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Sample records for related mechanical properties

  1. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  2. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of rocks related to induced seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Gale, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Witherspoon, P.A. and Gale, J.E., 1977. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of rocks related to induced seismicity. Eng. Geol., 11(1): 23-55. The mechanical and hydraulic properties of fractured rocks are considered with regard to the role they play in induced seismicity. In many cases, the mechanical properties of fractures determine the stability of a rock mass. The problems of sampling and testing these rock discontinuities and interpreting their non-linear behavior are reviewed. Stick slip has been proposed as the failure mechanism in earthquake events. Because of the complex interactions that are inherent in the mechanical behavior of fractured rocks, there seems to be no simple way to combine the deformation characteristics of several sets of fractures when there are significant perturbations of existing conditions. Thus, the more important fractures must be treated as individual components in the rock mass. In considering the hydraulic properties, it has been customary to treat a fracture as a parallel-plate conduit and a number of mathematical models of fracture systems have adopted this approach. Non-steady flow in fractured systems has usually been based on a two-porosity model, which assumes the primary (intergranular) porosity contributes only to storage and the secondary (fracture) porosity contributes only to the overall conductivity. Using such a model, it has been found that the time required to achieve quasi-steady state flow in a fractured reservoir is one or two orders of magnitude greater than it is in a homogeneous system. In essentially all of this work, the assumption has generally been made that the fractures are rigid. However, it is clear from a review of the mechanical and hydraulic properties that not only are fractures easily deformed but they constitute the main flow paths in many rock masses. This means that one must consider the interaction of mechanical and hydraulic effects. A considerable amount of laboratory and field data is now

  3. Silk Fibroin Degradation Related to Rheological and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Partlow, Benjamin P; Tabatabai, A Pasha; Leisk, Gary G; Cebe, Peggy; Blair, Daniel L; Kaplan, David L

    2016-05-01

    Regenerated silk fibroin has been proposed as a material substrate for biomedical, optical, and electronic applications. Preparation of the silk fibroin solution requires extraction (degumming) to remove contaminants, but results in the degradation of the fibroin protein. Here, a mechanism of fibroin degradation is proposed and the molecular weight and polydispersity is characterized as a function of extraction time. Rheological analysis reveals significant changes in the viscosity of samples while mechanical characterization of cast and drawn films shows increased moduli, extensibility, and strength upon drawing. Fifteen minutes extraction time results in degraded fibroin that generates the strongest films. Structural analysis by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates molecular alignment in the drawn films and shows that the drawing process converts amorphous films into the crystalline, β-sheet, secondary structure. Most interesting, by using selected extraction times, films with near-native crystallinity, alignment, and molecular weight can be achieved; yet maximal mechanical properties for the films from regenerated silk fibroin solutions are found with solutions subjected to some degree of degradation. These results suggest that the regenerated solutions and the film casting and drawing processes introduce more complexity than native spinning processes. PMID:26756449

  4. Mechanical Properties of Photovoltaic Silicon in Relation to Wafer Breakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, Prashant Kumar

    This thesis focuses on the fundamental understanding of stress-modified crack-propagation in photovoltaic (PV) silicon in relation to the critical issue of PV silicon "wafer breakage". The interactions between a propagating crack and impurities/defects/residual stresses have been evaluated for consequential fracture path in a thin PV Si wafer. To investigate the mechanism of brittle fracture in silicon, the phase transformations induced by elastic energy released at a propagating crack-tip have been evaluated by locally stressing the diamond cubic Si lattice using a rigid Berkovich nanoindenter tip (radius ≈50 nm). Unique pressure induced phase transformations and hardness variations have been then related to the distribution of precipitates (O, Cu, Fe etc.), and the local stresses in the wafer. This research demonstrates for the first time the "ductile-like fracture" in almost circular crack path that significantly deviates from its energetically favorable crystallographic [110](111) system. These large diameter (≈ 200 mm) Si wafers were sliced to less than 180 microm thickness from a Czochralski (CZ) ingot that was grown at faster than normal growth rates. The vacancy (vSi) driven precipitation of oxygen at enhanced thermal gradients in the wafer core develops large localized stresses (upto 100 MPa) which we evaluated using Raman spectral analysis. Additional micro-FTIR mapping and microscopic etch pit measurements in the wafer core have related the observed crack path deviations to the presence of concentric ring-like distributions of oxygen precipitates (OPs). To replicate these "real-world" breakage scenarios and provide better insight on crack-propagation, several new and innovative tools/devices/methods have been developed in this study. An accurate quantitative profiling of local stress, phase changes and load-carrying ability of Si lattice has been performed in the vicinity of the controlled micro-cracks created using micro-indentations to represent

  5. Mechanical Properties of Photovoltaic Silicon in Relation to Wafer Breakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, Prashant Kumar

    This thesis focuses on the fundamental understanding of stress-modified crack-propagation in photovoltaic (PV) silicon in relation to the critical issue of PV silicon "wafer breakage". The interactions between a propagating crack and impurities/defects/residual stresses have been evaluated for consequential fracture path in a thin PV Si wafer. To investigate the mechanism of brittle fracture in silicon, the phase transformations induced by elastic energy released at a propagating crack-tip have been evaluated by locally stressing the diamond cubic Si lattice using a rigid Berkovich nanoindenter tip (radius ≈50 nm). Unique pressure induced phase transformations and hardness variations have been then related to the distribution of precipitates (O, Cu, Fe etc.), and the local stresses in the wafer. This research demonstrates for the first time the "ductile-like fracture" in almost circular crack path that significantly deviates from its energetically favorable crystallographic [110](111) system. These large diameter (≈ 200 mm) Si wafers were sliced to less than 180 microm thickness from a Czochralski (CZ) ingot that was grown at faster than normal growth rates. The vacancy (vSi) driven precipitation of oxygen at enhanced thermal gradients in the wafer core develops large localized stresses (upto 100 MPa) which we evaluated using Raman spectral analysis. Additional micro-FTIR mapping and microscopic etch pit measurements in the wafer core have related the observed crack path deviations to the presence of concentric ring-like distributions of oxygen precipitates (OPs). To replicate these "real-world" breakage scenarios and provide better insight on crack-propagation, several new and innovative tools/devices/methods have been developed in this study. An accurate quantitative profiling of local stress, phase changes and load-carrying ability of Si lattice has been performed in the vicinity of the controlled micro-cracks created using micro-indentations to represent

  6. Derivation of quantum mechanics from a single fundamental modification of the relations between physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Holger F.

    2014-04-01

    Recent results obtained in quantum measurements indicate that the fundamental relations between three physical properties of a system can be represented by complex conditional probabilities. Here, it is shown that these relations provide a fully deterministic and universally valid framework on which all of quantum mechanics can be based. Specifically, quantum mechanics can be derived by combining the rules of Bayesian probability theory with only a single additional law that explains the phases of complex probabilities. This law, which I introduce here as the law of quantum ergodicity, is based on the observation that the reality of physical properties cannot be separated from the dynamics by which they emerge in measurement interactions. The complex phases are an expression of this inseparability and represent the dynamical structure of transformations between the different properties. In its quantitative form, the law of quantum ergodicity describes a fundamental relation between the ergodic probabilities obtained by dynamical averaging and the deterministic relations between three properties expressed by the complex conditional probabilities. The complete formalism of quantum mechanics can be derived from this one relation, without any axiomatic mathematical assumptions about state vectors or superpositions. It is therefore possible to explain all quantum phenomena as the consequence of a single fundamental law of physics.

  7. Growth-related structural, biochemical, and mechanical properties of the functional bone–cartilage unit

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Nina; Zaucke, Frank; Dayakli, Münire; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Niehoff, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage and subchondral bone act together, forming a unit as a weight-bearing loading-transmitting surface. A close interaction between both structures has been implicated during joint cartilage degeneration, but their coupling during normal growth and development is insufficiently understood. The purpose of the present study was to examine growth-related changes of cartilage mechanical properties and to relate these changes to alterations in cartilage biochemical composition and subchondral bone structure. Tibiae and femora of both hindlimbs from 7- and 13-week-old (each n = 12) female Sprague-Dawley rats were harvested. Samples were processed for structural, biochemical and mechanical analyses. Immunohistochemical staining and protein expression analyses of collagen II, collagen IX, COMP and matrilin-3, histomorphometry of cartilage thickness and COMP staining height were performed. Furthermore, mechanical testing of articular cartilage and micro-CT analysis of subchondral bone was conducted. Growth decreased cartilage thickness, paralleled by a functional condensation of the underlying subchondral bone due to enchondral ossification. Cartilage mechanical properties seem to be rather influenced by growth-related changes in the assembly of major ECM proteins such as collagen II, collagen IX and matrilin-3 than by growth-related alterations in its underlying subchondral bone structure. Importantly, the present study provides a first insight into the growth-related structural, biochemical and mechanical interaction of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Finally, these data contribute to the general knowledge about the cooperation between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:23083449

  8. Regression relations for estimating the mechanical properties of steels subjected to solid-solution hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopopov, E. A.; Val'ter, A. I.; Protopopov, A. A.; Malenko, P. I.

    2015-07-01

    An approach is proposed to obtain regression relations to estimate the mechanical properties of steels subjected to solid-solution hardening. The applicability of the developed approach is shown for hot-rolled sheet austenitic iron-nickel and nickel alloys after quenching, toughened low-alloy structural steels with a sorbite structure in the case of full hardenabilty, sheet corrosion-resistant ferritic steels after softening heat treatment, and corrosion-resistant austenitic steels after austenitization. The derived regression relations serve as the basis for correcting the chemical composition of a metal melt to ensure the required level of the mechanical properties of ready products by controlling the degree of solid-solution hardening.

  9. The Elastic Constants and Related Mechanical Properties of the Monoclinic Polymorph of the Carbamazepine Molecular Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Himansu; Eckhardt, Craig J.

    2007-03-01

    Polymorphism is the property of a compound to crystallize in two or more crystalline phases containing different arrangements and/or conformations of the molecules in the crystal lattice. The Phenomenon of polymorphism is a major issue in the pharmaceutical industry especially in relation to drug uptake in the body, tablet processing and growth. This has led to considerable interest in predicting and understanding properties of drug polymorphs, and more recently the mechanical properties of the polymorphs. In this work, Brillouin scattering is used to probe the acoustic phonons of the monoclinic (P21/c) polymorph of the drug, carbamazepine (CBZ). By sampling a variety of acoustic phonons, the complete elastic constant tensor has been determined for this CBZ polymorph. The observed trend in the elastic constants: C11< C22˜C33 is qualitatively associated with the crystal growth pattern seen in CBZ. Investigation into the anisotropy of the intermolecular interactions has been investigated further by calculation of linear compressibilities.

  10. Application of SPM and Related Techniques to the Mechanical Properties of Biotool Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöberl, T.; Jäger, I. L.; Lichtenegger, H. C.

    Soon after the introduction of scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) originally developed for imaging purposes, their potential for mechanical analyses at the smallest scales was recognized and soon the method was applied to a variety of materials, including some of biological origin. Experimental techniques range from phase imaging to indentation and scratch testing. This chapter focuses on the use of instrumented indentation and related techniques such as scanning wear testing on biological tool tissues, materials often characterized by a high abrasion resistance. A brief overview of structure and composition of biological materials is given, since these factors are crucial in determining the mechanical properties and a basic understanding of such correlations is indispensable for the interpretation of the results. Furthermore, the influence of sample storage, preparation, and environmental conditions on mechanical tests is discussed, and relevant evaluation methods described. Finally, examples from the literature illustrating the successful application of SPM techniques on biotool tissues (mainly teeth) are presented.

  11. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanical properties related to the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2016-05-01

    Diverse intrinsic and extrinsic mechanical factors have a strong influence on the regulation of stem cell fate. In this work, we examined recent literature on the effects of mechanical environments on stem cells, especially on differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We provide a brief review of intrinsic mechanical properties of single MSC and examined the correlation between the intrinsic mechanical property of MSC and the differentiation ability. The effects of extrinsic mechanical factors relevant to the differentiation of MSCs were considered separately. The effect of nanostructure and elasticity of the matrix on the differentiation of MSCs were summarized. Finally, we consider how the extrinsic mechanical properties transfer to MSCs and then how the effects on the intrinsic mechanical properties affect stem cell differentiation. PMID:26403968

  12. Mechanical properties of the human hand digits: Age-related differences

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaebum; Pazin, Nemanja; Friedman, Jason; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanical properties of human digits may have significant implications for the hand function. We quantified several mechanical characteristics of individual digits in young and older adults. Methods Digit tip friction was measured at several normal force values using a method of induced relative motion between the digit tip and the object surface. A modified quick-release paradigm was used to estimate digit apparent stiffness, damping, and inertial parameters. The subjects grasped a vertical handle instrumented with force/moment sensors using a prismatic grasp with four digits; the handle was fixed to the table. Unexpectedly, one of the sensors yielded leading to a quick displacement of the corresponding digit. A second-order, linear model was used to fit the force/displacement data. Findings Friction of the digit pads was significantly lower in older adults. The apparent stiffness coefficient values were higher while the damping coefficients were lower in older adults leading to lower damping ratio. The damping ratio was above unity for most data in young adults and below unity for older adults. Quick release of a digit led to force changes in other digits of the hand, likely due to inertial hand properties. These phenomena of “mechanical enslaving” were smaller in older adults although no significant difference was found in the inertial parameter in the two groups. Interpretations The decreased friction and damping ratio present challenges for the control of everyday prehensile tasks. They may lead to excessive digit forces and low stability of the grasped object. PMID:24355703

  13. Relation between Thermal and Magnetic Properties of Active Regions as a Probe of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, Seiji; Shibata, Kazunari

    2001-03-01

    We study the relation between thermal and magnetic properties of active regions in the corona observed with the soft X-ray telescope aboard Yohkoh. We derive the mean temperature and pressure of 64 mature active regions using the filter ratio technique, and examine the relationship of region size with temperature and pressure. We find that the temperature T of active regions increases with increasing region size L as T~L0.28, while the pressure P slightly decreases with the region size as P~L-0.16. We confirm the scaling law T~(PL)1/3 for mature active regions found by R. Rosner, W. H. Tucker, & G. S. Vaiana. We examined the magnetic properties of active regions by analyzing 31 active regions observed with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager and find the following empirical scaling law between thermal and magnetic properties,Uth~Φ1.33,P~B0.78,where Uth, Φ, and B are the total thermal energy content, total magnetic flux, and average magnetic flux density of active regions, respectively. The former is consistent with the results of L. Golub et al., but the latter is not. Implications of our findings for coronal heating mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Modeling Structure Property Relations and Failure Mechanisms of PPTA Fibers using Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Dundar

    Failure mechanisms of poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) under extreme tensile deformation has been studied using reactive potentials with molecular dynamics simulations. Amorphous PPTA systems with different molecular weights generated using an in-house developed amorphous builder. Tensile modulus of amorphous PPTA has been calculated as up to 6.7 GPa. Nitrogen and carbon vacancy defects were introduced to both crystalline and amorphous systems. The tensile modulus of defects-free crystalline PPTA calculated as 350 GPa. Introduction of 5% nitrogen vacancy defects reduced the tensile modulus to 197 GPa. PPTA fibers generated with skin core structure where skin region composed of PPTA chains in crystalline order and core region was composed of unordered PPTA chains vice versa. Relation between ratios of skin and core regions and mechanical properties of the fiber studied. Tensile load was mostly accommodated through stretching of bonds between amide group and phenyl groups. Under extreme tensile deformation PPTA chains failed at these C-N bonds. TUBITAK Grant No: 113F358.

  15. Effects of solvent casting copolymer materials as related to mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bagrodia, S; Wilkes, G L

    1976-01-01

    Using a well characterized series of styrene butadiene triblock copolymers a systematic study was carried out to determine the influence of casting solvent, used for film preparation, on the final mechanical properties. The results clearly indicate that in the range of styrene contents of 30-40 mol %, the modulus behavior is greatly affected as the solubility parameter of the casting solvent, delta, is varied. Specifically, the modulus increases as delta increases to the value of polystyrene. At lower or higher styrene content, the properties are influenced but to a much lesser degree. Other mechanical properties measured were yield stress and breaking stress. The ramifications of these data are discussed in light of preparing prosthetic material via solvent casting. PMID:1249085

  16. Age-related ransparent root dentin: mineral concentration,crystallite size and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, John H.; Nalla, Ravi K.; Pople, John A.; Breunig, Tom M.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2004-12-29

    Many fractures occur in teeth that have been altered, forexample restored or endodontically repaired. It is therefore essential toevaluate the structure and mechanical properties of these altereddentins. One such altered form of dentin is transparent (sometimes calledsclerotic) dentin, which forms gradually with aging. The present studyfocuses on differences in the structure and mechanical properties ofnormal versus transparent dentin. The mineral concentration, as measuredby X-ray computed microtomography, was signifcantly higher in transparentdentin, the elevated concentration being consistent with the closure ofthe tubule lumens. Crystallite size, as measured by small angle X-rayscattering, was slightly smaller in transparent dentin, although theimportance of this ending requires further study. The elastic propertieswere unchanged by transparency; however, transparent dentin, unlikenormal dentin, exhibited almost no yielding before failure. In addition,the fracture toughness was lowered by roughly 20 percent while thefatigue lifetime was deleteriously affected at high stress levels. Theseresults are discussed in terms of the altered microstructure oftransparent dentin.

  17. The effects of relative humidity and super-disintegrant concentrations on the mechanical properties of pharmaceutical compacts.

    PubMed

    Hersen-Delesalle, Christine; Leclerc, Bernard; Couarraze, Guy; Busignies, Virginie; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    The influence of the composition and the relative humidity on the properties of pharmaceutical compacts prepared from mixtures of three excipients and three super-disintegrants was evaluated. Various amounts of super-disintegrant and different conditions of relative humidity during the storage were used to study mechanistically the disintegration process and to connect it to compact's mechanical properties. Three point single beam test was used to measure tensile strength and Young's modulus of compacts containing various amount of disintegrant and stored under various relative humidity. The presence of moisture within pharmaceutical compacts containing a disintegrant influences drastically their mechanical properties. Then, the results are related to micro-cracks visualized by MEB. PMID:18097803

  18. The physical and mechanical properties of laterite gravels from southeastern Nigeria relative to their engineering performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okagbue, C. O.

    Laterite gravels are used extensively as aggregates for highway construction, concrete making and fills in SE Nigeria. This paper presents results of laboratory investigations carried out to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of these gravels. High mechanical strength, as measured by aggregate crushing (AC), and Los Angeles abrasion (LAA) values were found to be significant factors controlling the performance. Results indicate that significant correlations exist between these and specific gravity, water absorption and angularity of the gravels. No clear distinction in physical and mechanical properties could be found between the laterite gravels formed over sandstones and shales, indicating perhaps that effects of parent rock on the physical and mechanical nature of laterite gravels is of secondary importance. It is proposed that laterite gravels with AC and LAA values in the range of 30-40% and 34-45%, respectively and 10% fines value of between 8 and 4 tonnes be used only for medium and light trafficked roads. Those with AC and LAA values of less than 30% and 34%, respectively and 10% fines value of greater than 8 tonnes can be used for heavily trafficked roads, provided that acceptable gradation, plasticity limits (on the fines) and other construction specifications are met.

  19. The Relation Between Collagen Fibril Kinematics and Mechanical Properties in the Mitral Valve Anterior Leaflet

    SciTech Connect

    Liao,J.; Yang, L.; Grashow, J.; Sacks, M.

    2007-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mitral valve anterior leaflet (MVAL) exhibited minimal hysteresis, no strain rate sensitivity, stress relaxation but not creep (Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed Eng., 34(2), pp. 315-325; Grashow et al., 2006, Ann Biomed. Eng., 34(10), pp. 1509-1518). However, the underlying structural basis for this unique quasi-elastic mechanical behavior is presently unknown. As collagen is the major structural component of the MVAL, we investigated the relation between collagen fibril kinematics (rotation and stretch) and tissue-level mechanical properties in the MVAL under biaxial loading using small angle X-ray scattering. A novel device was developed and utilized to perform simultaneous measurements of tissue level forces and strain under a planar biaxial loading state. Collagen fibril D-period strain ({epsilon}{sub D}) and the fibrillar angular distribution were measured under equibiaxial tension, creep, and stress relaxation to a peak tension of 90 N/m. Results indicated that, under equibiaxial tension, collagen fibril straining did not initiate until the end of the nonlinear region of the tissue-level stress-strain curve. At higher tissue tension levels, {epsilon}{sub D} increased linearly with increasing tension. Changes in the angular distribution of the collagen fibrils mainly occurred in the tissue toe region. Using {epsilon}{sub D}, the tangent modulus of collagen fibrils was estimated to be 95.5{+-}25.5 MPa, which was {approx}27 times higher than the tissue tensile tangent modulus of 3.58{+-}1.83 MPa. In creep tests performed at 90 N/m equibiaxial tension for 60 min, both tissue strain and D remained constant with no observable changes over the test length. In contrast, in stress relaxation tests performed for 90 min {epsilon}{sub D} was found to rapidly decrease in the first 10 min followed by a slower decay rate for the remainder of the test. Using a single exponential model, the time constant for the reduction in collagen

  20. Supra- and nanocrystallinity: specific properties related to crystal growth mechanisms and nanocrystallinity.

    PubMed

    Pileni, M P

    2012-11-20

    The natural arrangement of atoms or nanocrystals either in well-defined assemblies or in a disordered fashion induces changes in their physical properties. For example, diamond and graphite show marked differences in their physical properties though both are composed of carbon atoms. Natural colloidal crystals have existed on earth for billions of years. Very interestingly, these colloidal crystals are made of a fixed number of polyhedral magnetite particles uniform in size. Hence, opals formed of assemblies of silicate particles in the micrometer size range exhibit interesting intrinsic optical properties. A colorless opal is composed of disordered particles, but changes in size segregation within the self-ordered silica particles can lead to distinct color changes and patterning. In this Account, we rationalize two simultaneous supracrystal growth processes that occur under saturated conditions, which form both well-defined 3D superlattices at the air-liquid interface and precipitated 3D assemblies with well-defined shapes. The growth processes of these colloidal crystals, called super- or supracrystals, markedly change the mechanical properties of these assemblies and induce the crystallinity segregation of nanocrystals. Therefore, single domain nanocrystals are the primary basis in the formation of these supracrystals, while multiply twinned particles (MTPs) and polycrystals remain dispersed within the colloidal suspension. Nanoindentation measurements show a drop in the Young's moduli for interfacial supracrystals in comparison with the precipitated supracrystals. In addition, the value of the Young's modulus changes markedly with the supracrystal growth mechanism. Using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, we successfully imaged very thick supracrystals (from 200 nm up to a few micrometers) with remarkable conductance homogeneity and showed electronic fingerprints of isolated nanocrystals. This discovery of nanocrystal fingerprints within supracrystals

  1. MECHANICAL STRAIN AND PIEZOELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF PZT STACKS RELATED TO SEMI-BIPOLAR ELECTRIC CYCLING FATIGUE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Cooper, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    PZT stacks that had an inter-digital internal electrode configuration and consisted of a specific number of multilayer actuators were tested to more than 108 cycles by using a 100-Hz semi-bipolar sine wave with a field range of +4.5/-0.9 kV/mm and a 20-MPa mechanical preload. Significant reductions in mechanical strain and piezoelectric coefficients were observed during the fatigue cycling, depending on the measuring condition. Extensive surface discharges and arcs were also observed. These surface events as well as related dielectric breakdown resulted in the erosion of external electrode and outcrop of internal electrode, and that partially accounts for the reduction observed above. The data obtained in this study demonstrated the feasibility of using a semi-bipolar mode to drive a PZT stack with a designed mechanical preload applied and illustrated the potential fatigue of stack~{!/~}s performance during its service.

  2. Relation of structure to mechanical properties of thin thoria dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the relation between structure and mechanical properties of thin TD-NiCr sheet indicated that the elevated temperature tensile, stress-rupture, and creep strength properties depend primarily on the grain aspect ratio and sheet thickness. In general, the strength properties increased with increasing grain aspect ratio and sheet thickness. Tensile testing revealed an absence of ductility at elevated temperatures. A threshold stress for creep appears to exist. Even small amounts of prior creep deformation at elevated temperatures can produce severe creep damage.

  3. Agomelatine: mechanism of action and pharmacological profile in relation to antidepressant properties

    PubMed Central

    Guardiola-Lemaitre, B; De Bodinat, C; Delagrange, P; Millan, M J; Munoz, C; Mocaër, E

    2014-01-01

    Agomelatine behaves both as a potent agonist at melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors and as a neutral antagonist at 5-HT2C receptors. Accumulating evidence in a broad range of experimental procedures supports the notion that the psychotropic effects of agomelatine are due to the synergy between its melatonergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic effects. The recent demonstration of the existence of heteromeric complexes of MT1 and MT2 with 5-HT2C receptors at the cellular level may explain how these two properties of agomelatine translate into a synergistic action that, for example, leads to increases in hippocampal proliferation, maturation and survival through modulation of multiple cellular pathways (increase in trophic factors, synaptic remodelling, glutamate signalling) and key targets (early genes, kinases). The present review focuses on the pharmacological properties of this novel antidepressant. Its mechanism of action, strikingly different from that of conventional classes of antidepressants, opens perspectives towards a better understanding of the physiopathological bases underlying depression. PMID:24724693

  4. Nanoindentation of 35 Virus Capsids in a Molecular Model: Relating Mechanical Properties to Structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A coarse-grained model is used to study the mechanical response of 35 virus capsids of symmetries T = 1, T = 2, T = 3, pseudo T = 3, T = 4, and T = 7. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the C atoms associated with each amino acid. The number of these atoms ranges between 8 460 (for SPMV – satellite panicum mosaic virus) and 135 780 (for NBV – nudaureli virus). Nanoindentation by a broad AFM tip is modeled as compression between two planes: either both flat or one flat and one curved. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation show a variety of behaviors, but in each case there is an elastic region which extends to a characteristic force . Crossing results in a drop in the force and irreversible damage. Across the 35 capsids studied, both and the elastic stiffness are observed to vary by a factor of 20. The changes in mechanical properties do not correlate simply with virus size or symmetry. There is a strong connection to the mean coordination number , defined as the mean number of interactions to neighboring amino acids. The Young's modulus for thin shell capsids rises roughly quadratically with , where 6 is the minimum coordination for elastic stability in three dimensions. PMID:23785395

  5. Nanoindentation of 35 virus capsids in a molecular model: relating mechanical properties to structure.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O

    2013-01-01

    A coarse-grained model is used to study the mechanical response of 35 virus capsids of symmetries T = 1, T = 2, T = 3, pseudo T = 3, T = 4, and T = 7. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the C[Formula: see text] atoms associated with each amino acid. The number of these atoms ranges between 8 460 (for SPMV - satellite panicum mosaic virus) and 135 780 (for NBV - nudaureli virus). Nanoindentation by a broad AFM tip is modeled as compression between two planes: either both flat or one flat and one curved. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation show a variety of behaviors, but in each case there is an elastic region which extends to a characteristic force [Formula: see text]. Crossing [Formula: see text] results in a drop in the force and irreversible damage. Across the 35 capsids studied, both [Formula: see text] and the elastic stiffness are observed to vary by a factor of 20. The changes in mechanical properties do not correlate simply with virus size or symmetry. There is a strong connection to the mean coordination number [Formula: see text], defined as the mean number of interactions to neighboring amino acids. The Young's modulus for thin shell capsids rises roughly quadratically with [Formula: see text], where 6 is the minimum coordination for elastic stability in three dimensions. PMID:23785395

  6. Decorin expression is important for age-related changes in tendon structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dunkman, Andrew A; Buckley, Mark R; Mienaltowski, Michael J; Adams, Sheila M; Thomas, Stephen J; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P; Iozzo, Renato V; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    The aging population is at an increased risk of tendon injury and tendinopathy. Elucidating the molecular basis of tendon aging is crucial to understanding the age-related changes in structure and function in this vulnerable tissue. In this study, the structural and functional features of tendon aging are investigated. In addition, the roles of decorin and biglycan in the aging process were analyzed using transgenic mice at both mature and aged time points. Our hypothesis is that the increase in tendon injuries in the aging population is the result of altered structural properties that reduce the biomechanical function of the tendon and consequently increase susceptibility to injury. Decorin and biglycan are important regulators of tendon structure and therefore, we further hypothesized that decreased function in aged tendons is partly the result of altered decorin and biglycan expression. Biomechanical analyses of mature (day 150) and aged (day 570) patellar tendons revealed deteriorating viscoelastic properties with age. Histology and polarized light microscopy demonstrated decreased cellularity, alterations in tenocyte shape, and reduced collagen fiber alignment in the aged tendons. Ultrastructural analysis of fibril diameter distributions indicated an altered distribution in aged tendons with an increase of large diameter fibrils. Aged wild type tendons maintained expression of decorin which was associated with the structural and functional changes seen in aged tendons. Aged patellar tendons exhibited altered and generally inferior properties across multiple assays. However, decorin-null tendons exhibited significantly decreased effects of aging compared to the other genotypes. The amelioration of the functional deficits seen in the absence of decorin in aged tendons was associated with altered tendon fibril structure. Fibril diameter distributions in the decorin-null aged tendons were comparable to those observed in the mature wild type tendon with the absence

  7. Decorin expression is important for age-related changes in tendon structure and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Dunkman, Andrew A.; Buckley, Mark R.; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Adams, Sheila M.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Birk, David E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    The aging population is at an increased risk of tendon injury and tendinopathy. Elucidating the molecular basis of tendon aging is crucial to understanding the age-related changes in structure and function in this vulnerable tissue. In this study, the structural and functional features of tendon aging are investigated. In addition, the roles of decorin and biglycan in the aging process were analyzed using transgenic mice at both mature and aged time points. Our hypothesis is that the increase in tendon injuries in the aging population is the result of altered structural properties that reduce the biomechanical function of the tendon and consequently increase susceptibility to injury. Decorin and biglycan are important regulators of tendon structure and therefore, we further hypothesized that decreased function in aged tendons is partly the result of altered decorin and biglycan expression. Biomechanical analyses of mature (day 150) and aged (day 570) patellar tendons revealed deteriorating viscoelastic properties with age. Histology and polarized light microscopy demonstrated decreased cellularity, alterations in tenocyte shape, and reduced collagen fiber alignment in the aged tendons. Ultrastructural analysis of fibril diameter distributions indicated an altered distribution in aged tendons with an increase of large diameter fibrils. Aged wild type tendons maintained expression of decorin which was associated with the structural and functional changes seen in aged tendons. Aged patellar tendons exhibited altered and generally inferior properties across multiple assays. However, decorin-null tendons exhibited significantly decreased effects of aging compared to the other genotypes. The amelioration of the functional deficits seen in the absence of decorin in aged tendons was associated with altered tendon fibril structure. Fibril diameter distributions in the decorin-null aged tendons were comparable to those observed in the mature wild type tendon with the absence

  8. Absorption of Carotenoids and Mechanisms Involved in Their Health-Related Properties.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Victoria-Campos, Claudia I; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids participate in the normal metabolism and function of the human body. They are involved in the prevention of several diseases, especially those related to the inflammation syndrome. Their main mechanisms of action are associated to their potent antioxidant activity and capacity to regulate the expression of specific genes and proteins. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid metabolites may explain several processes where the participation of their parent carotenoids was unclear. The health benefits of carotenoids strongly depend on their absorption and transformation during gastrointestinal digestion. The estimation of the 'bioaccessibility' of carotenoids through in vitro models have made possible the evaluation of the effect of a large number of factors on key stages of carotenoid digestion and intestinal absorption. The bioaccessibility of these compounds allows us to have a clear idea of their potential bioavailability, a term that implicitly involves the biological activity of these compounds. PMID:27485232

  9. Relation of Murine Thoracic Aortic Structural and Cellular Changes With Aging to Passive and Active Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Jason B.; Mukherjee, Rupak; Stroud, Robert E.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintenance of the structure and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta contributes to aortic function and is dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix and the cellular content within the aortic wall. Age‐related alterations in the aorta include changes in cellular content and composition of the extracellular matrix; however, the precise roles of these age‐related changes in altering aortic mechanical function are not well understood. Methods and Results Thoracic aortic rings from the descending segment were harvested from C57BL/6 mice aged 6 and 21 months. Thoracic aortic diameter and wall thickness were higher in the old mice. Cellular density was reduced in the medial layer of aortas from the old mice; concomitantly, collagen content was higher in old mice, but elastin content was similar between young and old mice. Stress relaxation, an index of compliance, was reduced in aortas from old mice and correlated with collagen fraction. Contractility of the aortic rings following potassium stimulation was reduced in old versus young mice. Furthermore, collagen gel contraction by aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced with age. Conclusions These results demonstrate that numerous age‐related structural changes occurred in the thoracic aorta and were related to alterations in mechanical properties. Aortic contractility decreased with age, likely because of a reduction in medial cell number in addition to a smooth muscle contractile deficit. Together, these unique findings provide evidence that the age‐related changes in structure and mechanical function coalesce to provide an aortic substrate that may be predisposed to aortopathies. PMID:25716945

  10. Prediction of fish body's passive visco-elastic properties and related muscle mechanical performance in vivo during steady swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, YongLiang; Tong, BingGang

    2014-01-01

    For attaining the optimized locomotory performance of swimming fishes, both the passive visco-elastic properties of the fish body and the mechanical behavior of the active muscles should coordinate with the fish body's undulatory motion pattern. However, it is difficult to directly measure the visco-elastic constitutive relation and the muscular mechanical performance in vivo. In the present paper, a new approach based on the continuous beam model for steady swimming fish is proposed to predict the fish body's visco-elastic properties and the related muscle mechanical behavior in vivo. Given the lateral travelling-wave-like movement as the input condition, the required muscle force and the energy consumption are functions of the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, i.e. the Young's modulus E and the viscosity coefficient µ in the Kelvin model. After investigating the variations of the propagating speed of the required muscle force with the fish body's visco-elastic parameters, we analyze the impacts of the visco-elastic properties on the energy efficiencies, including the energy utilization ratios of each element of the kinematic chain in fish swimming and the overall efficiency. Under the constraints of reasonable wave speed of muscle activation and the physiological feasibility, the optimal design of the passive visco-elastic properties can be predicted aiming at maximizing the overall efficiency. The analysis is based on the small-amplitude steady swimming of the carangiform swimmer, with typical Reynolds number varying from 2.5×104 to 2.5×105, and the present results show that the non-dimensional Young's modulus is 112±34, and the non-dimensional viscosity coefficient is 13 approximately. In the present estimated ranges, the overall efficiency of the swimming fish is insensitive to the viscosity, and its magnitude is about 0.11±0.02, in the predicted range given by previous study.

  11. Mechanical properties of nickel ion-implanted with titanium and carbon and their relation to microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Dugger, M.T.

    1998-02-01

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon into nickel was shown to produce an amorphous layer with exceptionally high strength and hardness and substantially improved tribological properties. Indentation testing at submicrometer penetrations combined with finite-element modeling permitted quantification of the intrinsic elastic and plastic properties of the amorphous layer, which was found to have a yield strength near 5 GPa. During unlubricated sliding contact with a steel pin, the implantation treatment reduced friction, suppressed adhesion-and-fracture wear, and reduced wear depth. These tribological effects may enhance the performance and lifetime of microelectromechanical systems constructed from nickel.

  12. In vitro mechanical properties of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon in horses in relation to age.

    PubMed

    Becker, C K; Savelberg, H H; Barneveld, A

    1994-11-01

    The material properties of the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon (AL) of 21 forelimbs from horses between ages one day and 15 years were determined. The force (634-11416 N), failure stress (45-138 N/mm2), failure strain (7-24%) and tangent modulus (33-1639 MPa) are presented in relation to age. Tangent modulus did not indicate changes in elasticity due to age. The results demonstrate that complete ligament failures (CLF) of ALs of older horses (mean 7835 N) occur at lower forces than ALs of young adult horses (mean 8894 N). Sudden decreases, 'dips', in the force-time curves were noticed in ligaments from foals and yearlings and in ligaments from horses > 10 years. They were interpreted as the failure of a number of fibres which either fail at lower forces or are subject to higher forces than the rest. These differences in mechanical properties could be the result of age related differences in the material properties of ALs of older horses similar to alterations in collagenous tissue in other species. When analysing the data of the proximal, middle and distal regions of the ligaments separately, higher strain and elasticity were found in the distal compared to the proximal parts. It is suggested that the clinical occurrence of desmitis of the AL of older horses could be due to fibrillar failure caused by differences in the material properties of the ligaments. PMID:7889918

  13. Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Braendas, Erkki J.

    2007-12-26

    The old dilemma of quantum mechanics versus the theory of relativity is reconsidered via a first principles relativistically invariant theory. By analytic extension of quantum mechanics into the complex plane one may (i) include dynamical features such as time- and length-scales and (ii) examine the possibility and flexibility of so-called general Jordan block formations. The present viewpoint asks for a new perspective on the age-old problem of quantum mechanics versus the theory of relativity. To bring these ideas together, we will establish the relation with the Klein-Gordon-Dirac relativistic theory and confirm some dynamical features of both the special and the general relativity theory.

  14. The morphology of amputated human teeth and its relation to mechanical properties after restoration treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugger, Jonas; Krastl, Gabriel; Huser, Marius; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    The increased susceptibility to fracture of root canal- and post-treated teeth is less affected by alterations of the dentin structure, but seems to crucially depend on the loss of coronal tooth substance. The surface, available for adhesion of the composite material in the root canal and in the coronal part of the tooth, is assumed to be of key importance for the fracture resistance. Thus, an appropriate three-dimensional method should be identified to determine the adhesive surface with necessary precision. For this purpose, severely decayed teeth were simulated decapitating clinical crowns. After root canal filling and post space preparation, impressions of the root canal and the amputation surface were obtained using silicone. Micro computed tomography scans of these impressions were acquired. For one selected specimen, an additional high-resolution scan was recorded at a synchrotron radiation source. Software of ImageLab served for the extraction of the amputation interface, the post surface and the post volume from the tomography data, which have been finally correlated with the Young's modulus and the maximal load derived from mechanical tests. The morphological parameters show a realistic relationship to the mechanical tests performed after the restoration treatments and are consequently important for improving the dental skills.

  15. Investigation of the relations between resin and advanced composite mechanical properties. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.; Walrath, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    One untoughened epoxy baseline resin and three toughened epoxy resin systems were evaluated. The Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914 resin systems were supplied in the uncured state by NASA-Langley and cast into thin flat specimens and round dogbone specimens. Tensile and torsional shear measurements were performed at three temperatures and two moisture conditions. Coefficients of thermal expansion and moisture expansion were also measured. Extensive scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental conditions under which the various specimens were tested. A micromechanics analysis was used to predict the unidirectional composite response under the various test conditions, incorporating the neat resin experimental results as the required input data. The mechanical and physical test results, the scanning electron microscope observations, and the analytical predictions were then correlated.

  16. Investigation of the relations between neat resin and advanced composite mechanical properties. Volume 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.; Walrath, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of one untoughened epoxy baseline resin and three toughened epoxy resin systems was performed. The Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914 resin systems were supplied in the uncured state by NASA-Langley and cast into thin flat specimens and round dogbone specimens. Tensile and torsional shear measurements were performed at three temperatures and two moisture conditions. Coefficients of thermal expansion and moisture expansion were also measured. Extensive scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed, to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental conditions under which the various specimens were tested. A micromechanics analysis was used to predict the unidirectional composite response under the various test conditions, using the neat resin experimental results as the required input data. Mechanical and physical test results, the scanning electron microscope observations, and the analytical predictions were then correlated.

  17. Hypothesis for the Mechanism of Ascorbic Acid Activity in Living Cells Related to Its Electron-Accepting Properties.

    PubMed

    Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A; Modelli, Alberto; Lazneva, Eleonora F; Komolov, Alexei S

    2016-05-01

    Electron-accepting properties, and in particular resonance dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to ascorbic acid (AA), are investigated by means of DEA spectroscopy in vacuo. The experimental features are assigned in silico and discussed in relation to expected dissociative electron transfer processes in vivo with the support of density functional theory calculations and the polarizable continuum model. It is shown that formation of the two most abundant AA metabolites in living cells, namely monodehydroascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid, can be stimulated by cellular electron transfer to AA under reductive conditions. Prooxidant effects caused by AA are suggested to be mediated by hydroxyl radicals formation via the DEA mechanism. The involvement of excited electronic states under UV-irradiation in plants could open additional DEA channels leading to specific AA activity forbidden under dark state conditions. PMID:27074645

  18. Mechanical properties of nanophase materials

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.; Fougere, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has become possible in recent years to synthesize new materials under controlled conditions with constituent structures on a nanometer size scale (below 100 nm). These novel nanophase materials have grain-size dependent mechanical properties significantly different than those of their coarser-grained counterparts. For example, nanophase metals are much stronger and apparently less ductile than conventional metals, while nanophase ceramics are more ductile and more easily formed than conventional ceramics. The observed mechanical property changes are related to grain size limitations and/or the large percentage of atoms in grain boundary environments; they can also be affected by such features as flaw populations, strains and impurity levels that can result from differing synthesis and processing methods. An overview of what is presently known about the mechanical properties of nanophase materials, including both metals and ceramics, is presented. Some possible atomic mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior in these materials are considered in light of their unique structures.

  19. Applicability of failure criteria and empirical relations of mechanical rock properties from outcrop analogue samples for wellbore stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, D.; Philipp, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of failure criteria, Young's modulus and uniaxial and tensile strengths, are important to avoid borehole instabilities and adapt the drilling plan on rock mechanical conditions. By this means, a considerable reduction of the total drilling costs can be achieved. This is desirable to enlarge the profit margin of geothermal projects which is rather small compared with hydrocarbon projects. Because core material is rare we aim at predicting in situ rock properties from outcrop analogue samples which are easy and cheap to provide. The comparability of properties determined from analogue samples with samples from depths is analysed by performing conventional triaxial tests, uniaxial compressive strength tests and Brazilian tests of both quarry and equivalent core samples. Equivalent means that the quarry sample is of the same stratigraphic age and of comparable sedimentary facies and composition as the associated core sample. We determined the parameters uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), Young's modulus, and tensile strength for 35 rock samples from quarries and 14 equivalent core samples from the North German Basin. A subgroup of these samples, consisting of one volcanic rock sample, three sandstone and three carbonate samples, was used for triaxial tests. In all cases, comparability of core samples with quarry samples is evaluated using thin section analyses. For UCS versus Young's modulus and tensile strengths, linear- and non-linear regression analyses were performed. We repeat regression separately for clastic rock samples or carbonate rock samples only as well as for quarry samples or core samples only. Empirical relations have high statistical significance and properties of core samples lie within 90% prediction bands of developed regression functions of quarry samples. With triaxial tests we determined linearized Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, expressed in both principal stresses and shear and normal stresses, for quarry samples. Comparison with

  20. The Fundamental Property Relation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a basic equation in thermodynamics (the fundamental property relation), focusing on a logical approach to the development of the relation where effects other than thermal, compression, and exchange of matter with the surroundings are considered. Also demonstrates erroneous treatments of the relation in three well-known textbooks. (JN)

  1. Mechanical Properties of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Robert; Becerril, Joseph; Jeevarajan, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Many physiologic and pathologic processes alter the biomechanical properties of the tissue they affect, and these changes may be manifest at the single cell level. The normal and abnormal mechanical properties of a given cell type can be established with the aid of an atomic force microscope (AFM), nonetheless, consistency in the area of the tip has been a mayor limitation of using the AFM for quantitative measurements of mechanical properties. This project attempts to overcome this limitation by using materials with a known elastic modulus, which resembles the one of the cell, to create force-deformation curves to calculate the area of indentation by means of Hooke s Law (sigma = E(epsilon)), which states that stress (sigma) is proportional to the strain (epsilon) where the constant of proportionality, E, is called the Young s modulus, also referred as the elastic modulus. Hook s Law can be rearranged to find the area of indentation (Area= Force/ E(epsilon)), where the indentation force is defined by the means of the added mass spring calibration method.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmenter, Kelly E.; Milstein, Frederick

    1995-01-01

    Aerogels are extremely low density solids that are characterized by a high porosity and pore sizes on the order of nanometers. Their low thermal conductivity and sometimes transparent appearance make them desirable for applications such as insulation in cryogenic vessels and between double paned glass in solar architecture. An understanding of the mechanical properties of aerogels is necessary before aerogels can be used in load bearing applications. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of various types of fiber-reinforced silica aerogels was investigated with hardness, compression, tension and shear tests. Particular attention was paid to the effects of processing parameters, testing conditions, storage environment, and age on the aerogels' mechanical response. The results indicate that the addition of fibers to the aerogel matrix generally resulted in softer, weaker materials with smaller elastic moduli. Furthermore, the testing environment significantly affected compression results. Tests in ethanol show an appreciable amount of scatter, and are not consistent with results for tests in air. In fact, the compression specimens appeared to crack and begin to dissolve upon exposure to the ethanol solution. This is consistent with the inherent hydrophobic nature of these aerogels. In addition, the aging process affected the aerogels' mechanical behavior by increasing their compressive strength and elastic moduli while decreasing their strain at fracture. However, desiccation of the specimens did not appreciably affect the mechanical properties, even though it reduced the aerogel density by removing trapped moisture. Finally, tension and shear test results indicate that the shear strength of the aerogels exceeds the tensile strength. This is consistent with the response of brittle materials. Future work should concentrate on mechanical testing at cryogenic temperatures, and should involve more extensive tensile tests. Moreover, before the mechanical response

  3. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  4. Strain rate sensitivity of mechanical properties and related thermal activation process in a two-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Kim, Y.W.

    1997-12-31

    Tensile properties of a two-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide with duplex microstructure are tested under different strain rates from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1} at temperature from 1,123 K to 1,273 K. It is found that there exists approximate linear relationship between the flow stresses and the logarithm of the strain rate at different temperatures. The strain rate sensitivity can be explained by thermal activation theory, and dislocation climbing is identified as the rate controlling mechanism.

  5. Woven TPS Mechanical Property Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Gregory Lewis; Kao, David Jan-Woei; Stackpoole, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Woven Thermal Protection Systems (WTPS) is a relatively new program funded by the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The WTPS approach to producing TPS architectures uses precisely engineered 3-D weaving techniques that allow tailoring material characteristics needed to meet specific mission requirements. A series of mechanical tests were performed to evaluate performance of different weave types, and get a better understanding of failure modes expected in these three-dimensional architectures. These properties will aid in material down selection and guide selection of the appropriate WTPS for a potential mission.

  6. Glaucoma-related Changes in the Mechanical Properties and Collagen Micro-architecture of the Human Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Pijanka, Jacek K.; Jefferys, Joan L.; Goel, Adhiraj; Quigley, Harry A.; Boote, Craig; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The biomechanical behavior of the sclera determines the level of mechanical insult from intraocular pressure to the axons and tissues of the optic nerve head, as is of interest in glaucoma. In this study, we measure the collagen fiber structure and the strain response, and estimate the material properties of glaucomatous and normal human donor scleras. Methods Twenty-two posterior scleras from normal and diagnosed glaucoma donors were obtained from an eyebank. Optic nerve cross-sections were graded to determine the presence of axon loss. The specimens were subjected to pressure-controlled inflation testing. Full-field displacement maps were measured by digital image correlation (DIC) and spatially differentiated to compute surface strains. Maps of the collagen fiber structure across the posterior sclera of each inflated specimen were obtained using synchrotron wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). Finite element (FE) models of the posterior scleras, incorporating a specimen-specific representation of the collagen structure, were constructed from the DIC-measured geometry. An inverse finite element analysis was developed to estimate the stiffness of the collagen fiber and inter-fiber matrix. Results The differences between glaucoma and non-glaucoma eyes were small in magnitude. Sectorial variations of degree of fiber alignment and peripapillary scleral strain significantly differed between normal and diagnosed glaucoma specimens. Meridional strains were on average larger in diagnosed glaucoma eyes compared with normal specimens. Non-glaucoma specimens had on average the lowest matrix and fiber stiffness, followed by undamaged glaucoma eyes, and damaged glaucoma eyes but the differences in stiffness were not significant. Conclusion The observed biomechanical and microstructural changes could be the result of tissue remodeling occuring in glaucoma and are likely to alter the mechanical environment of the optic nerve head and contribute to axonal damage. PMID

  7. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  8. Structure-based analysis of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of cavity-containing proteins--case study of plant pathogenesis-related proteins of class 10.

    PubMed

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2014-01-01

    We provide theoretical comparisons of the physical properties of eighteen proteins with the pathogenesis-related proteins of class 10 (PR-10) fold, which is characterized by a large hydrophobic cavity enclosed between a curved β-sheet and a variable α-helix. Our novel algorithm to calculate the volume of internal cavities within protein structures is used to demonstrate that, although the sizes of the cavities of the investigated PR-10 proteins vary significantly, their other physical properties, such as thermodynamic and mechanical parameters or parameters related to folding, are very close. The largest variations (in the order of 20%) are predicted for the optimal folding times. We show that, on squeezing, the PR-10 proteins behave differently from typical virus capsids. PMID:24206126

  9. Influence of relative humidity on the mechanical and drug release properties of theophylline pellets coated with an acrylic polymer containing methylparaben as a non-traditional plasticizer.

    PubMed

    Wu, C; McGinity, J W

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the mechanical and dissolution properties of theophylline pellets coated with Eudragit((R)) RS 30 D/RL 30 D containing methylparaben (MP) as a non-traditional plasticizer. The coated beads were stored at 23 degrees C and at different relative humidities (0, 29, 51, 75 and 84% RH). The effect of storage conditions on the rate of drug release from coated beads was determined in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution. The mechanical properties, including tensile strength and Young's modulus, of individual beads were determined by a diametral compression method with a Chatillon((R)) tension/compression apparatus. The morphology of the intact and fractured beads was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The moisture content of the polymeric films was determined using a Karl Fischer coulometric moisture analyzer. The results from the mechanical studies demonstrated that an increase in the relative humidity resulted in a decrease in the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the coated beads. SEM photographs showed that coated beads stored at 0% RH exhibited brittle fracture failure. The coated beads stored at 84% RH showed ductile behavior, which was attributed to the hydroplasticization effect on the acrylic polymer due to the uptake of moisture. The moisture content in the films was also shown to influence the rate of drug release from Eudragit((R)) RS 30 D/RL 30 D coated beads containing MP as the plasticizer. The change in release profiles could be minimized when the relative humidity was reduced to zero. The dissolution rate of theophylline from the coated beads decreased when stored at high relative humidities. This trend was reversed when the coated beads that were stored at 84% RH for 5 weeks, were then equilibrated at 0% RH. PMID:10962239

  10. Relating mechanical properties with dislocation cores in Ni{sub 3}Ge-Fe{sub 3}Ge intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, T.J.; Kumar, M.; Hemker, K.J.

