-regulation of affect was predominant in borderline personality disorder, PTSD with re-experiencing symptoms and positive psychoform and somatoform dissociative symptoms. Over-regulation of affect was more prevalent in somatoform disorders and pathologies characterized by negative psychoform and somatoform symptoms. Throughout this continuum, different combinations between under- and over-regulation of affect strategies were also found. PMID:26812780

  3. The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, James D; Milne, Teresa; Fang, Mei Lan; Amari, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Aims This study provides a systematic review of existing research that has empirically evaluated interventions designed to reduce stigma related to substance use disorders. Methods A comprehensive review of electronic databases was conducted to identify evaluations of substance use disorder related stigma interventions. Studies that met inclusion criteria were synthesized and assessed using systematic review methods. Results Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the studies was moderately strong. Interventions of three studies (23%) focused on people with substance use disorders (self-stigma), three studies (23%) targeted the general public (social stigma) and seven studies (54%) focused on medical students and other professional groups (structural stigma). Nine interventions (69%) used approaches that included education and/or direct contact with people who have substance use disorders. All but one study indicated their interventions produced positive effects on at least one stigma outcome measure. None of the interventions have been evaluated across different settings or populations. Conclusions A range of interventions demonstrate promise for achieving meaningful improvements in stigma related to substance use disorders. The limited evidence indicates that self-stigma can be reduced through therapeutic interventions such as group-based acceptance and commitment therapy. Effective strategies for addressing social stigma include motivational interviewing and communicating positive stories of people with substance use disorders. For changing stigma at a structural level, contact-based training and education programs targeting medical students and professionals (e.g. police, counsellors) are effective. PMID:21815959

  4. Relations among Perceived Control over Anxiety-Related Events, Worry, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder in a Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frala, Jamie L.; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W.; Blumenthal, Heidemarie; Barreto, Carolina C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the associations among perceived control over anxiety-related events, worry, and both symptoms and diagnoses of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The sample was comprised of 140 adolescents (60 girls) between the ages of 10 and 17 years (M[subscript age] = 14.6 years; SD = 2.25) recruited from the general community. Findings…

  5. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sonja W.; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  6. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sonja W; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  7. Effect of cardiac pacing on sleep-related breathing disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulos, Dimitrios L; Chalkias, Athanasios; Iakovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2016-09-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders are commonly encountered in the middle-aged population, negatively affecting quality of life. Central sleep apnea is associated with congestive heart failure, whereas obstructive sleep apnea is related to different pathophysiologic mechanisms, such as the total or partial occlusion of upper airway tract. Both sleep-related disorders have been associated with increased morbidity, and hence, they have been a target of several treatment strategies. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the effect of different types of cardiac pacing on sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with or without heart failure. The PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were examined from April 2015 to January 2016. Of the initial 360 studies, 22 eligible trials were analyzed. The included studies were classified according to the type of sleep disorder and the intervention undertaken. The evidence shows that cardiac resynchronization therapy but not atrial overdrive pacing can reduce apneic events in central sleep apnea patients. However, their effect on obstructive sleep apnea is controversial. It can be assumed that pacing cannot be used alone as treatment of sleep-related breathing disorders. Further research is needed in order to elucidate the effect of these interventions in sleep apnea patients. PMID:27112558

  8. Analyses Related to the Development of DSM-5 Criteria for Substance Use Related Disorders: 1. Toward Amphetamine, Cocaine and Prescription Drug Use Disorder Continua Using Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tulshi D.; Compton, Wilson M.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon; Ruan, W. June; Huang, Boji; Pickering, Roger P.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior research has demonstrated the dimensionality of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis use disorders criteria. The purpose of this study was to examine the unidimensionality of DSM-IV cocaine, amphetamine and prescription drug abuse and dependence criteria and to determine the impact of elimination of the legal problems criterion on the information value of the aggregate criteria. Methods Factor analyses and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to explore the unidimensionality and psychometric properties of the illicit drug use criteria using a large representative sample of the U.S. population. Results All illicit drug abuse and dependence criteria formed unidimensional latent traits. For amphetamines, cocaine, sedatives, tranquilizers and opioids, IRT models fit better for models without legal problems criterion than models with legal problems criterion and there were no differences in the information value of the IRT models with and without the legal problems criterion, supporting the elimination of that criterion. Conclusion Consistent with findings for alcohol, nicotine and cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine, sedative, tranquilizer and opioid abuse and dependence criteria reflect underlying unitary dimensions of severity. The legal problems criterion associated with each of these substance use disorders can be eliminated with no loss in informational value and an advantage of parsimony. Taken together, these findings support the changes to substance use disorder diagnoses recommended by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 Substance and Related Disorders Workgroup. PMID:21963414

  9. Work-Family Relations among Mothers of Children with Learning Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yagon, Michal; Cinamon, Rachel Gali

    2008-01-01

    The study examined conflict and facilitation in work-family relations among working mothers of children with learning disorders (LD) or with typical development. The study also focused on three maternal personal resources (maternal anxious/avoidant attachment security, affect and sense of coherence) as antecedents of these work-family relations,…

  10. Procedural and Conceptual Print-Related Achievements in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanter, Elizabeth; Freeman, Daniel; Dove, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis between emergent procedural and conceptual print-related achievements was conducted for 32 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) aged 4 to 8 years. To minimize the influence of linguistic competence on the assessment, the ASD print-related profile was compared with that of a language-matched sample of typically…

  11. Therapeutic Alliance, Negative Mood Regulation, and Treatment Outcome in Child Abuse-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloitre, Marylene; Chase Stovall McClough,K.; Miranda, Regina; Chemtob, Claude M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the related contributions of the therapeutic alliance and negative mood regulation to the outcome of a 2-phase treatment for childhood abuse-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Phase 1 focused on stabilization and preparatory skills building, whereas Phase 2 was comprised primarily of imaginal exposure to traumatic…

  12. Reward-Related Decision-Making in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Erika E.; Christopher May, J.; Siegle, Greg J.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Ryan, Neal D.; Carter, Cameron S.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although reward processing is considered an important part of affective functioning, few studies have investigated reward-related decisions or responses in young people with affective disorders. Depression is postulated to involve decreased activity in reward-related affective systems. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance…

  13. Avoidant Coping and Treatment Outcome in Rape-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiner, Amy S.; Kearns, Megan C.; Jackson, Joan L.; Astin, Millie C.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the impact of avoidant coping on treatment outcome in rape-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Adult women with rape-related PTSD (N = 62) received 9 sessions of prolonged exposure (PE) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). The mean age for the sample was 34.7 years, and race…

  14. Autophagic pathways in Parkinson disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Xilouri, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2011-01-01

    Macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) are the two main mammalian lysosomal proteolytic systems. In macroautophagy, double-membrane structures engulf organelles and other intracellular constituents through a highly regulated process that involves the formation of autophagic vacuoles and their fusion with lysosomes. In CMA, selected proteins are targeted through a nonvesicular pathway to a transport complex at the lysosomal membrane, through which they are threaded into the lysosomes and degraded. Autophagy is important in development, differentiation, cellular remodelling and survival during nutrient starvation. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagic dysregulation causes accumulation of abnormal proteins or damaged organelles, which is a characteristic of chronic neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson disease (PD). Evidence from post-mortem material, transgenic mice, and animal and cellular models of PD suggests that both major autophagic pathways are malfunctioning. Numerous connections exist between proteins genetically linked to autosomal dominant PD, in particular α-synuclein and LRRK2, and autophagic pathways. However, proteins involved in recessive PD, such as PINK1 and Parkin (PINK2), function in the process of mitophagy, whereby damaged mitochondria are selectively engulfed by macroautophagy. This wealth of new data suggests that both autophagic pathways are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in PD and other related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:21418705

  15. Claims incidence of work-related disorders of the upper extremities: Washington state, 1987 through 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, B; Welp, E; Nelson, N; Kalat, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the claim incidence rate, cost, and industry distribution of work-related upper extremity disorders in Washington. METHODS: Washington State Fund workers' compensation claims from 1987 to 1995 were abstracted and categorized into general and specific disorders of gradual or sudden onset. RESULTS: Accepted claims included 100,449 for hand/wrist disorders (incidence rate: 98.2/10,000 full-time equivalents; carpal tunnel syndrome rate: 27.3), 30,468 for elbow disorders (incidence rate: 29.7; epicondylitis rate: 11.7), and 55,315 for shoulder disorders (incidence rate: 54.0; rotator cuff syndrome rate: 19.9). Average direct workers' compensation claims costs (medical treatment and indemnity) were $15,790 (median: $6774) for rotator cuff syndrome, $12,794 for carpal tunnel syndrome (median: $4190), and $6593 for epicondylitis (median: $534). Construction and food processing were among the industries with the highest rate ratios for all disorders (> 4.0). CONCLUSIONS: Upper extremity disorders represent a large and costly problem in Washington State industry. Industries characterized by manual handling and repetitive work have high rate ratios. The contingent workforce appears to be at high risk. PMID:9842381

  16. Characteristics and predictors of allergic rhinitis undertreatment in primary care.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Murgia, N; Baldacci, S; Maio, S; Pala, A P; Casciari, C; dell'Omo, M; Viegi, G

    2016-03-01

    Although allergic rhinitis is considered a raising medical problem in many countries it is often undertreated. The reasons for this phenomenon are not completely clear.The aim of this study is to evaluate factors associated with allergic rhinitis under-/no treatment.A sample of 518 allergic rhinitis patients recruited by their primary care physicians, as a part of the ARGA study, were invited to fill in a specific questionnaire regarding rhinitis symptoms, treatment, and rhinitis-related work/social disability. Chi-square test and logistic regression were performed to assess risk factors for allergic rhinitis under-/no treatment.Over one out of four patients had no treatment despite the symptoms and 13.5% were inadequately treated. Participants with asthma (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30-0.75) and conjunctivitis (0.44, 95% CI 0.27-0.71) were at lower risk of allergic rhinitis under-/no treatment: in asthmatics this reduction was related mainly to the concomitant asthma treatment (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.10-0.37).Asthmatics with under-/not treated rhinitis had the highest prevalence of rhinitis-related quality of life impairment.Under-/no treatment for allergic rhinitis is still rather frequent despite the relevance of this disease. The simultaneous presence of asthma and an anti-asthmatic therapy are able to influence positively the treatment. Targeted interventions toward a better characterization and a tight follow-up of rhinitis patient without asthma are needed. PMID:26680255

  17. Unique and related predictors of major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and their comorbidity after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Nosen, Elizabeth; Williams, Patrick A; Tracy, Melissa; Coffey, Scott F; Galea, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    The current study examined demographic and psychosocial factors that predict major depressive disorder (MDD) and comorbid MDD/posttraumatic stress disorder (MDD/PTSD) diagnostic status after Hurricane Katrina, one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. This study expanded on the findings published in the article by Galea, Tracy, Norris, and Coffey (J Trauma Stress 21:357-368, 2008), which examined the same predictors for PTSD, to better understand related and unique predictors of MDD, PTSD, and MDD/PTSD comorbidity. A total of 810 individuals representative of adult residents living in the 23 southernmost counties of Mississippi before Hurricane Katrina were interviewed. Ongoing hurricane-related stressors, low social support, and hurricane-related financial loss were common predictors of MDD, PTSD, and MDD/PTSD, whereas educational and marital status emerged as unique predictors of MDD. Implications for postdisaster relief efforts that address the risk for both MDD and PTSD are discussed. PMID:24080670

  18. A systematic review of the neural bases of psychotherapy for anxiety and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Samantha J.; Stein, Dan J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain imaging studies over two decades have delineated the neural circuitry of anxiety and related disorders, particularly regions involved in fear processing and in obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The neural circuitry of fear processing involves the amygdala, anterior cingulate, and insular cortex, while cortico-striatal-thalamic circuitry plays a key role in obsessive-compulsive disorder. More recently, neuroimaging studies have examined how psychotherapy for anxiety and related disorders impacts on these neural circuits. Here we conduct a systematic review of the findings of such work, which yielded 19 functional magnetic resonance imaging studies examining the neural bases of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in 509 patients with anxiety and related disorders. We conclude that, although each of these related disorders is mediated by somewhat different neural circuitry, CBT may act in a similar way to increase prefrontal control of subcortical structures. These findings are consistent with an emphasis in cognitive-affective neuroscience on the potential therapeutic value of enhancing emotional regulation in various psychiatric conditions. PMID:26487807

  19. Topiramate in the treatment of substance related disorders: a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Ann K.; Greenfield, Shelly F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To critically review the literature on topiramate in the treatment of substance related disorders. Data Sources A PubMed search of human studies published in English through January 2009. Study Selection 26 articles were identified and reviewed; these studies examined topiramate in disorders related to alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, ecstasy, and benzodiazepines. Data Extraction Study design, sample size, topiramate dose and duration, and study outcomes were reviewed. Data Synthesis There is compelling evidence for the efficacy of topiramate in the treatment of alcohol dependence. Two trials show trends for topiramate’s superiority over oral naltrexone in alcohol dependence, while one trial suggests topiramate is inferior to disulfiram. Despite suggestive animal models, evidence for topiramate in treating alcohol withdrawal in humans is slim. Studies of topiramate in nicotine dependence show mixed results. Human laboratory studies that used acute topiramate dosing show that topiramate actually enhances the pleasurable effects of both nicotine and methamphetamine. Evidence for topiramate in the treatment of cocaine dependence is promising, but limited by small sample size. The data on opioids, benzodiazepines, and ecstasy are sparse. Conclusion Topiramate is efficacious for the treatment of alcohol dependence, but side effects may limit widespread use. While topiramate’s unique pharmacodynamic profile offers a promising theoretical rationale for use across multiple substance related disorders, heterogeneity both across and within these disorders limits topiramate’s broad applicability in treating substance related disorders. Recommendations for future research include exploration of genetic variants for more targeted pharmacotherapies. PMID:20361908

  20. A systematic review of the neural bases of psychotherapy for anxiety and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Samantha J; Stein, Dan J

    2015-09-01

    Brain imaging studies over two decades have delineated the neural circuitry of anxiety and related disorders, particularly regions involved in fear processing and in obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The neural circuitry of fear processing involves the amygdala, anterior cingulate, and insular cortex, while cortico-striatal-thalamic circuitry plays a key role in obsessive-compulsive disorder. More recently, neuroimaging studies have examined how psychotherapy for anxiety and related disorders impacts on these neural circuits. Here we conduct a systematic review of the findings of such work, which yielded 19 functional magnetic resonance imaging studies examining the neural bases of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in 509 patients with anxiety and related disorders. We conclude that, although each of these related disorders is mediated by somewhat different neural circuitry, CBT may act in a similar way to increase prefrontal control of subcortical structures. These findings are consistent with an emphasis in cognitive-affective neuroscience on the potential therapeutic value of enhancing emotional regulation in various psychiatric conditions. PMID:26487807

  1. The working practices of the police in relation to mentally disordered offenders and diversion services.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, P J; Kelly, M; Pullen, N

    2001-01-01

    A research study was undertaken to examine the working practices of four bridewells in Hampshire in relation to mentally disordered offenders (MDOs) and diversion services. A consecutive sample of individuals detained in cells and not identified by the police as having a mental disorder were screened for the presence of mental disorder and their suitability for diversion. Custody and detention staff were observed and interviewed to elicit their views and working practices in relation to MDOs. The findings revealed that in bridewells with diversion schemes an average of about 7% of detained individuals had mental disorders who were suitable for diversion but were not detected by the police. In the bridewell without a diversion scheme the figure was 14%. Conversely, many individuals without a formal mental disorder were inappropriately referred to diversion schemes. The effectiveness of screening processes by custody staff was variable. Facilities in the bridewells were not suitable for containing disturbed individuals. Delays in obtaining mental health assessments caused considerable concern for police officers and prolonged the discomfort of vulnerable individuals. Further preparation and training of custody staff is needed to improve screening procedures. Reception and detention facilities for mentally disordered individuals should be reviewed and response times for approved social workers (ASWs) and psychiatrists would benefit from improvement. PMID:11219117

  2. Disorders Related to Use of Psychoactive Substances in DSM-5: Changes and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bhad, Roshan; Lal, Rakesh; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    In the most recent edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) that is DSM-5 many modifications have been made in substance use disorder section. These include changes in terminology; sections and categories; diagnostic criteria; threshold for diagnosis; severity; and specifier. Additionally, there have been certain additions and omissions from the earlier version. Critical evaluation of the changes made to the section on disorders related to use of psychoactive substances in India context has not been published so far. The current paper presents a critique of the changes made to the substance use disorder section in DSM-5. The rationale for these changes put forth by DSM-5 work group on substance related disorders have been discussed. Additionally, attempt has been made to highlight the possible future challenges consequent to the current nosological revision for substance use disorder category. Overall DSM-5 seems to be promising in fulfilling its goal of DSM-ICD harmonisation and movement towards an internationally compatible and practical diagnostic system for mental health disorders. It has increased the scope of addiction by inclusion of behavioural addiction. It has also tried to balance the categorical and dimensional approach to diagnosis. However, the real test of this newer edition of one of the most commonly used nosological systems will be during clinical care and research. This will help address the debatable issues regarding the changes that DSM-5 brings with it. PMID:26702188

  3. ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many fungi have been associated with allergic lung disease, but few are well studied and even fewer allergens of fungal origin are well characterized. Exposure to damp moldy environments has been associated with the exacerbation of asthma, but the role of molds in the induction o...

  4. Asthma and Respiratory Allergic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pathogenesis of non-communicable diseases such as allergy is complex and poorly understood. The causes of chronic allergic diseases including asthma involve to a large extent, immunomodulation of the adaptive and particularly the innate immune systems and are markedly influen...

  5. INDOOR MOLDS AND ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Damp/moldy environments have been associated with asthma exacerbation, but mold¿s role in allergic asthma induction is less clear. Recently, 5 molds were statistically associated with water-damaged asthmatic homes in the Cleveland area. The asthma exacerbation...

  6. Physician-diagnosed medical disorders in relation to PTSD symptoms in older male military veterans.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, P P; Spiro, A; Paris, A H

    2000-01-01

    The association between physician-diagnosed medical disorders and combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms was examined in 605 male combat veterans of World War II and the Korean conflict. Physician exams were performed at periodic intervals beginning in the 1960s. PTSD symptoms were assessed in 1990. Cox regression was used to examine the onset of each of 12 disorder categories as a function of PTSD symptoms, controlling for age, smoking, alcohol use, and body weight at study entry. Even with control for these factors, PTSD symptoms were associated with increased onset of arterial, lower gastrointestinal, dermatologic, and musculoskeletal disorders. There was only weak evidence that PTSD mediated the effects of combat exposure on morbidity. Possible mediators of the relationship between combat exposure, PTSD, and physical morbidity are discussed. PMID:10711592

  7. Obesity and weight-related medical problems of incarcerated persons with and without mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Nancy; Shi, Jing; Fabrikant, Nicole; Schumann, Brooke E

    2012-07-01

    This study examined weight and weight-related medical conditions of soon-to-be released inmates with and without a mental disorder. The sample included 4,204 males and females aged 18 or older residing in 11 state prisons. Three quarters or more of the inmates were overweight or obese. Mental health status was not found to be a significant factor in the presence or absence of overweight or obesity. Male inmates with mental disorders had higher rates of breathing, walking, and intense pain problems compared to those without mental disorders. Obese male inmates with schizophrenia or bipolar were more likely than those without a mental disorder to report medication treatment for diabetes, cardiovascular problems, arthritis, and intense pain. Evidence-based interventions are needed to monitor weight and obesity during incarceration and to teach weight management skills as part of an integrated psychiatric and medical program. PMID:22569903

  8. Violent Behavior and DSM-IV Psychiatric Disorders: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pulay, Attila J.; Dawson, Deborah A.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Goldstein, Rise B.; June Ruan, Ms. W.; Pickering, Roger P.; Huang, Boji; Chou, S. Patricia; Grant, Bridget F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To present nationally representative data on the lifetime prevalence and population estimates of violent behavior among individuals with DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Method The data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Prevalences, population estimates, and associations of violent behavior occurring among individuals with pure, comorbid and specific DSM-IV psychiatric disorders were examined. Results Controlling for sociodemographic characteristics and other comorbidity, the odds of violent behavior were significantly increased (p < 0.05) among individuals with substance use disorders, pathological gambling, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorders, panic disorder with agoraphobia, specific phobia, and paranoid, schizoid, histrionic, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders. Percentages of violent behavior among individuals with each comorbid disorders was significantly greater (p < 0.05 – p < 0.0001) than the corresponding percentages among those presenting with the pure form of each disorder. Alcohol and drug use disorders were the most significant contributors to the public health burden of violent behavior. Conclusion The majority of individuals with psychiatric disorders do not engage in violent behavior, and public perception associated with stereotypic violence among individuals with psychiatric disorders appears unwarranted. Elevated risks and burden of violent behavior were not equally shared across the spectrum of psychiatric disorders, with particular disorders, especially substance use disorders, contributing disproportionately to the burden. Future research should examine the circumstances under which violence among individuals with psychiatric disorders occurs with a view towards improving clinical prediction and developing more effective prevention strategies. PMID:18312033

  9. NLRP3 inflammasome activation by mitochondrial ROS in bronchial epithelial cells is required for allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S R; Kim, D I; Kim, S H; Lee, H; Lee, K S; Cho, S H; Lee, Y C

    2014-01-01

    Abnormality in mitochondria has been suggested to be associated with development of allergic airway disorders. In this study, to evaluate the relationship between mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in allergic asthma, we used a newly developed mitochondrial ROS inhibitor, NecroX-5. NecroX-5 reduced the increase of mitochondrial ROS generation in airway inflammatory cells, as well as bronchial epithelial cells, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB, increased expression of various inflammatory mediators and pathophysiological features of allergic asthma in mice. Finally, blockade of IL-1β substantially reduced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the asthmatic mice. These findings suggest that mitochondrial ROS have a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation through the modulation of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, providing a novel role of airway epithelial cells expressing NLRP3 inflammasome as an immune responder. PMID:25356867

  10. The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) and traditional childhood anxiety measures.

    PubMed

    Muris, P; Merckelbach, H; Mayer, B; van Brakel, A; Thissen, S; Moulaert, V; Gadet, B

    1998-12-01

    The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) is a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms of DSM-IV linked anxiety disorders in children. This article presents two studies that investigated the relationship between the SCARED, on the one hand, and two other widely used anxiety measures for children, namely the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) and the Fear Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R), on the other hand. Results indicate that SCARED scores are positively and in a theoretically meaningful way related to RCMAS and FSSC-R scores, and thus provide evidence for the concurrent validity of the SCARED. PMID:10037229

  11. Subjective and Objective Binge Eating in Relation to Eating Disorder Symptomatology, Negative Affect, and Personality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Lisa M.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Printz, Katherine S.; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The current study explored the clinical meaningfulness of distinguishing subjective (SBE) from objective binge eating (OBE) among individuals with threshold/subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). We examined relations between OBEs and SBEs and eating disorder symptoms, negative affect, and personality dimensions using both a group comparison and a continuous approach. Method Participants were 204 adult females meeting criteria for threshold/subthreshold BN who completed questionnaires related to disordered eating, affect, and personality. Results Group comparisons indicated that SBE and OBE groups did not significantly differ on eating disorder pathology or negative affect, but did differ on two personality dimensions (cognitive distortion and attentional impulsivity). Using the continuous approach, we found that frequencies of SBEs (not OBEs) accounted for unique variance in weight/shape concern, diuretic use frequency, depressive symptoms, anxiety, social avoidance, insecure attachment, and cognitive distortion. Discussion SBEs in the context of BN may indicate broader areas of psychopathology. PMID:23109272

  12. Insomnia Disorder is Associated with Increased Amygdala Reactivity to Insomnia-Related Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Baglioni, Chiara; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Regen, Wolfram; Feige, Bernd; Nissen, Christoph; Lombardo, Caterina; Violani, Cristiano; Hennig, Jürgen; Riemann, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Alterations in emotional reactivity may play a key role in the pathophysiology of insomnia disorder (ID). However, only few supporting experimental data are currently available. We evaluated in a hypothesis-driven design whether patients with ID present altered amygdala responses to emotional stimuli related and unrelated to the experience of insomnia and, because of chronic hyperarousal, less habituation of amygdala responses. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Departments of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy and of Radiology of the University of Freiburg Medical Center. Participants: There were 22 patients with ID (15 females; 7 males; age 40.7 ± 12.6 y) and 38 healthy good sleepers (HGS, 21 females; 17 males; age 39.6 ± 8.9 y). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: In a functional magnetic resonance imaging session, five different blocks of pictures with varying emotional arousal, valence, and content (insomnia-relatedness) were presented. Pictures were presented twice to test for habituation processes. Results showed that patients with ID, compared to HGS, presented heightened amygdala responses to insomnia-related stimuli. Moreover, habituation of amygdala responses was observed only in HGS, but not in patients with ID who showed a mixed pattern of amygdala responses to the second presentation of the stimuli. Conclusions: The results provide evidence for an insomnia-related emotional bias in patients with insomnia disorder. Cognitive behavior treatment for the disorder could benefit from strategies dealing with the emotional charge associated with the disorder. Further studies should clarify the role of insomnia disorder with respect to habituation of amygdala responses. Citation: Baglioni C, Spiegelhalder K, Regen W, Feige B, Nissen C, Lombardo C, Violani C, Hennig J, Riemann D. Insomnia disorder is associated with increased amygdala reactivity to insomnia-related stimuli. SLEEP 2014;37(12):1907-1917. PMID:25325493

  13. Different changes in cortical tumor necrosis factor-α-related pathways in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Dean, B; Gibbons, A S; Tawadros, N; Brooks, L; Everall, I P; Scarr, E

    2013-07-01

    The growing body of evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders led us to measure levels of that protein in the cortex of subjects with major depressive disorders (MDD). Having reported an increase (458%) in the levels of the transmembrane (tmTNFα), but not the soluble (sTNFα), form of the protein in Brodmann's area (BA) 46, but not 24, in people with the disorder, we decided to examine additional components of TNFα-related pathways in the same regions in people with MDD and extend our studies to the same cortical regions of people with schizophrenia (Sz) and bipolar disorders (BD). Using postmortem tissue, western blots and quantitative PCR, we have now shown there is a significant increase (305%) in tmTNFα in Brodmann's area 24, but not 46, from subjects with BD, and that levels of the protein were not altered in Sz. Levels of sTNFα were not altered in BD or Sz. In addition, we have shown that levels of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) mRNA are increased in BA 24 (53%) and BA 46 (82%) in people with Sz, whereas levels of TNFR2 mRNA was decreased in BA 46 in people with mood disorders (MDD=-51%; BD=-67%). Levels of proteins frequently used as surrogate markers of neuronal, astrocytic and microglia numbers, as well as levels of the pro-inflammatory marker (interleukin 1β), were not changed in the cortex of people with mood disorders. Our data suggest there are differential changes in TNFα-related markers in the cortex of people with MDD, BD and Sz that may not be related to classical inflammation and may cause changes in different TNFα-related signaling pathways. PMID:22801413