    1997-12-31

    The transition from positive to negative temperature dependence of 0.2% yield stress is investigated in the model pseudo-binary Ni{sub 3}Ge-Fe{sub 3}Ge system. Ni{sub 3}Ge and Fe{sub 3}Ge, both L1{sub 2} intermetallic alloys, show complete solid solubility as Fe is continuously substituted for Ni across the composition range. However, Ni{sub 3}Ge exhibits the yield stress anomaly, whereas the yield stress of Fe{sub 3}Ge shows a normal decline with temperature. Mechanical testing has verified this behavior, with the anomalous behavior gradually disappearing with increasing Fe content. It is proposed that this transition results from changes in the structure of dissociated superdislocation cores. Alloys with anomalous behavior from this system are observed to contain curvilinear superdislocations that glide on the cube planes. Results from mechanical testing are presented and correlated with TEM observations of deformation structures. These results are discussed in light of planar fault energies determined through computer simulations of images.

  11. On the Relative Relevance of Subject-Specific Geometries and Degeneration-Specific Mechanical Properties for the Study of Cell Death in Human Intervertebral Disk Models

    PubMed Central

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M.; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F.; van Rijsbergen, Marc M.; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration. PMID:25717471

  12. On the relative relevance of subject-specific geometries and degeneration-specific mechanical properties for the study of cell death in human intervertebral disk models.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F; van Rijsbergen, Marc M; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration. PMID:25717471

  13. Mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimpoor, Amir A.; Erb, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Due to their excellent wear and corrosion properties, nanocrystalline cobalt and several cobalt alloys made by electrodeposition are currently being developed as environmentally benign replacement coatings for hard chromium electrodeposits. The focus of this study is on the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline cobalt, which are currently not well understood. A comparison is presented for hardness, tensile properties, Charpy impact properties and fracture surface analysis of both nanocrystalline (grain size: 12 nm) and conventional polycrystalline (grain size: 4.8 m) cobalt. It is shown that the hardness and tensile strength of nanocrystalline cobalt is 2-3 times higher than for polycrystalline cobalt. However, in contrast to other nanocrystalline materials tested previously, nanocrystalline cobalt retains considerable ductility with elongation to fracture values up to 7%.

  14. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films. PMID:25829623

  15. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  16. Mechanical properties of metal dihydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter A.; Snow, Clark S.

    2016-03-01

    First-principles calculations are used to characterize the bulk elastic properties of cubic and tetragonal phase metal dihydrides, \\text{M}{{\\text{H}}2} {\\text{M}   =  Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, lanthanides} to gain insight into the mechanical properties that govern the aging behavior of rare-earth di-tritides as the constituent 3H, tritium, decays into 3He. As tritium decays, helium is inserted in the lattice, the helium migrates and collects into bubbles, that then can ultimately create sufficient internal pressure to rupture the material. The elastic properties of the materials are needed to construct effective mesoscale models of the process of bubble growth and fracture. Dihydrides of the scandium column and most of the rare-earths crystalize into a cubic phase, while dihydrides from the next column, Ti, Zr, and Hf, distort instead into the tetragonal phase, indicating incipient instabilities in the phase and potentially significant changes in elastic properties. We report the computed elastic properties of these dihydrides, and also investigate the off-stoichiometric phases as He or vacancies accumulate. As helium builds up in the cubic phase, the shear moduli greatly soften, converting to the tetragonal phase. Conversely, the tetragonal phases convert very quickly to cubic with the removal of H from the lattice, while the cubic phases show little change with removal of H. The source and magnitude of the numerical and physical uncertainties in the modeling are analyzed and quantified to establish the level of confidence that can be placed in the computational results, and this quantified confidence is used to justify using the results to augment and even supplant experimental measurements.

  17. Mechanical properties of metal dihydrides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schultz, Peter A.; Snow, Clark S.

    2016-02-04

    First-principles calculations are used to characterize the bulk elastic properties of cubic and tetragonal phase metal dihydrides,more » $$\\text{M}{{\\text{H}}_{2}}$$ {$$\\text{M}$$ = Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, lanthanides} to gain insight into the mechanical properties that govern the aging behavior of rare-earth di-tritides as the constituent 3H, tritium, decays into 3He. As tritium decays, helium is inserted in the lattice, the helium migrates and collects into bubbles, that then can ultimately create sufficient internal pressure to rupture the material. The elastic properties of the materials are needed to construct effective mesoscale models of the process of bubble growth and fracture. Dihydrides of the scandium column and most of the rare-earths crystalize into a cubic phase, while dihydrides from the next column, Ti, Zr, and Hf, distort instead into the tetragonal phase, indicating incipient instabilities in the phase and potentially significant changes in elastic properties. We report the computed elastic properties of these dihydrides, and also investigate the off-stoichiometric phases as He or vacancies accumulate. As helium builds up in the cubic phase, the shear moduli greatly soften, converting to the tetragonal phase. Conversely, the tetragonal phases convert very quickly to cubic with the removal of H from the lattice, while the cubic phases show little change with removal of H. Finally, the source and magnitude of the numerical and physical uncertainties in the modeling are analyzed and quantified to establish the level of confidence that can be placed in the computational results, and this quantified confidence is used to justify using the results to augment and even supplant experimental measurements.« less

  18. Relation between electrical properties of aerosol-deposited BaTiO3 thin films and their mechanical hardness measured by nano-indentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To achieve a high capacitance density for embedded decoupling capacitor applications, the aerosol deposition (AD) process was applied as a thin film deposition process. BaTiO3 films were fabricated on Cu substrates by the AD process at room temperature, and the film thickness was reduced to confirm the limit of the critical minimum thickness for dielectric properties. As a result, the BaTiO3 thin films that were less than 1-μm thick showed unstable electric properties owing to their high leakage currents. Therefore, to overcome this problem, the causes of the high leakage currents were investigated. In this study, it was confirmed that by comparing BaTiO3 thin films on Cu substrates with those on stainless steels (SUS) substrates, macroscopic defects and rough interfaces between films and substrates influence the leakage currents. Moreover, based on the deposition mechanism of the AD process, it was considered that the BaTiO3 thin films on Cu substrates with thicknesses of less than 1 μm are formed with chinks and weak particle-to-particle bonding, giving rise to leakage currents. In order to confirm the relation between the above-mentioned surface morphologies and the dielectric behavior, the hardness of BaTiO3 films on Cu and SUS substrates was investigated by nano-indentation. Consequently, we proposed that the chinks and weak particle-to-particle bonding in the BaTiO3 thin films with thicknesses of less than 0.5 μm on Cu substrates could be the main cause of the high leakage currents. PMID:22616759

  19. Mechanical properties of crosslinked polymer coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csernica, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment are to: fabricate and test thin films to explore relations between a polymer's structure and its mechanical properties; expose students to testing methods for hardness and impact energy that are simple to perform and which have results that are easy to comprehend; show importance of polymer properties in materials that students frequently encounter; illustrate a system which displays a tradeoff between strength and impact resistance, the combination of which would need to be optimized for a particular application; and to expose students to coatings technology and testing.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  1. Mechanical properties of titanium connectors.

    PubMed

    Neo, T K; Chai, J; Gilbert, J L; Wozniak, W T; Engelman, M J

    1996-01-01

    The tensile mechanical properties of welded titanium joints were studied, and intact titanium was used as controls. Welded joints were fabricated with either a stereographic laser-welding technique or a gas tungsten arc welding technique. The effect of heat treatment following a simulated porcelain application was also investigated. Heat-treated laser welds had significantly lower ultimate tensile strengths. Heat treatment had no effect on the modulus of elasticity or elongation, but generally significantly decreased the yield strength of the titanium specimens. The gas tungsten are welding specimens had significantly higher yield strengths and elastic moduli than the other two groups. The elongation of the control specimens was significantly greater than the elongation of the gas tungsten arc welding specimens, which was in turn significantly higher than that of the laser-welded specimens. PMID:8957877

  2. Mechanical Properties of Primary Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Christopher; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the primary cilium, long thought to be a vestigial cellular appendage with no function, is involved in a multitude of sensory functions. One example, interesting from both a biophysical and medical standpoint, is the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells, which acts as a mechanosensitive flow sensor. Genetic defects in ciliary function can cause, e.g., polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The material properties of these non-motile, microtubule-based 9 +0 cilia, and the way they are anchored to the cell cytoskeleton, are important to know if one wants to understand the mechano-electrochemical response of these cells, which is mediated by their cilia. We have probed the mechanical properties, boundary conditions, and dynamics of the cilia of MDCK cells using optical traps and DIC/fluorescence microscopy. We found evidence for both elastic relaxation of the cilia themselves after bending and for compliance in the intracellular anchoring structures. Angular and positional fluctuations of the cilia reflect both thermal excitations and cellular driving forces.

  3. Mechanical properties of additively manufactured octagonal honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-12-01

    Honeycomb structures have found numerous applications as structural and biomedical materials due to their favourable properties such as low weight, high stiffness, and porosity. Application of additive manufacturing and 3D printing techniques allows for manufacturing of honeycombs with arbitrary shape and wall thickness, opening the way for optimizing the mechanical and physical properties for specific applications. In this study, the mechanical properties of honeycomb structures with a new geometry, called octagonal honeycomb, were investigated using analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. An additive manufacturing technique, namely fused deposition modelling, was used to fabricate the honeycomb from polylactic acid (PLA). The honeycombs structures were then mechanically tested under compression and the mechanical properties of the structures were determined. In addition, the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories were used for deriving analytical relationships for elastic modulus, yield stress, Poisson's ratio, and buckling stress of this new design of honeycomb structures. Finite element models were also created to analyse the mechanical behaviour of the honeycombs computationally. The analytical solutions obtained using Timoshenko beam theory were close to computational results in terms of elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and yield stress, especially for relative densities smaller than 25%. The analytical solutions based on the Timoshenko analytical solution and the computational results were in good agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the elastic properties of the proposed honeycomb structure were compared to those of other honeycomb structures such as square, triangular, hexagonal, mixed, diamond, and Kagome. The octagonal honeycomb showed yield stress and elastic modulus values very close to those of regular hexagonal honeycombs and lower than the other considered honeycombs. PMID:27612831

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Porous Mullite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Chwan-Hai Harold

    Mullite (3 Al2O3 : 2 SiO2) is a technologically important ceramic due to its thermal stability, corrosion resistance, and mechanical robustness. One variant, porous acicular mullite (ACM), has a unique needle-like microstructure and is the material platform for The Dow Chemical Company's diesel particulate filter AERIFY(TM). The investigation described herein focuses on the microstructure-mechanical property relationships in acicular mullites as well as those with traditional porous microstructures with the goal of illuminating the critical factors in determining their modulus, strength, and toughness. Mullites with traditional pore morphologies were made to serve as references via slipcasting of a kaolinite-alumina-starch slurry. The starch was burned out to leave behind a pore network, and the calcined body was then reaction-sintered at 1600C to form mullite. The samples had porosities of approximately 60%. Pore size and shape were altered by using different starch templates, and pore size was found to influence the stiffness and toughness. The ACM microstructure was varied along three parameters: total porosity, pore size, and needle size. Total porosity was found to dominate the mechanical behavior of ACM, while increases in needle and pore size increased the toughness at lower porosities. ACM was found to have much improved (˜130%) mechanical properties relative to its non-acicular counterpart at the same porosity. A second set of investigations studied the role of the intergranular glassy phase which wets the needle intersections of ACM. Removal of the glassy phase via an HF etch reduced the mechanical properties by ˜30%, highlighting the intergranular phase's importance to the enhanced mechanical properties of ACM. The composition of the glassy phase was altered by doping the ACM precursor with magnesium and neodymium. Magnesium doping resulted in ACM with greatly reduced fracture strength and toughness. Studies showed that the mechanical properties of the

  5. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ˜1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon.

  6. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng; Chen, Xi

    2015-12-21

    Mechanical properties of phosphorene nanoribbons and oxides are investigated by using density functional theory. It is found that the ideal strength of nanoribbon decreases in comparison with that of 2D phosphorene. The Young's modulus of armchair nanoribbon has a remarkable size effect because of the edge relaxations. The analysis of the stress-strain relation indicates that, owing to chemisorbed oxygen atoms, the ideal strength and Young's modulus of 2D phosphorene oxide are greatly reduced along the zigzag direction, especially upon high oxidation ratios. In addition, strain and oxidation have significant impacts on phonon dispersion.

  8. Different mechanical properties in Seldinger guide wires

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Most central venous catheters are placed using Seldinger guide wires. EN ISO 11070 is the guideline for testing guide wire flexing performance and tensile strength, and we can safely assume that guide wires in use meet these requirements. Unfortunately, EN ISO 11070 guidelines do not reflect the clinical requirements and we continue to see mechanical failures and their associated complications. Material and Methods: This in vitro study was performed in an accredited laboratory. With regard to flexing, we: (1) Established the minimum flexing performance needed to meet clinical requirements, (2) developed flexing performance tests which mimic clinical requirement, and (3) evaluated the mechanical properties of various guide wires relative to these requirements. With regard to tensile strength, we used the testing method prescribed in ISO 11070, but did not end the test at 5 Newton (N). We continued until the guide wire was damaged, or we reached maximum tractive force. We then did a wire-to-wire comparison. We examined two basic wire constructions, monofil and core and coil. Results: Tensile strength: All wires tested, except one, met EN ISO 11070 requirements for 5 N tensile strength. The mean of the wire types tested ranged from 15.06 N to 257.76 N. Flexing performance: None of the wires kinked. The monofil had no evidence of bending. Two core/coil wires displayed minor bending (angle 1.5°). All other wires displayed bending angles between 22.5° and 43.0°. Conclusion: We recommend that: (1) Clinicians use guide wires with high-end mechanical properties, (2) EN ISO 11070 incorporate our flexing test into their testing method, raise the flexing requirement to kink-proof, (3) and raise the tensile strength requirement to a minimum of 30 N, and (3) all manufacturers and suppliers be required to display mechanical properties of all guide wire, and guide wire kits sold. PMID:26702209

  9. Mechanical properties of stapedial annular ligament.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiangming; Nakmali, Don

    2011-04-01

    Stapedial annular ligament (SAL) provides a sealed but mobile boundary between the stapes footplate and oval window bony wall. Mechanical properties of the SAL affect the transmission of ossicular movement into the cochlea in sound conduction. However, the mechanical properties of this tissue have never been investigated due to its complexity. In this paper, we report measurement of the viscoelastic properties of SAL on human cadaver temporal bones using a micro-material testing system with digital image correlation analysis. The measured load-deformation relations of SAL samples were converted into shear stress-shear strain relationship, stress relaxation function, and ultimate shear stress and shear strain of the SAL. The hyperelastic Ogden model was used to describe constitutive behavior of the SAL and a 3D finite element model of the experimental setup with SAL was created for assessing the effects of loading variation and measurement errors on results. The study demonstrates that the human SAL is a typical viscoelastic material with hysteresis, nonlinear stress-strain relationship and stress relaxation function. The shear modulus changes from 3.6 to 220 kPa when the shear stress increases from 2 to 140 kPa. These results provide useful information on quasi-static behavior of the SAL. PMID:21112232

  10. Composition-related structural, thermal and mechanical properties of Ba1-xSrxTiO3 ceramics (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiga, W.; Sitko, D.; Piekarczyk, W.; Jankowska-Sumara, I.; Kalvane, M.

    2015-07-01

    The Ba1-xSrxTiO3 (BST) ceramics were prepared by conventional ceramic method. The crystalline structure and morphology were studied by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Experimental results show that increase of sintering temperature leads to an uncontrolled precipitating of the phase with a lower content of Ti. The dielectric constant and specific heat as a function of composition and temperature were investigated. The increasing concentration of Sr ions leads to a shift of the Curie point below room temperature. To determine the elastic constants (the Young's modulus E, the shear modulus G and the Poisson's ratio v) of BST, a method of measurement of the longitudinal (νL) and transverse (νT) ultrasonic wave velocities for this type of material was developed. The structural, dielectric and mechanical properties of BST ceramics were discussed in terms of microstructure and chemical composition

  11. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1995-01-01

    A composition and method of preparing YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T.sub.c. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  12. Enhancement of mechanical properties of 123 superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.

    1995-04-25

    A composition and method are disclosed of preparing YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} superconductor. Addition of tin oxide containing compounds to YBCO superconductors results in substantial improvement of fracture toughness and other mechanical properties without affect on T{sub c}. About 5-20% additions give rise to substantially improved mechanical properties.

  13. Linking properties to microstructure through multiresolution mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVeigh, Cahal James

    The macroscale mechanical and physical properties of materials are inherently linked to the underlying microstructure. Traditional continuum mechanics theories have focused on approximating the heterogeneous microstructure as a continuum, which is conducive to a partial differential equation mathematical description. Although this makes large scale simulation of material much more efficient than modeling the detailed microstructure, the relationship between microstructure and macroscale properties becomes unclear. In order to perform computational materials design, material models must clearly relate the key underlying microstructural parameters (cause) to macroscale properties (effect). In this thesis, microstructure evolution and instability events are related to macroscale mechanical properties through a new multiresolution continuum analysis approach. The multiresolution nature of this theory allows prediction of the evolving magnitude and scale of deformation as a direct function of the changing microstructure. This is achieved via a two-pronged approach: (a) Constitutive models which track evolving microstructure are developed and calibrated to direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the microstructure. (b) The conventional homogenized continuum equations of motion are extended via a virtual power approach to include extra coupled microscale stresses and stress couples which are active at each characteristic length scale within the microstructure. The multiresolution approach is applied to model the fracture toughness of a cemented carbide, failure of a steel alloy under quasi-static loading conditions and the initiation and velocity of adiabatic shear bands under high speed dynamic loading. In each case the multiresolution analysis predicts the important scale effects which control the macroscale material response. The strain fields predicted in the multiresolution continuum analyses compare well to those observed in direct numerical simulations of the

  14. Mechanical properties of 3D ceramic nanolattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Lucas

    Developments in advanced nanoscale fabrication techniques have allowed for the creation of 3-dimensional hierarchical structural meta-materials that can be designed with arbitrary geometry. These structures can be made on length scales spanning multiple orders of magnitude, from tens of nanometers to hundreds of microns. The smallest features are controllable on length scales where materials have been shown to exhibit size effects in their mechanical properties. Combining novel nanoscale mechanical properties with a 3-dimensional architecture enables the creation of new classes of materials with tunable and unprecedented mechanical properties. We present the fabrication and mechanical deformation of hollow tube alumina nanolattices that were fabricated using two-photon lithography direct laser writing (DLW), atomic layer deposition (ALD), and oxygen plasma etching. Nanolattices were designed in a number of different geometries including octet-truss, octahedron, and 3D Kagome. Additionally, a number of structural parameters were varied including tube wall thickness (t) , tube major axis (a) , and unit cell size (L) . The resulting nanolattices had a range of densities from ρ = 4 to 250 mg/cm3. Uniaxial compression and cyclic loading tests were performed on the nanolattices to obtain the yield strength and modulus. In these tests, a marked change in the deformation response was observed when the wall thickness was reduced below 20nm; thick-walled nanolattices (t>20nm) underwent catastrophic, brittle failure, which transitioned to a gradual, ductile-like deformation as wall thickness was reduced. Thick-walled nanolattices also exhibited no recovery after compression, while thin-walled structures demonstrated notable recovery, with some recovering by 98% after compression to 50% strain and by 80% when compressed to 90% strain. Across all geometries, unit cell sizes, and wall thicknesses, we found a consistent power law relation between strength and modulus with

  15. Mechanical properties of low dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Deepika

    Recent advances in low dimensional materials (LDMs) have paved the way for unprecedented technological advancements. The drive to reduce the dimensions of electronics has compelled researchers to devise newer techniques to not only synthesize novel materials, but also tailor their properties. Although micro and nanomaterials have shown phenomenal electronic properties, their mechanical robustness and a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationship are critical for their use in practical applications. However, the challenges in probing these mechanical properties dramatically increase as their dimensions shrink, rendering the commonly used techniques inadequate. This dissertation focuses on developing techniques for accurate determination of elastic modulus of LDMs and their mechanical responses under tensile and shear stresses. Fibers with micron-sized diameters continuously undergo tensile and shear deformations through many phases of their processing and applications. Significant attention has been given to their tensile response and their structure-tensile properties relations are well understood, but the same cannot be said about their shear responses or the structure-shear properties. This is partly due to the lack of appropriate instruments that are capable of performing direct shear measurements. In an attempt to fill this void, this dissertation describes the design of an inexpensive tabletop instrument, referred to as the twister, which can measure the shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of micron-sized individual fibers. An automated system applies a pre-determined twist to the fiber sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and KevlarRTM 119, were found to have G = 17 and 2.4 GPa, respectively. In addition to measuring the shear

  16. Function-related adaptations of ultrastructure, mineral phase distribution and mechanical properties in the incisive cuticle of mandibles of Porcellio scaber Latreille, 1804.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julia; Fabritius, Helge-Otto; Griesshaber, Erika; Ziegler, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    In terrestrial isopods the mandibles consist of a corpus carrying strong muscle tissue, and a pars incisiva (PI) that cuts dry leaves into smaller ingestible pieces. We studied the cuticle of the PI of Porcellio scaber in order to understand region-dependent differences in its ultrastructure, composition, and the resulting mechanical properties, employing several microscopic and analytical techniques as well as nanoindentation experiments. The cuticle of the incisive tip is not mineralized and consists of an unusually thick epicuticle containing thin fibrils, two subjacent cuticular layers, and a central core containing fibrils of different orientation, either longitudinal or circumferential. A thick epicuticle of the middle region just behind the tip projects long epicuticular extensions into the subjacent endocuticle, likely to prevent delamination. A distinct exocuticular layer is lacking in the middle region. Most chitin-protein fibrils within the endocuticle are oriented in parallel pointing towards the tip. Surprisingly, the middle region is mineralized by amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) only. Near the base, ACP is successively replaced by amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite is restricted to a distal layer in the base. At the transition between middle and base, the epicuticle forms a hybrid material containing fibrils of the exocuticle. Nanoindentation experiments reveal an increase of the stiffness and hardness from the tip towards the base and significantly higher values on transversal in comparison to longitudinal planes. The results suggest that ultrastructure and composition are adapted for conveying high forces from a rather thin cutting edge to the stable base of the PI. PMID:25230049

  17. Mechanical Properties of Cellular Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.; Dienes, J.K.

    1999-07-09

    The authors calculated the stress-strain relation for elastomeric foam from an ab initio theory, which shows that the plateau and densification regions should be described by a hyperbola. The theory seems to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of sheep horn.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The sheep horn presents outstanding mechanical properties of impact resistance and energy absorption, which suits the need of the vehicle bumper design, but the mechanism behind this phenomenon is less investigated. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the sheep horn of Small Tailed Han Sheep (Ovis aries) living in northeast China were investigated in this article. The effect of sampling position and orientation of the sheep horn sheath on mechanical properties were researched by tensile and compression tests. Meanwhile, the surface morphology and microstructure of the sheep horn were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation mechanism of the mechanical properties of the sheep horn was investigated by biological coupling analysis. The analytical results indicated that the outstanding mechanical properties of the sheep horn are determined by configuration, structure, surface morphology and material coupling elements. These biological coupling elements make the sheep horn possess super characteristics of crashworthiness and energy absorption through the internal coupling mechanism. We suppose that these findings would make a difference in vehicle bumper design. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:664-674, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184115

  19. Mechanical property characterization of intraply hybrid composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the mechanical properties of intraply hybrids made from graphite fiber/epoxy matrix hybridized with secondary S-glass or Kevlar 49 fiber composites is presented. The specimen stress-strain behavior was determined, showing that mechanical properties of intraply hybrid composites can be measured with available methods such as the ten-degree off-axis test for intralaminar shear, and conventional tests for tensile, flexure, and Izod impact properties. The results also showed that combinations of high modulus graphite/S-glass/epoxy matrix composites exist which yield intraply hybrid laminates with the best 'balanced' properties, and that the translation efficiency of mechanical properties from the constituent composites to intraply hybrids may be assessed with a simple equation.

  20. Relativity of representations in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A. C.

    2002-03-01

    Only the position representation is used in introductory quantum mechanics and the momentum representation is not usually presented until advanced undergraduate courses. To emphasize the relativity of the representations of the abstract formulation of quantum mechanics, two examples of representations related to the operators αX+(1-α)P and 1/2(XP+PX) are presented.

  1. Mechanical properties of icosahedral virus capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliegenthart, G. A.; Gompper, G.

    2007-12-01

    Virus capsids are self-assembled protein shells in the size range of 10 to 100 nanometers. The shells of DNA-viruses have to sustain large internal pressures while encapsulating and protecting the viral DNA. We employ computer simulations to study the mechanical properties of crystalline shells with icosahedral symmetry that serve as a model for virus capsids. The shells are positioned on a substrate and deformed by a uni-axial force excerted by a small bead. We predict the elastic response for small deformations, and the buckling transitions at large deformations. Both are found to depend strongly on the number N of elementary building blocks (capsomers), and the Föppl-von Kármán number γ which characterizes the relative importance of shear and bending elasticity.

  2. Tension-induced mechanical properties of stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Lele; Yang, Chuanghua; Wu, Liyuan; Han, Lihong; Song, Yuxin; Wang, Shumin; Lu, Pengfei

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, elastic properties of stanene under equiaxial or uniaxial tensions along armchair and zigzag directions are investigated by first-principles calculations. The stress-strain relation is calculated and the relaxation of the internal atom positions is analyzed. The high-order elastic constants are calculated by fitting the polynomial expressions. The Young’s modulus and Poisson ratio of the stanene is calculated to be 24.14 N/m and 0.39 N/m, respectively. The stanene exhibits lower Young’s modulus than those of the proceeding group IV elements, which is attributed to the smaller sp2-sp3 bond energy in stanene than those of silicene and germanene. Calculated values of ultimate stresses and strains, second-order elastic constants (SOCEs) and the in-plane Young’s modulus are all positive. It proves that stanene is mechanically stable.

  3. Mechanical properties of low tantalum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical property behavior of equiaxed cast B-1900 + Hf alloy as a function of tantalum content was studied. Tensile and stress rupture characterization was conducted on cast to size test bars containing tantalum at the 4.3% (standard level), 2.2% and 0% levels. Casting parameters were selected to duplicate conditions used to prepare test specimens for master metal heat qualification. The mechanical property results as well as results of microstructural/phase analysis of failed test bars are presented.

  4. Thigmomorphogenesis: on the mechanical properties of mechanically perturbed bean plants.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, M J; Telewski, F W; Cooke, P W

    1984-01-01

    The mechanical properties of control and mechanically perturbed (MP) bean stems (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cv. Cherokee wax) were compared. The rubbed plants were greatly hardened against mechanical rupture by previous MP. This hardening was due to a dramatic increase in the flexibility of the stems, but not in their stiffness. The MP-plants were able to bend more than 90 degree without breaking, whereas the control plants broke after just slight bending. A comparison with other work reveals that different species utilize different tactics for achieving similar resistance to rupture due to mechanical stress. PMID:11540788

  5. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Ag sintered alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mian; Zhang, Erlin; Zhang, Lan

    2016-05-01

    In this research, Ag element was selected as an antibacterial agent to develop an antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy by a powder metallurgy. The microstructure, phase constitution, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of the Ti-Ag sintered alloys have been systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, electrochemical measurements and antibacterial test. The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the antibacterial property and mechanical property as well as the anticorrosion property have been investigated. The microstructure results have shown that Ti-Ag phase, residual pure Ag and Ti were the mainly phases in Ti-Ag(S75) sintered alloy while Ti2Ag was synthesized in Ti-Ag(S10) sintered alloy. The mechanical test indicated that Ti-Ag sintered alloy showed a much higher hardness and the compressive yield strength than cp-Ti but the mechanical properties were slightly reduced with the increase of Ag content. Electrochemical results showed that Ag powder size had a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ag sintered alloy. Ag content increased the corrosion resistance in a dose dependent way under a homogeneous microstructure. Antibacterial tests have demonstrated that antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy was successfully prepared. It was also shown that the Ag powder particle size and the Ag content influenced the antibacterial activity seriously. The reduction in the Ag powder size was benefit to the improvement in the antibacterial property and the Ag content has to be at least 3wt.% in order to obtain a strong and stable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacterial mechanism was thought to be related to the Ti2Ag and its distribution. PMID:26952433

  6. Mechanical properties of mesoporous ceria nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Thi X T; Inkson, Beverley J; Möbus, Günter; Parker, Stephen C; Seal, Sudipta; Sayle, Dean C

    2014-12-01

    Architectural constructs are engineered to impart desirable mechanical properties facilitating bridges spanning a thousand meters and buildings nearly 1 km in height. However, do the same 'engineering-rules' translate to the nanoscale, where the architectural features are less than 0.0001 mm in size? Here, we calculate the mechanical properties of a porous ceramic functional material, ceria, as a function of its nanoarchitecture using molecular dynamics simulation and predict its yield strength to be almost two orders of magnitude higher than the parent bulk material. In particular, we generate models of nanoporous ceria with either a hexagonal or cubic array of one-dimensional pores and simulate their responses to mechanical load. We find that the mechanical properties are critically dependent upon the orientation between the crystal structure (symmetry, direction) and the pore structure (symmetry, direction). PMID:25322448

  7. Age Related Decline in Postural Control Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelmach, George E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied voluntary and reflexive mechanisms of postural control of young (N=8) and elderly (N=8) adults through measurement of reflexive reactions to large-fast and small-slow ankle rotation postural disturbances. Found reflexive mechanisms relatively intact for both groups although elderly appeared more disadvantaged when posture was under the…

  8. Two basic Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Angelow, Andrey

    2011-04-07

    In the present article, we discuss two types of uncertainty relations in Quantum Mechanics-multiplicative and additive inequalities for two canonical observables. The multiplicative uncertainty relation was discovered by Heisenberg. Few years later (1930) Erwin Schroedinger has generalized and made it more precise than the original. The additive uncertainty relation is based on the three independent statistical moments in Quantum Mechanics-Cov(q,p), Var(q) and Var(p). We discuss the existing symmetry of both types of relations and applicability of the additive form for the estimation of the total error.

  9. Two basic Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelow, Andrey

    2011-04-01

    In the present article, we discuss two types of uncertainty relations in Quantum Mechanics-multiplicative and additive inequalities for two canonical observables. The multiplicative uncertainty relation was discovered by Heisenberg. Few years later (1930) Erwin Schrödinger has generalized and made it more precise than the original. The additive uncertainty relation is based on the three independent statistical moments in Quantum Mechanics-Cov(q,p), Var(q) and Var(p). We discuss the existing symmetry of both types of relations and applicability of the additive form for the estimation of the total error.

  10. Fluid Mechanical Properties of Silkworm Fibroin Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Akira

    2005-11-01

    The aqueous solution behavior of silk fibroin is of interest due to the assembly and processing of this protein related to the spinning of protein fibers that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. To gain insight into the origins of this functional feature, it is desired to determine how the protein behaves under a range of solution conditions. Pure fibroin at different concentrations in water was studied for surface tension, as a measure of surfactancy. In addition, shear induced changes on these solutions in terms of structure and morphology was also determined. Fibroin solutions exhibited shear rate-sensitive viscosity changes and precipitated at a critical shear rate where a dramatic increase of 75-150% of the initial value was observed along with a decrease in viscosity. In surface tension measurements, critical micelle concentrations were in the range of 3-4% w/v. The influence of additional factors, such as sericin protein, divalent and monovalent cations, and pH on the solution behavior in relation to structural and morphological features will also be described.

  11. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  12. The mechanical properties of FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, I.; George, E.P.

    1996-12-31

    Only in the last few years has progress been made in obtaining reproducible mechanical properties data for FeAl. Two sets of observations are the foundation of this progress. The first is that the large vacancy concentrations that exist in FeAl at high temperature are easily retained at low temperature and that these strongly affect the low-temperature mechanical properties. The second is that RT ductility is adversely affected by water vapor. Purpose of this paper is not to present a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of FeAl but rather to highlight our understanding of key phenomena and to show how an understanding of the factors which control the yield strength and fracture behavior has followed the discovery of the above two effects. 87 refs, 9 figs.

  13. Generation of precedence relations for mechanical assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Sanderson, A. C.

    1989-01-01

    Planning of assembly sequences is essential to the manufacturing system design process. Several methodologies have been proposed to represent all the feasible assembly sequences. In this thesis, three algorithms are presented to generate three sets of precedence relations based on all the infeasible assembly tasks, all the infeasible assembly states, and all the feasible assembly sequences, respectively. The equivalence of the resulting sets of precedence relations to the AND/OR graph is established. A new property, the real time property, of a representation of assembly sequences is defined and discussed. A representation of assembly sequences is said to have the real time property, if it is possible to generate the next assembly task by testing locally in the representation, and it will guarantee that the generated assembly task will not lead the assembly sequence to a dead end situation, in which no feasible assembly task can be performed any more. It is shown that the correctness and completeness of one representation can not guarantee the real time property of the representation. It is proven that the directed graph representation and the set of precedence relations based on all the infeasible assembly states have the real time property, while the AND/OR graph representation and the set of precedence relations based on all the infeasible assembly tasks do not have the real time property. Finally in the thesis, the PLEIDEAS system, a PLanning Environment for Integrated DEsign of Assembly Systems, is described and illustrated by an example.

  14. Processing, texture and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landfermann, H.; Hausner, H.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to its favorable properties, in particular those shown at high temperatures, silicon carbide is of great interest for applications related to the construction of engines and turbines. Thus, silicon carbide could replace heat-resisting alloys with the objective to achieve a further increase in operational temperature. The present investigation is concerned with approaches which can provide silicon carbide material with suitable properties for the intended applications, taking into account the relations between characteristics of the raw material, material composition, sinter conditions, and results of the sintering process. The effects of density and texture formation on the mechanical properties are studied. It is found that a dense material with a fine-grained microstructure provides optimal mechanical properties, while any deviation from this ideal condition can lead to a considerable deterioration with respect to the material properties.

  15. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  17. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, L.; Babataheri, A.; Puech, P.-H.; Barakat, A. I.; Husson, J.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells’ actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D. PMID:26857265

  18. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation.

    PubMed

    Guillou, L; Babataheri, A; Puech, P-H; Barakat, A I; Husson, J

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells' actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D. PMID:26857265

  19. Dynamic monitoring of cell mechanical properties using profile microindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, L.; Babataheri, A.; Puech, P.-H.; Barakat, A. I.; Husson, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively inexpensive system to visualize adherent cells in profile while measuring their mechanical properties using microindentation. The setup allows simultaneous control of cell microenvironment by introducing a micropipette for the delivery of soluble factors or other cell types. We validate this technique against atomic force microscopy measurements and, as a proof of concept, measure the viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells in terms of an apparent stiffness and a dimensionless parameter that describes stress relaxation. Furthermore, we use this technique to monitor the time evolution of these mechanical properties as the cells’ actin is depolymerized using cytochalasin-D.

  20. Mechanical Properties Of Large Sodium Iodide Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry M.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents data on mechanical properties of large crystals of thallium-doped sodium iodide. Five specimens in shape of circular flat plates subjected to mechanical tests. Presents test results for each specimen as plots of differential pressure versus center displacement and differential pressure versus stress at center. Also tabulates raw data. Test program also developed procedure for screening candidate crystals for gamma-ray sensor. Procedure eliminates potentially weak crystals before installed and ensures material yielding kept to minimum.

  1. Mechanical properties of polygonal carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ling; Cao, Dapeng

    2012-08-01

    A group of polygonal carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) have been designed and their mechanical behavior was investigated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The research aimed at exploring the effects of structure, temperature, and strain rate on the mechanical properties. The results indicate that the Young's modulus of P-CNTs is lower than those of circumcircle carbon nanotubes (C-CNT). Moreover, with an increase in the number of sides to the polygons, the Young's modulus increases and is much closer to that of C-CNT. The effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of P-CNTs show that the higher temperature and slower strain rate result in a lower critical strain and weaker tensile strength. In addition, it was found that the critical strains of P-CNTs are dependent on the tube size. Finally, we used the transition-state theory model to predict the critical strain of P-CNTs at given experimental conditions. It is expected that this work could provide feasible means to manipulate the mechanical properties of novel P-CNTs and facilitate the mechanical application of nanostructures as potential electronic devices.A group of polygonal carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) have been designed and their mechanical behavior was investigated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The research aimed at exploring the effects of structure, temperature, and strain rate on the mechanical properties. The results indicate that the Young's modulus of P-CNTs is lower than those of circumcircle carbon nanotubes (C-CNT). Moreover, with an increase in the number of sides to the polygons, the Young's modulus increases and is much closer to that of C-CNT. The effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of P-CNTs show that the higher temperature and slower strain rate result in a lower critical strain and weaker tensile strength. In addition, it was found that the critical strains of P-CNTs are dependent on the tube size. Finally, we used the

  2. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  3. Relationship of the optical absorption and scattering properties with mechanical and structural properties of apple tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical absorption and scattering properties of fruit change with the physiological and biochemical activities in the tissue during ripening and postharvest storage. But it has not been well understood on how these changes are related to the structural and mechanical properties of fruit. This resear...

  4. Mechanical properties of lattice grid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hualin; Fang, Daining; Jin, Fengnian

    2008-08-01

    An equivalent continuum method only considering the stretching deformation of struts was used to study the in-plane stiffness and strength of planar lattice grid composite materials. The initial yield equations of lattices were deduced. Initial yield surfaces were depicted separately in different 3D and 2D stress spaces. The failure envelope is a polyhedron in 3D spaces and a polygon in 2D spaces. Each plane or line of the failure envelope is corresponding to the yield or buckling of a typical bar row. For lattices with more than three bar rows, subsequent yield of the other bar row after initial yield made the lattice achieve greater limit strength. The importance of the buckling strength of the grids was strengthened while the grids were relative sparse. The integration model of the method was used to study the nonlinear mechanical properties of strain hardening grids. It was shown that the integration equation could accurately model the complete stress-strain curves of the grids within small deformations.

  5. Supervisor security provision: correlates and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Shiri

    2014-06-01

    Attachment security in relationships is associated with several positive outcomes. Recently, researchers have applied attachment theory to employee-supervisor relationships. Two studies examined associations of supervisors' provision of attachment-related security with work-related outcomes and related underlying mechanisms. Participants completed measures of their supervisors' security provisions and of their own job satisfaction, organizational commitment, burnout, and performance. Supervisors' security provisions were associated with positive work-related outcomes, which were mediated by closeness behaviors (Study 1; N = 150, M age = 33.3 yr., SD = 9.6). These associations were also mediated by employees' sense of meaning at work when the supervisor was of the same sex (Study 2; N = 120, M age = 26.5 yr., SD = 5.0). Findings supported attachment-related dynamics in employee-supervisor relationships and suggested psychological mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:25074301

  6. Surface mechanical properties - effects of ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Herbert

    1981-05-01

    Ion implantation has been used to modify the mechanical properties of a wide range of metals and alloys. The affected properties which have been studied include friction and wear, erosion and fatigue. Both BCC and FCC systems have been examined, with the major effort being directed at the former, due to the strong influence of interstitial implantants on mechanical properties of BCC and because of the industrial utility of these alloys. In seeking the microstructural origins of these sometimes dramatic effects, researchers have employed numerous surface analysis techniques, including backscattering and electron spectroscopy, TEM, SEM, X-ray and Mössbauer analysis and internal friction measurements. The interactions of surface dislocation structures with implantation-induced imperfections, surface alloying, and precipitation phenomena are discussed. A review is given of the current status of activities as represented by a number of research groups.

  7. Mechanical Properties and Failure Mechanisms in Polycrystalline Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Joseph; Perriot, Romain; Oleynik, Ivan

    Large-scale growth of graphene using chemical vapor deposition produces polycrystalline material containing grain boundaries. Recent experiments demonstrate that polycrystalline graphene is nearly as strong as pristine. In this work, the mechanical properties of bi-crystal and polycrystalline graphene samples are investigated by simulating nano-indentation of a circular membrane using classical molecular dynamics and a novel Screened Environment Dependent Reactive Bond Order (SED-REBO) potential. The failure mechanisms and crack propagation in graphene samples containing grain boundaries are also discussed.

  8. Isotropic microscale mechanical properties of coral skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Luca; Molinari, Alan; Fantazzini, Paola; Dauphen, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Caroselli, Erik; Prada, Fiorella; Goffredo, Stefano; Di Giosia, Matteo; Reggi, Michela; Falini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Scleractinian corals are a major source of biogenic calcium carbonate, yet the relationship between their skeletal microstructure and mechanical properties has been scarcely studied. In this work, the skeletons of two coral species: solitary Balanophyllia europaea and colonial Stylophora pistillata, were investigated by nanoindentation. The hardness HIT and Young's modulus EIT were determined from the analysis of several load–depth data on two perpendicular sections of the skeletons: longitudinal (parallel to the main growth axis) and transverse. Within the experimental and statistical uncertainty, the average values of the mechanical parameters are independent on the section's orientation. The hydration state of the skeletons did not affect the mechanical properties. The measured values, EIT in the 76–77 GPa range, and HIT in the 4.9–5.1 GPa range, are close to the ones expected for polycrystalline pure aragonite. Notably, a small difference in HIT is observed between the species. Different from corals, single-crystal aragonite and the nacreous layer of the seashell Atrina rigida exhibit clearly orientation-dependent mechanical properties. The homogeneous and isotropic mechanical behaviour of the coral skeletons at the microscale is correlated with the microstructure, observed by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the longitudinal and transverse sections. PMID:25977958

  9. Improvement of mechanical properties of glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbay, Ismail Hakki Cengizhan; Budakoglu, Refika; Zayim, Esra Ozkan

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to enhance the mechanical and optical properties of glass substrates with thin films by the sol-gel method. TiO2-SiO2 binary system and Ta2O5 were deposited on glass substrates with high transparency. Ring-on-ring flexure and scratch tests were the main mechanical characterization tests. Herein, we report that the thin films can be used to enhance the mechanical properties of the glass substrates efficiently and effectively. TiO2-SiO2 binary system shows more than two times and Ta2O5 thin films show nearly three times better ultimate strength in the ring-on-ring flexure test. Besides, Ta2O5 thin film samples show superior scratch resistance. Additionally, the finite element method was also used to check the conformity in the application of mechanical properties of composite materials. It is also worth noting that, the finite element method can be used to accurately analyze the mechanical stability of composite materials. The use of the finite element method can reduce the total number of experimental trials without losing reliability.

  10. Mechanics of instability-related delimination growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1988-01-01

    Local buckling of a delaminated group of plies can lead to higher interlaminar stresses and delamination growth. The mechanics of instability-related delamination growth (IRDG) had been described previously for the through-width delamination. This paper describes the mechanics of IRDG for the embedded delamination subjected to either uniaxial or axisymmetric loads. The mechanics of IRDG are used to explain the dramatic differences in strain-energy release rates observed for the through-width, the axisymmetrically loaded embedded delamination, and the uniaxially loaded embedded delamination.

  11. Mechanics of instability-related delamination growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1990-01-01

    Local buckling of a delaminated group of plies can lead to higher interlaminar stresses and delamination growth. The mechanics of instability-related delamination growth (IRDG) had been described previously for the through-width delamination. This paper describes the mechanics of IRDG for the embedded delamination subjected to either uniaxial or axisymmetric loads. The mechanics of IRDG are used to explain the dramatic differences in strain-energy release rates observed for the through-width, the axisymmetrically loaded embedded delamination, and the uniaxially loaded embedded delamination.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Polymer Nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Iti

    Thermoset polymer composites are increasingly important in high-performance engineering industries due to their light-weight and high specific strength, finding cutting-edge applications such as aircraft fuselage material and automobile parts. Epoxy is the most widely employed thermoset polymer, but is brittle due to extensive cross-linking and notch sensitivity, necessitating mechanical property studies especially fracture toughness and fatigue resistance, to ameliorate the low crack resistance. Towards this end, various nano and micro fillers have been used with epoxy to form composite materials. Particularly for nano-fillers, the 1-100 nm scale dimensions lead to fascinating mechanical properties, oftentimes proving superior to the epoxy matrix. The chemical nature, topology, mechanical properties and geometry of the nano-fillers have a profound influence on nano-composite behavior and hence are studied in the context of enhancing properties and understanding reinforcement mechanisms in polymer matrix nano-composites. Using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as polymer filler, uniquely results in both increased stiffness as well as toughness, leading to extensive research on their applications. Though CNTs-polymer nano-composites offer better mechanical properties, at high stress amplitude their fatigue resistance is lost. In this work covalent functionalization of CNTs has been found to have a profound impact on mechanical properties of the CNT-epoxy nano-composite. Amine treated CNTs were found to give rise to effective fatigue resistance throughout the whole range of stress intensity factor, in addition to significantly enhancing fracture toughness, ductility, Young's modulus and average hardness of the nano-composite by factors of 57%, 60%, 30% and 45% respectively over the matrix as a result of diminished localized cross-linking. Graphene, a one-atom-thick sheet of atoms is a carbon allotrope, which has garnered significant attention of the scientific community and is

  13. Food mechanical properties and dietary ecology.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research has benefitted the fields of anthropology and engineering for decades: a classic example being the application of material science to the field of feeding biomechanics. However, after decades of research, discordances have developed in how mechanical properties are defined, measured, calculated, and used due to disharmonies between and within fields. This is highlighted by "toughness," or energy release rate, the comparison of incomparable tests (i.e., the scissors and wedge tests), and the comparison of incomparable metrics (i.e., the stress and displacement-limited indices). Furthermore, while material scientists report on a myriad of mechanical properties, it is common for feeding biomechanics studies to report on just one (energy release rate) or two (energy release rate and Young's modulus), which may or may not be the most appropriate for understanding feeding mechanics. Here, I review portions of materials science important to feeding biomechanists, discussing some of the basic assumptions, tests, and measurements. Next, I provide an overview of what is mechanically important during feeding, and discuss the application of mechanical property tests to feeding biomechanics. I also explain how 1) toughness measures gathered with the scissors, wedge, razor, and/or punch and die tests on non-linearly elastic brittle materials are not mechanical properties, 2) scissors and wedge tests are not comparable and 3) the stress and displacement-limited indices are not comparable. Finally, I discuss what data gathered thus far can be best used for, and discuss the future of the field, urging researchers to challenge underlying assumptions in currently used methods to gain a better understanding between primate masticatory morphology and diet. PMID:26808100

  14. Mechanical Properties of Fe-Ni Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberta, Mulford; El Dasher, B.

    2010-10-01

    Iron-nickel meteorites exhibit a unique lamellar microstructure, Widmanstatten patterns, consisting of small regions with steep-iron-nickel composition gradients.1,2 The microstructure arises as a result of extremely slow cooling in a planetary core or other large mass. Mechanical properties of these structures have been investigated using microindentation, x-ray fluorescence, and EBSD. Observation of local mechanical properties in these highly structured materials supplements bulk measurements, which can exhibit large variation in dynamic properties, even within a single sample. 3 Accurate mechanical properties for meteorites may enable better modeling of planetary cores, the likely origin of these objects. Appropriate values for strength are important in impact and crater modeling and in understanding the consequences of observed impacts on planetary crusts. Previous studies of the mechanical properties of a typical iron-nickel meteorite, a Diablo Canyon specimen, indicated that the strength of the composite was higher by almost an order of magnitude than values obtained from laboratory-prepared specimens.4 This was ascribed to the extreme work-hardening evident in the EBSD measurements. This particular specimen exhibited only residual Widmanstatten structures, and may have been heated and deformed during its traverse of the atmosphere. Additional specimens from the Canyon Diablo fall (type IAB, coarse octahedrite) and examples from the Muonionalusta meteorite and Gibeon fall ( both IVA, fine octahedrite), have been examined to establish a range of error on the previously measured yield, to determine the extent to which deformation upon re-entry contributes to yield, and to establish the degree to which the strength varies as a function of microstructure. 1. A. Christiansen, et.al., Physica Scripta, 29 94-96 (1984.) 2. Goldstein and Ogilvie, Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 29 893-925 (1965.) 3. M. D. Furnish, M.B. Boslough, G.T. Gray II, and J.L. Remo, Int. J. Impact Eng

  15. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyze the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on HRCT in a population of automobile mechanics. Methods The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos–related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers, with further consensus in the case of disagreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Results Pleural plaques were observed in 5 cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in 1 case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. Conclusions The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers. PMID:21965465

  16. Thermal Influence on Mechanical Properties of Granite: A Microcracking Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    The particle mechanics method is used to simulate the process of thermally induced micro- and macrocracks in granite, to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for temperature-dependent mechanical properties. The numerical results are quantified and compared with existing results from other experimental data in the literature. The results indicate that heating generally reduces the compressive and tensile strengths of granites, first because of increasing thermal stresses, and second because of the generation of tensile microcracks. Rock mechanical properties are reduced in specimens subjected to heating-cooling cycles, solely because of the increase in density of thermally induced tensile microcracks. The presence of a thermal gradient induces the formation of macrocracks, which propagate from relatively cool to relatively warm areas. It is also observed that the boundary condition of the specimen can also affect the development of microcracks.

  17. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  18. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  19. Consistency relations for the conformal mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Joyce, Austin; Khoury, Justin; Simonović, Marko E-mail: joyceau@sas.upenn.edu E-mail: marko.simonovic@sissa.it

    2013-04-01

    We systematically derive the consistency relations associated to the non-linearly realized symmetries of theories with spontaneously broken conformal symmetry but with a linearly-realized de Sitter subalgebra. These identities relate (N+1)-point correlation functions with a soft external Goldstone to N-point functions. These relations have direct implications for the recently proposed conformal mechanism for generating density perturbations in the early universe. We study the observational consequences, in particular a novel one-loop contribution to the four-point function, relevant for the stochastic scale-dependent bias and CMB μ-distortion.