  14. N-Acetyl Cysteine in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Georgina; Dean, Olivia; Camfield, David; Blair-West, Scott; Ng, Chee; Berk, Michael; Sarris, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obsessive compulsive and related disorders are a collection of debilitating psychiatric disorders in which the role of glutamate dysfunction in the underpinning neurobiology is becoming well established. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is a glutamate modulator with promising therapeutic effect. This paper presents a systematic review of clinical trials and case reports exploring the use of NAC for these disorders. A further objective was to detail the methodology of current clinical trials being conducted in the area. Methods PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane Library Database were searched for human clinical trials or case reports investigating NAC in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) or obsessive compulsive related disorders. Researchers with known involvement in NAC studies were contacted for any unpublished data. Results Four clinical trials and five case reports/series were identified. Study durations were commonly 12-weeks, using 2,400–3,000 mg/day of NAC. Overall, NAC demonstrates activity in reducing the severity of symptoms, with a good tolerability profile and minimal adverse effects. Currently there are three ongoing randomized controlled trials using NAC for OCD (two adults and one pediatric), and one for excoriation. Conclusion Encouraging results have been demonstrated from the few pilot studies that have been conducted. These results are detailed, in addition to a discussion of future potential research. PMID:25912534

  15. Toward precision medicine and health: Opportunities and challenges in allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Galli, Stephen Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Precision medicine (also called personalized, stratified, or P4 medicine) can be defined as the tailoring of preventive measures and medical treatments to the characteristics of each patient to obtain the best clinical outcome for each person while ideally also enhancing the cost-effectiveness of such interventions for patients and society. Clearly, the best clinical outcome for allergic diseases is not to get them in the first place. To emphasize the importance of disease prevention, a critical component of precision medicine can be referred to as precision health, which is defined herein as the use of all available information pertaining to specific subjects (including family history, individual genetic and other biometric information, and exposures to risk factors for developing or exacerbating disease), as well as features of their environments, to sustain and enhance health and prevent the development of disease. In this article I will provide a personal perspective on how the precision health-precision medicine approach can be applied to the related goals of preventing the development of allergic disorders and providing the most effective diagnosis, disease monitoring, and care for those with these prevalent diseases. I will also mention some of the existing and potential challenges to achieving these ambitious goals. PMID:27155026

  16. Trauma- and Stressor Related Disorders in the Tuareg Refugees of a Camp in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Carta, M.G.; Oumar, F. Wallet; Moro, M.F.; Moro, D.; Preti, A.; Mereu, A.; Bhugra, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is reported to be common among refugees. We set out to explore risk of Trauma- and Stress-or-Related Disorders and the associated burden of psychological distress in a refugee camp of Malian Refugees in Burkina Faso. Methods: One out of five persons living in the camp was selected randomly and interviewed using the French version of the Short Screening Scale for PTSD and the validated K6 scale to measure psychiatric morbidity. Results: Around 60% of the interviewed sample (N=408) met the criteria for Trauma- and Stress-or-Related Disorders and also reported severe mental distress on K6 scores. Women aged 40 and over were found to be at higher risk of Trauma- and Stress-or-Related Disorders whereas young people (39 or younger) scored higher on K6 ratings. Around 83% of the surveyed subjects had a family member killed in the war, 91% a relative in the war, more than 80% had a family member suffering from physical injuries, and 90% reported problems with food and housing. The frequency of these life events was not surprisingly higher in persons with Trauma- and Stress-or-Related Disorders, with the death of a family member and severe problems with food being specifically related to them.Conclusion: These results point to important psychological suffering in a population that is often ignored by the media and international political authorities. Immediate steps are required to provide urgent legal and humanitarian protection to those who are forced to flee their homes and cross international borders because of disasters. PMID:24285982

  17. Otitis Media and Related Complications among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Daniel J.; Susi, Apryl; Erdie-Lalena, Christine R.; Gorman, Gregory; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth; Rajnik, Michael; Elrod, Marilisa; Nylund, Cade M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) symptoms can be masked by communication deficits, common to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We sought to evaluate the association between ASD and otitis media. Using ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes, we performed a retrospective case-cohort study comparing AOM, and otitis-related diagnoses among children with and…

  18. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  19. Voice Relative Fundamental Frequency via Neck-Skin Acceleration in Individuals with Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Yu-An S.; Calabrese, Carolyn R.; Michener, Carolyn M.; Murray, Elizabeth Heller; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Hillman, Robert E.; Noordzij, J. Pieter; Stepp, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the use of neck-skin acceleration for relative fundamental frequency (RFF) analysis. Method: Forty individuals with voice disorders associated with vocal hyperfunction and 20 age- and sex-matched control participants were recorded with a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer and a microphone while producing speech…

  20. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder Symptomatology and Related Behavioural Characteristics in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Jo; Richards, Caroline; Nelson, Lisa; Oliver, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the proportion of individuals with Down syndrome (DS: N = 108) who met criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on the Social Communication Questionnaire and the severity of ASD-related symptomatology in this group. The proportions of individuals with DS meeting the cut-off for ASD and autism in this sample were 19% and 8%,…

  1. Job-Related Stress and Sleep Disorders among North Carolina College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Patricia; Grobe, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold. First, the study was to determine the extent of job-related stress among North Carolina community college presidents. Second, the study was to determine the extent of sleep disorders that exist in the target population. And finally, the study was to measure, if any, the relationship between job-related…

  2. The Relation between Mathematics and Working Memory in Young Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Carmen; Bisanz, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the relation between mathematics and working memory in young children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Children with FASD and comparison children (4 to 6 years old) completed standardized tests of mathematics and working memory. Children with FASD showed impairments on mathematics (applied…

  3. Do Feminist Identity Styles Moderate the Relation between Perceived Sexist Events and Disordered Eating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabik, Natalie J.; Tylka, Tracy L.

    2006-01-01

    Feminist consciousness is theorized to be a powerful resource against the detrimental effects of sexism. The present study examined whether feminist identity styles moderated the relation of perceived lifetime and recent sexist events to disordered eating for 256 college women. Using hierarchical moderated regression, we found two styles of…

  4. First-Degree Relatives of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Some Gender Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Mats Anders; Westerlund, Joakim; Anderlid, Britt Marie; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal risk factors, with special focus on gender distribution of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions were analysed in first-degree relatives in a population-based group of young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Multiple information sources were combined. This group was contrasted with the general population regarding…

  5. Psychiatric Disorders in Smokers Seeking Treatment for Tobacco Dependence: Relations with Tobacco Dependence and Cessation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Megan E.; Smith, Stevens S.; Schlam, Tanya R.; Fleming, Michael F.; Bittrich, Amy A.; Brown, Jennifer L.; Leitzke, Cathlyn J.; Zehner, Mark E.; Fiore, Michael C.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present research examined the relation of psychiatric disorders to tobacco dependence and cessation outcomes. Method: Data were collected from 1,504 smokers (58.2% women; 83.9% White; mean age = 44.67 years, SD = 11.08) making an aided smoking cessation attempt as part of a clinical trial. Psychiatric diagnoses were determined with…

  6. Early Childhood Psychosis: Infantile Autism, Childhood Schizophrenia and Related Disorders. An Annotated Bibliography 1964 to 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Carolyn Q.; Hingtgen, Joseph N.

    The annotated bibliography on early childhood psychosis (infantile autism, childhood schizophrenia, and related disorders) contains 424 entries (books, journal articles, conference and research reports) dating from 1964 through the first 6 months of 1970, which pertain to theory, research, and treatment. Number of entries for each subject is noted…

  7. Diminished prefrontal brain function in adults with psychopathology in childhood related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Fallgatter, Andreas J; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Rösler, Michael; Strik, Werner K; Blocher, Detlev; Herrmann, Martin J

    2005-02-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate prefrontal brain function and cognitive response control in patients with personality disorders who either suffered or did not suffer from psychopathology related to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during childhood. For this purpose, 36 psychiatric out-patients with personality disorders--24 of whom showed ADHD-related psychopathology during childhood assessed by the German short form of the Wender Utah Rating Scale--and 24 healthy controls were investigated electrophysiologically by means of a cued Go-NoGo task (Continuous Performance Test). Topographical analyses were conducted to individually quantify the NoGo anteriorisation (NGA), a neurophysiological correlate of prefrontal response control that has been suggested to reflect activation of the anterior cingulate cortex. ADHD patients exhibited a significantly reduced mean NGA and diminished amplitudes of the Global Field Power, as well as a reduced increase of fronto-central P300 amplitudes, in NoGo-trials compared with the healthy controls, whereas patients with personality disorders alone did not differ from the control group in any of the electrophysiological parameters. The results indicate that ADHD-related psychopathology is associated with prefrontal brain dysfunction, probably related to processes of response inhibition and/or cognitive response control. PMID:15766638

  8. Melatonin in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Endogenous and Pharmacokinetic Profiles in Relation to Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Suzanne E.; Adkins, Karen W.; Calcutt, M. Wade; Carter, Melissa D.; Goodpaster, Robert L.; Wang, Lily; Shi, Yaping; Burgess, Helen J.; Hachey, David L.; Malow, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental melatonin has been used to treat sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), although the mechanism of action is uncertain. We assessed endogenous and supplemental melatonin profiles in relation to sleep in nine children with ASD. In endogenous samples, maximal melatonin concentration (C[subscript max]) and…

  9. Statewide Assessment of Professional Development Needs Related to Educating Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Matthew E.; Huber, Heartley B.; Carter, Erik W.; Juarez, A. Pablo; Warren, Zachary E.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing teachers to implement evidence-based practices for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pressing need. We surveyed 456 teachers and administrators in a southern state about professional development related to educating students with ASD. Specifically, we were interested in confidence in implementation of evidence-based…

  10. An Evaluation of the Response Modulation Hypothesis in Relation to Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Richard F.; Rucklidge, Julia J.

    2006-01-01

    Several hypotheses related to Newman's (e.g., Patterson & Newman, 1993) response modulation hypothesis were examined among adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; n = 18) and normal controls (n = 23). Consistent with predictions, youth with ADHD committed more passive avoidance errors (PAEs) than controls during the latter…

  11. The Impacts of Language Background and Language-Related Disorders in Auditory Processing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Jenny Hooi Yin; Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Rosen, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of language background and language-related disorders (LRDs--dyslexia and/or language impairment) on performance in English speech and nonspeech tests of auditory processing (AP) commonly used in the clinic. Method: A clinical database concerning 133 multilingual children (mostly with English as an additional…

  12. The Relation of Substance Use to Trauma and Conduct Disorder in an Adolescent Psychiatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evansm, Allison Schettini; Spirito, Anthony; Celio, Mark; Dyl, Jennifer; Hunt, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Substance abuse is one of the most problematic health risk behaviors among adolescents. Given that research consistently finds increased levels of substance use among adolescents with conduct problems as well as trauma-related symptoms, it is important that substance abuse be examined to better understand its role in Conduct Disorder (CD) and…

  13. Immunological disorders associated with polychlorinated biphenyls and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noguchi, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    This review characterizes immunological disorders in fish associated with the widespread environmental contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs). Special attention is devoted to comparing the sensitivity of fish species, identifying sensitive immunological endpoints and postulating mechanisms of action.

  14. A Developmental Perspective on Assessment of Infants with Clefts and Related Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Hallie E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for comprehensive developmental assessment for infants with cleft palates/lips and related disorders. The assessment model is based on risk factors influencing early development and on clinical research on developmental outcomes. Implications on the clinical assessment process and early intervention are discussed.…

  15. Measured Gene-by-Environment Interaction in Relation to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize and evaluate the state of knowledge regarding the role of measured gene-by-environment interactions in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Method: A selective review of methodologic issues was followed by a systematic search for relevant articles on measured gene-by-environment interactions; the search…

  16. Diagnosis of Age-Related Cardiovascular Disorders | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the NIH, National Institute on Aging, Cardiovascular Biology Unit-Vascular Group have discovered a method for the diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular aging, and is seeking parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods for diagnosing age-related cardiovascular disorders.

  17. Pain-related anxiety and anxiety sensitivity across anxiety and depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Abrams, Murray P; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Antony, Martin M; McCabe, Randi E

    2009-08-01

    Fear-anxiety-avoidance models posit pain-related anxiety and anxiety sensitivity as important contributing variables in the development and maintenance of chronic musculoskeletal pain [Asmundson, G. J. G, Vlaeyen, J. W. S., & Crombez, G. (Eds.). (2004). Understanding and treating fear of pain. New York: Oxford University Press]. Emerging evidence also suggests that pain-related anxiety may be a diathesis for many other emotional disorders [Asmundson, G. J. G., & Carleton, R. N. (2005). Fear of pain is elevated in adults with co-occurring trauma-related stress and social anxiety symptoms. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 34, 248-255; Asmundson, G. J. G., & Carleton, R. N. (2008). Fear of pain. In: M. M. Antony & M. B. Stein (Eds.), Handbook of anxiety and the anxiety disorders (pp. 551-561). New York: Oxford University Press] and appears to share several elements in common with other fears (e.g., anxiety sensitivity, illness/injury sensitivity, fear of negative evaluation) as described by Reiss [Reiss, S. (1991). Expectancy model of fear, anxiety, and panic. Clinical Psychology Review, 11, 141-153] and Taylor [Taylor, S. (1993). The structure of fundamental fears. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 24, 289-299]. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess self-reported levels of pain-related anxiety [Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-Short Form; PASS-20; McCracken, L. M., & Dhingra, L. (2002). A short version of the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS-20): preliminary development and validity. Pain Research and Management, 7, 45-50] across several anxiety and depressive disorders and to compare those levels to non-clinical and chronic pain samples. Participants consisted of a clinical sample (n=418; 63% women) with principal diagnoses of a depressive disorder (DD; n=22), panic disorder (PD; n=114), social anxiety disorder (SAD; n=136), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n=86), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n=46), or specific phobia (n=14

  18. Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Chigbu, DeGaulle I; Coyne, Alissa M

    2015-01-01

    Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:26185412

  19. Update and clinical utility of alcaftadine ophthalmic solution 0.25% in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Chigbu, DeGaulle I; Coyne, Alissa M