  20. Beyond relativity and quantum mechanics: space physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Henry H.

    2011-09-01

    Albert Einstein imposed an observer-based epistemology upon physics. Relativity and Quantum Mechanics limit physics to describing and modeling the observer's sensations and measurements. Their "underlying reality" consists only of ideas that serve to model the observer's experience. These positivistic models cannot be used to form physical theories of Cosmic phenomena. To do this, we must again remove the observer from the center of physics. When we relate motion to Cosmic space instead of to observers and we attempt to explain the causes of Cosmic phenomena, we are forced to admit that Cosmic space is a substance. We need a new physics of space. We can begin by replacing Relativity with a modified Lorentzian-Newtonian model of spatial flow, and Quantum Mechanics with a wave-based theory of light and electrons. Space physics will require the reinterpretation of all known phenomena, concepts, and mathematical models.

  1. Mechanical properties of intra-ocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Kim, Eon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2008-02-01

    Cataract surgery usually involves the replacement of the natural crystalline lens with a rigid or foldable intraocular lens to restore clear vision for the patient. While great efforts have been placed on optimising the shape and optical characteristics of IOLs, little is know about the mechanical properties of these devices and how they interact with the capsular bag once implanted. Mechanical properties measurements were performed on 8 of the most commonly implanted IOLs using a custom build micro tensometer. Measurement data will be presented for the stiffness of the haptic elements, the buckling resistance of foldable IOLs, the dynamic behaviour of the different lens materials and the axial compressibility. The biggest difference between the lens types was found between one-piece and 3-piece lenses with respect to the flexibility of the haptic elements

  2. Rhenium Mechanical Properties and Joining Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Biaglow, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) provides thermal margin for high performance and long life radiation cooled rockets. Two issues that have arisen in the development of flight Ir/Re engines are the sparsity of rhenium (Re) mechanical property data (particularly at high temperatures) required for engineering design, and the inability to directly electron beam weld Re chambers to C103 nozzle skirts. To address these issues, a Re mechanical property database is being established and techniques for creating Re/C103 transition joints are being investigated. This paper discusses the tensile testing results of powder metallurgy Re samples at temperatures from 1370 to 2090 C. Also discussed is the evaluation of Re/C103 transition pieces joined by both, explosive and diffusion bonding. Finally, the evaluation of full size Re transition pieces, joined by inertia welding, as well as explosive and diffusion bonding, is detailed.

  3. Measurement and Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Nitinol Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Josef; Zahora, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    The self expandable Nitinol stents or stentgrafts are typically used for miniinvasive treatment of stenosis and aneurysms in the cardiovascular system. The minimal traumatisation of the patient, shorter time of hospitalization are typical advantages of these methods. More than ten years of experience has yielded also important information about the performance of stents in interaction with biological system and the possible problems related with it. The leakage or the shift of stent are some typical disadvantages, that can be related among other in the construction of the stent. The problem is that the mechanical properties, dimensions and the dynamical properties of the stent do not exactly correspond to the properties of the vessel or generally of tissue where this stent is introduced. The measurement, the description and the comparison of the relations between the mechanical properties of stents and tissues can be one of the possible ways to minimize these disadvantages. The developed original computer controlled measuring system allows the measurement of mechanical properties of stents, the measurement of strain-stress curves or simulation of interaction of the stent and vessel for exactly defined hemodynamic conditions. We measured and compared the mechanical parameters of different selfexpandable Nitinol stents, which differed in geometry (radius and length), in the type of construction (number of branches and rising of winding) and in the diameter of used wire. The results of measurements confirmed the theoretical assumptions that just the diameter of the Nitinol wire significantly influences the rigidity and the level of compressibility of the stent as well. A compromise must be found between the required rigidity of the stent and the minimal size of the delivery system. The exact description of the relation between the mechanical properties and geometry and construction of the stents enables to design the stent to fit the patient and it is expected that

  4. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  5. Determinants of the mechanical properties of bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bones are governed by the same principles as those of man-made load-bearing structures, but the organism is able to adapt its bone structure to changes in skeletal loading. In this overview of the determinants of the strength and stiffness of bone, a continuum approach has been taken, in which the behavior of a macroscopic structure depends on its shape and size, and on the mechanical properties of the material within. The latter are assumed to depend on the composition (porosity and mineralization) and organization (trabecular or cortical bone architecture, collagen fiber orientation, fatigue damage) of the bone. The effects of each of these factors are reviewed. Also, the possible means of non-invasively estimating the strength or other mechanical properties of a bone are reviewed, including quantitative computed tomography, photon absorptiometry, and ultrasonic measurements. The best estimates of strength have been obtained with photon absorptiometry and computed tomography, which at best are capable of accounting for 90% of the strength variability in a simple in vitro test, but results from different laboratories have been highly variable.

  6. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  7. Obtaining railpad properties via dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; de Man, A.; Woldekidan, M. F.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose combining dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the time-temperature superposition principle to determine various railpad dynamic properties. Having accurate information regarding the dynamic properties of a railpad is a fundamental requirement for designing tracks and understanding track deterioration. By testing three different railpad types, we demonstrate that the dynamic behavior of railpads over a wide frequency range can be successfully obtained under different preloads and temperatures if time-temperature superposition can be applied. To investigate railpad aging, worn railpads taken from a mainline in the Netherlands are tested. In this case, worn railpads are softer and possess a lower damping capacity than new railpads. In addition to performing these measurements, a Prony series material model is proposed to reproduce the dynamic behavior of railpads. The Prony series model is in good agreement with the measurements. Measured railpad dynamic properties and the corresponding Prony series numerical model provide valuable information for track design and modeling.

  8. Database of Mechanical Properties of Textile Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbrey, Jerry

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the approach followed to develop a database for mechanical properties of textile composites. The data in this database is assembled from NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) programs and from data in the public domain. This database meets the data documentation requirements of MIL-HDBK-17, Section 8.1.2, which describes in detail the type and amount of information needed to completely document composite material properties. The database focuses on mechanical properties of textile composite. Properties are available for a range of parameters such as direction, fiber architecture, materials, environmental condition, and failure mode. The composite materials in the database contain innovative textile architectures such as the braided, woven, and knitted materials evaluated under the NASA ACT programs. In summary, the database contains results for approximately 3500 coupon level tests, for ten different fiber/resin combinations, and seven different textile architectures. It also includes a limited amount of prepreg tape composites data from ACT programs where side-by-side comparisons were made.

  9. Mechanical properties of normal versus cancerous breast cells.

    PubMed

    Smelser, Amanda M; Macosko, Jed C; O'Dell, Adam P; Smyre, Scott; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2015-11-01

    A cell's mechanical properties are important in determining its adhesion, migration, and response to the mechanical properties of its microenvironment and may help explain behavioral differences between normal and cancerous cells. Using fluorescently labeled peroxisomes as microrheological probes, the interior mechanical properties of normal breast cells were compared to a metastatic breast cell line, MDA-MB-231. To estimate the mechanical properties of cell cytoplasms from the motions of their peroxisomes, it was necessary to reduce the contribution of active cytoskeletal motions to peroxisome motion. This was done by treating the cells with blebbistatin, to inhibit myosin II, or with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, to reduce intracellular ATP. Using either treatment, the peroxisomes exhibited normal diffusion or subdiffusion, and their mean squared displacements (MSDs) showed that the MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly softer than normal cells. For these two cell types, peroxisome MSDs in treated and untreated cells converged at high frequencies, indicating that cytoskeletal structure was not altered by the drug treatment. The MSDs from ATP-depleted cells were analyzed by the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation to estimate the interior viscoelastic modulus G* and its components, the elastic shear modulus G' and viscous shear modulus G", at angular frequencies between 0.126 and 628 rad/s. These moduli are the material coefficients that enter into stress-strain relations and relaxation times in quantitative mechanical models such as the poroelastic model of the interior regions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells. PMID:25929519

  10. Electrical and dielectric properties of bovine trabecular bone - relationships with mechanical properties and mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierpowska, J.; Töyräs, J.; Hakulinen, M. A.; Saarakkala, S.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Lappalainen, R.

    2003-03-01

    Interrelationships of trabecular bone electrical and dielectric properties with mechanical characteristics and density are poorly known. While electrical stimulation is used for healing fractures, better understanding of these relations has clinical importance. Furthermore, earlier studies have suggested that bone electrical and dielectric properties depend on the bone density and could, therefore, be used to predict bone strength. To clarify these issues, volumetric bone mineral density (BMDvol), electrical and dielectric as well as mechanical properties were determined from 40 cylindrical plugs of bovine trabecular bone. Phase angle, relative permittivity, loss factor and conductivity of wet bovine trabecular bone were correlated with Young's modulus, yield stress, ultimate strength, resilience and BMDvol. The reproducibility of in vitro electrical and dielectric measurements was excellent (standardized coefficient of variation less than 1%, for all parameters), especially at frequencies higher than 1 kHz. Correlations of electrical and dielectric parameters with the bone mechanical properties or density were frequency-dependent. The relative permittivity showed the strongest linear correlations with mechanical parameters (r > 0.547, p < 0.01, n = 40, at 50 kHz) and with BMDvol (r = 0.866, p < 0.01, n = 40, at 50 kHz). In general, linear correlations between relative permittivity and mechanical properties or BMDvol were highest at frequencies over 6 kHz. In addition, a significant site-dependent variation of electrical and dielectric characteristics, mechanical properties and BMDvol was revealed in bovine femur (p < 0.05, Kruskall-Wallis H-test). Based on the present results, we conclude that the measurement of electrical and dielectric properties provides quantitative information that is related to bone quantity and quality.

  11. Measurements and Characterizations of Mechanical Properties of Human Skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Han Wook; Park, Yon Kyu

    A skin is an indispensible organ for humans because it contributes to metabolism using its own biochemical functions and protects the human body from external stimuli. Recently, mechanical properties such as a thickness, a friction and an elastic coefficient have been used as a decision index in the skin physiology and in the skin care market due to the increased awareness of wellbeing issues. In addition, the use of mechanical properties is known to have good discrimination ability in the classification of human constitutions, which are used in the field of an alternative medicine. In this study, a system that measures mechanical properties such as a friction and an elastic coefficient is designed. The equipment consists of a load cell type (manufactured by the authors) for the measurements of a friction coefficient, a decompression tube for the measurement of an elastic coefficient. Using the proposed system, the mechanical properties of human skins from different constitutions were compared, and the relative repeatability error for measurements of mechanical properties was determined to be less than 2%. Combining the inspection results of medical doctors in the field of an alternative medicine, we could conclude that the proposed system might be applicable to a quantitative constitutional diagnosis between human constitutions within an acceptable level of uncertainty.

  12. Mechanical properties and fiber type composition of chronically inactive muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Monti, R. J.; Vallance, K. A.; Kim, J. A.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    A role for neuromuscular activity in the maintenance of skeletal muscle properties has been well established. However, the role of activity-independent factors is more difficult to evaluate. We have used the spinal cord isolation model to study the effects of chronic inactivity on the mechanical properties of the hindlimb musculature in cats and rats. This model maintains the connectivity between the motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate, but the muscle unit is electrically "silent". Consequently, the measured muscle properties are activity-independent and thus the advantage of using this model is that it provides a baseline level (zero activity) from which regulatory factors that affect muscle cell homeostasis can be defined. In the present paper, we will present a brief review of our findings using the spinal cord isolation model related to muscle mechanical and fiber type properties.

  13. Mechanical Behavior of Agave Americana L. Fibres: Correlation Between Fine Structure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msahli, S.; Chaabouni, Y.; Sakli, F.; Drean, J. Y.

    In this study, results of a mechanical behavior study of fibres extracted from the agave Americana L. plant, the most abundant variety in Tunisia, are presented. These results deal with the principal and mechanical characteristics of these fibres which are the elongation at break, the elasticity modulus and the rupture facture. These results permitted to situate these fibres, compared to the other textile fibres, as materials that can be used in technical applications such as reinforcing composites or geotextile. In order to understand the mechanical properties of these fibres, a correlation study between the properties already cited and the fine structure was done. The obtained results showed that the mechanical properties of agave Americana L. fibres are closely related to the individual fibers deformations and to the natural matrix (lignin and gums) that links these elementary fibres.

  14. Machining as a mechanical property test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.

    There is much need for data on mechanical behavior of metals at high strains and strain rates. This need is dictated by modeling of processes like forming and machining, wherein the material in the deformation zone is subjected to severe deformation conditions atypical of conventional material property tests such as tension and torsion. Accurate flow stress data is an essential input for robust prediction of process outputs. Similar requirements arise from applications in high speed ballistic penetration and design of materials for armor. Since the deformation zone in cutting of metals is characterized by unique and extreme combinations of strain, strain rate and temperature, an opportunity exists for using plane-strain cutting as a mechanical property test for measuring flow properties of metals. The feasibility of using plane-strain cutting to measure flow properties of metals is revisited in the light of recent data showing controllability of the deformation conditions in chip formation by systematic variation of process input parameters. A method is outlined as to how the deformation conditions can be varied by changing the process parameters. The method is applied to cutting of commercially pure copper (FCC), iron (BCC) and zinc (HCP). Forces and chip geometries are measured, in conjunction with particle image velocimetry characterization of the deformation using high speed image sequences. The flow stresses are estimated from these measurements. The measured flow stress and its dependence on strain are shown to agree well with prior measurements of these parameters using conventional tests, and flow stress inferred from hardness characterization. The method is also demonstrated to be able to measure properties of metals that recrystallize at room temperature (zinc), wherein quasi-static tests predict much lower strength. Sources of variability and uncertainty in the application of this measurement technique are discussed. Future work in the context of further

  15. High-rate mechanical properties of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walley, S. M.; Siviour, C. R.; Drodge, D. R.; Williamson, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the many thousands of studies that have been performed on the energy release mechanisms of high energy materials, relatively few studies have been performed (a few hundred) into their mechanical properties. Since it is increasingly desired to model the high rate deformation of such materials, it is of great importance to gather data on their response so that predictive constitutive models can be constructed. This paper reviews the state of the art concerning what is known about the mechanical response of high energy materials. Examples of such materials are polymer bonded explosives (used in munitions), propellants (used to propel rockets), and pyrotechnics (used to initiate munitions and also in flares).

  16. Aggregate of nanoparticles: rheological and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Wei; Zhai, Yuanming; Xie, Banghu; Yang, Mingbo

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the rheological and mechanical properties of nanoparticle aggregates is important for the application of nanofillers in nanocompoistes. In this work, we report a rheological study on the rheological and mechanical properties of nano-silica agglomerates in the form of gel network mainly constructed by hydrogen bonds. The elastic model for rubber is modified to analyze the elastic behavior of the agglomerates. By this modified elastic model, the size of the network mesh can be estimated by the elastic modulus of the network which can be easily obtained by rheology. The stress to destroy the aggregates, i.e., the yield stress ( σ y ), and the elastic modulus ( G') of the network are found to be depended on the concentration of nano-silica ( ϕ, wt.%) with the power of 4.02 and 3.83, respectively. Via this concentration dependent behavior, we can extrapolate two important mechanical parameters for the agglomerates in a dense packing state ( ϕ = 1): the shear modulus and the yield stress. Under large deformation (continuous shear flow), the network structure of the aggregates will experience destruction and reconstruction, which gives rise to fluctuations in the viscosity and a shear-thinning behavior.

  17. Iatrogenic pneumothorax related to mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chien-Wei; Sun, Shu-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a potentially lethal complication associated with mechanical ventilation. Most of the patients with pneumothorax from mechanical ventilation have underlying lung diseases; pneumothorax is rare in intubated patients with normal lungs. Tension pneumothorax is more common in ventilated patients with prompt recognition and treatment of pneumothorax being important to minimize morbidity and mortality. Underlying lung diseases are associated with ventilator-related pneumothorax with pneumothoraces occurring most commonly during the early phase of mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis of pneumothorax in critical illness is established from the patients’ history, physical examination and radiological investigation, although the appearances of a pneumothorax on a supine radiograph may be different from the classic appearance on an erect radiograph. For this reason, ultrasonography is beneficial for excluding the diagnosis of pneumothorax. Respiration-dependent movement of the visceral pleura and lung surface with respect to the parietal pleura and chest wall can be easily visualized with transthoracic sonography given that the presence of air in the pleural space prevents sonographic visualization of visceral pleura movements. Mechanically ventilated patients with a pneumothorax require tube thoracostomy placement because of the high risk of tension pneumothorax. Small-bore catheters are now preferred in the majority of ventilated patients. Furthermore, if there are clinical signs of a tension pneumothorax, emergency needle decompression followed by tube thoracostomy is widely advocated. Patients with pneumothorax related to mechanical ventilation who have tension pneumothorax, a higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score or PaO2/FiO2 < 200 mmHg were found to have higher mortality. PMID:24834397

  18. Polymer nanocomposites: permeability, chain dynamics, mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Laxmi

    2005-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites based on dispersion of surfactant treated expandable smectite clays such as montmorillonite layered silicates (MLS) have shown promise as organic-inorganic hybrids with the potential to improve barrier properties. Separately, flexible displays based on plastic substrates have reduced lifetimes tied to the low barrier properties. While there has been a general attribution of improved barrier properties to the tortuous path, this does not consider the influence the introduction of a secondary filler has on the morphology of the host polymer. Here we examine the influence of MLS nanoplatelets on the barrier properties and chain dynamics of polymers. We investigate the potential for host polymer modification by comparing two crystallizable polymers nylon and PET and resulting well dispersed nanocomposites. We study mechanical, cyclic fatigue and permeability of films. Permeability of the biaxially stretched film and when the film undergoes fatigue of 50 and 10000 cycles are also measured. Chain dynamics were modeled based on the Burger model fit to creep-recovery data. A systematic approach to predict the permeability considering amorphous, crystalline and MLS content and comparison with experimental values were done. We also conducted water absorption measurements to highlight the water absorption differences in the two polymers. Dimensional stability of PET was studied by measuring coefficient of thermal expansion of thin film on Si substrate by ellipsometry method.

  19. Rock Mechanical Properties from Logs Petrophysics : Concepts and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillot, Philippe; Crawford, Brian; Alramahi, Bashar; Karner, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the "geomechanics from logs" (GML) research project is to develop model-driven predictive software for determining rock mechanical properties (specifically rock strength, compressibility and fracability) from other, more easily measured, rock properties (e.g. lithology, porosity, clay volume, velocity) routinely derived from nuclear, resistivity and acoustic logging tools. To this end, geomechanics from logs seeks to increase fundamental understanding of the primary geologic controls on rock mechanical properties and to translate this new insight into novel predictive tools. In detail, GML predictors rely on (i) the generation of relational rock mechanical properties databases incorporating QC'd core-based laboratory measurements (both in-house and high-precision published data); (ii) the use of established rock physics models (e.g. friable sand, contact cement models) to investigate theoretical relationships between geologic processes, reservoir environment, rock microstructure and elastic, bulk and transport petrophysical attributes/properties; (iii) the subdivision of database rocks into generic lithotypes (e.g. sand, shaly sand, sandy shale, shale) with common petrophysical attributes/properties; (iv) the use of multivariate statistics to generate lithotype-dependent empirical predictive relationships between mechanical properties and log-derived petrophysical attributes/properties; (v) the estimation of uncertainties associated with predictive function parameters; (vi) the application and validation of mechanical properties predictive tools to well-documented case studies (e.g. sand strength for perforation stability, rock compressibility for reservoir simulation) to test overall performance and quantify uncertainty in predictions. This paper presents the results of various rock strength, rock compressibility and rock fracability case studies conducted in wells of different stratigraphic age and depositional environment. Overall, GML (i

  20. PICA Variants with Improved Mechanical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Jeremy; Ghandehari, Ehson M.; Fan, Wenhong; Stackpoole, Margaret; Chavez-Garcia, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) is a member of the family of Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) and was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a thermal protection system (TPS) material for the Stardust mission probe that entered the Earth s atmosphere faster than any other probe or vehicle to date. PICA, carbon fiberform base and phenolic polymer, shows excellent thermal insulative properties at heating rates from about 250 W/sq cm to 1000 W/sq cm. The density of standard PICA - 0.26 g/cu cm to 0.28 g/cu cm - can be changed by changing the concentration of the phenolic resin. By adding polymers to the phenolic resin before curing it is possible to significantly improve the mechanical properties of PICA without significantly increasing the density.

  1. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Graphene is an exciting new atomically-thin two-dimensional (2D) system of carbon atoms organized in a hexagonal lattice structure. This "wonder material" has been extensively studied in the last few years since it's first isolation in 2004. Its rapid rise to popularity in scientific and technological communities can be attributed to a number of its exceptional properties. In this thesis I will present several topics including fabrication of graphene devices, electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. I will start with a brief introduction of electronic transport in nanosclae system including quantum Hall effect, followed by a discussion of fundamental electrical and mechanical properties of graphene. Next I will describe how graphene devices are produced: from the famous "mechnical exfoliation" to our innovative "scratching exfoliation" method, together with the traditional lithography fabrication for graphene devices. We also developed a lithography-free technique for making electrical contacts to suspended graphene devices. Most of the suspended devices presented in this thesis are fabricated by this technique. Graphene has remarkable electrical properties thanks to its crystal and band structures. In Chapter 3, I will first focus on proximity-induced superconductivity in graphene Josephson transistors. In this section we investigate electronic transport in single layer graphene coupled to superconducting electrodes. We observe significant suppression in the critical current I c and large variation in the product IcR n in comparison to theoretic prediction; both phenomena can be satisfactorily accounted for by premature switching in underdamped Josephson junctions. Another focus of our studies is quantum Hall effect and many body physics in graphene in suspended bilayer and trilayer graphene. We demonstrate that symmetry breaking of the first 3 Landau levels and fractional quantum Hall states are observed in both bilayer and trilayer suspended graphene

  2. Mechanical Properties from PBX 9501 Pressing Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff Thompson, Darla; Wright, Walter J.

    2004-07-01

    A PBX 9501 pressing study was conducted by researchers in ESA-WMM, LANL, to identify the hydrostatic pressing parameters most important in fabricating high-density parts with uniform density. In this study, 31 charges were pressed using a full permutation of six pressing parameters. Five charges from the set of 31 were selected for an evaluation of their mechanical properties, specifically uniaxial compression and tension. Charges were selected to 1) span the density range of the study, and 2) allow two direct comparisons of pressing parameters independent of bulk density (density has a well-established affect on some material properties). Three PBX 9501 charges pressed isostatically at Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX were also included in the study. The tensile properties of the 8 charges varied significantly. Careful evaluation of the results suggests that an increase in pressing temperature may correlate with an increase in tensile stress (strength) and a decrease in strain (ductility). Trends in compression exist but are less pronounced. In an effort to explore the relationship between pressing temperature and tensile strength, four sheets of Estane polymer (a component of the PBX 9501 binder) were compression molded at 70, 90, 110 and 130°C. The tensile strength of Estane was observed to increase by a factor of nearly 20 when the molding temperature was increased from 70 to 90°C (strength increase was negligible beyond 90°C). We present an outline of ongoing work that will irrefutably quantify the mechanical property affects of both pressing temperature and dwell time on PBX 9501.(LA-UR 03-4842).

  3. Effects of humidity on the mechanical properties of gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Michael S; Wilkinson, Matt; Puthoff, Jonathan B; Mayer, George; Autumn, Kellar

    2011-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increase in relative humidity (RH) causes changes in the mechanical properties of the keratin of adhesive gecko foot hairs (setae). We measured the effect of RH on the tensile deformation properties, fracture, and dynamic mechanical response of single isolated tokay gecko setae and strips of the smooth lamellar epidermal layer. The mechanical properties of gecko setae were strongly affected by RH. The complex elastic modulus (measured at 5 Hz) of a single seta at 80% RH was 1.2 GPa, only 39% of the value when dry. An increase in RH reduced the stiffness and increased the strain to failure. The loss tangent increased significantly with humidity, suggesting that water absorption produces a transition to a more viscous type of deformation. The influence of RH on the properties of the smooth epidermal layer was comparable with that of isolated seta, with the exception of stress at rupture. These values were two to four times greater for the setae than for the smooth layer. The changes in mechanical properties of setal keratin were consistent with previously reported increases in contact forces, supporting the hypothesis that an increase in RH softens setal keratin, which increases adhesion and friction. PMID:20920615

  4. Composite propellant technology research: Mechanical property characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1991-01-01

    Proof for the existence of a single Poisson's ratio function in isotropic linear viscoelastic materials is presented. An in-depth discussion is given of three dimensional viscoelastic material properties and their relationships to linear isotropic and orthotropic viscoelastic materials. A discussion of the alternate invariant definition as used by Abaqus and how it relates to the form used by Dr. S. Peng is presented.

  5. Reciprocal relativity of noninertial frames: quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Stephen G.

    2007-04-01

    Noninertial transformations on time-position-momentum-energy space {t, q, p, e} with invariant Born-Green metric ds^{2}=-d t^{2}+\\frac{1}{c^{2}}\\,d q^{2}+\\frac{1}{b^{2}} \\big(d p^{2}-\\frac{1}{c^{2}}\\,d e^{2}\\big) and the symplectic metric -de ∧ dt + dp ∧ dq are studied. This {\\cal U}1,3) group of transformations contains the Lorentz group as the inertial special case and, in the limit of small forces and velocities, reduces to the expected Hamilton transformations leaving invariant the symplectic metric and the nonrelativistic line element ds2 = -dt2. The {\\cal U}( 1,3) transformations bound relative velocities by c and relative forces by b. Spacetime is no longer an invariant subspace but is relative to noninertial observer frames. In the limit of b → ∞, spacetime is invariant. Born was lead to the metric by a concept of reciprocity between position and momentum degrees of freedom and for this reason we call this reciprocal relativity. For large b, such effects will almost certainly only manifest in a quantum regime. Wigner showed that special relativistic quantum mechanics follows from the projective representations of the inhomogeneous Lorentz group. Projective representations of a Lie group are equivalent to the unitary representations of its central extension. The same method of projective representations for the inhomogeneous {\\cal U}( 1,3) group is used to define the quantum theory in the noninertial case. The central extension of the inhomogeneous {\\cal U}( 1,3) group is the cover of the quaplectic group {\\cal Q}( 1,3) ={\\cal U}( 1,3) \\otimes _{s}{\\cal H}(4) . {\\cal H}( 4) is the Weyl-Heisenberg group. The {\\cal H}( 4) group, and the associated Heisenberg commutation relations central to quantum mechanics, results directly from requiring projective representations. A set of second-order wave equations result from the representations of the Casimir operators.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Ipidapo; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Generation IV nuclear reactors will use the TRISO fuels, a type of micro fuel particle. It consists of a fuel kernel coated with four layers of isotropic material. One of the materials considered for these layers is silicon carbide ceramic. This lightweight material can maintain chemical and dimensional stability in adverse environments at very high temperatures up to 3000 C, and it is chemically inert. It is widely used as a semiconductor material in electronics because of its high thermo conductivity, high electric field break down strength, and high maximum current density, which makes it more desirable than silicon. Silicon carbide has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion and has no phase transition that would discontinue its thermal expansion. At the Center for Irradiation of Materials (C.I.M.) we are developing a new fabrication process for nanopowdered silicon carbide for TRISO fuel coating purposes. We also study the mechanical properties of the material produced. Among the different test being performed are particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) an Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The mechanical properties of interest are hardness (measured by Vickers Hardness machine), toughness (measured by the Anstis equation, KIC= 1.6 x 10-2(E/H)^1/2(P/C0^3/2, where P=load, C0=crack length, E=Young's modulus and H=Vickers Hardness), tensile strength and flexural strength (measured by a three point bend test). Results will be presented during the meeting.

  7. Chirality-Mediated Mechanical and Structural Properties of Oligopeptide Hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Hyland, Laura L.; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-10-29

    The origin and the effects of homochirality in the biological world continuously stimulate numerous hypotheses and much debate. This work attempts to look at the biohomochirality issue from a different angle - the mechanical properties of the bulk biomaterial and their relation to nanoscale structures. Using a pair of oppositely charged peptides that co-assemble into hydrogels, we systematically investigated the effect of chirality on the mechanical properties of these hydrogels through different combinations of syndiotactic and isotactic peptides. It was found that homochirality confers mechanical advantage, resulting in a higher elastic modulus and strain yield value. Yet, heterochirality confers kinetic advantage, resulting in faster gelation. Structurally, both homochiral and heterochiral hydrogels are made of fibers interconnected by lappet-like webs, but the homochiral peptide fibers are thicker and denser. These results highlight the possible role of biohomochirality in the evolution and/or natural selection of biomaterials.

  8. Relational mechanics as a gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Absolute space is eliminated from the body of mechanics by gauging translations and rotations in the Lagrangian of a classical system. The procedure implies the addition of compensating terms to the kinetic energy, in such a way that the resulting equations of motion are valid in any frame. The compensating terms provide inertial forces depending on the total momentum P, intrinsic angular momentum J and intrinsic inertia tensor I. Therefore, the privileged frames where Newton's equations are valid ( Newtonian frames) are completely determined by the matter distribution of the universe ( Machianization). At the Hamiltonian level, the gauge invariance leads to first class constraints that remove those degrees of freedom that make no sense once the absolute space has been eliminated. This reformulation of classical mechanics is entirely relational, since it is a dynamics for the distances between particles. It is also Machian, since the rotation of the rest of the universe produces centrifugal effects. It then provides a new perspective to consider the foundational ideas of general relativity, like Mach's principle and the weak equivalence principle. With regard to the concept of time, the absence of an absolute time is known to be a characteristic of parametrized systems. Furthermore, the scale invariance of those parametrized systems whose potentials are inversely proportional to the squared distances can be also gauged by introducing another compensating term associated with the intrinsic virial G ( shape-dynamics).

  9. Probing mechanical properties of liposomes using acoustic sensors.

    PubMed

    Melzak, Kathryn A; Bender, Florian; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2008-08-19

    Acoustic devices were employed to characterize variations in the mechanical properties (density and viscoelasticity) of liposomes composed of 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and cholesterol. Liposome properties were modified in three ways. In some experiments, the POPC/cholesterol ratio was varied prior to deposition on the device surface. Alternatively, the ratio was changed in situ via either insertion of cholesterol or removal of cholesterol with beta-cyclodextrin. This was done for liposomes adsorbed directly on the device surface and for liposomes attached via a biotin-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) linker. The acoustic measurements make use of two simultaneous time-resolved signals: one signal is related to the velocity of the acoustic wave, while the second is related to dissipation of acoustic energy. Together, they provide information not only about the mass (or density) of the probed medium but also about its viscoelastic properties. The cholesterol-induced increase in the surface density of the lipid bilayer was indeed observed in the acoustic data, but the resulting change in signal was larger than expected from the change in surface density. In addition, increasing the bilayer resistance to stretching was found to lead to a greater dissipation of the acoustic energy. The acoustic response is assessed in terms of the possible distortions of the liposomes and the known effects of cholesterol on the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer that encloses the aqueous core of the liposome. To aid the interpretation of the acoustic response, it is discussed how the above changes in the lipid bilayer will affect the effective viscoelastic properties of the entire liposome/solvent film on the scale of the acoustic wavelength. It was found that the acoustic device is very sensitive to the mechanical properties of lipid vesicles; the response of the acoustic device is explained, and the basic underlying mechanisms of interaction are

  10. Mechanical properties of monolayer graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Suk, Ji Won; Piner, Richard D; An, Jinho; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2010-11-23

    Mechanical properties of ultrathin membranes consisting of one layer, two overlapped layers, and three overlapped layers of graphene oxide platelets were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in contact mode. In order to evaluate both the elastic modulus and prestress of thin membranes, the AFM measurement was combined with the finite element method (FEM) in a new approach for evaluating the mechanics of ultrathin membranes. Monolayer graphene oxide was found to have a lower effective Young's modulus (207.6 ± 23.4 GPa when a thickness of 0.7 nm is used) as compared to the value reported for "pristine" graphene. The prestress (39.7-76.8 MPa) of the graphene oxide membranes obtained by solution-based deposition was found to be 1 order of magnitude lower than that obtained by others for mechanically cleaved graphene. The novel AFM imaging and FEM-based mapping methods presented here are of general utility for obtaining the elastic modulus and prestress of thin membranes. PMID:20942443

  11. Predicting the Highly Nonlinear Mechanical Properties of Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, David

    2009-06-01

    Over the past few years, we have developed models that calculate the highly nonlinear mechanical properties of polymers as a function of temperature, strain and strain rate from their molecular and morphological structure. A review of these models is presented here, with emphasis on combining the fundamental aspects of molecular physics that dictate these properties and the pragmatic need to make realistic predictions for our customers; the designer of new materials and the engineers who use these materials. The models calculate the highly nonlinear mechanical properties of polymers as a function of temperature, strain and strain rate from their molecular structure. The model is based upon the premise that mechanical properties are a direct consequence of energy stored and energy dissipated during deformation of a material. This premise is transformed into a consistent set of structure-property relations for the equation of state, EoS, and the engineering constitutive relations in a polymer by quantifying energy storage and loss at the molecular level of interactions between characteristic groups of atoms in a polymer. These relations are derived from a simple volumetric mean field Lennard-Jones potential function for the potential energy of intermolecular interactions in a polymer. First, properties such as temperature-volume relations and glass transition temperature are calculated directly from the potential function. Then, the `shock' EoS is derived simply by differentiating the potential function with respect to volume, assuming that the molecules cannot relax in the time scales of the deformation. The energy components are then used to predict the dynamic mechanical spectrum of a polymer in terms of temperature and rate. This can be transformed directly into the highly nonlinear stress-strain relations through yield. The constitutive relations are formulated as a set of analytical equations that predict properties directly in terms of a small set of

  12. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  13. Mechanical properties of Gd123 superconducting bulks at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Murakami, A.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical properties of melt-grown GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd123) large single-domain superconducting bulks with 10 wt% of Ag2O and 0.5 wt% of Pt have been evaluated at 77 K through flexural tests, on specimens cut from the samples, in order to estimate the mechanical properties of the Gd123 material without metal substrates, buffer layers or stabilization layers. The densified bulk was 46 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness, with low void density, and the standard bulk was around the same size, with voids. The results show that the mechanical properties of the densified Gd123 bulk with low void density are better than those of the standard Gd123 bulk with voids. We also compared the mechanical properties of as-grown bulks with those of annealed bulks. The relations between the microstructure and the flexural strength or the fracture toughness of the densified Gd123 bulk have been shown.

  14. Mechanical properties of single pellets containing acrylic polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; Zhang, G; Shah, N H; Infeld, M H; Malick, A W; McGinity, J W

    1996-07-01

    Three aqueous-based acrylic latex dispersions, Eudragit L 30 D, NE 30 D, and RS 30 D, were incorporated as granulating binders into a powder blend of microcrystalline cellulose and anhydrous lactose by wet massing. Spheronized pellets were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and the mechanical properties of single pellets, including the tensile strength at break and the Young's modulus were determined from the stress-strain profiles using a Chatillon TCD-200 tension/compression digital test gauge. The influence of particle size and plasticizer on the mechanical properties of pellets containing Eudragit RS 30 D was investigated. All bead formulations deformed by brittle fracture under a diametral compression force. The mechanical strength was found to be influenced by the adhesive strength between the polymers and the powder particles instead of the cohesive strength of each polymer. The Young's modulus and the tensile strength were also significantly influenced by the type and concentration of polymer, the presence of plasticizer, and the particle size of the beads. The results were related to the properties of the polymers and the fracture mechanisms of the beads. Furthermore, the polymer type and the incorporation of plasticizer influenced the susceptibility of the moistened extruded granules to the shearing forces during the spheronization process, which influenced the surface morphological properties of the pellets. PMID:9552348

  15. Environmental properties set cell mechanics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Many cell types are sensitive to mechanical signals that are produced either by application of exogenous force to their surfaces, or by the resistance that their surroundings place on forces generated by the cells themselves. Cell morphology, motility, proliferation, and protein expression all change in response to substrate stiffness. Changing the elastic moduli of substrates alters the formation of focal adhesions, the assembly of actin filaments into bundles, and the stability of intermediate filaments. The range of stiffness over which different primary cell types respond can vary over a wide range and generally reflects the elastic modulus of the tissue from which these cells were isolated. Mechanosensing depends on the type of adhesion receptor by which the cell binds, and therefore on both the molecular composition of the extracellular matrix and the nature of its link to the cytoskeleton. Many cell types can alter their own stiffness to match that of the substrate to which they adhere. The maximal elastic modulus that cells such as fibroblasts can attain is similar to that of crosslinked actin networks at the concentrations in the cell cortex. The precise mechanisms of mechanosensing are not well defined, but they presumably require an elastic connection between cell and substrate, mediated by transmembrane proteins. The viscoelastic properties of different extracellular matrices and cytoskeletal elements strongly influence the response of cells to mechanical signals, and the unusual non-linear elasticity of many biopolymer gels, characterized by strain-stiffening, leads to novel mechanisms by which cells alter their stiffness by engagement of molecular motors that produce internal stresses. Cell cortical elasticity is dominated by cytoskeletal polymer networks and can be modulated by internal tension. Simultaneous control of substrate stiffness and adhesive patterns suggests that stiffness sensing occurs on a length scale much larger than single molecular

  16. Study of mechanical properties of nanomaterials under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Kaur, Namrat; Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, the study of physical properties and behaviour of nanomaterials i.e. n-γ- Al2O3and n-Si3C4 under high pressure is done. For this purpose Murnaghan equation of state is used. The applicability of Murnaghan equation of state is fully tested by calculating mechanical properties of nano materials i.e. volume compression (V/Vo), bulk modulus (KT) and relative isothermal compression coefficient (α(P)/α0) at different pressures. The present calculated values of compression curve for the cited nanomaterials come out to be in reasonable good agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in the diamond technology is in progress, as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear-resistant, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly regarding solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This paper reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamonds to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  18. Uncertainty relations from simple entropic properties.

    PubMed

    Coles, Patrick J; Colbeck, Roger; Yu, Li; Zwolak, Michael

    2012-05-25

    Uncertainty relations provide constraints on how well the outcomes of incompatible measurements can be predicted, and as well as being fundamental to our understanding of quantum theory, they have practical applications such as for cryptography and witnessing entanglement. Here we shed new light on the entropic form of these relations, showing that they follow from a few simple properties, including the data-processing inequality. We prove these relations without relying on the exact expression for the entropy, and hence show that a single technique applies to several entropic quantities, including the von Neumann entropy, min- and max-entropies, and the Rényi entropies. PMID:23003225

  19. Influence of sedimentary environments on mechanical properties of clastic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaoping; Zhang, Jincai; Peng, Suping

    2006-10-01

    The sedimentary environments are the intrinsic factor controlling the mechanical properties of clastic rocks. Examining the relationship between rock sedimentary environments and rock mechanical properties gives a better understanding of rock deformation and failure mechanisms. In this study, more than 55 samples in coal measures were taken from seven different lithologic formations in eastern China. Using the optical microscope the sedimentary characteristics, such as components of clastic rocks and sizes of clastic grains were quantitatively tested and analyzed. The corresponding mechanical parameters were tested using the servo-controlled testing system. Different lithologic attributes in the sedimentary rocks sampled different stress-strain behaviors and failure characteristics under different confining pressures, mainly due to different compositions and textures. Results demonstrate that clastic rocks have the linear best-fit for Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The elastic moduli in clastic rocks are highly dependent upon confining pressures, unlike hard rocks. The envelope lines of the mechanical properties versus the contents of quartz, detritus of the grain diameter of more than 0.03 mm, and grain size in clastic rocks are given. The compressive strength or elastic modulus and the grain diameter have a non-monotonic relation and demonstrate the “grain-diameter softening” effect.

  20. Evaluation of mechanical properties of esthetic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Eisaku; Komazawa, Daigo; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Suda, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Plastic brackets, as well as ceramic brackets, are used in various cases since they have excellent esthetics. However, their mechanical properties remain uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine how deformation and stress distribution in esthetic brackets differ among materials under the same wire load. Using the digital image correlation method, we discovered the following: (1) the strain of the wings of plastic brackets is within 0.2% and that of ceramic and metal brackets is negligible, (2) polycarbonate brackets having a stainless steel slot show significantly smaller displacement than other plastic brackets, and (3) there is a significant difference between plastic brackets and ceramic and stainless steel brackets in terms of the displacement of the bracket wing. PMID:25755677

  1. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Carbonitride Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xingfang; Wang, Wei; Song, Lixin

    2003-02-01

    Silicon carbonitride thin films were synthesized by reactive rf sputtering a silicon carbide target in nitrogen and argon atmosphere, or sputtering a silicon nitride target in methane and argon atmosphere, respectively. The Nanoindentation technique (Nanoindenter XP system with a continuous stiffness measurement technique) was employed to measure the hardness and elastic modulus of thin films. The effects of sputtering power on the mechanical properties are different for the two SiCN thin films. With increasing sputtering power, the hardness and the elastic modulus decrease for the former but increase for the latter. The tendency is similar to the evolution trend of Si-C bonds in SiCN materials. This reflects that Si-C bonds provide greater hardness for SiCN thin films than Si-N and C-N bonds.

  2. ESTEC wiring test programme materials related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wires are considered as EEE parts and are covered within the ESA SCC specification series (ESA SCC 3901/XXX). This specification defines the principal properties of the wires including insulation/lay-up and electrical properties. Some additional space related materials requirements are also included, requirements such as outgassing and silver plating thickness. If a project has additional materials requirements over and above those covered by the relevant SCC specification, then additional testing is required. This is especially true for crewed spacecraft. The following topics are discussed in this context: additional requirements for manned spacecraft; flammability; arc tracking; thermal decomposition; microbial surface growth; and ageing.

  3. Rationally designing the mechanical properties of protein hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    Naturally occurring biomaterials possess diverse mechanical properties, which are critical to their unique biological functions. However, it remains challenging to rationally control the mechanical properties of synthetic biomaterials. Here we provide a bottom-up approach to rationally design the mechanical properties of protein-based hydrogels. We first use atomic fore microscope (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to characterize the mechanical stability of individual protein building blocks. We then rationally design the mechanical properties of hydrogels by selecting different combination of protein building blocks of known mechanical properties. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the engineering of hydrogels of distinct extensibility and toughness. This simple combinatorial approach allows direct translation of the mechanical properties of proteins from the single molecule level to the macroscopic level and represents an important step towards rationally designing the mechanical properties of biomaterials.

  4. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  5. Photopatterning the mechanical properties of polydimethylsiloxane films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, D. P. J.; Popel, A.; Graz, I. M.; Lacour, S. P.

    2011-03-01

    Silicone rubber films with graded and localized mechanical properties are prepared using two-part polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer, photoinhibitor compounds and conventional photolithography. First the un-cross-linked PDMS is mixed with benzophenone. The resulting positive photosensitive material is then exposed through a mask to UV light from a conventional mask aligner. Cross-linking of the UV exposed elastomer is inhibited, leading to softer regions than the surrounding unexposed matrix. By empirically fitting the nonlinear, hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin model to experimentally measured stress-strain curves we determine the equivalent tensile modulus (E) of the rubber film. We show the PDMS tensile modulus can then be adjusted in the 0.65-2.9 MPa range by decreasing the UV exposure dose (from 24 000 to 0 mJ cm-2). Further, using a patterned UV mask, we can locally define differential regions of tensile modulus within a single PDMS rubber film. We demonstrate that "hard islands" (E ≈ 2.9 MPa) of 100 μm minimum diameter can be patterned within a 100-μm-thick, single "soft" PDMS rubber membrane (E ≈ 0.65 MPa) cured at 150 °C for 24 h. Thin gold film conductors patterned directly onto the photopatterned PDMS are stretchable and withstand uniaxial cycling to tens of percent strain. The mechanically "pixellated" PDMS rubber film provides an improved substrate with built-in strain relief for stretchable electronics.

  6. Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties and Fractal Dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.

    1996-01-01

    Countermeasures for reducing bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to the microgravity environment of space are continuing to be developed and improved. An important component of this effort is finite element modeling of the lower extremity and spinal column. These models will permit analysis and evaluation specific to each individual and thereby provide more efficient and effective exercise protocols. Inflight countermeasures and post-flight rehabilitation can then be customized and targeted on a case-by-case basis. Recent Summer Faculty Fellowship participants have focused upon finite element mesh generation, muscle force estimation, and fractal calculations of trabecular bone microstructure. Methods have been developed for generating the three-dimensional geometry of the femur from serial section magnetic resonance images (MRI). The use of MRI as an imaging modality avoids excessive exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based methods. These images can also detect trabecular bone microstructure and architecture. The goal of the current research is to determine the degree to which the fractal dimension of trabecular architecture can be used to predict the mechanical properties of trabecular bone tissue. The elastic modulus and the ultimate strength (or strain) can then be estimated from non-invasive, non-radiating imaging and incorporated into the finite element models to more accurately represent the bone tissue of each individual of interest. Trabecular bone specimens from the proximal tibia are being studied in this first phase of the work. Detailed protocols and procedures have been developed for carrying test specimens through all of the steps of a multi-faceted test program. The test program begins with MRI and X-ray imaging of the whole bones before excising a smaller workpiece from the proximal tibia region. High resolution MRI scans are then made and the piece further cut into slabs (roughly 1 cm thick). The slabs are X-rayed again

  7. Mechanical properties of murine and porcine ocular tissues in compression.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kristan S; Wiley, Luke A; Bartlett, Alexandra M; Stone, Edwin M; Mullins, Robert F; Salem, Aliasger K; Guymon, C Allan; Tucker, Budd A

    2014-04-01

    Sub-retinal implantation of foreign materials is becoming an increasingly common feature of novel therapies for retinal dysfunction. The ultimate compatibility of implants depends not only on their in vitro chemical compatibility, but also on how well the mechanical properties of the material match those of the native tissue. In order to optimize the mechanical properties of retinal implants, the mechanical properties of the mammalian retina itself must be carefully characterized. In this study, the compressive moduli of eye tissues, especially the retina, were probed using a dynamic mechanical analysis instrument in static mode. The retinal compressive modulus was lower than that of the sclera or cornea, but higher than that of the RPE and choroid. Compressive modulus remained relatively stable with age. Conversely, apparent retinal softening occurred at an early age in mice with inherited retinal degeneration. Compressive modulus is an important consideration for the design of retinal implants. Polymer scaffolds with moduli that are substantially different than that of the native tissue in which they will ultimately reside will be less likely to aid in the differentiation and development of the appropriate cell types in vitro and will have reduced biocompatibility in vivo. PMID:24613781

  8. On the mechanical properties of selenite glass nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar, Arun Kr.; Kundu, Ranadip; Roy, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the room temperature micro-hardness of selenite glass-nanocomposites has been measured using a Vickers and Knoop micro hardness tester where the applied load varies from 0.01N to 0.98 N. A significant indentation size effect was observed for each sample at relatively low indentation test loads. The classical Meyer's law and the proportional specimen resistance model were used to analyze the micro-hardness behavior. It was found that the selenite glass-nanocomposite becomes harder with increasing CuI composition and the work hardening coefficient and mechanical properties like Young modulus, E, were also calculated. Our results open the way for the preparation, application and investigation of significant mechanical properties of new type of glass-nanocomposites.

  9. Mechanical Properties of the Frog Sarcolemma

    PubMed Central

    Fields, R. Wayne

    1970-01-01

    The elastic properties of cylindrical segments of sarcolemma were studied in single striated fibers of the frog semitendinosus muscle. All measurements were made on membranes of retraction zones, cell segments from which the sarcoplasm had retracted. Quantitative morphological studies indicated that three deforming forces interact with the intrinsic elastic properties of the sarcolemma to determine membrane configuration in retraction zone segments. The three deforming forces, namely intrazone pressure, axial fiber loads, and radial stresses introduced by retracted cell contents, could all be experimentally removed, permitting determination of the “undeformed” configuration of the sarcolemma. Analysis of these results indicated that membrane of intact fibers at rest length is about four times as wide and two-thirds as long as undeformed membrane. Membrane geometry was also studied as a function of internal hydrostatic pressure and axial loading to permit calculation of the circumferential and longitudinal tension-strain (T-S) diagrams. The sarcolemma exhibited nonlinear T-S properties concave to the tension axis in both directions. Circumferential T-S slopes (measures of membrane stiffness) ranged from 1500 to greater than 50,000 dynes/cm over the range of deformations investigated, while longitudinal T-S slopes varied from 23,000 to 225,000 dynes/cm. Thus, the membrane is anisotropic, being much stiffer in the longitudinal direction. Certain ramifications of the present results are discussed in relation to previous biomechanical studies of the sarcolemma and of other tissues. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:5439320

  10. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry.

    PubMed

    Aho, Johnathon M; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  11. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal–submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa–submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered

  12. Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Mazariegos, R.; Shea, W.T.

    1991-03-01

    The goal of this research is to evaluate the roles of deformation and the occurrence of weak sedimentary lithologies subjected to gravitational loads in shaping conventional and unconventional oil and gas reservoirs. Two sedimentary lithologies that influence the geometries, physical properties, and heterogeneities of oil and gas reservoirs are shale and rocksalt. Both form effect barriers to the flow and communication of petroleum and gas and, in many cases, form the seals to major reservoirs due to their low permeabilities. Both are actively deformed in depositional environments due to their low strengths relative to gravitational loads applied. Thus, the shapes of seal-forming units, and the nature of fractures and faults that may breach them depend upon either the mechanical properties of shale or those of salt, and the loading histories to which they have been subjected. Deformed shales may, in addition, serve as unconventional reservoirs of gas if open fractures within them provide sufficient porosity. The fracture and flow properties of shales are not well constrained, and the authors are currently investigating these properties experimentally. The rheology of rocksalt, on the other hand, is well known and they believe that the time is right to apply the experimentally constrained constitutive relations for rocksalt to deformations in the Earth. Efforts are continuing on modeling fracture anisotropy and the authors have examined simple, two-mica models to evaluate the mechanical interactions they proposed for gneiss and mica-poor schists. Brief summaries of the progress and results to date for (1) the mechanical properties of schist, (2) a two-mica model of fracture anisotropy, (3) deformation of shale, and (4) modeling of salt and shale tectonics of the northern Gulf of Mexico are given in the following sections. 35 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Nb-1Zr Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santella, Michael; McNabb, Jeffery; Frederick, Alan

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this work was to measure the mechanical properties of Nb-1Zr weldments, and, more specifically, to evaluate whether Charpy V-notch impact testing may be a more meaningful indication of weld deposit ductility than the slow bend testing. Manual gas-tungsten-arc welds were made in Mb-1Zr plates using 4 beads of filler wire from the same heat. The cold-rolled plates were recrystallized by heat treatment at 1773 K for 1 hour prior to welding. Welded plates were made in a stainless steel welding glove box backfilled with either argon or helium. Two plates were made with each gas, with one plate post-weld heat treated at 1373 K. Weld metal from each of the four welded plates was subjected to chemical analysis, tensile testing at room temperature, and Charpy V-notch testing at 93-473 K. Also, microhardness testing was used to evaluate property gradients in the weldments. Impurity concentrations in the weld deposits compared well with the base metal concentrations and were within the limits of the relevant ASTM specification, B393 Type 3. All specimens with one minor exception had yield strengths, tensile strengths, and ductilities that exceeded the ASTM specified minimums. The Charpy V-notch specimens from the as-welded He weld deposit, and from both post-weld-heat-treated weld deposits showed similar behavior with upper shelf energies of 9.7-10 J and ductile-brittle transition temperatures of 85-100 K. These Charpy V-notch properties were comparable to those of the unwelded plate. The as-welded Ar weld deposit had a slightly higher ductile-brittle transition temperature near 150 K. Microhardness testing indicated that in the as-welded conditions the average hardness of the weld deposit made in Ar was higher than that made in He. Post-weld heat treatment reduced the average hardnesses of base metal and weld metal. The range of hardnesses in the weld deposits was increased by the post weld heat treatment.