    2015-01-01

    Allergic disorders of the ocular surface are primarily characterized as IgE- and/or T-lymphocyte-mediated disorders that affect the cornea, conjunctiva, and eyelid. Approximately 40% of individuals in the developed countries have allergic conjunctivitis, and as such, it is the most common form of ocular allergy. Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is the most prevalent type of allergic conjunctivitis that impacts the quality of life of patients. This article reviews the pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, clinical efficacy, and safety of alcaftadine. Histamine and the pathological mechanism of ocular allergy will be briefly reviewed with the intent of providing a background for the detailed discussion on the clinical utility of alcaftadine in allergic conjunctivitis. The Medline PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, and Google Scholar databases were used to search for evidence-based literature on histamine and immunopathological mechanism of allergic conjunctivitis, as well as on pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and clinical efficacy of alcaftadine. The treatment and management goals of allergic conjunctivitis are to prevent or minimize the inflammatory cascade associated with allergic response in the early stages of the pathological mechanism. It is of note that activation of histamine receptors on immune and nonimmune cells are associated with allergen-induced inflammation of the conjunctiva and its associated ocular allergic manifestations, including itching, edema, hyperemia, and tearing. Alcaftadine is an efficacious multiple action antiallergic therapeutic agent with inverse agonist activity on H1, H2, and H4 receptors, as well as anti-inflammatory and mast cell stabilizing effects that could provide therapeutic benefits to patients with allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:26185412

  20. Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Eating Disorder-Related Symptoms, Behaviors, and Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Davis, Oliver SP; Cherkas, Lynn F; Helder, Sietske G; Harris, Juliette; Krug, Isabel; Pei-Chi Liao, Thomas; Treasure, Janet; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karhunen, Leila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Christakopoulou, Danai; Raevuori, Anu; Shin, So-Youn; Dedoussis, George V; Kaprio, Jaakko; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are common, complex psychiatric disorders thought to be caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They share many symptoms, behaviors, and personality traits, which may have overlapping heritability. The aim of the present study is to perform a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) of six ED phenotypes comprising three symptom traits from the Eating Disorders Inventory 2 [Drive for Thinness (DT), Body Dissatisfaction (BD), and Bulimia], Weight Fluctuation symptom, Breakfast Skipping behavior and Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait (CHIRP). Investigated traits were derived from standardized self-report questionnaires completed by the TwinsUK population-based cohort. We tested 283,744 directly typed SNPs across six phenotypes of interest in the TwinsUK discovery dataset and followed-up signals from various strata using a two-stage replication strategy in two independent cohorts of European ancestry. We meta-analyzed a total of 2,698 individuals for DT, 2,680 for BD, 2,789 (821 cases/1,968 controls) for Bulimia, 1,360 (633 cases/727 controls) for Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder trait, 2,773 (761 cases/2,012 controls) for Breakfast Skipping, and 2,967 (798 cases/2,169 controls) for Weight Fluctuation symptom. In this GWAS analysis of six ED-related phenotypes, we detected association of eight genetic variants with P < 10−5. Genetic variants that showed suggestive evidence of association were previously associated with several psychiatric disorders and ED-related phenotypes. Our study indicates that larger-scale collaborative studies will be needed to achieve the necessary power to detect loci underlying ED-related traits. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22911880

  1. RDoC and Translational Perspectives on the Genetics of Trauma-Related Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza L.; Gelernter, Joel; Hudziak, James; Kaufman, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with a history of child abuse are at high risk for depression, anxiety disorders, aggressive behavior, and substance use problems. The goal of this paper is to review studies of the genetics of these stress-related psychiatric disorders. An informative subset of studies that examined candidate gene by environment (GxE) predictors of these psychiatric problems in individuals maltreated as children is reviewed, together with extant genome wide association studies (GWAS). Emerging findings on epigenetic changes associated with adverse early experiences are also reviewed. Meta-analytic support and replicated findings are evident for several genetic risk factors; however, extant research suggests the effects are pleiotropic. Genetic factors are not associated with distinct psychiatric disorders, but rather diverse clinical phenotypes. Research also suggests adverse early life experiences are associated with changes in gene expression of multiple known candidate genes, genes involved in DNA transcription and translation, and genes necessary for brain circuitry development, with changes in gene expression reported in key brain structures implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. The finding of pleiotropy highlights the value of using the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework in future studies of the genetics of stress-related psychiatric disorders, and not trying simply to link genes to multifaceted clinical syndromes, but to more limited phenotypes that map onto distinct neural circuits. Emerging work in the field of epigenetics also suggests that translational studies that integrate numerous unbiased genome-wide approaches will help to further unravel the genetics of stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:26592203

  2. RDoC and translational perspectives on the genetics of trauma-related psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza L; Gelernter, Joel; Hudziak, James; Kaufman, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with a history of child abuse are at high risk for depression, anxiety disorders, aggressive behavior, and substance use problems. The goal of this paper is to review studies of the genetics of these stress-related psychiatric disorders. An informative subset of studies that examined candidate gene by environment (GxE) predictors of these psychiatric problems in individuals maltreated as children is reviewed, together with extant genome wide association studies (GWAS). Emerging findings on epigenetic changes associated with adverse early experiences are also reviewed. Meta-analytic support and replicated findings are evident for several genetic risk factors; however, extant research suggests the effects are pleiotropic. Genetic factors are not associated with distinct psychiatric disorders, but rather diverse clinical phenotypes. Research also suggests adverse early life experiences are associated with changes in gene expression of multiple known candidate genes, genes involved in DNA transcription and translation, and genes necessary for brain circuitry development, with changes in gene expression reported in key brain structures implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. The finding of pleiotropy highlights the value of using the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework in future studies of the genetics of stress-related psychiatric disorders, and not trying simply to link genes to multifaceted clinical syndromes, but to more limited phenotypes that map onto distinct neural circuits. Emerging work in the field of epigenetics also suggests that translational studies that integrate numerous unbiased genome-wide approaches will help to further unravel the genetics of stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:26592203

  3. Allergic Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  4. Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA)

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  5. Quetiapine-induced sleep-related eating disorder-like behavior: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Somnambulism or sleepwalking is a disorder of arousal from non-rapid eye movement sleep. The prevalence of sleep-related eating disorder has been found to be approximately between 1% and 5% among adults. Many cases of medication-related somnambulism and sleep-related eating disorder-like behavior have been reported in the literature. Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic medication, has been associated with somnambulism but has not yet been reported to be associated with sleep-related eating disorder. Case presentation Case 1 is a 51-year-old obese African American male veteran with a body mass index of 34.11kg/m2 and severe sleep apnea who has taken 150mg of quetiapine at bedtime for more than one year for depression. He developed sleepwalking three to four nights per week which resolved after stopping quetiapine while being compliant with bi-level positive pressure ventilation therapy. At one year follow-up, his body mass index was 32.57kg/m2. Case 2 is a 50-year-old African American female veteran with a body mass index of 30.5kg/m2 and mild sleep apnea who has taken 200mg of quetiapine daily for more than one year for depression. She was witnessed to sleepwalk three nights per week which resolved after discontinuing quetiapine while being treated with continuous positive airway pressure. At three months follow-up, her body mass index was 29.1kg/m2. Conclusion These cases illustrate that quetiapine may precipitate complex motor behavior including sleep-related eating disorder and somnambulism in susceptible patients. Atypical antipsychotics are commonly used in psychiatric and primary care practice, which means the population at risk of developing parasomnia may often go unrecognized. It is important to recognize this potential adverse effect of quetiapine and, to prevent injury and worsening obesity, discuss this with the patients who are prescribed these medications. PMID:23130910

  6. [Infectious-allergic bronchopulmonary paecilomycosis].

    PubMed

    Akhunova, A M

    1991-01-01

    Primary or secondary infection of the lungs with fungi of the Paecilomyces family (P. variotii and P. viridis) gives rise to the development of infectious allergic bronchopulmonary paecilomycosis characterized by the presence of chronic allergic interstitial pneumonia and obstructive bronchitis, bronchial asthma, total and pulmonary eosinophilia, the presence of the tissue parasitic form of the fungus in sputum, blood, pulmonary tissue, the presence of allergen-specific IgE and/or IgG antibodies in patients' sera, immediate or double (20 min and 6 h) reaction of the skin to administration of allergen of Paecilomyces, by not infrequent combination of lung damage and impairment of other organs as well as by chronic relapses. PMID:1805416

  7. Active Reward Processing during Human Sleep: Insights from Sleep-Related Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Perogamvros, Lampros; Baud, Patrick; Hasler, Roland; Cloninger, Claude Robert; Schwartz, Sophie; Perrig, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present two carefully documented cases of patients with sleep-related eating disorder (SRED), a parasomnia which is characterized by involuntary compulsive eating during the night and whose pathophysiology is not known. Using video-polysomnography, a dream diary and psychometric examination, we found that both patients present elevated novelty seeking and increased reward sensitivity. In light of new evidence on the mesolimbic dopaminergic implication in compulsive eating disorders, our findings suggest a role of an active reward system during sleep in the manifestation of SRED. PMID:23205019

  8. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Batarseh, Yazan S; Duong, Quoc-Viet; Mousa, Youssef M; Al Rihani, Sweilem B; Elfakhri, Khaled; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26959008

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria.

    PubMed

    Marks, J G

    1988-06-01

    Two female florists developed dermatitis of the fingertips. Patch testing revealed allergic contact dermatitis to the flower, Alstroemeria, used in floral arrangements. They had positive patch tests to portions of Alstroemeria, and to tuliposide A, the allergen in this plant. Vinyl gloves were not helpful since tuliposide A readily penetrates through these gloves. Nitrile gloves may be protective since they prevented positive patch test to tuliposide A. PMID:2967676

  10. Immunologic principles of allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, Marco; Gebhardt, Carl; Emmrich, Frank; Treudler, Regina; Simon, Jan C

    2007-11-01

    Allergy either results from a pathological excessive immune reaction, or from the defective induction of tolerance to otherwise harmless antigens. Allergic reactions are mounted by mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. The development of an allergic response can be divided in sensitization and elicitation phases. Immediate type allergic reactions (e.g. anaphylaxis, urticaria, rhinoconjunctivitis allergica, allergic asthma) are mediated by IgE antibodies which are produced by B cells stimulated by allergen-specific Th2 cells. Crosslinking of allergen-specific IgE on membrane surfaces of mast cells and basophilic granulocytes leads to release of soluble mediators which may cause systemic symptoms within minutes to hours. The following infiltration of eosinophilic granulocytes and Th2 cells directs chronic inflammation. Humoral cytotoxic immune reactions (e.g. drug induced cytopenia) are mediated by IgG and IgM antibodies which are directed against membrane associated antigens. IgG and IgM antibodies directed against soluble antigens elicit immune complex mediated cytotoxicity (e.g.drug induced vasculitis). Delayed type immune reactions (e.g.contact dermatitis) are based on the activation of antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and need 24 h to 48 h to develop. Upon recurrent contact with identical antigens, recruitment of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells cause inflammation and cytotoxic induced apoptosis in target cells as well as cytokine mediated leukocyte infiltration. Subsequent immigration of CD4(+) Th2 cells provides anti-inflammatory mechanisms leading to resolution of the inflammatory response and tissue repair. PMID:17976144

  11. [Recent advances in allergic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Liang, Meijun; Xu, Rui; Xu, Geng

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) clinically expressed by sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal itching and congestion is an allergen-driven mucosal inflammatory disease which is modulated by immunoglobulin E. Epidemiological studies have indicated that prevalence of AR continues to increase, and it has been a worldwide health problem that places a significant healthcare burden on individuals and society. Given the evolving understanding of the process by which an allergen is recognized and the roles of mediators which account for AR progress, the pathogenesis of AR has become clearer. Current studies have demonstrated local allergic rhinitis (LAR) that patients with both sug- gestive symptoms of AR and a negative diagnostic test for atopy may have local allergic inflammation is a prevalent entity in patients evaluated with rhinitis, but further research remains needed. Management of AR includes aller- gen avoidance, pharmacological treatment and allergen-specific immunotherapy. Recently montelukast has exhibited previously undocumented anti-inflammatory properties, leukotriene receptor antagonists therefore may serve a more important role in the treatment of AR. Not only has immunotherapy proved its efficacy, but also been able to alter disease course and thereby mitigate progression to asthma. Thus immunotherapy can be initiated while receiving pharmacotherapy, especially in children with AR. As clinical guidelines, the ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) provides basic principles of effective treatment of AR. Besides, choosing an appropriate treatment strategy should be based on the severity and chronicity of patient's symptom. The aim of this review was to provide an update mainly on the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and management of AR. PMID:26012287

  12. Impaired regulation of emotion: neural correlates of reappraisal and distraction in bipolar disorder and unaffected relatives

    PubMed Central

    Kanske, P; Schönfelder, S; Forneck, J; Wessa, M

    2015-01-01

    Deficient emotion regulation has been proposed as a crucial pathological mechanism in bipolar disorder (BD). We therefore investigated emotion regulation impairments in BD, the related neural underpinnings and their etiological relevance for the disorder. Twenty-two euthymic patients with bipolar-I disorder and 17 unaffected first-degree relatives of BD-I patients, as well as two groups of healthy gender-, age- and education-matched controls (N=22/17, respectively) were included. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while applying two different emotion regulation techniques, reappraisal and distraction, when presented with emotional images. BD patients and relatives showed impaired downregulation of amygdala activity during reappraisal, but not during distraction, when compared with controls. This deficit was correlated with the habitual use of reappraisal. The negative connectivity of amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) observed during reappraisal in controls was reversed in BD patients and relatives. There were no significant differences between BD patients and relatives. As being observed in BD patients and unaffected relatives, deficits in emotion regulation through reappraisal may represent heritable neurobiological abnormalities underlying BD. The neural mechanisms include impaired control of amygdala reactivity to emotional stimuli and dysfunctional connectivity of the amygdala to regulatory control regions in the OFC. These are, thus, important aspects of the neurobiological basis of increased vulnerability for BD. PMID:25603413

  13. Investigational drugs for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Compalati, Enrico; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a high-prevalence disease, triggered by an IgE-mediated reaction, and sustained by a complex inflammatory network of cells, mediators, and cytokines. When the exposure to allergens persists, the inflammatory process becomes chronic. The current therapeutic strategy is based on allergen avoidance when possible, drugs and allergen immunotherapy. The main drugs are oral and topical antihistamines and nasal steroids. They are overall effective in controlling symptoms, but do not modify the immune background that leads to allergic inflammation. In addition, safety concerns may be present, especially for prolonged treatments. Thus, efforts are currently made to improve the existing molecules and to develop new drugs, in order to achieve greater clinical efficacy with a better tolerability. Also, attempts are made to selectively block relevant signal pathways of the allergic reaction by means of specific anti-mediators. Specific immunotherapy, in addition to the clinical effect, is capable of modifying the Th2-biased immune response. Thus, an intense research activity is presently ongoing with the aim of improving the characteristics and modes of action of this treatment. PMID:20001557

  14. [Functions of participatory ergonomics programs in reducing work-related musculoskeletal disorders].

    PubMed

    Guo, M J; Liu, J J; Yao, H Y

    2016-08-10

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are most commonly seen in all the occupational non-fatal injuries and illnesses for workers, especially those who are involved in labor-intensive industries. Participatory ergonomics is frequently used to prevent musculoskeletal disorders. This paper gives an overview of a historical perspective on the use of participatory ergonomics approach in reducing the health effects of labor-intensive industries. Progress, barriers and facilitators on the organization, implementation and evaluation of participatory ergonomics programs are studied. Participatory ergonomics seems a successful method to develop, prioritize measures to prevent MSDs. Participatory ergonomics can help industries reduce musculoskeletal injuries and disorders, improve workplace condition and promote health conditions of the workers. PMID:27539352

  15. Types of Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Allergies and Dentistry Ensure You Have an Allergy-Free Dental Visit ... Terms and Conditions © 1996-2016 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  16. School performance and alcohol-related disorders in early adulthood: a Swedish national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gauffin, Karl; Vinnerljung, Bo; Hjern, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol misuse is an important global health determinant and a major contributor to health inequalities. We aimed to investigate the association between school performance and alcohol-related disorders in early adulthood in a longitudinal register-based national cohort study. Methods We followed a register-based national cohort of Swedish citizens born 1973–1984 (N = 948 440) from compulsory school graduation at age 15–16 to 2009. We divided the population into five groups: high school marks (> mean + 1 SD); high average (between mean and mean + 1 SD); low average (between mean and mean − 1 SD); low (< mean – 1SD); and missing. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the relation between school marks at time of graduation and hospital care for alcohol-related disorders in early adulthood. Results There was a steep gradient in the risk of alcohol-related disorders related to school performance. In comparison with peers in the top category of school marks, students with low marks had adjusted hazard ratios of 8.02 [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.20 to 8.91], low average 3.02 (2.72 to 3.35) and high average 1.55 (1.39 to 1.73). The risk associated with low school marks was stronger in the male population and in the group from high socioeconomic background. Conclusions The study demonstrated a strong graded relation between low school performance and alcohol-related disorders in young adulthood. School performance should be taken into account when developing prevention programmes/policies targeting alcohol misuse among teenagers and young adults, especially if the aim is to reach high-risk groups. PMID:25797580

  17. The eating-related behaviours, disorders and expectations of candidates for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Opolski, M; Chur-Hansen, A; Wittert, G

    2015-08-01

    It is important that clinicians and researchers understand the possible eating-related difficulties experienced by pre-bariatric surgery candidates, as well as their expectations of how their eating and hunger will change after surgery. This review examines English-language publications related to the eating-related behaviours, disorders and expectations of bariatric candidates. Seventy-five articles related to binge eating disorder, grazing, night eating syndrome, emotional eating, food cravings and addiction, and pre-surgical expectations of post-surgical eating in this population were critically reviewed. A variety of often problematic eating behaviours appear more common in bariatric candidates than in non-obese populations. The literature suggests that 4-45% of candidates may have binge eating disorder, 20-60% may graze, 2-42% may have night eating syndrome, 38-59% may engage in emotional eating and 17-54% may fit criteria for food addiction. Binge eating may also be more prevalent in bariatric candidates than in similarly obese non-surgical individuals. Expectations of surgery are high, with pre-surgical candidates believing their bariatric procedure will virtually guarantee significantly improved eating behaviours. Study replications are needed, and further investigation into prevalence, impacts and candidate characteristics related to disordered eating behaviours, as well as candidates' expectations of eating after surgery, will be important. Further comparisons of bariatric candidates to similarly obese non-bariatric populations will be important to understand eating-related characteristics of candidates beyond those related to their weight. Future research may be improved by the use of validated measures, replicable methodologies, minimization of data collected in circumstances where respondents may been motivated to 'fake good', use of prospective data and consistent definitions of key terminology. PMID:26173752

  18. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by dorzolamide eyedrops.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-01-01

    The side effects of topical dorzolamide hydrochloride, such as conjunctivitis, eyelid edema, and eye lid irritation, are well known. However, allergic contact dermatitis due to dorzolamide is rare, although the product has been commonly used worldwide in patients with glaucoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical dorzolamide hydrochloride in Korea. Herein we report a case of allergic contact dermatitis due to topical dorzolamide eyedrops. PMID:25897195

  19. Eating-related Intrusive Thoughts Inventory: exploring the dimensionality of eating disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Perpiñá, Conxa; Roncero, María; Belloch, Amparo; Sánchez-Reales, Sergio

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were, first, to examine the structure and validity of the Eating-related Intrusive Thoughts Inventory (INPIAS), a self-report questionnaire designed to assess eating disorders related to intrusive thoughts (EDITs), and second, to explore the existence of a continuum ranging from normal to abnormal thought intrusions related to eating, weight, and shape. Participants were 574 (408 women) nonclinical community individuals. Analyses revealed that EDITs can be clustered into three sets: appearance-dieting, need to exercise, and thoughts-impulses related to eating disorders. EDITs' consequences showed a two-factor structure: emotional consequences/personal meaning and thought-action fusion responsibility; and four factors of strategies: "anxiety," suppression, obsessive-compulsive rituals, and distraction. The sample was then divided according to reported restrained eating. The High dietary restraint group reported a higher frequency of EDITs, whereas differences in the other factors were mediated by depression, anxiety, and obsessionality. The results suggest that eating disorder-related cognitions are experienced by nonclinical individuals, and distributed on a continuum. PMID:22049653

  20. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Zafar, Hamayun; Iqbal, Zaheen A.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Musculoskeletal disorders are common causes of work-related disability in different professions involving the frequent practice of lifting, stooping, twisting, prolonged sitting, or standing. The dental profession is one such profession. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia, the factors associated with them, and their consequences and to propose preventive measures for them. [Subjects and Methods] A self-administered online questionnaire was sent to 225 members of the Saudi Dental Association. It included questions on demographic and professional characteristics, general medical history, and history of work-related musculoskeletal disorders before and after joining the dental profession. [Results] The questionnaire was completed by 65% of the respondents. Among them 85% reported that they had developed some pain due to work after joining the dental profession, and 42% reported that they were suffering pain at the time of the survey. Besides lower back, shoulder, and neck regions, the hands, upper back, and other regions like the elbows, buttocks, thighs, leg, and feet were areas in which they pain. [Conclusion] The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental professionals in Saudi Arabia is high, affecting their daily activities, sometimes even forcing them to change their work setting. Age, gender, specialty of work, work setting, number of contact hours with patients, etc., were all found to be related to their work-related pain. We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics, counseling, proper techniques of patient handling, etc., during the training of dental professionals so that they can work efficiently. PMID:25995567

  1. Elongation factor 1 β/δ of Echinococcus granulosus and allergic manifestations in human cystic echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortona, E; Margutti, P; Vaccari, S; Riganò, R; Profumo, E; Buttari, B; Chersi, A; Teggi, A; Siracusano, A

    2001-01-01

    Allergic reactions, such as urticaria, itching and anaphylactic shock, often complicate the course of cystic echinococcosis (CE). To investigate the role of the IgE-immunoreactive recombinant Echinococcus granulosus elongation factor-1 β/δ (EgEF-1 β/δ) in the allergic disorders during CE we determined humoral and cell-mediated responses to this antigen in patients with CE grouped according to the clinical presence or absence of allergic reactions. Immunoblotting analysis showed that serum IgE-binding reactivity to EgEF-1 β/δ differed significantly in patients with and without allergic reactions (38 of 42, 90% vs. 31 of 56, 56%; P < 10−4). EgEF-1 β/δ induced a proliferative response in 14 of 19 (74%) patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) irrespective of the allergic manifestations and skewed Th1/Th2 cytokine activation towards a preferentially Th2 polarization. Epitope mapping identified an immunodominant epitope of 18 residues with 78% identity and 89% similarity with an IgE-immunoreactive Strongyloides stercoralis antigen. Overall these findings suggest that EgEF-1 β/δ is an allergenic molecule that may be a general marker of the intensity of CE immune response and that could lead to a deeper understanding of the specific antigen-induced mechanisms underlying allergic reactions in the human host. PMID:11472433

  2. A bug's view of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter S; Campbell, Dianne E

    2016-06-01

    The increase in allergic airways disease has been linked to modern urbanization and lifestyle. Recent evidence suggests that the associated reduction in microbial exposure, reduction in dietary fibre intake and increased antibiotic use may cause early dysbiosis in infancy, which predisposes to immune dysregulation and allergic airways disease later in life. This implies that there may be a window of opportunity for primary prevention strategies aimed to protect or restore the microbiome early in life and thereby decrease the risk of developing allergic airways disease. Alternatively, strategies that correct dysbiosis may aid in the treatment of established allergic airways disease. PMID:27012478

  3. Temperament and character dimensions in male patients with substance use disorders: Differences relating to psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Arrico, Julia E; López-Vera, Silvia; Prat, Gemma; Adan, Ana

    2016-03-30

    Previous research has not considered the influence of the Comorbid Mental Disorder (CMD) among Substance Use Disorders (SUD) patients. We explored the possible differences in personality dimensions among SUD patients taking into account their CMD (Schizophrenia, SZ; Bipolar Disorder, BD; Major Depressive Disorder, MDD); and elucidated clinical factors related to personality dimensions according to the CMD. The Temperament and Character Inventory Revised was used to assess a sample of 102 SUD male patients, considered in three groups according to their CMD: SUD+SZ (N=37), SUD+BD (N=30) and SUD+MDD (N=35). SUD+BD patients had the highest levels of Novelty Seeking and Persistence, SUD+SZ patients showed the highest levels of Harm Avoidance, and SUD+MDD patients reported a lower level of Self-transcendence. Novelty Seeking was positively associated with severity of addiction for SUD+BD; Harm Avoidance was positively associated with psychiatric symptoms for SUD+SZ; and the age of SUD onset was positively linked to Cooperativeness for SUD+BD and to Self-transcendence for SUD+MDD. The different personality characteristics associated to the type of CMD among SUD patients are related to several clinical variables. Interventions in these patients should be tailored according the personality traits that could influence treatment outcomes and patients' prognoses. PMID:26921044

  4. Short communication: genetic parameters for fertility-related disorders in Norwegian Red.

    PubMed

    Haugaard, Katrine; Heringstad, Bjørg

    2015-02-01

    Heritabilities and genetic correlations were estimated for the 4 most common fertility-related disorders in Norwegian Red: retained placenta, cystic ovaries, silent heat, and metritis. Data on 1,747,500 lactations from 780,114 cows calving from January 2001 through December 2011 were analyzed using multivariate threshold sire models to estimate variance components for the 4 disorders in the first 5 lactations. The traits were defined as binary within lactation (0=unaffected, 1=affected), and each fertility-related disorder was analyzed separately with the 5 lactations as correlated traits. The mean frequency of affected cows ranged from 0.5 to 1.7% for cystic ovaries, 0.7 to 1.1% for metritis, 1.3 to 3.4% for retained placenta, and 1.7 to 2.7% for silent heat. Posterior means (standard deviations) of heritability of liability ranged from 0.02 (0.01) to 0.12 (0.01), and were lowest for silent heat and highest for cystic ovaries. Genetic correlations across lactation within disorder were positive and moderate to high, ranging from 0.79 to 0.95 for cystic ovaries, 0.40 to 0.75 for metritis, 0.53 to 0.94 for retained placenta, and 0.39 to 0.83 for silent heat. PMID:25497813

  5. Therapeutic Role of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Autism Spectrum Disorder-Related Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalco, Dario; Bradstreet, James Jeffrey; Antonucci, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous, severe neuro-developmental disorders with core symptoms of dysfunctions in social interactions and communication skills, restricted interests, repetitive – stereotypic verbal and non-verbal behaviors. Biomolecular evidence points to complex gene-environmental interactions in ASDs. Several biochemical processes are associated with ASDs: oxidative stress (including endoplasmic reticulum stress), decreased methylation capacity, limited production of glutathione; mitochondrial dysfunction, intestinal dysbiosis, increased toxic metal burden, and various immune abnormalities. The known immunological disorders include: T-lymphocyte populations and function, gene expression changes in monocytes, several autoimmune-related findings, high levels of N-acetylgalactosaminidase (which precludes macrophage activation), and primary immune deficiencies. These immunological observations may result in minicolumn structural changes in the brain, as well as, abnormal immune mediation of synaptic functions. Equally, these immune dysregulations serve as the rationale for immune-directed interventions such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are pivotal in controlling chronic inflammation and in the restoration of immunological balance. These properties make them intriguing potential agents for ASD treatments. This prospective review will focus on the current state-of-the-art knowledge and challenges intrinsic in the application of HSCs for ASD-related immunological disorders. PMID:23772227