  14. Harmonizing General Relativity with Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

    2007-04-01

    Gravitation is the common underlying texture between General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. We take gravitation as the link that can make possible the marriage between these two sciences. We use here the duality of Nature for gravitation: A continuous warped space, wave-like, and a discrete quantum gas, particle-like, both coexistent and producing an equilibrium state in the Universe. The result is a static, non expanding, spherical, unlimited and finite Universe, with no cosmological constant and no dark energy. Macht's Principle is reproduced here by the convergence of the two cosmological equations of Einstein. From this a Mass Boom concept is born given by M = t, M the mass of the Universe and t its age. Also a decreasing speed of light is the consequence of the Mass Boom, c = 1/t, which explains the Supernovae Type Ia observations without the need of expansion (nor, of course, accelerated expansion). Our Mass Boom model completely wipes out the problems and paradoxes built in the Big Bang model, like the horizon, monopole, entropy, flatness, fine tuning, etc. It also eliminates the need for inflation.

  15. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2016-05-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    David Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Farhad Farzbod; Eric Burgett

    2013-05-01

    Detailed understanding between microstructure evolution and mechanical properties is important for designing new high burnup nuclear fuels. In this presentation we discuss the use of picosecond ultrasonics to measure localize changes in mechanical properties of fuel surrogates. We develop measurement techniques that can be applied to investigate heterogeneous elastic properties caused by localize changes in chemistry, grain microstructure caused by recrystallization, and mechanical properties of small samples prepared using focused ion beam sample preparation. Emphasis is placed on understanding the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties

  17. Mechanical properties of hybrid polymer nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan N.; Cadek, Martin; Dalton, Alan B.; Munoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito; Baughman, Ray H.; Blau, Werner J.

    2003-04-01

    In this work, mechanical properties of hybrid materials fabricated from nanotubes and commercially available polymers were investigated. It was found that, by adding various concentrations of arc discharge multiwall nanotubes, both Young"s modulus and hardness increased by factors of 1.8 and 1.6 at 1wt% in PVA and 2.8 and 2.0 at 8wt% in PVK, in reasonable agreement with the Halpin-Tsai theory. Furthermore, the presence of the nanotubes was found to nucleate crystallization of the PVA. This crystal growth is thought to enhance matrix-nanotube stress transfer. In addition, microscopy studies suggest extremely strong interfacial bonding in the PVA-based composite. This is manifested by the fracture of the polymer rather that the polymer-nanotube interface. The dependence of the polymer nanotube interfacial interaction on host polymer was studied by intercalating various polymers (PVA, PVP and PS) into single wall nanotube buckypaper. Even for short soak times, significant polymer intercalation into existing free volume was observed. Depending on the polymer and the level of intercalation tensile tests on intercalated sheets showed that the Young"s modulus, strength and toughness increased by factors of 3, 9 and 28, respectively. This indicates that the intercalated polymer enhances load transmission between nanotubes due the significant stress transfer. The level of stress transfer was observed to scale with polymer hydrophobicity as expected.

  18. Nonlinear NDE of Concrete Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Iosif E.

    2006-05-01

    Obtained theoretical relationship shows that the strength of concrete increases if the nonlinear parameter decreases. Experimental data proved that modulus of elasticity, ultrasound pulse velocity and nonlinear parameter are independent characteristics of concrete. Two nondestructive patent methods based on the measurement of resonant frequency shift and phase shift are described. These nonlinear nondestructive methods can be used when conventional acoustic methods are not applicable for evaluating strength of concrete. The relationship between static and dynamic modulus is obtained from the thermofluctuation theory and nonlinear equation of state of concrete. Corresponding relationship shows that the ratio of the static to the dynamic modulus of elasticity depends on the strength of concrete, its temperature, ratio and rate of loading, and that dynamic modulus is greater than static modulus of elasticity. Comparative study illustrates substantial agreement between obtained relationships and existing experimental results as well as general equations given in standards. Presented data illustrate the potential of the nonlinear approach, and indicate a new direction for nonlinear nondestructive methods of evaluating mechanical properties of concrete.

  19. Tuning the mechanical properties of silica microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; D'Acunzi, Maria; Kappl, Michael; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Graf, Robert; Vollmer, Doris

    2010-12-21

    Heat treatment is a standard method to increase the hardness of silica in various applications. Here, we tested the effect of high temperature annealing on the mechanical properties of silica microcapsules by force spectroscopy under point loads applied to the particle shell. The Young's modulus of the shells moderately increases after annealing at temperatures above 500 °C. Temperatures over 850 °C result in a much stronger increase and the Young's modulus is close to that of fused silica after annealing at 1100 °C. NMR analysis revealed that in untreated microcapsules synthesized by seeded growth using the Stöber method only 55% of the silicon atoms form siloxane bonds with four neighbors, whereas the remaining ones only form three or less siloxane bonds each and, thus, a large number of ethoxy and silanol groups still exist. During annealing at 500 °C, these are successively transformed into siloxane bonds through condensation reactions. This process correlates with only a moderate increase in Young's modulus. The strong increase at temperatures above 850 °C was associated with a densification which was associated by a decrease in capsule size and shell thickness while the shells remained homogenous and of spherical shape. The main strengthening of the shells is thus mainly due to compaction by sintering at length scales significantly larger than that of local siloxane bonds. PMID:20963236

  20. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  1. Mechanics/heat-transfer relation for particulate materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Wang, D.G.; Rahman, K.

    1991-11-01

    The original goal of this study was to try and understand the relationship between the thermal and mechanical properties of particulate flows. Two situations were examined. The first is a study of the effects of simple shear flows, as a embryonic flow type on the apparent thermal conductivity and apparent viscosity of a dry granular flow. The second study involved fluidized beds. The original idea was to try and relate the heat transfer behavior of a fluidized bed to the ``particle pressure,`` the forces by only the particle phase of the two-phase mixture. (VC)

  2. Mechanics/heat-transfer relation for particulate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Wang, D.G.; Rahman, K.

    1991-11-01

    The original goal of this study was to try and understand the relationship between the thermal and mechanical properties of particulate flows. Two situations were examined. The first is a study of the effects of simple shear flows, as a embryonic flow type on the apparent thermal conductivity and apparent viscosity of a dry granular flow. The second study involved fluidized beds. The original idea was to try and relate the heat transfer behavior of a fluidized bed to the particle pressure,'' the forces by only the particle phase of the two-phase mixture. (VC)

  3. Characterization of the mechanical properties of freestanding platinum thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Khawar

    Many MEMS devices utilize nanocrystalline thin metallic films as mechanical structures, in particular, micro switching devices where these films are used as Ohmic contacts. But the elastic and plastic properties of these thin films (thickness < 1mum) are significantly different from those of the bulk material. At these scales the volume fraction of material defects such as: grain boundaries, dislocations and interstitials become quite significant and become a chief contributor to the physical and mechanical material properties. In order to effectively design MEMS devices it is important that these material properties are explored and mechanical behavior of the structure they form be characterized. Popular thin film materials used in MEMS devices are Aluminum (Al), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni) and Gold (Au). Platinum has traditionally gained acceptance into the MEMS industry because of its chemical inertness and high temperature stability. However the mechanical properties of platinum remains the least exploited. Platinum has a high Young's Modulus (164 GPa, for bulk) and high melting temperature (1768 °C) and therefore can be used as a 'thin film' structure (cantilever, a bridge or a membrane) in high temperature environments with high resistance to mechanical failure. The physical size of these thin film structure make it very difficult to handle them and employ traditional mechanical testing methodologies and techniques and therefore require custom test platforms. One such recently developed platform is presented in this dissertation. The test platform is comprised of a microfabricated cascaded thermal actuator system and test specimen. The cascaded thermal actuator system is capable of providing tens of microns of displacement and tens of milli-Newton forces simultaneously while applying a relatively low temperature gradient across the test specimen. The dimensions of the platform make its use possible in both the SEM/TEM environments and on a probe station under

  4. Cell Mechanosensitivity: Mechanical Properties and Interaction with Gravitational Field

    PubMed Central

    Ogneva, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addressed the possible mechanisms of primary reception of a mechanical stimulus by different cells. Data concerning the stiffness of muscle and nonmuscle cells as measured by atomic force microscopy are provided. The changes in the mechanical properties of cells that occur under changed external mechanical tension are presented, and the initial stages of mechanical signal transduction are considered. The possible mechanism of perception of different external mechanical signals by cells is suggested. PMID:23509748

  5. Serotonergic Mechanisms in Addiction-Related Memories

    PubMed Central

    Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd Á; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2008-01-01

    Drug-associated memories are a hallmark of addiction and a contributing factor in the continued use and relapse to drugs of abuse. Repeated association of drugs of abuse with conditioned stimuli leads to long-lasting behavioral responses that reflect reward-controlled learning and participate in the establishment of addiction. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of drug-associated memories may shed light on potential therapeutic approaches to effectively intervene with drug use-associated memory. There is evidence to support the involvement of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission in learning and memory formation through the families of the 5-HT1 receptor (5-HT1R) and 5-HT2R which have also been shown to play a modulatory role in the behavioral effects induced by many psychostimulants. While there is a paucity of studies examining the effects of selective 5-HT1AR ligands, the available dataset suggests that 5-HT1BR agonists may inhibit retrieval of cocaine-associated memories. The 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR appear to be integral in the strong conditioned associations made between cocaine and environmental cues with 5-HT2AR antagonists and 5-HT2CR agonists possessing potency in blocking retrieval of cocaine-associated memories following cocaine self-administration procedures. The complex anatomical connectivity between 5-HT neurons and other neuronal phenotypes in limbic-corticostriatal brain structures, the heterogeneity of 5-HT receptors (5-HTXR) and the conflicting results of behavioral experiments which employ non-specific 5-HTXR ligands contribute to the complexity of interpreting the involvement of 5-HT systems in addictive-related memory processes. This review briefly traces the history of 5-HT involvement in retrieval of drug-cue associations and future targets of serotonergic manipulation that may reduce the impact that drug cues have on addictive behavior and relapse. PMID:18639587

  6. Auxetic oesophageal stents: structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Busfield, James J C; Rehman, Ihtesham U

    2014-02-01

    Oesophageal cancer is the ninth leading cause of malignant cancer death and its prognosis remains poor, ranking as the sixth most frequent cause of death in the world. This research work aims to adopt an Auxetic (rotating-squares) geometry device, that had previously been examined theoretically and analysed by Grima and Evans (J Mater Sci Lett 19(17):1563-1565, 2000), to produce a novel Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-grafts relevant to the palliative treatment of oesophageal cancer and also for the prevention of dysphagia. This paper discusses the manufacture of a small diameter Auxetic oesophageal stent and stent-graft. The oral deployment of such an Auxetic stent would be simplest if a commercial balloon dilatational catheter was used as this obviates the need for an expensive dedicated delivery system. A novel manufacturing route was employed in this research to develop both Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents, which ranged from conventional subtractive techniques to a new additive manufacturing method. Polyurethane was selected as a material for the fabrication of Auxetic films and Auxetic oesophageal stents because of its good biocompatibility and non-toxicological properties. The Auxetic films were later used for the fabrication of seamed Auxetic oesophageal stents. The flexible polyurethane tubular grafts were also attached to the inner luminal side of the seamless Auxetic oesophageal stents, in order to prevent tumour in-growth. Scanning electron microscopy was used to conduct surface morphology study by using different Auxetic specimens developed from different conventional and new additive manufacturing techniques. Tensile testing of the Auxetic films was performed to characterise their mechanical properties. The stent expansion tests of the Auxetic stents were done to analyse the longitudinal extension and radial expansion of the Auxetic stent at a range of radial pressures applied by the balloon catheter, and to also identify the pressure

  7. Enhanced mechanical properties of nanocomposites at low graphene content.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mohammad A; Rafiee, Javad; Wang, Zhou; Song, Huaihe; Yu, Zhong-Zhen; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-12-22

    In this study, the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites with graphene platelets, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and multi-walled carbon nanotube additives were compared at a nanofiller weight fraction of 0.1 +/- 0.002%. The mechanical properties measured were the Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength, fracture toughness, fracture energy, and the material's resistance to fatigue crack propagation. The results indicate that graphene platelets significantly out-perform carbon nanotube additives. The Young's modulus of the graphene nanocomposite was approximately 31% greater than the pristine epoxy as compared to approximately 3% increase for single-walled carbon nanotubes. The tensile strength of the baseline epoxy was enhanced by approximately 40% with graphene platelets compared to approximately 14% improvement for multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The mode I fracture toughness of the nanocomposite with graphene platelets showed approximately 53% increase over the epoxy compared to approximately 20% improvement for multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The fatigue resistance results also showed significantly different trends. While the fatigue suppression response of nanotube/epoxy composites degrades dramatically as the stress intensity factor amplitude is increased, the reverse effect is seen for graphene-based nanocomposites. The superiority of graphene platelets over carbon nanotubes in terms of mechanical properties enhancement may be related to their high specific surface area, enhanced nanofiller-matrix adhesion/interlocking arising from their wrinkled (rough) surface, as well as the two-dimensional (planar) geometry of graphene platelets. PMID:19957928

  8. Application of planetary analog mechanical properties to subsurface geological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElShafie, A.; Chevrier, V. F.; Dennis, N.

    2012-12-01

    Investigations of the mechanical properties of planetary analog materials are of great importance to improve future mission success and to enhance our understanding of the history and evolution of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces. Determining the stratigraphy of the subsurface using drills and penetrometers implies knowing the mechanical properties of the regolith. Therefore, we investigated the mechanical properties of Martian regolith analogs (JSC Mars-1 and an unaltered basaltic soil from Mojave desert). Penetration force is dependent on the bearing capacity factor (Nq) and the angle of internal friction which is found to be function of the level of compaction and increases with relative density. The bearing capacity factor (Nq) showed an exponential trend with the angle of internal friction. For Mojave soil, (Nq) increased from 64 to 338 with φ increasing from 32 to 41.3° while (Nq) increased from 161 to 3347 with φ increasing from 39.4 to 54.7° for JSC Mars-1. Based on estimation of the bearing capacity factor and the angle of internal friction, we predicted the force of penetration under the Martian gravity using a 1.2 cm diameter penetrometer. Under a bulk density of 1240 and 1500 kg m-3 in JSC Mars-1 and Mojave soil, 460 and 200 N is the estimated force to reach a depth of about 20 cm deep. Based on this investigation, distinguishing between different regolith layers on the subsurface of Mars is possible and observable using penetration force.

  9. Mechanical properties of thin-wall ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2000-10-01

    The use of cast iron in automotive applications in this era of increasing fuel efficiency requires the ability to cast very thin sections (2-7 mm). Although thin-wall iron castings have been produced, difficulty arises in predicting the mechanical properties of these castings because mechanical behavior is closely related to thickness, which in turn is a direct consequence of the section cooling rate. Experiments relating casting thickness with ultimate tensile strength, elongation, reduction in area, and hardness were performed. An inverse relationship was found between ultimate tensile strength and thickness. Elongation was found to depend only on the thickness of the sample and approached zero as the thickness of the sample decreased below 1.5 mm. Percent reduction in area was found to depend linearly on thickness. Although average hardness also correlated with the inverse of thickness, it was not found to be a useful measure of ultimate tensile strength. The results of this study show that cooling rate of the thin wall casting very much affects the mechanical properties.

  10. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, microstructure, and mechanical property interrelations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques for mechanical property characterizations are reviewed and conceptual models are advanced for explaining and interpreting the empirically based results. At present, the technology is generally empirically based and is emerging from the research laboratory. Advancement of the technology will require establishment of theoretical foundations for the experimentally observed interrelations among ultrasonic measurements, mechanical properties, and microstructure. Conceptual models are applied to ultrasonic assessment of fracture toughness to illustrate an approach for predicting correlations found among ultrasonic measurements, microstructure, and mechanical properties.

  11. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length. PMID:26040560

  12. Mechanical properties of porcine intralobar pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, H; Hogg, J C; Moreno, R H; Paré, P D; Schellenberg, R R

    1988-04-01

    The isobaric and isovolumetric properties of intrapulmonary arteries were evaluated by placing a highly compliant balloon inside arterial segments. The passive pressure-volume (P-V) curve was obtained by changing volume (0.004 ml/s) and measuring pressure. The isobaric active volume change (delta V) or isovolumetric active pressure change (delta P) generated by submaximal histamine was measured at four different transmural pressures (Ptm's) reached by balloon inflation. The maximal delta P = 11.2 +/- 0.6 cmH2O (mean +/- SE) was achieved at 30.8 +/- 1.2 cmH2O Ptm and maximal delta V = 0.20 +/- 0.02 ml at 16.7 +/- 1.7 cmH2O Ptm. The P-V relationships were similar when volume was increased after either isobaric or isovolumetric contraction. The calculated length-tension (L-T) relationship showed that the active tension curve was relatively flat and that the passive tension at the optimal length was 149 +/- 11% of maximal active tension. These data show that 1) a large elastic component operates in parallel with the smooth muscle in intralobar pulmonary arteries, and 2) the change in resistance associated with vascular expansion of the proximal arteries is independent of the type of contraction that occurs in the more distal arterial segments. PMID:3378988

  13. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Falcke, Martin; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measured in lamellipodia. These networks reproduce both the weak and strong force response of lamellipodia as measured in force-velocity experiments. We compare properties of branched and unbranched networks. The ratio of the network average of the force per branched filament to the average force per unbranched filament depends on the orientation distribution of the filaments. The ratio exhibits compression dependence and may go up to about 4.5 in networks with a narrow orientation distribution. With orientation distributions measured in lamellipodia, it is about two and essentially independent from network compression, graft elasticity and filament persistence length.

  14. Time-Temperature Superposition Applied to PBX Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Deluca, Racci

    2011-06-01

    The use of plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) in weapon applications requires a certain level of structural/mechanical integrity. Uniaxial tension and compression experiments characterize the mechanical response of materials over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates, providing the basis for predictive modeling in more complex geometries. After years of data collection on a wide variety of PBX formulations, we have applied time-temperature superposition principles to a mechanical properties database which includes PBX 9501, PBX 9502, PBXN-110, PBXN-9, and HPP (propellant). The results of quasi-static tension and compression, SHPB compression, and cantilever DMA are compared. Time-temperature relationships of maximum stress and corresponding strain values are analyzed in addition to the more conventional analysis of modulus. Our analysis shows adherence to the principles of time-temperature superposition and correlations of mechanical response to the binder glass transition and specimen density. Direct ties relate time-temperature analysis to the underlying basis of existing PBX mechanical models (ViscoSCRAM). Results suggest that, within limits, mechanical response can be predicted at conditions not explicitly measured. LA-UR 11-01096.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Fergyanto E.; Homma, Hiroomi; Brodjonegoro, Satryo S.; Hudin, Afzer Bin Baseri; Zainuddin, Aryanti Binti

    In tropical countries such as Indonesia and Malaysia, the empty fruit bunches are wastes of the oil palm industry. The wastes are abundantly available and has reached a level that severely threats the environment. Therefore, it is a great need to find useful applications of those waste materials; but firstly, the mechanical properties of the EFB fiber should be quantified. In this work, a small tensile test machine is manufactured, and the tensile test is performed on the EFB fibers. The results show that the strength of the EFB fiber is strongly affected by the fiber diameter; however, the fiber strength is relatively low in comparison to other natural fibers.

  16. Statistical mechanics in the context of special relativity.

    PubMed

    Kaniadakis, G

    2002-11-01

    In Ref. [Physica A 296, 405 (2001)], starting from the one parameter deformation of the exponential function exp(kappa)(x)=(sqrt[1+kappa(2)x(2)]+kappax)(1/kappa), a statistical mechanics has been constructed which reduces to the ordinary Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics as the deformation parameter kappa approaches to zero. The distribution f=exp(kappa)(-beta E+betamu) obtained within this statistical mechanics shows a power law tail and depends on the nonspecified parameter beta, containing all the information about the temperature of the system. On the other hand, the entropic form S(kappa)= integral d(3)p(c(kappa) f(1+kappa)+c(-kappa) f(1-kappa)), which after maximization produces the distribution f and reduces to the standard Boltzmann-Shannon entropy S0 as kappa-->0, contains the coefficient c(kappa) whose expression involves, beside the Boltzmann constant, another nonspecified parameter alpha. In the present effort we show that S(kappa) is the unique existing entropy obtained by a continuous deformation of S0 and preserving unaltered its fundamental properties of concavity, additivity, and extensivity. These properties of S(kappa) permit to determine unequivocally the values of the above mentioned parameters beta and alpha. Subsequently, we explain the origin of the deformation mechanism introduced by kappa and show that this deformation emerges naturally within the Einstein special relativity. Furthermore, we extend the theory in order to treat statistical systems in a time dependent and relativistic context. Then, we show that it is possible to determine in a self consistent scheme within the special relativity the values of the free parameter kappa which results to depend on the light speed c and reduces to zero as c--> infinity recovering in this way the ordinary statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The statistical mechanics here presented, does not contain free parameters, preserves unaltered the mathematical and epistemological structure of

  17. Statistical mechanics in the context of special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniadakis, G.

    2002-11-01

    In Ref. [Physica A 296, 405 (2001)], starting from the one parameter deformation of the exponential function exp{κ}(x)=((1+κ2x2)+κx)1/κ, a statistical mechanics has been constructed which reduces to the ordinary Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics as the deformation parameter κ approaches to zero. The distribution f=exp{κ}(-β E+βμ) obtained within this statistical mechanics shows a power law tail and depends on the nonspecified parameter β, containing all the information about the temperature of the system. On the other hand, the entropic form Sκ=∫d3p(cκ f1+κ+c-κ f1-κ), which after maximization produces the distribution f and reduces to the standard Boltzmann-Shannon entropy S0 as κ-->0, contains the coefficient cκ whose expression involves, beside the Boltzmann constant, another nonspecified parameter α. In the present effort we show that Sκ is the unique existing entropy obtained by a continuous deformation of S0 and preserving unaltered its fundamental properties of concavity, additivity, and extensivity. These properties of Sκ permit to determine unequivocally the values of the above mentioned parameters β and α. Subsequently, we explain the origin of the deformation mechanism introduced by κ and show that this deformation emerges naturally within the Einstein special relativity. Furthermore, we extend the theory in order to treat statistical systems in a time dependent and relativistic context. Then, we show that it is possible to determine in a self consistent scheme within the special relativity the values of the free parameter κ which results to depend on the light speed c and reduces to zero as c-->∞ recovering in this way the ordinary statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The statistical mechanics here presented, does not contain free parameters, preserves unaltered the mathematical and epistemological structure of the ordinary statistical mechanics and is suitable to describe a very large class of experimentally observed

  18. Fluid mechanical properties of flames in enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Pindera, M.Z.; Oppenheim, A.K.

    1988-07-01

    In an enclosure where the reacting medium is initially at rest, the flame first generates a flowfield that then gets stretched, i.e., its front is pulled along the surface by the flowfield in which it then finds itself residing. A methodology developed for numerical modeling of such fields is described. Of key significance in this respect is the zero Mach number model/endash/a reasonable idealization in view of the relatively high temperature, and hence sound speed, that exists, concomitantly with a comparatively low particle velocity, in the confinement of a combustion chamber. According to this model, the density gradient in the field is nullified, while across the flame front it approaches infinity. One has thus two regimes: one of the unburned medium and the other of the burned gas, each of spatially uniform density, separated by a flame front interface. The latter is endowed with four properties, of which the first two are purely kinematic and the others dynamic in nature, namely: 1) it is advected at the local velocity of flow; 2) it self-advances at the normal burning speed, the eigenvalue of the system; 3) it acts as the velocity source due to the exothermicity of the combustion process; and 4) it acts as the vorticity source due to the baroclinic effect generated by the pressure gradient along its surface and the density gradient across it. A solution obtained for a flame propagating in an oblong rectangular enclosure demonstrates that the latter has a significant influence upon the formation of the well known tulip shape. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. [thermodynamic properties of gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The basic thermodynamic properties of gases are reviewed and the relations between them are derived from the first and second laws. The elements of statistical mechanics are then formulated and the partition function is derived. The classical form of the partition function is used to obtain the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energies in the gas phase and the equipartition of energy theorem is given in its most general form. The thermodynamic properties are all derived as functions of the partition function. Quantum statistics are reviewed briefly and the differences between the Boltzmann distribution function for classical particles and the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distributions for quantum particles are discussed.

  20. Mechanical property evaluation of natural fiber coir composite

    SciTech Connect

    Harish, S.; Michael, D. Peter; Bensely, A. Lal, D. Mohan; Rajadurai, A.

    2009-01-15

    The fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural. Past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber-reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber-reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of coir, a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, coir composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Scanning electron micrographs obtained from fractured surfaces were used for a qualitative evaluation of the interfacial properties of coir/epoxy and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that coir can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites.

  1. Photoacoustic characterization of the mechanical properties of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Carmen M.; Murray, Todd W.; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2002-01-01

    Narrow band photoacoustics (laser ultrasonics) are used to characterize the properties of free-standing nanometer-sized thin films. Photoacoustic generation is achieved by use of a microchip laser which deposits pulsed laser energy in the form of a spatially periodic source on the structure. The resulting narrow band ultrasonic modes are monitored using a Michelson interferometer. By varying the geometry of the spatially periodic source, a wide range of acoustic wave numbers is probed. Results are presented for two-layer thin film aluminum/silicon-nitride (Al/Si3N4) membranes. For such thin films, only the two lowest order guided modes are generated and these in turn can be related to sheet and flexural modes in plates. The mechanical properties and residual stress in the thin films are evaluated from measured acoustic dispersion curves for these two lowest order modes.

  2. Morphology, orientation, and mechanical properties of gelatin films

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, T.N.; Tsou, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    Gelatin is a polypeptide derived from degradation and disorganization of collagen fibers and is the primary binder in photographic emulsions. Gelatin provides the mechanical integrity and strength to the photographic emulsion allowing for packaging, handling, and photofinishing operations. Gelatin films generated from aqueous-solution casting can exist in a semicrystalline or an amorphous state. When a gelatin solution is cooled below its helix-coil transition temperature, partial renaturation of gelatin to form triple helices can occur. The degree of renaturation in a coated film is dependent upon the drying temperature and the drying rate. During the drying process, gelatin crystals can be formed by lateral association of the triple helices through a mechanism of nucleation and growth of a fringed micelle structure. X-ray scattering techniques have been utilized to examine the morphology and orientation of gelatin films. Based on X-ray diffraction data, it is observed that aggregates of triple-helix rods lie parallel to the film plane but are symmetrically distributed within the film plane. Since a material`s physical and mechanical properties are related to its structure, it is necessary to understand and to characterize the morphological development in gelatin film formation. In this study, an X-ray diffractometer and pole figure goniometer were utilized to examine the structural development and orientation anisotropy in solid-state gelatin films. Also, in this study, the in-plane mechanical properties of a gelatin film were determined from a uniaxial tensile test, and the gelatin film properties in the thickness direction were extracted from an indentation test based on the finite element analysis of the indentation results using a viscoelastic material model.

  3. Dynamic and mechanical properties of supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing-Lun; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2016-04-21

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) offer an excellent model system for investigating the physico-chemical properties of the cell membrane. In this work, dynamic and mechanical properties of SLBs are explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for lipids with different architectures (chain length, kink, and asymmetry associated with lipid tails). It is found that the lateral diffusivity (Dx) and flip-flop rate (FF) grow with increasing temperature in both gel and liquid phases and can be described by an Arrhenius-like expression. Three regimes can be clearly identified for symmetric and asymmetric saturated lipids but only two regimes are observed for kinked lipids. Both Dx and FF grow with decreasing tail length and increasing number of kinks. The stretching (KA) and apparent bending (KB) moduli exhibit concave upward curves with temperature and the minima are attained at Tm. In general, the minima of KA and KB decrease with the chain length and increase with number of kinks. The typical relation among the bending modulus, area stretching modulus, and bilayer thickness is still followed, KB = βKAh(2) and β is much smaller in the gel phase. The dynamic and mechanical properties of lipids with asymmetric tails are found to situate between their symmetric counterparts. PMID:27389237

  4. Dynamic and mechanical properties of supported lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsing-Lun; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2016-04-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) offer an excellent model system for investigating the physico-chemical properties of the cell membrane. In this work, dynamic and mechanical properties of SLBs are explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for lipids with different architectures (chain length, kink, and asymmetry associated with lipid tails). It is found that the lateral diffusivity (Dx) and flip-flop rate (FF) grow with increasing temperature in both gel and liquid phases and can be described by an Arrhenius-like expression. Three regimes can be clearly identified for symmetric and asymmetric saturated lipids but only two regimes are observed for kinked lipids. Both Dx and FF grow with decreasing tail length and increasing number of kinks. The stretching (KA) and apparent bending (KB) moduli exhibit concave upward curves with temperature and the minima are attained at Tm. In general, the minima of KA and KB decrease with the chain length and increase with number of kinks. The typical relation among the bending modulus, area stretching modulus, and bilayer thickness is still followed, KB = βKAh2 and β is much smaller in the gel phase. The dynamic and mechanical properties of lipids with asymmetric tails are found to situate between their symmetric counterparts.

  5. Wave-Mechanical Properties of Stationary States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph is a review of the quantum mechanical concepts presented in two other monographs, "The Nature of Atoms" and "Bonds Between Atoms," by the same author. It is assumed the reader is familiar with these ideas. The monograph sketches only those aspects of quantum mechanics that are of most direct use in picturing and calculating the…

  6. Mechanical properties and modeling of seal-forming lithologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K.; Russell, J.E.; Carter, N.L.; Ibanez, W.; Mazariegos, R.

    1992-04-01

    Both rocksalt and shale lithologies are actively deformed in response to gravitational loads associated with deposition, and both form effective seals to petroleum and natural gas. Thus, the shapes of seal-forming units, and the nature of fractures and faults that may breach them depend upon either the mechanical properties of salt or those of shale, and the loading histories to which they have been subjected. The objectives of this research include the determination of the mechanical properties under controlled conditions of well-characterized shales, and the numerical modeling of rocksalt (and eventually shale) formations using laboratory-based rheologies. Progress has been made towards these goals over this project period, both in our experimental program on shale deformation and model development for the growth of salt diapirs. The mechanical anisotropy of an illite-bearing shale from Louisiana has been determined and related to the preferred orientation and distribution of clays. Its strength in the absence of pore fluids has been determined at confining pressures of up to 250 MPa and at high pressure we have investigated the effects of deformation rate and temperature. A numerical finite difference code has been developed to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and validated using a two- layer linear viscous model for which analytic solutions are available. Although the code has only been validated for the linear viscous case, it is capable of solving for highly nonlinear constitutive laws as well as solving for arbitrary interfaces between the salt and overburden.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.; McManus, Hugh L.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a non-uniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hours. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  8. Heritability of Lumbar Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Havill, L.M.; Allen, M.R.; Bredbenner, T.L.; Burr, D.B.; Nicolella, D.P.; Turner, C.H.; Warren, D.M.; Mahaney, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic effects on mechanical properties have been demonstrated in rodents, but not confirmed in primates. Our aim was to quantify the proportion of variation in vertebral trabecular bone mechanical properties that is due to the effects of genes. L3 vertebrae were collected from 110 females and 46 male baboons (6–32 years old) from a single extended pedigree. Cranio-caudally oriented trabecular bone cores were scanned with microCT then tested in monotonic compression to determine apparent ultimate stress, modulus, and toughness. Age and sex effects and heritability (h2) were assessed using maximum likelihood-based variance components methods. Additive effects of genes on residual trait variance were significant for ultimate stress (h2=0.58), toughness (h2=0.64), and BV/TV (h2=0.55). When BV/TV was accounted for, the residual variance in ultimate stress accounted for by the additive effects of genes was no longer significant. Toughness, however, showed evidence of a non-BV/TV-related genetic effect. Overall, maximum stress and modulus show strong genetic effects that are nearly entirely due to bone volume. Toughness shows strong genetic effects related to bone volume and shows additional genetic effects (accounting for 10% of the total trait variance) that are independent of bone volume. These results support continued use of bone volume as a focal trait to identify genes related to skeletal fragility, but also show that other focal traits related to toughness and variation in the organic component of bone matrix will enhance our ability to find additional genes that are particularly relevant to fatigue-related fractures. PMID:19900599

  9. Mechanical properties of UV irradiated rat tail tendon (RTT) collagen.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Wess, Tim

    2004-04-01

    The mechanical properties of RTT collagen tendon before and after UV irradiation have been investigated by mechanical testing (Instron). Air-dried tendon were submitted to treatment with UV irradiation (wavelength 254 nm) for different time intervals. The changes in such mechanical properties as breaking strength and percentage elongation have been investigated. The results have shown, that the mechanical properties of the tendon were greatly affected by time of UV irradiation. Ultimate tensile strength and ultimate percentage elongation decreased after UV irradiation of the tendon. Increasing UV irradiation leads to a decrease in Young's modulus of the tendon. PMID:15178003

  10. Mechanical Properties of ZnSe for the FEANICS Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ZnSe windows to be used with the FEANICS (Flow Enclosure Accommodating Novel Investigations in Combustion of Solids) experiments were measured in order to determine design allowables. In addition, the literature on crack growth properties was summarized. The average Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, equibiaxial fracture strength, flaw size, grain size, Knoop hardness, Vicker's hardness, and branching constant were 74.3 +/- 0.1 GPa, 0.31, 57.8 +/- 6.5 MPa, 21 4 mm, 43 +/- 9 micron, 0.97 +/- 0.02 GPa, 0.97 +/- 0.02 GPa, and 1.0 +/- 0.1 MPam(exp 0.5), respectively. The properties of current ZnSe made by chemical vapor deposition are in good agreement with those measured in the 1970's. The hardness of CVD ZnSe windows is about one twentieth of the sapphire window being replaced, and about one-sixth of that of window glass. Thus the ZnSe window must be handled with great care. The large grain size relative to the inherent crack size implies the need to use single crystal crack growth properties in the design process. In order to determine the local failure stresses in one of the test specimens, a solution for the stresses between the support ring and the edge of a circular plate load between concentric rings was derived.

  11. Mechanical and physical properties of plasma-sprayed stabilized zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. A.; Mehan, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties were determined for plasma-sprayed MgO- or Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings. Properties were determined for the ceramic coating in both the freestanding condition and as-bonded to a metal substrate. The properties of the NiCrAlY bond coating were also investigated.

  12. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hr. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. The nitrogen-aged specimens were assumed to have the same properties as the interior material in the air-aged specimens. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  14. Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.

    1974-01-01

    The long-range objectives were to develop methods of experimentation and analysis for the determination of the physical properties and engineering behavior of lunar surface materials under in situ environmental conditions. Data for this purpose were obtained from on-site manned investigations, orbiting and softlanded spacecraft, and terrestrial simulation studies. Knowledge of lunar surface material properties are reported for the development of models for several types of lunar studies and for the investigation of lunar processes. The results have direct engineering application for manned missions to the moon.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of ageing and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Human and other multicellular life species age, and ageing processes become dominant during the late phase of life. Recent studies challenge this dogma, suggesting that ageing does not occur in some animal species. In mammals, cell replicative senescence occurs as early as before birth (i.e. in embryos) under physiological conditions. How the molecular machinery operates and why ageing cells dominate under some circumstances are intriguing questions. Recent studies show that cell ageing involves extensive cellular remodelling, including telomere attrition, heterochromatin formation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial disorders and lysosome processing organelles and chromatins. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing of various cell types, the newly described developmental and programmed replicative senescence and the critical roles of cellular organelles and effectors in Parkinson's disease, diabetes, hypertension and dyskeratosis congenita. PMID:24798238

  16. Physical and mechanical properties of icebergs

    SciTech Connect

    Gammon, P.H.; Bobby, W.; Gagnon, R.E.; Russell, W.E.

    1983-05-01

    Physical and mechanical characteristics of iceberg ice were studied from samples collected near the shores of eastern Newfoundland. Although the physical characteristics show considerable diversity, iceberg ice has some common features and is generally porous, lacks significant concentrations of dissolved materials, contains internal cracks and has an irregular interlocking grain structure. A review of mechanical testing of ice was carried out and an experimental setup was devised to reduce effects of improper contact between specimen and loading apparatus. Uniaxial compressive strength for iceberg ice was determined and compared with that for lake ice. The strength of iceberg ice was higher than that of lake ice but Young's Modulus for lake ice was higher.

  17. Supramolecular Polymer Nanocomposites - Improvement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinricher, Jesse; Neikirk, Colin; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers differ from traditional polymers in that their repeat units are connected by hydrogen bonds that can reversibly break and form under various stimuli. They can be more easily recycled than conventional materials, and their highly temperature dependent viscosities result in reduced energy consumption and processing costs. Furthermore, judicious selection of supramolecular polymer architecture and functionality allows the design of advanced materials including shape memory and self-healing materials. Supramolecular polymers have yet to see widespread use because they can't support much weight due to their inherent mechanical weakness. In order to address this issue, the mechanical strength of supramolecular polymer nanocomposites based on ureidopyrmidinone (UPy) telechelic poly(caprolactone) doped with surface activated silica nanoparticles was investigated by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis. The effects of varying amounts and types of nanofiller surface functionality were investigated to glean insight into the contributions of filler-filler and filler-matrix interactions to mechanical reinforcement in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites. MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja)

  18. Towards the feasibility of using ultrasound to determine mechanical properties of tissues in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Joseph M; Gu, Di-Win Marine; Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Althans, Jake; Abdalian, Sarah; Schluchter, Mark D; Liu, Yiying; Welter, Jean F

    2014-10-01

    Our ultimate goal is to non-destructively evaluate mechanical properties of tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage using ultrasound (US). We used agarose gels as surrogates for TE cartilage. Previously, we showed that mechanical properties measured using conventional methods were related to those measured using US, which suggested a way to non-destructively predict mechanical properties of samples with known volume fractions. In this study, we sought to determine whether the mechanical properties of samples, with unknown volume fractions could be predicted by US. Aggregate moduli were calculated for hydrogels as a function of SOS, based on concentration and density using a poroelastic model. The data were used to train a statistical model, which we then used to predict volume fractions and mechanical properties of unknown samples. Young's and storage moduli were measured mechanically. The statistical model generally predicted the Young's moduli in compression to within <10% of their mechanically measured value. We defined positive linear correlations between the aggregate modulus predicted from US and both the storage and Young's moduli determined from mechanical tests. Mechanical properties of hydrogels with unknown volume fractions can be predicted successfully from US measurements. This method has the potential to predict mechanical properties of TE cartilage non-destructively in a bioreactor. PMID:25092421

  19. Generalized nonholonomic mechanics, servomechanisms and related brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendra, H.; Grillo, S.

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that nonholonomic systems obeying D'Alembert's principle are described on the Hamiltonian side, after using the Legendre transformation, by the so-called almost-Poisson brackets. In this paper we define the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian sides of a class of generalized nonholonomic systems (GNHS), obeying a generalized version of D'Alembert's principle, such as rubber wheels (like some simplified models of pneumatic tires) and certain servomechanisms (like the controlled inverted pendulum), and show that corresponding equations of motion can also be described in terms of a bracket. We present essentially all possible brackets in terms of which the mentioned equations can be written down, which include the brackets that appear in the literature, and point out those (if any) that are naturally related to each system. In particular, we show there always exists a Leibniz bracket related to a GNHS, and conversely, that every Leibniz system is a GNHS. The control of the inverted pendulum on a cart is studied as an illustrative example.

  20. ZM-21 magnesium alloy corrosion properties and cryogenic to elevated temperature mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montana, J. W.; Nelson, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bare ZM-21 magnesium alloy flat tensile specimens were determined for test temperatures of +400 F, +300 F, +200 F, +80 F, 0 F, -100 F, -200 F, and -320 F. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths of the material increased with decreasing temperature with a corresponding reduction in elongation values. Stress corrosion tests performed under: (1) MSFC atmospheric conditions; (2) 95% relative humidity; and (3) submerged in 100 ppm chloride solution for 8 weeks indicated that the alloy is not susceptible to stress corrosion. The corrosion tests indicated that the material is susceptible to attack by crevice corrosion in high humidity and chemical type attack by chloride solution. Atmospheric conditions at MSFC did not produce any adverse effects on the material, probably due to the rapid formation of a protective oxide coating. In both the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion evaluations the test specimens which were cut transverse to the rolling direction had superior properties when compared to the longitudinal properties.

  1. Dynamic network mechanisms of relational integration.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Beth L; Hellyer, Peter J; Leech, Robert; Hampshire, Adam

    2015-05-20

    A prominent hypothesis states that specialized neural modules within the human lateral frontopolar cortices (LFPCs) support "relational integration" (RI), the solving of complex problems using inter-related rules. However, it has been proposed that LFPC activity during RI could reflect the recruitment of additional "domain-general" resources when processing more difficult problems in general as opposed to RI specifically. Moreover, theoretical research with computational models has demonstrated that RI may be supported by dynamic processes that occur throughout distributed networks of brain regions as opposed to within a discrete computational module. Here, we present fMRI findings from a novel deductive reasoning paradigm that controls for general difficulty while manipulating RI demands. In accordance with the domain-general perspective, we observe an increase in frontoparietal activation during challenging problems in general as opposed to RI specifically. Nonetheless, when examining frontoparietal activity using analyses of phase synchrony and psychophysiological interactions, we observe increased network connectivity during RI alone. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling with Bayesian model selection identifies the LFPC as the effective connectivity source. Based on these results, we propose that during RI an increase in network connectivity and a decrease in network metastability allows rules that are coded throughout working memory systems to be dynamically bound. This change in connectivity state is top-down propagated via a hierarchical system of domain-general networks with the LFPC at the apex. In this manner, the functional network perspective reconciles key propositions of the globalist, modular, and computational accounts of RI within a single unified framework. PMID:25995457

  2. Dynamic Network Mechanisms of Relational Integration

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, Beth L.; Hellyer, Peter J.; Leech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A prominent hypothesis states that specialized neural modules within the human lateral frontopolar cortices (LFPCs) support “relational integration” (RI), the solving of complex problems using inter-related rules. However, it has been proposed that LFPC activity during RI could reflect the recruitment of additional “domain-general” resources when processing more difficult problems in general as opposed to RI specifically. Moreover, theoretical research with computational models has demonstrated that RI may be supported by dynamic processes that occur throughout distributed networks of brain regions as opposed to within a discrete computational module. Here, we present fMRI findings from a novel deductive reasoning paradigm that controls for general difficulty while manipulating RI demands. In accordance with the domain-general perspective, we observe an increase in frontoparietal activation during challenging problems in general as opposed to RI specifically. Nonetheless, when examining frontoparietal activity using analyses of phase synchrony and psychophysiological interactions, we observe increased network connectivity during RI alone. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling with Bayesian model selection identifies the LFPC as the effective connectivity source. Based on these results, we propose that during RI an increase in network connectivity and a decrease in network metastability allows rules that are coded throughout working memory systems to be dynamically bound. This change in connectivity state is top-down propagated via a hierarchical system of domain-general networks with the LFPC at the apex. In this manner, the functional network perspective reconciles key propositions of the globalist, modular, and computational accounts of RI within a single unified framework. PMID:25995457

  3. Mechanical Properties of a Calcium Dietary Supplement, Calcium Fumarate Trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shijing; Henke, Sebastian; Wharmby, Michael T; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Li, Wei; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of calcium fumarate trihydrate, a 1D coordination polymer considered for use as a calcium source for food and beverage enrichment, have been determined via nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction with single crystals. The nanoindentation studies reveal that the elastic modulus (16.7-33.4 GPa, depending on crystallographic orientation), hardness (1.05-1.36 GPa), yield stress (0.70-0.90 GPa), and creep behavior (0.8-5.8 nm/s) can be rationalized in view of the anisotropic crystal structure; factors include the directionality of the inorganic Ca-O-Ca chain and hydrogen bonding, as well as the orientation of the fumarate ligands. High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show a bulk modulus of ∼ 20 GPa, which is indicative of elastic recovery intermediate between small molecule drug crystals and inorganic pharmaceutical ingredients. The combined use of nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction techniques provides a complementary experimental approach for probing the critical mechanical properties related to tableting of these dietary supplements. PMID:26588472

  4. Simultaneous spectrophotometric and mechanical property characterization of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunegin, Leonid; Moore, Jeffery B.

    2006-02-01

    Both reflectance spectroscopy and the determination Young's Modulus of skin have shown promise for identifying skin pathology. At present, these determinations are carried out using separate methodologies. This study demonstrates a new technology combining digital UV/VIS reflectance spectroscopy and vacuum aspiration for simultaneously determining the reflectance spectrum and mechanical properties of human skin tissue. A small hand held prototype device incorporating fiber-optic light guides into a vacuum channel was calibrated using various elastic materials subjected to increments of stress by vacuum from 0 to 25 in Hg. The intensity of a UV/VIS light beam reflected from the material at each vacuum increment was compared to the resulting material strain. The reflected beam was also spectrophotometrically analyzed. Skin types were similarly evaluated comparing normal and scar tissue and skin of various ages and coloration. An exponential relationship between reflected beam intensity and the amount of strain resulting from vacuum increments was observed. Young's Modulus (calculated from Aoki et. al equation) and spectra from normal skin and scar tissue were in agreement with previously published observations. Age related decreases in skin elasticity were also demonstrated. In the reflectance spectra, oxy and deoxy-hemoglobin absorbance bands were detected, becoming significantly enhanced at increased levels of vacuum. Melanin absorbance was also easily detected and appeared to correlate with skin coloration. Since superficial skin pathologies have characteristic spectroscopic and mechanical properties, this technique may provide a promising new approach for rapid, non-invasive method for the evaluation of skin lesions.

  5. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Soft Tissue with Ultrasound Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadich, I.; Bernal, M.; Greenleaf, J. F.

    The cardiovascular diseases atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension and heart failure have been related to stiffening of vessels and myocardium. Noninvasive measurements of mechanical properties of cardiovascular tissue would facilitate detection and treatment of disease in early stages, thus reducing mortality and possibly reducing cost of treatment. While techniques capable of measuring tissue elasticity have been reported, the knowledge of both elasticity and viscosity is necessary to fully characterize mechanical properties of soft tissues. In this article, we summarize the Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) method developed by our group and report on advances made in characterizing stiffness of large vessels and myocardium. The method uses radiation forceFadiation force to excite shear waves in soft tissue and pulse echo ultrasound to measure the motion. The speed of propagation of shear waves at different frequencies is used to generate dispersions curves for excised porcine left-ventricular free-wall myocardium and carotid arteries. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the LV myocardium dispersion curves to obtain elasticity and viscosity moduli. The results suggest that the speed of shear wave propagation in four orthogonal directions on the surface of the excised myocardium is similar. These studies show that the SDUV method has potential for clinical application in noninvasive quantification of elasticity and viscosity of vessels and myocardium.

  6. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Aluminum/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lina; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Wang, Zijun; Cai, Huiwu; Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yating; Zhou, Anning

    2016-07-01

    Surface-modified self-passivated aluminum (Al) nanoparticles were used for reinforcing epoxy (EP) resin, and the curing behavior, mechanical and electrical properties of the Al/EP nanocomposites were investigated. The incorporation of Al nanoparticles into EP significantly decreases the cure reaction enthalpy of the nancomposites, and the apparent activation energy of Al/EP systems is 64.96 kJ/mol. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the Al loading due to the strong interaction between the Al and the EP matrix. The storage modulus of the nanocomposites increases continuously with Al content, whereas, the glass transition temperature declines slightly. With increasing the Al content, the tensile modulus, flexural modulus and compressive modulus of the nanocomposites increase continuously compared with the neat one. The mechanical properties are improved by Al nanoparticles at low Al contents. The best overall dielectric and electrical performance are achieved about at 1 wt.% of Al concentration. The enhanced dielectric breakdown strength is mainly related to the insulating alumina shell on the surface of core Al and the strong interfacial interactions.

  7. [Estimations of mechanical properties of bones using nanoindentation].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Nanoindentation has been applied in recent years to measure the mechanical properties of bone tissues at a microscopic scale, overcoming the limitations of traditional mechanical testing techniques for small samples. This method is precise and accurate and appears well suited for measuring mechanical properties in bone. Dynamic nanoindentation is also a promising method of measuring the viscoelastic properties of bone tissues at smaller length and load scales than allowed by other testing methods, thus allowing individual constituents and local regions of inhomogeneous tissues to be characterized individually. This article describes our nanoindentation studies of bone tissues with recent studies. PMID:26728534

  8. Mechanical properties and morphology of polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Sirk, Timothy; Brennan, John; Andzelm, Jan; Mrozek, Randy; Lenhart, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Understanding morphology and mechanical response of polymeric gels is of particular importance to design materials with required energy dissipation characteristics. We will present our latest results for polymer gels based on 1) self-assembled block copolymers and 2) chemically cross-linked polymers. The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was used to predict morphology in good agreement with atomic force microscopy. We have performed DPD non-equilibrium oscillatory shear calculations predicting elastic modulus of unentangled gels that correlates well with experimental rheology data. However, this methodology fails to predict mechanics of entangled polymer networks due to unphysical chain crossing brought by the soft potentials used in DPD simulations. Recently, we have introduced an improved segmental repulsion potential that removes the bond crossing allowing for reptation dynamics. The improved DPD method was used in simulations for entangled gels to explore impact of branched architecture of solvent on the mechanical response to the tensile deformation. Novel architectures of solvent resulting in a dramatic increase of the elastic modulus were identified. The topological analysis was applied to understand contributions of chemical cross-links and entanglements to the stress.