  6. Epigenetic Control of B Cell Development and B-Cell-Related Immune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-06-01

    B lymphocytes are generally recognized as the essential component of humoral immunity and also a regulator of innate immunity. The development of B cells is precisely regulated by a variety of factors via different mechanisms, including cytokine/cytokine receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA, play critical roles in establishing B cell lineage-specific gene expression profiles to define and sustain B cell identity and function. Epigenetic modifications are also sensitive to external stimuli and might bridge genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis or control of B-cell-related immune disorders, such as autoimmune diseases, lymphoma, and leukemia. Better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms for regulating B cell development and involving B cell abnormal differentiation and function will shed light on the design of new therapeutic approaches to B-cell-related diseases, and potential candidates of epigenetic modulators may be identified to target epigenetic pathways to prevent or treat B cell disorders. We summarize the relevance of epigenetic marks and landscapes in the stages of B cell development, discuss the interaction of the transcriptional networks and epigenetic changes, and review the involvement of epigenetic risk in the pathogenesis of B-cell-related diseases. Understanding how specific epigenetic alterations contribute to the development of B-cell-related autoimmunity and malignancies is instrumental to control B cell disorders. PMID:26066671

  7. NASPGHAN Clinical Report on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Gluten-related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ivor D; Fasano, Alessio; Guandalini, Stefano; Hoffenberg, Edward; Levy, Joseph; Reilly, Norelle; Verma, Ritu

    2016-07-01

    Dietary exclusion of gluten-containing products has become increasingly popular in the general population, and currently ∼30% of people in the United States are limiting gluten ingestion. Although celiac disease (CD), wheat allergy (WA), and nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) constitute a spectrum of gluten-related disorders that require exclusion of gluten from the diet, together these account for a relatively small percentage of those following a gluten-free diet, and the vast majority has no medical necessity for doing so. Differentiating between CD, WA, and NCGS has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Because of the protean manifestations of gluten-related disorders, it is not possible to differentiate between them on clinical grounds alone. This clinical report will compare and contrast the manifestations of gluten-related disorders, emphasize the importance of differentiating between these conditions, discuss initial and subsequent tests needed to confirm the diagnosis, and provide recommendations on treatment and follow-up for each condition. PMID:27035374

  8. Risk or resilience? Empathic abilities in patients with bipolar disorders and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Eva-Maria; Habel, Ute; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Hasmann, Alexander; Dobmeier, Matthias; Derntl, Birgit

    2012-03-01

    Endophenotypes are intermediate phenotypes which are considered a more promising marker of genetic risk than illness itself. While previous research mostly used cognitive deficits, emotional functions are of greater relevance for bipolar disorder regarding the characteristic emotional hyper-reactability and deficient social-emotional competence. Hence, the aim of the present study was to clarify whether empathic abilities can serve as a possible endophenotype of bipolar disorder by applying a newly developed task in bipolar patients and their first-degree relatives. Three components of empathy (emotion recognition, perspective taking and affective responsiveness) have been assessed in a sample of 21 bipolar patients, 21 first-degree relatives and 21 healthy controls. Data analysis indicated significant differences between controls and patients for emotion recognition and affective responsiveness but not for perspective taking. This shows that in addition to difficulties in recognizing facial emotional expressions, bipolar patients have difficulties in identifying emotions they would experience in a given situation. However, the ability to take the perspective of another person in an emotional situation was intact but decreased with increasing severity of residual hypomanic and depressive symptoms. Relatives performed comparably bad on emotion recognition but did not differ from controls or patients in affective responsiveness. This study is the first to show that deficient emotion recognition is the only component of empathy which forms a possible endophenotype of bipolar disorder. This has important implications for prevention strategies. Furthermore, changes in affective responsiveness in first-degree relatives show a potential resilience marker. PMID:22133461

  9. Altered sleep in Borderline Personality Disorder in relation to the core dimensions of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to review the literature regarding sleep disturbances in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and to relate the reported sleep alterations to the underlying core dimensions of BPD pathology. We present a qualitative and theoretical review regarding the empirical studies that investigated objective and subjective sleep quality in BPD and in different psychiatric conditions showing high co-morbidity with this disorder. We show that disturbed sleep including sleep fragmentation, alterations in Slow Wave Sleep and REM sleep, and dysphoric dreaming are prevalent symptoms in BPD. We provide a framework relating the specific sleep alterations to the core dimensions of BPD pathology in order to clarify the inconsistencies of the different findings. The specific sleep disturbances in BPD seem to be related to different dimensions of psychopathological functioning and may have detrimental consequences on waking affect and cognition. Investigating disturbed sleep in BPD in relation to waking symptoms and underlying neural functioning would shed more light on the nature of this complex disorder. Moreover, a stronger emphasis on sleep disturbances would enrich the treatment protocols of BPD. PMID:23574575

  10. Platelets promote allergic asthma through the expression of CD154.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Zhu, Tianyi; Liu, Juan; Guo, Zhenhong; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-11-01

    Platelet activation is associated with multiple immune responses and the pathogenesis of various immune-related diseases. However, the exact role and the underlying mechanism of platelets in the progression of allergic asthma remain largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that during antigen sensitization, platelets can be activated by ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol via the upregulation of CD154 (CD40L) expression. Platelet transfer promoted allergic asthma progression by inducing more severe leukocyte infiltration and lung inflammation, elevated IgE production and strengthened T helper 2 (Th2) responses in asthma-induced mice. Accordingly, platelet depletion compromised allergic asthma progression. Cd154-deficient platelets failed to promote asthma development, indicating the requirement of CD154 for platelets to promote asthma progression. The mechanistic study showed that platelets inhibited the induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells both in vivo and in vitro at least partially through CD154, providing an explanation for the increase of Th2 responses by platelet transfer. Our study reveals the previously unknown role of platelet CD154 in the promotion of asthma progression by polarizing Th2 responses and inhibiting regulatory T-cell generation and thus provides a potential clue for allergic disease interventions. PMID:25418472

  11. Gender Associated High Body Mass Index in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj-Berisha, Violeta; Gacaferri-Lumezi, Besa; Minci–Bejtullahu, Ganimete; Latifi-Pupovci, Hatixhe; Karahoda–Gjurgjeala, Natyra; Berisha, Naser; Morina, Teuta

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing prevalence of allergic diseases and atopy is affected by sex, age and lifestyle factors. Obesity and excess weight are reported to be potential risk factors for atopy and specifically for asthma symptoms in children and adults. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between body mass index (BMI) and allergic diseases in patients of both genders, as well as association of BMI with atopy in healthy subjects. METHODS: BMI (kg/m2), skin-prick test and total serum immunoglobulin E levels were assessed in 139 subjects: 109 were patients with allergic diseases (M to F ratio was 51:58) and 30 were healthy controls (M to F ratio was 6:24). RESULTS: The study population was grouped into asthma, asthmarhinitis, rhinitis, Urticaria oreczema and controls by BMI and sex. Females with the highest BMI were in asthma and urticaria/eczema group. Males with the highest BMI were in asthmarhinitis and urticariaeczema group. High BMI was associated with atopy in both genders of healthy controls. High levels of total IgE were in male allergic patients. CONCLUSION: High BMI was associated with asthma in females, urticaria/eczema in both genders and atopy in both genders of healthy controls. Higher levels of total IgE were concluded in male patients.

  12. Alcohol use disorder-related sick leave and mortality: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are associated with the highest all-cause mortality rates of all mental disorders. The majority of patients with AUDs never receive inpatient treatment for their AUD, and there is lack of data about their mortality risks despite their constituting the majority of those affected. Absenteeism from work (sick leave) due to an AUD likely signals worsening. In this study, we assessed whether AUD-related sick leave was associated with mortality in a cohort of workers in Germany. Methods 128,001 workers with health insurance were followed for a mean of 6.4 years. We examined the associations between 1) AUD-related sick leave managed on an outpatient basis and 2) AUD-related psychiatric inpatient treatment, and mortality using survival analysis, and Cox proportional hazard regression models (separately by sex) adjusted for age, education, and job code classification. We also stratified analyses by sick leave related to three groups of alcohol-related conditions (all determined by International Classification of Diseases 9th ed. (ICD-9) codes): alcohol abuse and dependence; alcohol-induced mental disorder; and alcohol-induced medical conditions. Results Outpatient-managed AUD-related sick leave was significantly associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 2.90 (95% Confidence interval (CI) 2.24-3.75) for men, HR 5.83 (CI 2.90-11.75) for women). The magnitude of the association was similar for receipt of AUD-related psychiatric inpatient treatment (HR 3.2 (CI 2.76-3.78) for men, HR 6.5 (CI 4.41-9.47) for women). Compared to those without the conditions, higher mortality was observed consistently for outpatients and inpatients across the three groups of alcohol-related conditions. Those with alcohol-related medical conditions who had AUD-related psychiatric inpatient treatment appeared to have the highest mortality. Conclusions Alcohol use disorder-related sick leave as documented in health insurance records is associated with

  13. Social anxiety disorder in recent onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders: The relation with symptomatology, anxiety, and social rank.

    PubMed

    Sutliff, Stephanie; Roy, Marc-André; Achim, Amélie M

    2015-05-30

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) represents a common comorbidity in schizophrenia, but questions remain regarding how this comorbidity is related to symptomatology and self-perceptions. Forty-two patients with recent-onset schizophrenia were evaluated for SAD, and assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), as well as the Social Comparison Scale (SCS), which assessed how participants perceived themselves in relation with others (i.e., social rank). Eighteen patients met criteria for SAD (SZ+) while 24 patients did not (SZ-). Analysis of symptoms using a five-factor model of the PANSS revealed that the SZ- group had more severe symptoms than SZ+ on the Cognitive/Disorganization factor. Further analyses of individual symptoms demonstrated that the SZ- group was more affected in attention, abstract thinking, and cognitive disorganization (Cognitive/Disorganization symptoms), while the SZ+ group was more severely affected in anxiety, suspiciousness/persecution, and active social avoidance. Interestingly, severity of social anxiety symptom ratings correlated with certain PANSS symptoms only in the SZ- group. Perception of social rank, which was reduced in SZ+, displayed a trend level correlation with the positive symptoms in SZ-. Overall, the results suggest that SZ+ and SZ- may have different clinical profiles that could be important to consider when tailoring treatments for these patients. PMID:25818255

  14. Personalized symptoms forecasting for pollen-induced allergic rhinitis sufferers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voukantsis, D.; Berger, U.; Tzima, F.; Karatzas, K.; Jaeger, S.; Bergmann, K. C.

    2015-07-01

    Hay fever is a pollen-induced allergic reaction that strongly affects the overall quality of life of many individuals. The disorder may vary in severity and symptoms depending on patient-specific factors such as genetic disposition, individual threshold of pollen concentration levels, medication, former immunotherapy, and others. Thus, information services that improve the quality of life of hay fever sufferers must address the needs of each individual separately. In this paper, we demonstrate the development of information services that offer personalized pollen-induced symptoms forecasts. The backbone of these services consists of data of allergic symptoms reported by the users of the Personal Hay Fever Diary system and pollen concentration levels (European Aeroallergen Network) in several sampling sites. Data were analyzed using computational intelligence methods, resulting in highly customizable forecasting models that offer personalized warnings to users of the Patient Hay Fever Diary system. The overall system performance for the pilot area (Vienna and Lower Austria) reached a correlation coefficient of r = 0.71 ± 0.17 (average ± standard deviation) in a sample of 219 users with major contribution to the Pollen Hay Fever Diary system and an overall performance of r = 0.66 ± 0.18 in a second sample of 393 users, with minor contribution to the system. These findings provide an example of combining data from different sources using advanced data engineering in order to develop innovative e-health services with the capacity to provide more direct and personalized information to allergic rhinitis sufferers.

  15. Targeting the neuropeptide Y system in stress-related psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Enman, Nicole M.; Sabban, Esther L.; McGonigle, Paul; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated, extreme, or traumatic stressors can elicit pathological effects leading to many negative physical and psychological outcomes. Stressors can precipitate the onset of psychiatric diseases, or exacerbate pre-existing disorders including various anxiety and mood disorders. As stressors can negatively impact human psychiatric health, it is essential to identify neurochemicals that may confer protection from the negative sequelae of repeated or extreme stress exposure. Elucidating the neurobiological underpinnings of stress resilience will enhance our ability to promote resilience to, or recovery from, stress-related psychiatric disease. Herein, we will review the evidence for neuropeptide Y as an endogenous mediator of resilience and its potential relevance for the treatment of stress-related psychiatric diseases. PMID:25506604

  16. Gambling disorder in financial markets: Clinical and treatment-related features

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Chul; Choi, Sam-Wook; Ha, Juwon; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims To date, few studies have examined the clinical manifestation of disordered gamblers in financial markets. This study examined the differences in the clinical and treatment-related features of gambling disorder between financial markets and horse races. Methods Subjects who met the DSM-IV criteria for pathological gambling (PG) and who sought treatment were assessed by retrospective chart review. One hundred forty-four subjects were included in this sample, which consisted of the following groups: financial markets (n = 45; 28.6%) and horse races (n = 99; 71.4%). Results Multiple similar manifestations were found between the groups, including severity of PG, age of PG onset, amounts of gambling debts, drinking days per week, depressive mood, duration of seeking treatment after the onset of PG, and treatment follow-up duration. However, disordered gamblers who invested in the financial market were significantly more likely to be educated (p = 0.003), live with their spouses (p = 0.007), have full-time jobs (p = 0.006), and they were more likely to participate in the first type of gambling than the horse races group (p<0.001). Furthermore, the financial markets group received the anti-craving medication less often than the horse races group (p = 0.04). Discussion and Conclusions: These findings suggest that disordered gamblers in financial markets show different socio-demographic, clinical and treatment-related features compared with the horse race gamblers, despite a similar severity of gambling disorder. Understanding these differential manifestations may provide insight into prevention and treatment development for specific types of gambling. PMID:26690619

  17. Preventative and Therapeutic Probiotic Use in Allergic Skin Conditions: Experimental and Clinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Öner; Göksu Erol, Azize Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are ingested live microbes that can modify intestinal microbial populations in a way that benefits the host. The interest in probiotic preventative/therapeutic potential in allergic diseases stemmed from the fact that probiotics have been shown to improve intestinal dysbiosis and permeability and to reduce inflammatory cytokines in human and murine experimental models. Enhanced presence of probiotic bacteria in the intestinal microbiota is found to correlate with protection against allergy. Therefore, many studies have been recently designed to examine the efficacy of probiotics, but the literature on the allergic skin disorders is still very scarce. Here, our objective is to summarize and evaluate the available knowledge from randomized or nonrandomized controlled trials of probiotic use in allergic skin conditions. Clinical improvement especially in IgE-sensitized eczema and experimental models such as atopic dermatitis-like lesions (trinitrochlorobenzene and picryl chloride sensitizations) and allergic contact dermatitis (dinitrofluorobenzene sensitization) has been reported. Although there is a very promising evidence to recommend the addition of probiotics into foods, probiotics do not have a proven role in the prevention or the therapy of allergic skin disorders. Thus, being aware of possible measures, such as probiotics use, to prevent/heal atopic diseases is essential for the practicing allergy specialist. PMID:24078929

  18. Neurology of sleep and sleep-related breathing disorders and their relationships to sleep bruxism.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jerald H

    2012-02-01

    Conditions that affect sleep can impact overall health. More than 70 million Americans suffer from problems with sleep. The purpose of this article is to provide the basic science of sleep physiology and how it relates to disorders that are pertinent to dentistry. Concepts are presented that explain airway dynamics and how the jaw and tongue influence airway obstruction. Additionally, explanation is given on an association between temporomandibularj aw dysfunction and bruxism during sleep. PMID:22416635

  19. The Relation among Sleep, Routines, and Externalizing Behavior in Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jill A.; Barry, Tammy D.; Bader, Stephanie H.; Jordan, Sara Sytsma

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined relations among sleep, routines, and externalizing behavior (based on parent report) in 115 children ages 6 to 12 years in two groups: 58 children with an autism spectrum disorder (age M = 9.0, SD = 2.09) and 57 non-ASD children (age M = 8.25, SD = 1.98). Within the ASD group, sleep hygiene and sleep quality were related…

  20. Gender-related Differences in the Associations between Sexual Impulsivity and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Galit; Pilver, Corey E.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sexual impulsivity (SI) has been associated with conditions that have substantial public health costs, such as sexually transmitted infections and unwanted pregnancies. However, SI has not been examined systematically with respect to its relationships to psychopathology. We aimed to investigate associations between SI and psychopathology, including gender-related differences. Method We performed a secondary data analysis of Wave-2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national sample of 34,653 adults in the United States. DSM-IV-based diagnoses of mood, anxiety, drug and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Scheduled DSM-IV Version. Results The prevalence of SI was considerable (14.7%), with greater acknowledgment by men than women (18.9% versus 10.9%; p<0.0001). For both women and men, SI was positively associated with most Axis-I and Axis-II psychiatric disorders (OR range: Women, Axis-I:1.89-6.14, Axis-II:2.10-10.02; Men, Axis-I:1.92-6.21, Axis-II:1.63-6.05). Significant gender-related differences were observed. Among women as compared to men, SI was more strongly associated with social phobia, alcohol abuse/dependence, and paranoid, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders. Conclusion The robust associations between SI and psychopathology across genders suggest the need for screening and interventions related to SI for individuals with psychiatric concerns. The stronger associations between SI and psychopathology among women as compared to men emphasize the importance of a gender-oriented perspective in targeting SI. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the extent to SI predates, postdates or co-occurs with specific psychiatric conditions. PMID:24793538

  1. Identification as Overweight by Medical Professionals: Relation to Eating Disorder Diagnosis and Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Andrea E.; Wang, Annie Z.; Kolko, Rachel P.; Holland, Jodi C.; Altman, Myra; Trockel, Mickey; Taylor, C. Barr; Wilfley, Denise E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Discussions about weight between medical professionals and young adults may increase risk of eating disorders (EDs). Clarifying the relation between screening for overweight and ED risk is needed. Methods 548 college-age women were classified as at-risk (n=441) or with an ED (n=107), and were assessed for disordered eating attitudes, behaviors, and relevant history, including, “Has a doctor, nurse, or other medical professional ever told you that you were overweight?” Regression analyses were used to evaluate the relations between being identified as overweight and current disordered eating behaviors, attitudes, and ED diagnosis, without and with covariates (history of weight-related teasing, history of an ED, family history of being identified as overweight, and current body mass index). Results 146 (26.6%) women reported being previously identified as overweight by a medical professional. There was no relation between being previously identified as overweight and having an ED. Those identified as overweight were more likely to have weight/shape concerns above a high-risk cutoff, but showed no difference in dietary restraint, binge eating, purging behaviors, or excessive exercise compared to those not identified. Conclusions Being previously identified as overweight by a medical professional was associated with increased weight/shape concerns but not with current disordered eating behaviors or ED status. Minimizing the potential negative effects of overweight screening on weight and shape concerns by providing patients with strategies to increase healthy lifestyle behaviors and long-term support for healthy weight loss goals may have a positive impact on reducing the public health problem of overweight and obesity. PMID:25602172

  2. Accurate Prediction of Severe Allergic Reactions by a Small Set of Environmental Parameters (NDVI, Temperature)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianaki, Maria; Azariadis, Kalliopi; Kampouri, Errika; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Lavrentaki, Katerina; Kastrinakis, Stelios; Kampa, Marilena; Agouridakis, Panagiotis; Pirintsos, Stergios; Castanas, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Severe allergic reactions of unknown etiology,necessitating a hospital visit, have an important impact in the life of affected individuals and impose a major economic burden to societies. The prediction of clinically severe allergic reactions would be of great importance, but current attempts have been limited by the lack of a well-founded applicable methodology and the wide spatiotemporal distribution of allergic reactions. The valid prediction of severe allergies (and especially those needing hospital treatment) in a region, could alert health authorities and implicated individuals to take appropriate preemptive measures. In the present report we have collecterd visits for serious allergic reactions of unknown etiology from two major hospitals in the island of Crete, for two distinct time periods (validation and test sets). We have used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), a satellite-based, freely available measurement, which is an indicator of live green vegetation at a given geographic area, and a set of meteorological data to develop a model capable of describing and predicting severe allergic reaction frequency. Our analysis has retained NDVI and temperature as accurate identifiers and predictors of increased hospital severe allergic reactions visits. Our approach may contribute towards the development of satellite-based modules, for the prediction of severe allergic reactions in specific, well-defined geographical areas. It could also probably be used for the prediction of other environment related diseases and conditions. PMID:25794106

  3. Current understanding of allergic transfusion reactions: incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumiya

    2013-02-01

    Non-haemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common type of transfusion reaction and include transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, allergic reactions, febrile reactions, post-transfusion purpura and graft-versus- host disease. Although life-threatening anaphylaxis occurs rarely, allergic reactions occur most frequently. If possible, even mild transfusion reactions should be avoided because they add to patients' existing suffering. During the last decade, several new discoveries have been made in the field of allergic diseases and transfusion medicine. First, mast cells are not the only cells that are key players in allergic diseases, particularly in the murine immune system. Second, it has been suggested that immunologically active undigested or digested food allergens in a donor's blood may be transferred to a recipient who is allergic to these antigens, causing anaphylaxis. Third, washed platelets have been shown to be effective for preventing allergic transfusion reactions, although substantial numbers of platelets are lost during washing procedures, and platelet recovery after transfusion may not be equivalent to that with unwashed platelets. This review describes allergic transfusion reactions, including the above-mentioned points, and focusses on their incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment. PMID:23215650

  4. Relations between emotional and social functioning in children with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Marni L; Suveg, Cynthia; Whitehead, Monica R

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated concurrent relations between emotional and social functioning in youth with anxiety disorders using a multi-reporter (i.e., children, parents, teachers) assessment strategy. Ninety youth (M age = 8.98 years, SD = 1.68) with a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder, and a parent participated. Regression analyses indicated that positive affect and emotion regulation coping were related to adaptive measures of social functioning, whereas positive affect, negative affect, reluctance to share emotional experiences with peers, and lability/negativity were related to maladaptive measures of social functioning in the expected directions. For youth high in lability/negativity and low in emotion regulation coping, the relationship between diagnostic severity and social problems was exacerbated. This research contributes to our understanding of the interplay of social and emotional variables and suggests that efforts to facilitate child emotional functioning may improve social functioning for anxious youth, or vice versa. PMID:24258408

  5. Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: The New Frontier of Gluten Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Catassi, Carlo; Bai, Julio C.; Bonaz, Bruno; Bouma, Gerd; Calabrò, Antonio; Carroccio, Antonio; Castillejo, Gemma; Ciacci, Carolina; Cristofori, Fernanda; Dolinsek, Jernej; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Elli, Luca; Green, Peter; Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Koehler, Peter; Koletzko, Sibylle; Meinhold, Christof; Sanders, David; Schumann, Michael; Schuppan, Detlef; Ullrich, Reiner; Vécsei, Andreas; Volta, Umberto; Zevallos, Victor; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Non Celiac Gluten sensitivity (NCGS) was originally described in the 1980s and recently a “re-discovered” disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food, in subjects that are not affected with either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). Although NCGS frequency is still unclear, epidemiological data have been generated that can help establishing the magnitude of the problem. Clinical studies further defined the identity of NCGS and its implications in human disease. An overlap between the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and NCGS has been detected, requiring even more stringent diagnostic criteria. Several studies suggested a relationship between NCGS and neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly autism and schizophrenia. The first case reports of NCGS in children have been described. Lack of biomarkers is still a major limitation of clinical studies, making it difficult to differentiate NCGS from other gluten related disorders. Recent studies raised the possibility that, beside gluten, wheat amylase-trypsin inhibitors and low-fermentable, poorly-absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates can contribute to symptoms (at least those related to IBS) experienced by NCGS patients. In this paper we report the major advances and current trends on NCGS. PMID:24077239

  6. Relationship between dementia and nutrition-related factors and disorders: an overview.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Kennedy, Rossana; Cashman, Kevin D

    2005-03-01

    This review gives a brief overview of the main types of dementia and summarizes current thinking on the relationship between nutritional-related factors and disorders, and dementia. Dementia is a multi-factor pathological condition, and nutrition is one factor that may play a role on its onset and progression. An optimal intake of nutrients doesn't protect people from dementia. However, studies in this area show that inadequate dietary habits, which are of particular concern in elderly populations, may increase the risk of developing a number of age-related diseases, including disorders of impaired cognitive function. They show that a deficiency in essential nutrients, such as certain B complex vitamins, can result in hyperhomocysteinemia, a well-known risk factor for atherosclerosis and recently associated with cognitive impairment in old age. A deficiency of antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, and beta-carotene, as well as nutrition-related disorders like hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes, may also have some role in cognitive impairment. These factors can be present for a long time before cognitive impairment becomes evident, therefore they could be potentially detected and corrected in a timely manner. PMID:15929630

  7. Multi-systemic involvement in NGLY1-related disorder caused by two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Heeley, Jennifer; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-04-01

    NGLY1-related disorder is a newly described autosomal recessive condition characterized by neurological, hepatic, ophthalmological findings and associated with dysmorphic features, constipation and scoliosis. It is caused by mutations in NGLY1, which encodes an enzyme, N-glycanase 1, involved in deglycosylation of glycoproteins, an essential step in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. The disorder has been described in eight patients. We investigated the molecular basis and phenotype of NGLY1-related disorder in an additional patient. The proband is a 14-year-old who presented in early infancy with profound hypotonia and elevated transaminases. Liver biopsy showed lipid accumulation with dilated endoplasmic reticulum. He exhibited global developmental delay, acquired microcephaly, seizures, involuntary body movements, muscle atrophy, absent reflexes, and poor growth. He had multiple procedures for lacrimal duct stenosis and strabismus and had intractable blepharitis. He had severe osteopenia and persistent hypocholesterolemia. Whole exome sequencing revealed two novel variants in NGLY1: a truncating mutation, c.347C > G (p.S116X), and a splicing mutation, c.881 + 5G (p.IVS5 + 5G>T), predicted to abolish the splice donor site of exon 5. This study, along with previously reported cases, suggests that mutations in NGLY1 cause a recognizable phenotype and targeted sequencing should be considered in patients with typical presentation. This study expands the molecular spectrum of NGLY1-related condition and suggests that osteopenia and hypocholesterolemia may be part of the phenotype. PMID:25707956

  8. Emotional, cognitive and physiological correlates of abuse-related stress in borderline and antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud

    2010-02-01

    Childhood abuse is an important precursor of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). The current study compared the emotional reactivity to abuse-related stress of these patients on a direct and an indirect level. Changes in self-reported affect and schema modes, psychophysiology and reaction time based cognitive associations were assessed following confrontation with an abuse-related film fragment in patients with BPD (n=45), ASPD (n=21), Cluster C personality disorder (n=46) and non-patient controls (n=36). Results indicated a hyperresponsivity of BPD-patients on self-reported negative affect and schema modes, on some psychophysiological indices and on implicit cognitive associations. The ASPD-group was comparable to the BPD group on implicit cognitions but did not show self-reported and physiological hyper-reactivity. These findings suggest that BPD and ASPD-patients are alike in their implicit cognitive abuse-related stress reactivity, but can be differentiated in their self-reported and physiological response patterns. PMID:19854433