  9. Mechanical properties of intermediate filament proteins

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Elisabeth E.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filament form viscoelastic gels. The crosslinks holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking non-linear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large stains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual Ifs can be stretched to more than 2 or 3 times their resting length without breaking. At least ten different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of IF on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations. PMID:26795466

  10. Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Elisabeth E; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament (IF) proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filaments form viscoelastic gels. The cross-links holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking nonlinear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large strains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual IFs can be stretched to more than two or three times their resting length without breaking. At least 10 different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of cytoplasmic IFs on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations. PMID:26795466

  11. Mechanical properties of alumina porcelain during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šín, Peter; Podoba, Rudolf; ŠtubÅa, Igor; Trník, Anton

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical strength and Young's modulus of green alumina porcelain (50 wt. % of kaolin, 25 wt. % of Al2O3, and 25 wt. % of feldspar) were measured during heating up to 900 °C and 1100 °C, respectively. To this end, we used the three point-bending method and modulated force thermomechanical analysis (mf-TMA). The loss liberation - of the physically bound water (20 - 250 °C) strengthens the sample and Young's modulus increases its values significantly. The dehydroxylation that takes place in the range of 400 - 650 °C causes a slight decrease in Young's modulus. On the other hand, the mechanical strength slightly increases in this temperature range, although it has a sudden drop at 420 °C. Beyond the dehydroxylation range, above 650 °C, both Young's modulus and mechanical strength increase. Above 950 °C, a sharp increase of Young's modulus is caused by the solid-state sintering and the new structure created by the high-temperature reactions in metakaolinite.

  12. Electron radiation effects on the electrical and mechanical properties of polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Hammoud, A.N.; Laghari, J.R.; Krishnakumar, B.

    1987-12-01

    Capacitor-grade polypropylene film was irradiated in air with a 1 MeV electron beam to different doses up to 10/sup 8/ rads and the post-irradiation effects on the electrical and mechanical properties of the film were evaluated. The electrical properties included the 60 Hz a.c. breakdown voltage, dielectric constant and dissipation factor. The dielectric constant and dissipation factor were obtained at five frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 10 kHz. The tensile properties comprised the Young's modulus, elongation-at-break and tensile strength. While the electrical and tensile properties were evaluated at room temperature, the dynamic mechanical properties were determined at a frequency of 110 Hz in a temperature range of 12/sup 0/C to 120/sup 0/C. The results obtained indicate that while the electrical properties remain relatively stable at doses up to 10/sup 7/ rads, the mechanical properties exhibit a steady decline even at lower dose levels.

  13. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    PubMed

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  14. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of materials

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  16. Designing the Structure of Carbon Fibers for Optimal Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Vautard, Frederic; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber manufacturing follows generic processing steps: formation of thermoplastic fibers, stabilization, and carbonization. The final structures and end properties of the carbon fiber can differ significantly depending on the precursor chemistry and the associated processing sciences. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and mesophase pitch are the predominant precursors used in the production of carbon fibers. PAN-based carbon fibers consist of nanocrystalline graphitic domains typically 1.5 5 nm in size surrounded by amorphous carbon; in contrast, pitch-based carbon fibers are 10 50 nm crystallites with the graphitic (002) planes mostly aligned parallel to the fiber axis. It has been seen that the skin core structure of PAN-based carbon fibers plays a significant role in their mechanical properties. Designing a more homogenous carbon fiber microstructure by controlling the starting polymer and process parameters results in a different set of tensile strengths and elastic moduli. In this study the microstructural defect distribution (0.1 200 nm), measured by small-angle X-ray scattering, was shown to be directly related to the tensile strength of the carbon fibers. Here the formation of carbon structures from various polymer precursors is reviewed. Such a comprehensive understanding offers the opportunity to design carbon fiber microstructures with improved properties and to ultimately create new types of carbon fibers from alternative precursors at reduced cost.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Composite Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret; Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul; Weitz, D. A.

    2003-03-01

    There exits a family of actin-binding proteins (ABPs) and each protein has a distinct function for bundling, networking, gelating, capping, or simply binding to actin. Whether actin serves as a structural or motile component, its mechanical properties are determined by its degree and kinds of association with different ABPs and these properties are often closely related to its functional needs. For instance, in a cell actin is highly crosslinked with multiple ABPs (fimbrin, alpha-actinin, etc.) to generate thrust and strength for locomotion. In the acrosomal reaction of horseshoe crab sperm, actin exists as a bundle of preassembled filaments crosslinked with scruin to form a rigid structure to penetrate into an egg without yielding. We study the effects three different ABPs (scruin,fimbrin and alpha-actinin) have on the rheology and microstructure of actin networks using multiparticle tracking, imaging, and bulk rheology. From these experiments we can deduce how an evolving microstructure affects the bulk rheological properties and the role different concentrations and kinds of ABPs have in these changes.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  19. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  20. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  1. Quantifying tissue mechanical properties using photoplethysmography

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical method that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. The PPG signal comprises two components; a pulsatile waveform (AC) attributed to changes in the interrogated blood volume with each heartbeat, and a slowly varying baseline (DC) combining low frequency fluctuations mainly due to respiration and sympathetic nervous system activity. In this report, we investigate the AC pulsatile waveform of the PPG pulse for ultimate use in extracting information regarding the biomechanical properties of tissue and vasculature. By analyzing the rise time of the pulse in the diastole period, we show that PPG is capable of measuring changes in the Young s Modulus of tissue mimicking phantoms with a resolution of 4 KPa in the range of 12 to 61 KPa. In addition, the shape of the pulse can potentially be used to diagnose vascular complications by differentiating upstream from downstream complications. A Windkessel model was used to model changes in the biomechanical properties of the circulation and to test the proposed concept. The modeling data confirmed the response seen in vitro and showed the same trends in the PPG rise and fall times with changes in compliance and vascular resistance.

  2. Quantifying tissue mechanical properties using photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Wilson, Mark A; Ericson, M Nance; Coté, Gerard L

    2014-07-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical method that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. The PPG signal comprises two components; a pulsatile waveform (AC) attributed to changes in the interrogated blood volume with each heartbeat, and a slowly varying baseline (DC) combining low frequency fluctuations mainly due to respiration and sympathetic nervous system activity. In this report, we investigate the AC pulsatile waveform of the PPG pulse for ultimate use in extracting information regarding the biomechanical properties of tissue and vasculature. By analyzing the rise time of the pulse in the diastole period, we show that PPG is capable of measuring changes in the Young's Modulus of tissue mimicking phantoms with a resolution of 4 KPa in the range of 12 to 61 KPa. In addition, the shape of the pulse can potentially be used to diagnose vascular complications by differentiating upstream from downstream complications. A Windkessel model was used to model changes in the biomechanical properties of the circulation and to test the proposed concept. The modeling data confirmed the response seen in vitro and showed the same trends in the PPG rise and fall times with changes in compliance and vascular resistance. PMID:25071970

  3. Quantifying tissue mechanical properties using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive optical method that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. The PPG signal comprises two components; a pulsatile waveform (AC) attributed to changes in the interrogated blood volume with each heartbeat, and a slowly varying baseline (DC) combining low frequency fluctuations mainly due to respiration and sympathetic nervous system activity. In this report, we investigate the AC pulsatile waveform of the PPG pulse for ultimate use in extracting information regarding the biomechanical properties of tissue and vasculature. By analyzing the rise time of the pulse in the diastole period, we show that PPG is capable of measuring changes in the Young’s Modulus of tissue mimicking phantoms with a resolution of 4 KPa in the range of 12 to 61 KPa. In addition, the shape of the pulse can potentially be used to diagnose vascular complications by differentiating upstream from downstream complications. A Windkessel model was used to model changes in the biomechanical properties of the circulation and to test the proposed concept. The modeling data confirmed the response seen in vitro and showed the same trends in the PPG rise and fall times with changes in compliance and vascular resistance. PMID:25071970

  4. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalatur, Ekaterina Narikovich, Anton; Buyakova, Svetlana E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey E-mail: kulkov@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    The article studies the porous ceramics consisting of ultra-fine ZrO{sub 2} powders. The porosity of ceramic samples varied from 15% to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials had a cellular configuration. The distinctive feature of all experimentally obtained strain diagrams is their nonlinearity at low deformations characterized by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformations shown in strain diagrams is due to the mechanical instability of cellular elements of the ceramic framework.

  5. Mechanical properties of composite materials with integrated embedded sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Kristin; Cook, Ben; Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Starr, Anthony; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2005-05-01

    We present efforts to develop structural composite materials which include networks of embedded sensors with decision-making capabilities that extend the functionality of the composite materials to be information-aware. The next generation of structural systems will include the capability to acquire, process, and if necessary respond to structural or other types of information. We present work related to the development of embedded arrays of miniature electronic-based microsensors within a structural composite materials, such as GFRP. Although the scale and power consumption of such devices continues to decrease while increasing the functionality, the size of these devices remain large relative the typical scale of the reinforcing fibers and the interlayer spacing. Therefore, the question of the impact of those devices on the various mechanical properties is relevant and important. We present work on characterizing some of those effects in specific systems where sensors, or suitable dummy sensors, are arrayed with ~1 cm spacing between elements. The typical size of the microelectronic sensing element is ~1 mm, and here is orthorhombic. Of particular importance are the effects of inclusion of such devices on strength or fatigue properties of the base composite. Our work seeks to characterize these effects for 1 and 2 dimensional arrays lying in planes normal to the thickness direction in laminated composites. We also seek to isolate the effects due to the sensing elements and the required interconnections that represent the power-carrying and data communications capabilities of the embedded network.

  6. Montmorillonite-levan nanocomposites with improved thermal and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Gao, Hongsheng; Ploehn, Harry J

    2014-01-30

    This work reports on the structure and properties of novel nanocomposites composed of exfoliated montmorillonite clay blended with levan, a polysaccharide produced by Bacillus sp. Dry levan is very brittle, making it difficult to obtain stand-alone films. MMT-levan composites were prepared by solution blending in water, coating on plastic surfaces, partial drying at 50°C, and conditioning in air at 50-60% relative humidity. This process results in freestanding, transparent, and flexible films of pure levan and MMT-levan composites plasticized by 10-15 wt% water. XRD patterns from levan-MMT composites indicate an MMT interlayer spacing 0.62 nm greater than that of the starting MMT, suggesting re-stacking of MMT platelets coated by adsorbed, uncoiled levan molecules. FTIR results suggest that levan adheres to MMT via water-mediated hydrogen bonding between the levan's hydroxyl groups and MMT surface oxygens. MMT-levan composites have improved thermal stability and a well-defined glass transition temperature that increases with MMT loading. The tensile moduli of levan-MMT composites increase by as much as 480% relative to pure levan. The XRD and mechanical property results suggest that MMT reinforces levan through a filler network structure composed of MMT platelets bridged by adsorbed levan molecules, enhanced when the MMT loading becomes high enough (5-10wt% MMT) to induce an isotropic-nematic transition in MMT platelet orientation. PMID:24299812

  7. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Praseodymium Monopnictides: AN Ultrasonic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Kumar, Raj; Tripathy, Chinmayee; Singh, Devraj

    2013-09-01

    We have computed ultrasonic attenuation, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic velocities of praseodymium monopnictides PrX(X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) along the <100>, <110>, <111> in the temperature range 100-500 K using higher order elastic constants. The higher order elastic constants are evaluated using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential with two basic parameters viz. nearest-neighbor distance and hardness parameter in the temperature range of 0-500 K. Several other mechanical and thermal parameters like bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, anisotropic ratio, tetragonal moduli, Breazeale's nonlinearity parameter and Debye temperature are also calculated. In the present study, the fracture/toughness (B/G) ratio is less than 1.75 which implies that PrX compounds are brittle in nature at room temperature. The chosen material fulfilled Born criterion of mechanical stability. We also found the deviation of Cauchy's relation at higher temperatures. PrN is most stable material as it has highest valued higher order elastic constants as well as the ultrasonic velocity. Further, the lattice thermal conductivity using modified approach of Slack and Berman is determined at room temperature. The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction and thermoelastic relaxation mechanisms have been computed using modified Mason's approach. The results with other well-known physical properties are useful for industrial applications.

  8. Interfaces with Tunable Mechanical and Radiosensitizing Properties.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nora G; Pearce, Brady L; Snyder, Patrick J; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Nolan, Michael W; Adhikari, Prajesh; Khan, Saad A; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-08-31

    We report the fabrication of a composite containing nanostructured GaOOH and Matrigel with tunable radiosensitizing and stiffness properties. Composite characterization was done with microscopy and rheology. The utility of the interface was tested in vitro using fibroblasts. Cell viability and reactive oxygen species assays quantified the effects of radiation dosages and GaOOH concentrations. Fibroblasts' viability decreased with increasing concentration of GaOOH and composite stiffness. During ionizing radiation experiments the presence of the scintillating GaOOH triggered a different cellular response. Reactive oxygen species data demonstrated that one can reduce the amount of radiation needed to modulate the behavior of cells on interfaces with different stiffness containing a radiosensitizing material. PMID:26882455

  9. Mechanical properties of the porcine bile duct wall

    PubMed Central

    Duch, Birgitte U; Andersen, Helle; Gregersen, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Background and Aim The function of the common bile duct is to transport bile from the liver and the gall bladder to the duodenum. Since the bile duct is a distensible tube consisting mainly of connective tissue, it is important to obtain data on the passive mechanical wall properties. The aims of this study were to study morphometric and biomechanical wall properties during distension of the bile duct. Methods Ten normal porcine common bile ducts were examined in vitro. A computer-controlled volume ramp infusion system with concomitant pressure recordings was constructed. A video camera provided simultaneous measurement of outer dimensions of the common bile duct. Wall stresses and strains were computed. Results The common bile duct length increased by 25% from 24.4 ± 1.8 mm at zero pressure to 30.5 ± 2.0 mm at 5 kPa (p < 0.01). The diameter increased less than 10% in the same pressure range from 8.6 ± 0.4 mm to 9.3 ± 0.4 mm (p < 0.01). The stress-strain relations showed an exponential behavior with a good fit to the equation: σ = α . (exp(βε) - 1). The circumferential stress-strain curve was shifted to the left when compared to the longitudinal stress-strain curve, i.e. the linear constants (α values) were different (p < 0.01) whereas the exponential constants (β values) did not differ (p > 0.5). Conclusion The porcine bile duct exhibited nonlinear anisotropic mechanical properties. PMID:15260881

  10. Characterising Mechanical Properties of Braided and Woven Textile Composite Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauda, Benjamin; Oyadiji, S. Olutunde; Potluri, Prasad

    2009-02-01

    The focus of this paper is on the manufacture of textile composite beams and on the determination of their mechanical properties. This includes investigating the effects of fibre orientation on the mechanical properties of braided and woven textile composites. Composites were manufactured from nominally identical constituents and identical consolidation processes, leaving as the only variables, variations caused by the different fibre architecture of the preform. The repeatability and, hence, reliability of this approach is demonstrated. Results obtained show that fibre architecture affects composite strength and extensibility. Composites with woven preforms are practically linear up to catastrophic failure while composites with braided preforms exhibit non-linearity prior to failure. Also the mechanical properties of the textile composite beams were determined. Results show that by tailoring the braid angle and pick density of braided and woven composite performs, the mechanical properties of the composite beams can be controlled to suit end-use requirement.

  11. Tailoring of mechanical properties of hydroformed aluminum tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Lavender, Curt A.

    2007-07-06

    Tailoring of the mechanical properties of hydroformed aluminum 6063-T4 tubes to those of aluminum 6063-T6 was performed by heat treatment. Quasi-static tensile tests and a SEM analysis were conducted to evaluate the change of the mechanical properties. The experimental results of the hydroformed tubes in T4 condition (before the heat treatment) show significant variations of the mechanical properties along the length due to the different extents of work hardening by hydroforming. The experimental results of the hydroformed tubes in T6 condition (after the heat treatment) show that the precipitation hardening successfully removed the effects of the non-uniform work hardening and resulted in the uniform mechanical properties in the tube.

  12. Mechanisms Responsible for Microwave Properties in High Performance Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengke

    Microwave properties of low-loss commercial dielectric materials are optimized by adding transition-metal dopants or alloying agents (i.e. Ni, Co, Mn) to tune the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (tau f) to zero. This occurs as a result of the temperature dependence of dielectric constant offsetting the thermal expansion. At cryogenic temperatures, the microwave loss in these dielectric materials is dominated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) loss, which results from the spin-excitations of d-shell electron spins in exchange-coupled clusters. We show that the origin of the observed magnetically-induced shifts in the dielectric resonator frequency originates from the same mechanism, as described by the Kramers-Kronig relations. The temperature coefficient of resonator frequency, tauf, is related to three material parameters according to the equation, tau f = - (½ tauepsilon + ½ taumu + alphaL), where tauepsilon, taumu , and alphaL are the temperature coefficient of dielectric constant, magnetic permeability, and lattice constant, respectively. Each of these parameters for dielectric materials of interest are measured experimentally. These results, in combination with density functional simulations, developed a much improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for tau f. The same experimental methods have been used to characterize in-situ the physical nature and concentration of performance-degrading point defects in the dielectrics of superconducting planar microwave resonators.

  13. Production, structure, texture, and mechanical properties of severely deformed magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. Yu.; Antonova, O. V.; Kamenetskii, B. I.; Klyukin, I. V.; Komkova, D. A.; Antonov, B. D.

    2016-05-01

    Methods of the severe plastic deformation (SPD) of pure magnesium at room temperature, namely, transverse extrusion and hydroextrusion in a self-destroyed shell, have been developed. The maximum true strain of the samples after the hydroextrusion was e ~ 3.2; in the course of transverse extrusion and subsequent cold rolling, a true strain of e ~ 6.0 was achieved. The structure and mechanical properties of the magnesium samples have been studied in different structural states. It has been shown that the SPD led to a decrease in the grain size d to ~2 μm; the relative elongation at fracture δ increased to ~20%. No active twinning has been revealed. The reasons for the high plasticity of magnesium after SPD according to the deformation modes suggested are discussed from the viewpoint of the hierarchy of the observed structural states.

  14. Thermo-mechanical properties of polyester mortar using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Craft, A.P.

    1997-07-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of polyester mortar (PM) using unsaturated polyester resins based on recycled PET are investigated in this paper (the recycled PET waste is mainly obtained from used plastic beverage bottles). The use of recycled PET in PM formulation is important because it helps produce good quality PM at a relatively low cost, save energy and alleviate an environmental problem posed by plastic wastes. PM construction applications include the repair of dams, piers, runways, bridges and other structures. Test results show that the effective use of PM overlays on portland cement concrete slabs is best achieved by utilizing flexible resins with low modulus and high elongation capacity at failure. The use of flexible resins in PM production is especially important in situations involving large thermal movements.

  15. Mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite/mica composite.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Herø, H; Jørgensen, R B

    1994-01-01

    Bend specimens of the inorganic synthetic materials hydroxyapatite (HA) and a composite of hydroxyapatite/muscovite mica have been prepared and tested mechanically. Sintering followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) without encapsulation gave an increased strength for HA alone, but no significant increase in strength compared with sintering alone for HA/mica composites. The bend strength of the HA/mica composite was inferior to that of HA alone, the reason being inadequate bonding between HA and mica. HIP in glass capsules and an increased cold compaction pressure tended to improve the bend strength of the composite. Corrosion in tris for 7 d did not affect the bend strength of the investigated materials significantly. PMID:7950878

  16. Processing effects on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishi, Toshihito; German, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys exhibit significant mechanical property sensitivities to the fabrication variables. These sensitivities are illustrated in this examination of vacuum sintering and the effects of composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys. Measurements were conducted to assess the density, strength, hardness, and elongation dependencies. A detrimental aspect of vacuum sintering is matrix phase evaporation, although vacuum sintering does eliminate the need for postsintering heat treatments.

  17. Structure, mechanical properties, and fracture of 20GL cast steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Klyueva, S. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of 20GL steel are studied. It is shown that a significant decrease in the ductility and impact toughness of the steel is caused by intercrystalline fracture, which is induced by a weakening of the intercrystallite bonds due to the existence of coarse lamellar pearlite and nonmetallic inclusions, namely, film inclusions and eutectic-type oxysulfides, at the boundaries of primary crystals. Annealing from a temperature in the intercritical range is found to improve the mechanical properties.

  18. Primate dietary ecology in the context of food mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Coiner-Collier, Susan; Scott, Robert S; Chalk-Wilayto, Janine; Cheyne, Susan M; Constantino, Paul; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Elgart, Alison A; Glowacka, Halszka; Loyola, Laura C; Ossi-Lupo, Kerry; Raguet-Schofield, Melissa; Talebi, Mauricio G; Sala, Enrico A; Sieradzy, Pawel; Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J; Wright, Barth W; Yamashita, Nayuta; Lucas, Peter W; Vogel, Erin R

    2016-09-01

    Substantial variation exists in the mechanical properties of foods consumed by primate species. This variation is known to influence food selection and ingestion among non-human primates, yet no large-scale comparative study has examined the relationships between food mechanical properties and feeding strategies. Here, we present comparative data on the Young's modulus and fracture toughness of natural foods in the diets of 31 primate species. We use these data to examine the relationships between food mechanical properties and dietary quality, body mass, and feeding time. We also examine the relationship between food mechanical properties and categorical concepts of diet that are often used to infer food mechanical properties. We found that traditional dietary categories, such as folivory and frugivory, did not faithfully track food mechanical properties. Additionally, our estimate of dietary quality was not significantly correlated with either toughness or Young's modulus. We found a complex relationship among food mechanical properties, body mass, and feeding time, with a potential interaction between median toughness and body mass. The relationship between mean toughness and feeding time is straightforward: feeding time increases as toughness increases. However, when considering median toughness, the relationship with feeding time may depend upon body mass, such that smaller primates increase their feeding time in response to an increase in median dietary toughness, whereas larger primates may feed for shorter periods of time as toughness increases. Our results emphasize the need for additional studies quantifying the mechanical and chemical properties of primate diets so that they may be meaningfully compared to research on feeding behavior and jaw morphology. PMID:27542555

  19. Mechanical and Electromechanical Properties of Semiconducting and Metallic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal Montoya, Rodrigo A.

    Nanowires are envisioned as the building blocks of future electronics, sensing and actuation devices, nanostructured materials, among many applications. This technological potential arises because the properties of nanowires tend to be superior to those of bulk structures. However, unambiguous characterization of these properties has not been yet achieved, due to the challenging nature of nanoscale experimentation. In this thesis, we aimed at advancing the unambiguous characterization of mechanical and electromechanical properties of nanowires, by employing and improving MEMS-based (Microelectromechanical Systems) characterization technologies, which allow in-situ electron microscopy testing. Furthermore, we coupled the experimental results with atomistic simulations in order to attain fundamental understanding, and allow the determination of structure-property relations. This synergy between experiments and simulations also provides guidelines for improvements in both the experimental and computational techniques. In the context of semiconducting specimens, we characterized the elastic modulus of GaN nanowires. We find that below 20 nm in diameter, the nanowires display enhanced elastic moduli. Above this size, nanowires show bulk behavior. The measured trends are consistent both in experiments and simulations. The modulus enhancement is caused by local contraction of the atomic bonds near the surface of the nanowires, which leads to a locally higher modulus at the surface. For metallic specimens, we characterized the mechanical behavior of fivefold-twinned silver nanowires below 120 nm in diameter. To better match the loading condition between experiments and simulations, we implement a MEMS device for displacement-controlled testing, and subsequently employ it to characterize the cyclic plastic behavior of the nanowires. Experimentally, Bauschinger effect and partial recovery of the plastic deformation are observed. In-situ TEM experiments and atomistic

  20. Alterations in mechanical properties are associated with prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejian; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Yingxi; Zong, Huafeng; Che, Xiangyu; Zheng, Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Zheng; Yang, Deyong; Song, Xishuang

    2014-03-01

    Cancer progression and metastasis have been shown to be accompanied by alterations in the mechanical properties of tissues, but the relationship between the mechanical properties and malignant behavior in prostate cancer (Pca) is less clear. The aims of this study were to detect the mechanical properties of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and Pca tissues on both the macro- and micro-scales, to explore the relationships between mechanical properties and malignant behavior and, finally, to identify the important molecules in the mechanotransduction signaling pathway. We demonstrated that the strain index of Pca tissue was significantly higher than that of BPH tissue on the macro-scale but the Young's modulus of the Pca tissues, especially in advanced Pca, was lower than that of BPH tissues on the micro-scale. These two seemingly contradictory results can be explained by the excessive proliferation of tumor cells (Ki-67) and the degradation of scaffold proteins (collagens). These data indicate that alterations of the macro- and micro-mechanical properties of Pca tissues with malignant behavior are contradictory. The mechanical properties of tissues might be useful as a new risk factor for malignancy and metastasis in Pca. Furthermore, collagens, matrix metalloproteinase, fibronectin, and integrins might be the important molecules in the mechanotransduction signaling pathway. PMID:24504844

  1. Understanding and Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of LIGA Fabricated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Lavan, D.A.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-25

    LIGA fabricated materials and components exhibit several processing issues affecting their metallurgical and mechanical properties, potentially limiting their usefulness for MEMS applications. For example, LIGA processing by metal electrodeposition is very sensitive to deposition conditions which causes significant processing lot variations of mechanical and metallurgical properties. Furthermore, the process produces a material with a highly textured lenticular rnicrostructural morphology suggesting an anisotropic material response. Understanding and controlling out-of-plane anisotropy is desirable for LIGA components designed for out-of-plane flexures. Previous work by the current authors focused on results from a miniature servo-hydraulic mechanical test frame constructed for characterizing LIGA materials. Those results demonstrated microstructural and mechanical properties dependencies with plating bath current density in LIGA fabricated nickel (LIGA Ni). This presentation builds on that work and fosters a methodology for controlling the properties of LIGA fabricated materials through processing. New results include measurement of mechanical properties of LIGA fabricated copper (LIGA Cu), out-of-plane and localized mechanical property measurements using compression testing and nanoindentation of LIGA Ni and LIGA Cu.

  2. In Vitro Tissue Differentiation using Dynamics of Tissue Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chiang; Phillips, Paul J.

    2002-03-01

    Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties of various human tissue types were studied at macroscopic as well as microscopic level in vitro. This study was conducted to enable the development of a feedback system based on dynamics of tissue mechanical properties for intraoperative guidance for tumor treatment (e.g., RF ablation of liver tumor) and noninvasive tumor localization. Human liver tissues, including normal, cancerous, and cirrhotic tissues, were obtained from patients receiving liver transplant or tumor resection at Vanderbilt University Medical Center with the approval of the Vanderbilt Institutional Review Board. Tissue samples, once resected from the patients, were snap-frozen using liquid nitrogen and stored at -70 oC. Measurements of the mechanical properties of these tissue samples were conducted at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties were measured from both native and thermally coagulated tissue samples at macroscopic and microscopic level. Preliminary results suggest the dynamics of mechanical properties of normal liver tissues are very different from those of cancerous liver tissues. The correlation between the dynamics of mechanical properties at macroscopic level and those at microscopic level is currently under investigation.

  3. Predict compositions and mechanical properties of sugar beet using hyperspectral scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose, soluble solids, and moisture content and mechanical properties are important quality/property attributes of sugar beet. In this study, hyperspectral scattering images for the spectral region of 500-1,000 nm were acquired from 398 beet slices, from which relative mean spectra were calculated...

  4. Mechanical properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-07-01

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens for a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The first of the new alloys was a simple ternary alloy with iron, aluminum, and chromium contents that matched the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. Three heats were produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. Additions of titanium or yttrium were included. The ductile-to brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with the yttrium addition showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of over 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150{degrees}C, compared to approximately 300{degrees}C for FA-129.

  5. STARCH FILLED TERNARY POLYMER COMPOSITES I: DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been shown that the dynamic mechanical properties of starch filled blends of polyethylene (PE) and poly (hydroxy ester ether) (PHEE) are strongly dependent on the properties and distribution of the minor component of the blend (PHEE). The effect of this minor component on the viscoelastic pr...

  6. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Buyakova, S. Kulkov, S.; Sablina, T.

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  7. Mechanical properties of lanthanum and yttrium chromites

    SciTech Connect

    Paulik, S.W.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    In an operating high-temperature (1000{degrees}C) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the interconnect separates the fuel (P(O{sub 2}){approx}10{sup -16} atm) and the oxidant (P(O2){approx}10{sup 0.2} atm), while being electrically conductive and connecting the cells in series. Such severe atmospheric and thermal demands greatly reduce the number of viable candidate materials. Only two materials, acceptor substituted lanthanum chromite and yttrium chromite, meet these severe requirements. In acceptor substituted chromites (Sr{sup 2+} or Ca{sup 2+} for La{sup 3+}), charge compensation is primarily electronic in oxidizing conditions (through the formation of Cr{sup 4+}). Under reducing conditions, ionic charge compensation becomes significant as the lattice becomes oxygen deficient. The formation of oxygen vacancies is accompanied by the reduction of Cr{sup 4+} ions to Cr{sup 3+} and a resultant lattice expansion. The lattice expansion observed in large chemical potential gradients is not desirable and has been found to result in greatly reduced mechanical strength.

  8. Mechanical and Thermophysical Properties of Cerium Monopnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Singh, Devraj; Jain, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction, thermoelastic relaxation and dislocation damping mechanisms has been investigated in cerium monopnictides CeX (X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) for longitudinal and shear waves along {< }100{rangle }, {< }110{rangle } and {< }111{rangle } directions. The second- and third-order elastic constants of CeX have also been computed in the temperature range 0 K to 500 K using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential upto second nearest neighbours. The computed values of these elastic constants have been applied to find out Young's moduli, bulk moduli, Breazeale's non-linearity parameters, Zener anisotropy, ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic Grüneisen parameter, thermal relaxation time, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic attenuation. The fracture/toughness ratio is less than 1.75, which shows that the chosen materials are brittle in nature as found for other monopnictides. The drag coefficient acting on the motion of screw and edge dislocations due to shear and compressional phonon viscosities of the lattice have also been evaluated for both the longitudinal and shear waves. The thermoelastic loss and dislocation damping loss are negligible in comparison to loss due to Akhieser damping (phonon-phonon interaction). The obtained results for CeX are in qualitative agreement with other semi-metallic monopnictides.

  9. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyakova, S.; Sablina, T.; Kulkov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO2(MgO), ZrO2(Y2O3) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO2 powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO2 grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  10. Measuring the mechanical properties of molecular conformers

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, S. P.; Taylor, S.; Baran, J. D.; Champness, N. R.; Larsson, J. A.; Moriarty, P.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning probe-actuated single molecule manipulation has proven to be an exceptionally powerful tool for the systematic atomic-scale interrogation of molecular adsorbates. To date, however, the extent to which molecular conformation affects the force required to push or pull a single molecule has not been explored. Here we probe the mechanochemical response of two tetra(4-bromophenyl)porphyrin conformers using non-contact atomic force microscopy where we find a large difference between the lateral forces required for manipulation. Remarkably, despite sharing very similar adsorption characteristics, variations in the potential energy surface are capable of prohibiting probe-induced positioning of one conformer, while simultaneously permitting manipulation of the alternative conformational form. Our results are interpreted in the context of dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations which reveal significant differences in the diffusion barriers for each conformer. These results demonstrate that conformational variation significantly modifies the mechanical response of even simple porpyhrins, potentially affecting many other flexible molecules. PMID:26388232

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  12. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Gels; Stress from Confined Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    George W. Scherer

    2009-12-01

    Abstract for Grant DE-FG02-97ER45642 Period: 1997-2002 Mechanical Properties of Gels 2002-2008 Stress from Confined Fluids Principal investigator: Prof. George W. Scherer Dept. Civil & Env. Eng./PRISM Eng. Quad. E-319 Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Recipient organization: Trustees of Princeton University 4 New South Princeton, NJ 08544 USA Abstract: The initial stage of this project, entitled Mechanical Properties of Gels, was dedicated to characterizing and explaining the properties of inorganic gels. Such materials, made by sol-gel processing, are of interest for fabrication of films, fibers, optical devices, advanced insulation and other uses. However, their poor mechanical properties are an impediment in some applications, so understanding the origin of these properties could lead to enhanced performance. Novel experimental methods were developed and applied to measure the stiffness and permeability of gels and aerogels. Numerical simulations were developed to reproduce the growth process of the gels, resulting in structures whose mechanical properties matched the measurements. The models showed that the gels are formed by the growth of relatively robust clusters of molecules that are joined by tenuous links whose compliance compromises the stiffness of the structure. Therefore, synthetic methods that enhance the links could significantly increase the rigidity of such gels. The next stage of the project focused on Stress from Confined Fluids. The first problem of interest was the enhanced thermal expansion coefficient of water that we measured in the nanometric pores of cement paste. This could have a deleterious effect on the resistance of concrete to rapid heating in fires, because the excessive thermal expansion of water in the pores of the concrete could lead to spalling and collapse. A series of experiments demonstrated that the expansion of water increases as the pore size decreases. To explain this behavior, we undertook a collaboration with Prof. Stephen

  14. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  17. Mechanical properties of turbine blade alloys in hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical properties of single crystal turbine blade alloys in a gaseous hydrogen environment were determined. These alloys are proposed for use in space propulsion systems in pure or partial high pressure hydrogen environments at elevated temperatures. Mechanical property tests included: tensile, creep, low fatigue (LCF), and crack growth. Specimens were in both transverse and longitudinal directions relative to the casting solidification direction. Testing was conducted on solid specimens exposed to externally pressurized environments of gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched steam.

  18. Dispositional mindfulness in trauma recovery: Prospective relations and mediating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nitzan-Assayag, Yaara; Aderka, Idan M; Bernstein, Amit

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the protective properties and candidate mediating processes (cognitive fusion and cognitive suppression) linking dispositional mindfulness to distal risk factors (negative affect, anxiety sensitivity, rumination) and psychopathology symptom outcomes (depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms) following trauma exposure. To do so, a community-based sample of adults was longitudinally studied in the six-months following exposure--within 30-days (T1), 3-months (T2), and 6-months (T3)--to a shared disaster-related potentially traumatic event (PTE). Specifically, we found that cognitive fusion predicted, and mediated, the effect of mindfulness on outcomes related to distress post-trauma including negative affect, depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Complementary to these effects, we found that cognitive suppression predicted, and mediated, the effect of mindfulness on distal risk factors linked to negative self-referential processes including rumination and anxiety sensitivity. Findings are discussed with respect to their theoretical and clinical implications for the potential role and mechanisms of mindfulness in recovery following trauma. PMID:26401969

  19. Mechanical and biological properties of keratose biomaterials.

    PubMed

    de Guzman, Roche C; Merrill, Michelle R; Richter, Jillian R; Hamzi, Rawad I; Greengauz-Roberts, Olga K; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2011-11-01

    The oxidized form of extractable human hair keratin proteins, commonly referred to as keratose, is gaining interest as a biomaterial for multiple tissue engineering studies including those directed toward peripheral nerve, spinal cord, skin, and bone regeneration. Unlike its disulfide cross-linked counterpart, kerateine, keratose does not possess a covalently cross-linked network structure and consequently displays substantially different characteristics. In order to understand its mode(s) of action and potential for clinical translatability, detailed characterization of the composition, physical properties, and biological responses of keratose biomaterials are needed. Keratose was obtained from end-cut human hair fibers by peracetic acid treatment, followed by base extraction, and subsequent dialysis. Analysis of lyophilized keratose powder determined that it contains 99% proteins by mass with amino acid content similar to human hair cortex. Metallic elements were also found in minute quantities. Protein oxidation led to disulfide bond cleavage and drastic reduction of free thiols due to conversion of sulfhydryl to sulfonic acid, chain fragmentation, and amino acid modifications. Mass spectrometry identified the major protein constituents as a heterogeneous mixture of 15 hair keratins (type I: K31-35 and K37-39, and type II: K81-86) with small amounts of epithelial keratins which exist in monomeric, dimeric, multimeric, and even degraded forms. Re-hydration with PBS enabled molecular assembly into an elastic solid-like hydrogel. Highly-porous scaffolds formed by lyophilization of the gel had the compression behavior of a cellular foam material and reverted back to gel upon wetting. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the EC50 for various cell lines were attained at 8-10 mg/mL keratose, indicating the non-toxic nature of the material. Implantation in mouse subcutaneous tissue pockets demonstrated that keratose resorption follows a rectangular hyperbolic regression

  20. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  1. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  2. Mechanical properties of metallic thin films: theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong, Duong Dai; Hoa, Nguyen Thi; Van Hung, Vu; Khoa, Doan Quoc; Hieu, Ho Khac

    2016-03-01

    The statistical moment method in statistical mechanics was developed to investigate the mechanical properties of free-standing metallic thin films at ambient conditions including the anharmonicity effects of thermal lattice vibrations. Analytical expressions of isothermal areal modulus B T , Young's modulus E and shear modulus G were derived in terms of the power moments of the atomic displacements. Numerical calculations have been performed for metallic Ni, Au and Al thin films, and compared with those of bulk metals. This method is physically transparent and it successfully described the temperature effects on mechanical properties of metallic thin films.

  3. Lithophysal Rock Mass Mechanical Properties of the Repository Host Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    D. Rigby

    2004-11-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop estimates of key mechanical properties for the lithophysal rock masses of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) within the repository host horizon, including their uncertainties and spatial variability. The mechanical properties to be characterized include an elastic parameter, Young's modulus, and a strength parameter, uniaxial compressive strength. Since lithophysal porosity is used as a surrogate property to develop the distributions of the mechanical properties, an estimate of the distribution of lithophysal porosity is also developed. The resulting characterizations of rock parameters are important for supporting the subsurface design, developing the preclosure safety analysis, and assessing the postclosure performance of the repository (e.g., drift degradation and modeling of rockfall impacts on engineered barrier system components).

  4. A simple auxetic tubular structure with tuneable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xin; Shen, Jianhu; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Tian, Hongqi; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-06-01

    Auxetic materials and structures are increasingly used in various fields because of their unusual properties. Auxetic tubular structures have been fabricated and studied due to their potential to be adopted as oesophageal stents where only tensile auxetic performance is required. However, studies on compressive mechanical properties of auxetic tubular structures are limited in the current literature. In this paper, we developed a simple tubular structure which exhibits auxetic behaviour in both compression and tension. This was achieved by extending a design concept recently proposed by the authors for generating 3D metallic auxetic metamaterials. Both compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the auxetic tubular structure were investigated. It was found that the methodology for generating 3D auxetic metamaterials could be effectively used to create auxetic tubular structures as well. By properly adjusting certain parameters, the mechanical properties of the designed auxetic tubular structure could be easily tuned.

  5. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Arash, B; Wang, Q; Varadan, V K

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  6. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-10-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region.

  7. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Arash, B.; Wang, Q.; Varadan, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, such as high elastic modulus and tensile strength, make them the most ideal and promising reinforcements in substantially enhancing the mechanical properties of resulting polymer/carbon nanotube composites. It is acknowledged that the mechanical properties of the composites are significantly influenced by interfacial interactions between nanotubes and polymer matrices. The current challenge of the application of nanotubes in the composites is hence to determine the mechanical properties of the interfacial region, which is critical for improving and manufacturing the nanocomposites. In this work, a new method for evaluating the elastic properties of the interfacial region is developed by examining the fracture behavior of carbon nanotube reinforced poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix composites under tension using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the aspect ratio of carbon nanotube reinforcements on the elastic properties, i.e. Young's modulus and yield strength, of the interfacial region and the nanotube/polymer composites are investigated. The feasibility of a three-phase micromechanical model in predicting the elastic properties of the nanocomposites is also developed based on the understanding of the interfacial region. PMID:25270167

  8. Mechanics of intraply hybrid composites - Properties, analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    A mechanics theory is developed for predicting the physical thermal, hygral and mechanical properties (including various strengths) of unidirectional intraply hybrid composites (UIHC) based on unidirectional properties of the constituent composites. Procedures are described which can use this theory in conjunction with composite mechanics computer codes and general purpose structural analysis finite element programs for the analysis/design of structural components made from intraply hybrid angleplied laminates (IHAL). Comparisons with limited data show that this theory predicts mechanical properties of UIHC and flexural stiffnesses of IHAL which are in good agreement with experimental data. The theory developed herein makes it possible to design and optimize structural components from IHAL based on a large class of available constituent fibers.

  9. Mechanical properties of graphene and boronitrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, R. C.; Mapasha, R. E.; Ukpong, A. M.; Chetty, N.

    2012-03-01

    We present an equation of state (EOS) that describes how the hydrostatic change in surface area is related to two-dimensional in-plane pressure (F) and yields the measure of a material's resilience to isotropic stretching (the layer modulus γ) as one of its fit parameters. We give results for the monolayer systems of graphene and boronitrene, and we also include results for Si, Ge, GeC, and SiC in the isostructural honeycomb structure for comparison. Our results show that, of the honeycomb structures, graphene is the most resilient to stretching with a value of γC = 206.6 N m-1, second is boronitrene with γBN = 177.0 N m-1, followed by γSiC = 116.5 N m-1, γGeC = 101.0 N m-1, γSi = 44.5 N m-1, and γGe = 29.6 N m-1. We calculate the Young's and shear moduli from the elastic constants and find that, in general, they rank according to the layer modulus. We also find that the calculated layer modulus matches the one obtained from the EOS. We use the EOS to predict the isotropic intrinsic strength of the various systems and find that, in general, the intrinsic stresses also rank according to the layer modulus. Graphene and boronitrene have comparable strengths with intrinsic stresses of 29.4 and 26.0 N m-1, respectively. We considered four graphene allotropes including pentaheptite and graphdiyne and find that pentaheptite has a value for γ comparable to graphene. We find a phase transition from graphene to graphdiyne at F = -7.0 N m-1. We also consider bilayer, trilayer, and four-layered graphene and find that the addition of extra layers results in a linear dependence of γ with F.

  10. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  11. Understanding nanoscale mechanical properties of materials using ultrafast EUV photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeboom-Pot, K.; Turgut, E.; Shaw, J.; Hernandez-Charpak, J.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Nardi, D.

    2014-03-01

    How do the elastic properties of materials evolve as a nanostructure builds up layer by layer? A host of questions in nanoscience, nanotechnology, quantum dot systems and more rely on an answer to this issue; but our ability to probe mechanical properties is severely constrained at dimensions below 100 nm. With tabletop high harmonic generation (HHG), we overcome these limitations by extending non-destructive visible photoacoustics to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The short wavelength of EUV light, combined with the coherence and ultrashort pulses of HHG creates a unique and powerful probe of nanostructured materials on their intrinsic length and time scales. We study a series of ultrathin bilayer (10-nm Ni/0-6-nm Ta) nanostructures on SiO2 substrates. A femtosecond infrared pulse excites longitudinal acoustic waves (LAWs) within the nanostructures and surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in the substrate. Diffraction of a time-delayed EUV probe pulse monitors the dynamics. LAW resonances are directly related to the bilayer thickness and effective speed of sound; their dependence on Ta-layer thickness reveals that the LAW velocities of both Ni and Ta differ from bulk values. The changing mass of Ta also affects the SAW frequency, allowing us to extract nanoscale densities. This work was supported by the SRC Contract 2012-OJ-2304, by NSF Award No.: DGE 1144083, and used facilities provided by the NSF Engineering Research Center in EUV Science and Technology.

  12. Mechanical properties of jennite: A theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Juhyuk; Yoon, Seyoon; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of jennite. To date, several hypotheses have been proposed to predict the structural properties of jennite. For the first time as reported herein, the isothermal bulk modulus of jennite was measured experimentally. Synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments were performed to observe the variation of lattice parameters under pressure. First-principles calculations were applied to compare with the experimental results and predict additional structural properties. Accurately measured isothermal bulk modulus herein (K{sub 0} = 64(2) GPa) and the statistical assessment on experimental and theoretical results suggest reliable mechanical properties of shear and Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and elastic tensor coefficients. Determination of these fundamental structural properties is the first step toward greater understanding of calcium–silicate–hydrate, as well as provides a sound foundation for forthcoming atomic level simulations.

  13. Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites: mechanical properties and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Anesi, Alexandre; Salvatori, Roberta; Chiarini, Luigi; Cannillo, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites for bone tissue repair and regeneration have been produced and discussed. The use of a recently developed glass, namely BG_Ca/Mix, with its low tendency to crystallize, allowed one to sinter the samples at a relatively low temperature thus avoiding several adverse effects usually reported in the literature, such as extensive crystallization of the glassy phase, hydroxyapatite (HA) decomposition and reaction between HA and glass. The mechanical properties of the composites with 80wt.% BG_Ca/Mix and 20wt.% HA are sensibly higher than those of Bioglass® 45S5 reference samples due to the presence of HA (mechanically stronger than the 45S5 glass) and to the thermal behaviour of the BG_Ca/Mix, which is able to favour the sintering process of the composites. Biocompatibility tests, performed with murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 and osteocites MLO-Y4 throughout a multi-parametrical approach, allow one to look with optimism to the produced composites, since both the samples themselves and their extracts do not induce negative effects in cell viability and do not cause inhibition in cell growth. PMID:25842126

  14. Probing mechanical properties of fully hydrated gels and biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Georgios; Kalcioglu, Z Ilke; McFarland, Meredith; Smith, James F; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2008-11-14

    A longstanding challenge in accurate mechanical characterization of engineered and biological tissues is maintenance of both stable sample hydration and high instrument signal resolution. Here, we describe the modification of an instrumented indenter to accommodate nanomechanical characterization of biological and synthetic tissues in liquid media, and demonstrate accurate acquisition of force-displacement data that can be used to extract viscoelastoplastic properties of hydrated gels and tissues. We demonstrate the validity of this approach via elastoplastic analysis of relatively stiff, water-insensitive materials of elastic moduli E>1000 kPa (borosilicate glass and polypropylene), and then consider the viscoelastic response and representative mechanical properties of compliant, synthetic polymer hydrogels (polyacrylamide-based hydrogels of varying mol%-bis crosslinker) and biological tissues (porcine skin and liver) of E<500 kPa. Indentation responses obtained via loading/unloading hystereses and contact creep loading were highly repeatable, and the inferred E were in good agreement with available macroscopic data for all samples. As expected, increased chemical crosslinking of polyacrylamide increased stiffness (E40 kPa) and decreased creep compliance. E of porcine liver (760 kPa) and skin (222 kPa) were also within the range of macroscopic measurements reported for a limited subset of species and disease states. These data show that instrumented indentation of fully immersed samples can be reliably applied for materials spanning several orders of magnitude in stiffness (E=kPa-GPa). These capabilities are particularly important to materials design and characterization of macromolecules, cells, explanted tissues, and synthetic extracellular matrices as a function of spatial position, degree of hydration, or hydrolytic/enzymatic/corrosion reaction times. PMID:18922534

  15. Mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite whisker reinforced polyetherketoneketone composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Converse, Gabriel L; Conrad, Timothy L; Roeder, Ryan K

    2009-12-01

    The apparent mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) whisker reinforced polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) scaffolds were evaluated in unconfined, uniaxial compression to investigate the effects of the porosity (75%, 82.5% and 90%), HA content (0, 20 and 40 vol%) and mold temperature (350, 365 and 375 ( composite function)C). Increased porosity resulted in a non-linear decrease in the elastic modulus and yield strength for both reinforced and unreinforced PEKK scaffolds, as expected. The increase in elastic modulus and yield strength with increased relative density followed a power-law, similar to trabecular bone and other open-cell foams. HA whisker reinforcement generally resulted in an increased elastic modulus from 0 to 20 vol% HA and a subsequent decrease from 20 to 40 vol% HA, while the yield strength and strain were decreased in scaffolds with 40 vol% HA compared to those with 0 or 20 vol% HA. Increased mold temperature resulted in an increased elastic modulus, yield strength and yield strain. These effects enabled the mechanical properties to be tailored to mimic human trabecular bone. The elastic modulus was greater than 50 MPa, and the yield strength was greater than 0.5 MPa, for scaffolds with 75% porosity at all combinations of reinforcement level and mold temperature. Scaffolds with 75% porosity and 20 vol% HA molded at 375 ( composite function)C exhibited a mean elastic modulus and yield strength of 149 MPa and 2.2 MPa, respectively, which was the highest of the conditions investigated in this study and similar to human vertebral trabecular bone. Therefore, HA whisker reinforced PEKK scaffolds may be advantageous for permanent implant fixation, including interbody spinal fusion. PMID:19716108

  16. Multi-level femoral morphology and mechanical properties of rats of different ages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Ma, Renshi; Fang, Juan; Fan, Yobo

    2015-07-01

    A macro-micro-nano-multi-level study was conducted to explore age-related structural and mechanical properties of bone, as well as the effects of aging on bone properties. A total of 70 male Wistar rats were used, ranging in the ages of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 15, 16, and 17 months (n = 7/age group). After micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning, longitudinal cortical bone specimens with a length of 5mm were cut along the femoral shaft axis from left femur shafts for mechanical testing, and the cross-sectional areas were measured. The macro-mechanical properties obtained in mechanical testing and microarchitecture parameters measured by micro-CT were significantly correlated with the animal age (r(2) = 0.96, p < 0.001). Scanning electron microscopy was used for detecting the microarchitecture features of the fractured surfaces, which exhibited age-related plate-fibrous-mixed fibrous-plate texture, resulting in changes in macro-mechanical properties (r(2) > 0.90, p < 0.001). The mineral phase of the left femoral shaft and head was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Longitudinal and transverse trabecular bone tissues, as well as longitudinal cortical bone tissue, were used for nanoindentation test, and the chemical composition was evaluated by quantitative chemical analyses. The correlations between mineral content and bone material properties (i.e., elastic properties of the bone tissue and size and roughness of bone mineral grains) were highly significant (r > 0.95, p < 0.001). Multi-level femur morphology, mechanical property, and mineral content were significantly correlated with the animal age. The correlations between bone mineral content and bone material morphological and mechanical properties may partly explain the increase in bone fragility with aging, which will provide a theoretical basis for the investigation of age-related bone properties in clinics. PMID:25857690

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extruded Gamma Met PX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Das, G.; Locci, I.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Lerch, B. A.; Kestler, H.

    2003-01-01

    A gamma TiAl alloy with a high Nb content is being assessed as a compressor blade material. The microstructure and mechanical properties of extruded Ti-45Al-X(Nb,B,C) (at %) were evaluated in both an as-extruded condition and after a lamellar heat treatment. Tensile behavior of both as-extruded and lamellar heat treated specimens was studied in the temperature range of RT to 926 C. In general, the yield stress and ultimate tensile strength reached relatively high values at room temperature and decreased with increasing deformation temperature. The fatigue strength of both microstructures was characterized at 650 C and compared to a baseline TiAl alloy and to a Ni-base superalloy. Tensile and fatigue specimens were also exposed to 800 C for 200 h in air to evaluate the alloy's environmental resistance. A decrease in ductility was observed at room temperature due to the 800 C exposure but the 650 C fatigue properties were unaffected. Compressive and tensile creep testing between 727 and 1027 C revealed that the creep deformation was reproducible and predictable. Creep strengths reached superalloy-like levels at fast strain rates and lower temperatures but deformation at slower strain rates and/or higher temperature indicated significant weakening for the as-extruded condition. At high temperatures and low stresses, the lamellar microstructure had improved creep properties when compared to the as-extruded material. Microstructural evolution during heat treatment, identification of various phases, and the effect of microstructure on the tensile, fatigue, and creep behaviors is discussed.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Extruded Gamma Microstructure Met PX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, S. L.; Das, G.; Locci, J.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Lerch, B. A.; Kestler, H.

    2003-01-01

    A gamma TiAl alloy with a high Nb content is being assessed as a compressor blade material. The microstructure and mechanical properties of extruded Ti-45Al-X(Nb,B,C) (at.%) were evaluated in both an as-extruded condition and after a lamellar heat treatment. Tensile behavior of both as-extruded and lamellar heat treated specimens was studied in the temperature range of RT to 926 C. In general, the yield stress and ultimate tensile strength reached relatively high values at room temperature and decreased with increasing deformation temperature. The fatigue strength of both microstructures was characterized at 650 C and compared to a baseline TiAl alloy and to a Ni-base superalloy. Tensile and fatigue specimens were also exposed to 800 C for 200 h in air to evaluate the alloy's environmental resistance. A decrease in ductility was observed at room temperature due to the 800 C. exposure but the 650 C fatigue properties were unaffected. Compressive and tensile creep testing between 727 and 1027 C revealed that the creep deformation was reproducible and predictable. Creep strengths reached superalloy-like levels at fast strain rates and lower temperatures but deformation at slower strain rates and/or higher temperature indicated significant weakening for the as-extruded condition. At high temperatures and low stresses, the lamellar microstructure had improved creep properties when compared to the as-extruded material. Microstructural evolution during heat treatment, identification of various phases, and the effect of microstructure on the tensile, fatigue, and creep behaviors is discussed.

  19. Mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of bioresorbable knitted stents.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Juha-Pekka; Välimaa, Tero; Clerc, Claude; Törmälä, Pertti

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of bioresorbable knitted stents. Each stent was knitted using a single self-reinforced fibre made out of either PLLA or 96L/4D PLA or 80L/20G PLGA. The mechanical and physical properties of the fibres and stents were measured before and after gamma sterilization, as well as during in vitro degradation. The mechanical properties of the knitted stents made out of bioresorbable fibres were similar to those of commercially available metallic stents. The knitting geometry (loop height) had a marked effect on the mechanical properties of the stents. The rate of in vitro degradation in mechanical and physical properties for the PLLA and 96L/4D PLA stents was similar and significantly lower than that of the 80L/20G PLGA stents. The 80L/20G PLGA stents lost about 35% of their initial weight at 11 weeks. At this time, they had lost all their compression resistance strength. These data can be used as a guideline in planning further studies in vivo. PMID:12555898

  20. Deformation behavior and mechanical properties of amyloid protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are most often associated with their pathological role in diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but they are now increasingly being considered for uses in functional engineering materials. They are among the stiffest protein fibers known but they are also rather brittle, and it is unclear how this combination of properties affects the behavior of amyloid structures at larger length scales, such as in films, wires or plaques. Using a coarse-grained model for amyloid fibrils, we study the mechanical response of amyloid nanowires and examine fundamental mechanical properties, including mechanisms of deformation and failure under tensile loading. We also explore the effect of varying the breaking strain and adhesion strength of the constituent amyloid fibrils on the properties of the larger structure. We find that deformation in the nanowires is controlled by a combination of fibril sliding and fibril failure and that there exists a transition from brittle to ductile behavior by either increasing the fibril failure strain or decreasing the strength of adhesion between fibrils. Furthermore, our results reveal that the mechanical properties of the nanowires are quite sensitive to changes in the properties of the individual fibrils, and the larger scale structures are found to be more mechanically robust than the constituent fibrils, for all cases considered. More broadly, this work demonstrates the promise of utilizing self-assembled biological building blocks in the development of hierarchical nanomaterials. PMID:23290516

  1. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Seifi, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews published data on the mechanical properties of additively manufactured metallic materials. The additive manufacturing techniques utilized to generate samples covered in this review include powder bed fusion (e.g., EBM, SLM, DMLS) and directed energy deposition (e.g., LENS, EBF3). Although only a limited number of metallic alloy systems are currently available for additive manufacturing (e.g., Ti-6Al-4V, TiAl, stainless steel, Inconel 625/718, and Al-Si-10Mg), the bulk of the published mechanical properties information has been generated on Ti-6Al-4V. However, summary tables for published mechanical properties and/or key figures are included for each of the alloys listed above, grouped by the additive technique used to generate the data. Published values for mechanical properties obtained from hardness, tension/compression, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth, and high cycle fatigue are included for as-built, heat-treated, and/or HIP conditions, when available. The effects of test orientation/build direction on properties, when available, are also provided, along with discussion of the potential source(s) (e.g., texture, microstructure changes, defects) of anisotropy in properties. Recommendations for additional work are also provided.

  2. Relating nanomaterial properties and microbial toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials are meeting diverse needs in consumer and industrial products. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are among the most commonly used materials and their potential for adversely affecting environmental systems raises concern. Complex microbial consortia underlie environmental processes, and the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to microbial systems, and the consequent impacts on trophic balances, is particularly worrisome. The diverse array of metal and metal oxides, the different sizes and shapes that can be prepared and the variety of possible surface coatings complicate toxicity assessments. Further complicating toxicity interpretations are the diversity of microbial systems and their metabolic capabilities. Here, we review various studies focused on nanoparticle-microbial interactions in an effort to correlate the physical-chemical properties of engineered metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to their biological response. Gaining a predictive understanding of nanoparticle toxicity, based on the physical-chemical properties of the material, will be key to the design and responsible use of nanotechnologies. General conclusions regarding the parent material of the nanoparticle and nanoparticle s size and shape on potential toxicity can be made. However, the surface coating of the material, which can be altered significantly by environmental conditions, can ameliorate or promote microbial toxicity. Understanding nanoparticle transformations and how the nanoparticle surface can be designed to control toxicity represents a key area for further study. Additionally, the vast array of microbial species and their intrinsic metabolic capabilities complicates extrapolations of nanoparticle toxicity. A molecular-based understanding of the various microbial responses to nanoparticle-induced stress is needed. Ultimately, to interpret the effect and eventual fate of engineered materials in the environment, an understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle

  3. International conference on Statistical Mechanics of Plasticity and Related Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    The papers compiled in this volume are based on talks and posters given at the International Conference on "Statistical Mechanics of Plasticity and Related Instabilities", (SMPRI 2005), held at the Materials Research Center of the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, from August 29 to September 2, 2005. Our aim in organizing SMPRI 2005 was to promote and enhance interactions between researchers from the statistical physics, materials science and solid mechanics communities. While predicting the (macroscopic) deformation properties of materials is a classical topic of materials science and materials mechanics, statistical physicists have become increasingly interested in the collective processes which control the irreversible deformation of matter on microscopic and mesoscopic scales. The SMPRI 2005 meeting has been a forum for the exchange of concepts, research ideas, and results among these communities. We hope that the contributions contained in this proceedings volume will not only help to continue and deepen this exchange, but also to disseminate the results beyond the, necessarily limited, circle of the actual participants. We want to thank all contributors for the work in preparing their manuscripts. We are grateful to the institutions which have supported this conference, in particular the Asian Office for Aerospace Research and Developement (AOARD/AFOSR), the Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, the Indian Center for Scientific and Industrial Research, the Indian Defense Research and Developement Organization, The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Italy, the Indian Institute of Science, in particular the Center for Condensed Matter Theory and Materials Reseach Center, the Department of Science and Technology, India, the Materials Research Society of India, and the Karnatake State Center for Science and Technology. We would also like to thank the staff and students of Materials Research Center, Indian

  4. Microstructural influences on the mechanical properties of solder

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Goldstein, J.L.F.; Mei, Z.

    1993-04-01

    Intent of this book is to review analytic methods for predicting behavior of solder joints, based on continuum mechanics. The solder is treated as a continuous, homogeneous body, or composite of such bodies, whose mechanical behavior is uniform and governed by simple constitutive equations. The microstructure of a solder joint influences its mechanical properties in 3 ways: it governs deformation and failure; common solders deform inhomogeneously; and common solders are microstructurally unstable. The variety of microstructures often found in solder joints are briefly reviewed, and some of the ways are discussed in which the microstructure influences the common types of high-temperature mechanical behavior. 25 figs, 40 refs.

  5. Microstructure engineering from metallic powder blends for enhanced mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, P.; Fagnon, N.; Dirras, G.

    2010-07-01

    The present work focuses on the transformation of high-purity Ni powder blends of controlled volume fractions (40 and 60 %) of nanometre-sized (100 nm) and micrometre-sized (544 nm) particles into bulk samples as part of a strategy for producing ultrafine-grained materials usefully exhibiting both strength and ductility. The process involved cold isostatic pressing at 1.5 GPa and sintering. The resulting bulk samples had relative densities near 95 %, were texture-free, and exhibited two different grain size distributions with an average value of 600 ± 30 nm. The mechanical properties were investigated by compression and microhardness tests, both at room temperature, and compared to the behaviour of a sample processed from micrometre-sized powder only. Samples prepared from the blends exhibited high yield stresses of 440 and 550 MPa after compression, and they did sustain work hardening. Tests conducted before and after compression up to 50 % deformation showed the same relative amount of hardness increase around 20 %, which was three times lower than that of the monolithic sample for which a decrease of the average grain size close to 26 % was measured.

  6. Structure property relations in glassy-semicrystalline block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Vikram

    The ability of block copolymers to segregate into nanoscale morphologies makes them a versatile class of engineering materials. This work investigates the relation between the block copolymer structure and its mechanical properties, film dynamics and diffusion kinetics. The first part investigates the influence of structure on the mechanical properties of poly(cyclohexylethylene)-poly(ethylene) (PCHE-PE) block copolymer films. For lamellar block copolymers the mechanical properties depend significantly on the chain architecture (diblock, triblock and pentablock). Diblock copolymer films show complete failure at small strains and pentablock copolymer films show the toughest, response. Moreover, the orientation of the cylinders in a cylinder forming pentablock copolymer affects the toughness of the block copolymer films. In the second part, the effect of surface energy and chain architecture on the orientation of microdomains in the same block copolymer films is investigated. Cylindrical and lamellar triblock copolymers with a PE midblock orient their microdomains normal to the surface. However, a lamellar diblock copolymer prefers a parallel orientation of the sheets with an E surface. Moreover, a cylindrical triblock copolymer with a reduced surface energy poly(ethylene-butylene) midblock orders with the cylinder domains oriented parallel to the surface. Self-consistent field theory calculations suggest that the entropic cost of forming a wetting layer comprised entirely of looping blocks for the triblock architecture, a constraint absent in diblock copolymers, stabilizes the perpendicular orientation. Thus in triblock copolymers, parallel orientations are only stabilized when the surface energy of the midblock is small enough to compensate for this conformational penalty. Finally, a study of the diffusion kinetics of cylinder forming poly(styrene)-poly(ethylene) triblock (SES) and pentablock (SESES) copolymers suggests that for similar molecular weights SESES

  7. Bioinspired Reductionistic Peptide Engineering for Exceptional Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, M. B.; Raut, Devaraj; Mishra, Manish Kumar; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Govindaraju, T.

    2015-11-01

    A simple solution-processing and self-assembly approach that exploits the synergistic interactions between multiple hydrogen bonded networks and aromatic interactions was utilized to synthesize molecular crystals of cyclic dipeptides (CDPs), whose molecular weights (~0.2 kDa) are nearly three orders of magnitude smaller than that of natural structural proteins (50-300 kDa). Mechanical properties of these materials, measured using the nanoindentation technique, indicate that the stiffness and strength are comparable and sometimes better than those of natural fibres. The measured mechanical responses were rationalized by recourse to the crystallographic structural analysis and intermolecular interactions in the self-assembled single crystals. With this work we highlight the significance of developing small molecule based bioinspired design strategies to emulate biomechanical properties. A particular advantage of the successfully demonstrated reductionistic strategy of the present work is its amenability for realistic industrial scale manufacturing of designer biomaterials with desired mechanical properties.

  8. Bioinspired Reductionistic Peptide Engineering for Exceptional Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Avinash, M. B.; Raut, Devaraj; Mishra, Manish Kumar; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Govindaraju, T.

    2015-01-01

    A simple solution-processing and self-assembly approach that exploits the synergistic interactions between multiple hydrogen bonded networks and aromatic interactions was utilized to synthesize molecular crystals of cyclic dipeptides (CDPs), whose molecular weights (~0.2 kDa) are nearly three orders of magnitude smaller than that of natural structural proteins (50–300 kDa). Mechanical properties of these materials, measured using the nanoindentation technique, indicate that the stiffness and strength are comparable and sometimes better than those of natural fibres. The measured mechanical responses were rationalized by recourse to the crystallographic structural analysis and intermolecular interactions in the self-assembled single crystals. With this work we highlight the significance of developing small molecule based bioinspired design strategies to emulate biomechanical properties. A particular advantage of the successfully demonstrated reductionistic strategy of the present work is its amenability for realistic industrial scale manufacturing of designer biomaterials with desired mechanical properties. PMID:26525957

  9. Build-in Electric Field Induced Mechanical Property Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Te-Yu; Liu, Jian; Yost, Andrew J.; Chakhalian, Jacques; Freeland, John W.; Guisinger, Nathan P.

    Mechanical properties describe how materials respond to external stress. Microscopically, many intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as bond length and strength (intrinsic) and grain boundaries (extrinsic), may affect the mechanical property of the materials. In this study, we observed a change of fracturing behavior of Nb-doped SrTiO3 in a Schottky barrier near the interfaces with metallic LaNiO3 films. Through cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (XSTM/S) experiments and theoretical analysis, the observed fractured topography could be explained by the change of the bond length caused alternation of mechanical property inside the Schottky barrier. Same model could also explain the widely observed dielectric dead layer for SrTiO3 in contact with metal electrodes.

  10. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  11. Mechanical properties of β-SiC fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi A.; Kondou, Takayuki; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Ishii, Takashi; Ohyanagi, Manshi; Munir, Zuhair A.

    2005-08-01

    The consolidation of SiC nanopowder synthesized by the mechanical alloying method was subsequently accomplished by spark plasma sintering of 1700 °C for 10 min under an applied pressure of 40 MPa. The SiC sintered compact with relative density of 98% consisted of nano-sized particles smaller than 100 nm. This phenomenon resulted in the ordering process of stacking disordered structure formed by mechanical alloying. In this work, the effect of grain size and relative density on the mechanical properties were studied. The mechanical properties of sintered compacts were evaluated and compared with the reference samples fabricated from the commercial SiC powder (β-SiC, 0.3 µm, IBIDEN Co., Gifu, Japan) with sintering additive (B-C mixture). The Vickers hardness and bending strength of those sintered compacts increased with the increment of the density. However, the mechanical properties were lower than those of reference samples in case of lower density, even though the mechanical property was close to that of reference sample in case of higher density. This phenomenon was considered for the difference of bond strength between grains because those sintered compacts were fabricated without any sintering additives, while those reference samples were fabricated by accelerating the grain bonding with a sintering additive of B-C mixture. In other words, those results indicated that the effect of sintering additive affected on mechanical properties directly.

  12. Estimating Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties From Non-Invasive Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.; Webster, Laurie

    1997-01-01

    An important component in developing countermeasures for maintaining musculoskeletal integrity during long-term space flight is an effective and meaningful method of monitoring skeletal condition. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive non-invasive approach because it avoids the exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based imaging and also provides measures related to bone microstructure rather than just density. The purpose of the research for the 1996 Summer Faculty Fellowship period was to extend the usefulness of the MRI data to estimate the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. The main mechanical properties of interest are the elastic modulus and ultimate strength. Correlations are being investigated between these and fractal analysis parameters, MRI relaxation times, apparent densities, and bone mineral densities. Bone specimens from both human and equine donors have been studied initially to ensure high-quality MR images. Specimens were prepared and scanned from human proximal tibia bones as well as the equine distal radius. The quality of the images from the human bone appeared compromised due to freezing artifact, so only equine bone was included in subsequent procedures since these specimens could be acquired and imaged fresh before being frozen. MRI scans were made spanning a 3.6 cm length on each of 5 equine distal radius specimens. The images were then sent to Dr. Raj Acharya of the State University of New York at Buffalo for fractal analysis. Each piece was cut into 3 slabs approximately 1.2 cm thick and high-resolution contact radiographs were made to provide images for comparing fractal analysis with MR images. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were also made of each slab for subsequent bone mineral density determination. Slabs were cut into cubes for mechanical using a slow-speed diamond blade wafering saw (Buehler Isomet). The dimensions and wet weights of each cube specimen were measured and recorded. Wet weights

  13. Punching Deterioration Mechanism of Magnetic Properties of Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaido, Chikara; Mogi, Hisashi; Fujikura, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Jiro

    This paper discusses the deterioration mechanism of magnetic properties of cores due to punching and proposes the modeling, as the best design of motors, considering manufacturing motors, is important in order to improve the high performance of motors corresponding to energy saving. In producing motors, magnetic cores with laminated steel sheets are made of punched sheets, and then the magnetic properties of steel sheets are deteriorated by plastic deformation and the induced residual stress due to punching. In this paper, the punching deterioration mechanism is investigated by observing magnetic domains at steel surfaces near sheared parts. Tensile and compressive stresses induced at cut steel edges deteriorate the magnetic properties of punched steel sheets in high flux densities as the compression deterioration is stronger than the tension improvement, and improve permeabilities at low magnetic field because the increases in permeabilities with tensile stresses are emphasized. Therefore, it is necessary to model the magnetic properties of motor magnetic cores, taking account of these magnetic phenomena.

  14. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogen Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Jie; Jaffe, Richard L.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examined the electronic and mechanical properties of hydrogen functionalized carbon nanotubes. The functionalization pattern covers two extreme groups. One group has randomly selected functionalization sites including one to twenty percent of the carbon atoms. The other group has regularly patterned functional sites parallel to the tube axis. Metallic, small-gap semiconducting and large-gap semiconducting carbon nanotubes are studied. The results reveal that the electronic properties of the tubes are very sensitive to the degree of functionalization, with even one percent functionalization being enough to render metallic tubes semiconducting. On the other hand, the mechanical properties, like tensile modulus, are much less sensitive to functionalization. For carbon nanotubes functionalized with specific patterns, the electric properties depends strongly on the nature of the functionalization pattern.

  15. The role of focal adhesion kinase in the regulation of cellular mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of mechanical properties is necessary for cell invasion into connective tissue or intra- and extravasation through the endothelium of blood or lymph vessels. Cell invasion is important for the regulation of many healthy processes such as immune response reactions and wound healing. In addition, cell invasion plays a role in disease-related processes such as tumor metastasis and autoimmune responses. Until now the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in regulating mechanical properties of cells and its impact on cell invasion efficiency is still not well known. Thus, this review focuses on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. Moreover, it points out the connection between cancer cell invasion and metastasis and FAK by showing that FAK regulates cellular mechanical properties required for cellular motility. Furthermore, it sheds light on the indirect interaction of FAK with vinculin by binding to paxillin, which then impairs the binding of paxillin to vinculin. In addition, this review emphasizes whether FAK fulfills regulatory functions similar to vinculin. In particular, it discusses the differences and the similarities between FAK and vinculin in regulating the biomechanical properties of cells. Finally, this paper highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK, synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as stiffness and contractile forces. Subsequently, these mechanical properties determine cellular invasiveness into tissues and provide a source sink for future drug developments to inhibit excessive cell invasion and hence, metastases formation.

  16. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructural evolution of metals and alloys are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of crystal structure, neutron dose and temperature. The corresponding effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys are summarized, with particular attention on the phenomena of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. The prospects of developing improved high-performance structural materials with high resistance to radiation-induced property degradation are briefly discussed.

  17. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  18. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape. PMID:26976044

  19. Mechanical property quantification of endothelial cells using scanning acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, A.; Brand, S.; Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Blase, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical properties of cells reflect dynamic changes of cellular organization which occur during physiologic activities like cell movement, cell volume regulation or cell division. Thus the study of cell mechanical properties can yield important information for understanding these physiologic activities. Endothelial cells form the thin inner lining of blood vessels in the cardiovascular system and are thus exposed to shear stress as well as tensile stress caused by the pulsatile blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction might occur due to reduced resistance to mechanical stress and is an initial step in the development of cardiovascular disease like, e.g., atherosclerosis. Therefore we investigated the mechanical properties of primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC) of different age using scanning acoustic microscopy at 1.2 GHz. The HUVECs are classified as young (tD < 90 h) and old (tD > 90 h) cells depending upon the generation time for the population doubling of the culture (tD). Longitudinal sound velocity and geometrical properties of cells (thickness) were determined using the material signature curve V(z) method for variable culture condition along spatial coordinates. The plane wave technique with normal incidence is assumed to solve two-dimensional wave equation. The size of the cells is modeled using multilayered (solid-fluid) system. The propagation of transversal wave and surface acoustic wave are neglected in soft matter analysis. The biomechanical properties of HUVEC cells are quantified in an age dependent manner.

  20. Investigation of mechanical properties of cryogenically treated music wire.

    PubMed

    Heptonstall, A; Waller, M; Robertson, N A

    2015-08-01

    It has been reported that treating music wire (high carbon steel wire) by cooling to cryogenic temperatures can enhance its mechanical properties with particular reference to those properties important for musical performance. We use such wire for suspending many of the optics in Advanced LIGO, the upgrade to LIGO—the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory. Two properties that particularly interest us are mechanical loss and breaking strength. A decrease in mechanical loss would directly reduce the thermal noise associated with the suspension, thus enhancing the noise performance of mirror suspensions within the detector. An increase in strength could allow thinner wire to be safely used, which would enhance the dilution factor of the suspension, again leading to lower suspension thermal noise. In this article, we describe the results of an investigation into some of the mechanical properties of music wire, comparing untreated wire with the same wire which has been cryogenically treated. For the samples we studied, we conclude that there is no significant difference in the properties of interest for application in gravitational wave detectors. PMID:26329213

  1. Transient dynamic mechanical properties of resilin-based elastomeric hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linqing; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding high-frequency properties of emerging resilin-like polypeptides (RLPs) have motivated their development for vocal fold tissue regeneration and other applications. Recombinant RLP hydrogels show efficient gelation, tunable mechanical properties, and display excellent extensibility, but little has been reported about their transient mechanical properties. In this manuscript, we describe the transient mechanical behavior of new RLP hydrogels investigated via both sinusoidal oscillatory shear deformation and uniaxial tensile testing. Oscillatory stress relaxation and creep experiments confirm that RLP-based hydrogels display significantly reduced stress relaxation and improved strain recovery compared to PEG-based control hydrogels. Uniaxial tensile testing confirms the negligible hysteresis, reversible elasticity and superior resilience (up to 98%) of hydrated RLP hydrogels, with Young's modulus values that compare favorably with those previously reported for resilin and that mimic the tensile properties of the vocal fold ligament at low strain (<15%). These studies expand our understanding of the properties of these RLP materials under a variety of conditions, and confirm the unique applicability, for mechanically demanding tissue engineering applications, of a range of RLP hydrogels. PMID:24809044

  2. Mechanical properties of the brain-skull interface.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mohammad Mynuddin Gani; Miller, Karol; Bunt, Stuart; Mostayed, Ahmed; Joldes, Grand; Day, Robert; Hart, Robin; Wittek, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanical properties of the brain-skull interface is important for surgery simulation and injury biomechanics. These properties are known only to a limited extent. In this study we conducted in situ indentation of the sheep brain, and proposed to derive the macroscopic mechanical properties of the brain-skull interface from the results of these experiments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever analysis of this kind. When conducting in situ indentation of the brain, the reaction force on the indentor was measured. After the indentation, a cylindrical sample of the brain tissue was extracted and subjected to uniaxial compression test. A model of the brain indentation experiment was built in the Finite Element (FE) solver ABAQUS™. In the model, the mechanical properties of the brain tissue were assigned as obtained from the uniaxial compression test and the brain-skull interface was modeled as linear springs. The interface stiffness (defined as sum of stiffnesses of the springs divided by the interface area) was varied to obtain good agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured indentor force-displacement relationship. Such agreement was found to occur for the brain-skull interface stiffness of 11.45 Nmm⁻¹/mm². This allowed identification of the overall mechanical properties of the brain-skull interface. PMID:23951996

  3. The effect of composition on mechanical properties of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, Johanna; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Due to a fast setting reaction, good biological properties, and easily available starting materials, there has been extensive research within the field of brushite cements as bone replacing material. However, the fast setting of brushite cement gives them intrinsically low mechanical properties due to the poor crystal compaction during setting. To improve this, many additives such as citric acid, pyrophosphates, and glycolic acid have been added to the cement paste to retard the crystal growth. Furthermore, the incorporation of a filler material could improve the mechanical properties when used in the correct amounts. In this study, the effect of the addition of the two retardants, disodium dihydrogen pyrophosphate and citric acid, together with the addition of β-TCP filler particles, on the mechanical properties of a brushite cement was investigated. The results showed that the addition of low amounts of a filler (up to 10%) can have large effects on the mechanical properties. Furthermore, the addition of citric acid to the liquid phase makes it possible to use lower liquid-to-powder ratios (L/P), which strongly affects the strength of the cements. The maximal compressive strength (41.8MPa) was found for a composition with a molar ratio of 45:55 between monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and beta-tricalcium phosphate, an L/P of 0.25ml/g and a citric acid concentration of 0.5M in the liquid phase. PMID:24064324

  4. Investigation of mechanical properties of cryogenically treated music wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptonstall, A.; Waller, M.; Robertson, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    It has been reported that treating music wire (high carbon steel wire) by cooling to cryogenic temperatures can enhance its mechanical properties with particular reference to those properties important for musical performance. We use such wire for suspending many of the optics in Advanced LIGO, the upgrade to LIGO—the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory. Two properties that particularly interest us are mechanical loss and breaking strength. A decrease in mechanical loss would directly reduce the thermal noise associated with the suspension, thus enhancing the noise performance of mirror suspensions within the detector. An increase in strength could allow thinner wire to be safely used, which would enhance the dilution factor of the suspension, again leading to lower suspension thermal noise. In this article, we describe the results of an investigation into some of the mechanical properties of music wire, comparing untreated wire with the same wire which has been cryogenically treated. For the samples we studied, we conclude that there is no significant difference in the properties of interest for application in gravitational wave detectors.

  5. Hygrothermal ageing effect on mechanical properties of FRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, S.; Bensaada, R.; Bilek, A.; Djebali, S.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of hygrothermal aging on mechanical properties of two composite materials (carbon fiber / epoxy and glass fiber E / vinylester). Two stratifications are studied for each material. Both materials are exposed to two different environments, the sea water and the deionized water at a temperature of 40°C. The kinetic of material absorption is plotted. We see an irreversible degradation of material caused by exposure time. The characterization of samples in the virgin state and the aged condition is achieved with three points bending tests. We can see significant loss of mechanical properties due to hygrothermal aging.

  6. Characterization of High Temperature Mechanical Properties Using Laser Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    David Hurley; Stephen Reese; Farhad Farzbod; Rory Kennedy

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical properties are controlled to a large degree by defect structures such as dislocations and grain boundaries. These microstructural features involve a perturbation of the perfect crystal lattice (i.e. strain fields). Viewed in this context, high frequency strain waves (i.e. ultrasound) provide a natural choice to study microstructure mediated mechanical properties. In this presentation we use laser ultrasound to probe mechanical properties of materials. This approach utilizes lasers to excite and detect ultrasonic waves, and as a consequence has unique advantages over other methods—it is noncontacting, requires no couplant or invasive sample preparation (other than that used in metallurgical analysis), and has the demonstrated capability to probe microstructure on a micron scale. Laser techniques are highly reproducible enabling sophisticated, microstructurally informed data analysis. Since light is being used for generation and detection of the ultrasonic wave, the specimen being examined is not mechanically coupled to the transducer. As a result, laser ultrasound can be carried out remotely, an especially attractive characteristic for in situ measurements in severe environments. Several examples involving laser ultrasound to measure mechanical properties in high temperature environments will be presented. Emphasis will be place on understanding the role of grain microstructure.

  7. Hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of remineralized dentin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Jianming; Sun, Jian; Mao, Caiyun; Wang, Wei; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang; Gu, Xinhua

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the mechanical properties of dentin are significantly determined by its hierarchical structure. The current correlation between the mechanical properties and the hierarchical structure was mainly established by studying altered forms of dentin, which limits the potential outcome of the research. In this study, dentins with three different hierarchical structures were obtained via two different remineralization procedures and at different remineralization stages: (1) a dentin structure with amorphous minerals incorporated into the collagen fibrils, (2) a dentin with crystallized nanominerals incorporated into the collagen fibrils, and (3) a dentin with an out-of-order mineral layer filling the collagen fibrils matrix. Nanoindentation tests were performed to investigate the mechanical behavior of the remineralized dentin slides. The results showed that the incorporation of the crystallized nanominerals into the acid-etched demineralized organic fibrils resulted in a remarkable improvement of the mechanical properties of the dentin. In contrast, for the other two structures, i.e. the amorphous minerals inside the collagen fibrils and the out-of-order mineral layer within the collagen fibrils matrix, the excellent mechanical properties of dentin could not be restored. PMID:25259668

  8. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodali, Padma

    A variety of surface modification and surface coating techniques are currently used in industry to modify the near-surface mechanical properties that influence the friction and wear behavior of metals, metallic alloys, ceramics, and polymers. Near-surface mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness of a coating-substrate system can be tailored economically without changing the bulk properties of the system. The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) Investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation. (2) Characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation. (3) Developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. Wear mechanisms that occurred in implanted and unimplanted surfaces tested against AIS152100

  9. Luminescence and related properties of nanocrystalline porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshida, N.

    This document is part of subvolume C3 'Optical Properties' of volume 34 'Semiconductor quantum structures' of Landolt-Börnstein, Group III, Condensed Matter, on the optical properties of quantum structures based on group IV semiconductors. It discusses luminescence and related properties of nanocrystalline porous silicon. Topics include an overview of nanostructured silicon, its fabrication technology, and properties of nanocrystalline porous silicon such as confinement effects, photoluminescence, electroluminesce, carrier charging effects, ballistic transport and emission, and thermally induced acoustic emission.

  10. Inferential bridging relations reveal distinct neural mechanisms: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Petra

    2006-08-01

    This study investigates the online comprehension of Determiner Phrases (DPs) as a function of the given-new distinction in two-sentence texts in German and further focuses on DPs whose interpretation depends on inferential information (so-called 'bridging relations'). Previous reaction time studies report an advantage of given over new information. In the present study, this difference is reflected in distinct neural mechanisms: event-related potentials reveal that previously introduced (i.e., given) DPs elicit a reduced N400, while new DPs show an enhanced N400 followed by a P600. Crucially, inferentially bridged DPs, which are hypothesized to share properties with new and given information, first pattern with given DPs (showing an attenuated N400) and then with new DPs (showing an enhanced P600). The data demonstrate that salience relations between DPs and prior context ease DP integration and that additional cost arises from the establishment of independent reference. They further reveal that processing cost associated with the interpretation of bridged DPs results from the anaphoric complexity of introducing an independent referent. PMID:16725188

  11. Generalized Uncertainty Relation in the Non-commutative Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Won Sang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the non-commutative quantum mechanics (NCQM) with the generalized uncertainty relations {Δ } x1 {Δ } x2 ≥ {θ}/{2}, {Δ} p1 {Δ } p2 ≥ {bar{θ}}/{2}, {Δ } xi {Δ } pi ≥ {hbar _{eff}}/{2} is discussed. Four each uncertainty relation, wave functions saturating each uncertainty relation are explicitly constructed. The unitary operators relating the non-commutative position and momentum operators to the commutative position and momentum operators are also investigated. We also discuss the uncertainty relation related to the harmonic oscillator.

  12. Mechanical properties of the rabbit iris smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Kazutsuna; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Usui, Shiro; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka

    2003-02-01

    The study focuses on obtaining the visco-elastic properties of the iris sphincter and dilator muscles. Two kinds of experiments were performed: the isometric contraction experiment and the isotonic quick release experiment. The length-tension relationship was obtained from the former experiment. This relationship clarified the contribution of each muscle in determining the statics of the pupil. The viscous and serial elastic properties were obtained from the latter experiment. The viscosity could be expressed by the expanded Hill's equation as a function of velocity and contractile tension. We argue that serial elasticity is independent of contractile tension. These properties provide insights into the pupillary mechanism. PMID:12536003

  13. Investigation of the mechanical properties of superconducting coils

    SciTech Connect

    Markely, F.W.; Kerby, J.S.

    1990-03-01

    This paper presents data on 3 of the important mechanical properties of SSC type superconducting coils. The measured properties are: (1) The azimuthal elastic modulus of the coil samples made for the stress relaxation tests. (2) The rate of stress --- relaxation of collared SSC outer coils molded to different sizes and (3) The pressures that various insulations can withstand during molding or collaring before turn-to-turn shorts develop. Additional data on these and other properties are available but omitted here because of space limitations. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Related Mechanics 12-22-32. Industrial Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This curriculum guide contains learning module outlines for a series of related mechanics courses to be given in high schools in Alberta. Each module provides selected learning experiences to develop basic competence in a number of related trades. Each module consists of an introduction, objectives, learning resources list, content summary, and a…

  15. Designed biomaterials to mimic the mechanical properties of muscles.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shanshan; Dudek, Daniel M; Cao, Yi; Balamurali, M M; Gosline, John; Li, Hongbin

    2010-05-01

    The passive elasticity of muscle is largely governed by the I-band part of the giant muscle protein titin, a complex molecular spring composed of a series of individually folded immunoglobulin-like domains as well as largely unstructured unique sequences. These mechanical elements have distinct mechanical properties, and when combined, they provide the desired passive elastic properties of muscle, which are a unique combination of strength, extensibility and resilience. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies demonstrated that the macroscopic behaviour of titin in intact myofibrils can be reconstituted by combining the mechanical properties of these mechanical elements measured at the single-molecule level. Here we report artificial elastomeric proteins that mimic the molecular architecture of titin through the combination of well-characterized protein domains GB1 and resilin. We show that these artificial elastomeric proteins can be photochemically crosslinked and cast into solid biomaterials. These biomaterials behave as rubber-like materials showing high resilience at low strain and as shock-absorber-like materials at high strain by effectively dissipating energy. These properties are comparable to the passive elastic properties of muscles within the physiological range of sarcomere length and so these materials represent a new muscle-mimetic biomaterial. The mechanical properties of these biomaterials can be fine-tuned by adjusting the composition of the elastomeric proteins, providing the opportunity to develop biomaterials that are mimetic of different types of muscles. We anticipate that these biomaterials will find applications in tissue engineering as scaffold and matrix for artificial muscles. PMID:20445626

  16. Microstructure Related Properties of Optical Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, John James, Jr.

    Both the optical and physical properties of thin film optical interference coatings depend upon the microstructure of the deposited films. This microstructure is strongly columnar with voids between the columns. Computer simulations of the film growth process indicate that the two most important factors responsible for this columnar growth are a limited mobility of the condensing molecules and self-shadowing by molecules already deposited. During the vacuum deposition of thin films, the microstructure can be influenced by many parameters, such as substrate temperature and vacuum pressure. By controlling these parameters and introducing additional ones, thin film coatings can be improved. In this research, ultraviolet irradiation and ion bombardment were examined as additional parameters. Past studies have shown that post-deposition ultraviolet irradiation can be used to relieve stress and reduce absorption in the far ultraviolet of silicon dioxide films. Ion bombardment has been used to reduce stress, improve packing density, and increase resistance to moisture penetration. Three refractory oxide materials commonly used in thin film coatings were studied; they are silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, and zirconium dioxide. Both single-layer films and narrowband filters made of these materials were examined. A 1000-watt mercury-xenon lamp was used to provide ultraviolet irradiation. An inverted magnetron ion source was used to produce argon and oxygen ions. Ultraviolet irradiation was found to reduce the absorption and slightly increase the index of refraction in zirconium oxide films. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that ultraviolet irradiation caused titanium oxide films to become more amorphous; their absorption in the ultraviolet was slightly reduced. No changes were noted in film durability. Ion bombardment enhanced the tetragonal (lll) peak of zirconium oxide but increased the absorption of both zirconium oxide and titanium oxide films. The titanium oxide

  17. Electronic Properties of Ordered Quasicrystals and Related Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Byron Davis

    An extensive, systematic study of the electronic properties of the well-ordered icosahedral (i-) phases and related crystalline and amorphous phases is presented. Barely metallic behavior is observed in the ordered i-crystals, including high resistivities with large temperature coefficients, low electronic densities of states at the Fermi energy, large values of the low-temperature Hall coefficients, and unusual temperature dependences of the Hall coefficients and the thermoelectric powers. In addition, rapid variations of these properties with small changes in composition are observed. Similar behavior is seen in crystalline approximant structures, which are close crystalline analogues of the i-phase. With increasing structural disorder in disordered i-phases and in the totally disordered amorphous (a-) phases, the familiar metallic-glass-like electronic properties are restored. This striking electronic behavior is shown to be due to band structure effects. The high resistivities, low densities of states, and low carrier densities are shown to be due to the structural scattering mechanism of the Fermi-surface-Jones-zone interaction, which is enhanced due to the high degree of structural ordering and, in the i-phases, due to the icosahedral symmetry. The unusual temperature dependences of the Hall coefficients and thermoelectric powers, as well as the rapid variation of the electronic properties with small changes in composition, support the existence of a rapidly varying density of states on a fine energy scale, on the order of 26 meV. The existence of these band structure effects is further supported by the effects of structural disorder on the electronic properties, with disorder restoring the free-electron metallic-glass -like electronic properties. The temperature dependence of the conductivity at high temperatures displays novel concave upward curvature in a wide variety of icosahedral, amorphous, and crystalline phases which have high resistivity values

  18. Defect-related luminescent materials: synthesis, emission properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuimiao; Lin, Jun

    2012-12-01

    Luminescent materials have found a wide variety of applications, including information displays, lighting, X-ray intensification and scintillation, and so on. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to exploring novel luminescent materials so far. In the past decade, defect-related luminescent materials have inspired intensive research efforts in their own right. This kind of luminescent material can be basically classified into silica-based materials, phosphate systems, metal oxides, BCNO phosphors, and carbon-based materials. These materials combine several favourable attributes of traditional commercially available phosphors, which are stable, efficient, and less toxic, being free of the burdens of intrinsic toxicity or elemental scarcity and the need for stringent, intricate, tedious, costly, or inefficient preparation steps. Defect-related luminescent materials can be produced inexpensively and on a large scale by many approaches, such as sol-gel process, hydro(solvo)thermal reaction, hydrolysis methods, and electrochemical methods. This review article highlights the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and luminescent properties of the defect-related materials, together with their control and tuning, and emission mechanisms (solid state physics). We also speculate on their future and discuss potential developments for their applications in lighting and biomedical fields. PMID:23019577

  19. Characterization of mechanical and biochemical properties of developing embryonic tendon

    PubMed Central

    Marturano, Joseph E.; Arena, Jeffrey D.; Schiller, Zachary A.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kuo, Catherine K.

    2013-01-01

    Tendons have uniquely high tensile strength, critical to their function to transfer force from muscle to bone. When injured, their innate healing response results in aberrant matrix organization and functional properties. Efforts to regenerate tendon are challenged by limited understanding of its normal development. Consequently, there are few known markers to assess tendon formation and parameters to design tissue engineering scaffolds. We profiled mechanical and biological properties of embryonic tendon and demonstrated functional properties of developing tendon are not wholly reflected by protein expression and tissue morphology. Using force volume-atomic force microscopy, we found that nano- and microscale tendon elastic moduli increase nonlinearly and become increasingly spatially heterogeneous during embryonic development. When we analyzed potential biochemical contributors to modulus, we found statistically significant but weak correlation between elastic modulus and collagen content, and no correlation with DNA or glycosaminoglycan content, indicating there are additional contributors to mechanical properties. To investigate collagen cross-linking as a potential contributor, we inhibited lysyl oxidase-mediated collagen cross-linking, which significantly reduced tendon elastic modulus without affecting collagen morphology or DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen content. This suggests that lysyl oxidase-mediated cross-linking plays a significant role in the development of embryonic tendon functional properties and demonstrates that changes in cross-links alter mechanical properties without affecting matrix content and organization. Taken together, these data demonstrate the importance of functional markers to assess tendon development and provide a profile of tenogenic mechanical properties that may be implemented in tissue engineering scaffold design to mechanoregulate new tendon regeneration. PMID:23576745

  20. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  1. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Liyan; Yan, Shancheng; Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu; Yang, Fan

    2014-03-15

    A convenient solvothermal approach was applied for the first time to synthesize In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes. The morphology of the resultant nanotubes was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Nanotubes with a relatively uniform diameter of around 500 nm, tube wall thickness of 50–100 nm, and average length of tens of microns were obtained. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the crystal structures, composition, and optical properties of the products. To understand the growth mechanism of the In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes, we studied the influences of temperature, reaction time, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and ethylene diamine (EDA) dosages on the final products. Based on the experimental results, a possible growth mechanism of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes was proposed. In this mechanism, TeO{sub 3}{sup −2} is first reduced to allow nucleation. Circumferential edges of these nucleated molecules attract further deposition, and nanotubes finally grow rapidly along the c-axis and relatively slowly along the circumferential direction. The surface area of the products was determined by BET and found to be 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. This large surface area indicates that the nanotubes may be suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage applications. The nanotubes also showed broad light detection ranging from 300 nm to 1100 nm, which covers the UV–visible–NIR regions. Such excellent optical properties indicate that In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements in new photodetection and photosensing applications. -- Graphical abstract: A convenient solvothermal approach was applied to synthesize In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes, which has not been reported in the literature for our knowledge. Surface area of this material is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} from the BET testing, and such a high value makes it probably suitable for gas sensing and

  2. In vivo liver tissue mechanical properties by Transient Elastography: comparison with Dynamic Mechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chatelin, Simon; Oudry, Jennifer; Périchon, Nicolas; Sandrin, Laurent; Allemann, Pierre; Soler, Luc; Willinger, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of human liver is one of the most critical aspects of its numerical modeling for medical applications or impact biomechanics. Generally, model constitutive laws come from in vitro data. However, the elastic properties of liver may change significantly after death and with time. Furthermore, in vitro liver elastic properties reported in the literature have often not been compared quantitatively with in vivo liver mechanical properties on the same organ. In this study, both steps are investigated on porcine liver. The elastic property of the porcine liver, given by the shear modulus G, was measured by both Transient Elastography (TE) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Shear modulus measurements were realized on in vivo and in vitro liver to compare the TE and DMA methods and to study the influence of testing conditions on the liver viscoelastic properties. In vitro results show that elastic properties obtained by TE and DMA are in agreement. Liver tissue in the frequency range from 0.1 to 4 Hz can be modeled by a two-mode relaxation model. Furthermore, results show that the liver is homogeneous, isotropic and more elastic than viscous. Finally, it is shown in this study that viscoelastic properties obtained by TE and DMA change significantly with post mortem time and with the boundary conditions. PMID:21811013

  3. Hyperoxia alters the mechanical properties of alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roan, Esra; Wilhelm, Kristina; Bada, Alex; Makena, Patrudu S; Gorantla, Vijay K; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2012-06-15

    Patients with severe acute lung injury are frequently administered high concentrations of oxygen (>50%) during mechanical ventilation. Long-term exposure to high levels of oxygen can cause lung injury in the absence of mechanical ventilation, but the combination of the two accelerates and increases injury. Hyperoxia causes injury to cells through the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species. However, the precise mechanisms that lead to epithelial injury and the reasons for increased injury caused by mechanical ventilation are not well understood. We hypothesized that alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may be more susceptible to injury caused by mechanical ventilation if hyperoxia alters the mechanical properties of the cells causing them to resist deformation. To test this hypothesis, we used atomic force microscopy in the indentation mode to measure the mechanical properties of cultured AECs. Exposure of AECs to hyperoxia for 24 to 48 h caused a significant increase in the elastic modulus (a measure of resistance to deformation) of both primary rat type II AECs and a cell line of mouse AECs (MLE-12). Hyperoxia also caused remodeling of both actin and microtubules. The increase in elastic modulus was blocked by treatment with cytochalasin D. Using finite element analysis, we showed that the increase in elastic modulus can lead to increased stress near the cell perimeter in the presence of stretch. We then demonstrated that cyclic stretch of hyperoxia-treated cells caused significant cell detachment. Our results suggest that exposure to hyperoxia causes structural remodeling of AECs that leads to decreased cell deformability. PMID:22467640

  4. Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Polarization-Maintaining Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Ally, A.; Barnes, S.; Watkins, L.; Cuddihy, E.

    1996-01-01

    Polarization-maintaining optical fibers, referred to as PANDA fibers, were subjected to Cobalt 60 radiation (300,000 Rad). The mechanical properties of the PANDA fibers were measured after exposure to gamma radiation and compared to non-irradiated PANDA fibers.

  5. Mechanical shear and tensile properties of selected biomass stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulosic biomass, such as big bluestem, corn stalk, intermediate wheat grass and switchgrass stem are abundant and dominant species in the Midwest region of US. There is a need to understand the mechanical properties for these crops for better handling and processing of the biomass feedstocks...

  6. Mechanical and physical properties of modern boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of accurate measurements of the modern boron fiber's Young's modulus, flexural modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio are reported. Physical property data concerning fiber density, thermal expansion, and resistance obtained during the course of the mechanical studies are also given.

  7. Sterilizing elastomeric chains without losing mechanical properties. Is it possible?

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Ferraz, Caio Souza; Rosa, Francine Cristina Silva; Rosa, Luciano Pereira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different sterilization/disinfection methods on the mechanical properties of orthodontic elastomeric chains. METHODS: Segments of elastomeric chains with 5 links each were sent for sterilization by cobalt 60 (Co60) (20 KGy) gamma ray technology. After the procedure, the elastomeric chains were contaminated with clinical samples of Streptococcus mutans. Subsequently, the elastomeric chains were submitted to sterilization/disinfection tests carried out by means of different methods, forming six study groups, as follows: Group 1 (control - without contamination), Group 2 (70°GL alcohol), Group 3 (autoclave), Group 4 (ultraviolet), Group 5 (peracetic acid) and Group 6 (glutaraldehyde). After sterilization/disinfection, the effectiveness of these methods, by Colony forming units per mL (CFU/mL), and the mechanical properties of the material were assessed. Student's t-test was used to assess the number of CFUs while ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to assess elastic strength. RESULTS: Ultraviolet treatment was not completely effective for sterilization. No loss of mechanical properties occurred with the use of the different sterilization methods (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Biological control of elastomeric chains does not affect their mechanical properties. PMID:26154462

  8. Barrier and Mechanical Properties of Starch-Clay Nanocomposite Films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poor barrier and mechanical properties of biopolymer-based food packaging can potentially be enhanced by the use of layered silicates (nanoclay) to produce nanocomposites. In this study, starch-clay nano-composites were synthesized by a melt extrusion method. Natural (MMT) and organically modifi...

  9. Thermal treatment and mechanical properties of aluminum-2021

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennecke, M. W.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical properties, after thermal treatments, are summarized for sheet and plate of copper-rich, high-strength, heat-treatable aluminum-2021. The alloy is quench sensitive, quench rate and variations in aging affect corrosion behavior. Aging effects on yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation of sheet and plate are compared.

  10. Enhanced Graphene Mechanical Properties through Ultrasmooth Copper Growth Substrates.

    PubMed

    Griep, Mark H; Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Tumlin, Travis M; Wetzel, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The combination of extraordinary strength and stiffness in conjunction with exceptional electronic and thermal properties in lightweight two-dimensional materials has propelled graphene research toward a wide array of applications including flexible electronics and functional structural components. Tailoring graphene's properties toward a selected application requires precise control of the atomic layer growth process, transfer, and postprocessing procedures. To date, the mechanical properties of graphene are largely controlled through postprocess defect engineering techniques. In this work, we demonstrate the role of varied catalytic surface morphologies on the tailorability of subsequent graphene film quality and breaking strength, providing a mechanism to tailor the physical, electrical, and mechanical properties at the growth stage. A new surface planarization methodology that results in over a 99% reduction in Cu surface roughness allows for smoothness parameters beyond that reported to date in literature and clearly demonstrates the role of Cu smoothness toward a decrease in the formation of bilayer graphene defects, altered domain sizes, monolayer graphene sheet resistance values down to 120 Ω/□ and a 78% improvement in breaking strength. The combined electrical and mechanical enhancements achieved through this methodology allows for the direct growth of application quality flexible transparent conductive films with monolayer graphene. PMID:26882091

  11. Physical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyuta, E. N.

    2014-09-01

    We review the data on the physical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil that were acquired in the direct investigations on the lunar surface carried out in the manned and automatic missions and in the laboratory examination of the lunar samples returned to the Earth. In justice to the American manned program Apollo, we show that a large volume of the data on the properties of the lunar soil was also obtained in the Soviet automatic program Lunokhod and with the automatic space stations Luna-16, -20, and -24 that returned the lunar soil samples to the Earth. We consider all of the main physical and mechanical properties of the lunar soil, such as the granulometric composition, density and porosity, cohesion and adhesion, angle of internal friction, shear strength of loose soil, deformation characteristics (the deformation modulus and Poisson ratio), compressibility, and the bearing capacity, and show the change of some properties versus the depth. In most cases, the analytical dependence of the main parameters is presented, which is required in developing reliable engineering models of the lunar soil. The main physical and mechanical properties are listed in the summarizing table, and the currently available models and simulants of the lunar soil are reviewed.