  9. Decrease of event-related delta oscillations in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Atagün, Murat İlhan; Güntekin, Bahar; Maşalı, Belinda; Tülay, Elif; Başar, Erol

    2014-07-30

    Decreased delta oscillation upon cognitive load is common in patients with Alzheimer׳s disease, mild cognitive impairment, and schizophrenia. However, there is no previous study analyzing the delta responses in euthymic medication-free patients with bipolar disorder. Participants comprised of 22 euthymic medication-free patients with DSM-IV diagnoses of bipolar disorder and 21 healthy controls who were matched to the patients for sex, age, and education. Electroencephalographic activity was recorded at 30 electrode sites using an application of an auditory oddball paradigm. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes for each subject׳s averaged delta response (0.5-3.5Hz) were measured. There was a significant inter-group difference in evoked and event-related delta (0.5-3.5Hz) responses. Post-hoc comparisons revealed that the event-related delta oscillatory responses of the bipolar patient group were significantly lower than those of the healthy control group over the temporo-parietal and occipital electrode sites. Euthymic bipolar patients showed reduced event-related delta oscillatory responses in comparison to healthy subjects under cognitive load. The decrease of delta oscillations may be a common phenomenon that can be observed in different neuropsychiatric disorders with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:24819306

  10. Non-Celiac Gluten sensitivity: the new frontier of gluten related disorders.

    PubMed

    Catassi, Carlo; Bai, Julio C; Bonaz, Bruno; Bouma, Gerd; Calabrò, Antonio; Carroccio, Antonio; Castillejo, Gemma; Ciacci, Carolina; Cristofori, Fernanda; Dolinsek, Jernej; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Elli, Luca; Green, Peter; Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Koehler, Peter; Koletzko, Sibylle; Meinhold, Christof; Sanders, David; Schumann, Michael; Schuppan, Detlef; Ullrich, Reiner; Vécsei, Andreas; Volta, Umberto; Zevallos, Victor; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio

    2013-10-01

    Non Celiac Gluten sensitivity (NCGS) was originally described in the 1980s and recently a "re-discovered" disorder characterized by intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food, in subjects that are not affected with either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). Although NCGS frequency is still unclear, epidemiological data have been generated that can help establishing the magnitude of the problem. Clinical studies further defined the identity of NCGS and its implications in human disease. An overlap between the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and NCGS has been detected, requiring even more stringent diagnostic criteria. Several studies suggested a relationship between NCGS and neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly autism and schizophrenia. The first case reports of NCGS in children have been described. Lack of biomarkers is still a major limitation of clinical studies, making it difficult to differentiate NCGS from other gluten related disorders. Recent studies raised the possibility that, beside gluten, wheat amylase-trypsin inhibitors and low-fermentable, poorly-absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates can contribute to symptoms (at least those related to IBS) experienced by NCGS patients. In this paper we report the major advances and current trends on NCGS. PMID:24077239

  11. Combat-related mental health disorders: the case for resiliency in the long war.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Daryl J

    2010-09-01

    More US military service members have been deployed since 9/11 than in the previous 40 years. A greater number of these deployed service members are surviving, which has increased the incidence of combat-related mental health disorders among veterans of "The Long War." The societal cost of caring for veterans with such disorders is expected to surpass that of the Global War on Terror, which is estimated at $600 billion. Because the prospect of stopping all deployment is remote, standardized prevention and treatment methods must be used to eliminate these "invisible wounds of war." It is imperative that high-quality, evidence-based, and cost-effective treatments--pharmaceutical and nonpharmaceutical--be developed. Although no approved medication currently exists for the prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder, the blood pressure medication propranolol has shown promise in erasing the behavioral expression of fear memory and may be useful for preventing more severe emotional disorders. In addition, a nonpharmaceutical method known as stress inoculation training is ideally suited to military populations and should be incorporated into military training programs. Furthermore, osteopathic physicians can improve resilience in the communities they serve by considering the dynamic of body, mind, and spirit in their patients. Applying these methods, teaching self-regulation traits, and removing barriers to care will build resiliency among service personnel for The Long War. PMID:20876837

  12. Posturographic destabilization in eating disorders in female patients exposed to body image related phobic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, M; Monzani, D; Mackinnon, A; Ferrari, S; Gherpelli, C; Galeazzi, G M

    2016-08-26

    Human postural control is dependent on the central integration of vestibular, visual and proprioceptive inputs. Psychological states can affect balance control: anxiety, in particular, has been shown to influence balance mediated by visual stimuli. We hypothesized that patients with eating disorders would show postural destabilization when exposed to their image in a mirror and to the image of a fashion model representing their body ideal in comparison to body neutral stimuli. Seventeen females patients attending a day centre for the treatment of eating disorders were administered psychometric measures of body dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and underwent posturographic measures with their eyes closed, open, watching a neutral stimulus, while exposed to a full length mirror and to an image of a fashion model corresponding to their body image. Results were compared to those obtained by eighteen healthy subjects. Eating disordered patients showed higher levels of body dissatisfaction and higher postural destabilization than controls, but this was limited to the conditions in which they were exposed to their mirror image or a fashion model image. Postural destabilization under these conditions correlated with measures of body dissatisfaction. In eating disordered patients, body related stimuli seem to act as phobic stimuli in the posturographic paradigm used. If confirmed, this has the potential to be developed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27397012

  13. ADULT ANXIETY DISORDERS IN RELATION TO TRAIT ANXIETY AND PERCEIVED STRESS IN CHILDHOOD.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Elizabeth A; Weber, Mareen; Rauch, Scott L; Killgore, William D S; Simon, Naomi M; Pollack, Mark H; Rosso, Isabelle M

    2015-10-01

    It is well established that objective early life stressors increase risk for anxiety disorders and that environmental stressors interact with dispositional factors such as trait anxiety. There is less information on how subjective perception of stress during childhood relates to later clinical anxiety. This study tested whether childhood perceived stress and trait anxiety were independently and interactively associated with adult anxiety disorders. Forty-seven adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders (M age = 34 yr., SD = 11) and 29 healthy participants (M = 33 yr., SD = 13) completed the adult Perceived Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Global Perceived Early Life Events Scale as a measure of perceived stress during childhood. In a logistic regression model, high childhood perceived stress (β = 0.64) and trait anxiety (β = 0.11) were associated with significantly greater odds of adult anxiety disorder. The association between childhood perceived stress and adult anxiety remained significant when controlling for adult perceived stress. These findings suggest that children's perception of stress in their daily lives may be an important target of intervention to prevent the progression of stress into clinically significant anxiety. PMID:26340052

  14. Cross-species assessments of Motor and Exploratory Behavior related to Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brook L.; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W.; Paulus, Martin P.; Geyer, Mark A.; Perry, William

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in exploratory behavior are a fundamental feature of bipolar mania, typically characterized as motor hyperactivity and increased goal-directed behavior in response to environmental cues. In contrast, abnormal exploration associated with schizophrenia and depression can manifest as prominent withdrawal, limited motor activity, and inattention to the environment. While motor abnormalities are cited frequently as clinical manifestations of these disorders, relatively few empirical studies have quantified human exploratory behavior. This article reviews the literature characterizing motor and exploratory behavior associated with bipolar disorder and genetic and pharmacological animal models of the illness. Despite sophisticated assessment of exploratory behavior in rodents, objective quantification of human motor activity has been limited primarily to actigraphy studies with poor cross-species translational value. Furthermore, symptoms that reflect the cardinal features of bipolar disorder have proven difficult to establish in putative animal models of this illness. Recently, however, novel tools such as the Human Behavioral Pattern Monitor provide multivariate translational measures of motor and exploratory activity, enabling improved understanding of the neurobiology underlying psychiatric disorders. PMID:20398694

  15. Auditory Processing Disorder in Relation to Developmental Disorders of Language, Communication and Attention: A Review and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Piers; Bishop, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    Background: Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) does not feature in mainstream diagnostic classifications such as the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition" (DSM-IV), but is frequently diagnosed in the United States, Australia and New Zealand, and is becoming more frequently diagnosed in the United Kingdom. Aims: To…

  16. Allergic Rhinitis: Mechanisms and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Schwartz, Gene; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) has been estimated at 10% to 40%, and its economic burden is substantial. AR patients develop specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody responses to indoor and outdoor environmental allergens with exposure over time. These specific IgE antibodies bind to high-affinity IgE receptors on mast cells and basophils. Key outcome measures of therapeutic interventions include rhinitis symptom control, rescue medication requirements, and quality-of-life measures. A comprehensive multiple modality treatment plan customized to the individual patient can optimize outcomes. PMID:27083101

  17. Personality Disorders, Impulsiveness, and Novelty Seeking in Persons with DSM-IV Pathological Gambling and Their First-Degree Relatives.

    PubMed

    Black, Donald W; Coryell, William H; Crowe, Raymond R; Shaw, Martha; McCormick, Brett; Allen, Jeff

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the presence of personality disorders, impulsiveness, and novelty seeking in probands with DSM-IV pathological gambling (PG), controls, and their respective first-degree relatives using a blind family study methodology. Ninety-three probands with DSM-IV PG, 91 controls, and their 395 first-degree relatives were evaluated for the presence of personality disorder with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality. Impulsiveness was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Novelty seeking was evaluated using questions from Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory. Results were analyzed using logistic regression by the method of generalized estimating equations to account for within family correlations. PG probands had a significantly higher prevalence of personality disorders than controls (41 vs. 7 %, OR = 9.0, P < 0.001), along with higher levels of impulsiveness and novelty seeking. PG probands with a personality disorder had more severe gambling symptoms; earlier age at PG onset; more suicide attempts; greater psychiatric comorbidity; and a greater family history of psychiatric illness than PG probands without a personality disorder. PG relatives had a significantly higher prevalence of personality disorder than relatives of controls (24 vs. 9%, OR = 3.2, P < 0.001) and higher levels of impulsiveness. Risk for PG in relatives is associated with the presence of personality disorder and increases along with rising BIS Non-Planning and Total scale scores. Personality disorders, impulsiveness, and novelty seeking are common in people with PG and their first-degree relatives. The presence of a personality disorder appears to be a marker of PG severity and earlier age of onset. Risk for PG in relatives is associated with the presence of personality disorder and trait impulsiveness. These findings suggest that personality disorder and impulsiveness may contribute to a familial diathesis for PG. PMID:25424057

  18. Incident-related television viewing and psychiatric disorders in Oklahoma City bombing survivors.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S; Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Houston, J Brian; Regens, James L

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine terrorism media coverage and psychiatric outcomes in directly-exposed terrorism survivors. The study used (1) self-report questionnaires to retrospectively assess event-related media behaviors and reactions in a cross sectional design and (2) longitudinal structured diagnostic interviews to assess psychopathologic outcomes. The participants were 99 directly-exposed Oklahoma City bombing survivors who were initially studied six months after the 1995 incident. Though a fear reaction to bombing-related television coverage and fear-driven discontinuation of bombing-related media contact were associated with diagnostic outcomes, the number of hours viewing bombing-related television coverage in the first week after the event was not associated with the prevalence of bombing-related posttraumatic stress disorder or post-bombing major depressive disorder during the seven years post event. The results raise doubt about the effects of quantified incident-related television viewing on clinically-significant emotional outcomes in directly-exposed terrorism survivors. PMID:23980489

  19. Disorders of reproduction in patients with epilepsy: antiepileptic drug related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, Jouko

    2008-03-01

    Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and the reproductive system have complex interactions. Fertility is lower in both men and women with epilepsy than in the general population. Moreover, reproductive endocrine disorders are more common among patients with epilepsy than among the population in general. These disorders have been attributed both to epilepsy itself and to AEDs. The use of the liver enzyme inducing AEDs phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine increases serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women with epilepsy. Over time the increase in serum SHBG levels leads to diminished bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol, which may result in diminished potency in men and menstrual disorders in some women, and, thus, to reduced fertility. Valproate (VPA) medication may have effects on serum androgen concentrations and it reduces serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in men with epilepsy. However, the clinical significance of the VPA related reproductive endocrine changes in men is unknown. On the other hand, in women the use of VPA is associated with a frequent occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders characterized by polycystic changes in the ovaries, high serum testosterone concentrations (hyperandrogenism) and menstrual disorders. Young women with epilepsy seem to be especially vulnerable to the effects of VPA on serum androgen levels. The endocrine effects of the new AEDs have not been widely studied. However, it seems they may offer an alternative if reproductive endocrine problems emerge during treatment with the older antiepileptic drugs. On the other hand, it seems that in many cases the reproductive endocrine effects of the AEDs are reversible, if the medication is discontinued. PMID:18164216

  20. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in truck drivers and official workers.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Abolfazl; Vahedian, Mostafa; Mohebi, Siamak; Najafi, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are common among drivers and official workers. Musculoskeletal disorders are frequent causes of absenteeism in many countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and risk factors associated with these symptoms. A total of 346 workers and truck drivers were participated in this case-control study. All the participants were interviewed using a self- administered questionnaire containing demographic data and a Nordic questionnaire about presence site and characteristics of pain. Then the data were gathered, and the prevalence of the mentioned parameters and the relationship between variables in the questionnaire were analyzed statistically. The results of this study revealed that 78.6% out of truck drivers and 55.5% out of official workers had musculoskeletal disorders in on-year and there was a significant difference between two groups in this regard (P<0.001). On the whole, the most common symptoms were neck 47 (27.2%), followed by lumbar pain 42 (24.3%) in truck drivers and knee 63 (36.4%) and lumbar symptom 21 (12.1%) in one-year in official workers. In this study, musculoskeletal disorders showed statistically significant association with work duration, age and BMI (P<0.001). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the musculoskeletal troubles have a high frequency among the drivers and official workers. Both groups usually remain on a prolonged uncomfortable postures and high static muscle load which may imply a risk for development of the troubles. PMID:26520631