  12. Metallic syntactic foams synthesis, characterization and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Gerhard

    In this study, we report two procedures for producing lab-scale syntactic steel by melt infiltration of millimeter-sized alumina microspheres: mechanical pressure infiltration and gravity-fed infiltration. Both methods yield foam with uniform distributions of microspheres and negligible unintended porosity. The most critical parameters in the manufacture of the syntactic steel foams are the melt temperature and the preheat temperature of the microspheres prior to infiltration. The preheatment temperature of the microspheres must be close to the melting temperature of steel. Syntactic steel foams with relative density of about half of solid steel densities were produced using monosized microspheres randomly situated in a mold. Microspheres with a diameter of 1.27 mm were used for the mechanical pressure infiltration method and microspheres with a diameter of 4.45 mm for the gravity-fed infiltration method. Different steel chemical compositions were selected to produce steel foams of different inherent yield strength: including several ferritic-pearlitic steels and one TRIP steel (TRansformation-Induced Plasticity). The resultant foams were characterized by chemical and microstructural analysis. The microstructure of the samples consisted of blends of ferritic and pearlitic constituents in varying proportions for the ferritic-pearlitic steels, while the cast TRIP steel matrix presented an austenitic microstructure. The basic mechanical properties of the steel syntactic foams were studied under compression loading. The pearlitic syntactic foams have greater compression strength and energy absorption capacity than the ferritic syntactic foams, but the TRIP steel syntactic foam exhibited the highest compression strength and highest energy absorption capacity. The properties of the steel syntactic foams were compared to those of other steel foams, aluminum foams and other cellular structures reported in the literature. We present also the compression and impact behavior

  13. Synthetic melanin films: Assembling mechanisms, scaling behavior, and structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, Gabriela S.; Coluci, Vitor R.; da Silva, Maria Ivonete N.; Dezidério, Shirlei N.; Graeff, Carlos Frederico O.; Galva~O, Douglas S.; Cotta, Mônica A.

    2006-06-01

    In this work we report on the surface characterization of melanin thin films prepared using both water-based and organic solvent-based melanin syntheses. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of these films suggests that the organic solvent synthesis provides relatively planar basic melanin structures; these basic structures generate surface steps with height in the range of 2-3 nm and small tendency to form larger aggregates. The scaling properties obtained from the AFM data were used to infer the assembling mechanisms of these thin films which depend on the solvent used for melanin synthesis. The behavior observed in organic solvent-based melanin suggests a diffusion-limited aggregation process. Thus films with good adhesion to the substrate and smoother morphologies than water-prepared melanin films are obtained. Electronic structure calculations using a conductorlike screening model were also performed in order to elucidate the microscopic processes of thin film formation. Our results suggest that the agglomerates observed in hydrated samples originate from reaction with water at specific locations on the surface most likely defects on the planar structure.

  14. Brillouin microspectroscopy of nanostructured biomaterials: photonics assisted tailoring mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Jaiswal, Manish K.; Chitrakar, Chandani; Thakur, Teena; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2016-03-01

    Developing new biomaterials is essential for the next-generation of materials for bioenergy, bioelectronics, basic biology, medical diagnostics, cancer research, and regenerative medicine. Specifically, recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. The physical properties of nanocomposite biomaterials, including elasticity and viscosity, play key roles in controlling cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. Conventional mechanical tests, including uniaxial compression and tension, dynamic mechanical analysis and shear rheology, require mechanical forces to be directly exerted onto the sample and therefore may not be suitable for in situ measurements or continuous monitoring of mechanical stiffness. In this study, we employ spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy as a viscoelasticity-specific probing technique. We utilized a Brillouin spectrometer to characterize biomaterial's microscopic elasticity and correlated those with conventional mechanical tests (e.g., rheology).

  15. Mechanical properties of the bovine claw horn during lactation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B; Margerison, J K

    2012-04-01

    Claw horn disorders are one of the main causes of lameness in dairy cows globally. This study aimed to develop material testing techniques to assess changes in the mechanical properties of bovine claw horn (BCH) and to compare these mechanical properties with existing methods of assessing claw horn disorders during lactation. Lameness was also measured through locomotion scoring to assess the clinical significance of changes observed in the scoring for lesions. Experiment 1 used 8 claws collected from four 12 to 18 mo old beef heifers, to develop BCH sample storage methods and techniques to test the mechanical properties of BCH (puncture resistance and elastic modulus). The increase in the moisture content of BCH had a significant negative exponential effect on the elastic modulus of the sole and white line claw horn and a linear reduction in the puncture resistance of BCH. Placing BCH samples in sealed plastic bags and storing them either at 2°C or by freezing samples at -22°C did not alter the dry matter content and, consequently, the mechanical properties of the claw horn tissue. In experiment 2, BCH was collected from 36 lactating dairy cows and mechanical properties were tested using puncture resistance. Puncture resistance of the sole area of the claw horn decreased significantly when hemorrhages in the tested area increased. The puncture resistance of the sole and white line areas decreased at d 160 postpartum when the cows exhibited higher lesion scores and was lower in hind claws that had higher lesion scores when compared with the fore claws. The highest puncture resistance was found at 270 d postpartum, when the animals were at pasture. Puncture resistance was found to be an effective technique for assessing the effect of period of lactation and increasing hemorrhage levels on the mechanical properties and structural strength of bovine claw horn. It was found to be a good method of comparing changes and differences in mechanical properties and

  16. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of single-layer phosphorene at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Ding, Zhiwei; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene, has attracted great attention in recent years due to its superior physical and electrical properties. However, compared to graphene and other 2D materials, phosphorene has a relatively low Young’s modulus and fracture strength, which may limit its applications due to possible structure failures. For the mechanical reliability of future phosphorene-based nanodevices, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene. Previous studies on the mechanical properties of phosphorene were based on first principles calculations at 0 K. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. It is found that temperature has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of phosphorene. The fracture strength and strain reduce by more than 65% when the temperature increases from 0 K to 450 K. Moreover, the fracture strength and strain in the zigzag direction is more sensitive to the temperature rise than that in the armchair direction. More interestingly, the failure crack propagates preferably along the groove in the puckered structure when uniaxial tension is applied in the armchair direction. In contrast, when the uniaxial tension is applied in the zigzag direction, multiple cracks are observed with rough fracture surfaces. Our present work provides useful information about the mechanical properties and failure behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures.

  17. Mechanical property determination of high conductivity metals and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrod, D. L.; Vandergrift, E.; France, L.

    1973-01-01

    Pertinent mechanical properties of three high conductivity metals and alloys; namely, vacuum hot pressed grade S-200E beryllium, OFHC copper and beryllium-copper alloy no. 10 were determined. These materials were selected based on their possible use in rocket thrust chamber and nozzle hardware. They were procured in a form and condition similar to that which might be ordered for actual hardware fabrication. The mechanical properties measured include (1) tension and compression stress strain curves at constant strain rate (2) tensile and compressive creep, (3) tensile and compressive stress-relaxation behavior and (4) elastic properties. Tests were conducted over the temperature range of from 75 F to 1600 F. The resulting data is presented in both graphical and tabular form.

  18. Thin film characterization using a mechanical properties microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, W. C.; McHargue, C. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    A new ultra-low load microindentation system has been acquired in the ORNL Metals and Ceramics Division. The system's spatial resolution and its data acquisition capabilities allow the determination of several mechanical properties from volumes of material with submicron dimension; hence, the term Mechanical Properties Microprobe (MPM). Research with the MPM at Oak Ridge has led to improved techniques for determining the plastic and elastic properties of materials using microindentation experiments. The techniques have been applied to thin films created by ion implanting metals and ceramics, radiation damaged materials, and thin hard coatings of TiN. Changes in the strength (hardness) and modulus have been measured in films as thin as 200 nm.

  19. Mechanical and thermal properties of the Czech marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Keppert, Martin; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The paper is dealing with selected parameters of four marbles with respect to their utilization as building materials. Stones from four function quarries in the Czech Republic were chosen and scopes of physical properties were determined. Basic physical, mechanical and thermal properties belong among studied characteristics. Bulk density of studied marbles is in average 2750 kg/m3, matrix density 2770 kg/m3, open porosity 0.7%. Pore structure show similar distributions. Mechanical properties show more differences; however minimal value of compressive strength was 66.5 MPa, while maximum was 174 MPa. Thermal conductivity of studied marbles was about 2.955 W/mK. Last measured characteristic was specific heat capacity; its average value was 609 J/kgK.

  20. Moisture effect on mechanical properties of polymeric composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airale, A. G.; Carello, M.; Ferraris, A.; Sisca, L.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of moisture on the mechanical properties of fibre-reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was investigated. Four materials had been take into account considering: both 2×2-Twill woven carbon fibre or glass fibre, thermosetting matrix (Epoxy Resin) or thermoplastic matrix (Polyphenylene Sulfide). The specimens were submitted for 1800 hours to a hygrothermic test to evaluate moisture absorption on the basis of the Fick's law and finally tested to verify the mechanical properties (ultimate tensile strength). The results showed that the absorbed moisture decreases those properties of composites which were dominated by the matrix or the interface, while was not detectable the influence of water on the considered fibre. An important result is that the diffusion coefficient is highest for glass/PPS and lowest for carbon/epoxy composite material. The results give useful suggestions for the design of vehicle components that are exposed to environmental conditions (rain, snow and humidity).

  1. Processing dependence of mechanical properties of metallic glass nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Mo; Li, Qi-Kai

    2015-02-16

    Compared to their crystalline counterparts, nanowires made of metallic glass have not only superb properties but also remarkable processing ability. They can be processed easily and cheaply like plastics via a wide range of methods. To date, the underlying mechanisms of how these different processing routes affect the wires' properties as well as the atomic structure remains largely unknown. Here, by using atomistic modeling, we show that different processing methods can greatly influence the mechanical properties. The nanowires made via focused ion beam milling and embossing exhibit higher strength but localized plastic deformation, whereas that made by casting from liquid shows excellent ductility with homogeneous deformation but reduced strength. The different responses are reflected sensitively in the underlying atomic structure and packing density, some of which have been observed experimentally. The presence of the gradient of alloy concentration and surface effect will be discussed.

  2. Mechanical properties of silver halide core/clad IR fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalem, Shaul; German, Alla; Moser, Frank; Katzir, Abraham

    1996-04-01

    We have developed core/clad polycrystalline silver halide optical fibers with a loss of roughly 0.3 dB/m at 10.6 micrometers. Such fibers, with core diameters 0.3 - 0.6 mm and lengths of 1 to 2 meters are capable of continuously delivering output power densities as high as 14 KW/cm2. The fibers were repetitively bent in the plastic and elastic regimes and the optical transmission monitored during bending. The mechanical properties of the core/clad fibers and of the core only fibers are similar. It was also demonstrated that the 'bending' properties of the core/clad fibers are determined by the cladding material. Our investigations suggest that proper design of the core/clad structure may give significant improvement in mechanical properties such as more cycles to optical failure. This will be very important especially for endoscopic laser surgery and other medical applications.

  3. Mechanical and wear properties of PMMA/PVDF microfilled systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.L.; Koelling, K.W.; Seghi, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    There is a clinical need in fixed prosthodontics for aesthetic materials that are biologically compatible. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been used extensively in dental applications. Blends of PMMA and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are a new class of materials that might perform as aesthetic restorative materials. The fracture properties of PMMA have been intensively studied because it is an amorphous glass below 110{degrees}C, thus exhibiting brittle fracture under normal testing conditions below about 85{degrees}C. However, this brittle behavior leads to poor wear resistance. The properties of the matrix can be tailored by blending with PVDF. The blends are composed of homogeneous mixtures of the two polymers at the molecular level. Polyvinylidene fluoride molecules do not contribute to the mechanical yield behavior of the blend but do act as plasticizers. Improvements in the mechanical properties may be achieved by incorporating a filler into the polymer matrix.

  4. Determining the Mechanical Properties of Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Lattice block structures and shape memory alloys possess several traits ideal for solving intriguing new engineering problems in industries such as aerospace, military, and transportation. Recent testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center has investigated the material properties of lattice block structures cast from a conventional aerospace titanium alloy as well as lattice block structures cast from nickel-titanium shape memory alloy. The lattice block structures for both materials were sectioned into smaller subelements for tension and compression testing. The results from the cast conventional titanium material showed that the expected mechanical properties were maintained. The shape memory alloy material was found to be extremely brittle from the casting process and only compression testing was completed. Future shape memory alloy lattice block structures will utilize an adjusted material composition that will provide a better quality casting. The testing effort resulted in baseline mechanical property data from the conventional titanium material for comparison to shape memory alloy materials once suitable castings are available.

  5. Mechanical properties of graphynes under shearing and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lijun; Zhang, Yingyan; Feng, Xiqiao; Chang, Tienchong; Wang, Ji; Du, Jianke; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    Graphynes are the allotrope of graphene. In this work, extensive molecular dynamics simulations are performed on four different graphynes ( α - , β - , γ - , and 6,6,12-graphynes) to explore their mechanical properties (shear modulus, shear strength, and bending rigidity) under shearing and bending. While the shearing properties are anisotropic, the bending rigidity is almost independent of the chirality of graphynes. We also find that the shear modulus and shear fracture strength of graphynes decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the percentage of the acetylenic linkages on the shear mechanical properties and bending rigidity is investigated. It is shown that the fracture shear strengths and bending rigidities of the four types of graphynes decrease, while the fracture shear strain increases, with increasing percentages of the acetylenic linkages. Significant wrinkling is observed in graphyne under shear strain. The influence of the temperatures and percentages of the acetylenic linkages on the ratio of amplitude-to-wavelength in the wrinkles are examined.

  6. Mechanical properties of 4d transition metals in molten state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deobrat; Sonvane, Yogesh; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical properties of 4d transition metals in molten state have been studied in the present study. We have calculated mechanical properties such as isothermal bulk modulus (B), modulus of rigidity (G), Young's modulus (Y) and Hardness have also been calculated from the elastic part of the Phonon dispersion curve (PDC). To describe the structural information, we have used different structure factor S(q) using Percus-Yevick hard sphere (PYHS) reference systems along with our newly constructed parameter free model potential.To see the influence of exchange and correlation effect on the above said properties of 3d liquid transition metals, we have used Sarkar et al (S)local field correction functions. Present results have been found good in agreement with available experimental data.

  7. The influence of microstructure on the mechanical properties of solder

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Reynolds, H.L.

    1996-06-01

    Solder joints in microelectronics devices consist of low-melting solder compositions that wet and join metal contacts and are, ordinarily, used at high homologous temperatures in the as-solidified condition. Differences in solidification rate and substrate interactions have the consequence that even solder joints of similar compositions exhibit a wide range of microstructures. The variation in microstructure causes a variation in properties; in particular, the high-temperature creep properties that govern much of the mechanical behavior of the solder may differ significantly from joint to joint. The present paper reviews the varieties of microstructure that are found in common solder joints, and describes some of the ways in which microstructural changes affect mechanical properties and joint reliability.

  8. Multiscale Approach to Characterize Mechanical Properties of Tissue Engineered Skin.

    PubMed

    Tupin, S; Molimard, J; Cenizo, V; Hoc, T; Sohm, B; Zahouani, H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue engineered skin usually consist of a multi-layered visco-elastic material composed of a fibrillar matrix and cells. The complete mechanical characterization of these tissues has not yet been accomplished. The purpose of this study was to develop a multiscale approach to perform this characterization in order to link the development process of a cultured skin to the mechanical properties. As a proof-of-concept, tissue engineered skin samples were characterized at different stages of manufacturing (acellular matrix, reconstructed dermis and reconstructed skin) for two different aging models (using cells from an 18- and a 61-year-old man). To assess structural variations, bi-photonic confocal microscopy was used. To characterize mechanical properties at a macroscopic scale, a light-load micro-mechanical device that performs indentation and relaxation tests was designed. Finally, images of the internal network of the samples under stretching were acquired by combining confocal microscopy with a tensile device. Mechanical properties at microscopic scale were assessed. Results revealed that adding cells during manufacturing induced structural changes, which provided higher elastic modulus and viscosity. Moreover, senescence models exhibited lower elastic modulus and viscosity. This multiscale approach was efficient to characterize and compare skin equivalent samples and permitted the first experimental assessment of the Poisson's ratio for such tissues. PMID:26942585

  9. Short-range mechanical properties of skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Striated muscles are disproportionately stiff for small movements. This facet of their behavior can be demonstrated by measuring the force produced when the muscle is stretched more than about 1% of its initial length. When this is done, it can be seen that force rises rapidly during the initial phases of the movement and much less rapidly during the latter stages of the stretch. Experiments performed using chemically permeabilized skeletal and cardiac muscles show that the initial stiffness of the preparations increases in proportion with isometric force as the free Ca²(+) concentration in the bathing solution is raised from a minimal to a saturating value. This is strong evidence that the short-range mechanical properties of activated muscle result from stretching myosin cross-bridges that are attached between the thick and thin filaments. Relaxed intact muscles also exhibit short-range mechanical properties but the molecular mechanisms underlying this behavior are less clear. This chapter summarizes some of the interesting features of short-range mechanical properties in different types of muscle preparation, describes some of the likely underlying mechanisms and discusses the potential physiological significance of the behavior. PMID:20824529

  10. Mechanical Properties of Materials with Nanometer Scale Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    William D. Nix

    2004-10-31

    We have been engaged in research on the mechanical properties of materials with nanometer-scale microstructural dimensions. Our attention has been focused on studying the mechanical properties of thin films and interfaces and very small volumes of material. Because the dimensions of thin film samples are small (typically 1 mm in thickness, or less), specialized mechanical testing techniques based on nanoindentation, microbeam bending and dynamic vibration of micromachined structures have been developed and used. Here we report briefly on some of the results we have obtained over the past three years. We also give a summary of all of the dissertations, talks and publications completed on this grant during the past 15 years.

  11. Using optical tweezers to study mechanical properties of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Naghmeh; Downing, Benjamin P. B.; Wieczorek, Andrew; Chan, Clara K. Y.; Welch, Robert Lindsay; Forde, Nancy R.

    2011-08-01

    The mechanical response of biological molecules at the microscopic level contributes significantly to their function. Optical tweezers are instruments that enable scientists to study mechanical properties at microscopic levels. They are based on a highly focused laser beam that creates a trap for microscopic objects such as dielectric spheres, viruses, bacteria, living cells and organelles, and then manipulates them by applying forces in the picoNewton range (a range that is biologically relevant). In this work, mechanical properties of single collagen molecules are studied using optical tweezers. We discuss the challenges of stretching single collagen proteins, whose length is much less than the size of the microspheres used as manipulation handles, and show how instrumental design and biochemistry can be used to overcome these challenges.

  12. Quantitative Characterization of Mechanical Property of Annealed Monolayer Colloidal Crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijing; Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Lu; Wang, Xiuyu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2016-01-19

    Quantitative characterization of the mechanical properties of a polystyrene (PS) monolayer colloidal crystal (MCC) annealed with solvent vapor has been performed for the first time by means of atomic force microscopy nanoindentation. The results showed that both the compressive and bending elastic modulus of PS MCC increased with the prolongation of annealing time from initial to 13 min. When the annealing time reached 15 min or even more, the PS MCC almost deformed to a planar film, and the elastic modulus of the PS MCC presented a drastic increase. These results provide a basis for tailoring the mechanical properties of a polymer colloidal monolayer via solvent vapor annealing. Such self-supported and high-mechanical-strength colloidal monolayers can be transferred to other surfaces for potential and promising applications in the bottom-up fabrication of highly ordered nanostructured materials such as nano dot arrays, photonic crystals, and many others. PMID:26700374

  13. Mechanical Properties of Iron Alumininides Intermetallic Alloy with Molybdenum Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhailawati, H.; Fauzi, M. N. A.

    2010-03-11

    In this work, FeAl-based alloys with and without molybdenum addition were fabricated by sintering of mechanically alloyed powders in order to investigate the effect of molybdenum on iron aluminide mechanical properties. Bulk samples were prepared by mechanical alloying for 4 hours, pressing at 360 MPa and sintering at 1000 deg. C for 2 hours. The specimens were tested in compression at room temperature using Instron machine. The phase identification and microstructure of the consolidated material was examined by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope correspondingly. Results show that 2.5 wt%Mo addition significantly increased the ultimate stress and ultimate strain in compressive mode due to solid solution hardening. However, the addition of Mo more than 2.5 wt% was accompanied by a reduction in both properties caused by the presence of Mo-rich precipitate particles.

  14. Ultrasonic evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of granites.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, G; Lourenço, P B; Alves, C A S; Pamplona, J

    2008-09-01

    Masonry is the oldest building material that survived until today, being used all over the world and being present in the most impressive historical structures as an evidence of spirit of enterprise of ancient cultures. Conservation, rehabilitation and strengthening of the built heritage and protection of human lives are clear demands of modern societies. In this process, the use of nondestructive methods has become much common in the diagnosis of structural integrity of masonry elements. With respect to the evaluation of the stone condition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity is a simple and economical tool. Thus, the central issue of the present paper concerns the evaluation of the suitability of the ultrasonic pulse velocity method for describing the mechanical and physical properties of granites (range size between 0.1-4.0 mm and 0.3-16.5 mm) and for the assessment of its weathering state. The mechanical properties encompass the compressive and tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, and the physical properties include the density and porosity. For this purpose, measurements of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulse velocity with distinct natural frequency of the transducers were carried out on specimens with different size and shape. A discussion of the factors that induce variations on the ultrasonic velocity is also provided. Additionally, statistical correlations between ultrasonic pulse velocity and mechanical and physical properties of granites are presented and discussed. The major output of the work is the confirmation that ultrasonic pulse velocity can be effectively used as a simple and economical nondestructive method for a preliminary prediction of mechanical and physical properties, as well as a tool for the assessment of the weathering changes of granites that occur during the serviceable life. This is of much interest due to the usual difficulties in removing specimens for mechanical characterization. PMID:18471849

  15. Modeling of mechanical properties in alpha/beta-titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sujoy Kumar

    2005-11-01

    The accelerated insertion of titanium alloys in component application requires the development of predictive capabilities for various aspects of their behavior, for example, phase stability, microstructural evolution and property-microstructure relationships over a wide range of length and time scales. In this presentation some navel aspects of property-microstructure relationships and microstructural evolution in alpha/beta Ti alloys will be discussed. Neural Network (NN) Models based on a Bayesian framework have been developed to predict the mechanical properties of alpha/beta Ti alloys. The development of such rules-based model requires the population of extensive databases, which in the present case are microstructurally-based. The steps involved in database development include producing controlled variations of the microstructure using novel approaches to heat-treatments, the use of standardized stereology protocols to characterize and quantify microstructural features rapidly, and mechanical testing of the heat-treated specimens. These databases have been used to train and test NN Models for prediction of mechanical properties. In addition, these models have been used to identify the influence of individual microstructural features on the mechanical properties, consequently guiding the efforts towards development of more robust mechanistically based models. In order to understand the property-microstructure relationships, a detailed understanding of microstructure evolution is imperative. The crystallography of the microstructure developing as a result of the solid-state beta → beta+alpha transformation has been studied in detail by employing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Orientation Imaging Microscopy (in a high resolution SEM), site-specific TEM sample preparation using focused ion beam, and TEM based techniques. The influence of variant selection on the evolution of microstructure will be specifically addressed.

  16. Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplain, V.; Défossez, P.; Delarue, G.; Dexter, A. R.; Richard, G.; Tessier, D.

    2009-04-01

    Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties ? V. Chaplain1, P. Défossez2, G. Delarue1, A.R. Dexter3, G. Richard3 and D. Tessier1. 1 UR INRA PESSAC RD 10, F-78026 Versailles cedex 2 UMR INRA/URCA FARE, 2 Esplanade Roland Garros, BP 224 F-51686 Reims cedex 2 3 UR INRA Sols 2163 Avenue de la Pomme de Pin - CS 40001 ARDON F-45075 Orléans Cedex 2 Corresponding author : chaplain@versailles.inra.fr Structure of soils and its dynamic, physico-chemistry of the interface are of a great importance in the fate of organic pollutants because it governs the accessibility of pollutants to micro-organisms. The soil structure of soils is related to physical parameters (texture, density, water content) but the physico-chemical properties of the interface is not considered. In this study we performed hydro-mechanical measurements on soil samples taken from the 42-plot long-term experiment in Versailles. Indeed six plots were selected to cover a large range of pH values from acid (3.5) to alkaline (8.2) due to the repeated application of fertilizers. Soils were taken in the 0-20 cm and in the 30-35 cm layer out of the ploughed zone. All soils had similar texture and composition with low organic carbon. Therefore pH changes the surface charges and hydrophobicity that are implied in aggregation process. The two layers had the same pH values. The precompression stress Pc and the compression index Cc were derived from confined compression tests performed on remoulded soil samples (density 1.45 g/cm3) at saturation. Results shows that the precompression stress increased at pH lower than 4. In acid case, precompression stress was higher in subsoil. This increase of Pc was attributed to the hydrophobicity due in part to the condensation of charges probably sensitive to the humectation/dessication processes.

  17. Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Alterations in Cell Mechanical Properties on Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathivadhi, Sruti; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Nichols, Michael; Taylor, Carolyn; Ning, Jianhao

    Biological cells can modulate their mechanical properties to suit their functions and in response to changes in their environment. Thus, mechanical phenotyping of cells has been employed for tracking stem cell differentiation, bacterial infection, cell death, etc. Malignant transformation of cells also involves changes in mechanical properties. However, the extent to which mechanical properties of cancer cells contribute to metastasis is not well understood. Yet, more than 90% of all cancer deaths are directly related to metastasis. Transit of cells through the microcirculation is one of the key features of metastasis. We hypothesize that cancer treatment regimens do inadvertently alter cell mechanical properties in ways that might promote cancer metastasis. We use a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic (MMM) platform which mimics the capillary constrictions of the pulmonary and peripheral microcirculation to determine if in-vivo-like mechanical stimuli can evoke different responses from cells subjected to various cancer drugs. In particular, we show that cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as daunorubicin, become more deformable at short timescales (0.1 s) and transit faster through the device. Our results are first steps in evaluating the pro- or anti-metastatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs based on their induced alterations in cell mechanical properties.

  18. The effect of crystallinity on the deformation mechanism and bulk mechanical properties of PLLA.

    PubMed

    Renouf-Glauser, Annette C; Rose, John; Farrar, David F; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2005-10-01

    Poly (l-lactide) is a widely studied biomaterial, currently approved for use in a range of medical devices, however, most in vitro studies have so far focussed upon either the bulk properties during degradation and/or deformation, or on the microstructure of the unloaded material during degradation. This study aimed to combine these approaches through the technique of simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering and tensile testing at various stages of degradation up to 8 months, on material with a range of induced microstructures. Results showed that the amorphous material deformed by crazing in the dry, wet and degraded states, however, the mechanism by which the craze developed changed significantly on hydration. Despite this difference, there was little change in the bulk mechanical properties. Crystalline materials deformed through crystal-mediated deformation, with contributions from both cavitation and fibrillated shear, but surprisingly, differences in the length scales within the spherulitic structure caused by annealing at different temperatures had very little effect on the mechanism of deformation, though differences were seen in the bulk properties. Furthermore, hydration had little effect on the crystalline materials, though degradation over 8 months resulted in loss of mechanical properties for samples produced at higher annealing temperatures. In conclusion, the introduction of crystallinity had a huge effect on both bulk and microscopic properties of PLLA, but the spherulitic structure of the crystalline material affected the bulk properties significantly more than it did the micromechanism of deformation. PMID:15949544

  19. Relating FTS Catalyst Properties to Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wenping; Ramana Rao Pendyala, Venkat; Gao, Pei; Jermwongratanachai, Thani; Jacobs, Gary; Davis, Burton H.

    2016-01-01

    During the reporting period June 23, 2011 to August 31, 2013, CAER researchers carried out research in two areas of fundamental importance to the topic of cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS): promoters and stability. The first area was research into possible substitute promoters that might be used to replace the expensive promoters (e.g., Pt, Re, and Ru) that are commonly used. To that end, three separate investigations were carried out. Due to the strong support interaction of ?-Al2O3 with cobalt, metal promoters are commonly added to commercial FTS catalysts to facilitate the reduction of cobalt oxides and thereby boost active surface cobalt metal sites. To date, the metal promoters examined have been those up to and including Group 11. Because two Group 11 promoters (i.e., Ag and Au) were identified to exhibit positive impacts on conversion, selectivity, or both, research was undertaken to explore metals in Groups 12 - 14. The three metals selected for this purpose were Cd, In, and Sn. At a higher loading of 25%Co on alumina, 1% addition of Cd, In, or Sn was found to-on average-facilitate reduction by promoting a heterogeneous distribution of cobalt consisting of larger lesser interacting cobalt clusters and smaller strongly interacting cobalt species. The lesser interacting species were identified in TPR profiles, where a sharp low temperature peak occurred for the reduction of larger, weakly interacting, CoO species. In XANES, the Cd, In, and Sn promoters were found to exist as oxides, whereas typical promoters (e.g., Re, Ru, Pt) were previously determined to exist in an metallic state in atomic coordination with cobalt. The larger cobalt clusters significantly decreased the active site density relative to the unpromoted 25%Co/Al2O3 catalyst. Decreasing the cobalt loading to 15%Co eliminated the large non-interacting species. The TPR peak for reduction of strongly interacting CoO in the Cd promoted catalyst occurred at a measurably lower temperature

  20. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  1. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF. PMID:27101499

  2. Aging and mechanical properties of NR/BR blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsien-Tang; Tsai, Peir-An

    2006-02-01

    The mechanical properties and post-thermal aging properties of natural rubber (NR) and polybutadiene rubber (BR) blends at different blending ratios are investigated herein. The experimental results show that both tensile and tear strengths of NR/BR blends increase with increasing NR content. BR has a higher compression stiffness than NR. The deformation of BR is less than that of NR under the same load conditions. With regard to aging properties, both tensile stress and strain of NR/BR blends decrease after prolonged aging. In addition, the stress loss of BR is lower than that of NR, meaning that the aging resistance property of BR is superior to that of NR. Furthermore, accumulated thermal history has shifted the glass transition temperature (T g) of NR/BR blends toward lower temperatures while the loss tangent (tan δ) value increases with prolonged thermal aging.

  3. The Interplay between Cell Wall Mechanical Properties and the Cell Cycle in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard G.; Turner, Robert D.; Mullin, Nic; Clarke, Nigel; Foster, Simon J.; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale mechanical properties of live Staphylococcus aureus cells during different phases of growth were studied by atomic force microscopy. Indentation to different depths provided access to both local cell wall mechanical properties and whole-cell properties, including a component related to cell turgor pressure. Local cell wall properties were found to change in a characteristic manner throughout the division cycle. Splitting of the cell into two daughter cells followed a local softening of the cell wall along the division circumference, with the cell wall on either side of the division circumference becoming stiffer. Once exposed, the newly formed septum was found to be stiffer than the surrounding, older cell wall. Deeper indentations, which were affected by cell turgor pressure, did not show a change in stiffness throughout the division cycle, implying that enzymatic cell wall remodeling and local variations in wall properties are responsible for the evolution of cell shape through division. PMID:25468333

  4. Effect of equilibrium moisture content on barrier, mechanical and thermal properties of chitosan films.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Loredo, Rocío Yaneli; Rodríguez-Hernández, Adriana Inés; Morales-Sánchez, Eduardo; Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos Alberto; Velazquez, Gonzalo

    2016-04-01

    Water molecules modify the properties of biodegradable films obtained from hydrophilic materials. Most studies dealing with thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of hydrophilic films are carried out under one relative humidity (RH) condition. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of the moisture content on the thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of chitosan films under several RH conditions. Microclimates, obtained with saturated salt solutions were used for conditioning samples and the properties of the films were evaluated under each RH condition. Chitosan films absorbed up to 40% of moisture at the higher RH studied. The percentage of elongation and the water vapour permeability increased while tensile strength, Young's modulus and glass transition temperature decreased, when the moisture content increased. The results suggest that the water molecules plasticized the polymer matrix, changing the properties when the films were in contact with high RH environments. PMID:26593528

  5. The mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE loaded ALN after mechanical activation for joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kemeng; Qu, Shuxin; Liu, Yumei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchao; Jiang, Chongxi; Shen, Ru

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) loaded with alendronate sodium (ALN) has tremendous potential as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. However, poor mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN are still obstacle for further application. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of mechanical activation on mechanical and tribological properties of 1wt% ALN-loaded UHMWPE (UHMWPE-ALN-ma). In this study, tensile test, small punch test and reciprocating sliding wear test were applied to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were employed to characterize UHMWPE-ALN-ma. Tensile test and small punch test showed that Young׳s modulus, tensile strength and work-to-failure (WTF) of UHMWPE-ALN-ma increased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. The friction coefficients and wear factors of UHMWPE-ALN-ma both decreased significantly compared to those of UHMWPE-ALN. Mechanical activation obviously reduced type 1 (void) and type 2 (the disconnected and dislocated machining marks) fusion defects of UHMWPE-ALN-ma, which were revealed by SEM images of freeze fracture surfaces after etching and lateral surfaces of specimens after extension to fracture, respectively. It was attributed to peeled-off layers and chain scission of molecular chains of UHMWPE particles after mechanical activation, which were revealed by SEM images and FTIR spectra of UHMWPE-ALN-ma and UHMWPE-ALN, respectively. Moreover, EDS spectra revealed the more homogeneous distribution of ALN in UHMWPE-ALN-ma compared to that of UHMWPE-ALN. The present results showed that mechanical activation was a potential strategy to improve mechanical and tribological properties of UHMWPE-ALN-ma as an orthopeadic biomaterial for joint replacements. PMID:27104932

  6. Property attribution in Bohm's interpretation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Katherine Bedard

    1997-09-01

    Bohmian ontology includes particles and a wavefield. I explore how these objects give rise to the world we experience, which properties these fundamental objects have, and what kind of property is spin. Also, I present an example of how our choices about property attribution affect our evaluation of the nonlocality in the system. According to the traditional presentation of Bohm's interpretation, a Bohmian world is 'classical' in the sense that pointer states, mental states, etc., are composed of or supervene on particle properties alone. However, I show that this approach does not make sense and argue that a Bohmian account of these states must include both particle properties and wavefield properties. I then clarify the role this plays in a systematic account of Bohmian probability. Also, my discussion shows that Vink's interpretation does not give us the world we experience. I then focus on particle and wavefield properties. I start by evaluating the recent arguments given by Brown et. al. that Bohmian particles do not bear properties such as gravitational mass, charge, etc. I reject their arguments but agree that (with the exception of inertial mass) we should not attribute these properties to Bohmian particles. I continue by examining the confusions underlying Cushing's (1995) proposal that a tunneling time measurement might be able to falsify Bohm's interpretation but neither verify or falsify the Copenhagen interpretation. The recognition that tunneling time is both a wavefield property and a particle property clarifies many of the issues. Next, I explain how Bohm's interpretation models spin measurements, the ways in which spin is contextual, and how Bohmian spin relates to the Kochen-Specker theorem. I also provide several reasons why we should not attribute spin vectors to Bohmian particles. Finally, I use the framework of the Bell Inequalities to discuss a system in which the properties we decide to attribute, and the time at which we evaluate the system

  7. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D.J.; Smith, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigate for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649/sup 0/C showed that the tensile, yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and is comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  8. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. J.; Smith, H. H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigated for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649 °C showed that the tensile yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and was comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  9. Structure-mechanics property relationship of waste derived biochars.

    PubMed

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K; Bhattacharyya, Debes

    2015-12-15

    The widespread applications of biochar in agriculture and environmental remediation made the scientific community ignore its mechanical properties. Hence, to examine the scope of biochar's structural applications, its mechanical properties have been investigated in this paper through nanoindentation technique. Seven waste derived biochars, made under different pyrolysis conditions and from diverse feedstocks, were studied via nanoindentation, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, thermogravimetry, and electron microscopy. Following this, an attempt was made to correlate the biochars' hardness/modulus with reaction conditions and their chemical properties. The pine wood biochar made at 900°C and 60min residence time was found to have the highest hardness and elastic modulus of 4.29 and 25.01GPa, respectively. It was shown that a combination of higher heat treatment (≥500°C) temperature and longer residence time (~60min) increases the values of hardness and modulus. It was further realized that pyrolysis temperature was a more dominant factor than residence time in determining the final mechanical properties of biochar particles. The degree of aromaticity and crystallinity of the biochar were also correlated with higher values of hardness and modulus. PMID:26322726

  10. Mechanical properties of several iron-nickel meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, Roberta N; El - Dasher, Bassem

    2011-01-06

    Iron-nickel meteorites exhibit a unique lamellar microstructure, consisting of small regions with steep-iron-nickel composition gradients. The microstructure arises as a result of slow cooling in a planetary core or other large mass. The microstructure is further influenced by variable concentrations of other elements such as phosphorous which may have influenced cooling and phase separation. Mechanical properties of these composite structures have been investigated using Vickers and spherical indentation, x-ray fluorescence, and EBSD. Direct observation of mechanical properties in these highly structured materials provides a valuable supplement to bulk measurements, which frequently exhibit large variation in dynamic properties, even within a single sample. Previous studies of the mechanical properties of a typical iron-nickel meteorite, a Diablo Canyon specimen, indicated that the strength of the composite was higher by almost an order of magnitude than values obtained from laboratory-prepared specimens. This was ascribed to the extreme work-hardening evident in the EBSD measurements. Additional specimens from the Canyon Diablo fall (type IAB, coarse octahedrite) and several fine octahedrite meteorites, from the Muonionalusta meteorite (IVA) and Gibeon fall (IVA), have been examined to establish a range of error on the previously measured yield, to determine the extent to which deformation upon reentry contributes to yield, and to establish the degree to which the strength varies as a function of microstructure.

  11. Evolution of mechanical properties in ErT2 films.

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, James Frederick; Bond, Gillian Mary; Knapp, James Arthur

    2010-04-01

    The mechanical properties of rare earth tritide films evolve as tritium decays into {sup 3}He, which forms bubbles that influence long-term film stability in applications such as neutron generators. Ultralow load nanoindentation, combined with finite-element modeling to separate the mechanical properties of the thin films from their substrates, has been used to follow the mechanical properties of model ErT{sub 2} films as they aged. The size of the growing {sup 3}He bubbles was followed with transmission electron microscopy, while ion beam analysis was used to monitor total T and {sup 3}He content. The observed behavior is divided into two regimes: a substantial increase in layer hardness but elasticity changed little over {approx}18 months, followed by a decrease in elastic stiffness and a modest decease in hardness over the final 24 months. We show that the evolution of properties is explained by a combination of dislocation pinning by the bubbles, elastic softening as the bubbles occupy an increasing fraction of the material, and details of bubble growth modes.

  12. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotube ropes with hierarchical helical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Long; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Shan; Zhang, Zhong; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2014-11-01

    Hierarchical helical structures widely exist in both artificial and biological materials. Such nanomaterials as carbon nanotube ropes with hierarchical helical structures hold a promise for potential applications, for instance, in aerospace and medical engineering. In the present paper, a bottom-up theoretical model is established to investigate the mechanical properties of this kind of novel nanomaterials. The geometry of a rope with a hierarchy of chirality is first formulated. On the basis of the analysis of the internal forces and deformations of a single helical ply, a theoretical model is provided to predict the mechanical responses of multi-level helical materials. The effect of hierarchical helical structures is revealed by comparing the properties between a carbon nanotube rope with two-level helical structure and its counterpart bundle consisting of straight carbon nanotubes. The dependence of the mechanical properties of materials on the initial helical angles, fiber numbers, and handednesses at different structural levels are examined. Carbon nanotube ropes are found with higher deformation ability and elastic property which can be easily tuned via their microstructural parameters. This work helps understand the behavior of chiral materials and also provides inspirations for optimal design of advanced nanomaterials with hierarchical helical structures.

  13. Woven glass fabric reinforced laminates based on polyolefin wastes: Thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pietro; Acierno, Domenico; Simeoli, Giorgio; Lopresto, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    Potentialities of polyolefin wastes in place of virgin polypropylene to produce composite laminates have been investigated. Plaques reinforced with a woven glass fabric were prepared by film-stacking technique and systematically analyzed in terms of thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties. In case of PP matrices, the use of a typical compatibilizer to improve the adhesion at the interface has been considered. Thermal properties emphasized the chemical nature of plastic wastes. About mechanical properties, static tests showed an increase of flexural parameters for compatibilized systems due to the coupling effect between grafted maleic anhydride and silane groups on the surface of the glass fabric. These effects, maximized for composites based on car bumper wastes, is perfectly reflected in terms of storage modulus and damping ability of products as determined by single-cantilever bending dynamic tests.

  14. Mechanical properties of Municipal Solid Waste by SDMT

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The adoption of the SDMT for the measurements of MSW properties is proposed. • A comparison between SDMT results and laboratory tests was carried out. • A good reliability has been found in deriving waste properties by SDMT. • Results seems to be promising for the friction angle and Young’s modulus evaluation. - Abstract: In the paper the results of a geotechnical investigation carried on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) materials retrieved from the “Cozzo Vuturo” landfill in the Enna area (Sicily, Italy) are reported and analyzed. Mechanical properties were determined both by in situ and laboratory large-scale one dimensional compression tests. While among in situ tests, Dilatomer Marchetti Tests (DMT) is used widely in measuring soil properties, the adoption of the DMT for the measurements of MSW properties has not often been documented in literature. To validate its applicability for the estimation of MSW properties, a comparison between the seismic dilatometer (SDMT) results and the waste properties evaluated by laboratory tests was carried out. Parameters for “fresh” and “degraded waste” have been evaluated. These preliminary results seems to be promising as concerns the assessment of the friction angle of waste and the evaluation of the S-wave in terms of shear wave velocity. Further studies are certainly required to obtain more representative values of the elastic parameters according to the SDMT measurements.

  15. Factors affecting mechanical properties of biomass pellet from compost.

    PubMed

    Zafari, A; Kianmehr, M H

    2014-01-01

    Effectiveness of a densification process to create strong and durable bonding in pellets can be determined by testing the mechanical properties such as compressive strength (CS) and durability. Mechanical properties of pellet from composted municipal solid waste were determined at different raw material and densification conditions. Ground compost samples were compressed with three levels of moisture content (35%, 40% and 45% (wb)), piston compaction speed (2, 6 and 10 mm/s), die length (8, 10 and 12mm) and raw material particle size (0.3, 0.9 and 1.5mm) into cylindrical pellets utilizing opened-end dies under axial stress from a vertical piston applied by a hydraulic press. The effects of independent variables on mechanical properties were determined using response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design (BBD). All independent variables affected the durability significantly. However, different piston speed and die length not produce any significant difference on CS of pellets. Also in this research the electron photography method was used to identify the binding mechanism of compost particles. PMID:24600888

  16. Loops determine the mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    In mitosis, chromosomes undergo a condensation into highly compacted, rod-like objects. Many models have been put forward for the higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes including radial loop and hierarchical folding models. Additionally, mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes under different conditions were measured. However, the internal organization of mitotic chromosomes still remains unclear. Here we present a polymer model for mitotic chromosomes and show how chromatin loops play a major role for their mechanical properties. The key assumption of the model is the ability of the chromatin fibre to dynamically form loops with the help of binding proteins. Our results show that looping leads to a tight compaction and significantly increases the bending rigidity of chromosomes. Moreover, our qualitative prediction of the force elongation behaviour is close to experimental findings. This indicates that the internal structure of mitotic chromosomes is based on self-organization of the chromatin fibre. We also demonstrate how number and size of loops have a strong influence on the mechanical properties. We suggest that changes in the mechanical characteristics of chromosomes can be explained by an altered internal loop structure. YZ gratefully appreciates funding by the German National Academic Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and support by the Heidelberg Graduate School for Mathematical and Computational Methods in the Sciences (HGS MathComp).

  17. Mechanical Properties of Nanoworm Assembled by DNA and Nanoparticle Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yihua; Sohrabi, Salman; Tan, Jifu; Liu, Yaling

    2016-06-01

    Recently, DNA-nanoparticle conjugates have been widely used as building blocks for assembling complex nanostructures, due to their programmable recognitions, high cellular uptake and enhanced binding capabilities. In this study, a nanoworm structure, which can be applied in fields of drug targeting, image probing and thermal therapies, has been assembled by DNA-nanoparticle conjugates. Subsequently, its mechanical properties have been investigated due to their importance on the structural stability, transport and circulations of the nanoworm. Stiffness and strengths of the nanoworm under different deformation types are studied by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, DNA coating density and particle size on mechanical properties of nanoworms are also thoroughly investigated. Results show that both resistance and strength of the nanoworm are the weakest along the axial direction, indicating it is more prone to be ruptured by a stretching force. i addition, DNA strands are found to be more important than nanoparticles in determining mechanical properties of the nanoworm. Moreover, both strength and resistance in regardless of directions are proved to be enhanced by decreasing the temperature, raising the DNA coating density and enlarging the particle size. This study is capable of serving as guidance for designing nanoworms with optimal mechanical strengths for applications. PMID:27427583

  18. Mechanical properties of single electrospun drug-encapsulated nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yian Chew, Sing; Hufnagel, Todd C.; Teck Lim, Chwee; Leong, Kam W.

    2006-08-01

    The mechanical and structural properties of a surface play an important role in determining the morphology of attached cells, and ultimately their cellular functions. As such, mechanical and structural integrity are important design parameters for a tissue scaffold. Electrospun fibrous meshes are widely used in tissue engineering. When in contact with electrospun scaffolds, cells see the individual micro- or nanofibres as their immediate microenvironment. In this study, tensile testing of single electrospun nanofibres composed of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and its copolymer, poly(caprolactone-co-ethyl ethylene phosphate) (PCLEEP), revealed a size effect in the Young's modulus, E, and tensile strength, σT. Both strength and stiffness increase as the fibre diameter decreases from bulk (~5 µm) into the nanometre region (200 300 nm). In particular, E and σT of individual PCL nanofibres were at least two-fold and an order of magnitude higher than that of PCL film, respectively. PCL films were observed to have more pronounced crystallographic texture than the nanofibres; however no difference in crystalline fraction, perfection, or texture was detected among the various fibres. When drugs were encapsulated into single PCLEEP fibres, mechanical properties were enhanced with 1 20 wt% of loaded retinoic acid, but weakened by 10 20 wt% of encapsulated bovine serum albumin. This understanding of the effect of size and drug and protein encapsulation on the mechanical properties of electrospun fibres may help in the optimization of tissue scaffold design that combines biochemical and biomechanical cues for tissue regeneration.

  19. Mechanical properties of fibroblasts depend on level of cancer transformation.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Yu M; Lomakina, M E; Bagrov, D V; Makhnovskiy, P I; Alexandrova, A Y; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V

    2014-05-01

    Recently, it was revealed that tumor cells are significantly softer than normal cells. Although this phenomenon is well known, it is connected with many questions which are still unanswered. Among these questions are the molecular mechanisms which cause the change in stiffness and the correlation between cell mechanical properties and their metastatic potential. We studied mechanical properties of cells with different levels of cancer transformation. Transformed cells in three systems with different transformation types (monooncogenic N-RAS, viral and cells of tumor origin) were characterized according to their morphology, actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion organization. Transformation led to reduction of cell spreading and thus decreasing the cell area, disorganization of actin cytoskeleton, lack of actin stress fibers and decline in the number and size of focal adhesions. These alterations manifested in a varying degree depending on type of transformation. Force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy with spherical probes was carried out to measure the Young's modulus of cells. In all cases the Young's moduli were fitted well by log-normal distribution. All the transformed cell lines were found to be 40-80% softer than the corresponding normal ones. For the cell system with a low level of transformation the difference in stiffness was less pronounced than for the two other systems. This suggests that cell mechanical properties change upon transformation, and acquisition of invasive capabilities is accompanied by significant softening. PMID:24530505

  20. Mechanical properties of orbital fat and its encapsulating connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kinon; Weiland, James D

    2011-06-01

    There is an increasing need to understand the mechanical properties of human orbital fat and its encapsulating connective tissue (OFCT), but such knowledge is not available in the current literature. The purpose of the present study is to examine the mechanical properties of the OFCT. From 5 pairs of 76- to 92-year-old Caucasian human eyes and 33 5- to 7-month-old porcine eyes, 5 human and 11 porcine OFCT samples were dissected at the posterior pole or adjacent to the pole in the vertical, horizontal, and radial directions. Sample dimensions were fixed or measured. Tensile tests were performed on the samples in body-temperature saline. The stress-strain relationship was first approximately linear and then became nonlinear. The linear, the neo-Hookean, and the Mooney-Rivlin constants are reported in Tables 1 and 2. No statistical difference was found among their properties in the different directions in either the human or the porcine samples. Statistical differences were found between the human and the porcine material constants in the horizontal and radial directions. Among our material models, only the Mooney-Rivlin model was able to capture the mechanical properties of the OFCT in large deformation properly. The Mooney-Rivlin model was especially adaptive to the human data. This is the first time the mechanical properties of the human and porcine OFCT have been examined in the literature. We believe our data will provide valuable information to others regarding designing implant biomaterials in orbital treatments and developing computer models to study orbital biomechanics. PMID:21744934

  1. Mechanical and tribological properties of ion beam-processed surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, P.

    1998-01-01

    The intent of this work was to broaden the applications of well-established surface modification techniques and to elucidate the various wear mechanisms that occur in sliding contact of ion-beam processed surfaces. The investigation included characterization and evaluation of coatings and modified surfaces synthesized by three surface engineering methods; namely, beam-line ion implantation, plasma-source ion implantation, and DC magnetron sputtering. Correlation among measured properties such as surface hardness, fracture toughness, and wear behavior was also examined. This dissertation focused on the following areas of research: (1) investigating the mechanical and tribological properties of mixed implantation of carbon and nitrogen into single crystal silicon by beam-line implantation; (2) characterizing the mechanical and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings processed by plasma source ion implantation; and (3) developing and evaluating metastable boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) compound coatings for mechanical and tribological properties. The surface hardness of a mixed carbon-nitrogen implant sample improved significantly compared to the unimplanted sample. However, the enhancement in the wear factor of this sample was found to be less significant than carbon-implanted samples. The presence of nitrogen might be responsible for the degraded wear behavior since nitrogen-implantation alone resulted in no improvement in the wear factor. DLC coatings have low friction, low wear factor, and high hardness. The fracture toughness of DLC coatings has been estimated for the first time. The wear mechanism in DLC coatings investigated with a ruby slider under a contact stress of 1 GPa was determined to be plastic deformation. The preliminary data on metastable BCN compound coatings indicated high friction, low wear factor, and high hardness.

  2. Micro-mechanical properties of bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiev, V.; Markovsky, A.; Aznakayev, E.; Zakiev, I.; Gursky, E.

    2005-09-01

    Investigation of physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (ceramics for crowns, silver amalgam, cements and materials on a polymeric basis) properties by the modern methods and correspondence their physical-mechanical properties to the physical-mechanical properties of native teeth is represented. The universal device "Micron-Gamma" is built for this purpose. This device allows investigate the physical-mechanical characteristics of stomatologic materials (an elastic modulus, micro-hardness, destruction energy, resistance to scratching) by the methods of continuous indentation, scanning and pricking. A new effective method as well as its device application for the investigation of surface layers of materials and their physical-mechanical properties by means of the constant indenting of an indenter is realized. This method is based on the automatic registration of loading (P) on the indenter with the simultaneous measurement of its indentation depth (h). The results of investigations are presented on a loading diagram P=f(h) and as a digital imaging on the PC. This diagram allows get not only more diverse characteristics in the real time regime but also gives new information about the stomatologic material properties. Therefore, we can to investigate the wide range of the physical-mechanical properties of stomatologic materials. "Micron-alpha" is digital detection device for light imaging applications. It enables to detect the very low material surface relief heights and restoration of surface micro topography by a sequence data processing of interferential data of partially coherent light also. "Micron-alpha" allows: to build 2D and 3D imaging of a material surface; to estimate the quantitatively characteristics of a material surface; to observe the imaging interferential pictures both in the white and in the monochromatic light; to carry out the investigation of blood cells, microbes and biological macromolecules profiles. The method allows

  3. Brain mechanical property measurement using MRE with intrinsic activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-11-01

    Many pathologies alter the mechanical properties of tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been developed to noninvasively characterize these quantities in vivo. Typically, small vibrations are induced in the tissue of interest with an external mechanical actuator. The resulting displacements are measured with phase contrast sequences and are then used to estimate the underlying mechanical property distribution. Several MRE studies have quantified brain tissue properties. However, the cranium and meninges, especially the dura, are very effective at damping externally applied vibrations from penetrating deeply into the brain. Here, we report a method, termed ‘intrinsic activation’, that eliminates the requirement for external vibrations by measuring the motion generated by natural blood vessel pulsation. A retrospectively gated phase contrast MR angiography sequence was used to record the tissue velocity at eight phases of the cardiac cycle. The velocities were numerically integrated via the Fourier transform to produce the harmonic displacements at each position within the brain. The displacements were then reconstructed into images of the shear modulus based on both linear elastic and poroelastic models. The mechanical properties produced fall within the range of brain tissue estimates reported in the literature and, equally important, the technique yielded highly reproducible results. The mean shear modulus was 8.1 kPa for linear elastic reconstructions and 2.4 kPa for poroelastic reconstructions where fluid pressure carries a portion of the stress. Gross structures of the brain were visualized, particularly in the poroelastic reconstructions. Intra-subject variability was significantly less than the inter-subject variability in a study of six asymptomatic individuals. Further, larger changes in mechanical properties were observed in individuals when examined over time than when the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation

  4. Brain Mechanical Property Measurement Using MRE with Intrinsic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Problem Addressed Many pathologies alter the mechanical properties of tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been developed to noninvasively characterize these quantities in vivo. Typically, small vibrations are induced in the tissue of interest with an external mechanical actuator. The resulting displacements are measured with phase contrast sequences and are then used to estimate the underlying mechanical property distribution. Several MRE studies have quantified brain tissue properties. However, the cranium and meninges, especially the dura, are very effective at damping externally applied vibrations from penetrating deeply into the brain. Here, we report a method, termed ‘intrinsic activation’, that eliminates the requirement for external vibrations by measuring the motion generated by natural blood vessel pulsation. Methodology A retrospectively gated phase contrast MR angiography sequence was used to record the tissue velocity at eight phases of the cardiac cycle. The velocities were numerically integrated via the Fourier transform to produce the harmonic displacements at each position within the brain. The displacements were then reconstructed into images of the shear modulus based on both linear elastic and poroelastic models. Results, Significance and Potential Impact The mechanical properties produced fall within the range of brain tissue estimates reported in the literature and, equally important, the technique yielded highly reproducible results. The mean shear modulus was 8.1 kPa for linear elastic reconstructions and 2.4 kPa for poroelastic reconstructions where fluid pressure carries a portion of the stress. Gross structures of the brain were visualized, particularly in the poroelastic reconstructions. Intra-subject variability was significantly less than the inter-subject variability in a study of 6 asymptomatic individuals. Further, larger changes in mechanical properties were observed in individuals when examined over time than when

  5. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Wang, C; Besenbacher, F; Dong, M

    2015-05-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils. PMID:25839069

  6. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  7. The Structure, Functions, and Mechanical Properties of Keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKittrick, J.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bodde, S. G.; Yang, W.; Novitskaya, E. E.; Meyers, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Keratin is one of the most important structural proteins in nature and is widely found in the integument in vertebrates. It is classified into two types: α-helices and β-pleated sheets. Keratinized materials can be considered as fiber-reinforced composites consisting of crystalline intermediate filaments embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. They have a wide variety of morphologies and properties depending on different functions. Here, we review selected keratin-based materials, such as skin, hair, wool, quill, horn, hoof, feather, and beak, focusing on the structure-mechanical property-function relationships and finally give some insights on bioinspired composite design based on keratinized materials.

  8. Workability and mechanical properties of alkali activated slag concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.G.; Sanjayan, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on concrete containing alkali activated slag (AAS) as the binder, with emphasis on achievement of reasonable workability and equivalent one-day strength to portland cement concrete at normal curing temperatures. Two types of activators were used: sodium hydroxide in combination with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate in combination with hydrated lime. The fresh concrete properties reported include slump and slump loss, air content, and bleed. Mechanical properties of AAS concrete, including compressive strength, elastic modulus, flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and creep are contrasted with those of portland cement concrete.

  9. Concepts and techniques for ultrasonic evaluation of material mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1980-01-01

    The ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques discussed in the present paper indicate potentials for material characterization and property prediction. Stress wave interaction and material transfer function concepts are examined as a basis for explaining correlations between material mechanical behavior and ultrasonically measured quantities. It is observed that the effect and criticality of any discrete flaw, such as crack, inclusion, or any other stress raiser, is definable only in terms of its material microstructural environment. This underscores the importance of ultrasonic techniques capable of characterizing the stress wave energy transfer properties of a material.

  10. Simplified composite micromechanics equations for hygral, thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    A unified set of composite micromechanics equations of simple form is summarized and described. This unified set can be used to predict unidirectional composite (ply) geometric, mechanical, thermal and hygral properties using constituent material (fiber/matrix) properties. This unified set also includes approximate equations for predicting (1) moisture absorption; (2) glass transition temperature of wet resins; and (3) hygrothermal degradation effects. Several numerical examples are worked-out to illustrate ease of use and versatility of these equations. These numerical examples also demonstrate the interrelationship of the various factors (geometric to environmental) and help provide insight into composite behavior at the micromechanistic level.

  11. Simplified composite micromechanics equations of hygral, thermal, and mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    A unified set of composite micromechanics equations of simple form is summarized and described. This unified set can be used to predict unidirectional composite (ply) geometric, mechanical, thermal and hygral properties using constituent material (fiber/matrix) properties. This unified set also includes approximate equations for predicting (1) moisture absorption; (2) glass transition temperature of wet resins; and (3) hygrothermal degradation effects. Several numerical examples are worked-out to illustrate ease of use and versatility of these equations. These numerical examples also demonstrate the interrelationship of the various factors (geometric to environmental) and help provide insight into composite behavior at the micromechanistic level.

  12. Mixed 2D molecular systems: Mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beňo, Juraj; Weis, Martin; Dobročka, Edmund; Haško, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Study of Langmuir monolayers consisting of stearic acid (SA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) molecules was done by surface pressure-area isotherms ( π- A), the Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement, X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the selected mechanic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties based on orientational structure of monolayers. On the base of π- A isotherms analysis we explain the creation of stable structures and found optimal monolayer composition. The dielectric properties represented by MDC generated monolayers were analyzed in terms of excess dipole moment, proposing the effect of dipole-dipole interaction. XRR and AFM results illustrate deposited film structure and molecular ordering.

  13. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced By Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Taminger, Karen M. B.; Begley, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties have been demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys that are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit features more typical of cast material. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. In the current study, mechanical properties and resulting microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Material performance was evaluated based on tensile properties and results were compared with properties of Al 2219 wrought products. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains, typically with interior dendritic structures, which were described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  14. Evaluation of the compressive mechanical properties of endoluminal metal stents.

    PubMed

    Schrader, S C; Beyar, R

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of metal stents are important parameters in the consideration of stent design, matched to resist arterial recoil and vascular spasm. The purpose of this study was to develop a system for a standardized quantitative evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of various coronary stents. Several types of stents were compressed by external hydrostatic pressure. The stent diameter was assessed by placing a pair of small ultrasonic sono-crystals on the stent. From pressure-strain diagrams the ultimate strength and radial stiffness for each stent were determined. For all stents, except the MICRO-II and the Wiktor stent, the diameter decreased homogeneously until an ultimate compressive strength was exceeded, causing an abrupt collapse. Expanded to 3 mm, the mechanical behavior of the beStent, the Crown and the Palmaz-Schatz stent (PS153-series) were comparable. The spiral articulated Palmaz-Schatz stent showed twice the strength (1.26 atm) of the PS-153 (0.65 atm). The NIR stent yielded a maximum strength of 1.05 atm. The MICRO-II and the Wiktor stent did not collapse abruptly but rather showed a continuous decline of diameter with increasing external pressure. The Cardiocoil stent behaved in a fully elastic manner and showed the largest radial stiffness. Difference in mechanical properties between stents were documented using a new device specifically developed for that purpose. These mechanical stent parameters may have important clinical implications. PMID:9637441

  15. Mechanical properties testing and results for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Johnsen, B. P.; Nagy, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mechanical test data for thermal barrier coatings, including modulus, static strength, and fatigue strength data, are reviewed in support of the development of durability models for heat engine applica-tions. The materials include 7 and 8 wt % yttria partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) as well as a cermet ma-terial (PSZ +10 wt % NiCoCrAlY). Both air plasma sprayed and electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings were tested. The data indicate the basic trends in the mechanical properties of the coatings over a wide range of isothermal conditions. Some of the trends are correlated with material density.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, Alexey; Nemes, Alexandru; Stannarius, Ralf; Schulz, Mario; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    The formation of stable freely suspended filaments is an interesting peculiarity of some liquid crystal phases. So far, little is known about their structure and stability. Similarly to free-standing smectic films, an internal molecular structure of the mesophase stabilizes these macroscopically well-ordered objects with length to diameter ratios of 10{sup 3} and above. In this paper, we report observations of smectic liquid crystal fibers formed by bent-shaped molecules in different mesophases. Our study, employing several experimental techniques, focuses on mechanical and structural aspects of fiber formation such as internal structure, stability, and mechanical and optical properties.

  17. Consolidation of binderless nanostructured TiC by pulsed current activated sintering and its mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Shon, In-Jin; Kim, Byung-Ryang; Ko, In-Yong; Doh, Jung-Mann; Yoon, Jin-Kook

    2011-02-01

    A dense nanostructured TiC with a relative density of up to 98% was produced with simultaneous application of 80 MPa pressure and pulsed current of 2800 A using the nanopowder of TiC. The effect of the ball milling times on the sintering behavior, grain size and mechanical properties of binderless TiC was investigated. PMID:21456219

  18. Time-temperature superposition applied to PBX mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; DeLuca, Racci; Wright, Walter J.

    2012-03-01

    The use of plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) in weapon applications requires that they possess and maintain a level of structural/mechanical integrity. Uniaxial tension and compression experiments are typically used to characterize the mechanical response of materials over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates, providing the basis for predictive modeling in more complex geometries. After many years of data collection on a variety of PBX formulations, we have here applied the principles of time-temperature superposition to a mechanical properties database which includes PBX 9501, PBX 9502, PBXN-110, PBXN-9, and HPP (propellant). Consistencies are demonstrated between the results of quasi-static tension and compression, dynamic Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) compression, and cantilever Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Timetemperature relationships of maximum stress and corresponding strain values are analyzed, in addition to the more conventional analysis of modulus. The extensive analysis shows adherence to the principles of time-temperature superposition and correlations of mechanical response to binder glasstransition temperature (Tg) and specimen density. Direct ties exist between the time-temperature analysis and the underlying basis of a useful existing PBX mechanical model (ViscoSCRAM). Results give confidence that, with some limitations, mechanical response can be predicted at conditions not explicitly measured.

  19. Mapping the mechanical properties of cholesterol-containing supported lipid bilayers with nanoscale spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Shamitko-Klingensmith, Nicole; Molchanoff, Kelley M; Burke, Kathleen A; Magnone, George J; Legleiter, Justin

    2012-09-18

    It has been demonstrated that many biological processes are influenced by mechanical changes in membranes comprised of a variety of lipid components. As a result, the ability to map physicomechanical properties of surfaces with high temporal and spatial resolution is desirable. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to be a useful technique for imaging biological surfaces due to its ability to operate in solution; however, access to information concerning the mechanical properties of these surfaces can also be obtained by reconstructing the time-resolved tip/sample force interactions during the imaging process. An advantage of such an approach is the direct correlation of topographical features with mechanical properties. Reconstruction of the tip/sample force is achievable by a technique called scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM), which treats the cantilever as an accelerometer. The acceleration, which is directly related to the tip/sample force, of the cantilever is obtained by taking the second derivative of the cantilever deflection signal during a tapping mode AFM experiment in solution with standard cantilevers. Herein, we describe the applicability of SPAM to study mechanical properties of supported lipid bilayers with nanoscale spatial resolution via numerical simulations and experiment. The maximum and minimum tapping forces respond to changes in specific surface mechanical properties. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these changes can be used to map relative changes in the Young's modulus and adhesive properties of supported total brain lipid extract bilayers containing exogenous cholesterol. Finally, the ability of SPAM to distinguish nanoscale lipid raft domains based on changes in local mechanical properties is demonstrated. PMID:22924735

  20. Mechanical properties of structural amorphous steels: Intrinsic correlations, conflicts, and optimizing strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-12-01

    Amorphous steels have demonstrated superior properties and great potentials for structural applications since their emergence, yet it still remains unclear about how and why their mechanical properties are correlated with other factors and how to achieve intended properties by designing their compositions. Here, the intrinsic interdependences among the mechanical, thermal, and elastic properties of various amorphous steels are systematically elucidated and a general trade-off relation is exposed between the strength and ductility/toughness. Encouragingly, a breakthrough is achievable that the strength and ductility/toughness can be simultaneously improved by tuning the compositions. The composition dependences of the properties and alloying effects are further analyzed thoroughly and interpreted from the fundamental plastic flow and atomic bonding characters. Most importantly, systematic strategies are outlined for optimizing the mechanical properties of the amorphous steels. The study may help establish the intrinsic correlations among the compositions, atomic structures, and properties of the amorphous steels, and provide useful guidance for their alloy design and property optimization. Thus, it is believed to have implications for the development and applications of the structural amorphous steels.

  1. Quantitative ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    Current progress in the application of ultrasonic techniques to nondestructive measurement of mechanical strength properties of engineering materials is reviewed. Even where conventional NDE techniques have shown that a part is free of overt defects, advanced NDE techniques should be available to confirm the material properties assumed in the part's design. There are many instances where metallic, composite, or ceramic parts may be free of critical defects while still being susceptible to failure under design loads due to inadequate or degraded mechanical strength. This must be considered in any failure prevention scheme that relies on fracture analysis. This review will discuss the availability of ultrasonic methods that can be applied to actual parts to assess their potential susceptibility to failure under design conditions.

  2. Preparation and mechanical properties of chitosan/carbon nanotubes composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Feng; Shen, Lu; Zhang, Wei-De; Tong, Yue-Jin

    2005-01-01

    Biopolymer chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) nanocomposites have been successfully prepared by a simple solution-evaporation method. The morphology and mechanical properties of the chitosan/MWNTs nanocomposites have been characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical microscopy (OM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), and tensile as well as nanoindentation tests. The MWNTs were observed to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix. When compared with neat chitosan, the mechanical properties, including the tensile modulus and strength, of the nanocomposites are greatly improved by about 93% and 99%, respectively, with incorporation of only 0.8 wt % of MWNTs into the chitosan matrix. PMID:16283728

  3. Superior mechanical properties of FeCrMoVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, U.; Mattern, N.; Gemming, T.; Siegel, U.; Werniewicz, K.; Eckert, J.

    2007-06-01

    This work presents results on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the steel composition Fe84.3Cr4.3Mo4.6V2.2C4.6 subjected to preparation conditions typically used for manufacturing of bulk metallic glasses. Thermodynamical aspects and kinetic limitations on the specific solidification process of phase formation, particularly those, which are strongly dominated by diffusion controlled mechanisms, promote the formation of nonequilibrium phases, such as martensite and complex carbide structures already in the as-cast state. This combination of high strength phases yields material with highly desirable properties, such as an engineering compression strength of more than 4000MPa surprisingly combined with a fracture strain of about 12%.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Highly Porous NiTi Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bram, Martin; Köhl, Manuel; Buchkremer, Hans Peter; Stöver, Detlev

    2011-07-01

    Highly porous NiTi alloys with pseudoelastic properties are attractive candidates for biomedical implants, energy absorbers, or damping elements. Recently, a new method was developed for net-shape manufacturing of such alloys combining metal injection molding with the application of suitable space-holder materials. A comprehensive study of mechanical properties was conducted on samples with a porosity of 51% and a pore size in the range of 300-500 μm. At low deformations <6%, fully pronounced pseudoelasticity was found. Even at higher strains, a shape recovery of maximum 6% took place, on which the onset of irreversible plastic deformation was superposed. Results of static compression tests were also used to calculate the energy-absorbing capacity. Fatigue of porous NiTi was investigated by cyclic loading up to 230,000 stress reversals. The failure mechanisms responsible for a reduction of shape recovery after an increased number of load cycles are discussed.

  5. [A study of mechanical properties of orthodontic wires in tension].

    PubMed

    Konstantellos, B; Lagoudakis, M; Toutountzakis, N

    1990-12-01

    Orthodontic forces are applied to the teeth basically by means of different types of orthodontic wires. Knowledge of the mechanical properties of such wires are very helpful to the clinician in design and application of optimal force systems during orthodontic treatment. The basic mechanical properties were studied for 17 types of orthodontic wires (all rectangular and of the same size), in tension. Modulus of elasticity (E), yield strength (YS) and maximum elastic strain (Springback) (YS/E) were calculated for each type of wires. Stainless steel wires have demonstrated higher modulus of elasticity (and yield strength) in comparison with wires of nickel-titanium and beta titanium alloys. B-titanium wires showed higher modulus of elasticity than nickel-titanium ones. In addition stainless steel wires were found to have higher values for springback than cobalt-chromium ones and lower values (for the same variable) than nickel-titanium and B-titanium wires. PMID:2129597

  6. Mechanical and hyperthermic properties of magnetic nanocomposites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Tahlil, Abdullahi; Crosson, David; Yao, Nan; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the properties of multifunctional materials is important for the design of devices for biomedical applications. In this paper, a combination of experiments and models was used to study the mechanical and hyperthermic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP)-filled PDMS composites for biomedical applications. These are studied as a function of the weight of MNP, γ-Fe2O3. The results showed the effects on mechanical behavior, and specific losses in a magnetic field. The measured Young's moduli are in good agreement with the moduli predicted from the Bergström-Boybce model. Specific losses calculated from magnetic measurements are used to predict the thermal dose under in-vivo conditions. The implications of the results were discussed for potential applications in biomedical devices. PMID:26005843

  7. Temperature dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Brian DeVon; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip

    2010-08-01

    Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts.

  8. Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Polymers With Various Force Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of force field type on the predicted elastic properties of a polyimide is examined using a multiscale modeling technique. Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to predict the atomic structure and elastic properties of the polymer by subjecting a representative volume element of the material to bulk and shear finite deformations. The elastic properties of the polyimide are determined using three force fields: AMBER, OPLS-AA, and MM3. The predicted values of Young s modulus and shear modulus of the polyimide are compared with experimental values. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of the polyimide predicted with the OPLS-AA force field most closely matched those from experiment. The results also indicate that while the complexity of the force field does not have a significant effect on the accuracy of predicted properties, small differences in the force constants and the functional form of individual terms in the force fields determine the accuracy of the force field in predicting the elastic properties of the polyimide.

  9. Mechanical and biological properties of oxidized horn keratin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanbin; Shan, Guanghua; Cao, Ping; He, Jia; Lin, Zhongshi; Huang, Yaoxiong; Ao, Ningjian

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanical and biological properties of oxidized keratin materials, which were obtained by using buffalo horns to oxidize. It could provide a way to evaluate their potential for clinical translatability. The characterization on their composition, mechanical properties, and biological responses was performed. It is found that the oxidation process could lead the disulfide bond to break down and then to form sulfonic acid, or even make partial peptide chain to be fragment for the new modification of amino acid. Hence the oxidized horn keratins have lower thermal stability and hydrolytic stability in comparison with horn keratin, but the degradation products of oxidized horn keratins have no significant difference. In addition, the mechanical properties of oxidized horn keratins are poorer than that of horn keratin, but the oxidized horn keratins still have disulfide bonds to form a three-dimensional structure, which benefits for their mechanical properties. The fracture toughness of oxidized horn keratins increases with the increase in the degree of oxidation. After oxidation, the oxidized horn keratins have lower cytotoxicity and lower hemolysis ratio. Moreover, when the oxidized horn keratins, as well as different concentration of degradation products of oxidized horn keratins, are directly in contact with platelet-rich plasma, platelets are not activated. It suggests that the oxidized horn keratins have good hemocompatibility, without triggering blood thrombosis. The implantation experiment in vivo also demonstrates that the oxidized horn keratins are compatible with the tissue, because there are minimal fibrous capsule and less of infiltration of host cells, without causing serious inflammation. In summary, the oxidized horn keratins can act as implanted biomaterial devices that are directly in contact with blood and tissue. PMID:25492180

  10. Mechanical properties of D0 Run IIB silicon detector staves

    SciTech Connect

    Lanfranco, Giobatta; Fast, James; /Fermilab

    2001-06-01

    A proposed stave design for the D0 Run IIb silicon tracker outer layers featuring central cooling channels and a composite shell mechanical structure is evaluated for self-deflection and deflection due to external loads. This paper contains an introduction to the stave structure, a section devoted to composite lamina and laminate properties and finally a section discussing the beam deflections expected for assembled staves using these laminates.

  11. On-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, B.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1992-12-31

    The measurement of the velocity of ultrasound provides a nondestructive means to characterize the mechanical properties of paper. The objective of this program is to develop sensors capable of making such measurements in the thickness and in-plane directions of paper while the paper is moving at line speed on the paper machine. This would allow continuous monitoring of product quality as well as provide data for controlling the papermaking process.

  12. On-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, B.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop sensors capable of measuring the velocity of ultrasound in the thickness and in-plane directions of paper while the paper is moving at line speed on the paper machine. These measurements would provide a nondestructive characterization of the mechanical properties of paper, allowing continuous monitoring of product quality as well as providing data for controlling the papermaking process.

  13. On-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, B.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of the program is to develop sensors capable of measuring the velocity of ultrasound in the thickness and in-plane directions of paper while the paper is moving at line speed on the paper machine. These measurements would provide a nondestructive characterization of the mechanical properties of paper, allowing continuous monitoring of product quality as well as providing data for controlling the papermaking process.

  14. On-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, B.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of the velocity of ultrasound provides a nondestructive means to characterize the mechanical properties of paper. The objective of this program is to develop sensors capable of making such measurements in the thickness and in-plane directions of paper while the paper is moving at line speed on the paper machine. This would allow continuous monitoring of product quality as well as provide data for controlling the papermaking process.

  15. Mechanical and thermophysical properties of hot-pressed SYNROC B

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, C.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Otto, R.A.; Brady, R.L.; Brown, A.E.; Ulrich, A.R.; Lum, R.C.

    1981-05-06

    The optimal SYNROC compositons for use with commercial waste are reviewed. Large amounts of powder (about 2.5 kg) were prepared by convention al ceramic operations to test the SYNROC concept on a processing scale. Samples, 15.2 cm in diameter, were hot pressed in graphite, and representative samples were cut for microstructural evaluations. Measured mechanical and thermophysical properties did not vary significantly as a function of sample location and were typical of titanate ceramic materials.

  16. Mechanical properties of green composites based on thermoplastic starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornes, F.; Sánchez-Nácher, L.; Fenollar, O.; Boronat, T.; Garcia-Sanoguera, D.

    2010-06-01

    The present work is focused on study of "green composites" elaborated from thermoplastic starch (TPS) as polymer matrix and a fiber from natural origin (rush) as reinforced fiber. The effect of the fiber content has been studied by means of the mechanical properties. The composite resulting presents a lack of interaction between matrix and fiber that represents a performance decrease. However the biodegradability behavior of the resulting composite raise this composite as useful an industrial level.

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  18. Novel F-releasing Composite with Improved Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ling, L.; Xu, X.; Choi, G.-Y.; Billodeaux, D.; Guo, G.; Diwan, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the authors have been developing novel fluoride-releasing dental composites containing ternary zirconium fluoride chelates. The aim of this study was to improve the physical and mechanical properties of these composites by improving the formulation of the monomers and photoinitiators. The hypothesis was that reduction of hydrophilic monomers and improvement of the photoinitiators could reduce water sorption and significantly increase the mechanical properties of the composite. The degree of conversion of the composites containing different compositions of photoinitiators was studied by Fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIR). Ten experimental composites containing different compositions of ethoxylated bisphenol-A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA), 1,6-hexanediol dimethacrylate (HDDMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), and 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) were tested for flexural strength, viscosity, and water sorption. The experimental composite containing 20% synthesized fluoride-releasing monomer, 30% BisGMA, 30% EBPADMA, and 20% HDDMA showed significantly higher fluoride release and recharge, but physical and mechanical properties similar to those of the control composite containing 40% BisGMA, 40% EBPADMA, and 20% HDDMA. PMID:19131323

  19. Reconstruction of Sedimentary Rock Based on MechanicalProperties

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Guodong; Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitry B.

    2004-05-04

    We describe a general, physics-based approach to numericalreconstruction of the geometrical structure and mechanical properties ofnatural sedimentary rock in 3D. Our procedure consists of three mainsteps: sedimentation, compaction, and diagenesis, followed by theverification of rock mechanical properties. The dynamic geologicprocesses of grain sedimentation and compaction are simulated by solvinga dimensionless form of Newton's equations of motion for an ensemble ofgrains. The diagenetic rock transformation is modeled using a cementationalgorithm, which accounts for the effect of rock grain size on therelative rate of cement overgrowth. Our emphasis is on unconsolidatedsand and sandstone. The main input parameters are the grain sizedistribution, the final rock porosity, the type and amount of cement andclay minerals, and grain mechanical properties: the inter-grain frictioncoefficient, the cement strength, and the grain stiffness moduli. We usea simulated 2D Fontainebleau sandstone to obtain the grain mechanicalproperties. This Fontainebleau sandstone is also used to study theinitiation, growth, and coalescence of micro-cracks under increasingvertical stress. The box fractal dimension of the micro-crackdistribution, and its variation with the applied stress areestimated.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Particles: Effect of Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Nitzan; Gladnikoff, Micha; Barlam, David; Shneck, Roni Z.; Rein, Alan; Rousso, Itay

    2006-01-01

    After budding from the host cell, retroviruses undergo a process of internal reorganization called maturation, which is prerequisite to infectivity. Viral maturation is accompanied by dramatic morphological changes, which are poorly understood in physical/mechanistic terms. Here, we study the mechanical properties of live mature and immature murine leukemia virus particles by indentation-type experiments conducted with an atomic force microscope tip. We find that both mature and immature particles have an elastic shell. Strikingly, the virus shell is twofold stiffer in the immature (0.68 N/m) than the mature (0.31 N/m) form. However, finite-element simulation shows that the average Young's modulus of the immature form is more than fourfold lower than that of the mature form. This finding suggests that per length unit, the protein-protein interactions in the mature shell are stronger than those in the immature shell. We also show that the mature virus shell is brittle, since it can be broken by application of large loading forces, by firm attachment to a substrate, or by repeated application of force. Our results are the first analysis of the mechanical properties of an animal virus, and demonstrate a linkage between virus morphology and mechanical properties. PMID:16632508

  1. Mechanical Properties of a Primary Cilium Measured by Resonant Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Andrew

    Primary cilia are ubiquitous mammalian cellular substructures implicated in an ever-increasing number of regulatory pathways. The well-established `ciliary hypothesis' states that physical bending of the cilium (for example, due to fluid flow) initiates signaling cascades, yet the mechanical properties of the cilium remain incompletely measured, resulting in confusion regarding the biological significance of flow-induced ciliary mechanotransduction. In this work we measure the mechanical properties of a primary cilium by using an optical trap to induce resonant oscillation of the structure. Our data indicate 1), the primary cilium is not a simple cantilevered beam, 2), the base of the cilium may be modeled as a nonlinear rotatory spring, the linear spring constant `k' of the cilium base calculated to be (4.6 +/- 0.62)*10-12 N/rad and nonlinear spring constant ` α' to be (-1 +/- 0.34) *10-10 N/rad2 , and 3) the ciliary base may be an essential regulator of mechanotransduction signalling. Our method is also particularly suited to measure mechanical properties of nodal cilia, stereocilia, and motile cilia, anatomically similar structures with very different physiological functions.

  2. Bulk Mechanical Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Landi, Brian; Cress, Cory; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    The unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them especially well suited for use as electrodes in power devices such as lithium ion batteries, hydrogen fuel cells, solar cells, and supercapacitors. The performances of such devices are expected to be influenced, at least in part, by the mechanical properties of the SWNTs used in composites or in stand alone ``papers.'' Therefore, the elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strengths of SWNT papers were measured as functions of temperature, SWNT purity, SWNT length, and SWNT bundling. The SWNTs used to produce the papers were synthesized in an alexandrite laser vaporization reactor at 1100^oC and purified using conventional acid-reflux conditions. Characterization of the SWNTs was performed using SEM, BET, TGA, and optical and Raman spectroscopy. The purified material was filtered and dried to yield papers of bundled SWNTs which were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was observed that the mechanical properties of acid-refluxed SWNT papers were significantly improved by controlled thermal oxidation and strain-hardening. Elastic moduli of SWNT papers were measured between 3 and 6 GPa. Ultimate (breaking) tensile stresses were measured between 45 and 90 MPa at 1-3% strain. These results and their implications in regard to potential applications in power devices will be discussed.

  3. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers

    PubMed Central

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers. PMID:24284894

  4. Some physical and mechanical properties of roasted Zerun wheat.

    PubMed

    Işıklı, Nursel Develi; Senol, Belma; Coksöyler, Nafi

    2014-09-01

    Some physical and mechanical properties of roasted Zerun wheat were investigated in the moisture range from 8.80 % to 23.40 % wet basis. Mechanical properties were evaluated by examining the effect of moisture content upon the grain rupture force, energy and Weibull parameters. Length, width, thickness, porosity and angle of repose increased nonlinearly from 6.09 to 6.36 mm; 4.17 to 4.18 mm; 2.66 to 2.78 mm; 37.71 % to 39.09 % and 33.02° to 37.90°, respectively when moisture content increased. The Weibull distribution fits the data for rupture force and energy. The Weibull modulus and scale parameter for rupture force varied between 3.88 and 6.20; 26.61 and 44.24N, respectively. The Weibull modulus for energy increased from 2.15 to 3.24 with increased in moisture content. Measured mechanical properties of grains showed that the brittleness and fragile structure of the roasted grain gradually lost its characteristic crispiness and become soft and ductile above 13.78 % moisture content. PMID:25190855

  5. Rubber-toughened cyanate composites - Properties and toughening mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P. C.; Woo, E. P.; Laman, S. A.; Jakubowski, J. J.; Pickelman, D. M.; Sue, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier work by Young et al. (1990) has shown that Dow experimental cyanate ester resin XU71787.02 is readily toughenable by rubber. A particularly effective rubber for this purpose is an experimental core-shell rubber which toughens the polymer by inducing shear yielding. This paper describes an investigation into the toughening mechanism in the corresponding carbon-fiber composite systems and the effect of fibers on composite properties. Resin-fiber interfacial shear strengths have been successfully correlated to the compressive strengths after impact and other key properties of composites based on rubber-toughened cyanate and several carbon fibers. The differences in the properties are explained by the difference in the functioning of the rubber particles during the fracture process.

  6. Vibrational, mechanical, and thermal properties of III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1989-02-01

    Theories of the mechanical, vibrational, and electronic properties of 3 to 5 semiconductors were developed and applied to: (1) help determine the feasibility of InN-based visible and ultraviolet lasers and light detectors, (2) develop a theory of phonons in semiconductor alloys, (3) understand surface reconstruction of semiconductors, (4) predict the effects of atomic correlations on the light-scattering (Raman) properties of semiconductive alloys, (5) develop a new first principles pseudo-function implementation of local-density theory, (6) study the oxidation of GaAs, (7) develop a theory of scanning tunneling microscope images, and (8) understand the electronic and optical properties of highly strained artificial semiconductors and small semiconductor particles.

  7. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biological pathway for cancer-related fatigue, with studies documenting links between markers of inflammation and fatigue before, during, and particularly after treatment. There is considerable variability in the experience of cancer-related fatigue that is not explained by disease- or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors may play an important role in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have begun to identify genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors for cancer-related fatigue. Given the multi-factorial nature of cancer-related fatigue, a variety of intervention approaches have been examined in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. Although there is currently no gold standard for treating fatigue, several of these approaches have shown beneficial effects and can be recommended to patients. This report provides a state of the science review of mechanisms, risk factors, and interventions for cancer-related fatigue, with a focus on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients. PMID:25113839

  8. Effect of Hydroperoxides on Red Blood Cell Membrane Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hale, John P.; Winlove, C. Peter; Petrov, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of oxidative stress on red blood cell membrane mechanical properties in vitro using detailed analysis of the membrane thermal fluctuation spectrum. Two different oxidants, the cytosol-soluble hydrogen peroxide and the membrane-soluble cumene hydroperoxide, are used, and their effects on the membrane bending elastic modulus, surface tension, strength of confinement due to the membrane skeleton, and 2D shear elastic modulus are measured. We find that both oxidants alter significantly the membrane elastic properties, but their effects differ qualitatively and quantitatively. While hydrogen peroxide mainly affects the elasticity of the membrane protein skeleton (increasing the membrane shear modulus), cumene hydroperoxide has an impact on both membrane skeleton and lipid bilayer mechanical properties, as can be seen from the increased values of the shear and bending elastic moduli. The biologically important implication of these results is that the effects of oxidative stress on the biophysical properties, and hence the physiological functions, of the cell membrane depend on the nature of the oxidative agent. Thermal fluctuation spectroscopy provides a means of characterizing these different effects, potentially in a clinical milieu. PMID:22004746

  9. Do Stretch Durations Affect Muscle Mechanical and Neurophysiological Properties?

    PubMed

    Opplert, J; Genty, J-B; Babault, N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether stretching durations influence acute changes of mechanical and neurophysiological properties of plantar flexor muscles. Plantar flexors of 10 active males were stretched in passive conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Different durations of static stretching were tested in 5 randomly ordered experimental trials (1, 2, 3, 4 and 10×30-s). Fascicle stiffness index, evoked contractile properties and spinal excitability (Hmax/Mmax) were examined before (PRE), immediately after (POST0) and 5 min after (POST5) stretching. No stretch duration effect was recorded for any variable. Moreover, whatever the stretching duration, stiffness index, peak twitch torque and rate of force development were significantly lower at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Electromechanical delay was longer at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Whatever the stretch duration, no significant changes of Hmax/Mmax ratio were recorded. In conclusion, 30 s of static stretching to maximum tolerated discomfort is sufficient enough to alter mechanical properties of plantar flexor muscles, but 10×30 s does not significantly affect these properties further. Stretching does not impair spinal excitability. PMID:27191211

  10. Mechanical properties of several magnesium and aluminum composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsangarakis, N.; Taleghani, B.

    1992-12-01

    Several composites of magnesium and aluminum alloys were tested in order to assess and evaluate their mechanical properties. The magnesium alloys were AZ91 C, ZE41 A, and commercially pure magnesium, reinforced with 40% by volume continuous graphite fiber. The tensile properties of these composites were not superior to those of unreinforced magnesium and estimates of their fracture toughness were low. The matrices of the aluminum composites were 2124-T6, 6061-T4, 2124-T4, and 2219-T4. The reinforcements were either particulate or whiskers of silicon carbide or boron carbide and their volume content was 15% to 30%. The aluminum composites which were reinforced with silicon carbide particulate exhibited improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses, as well as tensile elastic modulus over the unreinforced aluminum alloys. The 2124-T4/B4C/25p composite exhibited the highest ultimate tensile strength which was 511 MPa. The composite which was reinforced with whiskers of silicon carbide exhibited an endurance limit which was 20% higher than that of the matrix alloy. The compressive properties and fracture toughness of some of these aluminum composites were not improved over those of the unreinforced matrix alloy.... Composites, Mechanical properties.

  11. Measurement of the Mechanical Properties of Intact Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes, H.; Heim, A.; Matthews, W. G.; Koob, T.

    2006-03-01

    Motivated by the genetic disorder Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), in which proper collagen synthesis is interrupted, we are investigating the structural and mechanical properties of collagen fibrils. The fibrous glycoprotein collagen is the most abundant protein found in the human body and plays a key role in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue, the properties of which are altered in EDS. We have selected as our model system the collagen fibrils of the sea cucumber dermis, a naturally mutable tissue. This system allows us to work with native fibrils which have their proteoglycan complement intact, something that is not possible with reconstituted mammalian collagen fibrils. Using atomic force microscopy, we measure, as a function of the concentration of divalent cations, the fibril diameter, its response to force loading, and the changes in its rigidity. Through these experiments, we will shed light on the mechanisms which control the properties of the sea cucumber dermis and hope to help explain the altered connective tissue extracellular matrix properties associated with EDS.

  12. The relation between Hill's equation and individual muscle properties.

    PubMed

    Thaller, S; Wagner, H

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we deal with movement-independent individual muscle properties derived from Hill's equation. Relations between these properties are found by theoretical considerations. We define a dimensionless quantity that turns out to play a major role in characterizing individual muscle properties, and we analyse normalization and symmetry behaviour of the parameters in Hill's equation. This leads to a systematic, transparent, and useful overview of mathematical relations involving muscle parameters. We examine the experimentally determined parameters of 62 subjects to find additional empirical relations between the muscle properties described by the parameters of Hill's equation. In the light of the theoretical end empirical results we investigate the connections between maximum efficiency, endurance, and fibre composition. PMID:15501465

  13. Mechanical properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirooyeh A, Mahmood R.

    Superplasticity is a well-known characteristic of Y2O 3-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (3Y-TZP) ceramic composites at elevated temperatures. The present investigation was originated to evaluate the potential of producing zirconia ceramics suitable for achieving superplasticity. High purity 3 mol% Y2O3-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (3Y-TZP) ceramic composites containing 20 wt% alumina were successfully consolidated by application of Cold Isostatic Pressing (CIP) followed by a subsequent sintering process. Constant-stress tensile creep experiments at elevated temperatures were conducted in order to examine plastic deformation behavior of the material. In addition to mechanical testing data, the microstructure observations confirmed superplastic properties of the ceramic composite. It is also known that in order to attain High Strain Rate Superplasticity (HSRS) in zirconia ceramics, it is essential to retain a stable fine-grained microstructure at high temperatures. Experiments have confirmed that adding a second soft phase such as spinel can facilitate to reach high strain-rate superplasticity in zirconia ceramics by suppressing grain growth during sintering process and enhancing cation diffusion. In the present investigation, homogenous 3Y-TZP ceramic composite powders containing 30 vol% MgAl2O4 spinel were successfully prepared through both physical-based and chemical-based methods. An electric current-activated method known as Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was employed for powder consolidation process. This is a very rapid electric current-activated sintering technique having a heating rate of 300 K/min. The powder preparation and consolidation steps were carried out over a wide range of conditions to ensure a homogenous nanocomposite. The experiments showed that fully-dense zirconia ceramics with an average initial grain size of the order of ˜100 nm can be sintered at the relatively low processing temperature of 1373 K in 10 min. In order to study the

  14. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single

  15. Mechanical Properties of Mineralized Collagen Fibrils As Influenced By Demineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Balooch, M.; Habelitz, S.; Kinney, J.H.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-05-11

    Dentin and bone derive their mechanical properties from a complex arrangement of collagen type-I fibrils reinforced with nanocrystalline apatite mineral in extra- and intrafibrillar compartments. While mechanical properties have been determined for the bulk of the mineralized tissue, information on the mechanics of the individual fibril is limited. Here, atomic force microscopy was used on individual collagen fibrils to study structural and mechanical changes during acid etching. The characteristic 67 nm periodicity of gap zones was not observed on the mineralized fibril, but became apparent and increasingly pronounced with continuous demineralization. AFM-nanoindentation showed a decrease in modulus from 1.5 GPa to 50 MPa during acid etching of individual collagen fibrils and revealed that the modulus profile followed the axial periodicity. The nanomechanical data, Raman spectroscopy and SAXS support the hypothesis that intrafibrillar mineral etches at a substantially slower rate than the extrafibrillar mineral. These findings are relevant for understanding the biomechanics and design principles of calcified tissues derived from collagen matrices.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Type IV Pili in P. Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shun; Touhami, Ahmed; Scheurwater, Edie; Harvey, Hanjeong; Burrows, Lori; Dutcher, John

    2009-03-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are thin flexible protein filaments that extend from the cell membrane of bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The mechanical properties of Tfp are of great importance since they allow bacteria to interact with and colonize various surfaces. In the present study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) for both imaging and pulling on Tfp from P. aeruginosa (PAO1) and from its PilA, PilT, and FliC mutants. A single pilus filament was mechanically stretched and the resulting force-extension profiles were fitted using the worm-like-chain (WLC) model. The statistical distributions obtained for contour length, persistence length, and number of pili per bacteria pole, were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single pilus and the biogenesis functions of different proteins (PilA, PilT) involved in its assembly and disassembly. Importantly, the persistence length value of ˜ 1 μm measured in the present study, which is consistent with the curvature of the pili observed in our AFM images, is significantly lower than the value of 5 μm reported earlier by Skerker et al. (1). Our results shed new light on the role of mechanical forces that mediate bacteria-surface interactions and biofilm formation. 1- J.M. Skerker and H.C. Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 98, 6901-6904 (2001).

  17. Mechanical properties of layered poly (ethylene glycol) gels.

    PubMed

    Skornia, S L; Bledsoe, J G; Kelso, B; Kuntz Willitz, R

    2007-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels have become a popular material for biomedical applications because of their versatility in use and design. As these gels are readily crosslinked under UV, microfabrication techniques have been investigated to manufacture complex three dimensional structures to better mimic the in vivo environment. This work investigated whether a layering technique to fabricate gels offered sufficient strength between the layers to perform similarly in mechanical testing to unlayered gels. Two mechanical tests were performed: tensile tests and peel tests. The tensile tests, which examined sample gels whose test sections were crosslinked for different durations, demonstrated no statistical differences in elastic modulus between sample and control gels. As expected, a statistical increase in the elastic modulus was found with increased PEG concentration. Comparison of the yield stress between samples and controls illustrated differences with total crosslinking duration, which may be due to the decreased molecular weight of the chains with decreased crosslinking time. In peel tests, no statistical differences of maximum peel force were found between samples and controls. However, an increase in the maximum peel force was found with increasing concentration of PEG. Overall, this study demonstrates that the layering process described for the PEG gels has minimal impact on the tested mechanical properties of the system. As mechanical properties are critical to the design of tissue engineered devices, these results demonstrate that this fabrication method may be appropriate for further study as a scaffold for complex cellular systems. PMID:20799187

  18. Prediction of mechanical properties of trabecular bone using quantitative MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammentausta, E.; Hakulinen, M. A.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Nieminen, M. T.

    2006-12-01

    Techniques for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been developed for non-invasive estimation of the mineral density and structure of trabecular bone. The R*2 relaxation rate (i.e. 1/T*2) is sensitive to bone mineral density (BMD) via susceptibility differences between trabeculae and bone marrow, and by binarizing MRI images, structural variables, such as apparent bone volume fraction, can be assessed. In the present study, trabecular bone samples of human patellae were investigated in vitro at 1.5 T to determine the ability of MRI-derived variables (R*2 and bone volume fraction) to predict the mechanical properties (Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate strength). Further, the MRI variables were correlated with reference measurements of volumetric BMD and bone area fraction as determined with a clinical pQCT system. The MRI variables correlated significantly (p < 0.01) with the mechanical variables (r = 0.32-0.46), BMD (r = 0.56) and bone structure (r = 0.51). A combination of R*2 and MRI-derived bone volume fraction further improved the prediction of yield stress and ultimate strength. Although pQCT showed a trend towards better prediction of the mechanical properties, current results demonstrate the feasibility of combined MR imaging of marrow susceptibility and bone volume fraction in predicting the mechanical strength of trabecular bone and bone mineral density.

  19. Manipulation of individual viruses: friction and mechanical properties.

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, M R; Washburn, S; Superfine, R; Finch, M; Brooks, F P; Chi, V; Taylor, R M

    1997-01-01

    We present our results on the manipulation of individual viruses using an advanced interface for atomic force microscopes (AFMs). We show that the viruses can be dissected, rotated, and translated with great facility. We interpret the behavior of tobacco mosaic virus with a mechanical model that makes explicit the competition between sample-substrate lateral friction and the flexural rigidity of the manipulated object. The manipulation behavior of tobacco mosaic virus on graphite is shown to be consistent with values of lateral friction observed on similar interfaces and the flexural rigidity expected for macromolecular assemblies. The ability to manipulate individual samples broadens the scope of possible studies by providing a means for positioning samples at specific binding sites or predefined measuring devices. The mechanical model provides a framework for interpreting quantitative measurements of virus binding and mechanical properties and for understanding the constraints on the successful, nondestructive AFM manipulation of delicate samples. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:9138585

  20. Mechanical property improvement by texture control of magnetron co-sputtered Zr-Ti films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weipeng; Zhan, Peng; Xie, Zheng; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    The present work studies the effect of substrate temperature and film composition on the structural and mechanical properties evolution of magnetron sputtered Zr-Ti films. As-deposited films show a monotonically strengthening (0002) crystallographic texture ranging from ambient temperature to 523 K, while then reveal a (0002) texture to randomly orientated structure transition at higher temperature. High Resolution TEM observations reveal a competitive and reconstruction growth mechanism which is in good agreement with the well-known Structure Zone Model. Nano-indentation measurements revealed that texture strengthening contribute to the improvement of mechanical properties. These results suggest that by establishing a semi-quantitative phase diagram based on the Structure Zone Model, structure and structure-related properties modification can be easily realized and precisely controlled by modifying the TS/Tm region during deposition.

  1. The structure and mechanical properties of dragonfly wings and their role on flyability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiyu; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    Dragonfly wings possess great stability and high load-bearing capacity during flapping flight, glide, and hover. Scientists have been intrigued by them and have carried out research for biomimetic applications. Relative to the large number of works on its flight aerodynamics, few researchers have focused on the insect wing structure and its mechanical properties. The wings of dragonflies are mainly composed of veins and membranes, a typical nanocomposite material. The veins and membranes have a complex design within the wing that give rise to whole-wing characteristics which result in dragonflies being supremely versatile, maneuverable fliers. The wing structure, especially corrugation, on dragonflies is believed to enhance aerodynamic performance. The mechanical properties of dragonfly wings need to be understood in order to perform simulated models. This paper focuses on the effects of structure, mechanical properties, and morphology of dragonfly wings on their flyability, followed by the implications in fabrication and modeling.

  2. Influence of Weld Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Alloy 718 Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprasad, K.; Ganesh Sundara Raman, S.

    2008-09-01

    Even though alloy 718 is the best for welding among all nickel-base superalloys, the formation of the Laves phase in welds is a major concern. The presence of this phase drastically degrades mechanical properties of the welds. To study the influence of weld cooling rate on microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 weldments, two distinct welding processes were adopted—gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding. The EB welding resulted in finer and relatively discrete Laves phase in lower quantity due to higher cooling rates prevailing in this process. On the other hand, due to lower cooling rates, GTA weld fusion zones exhibited coarse Laves with higher niobium. Depletion of the primary strengthening element niobium in the surrounding regions of Laves promoted crack propagation. Because EB welds had finer and lower amount of Laves, EB weldments exhibited superior mechanical properties compared with GTA weldments.

  3. Mechanical and transport properties of IBAD/EDDC-SmBCO coated conductor tapes during fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyung-Seop; Dedicatoria, Marlon J.

    2011-06-01

    In electrical devices like superconducting motor, generator and SMES, HTS coated conductor (CC) tapes will be subjected to alternating stress or strain during manufacturing and operation. The repeated loading will affect the mechanical integrity and eventually the electrical transport property of CC tapes. Therefore in such applications, electro-mechanical property of CC tapes should be evaluated. In this study, the endurance of an IBAD/EDDC-SmBCO CC tape under high-cycle fatigue loading has been evaluated. Applied maximum stress and fatigue life ( S-N) relation was obtained at 77 K. The mechanical properties and the critical current, I c, of the sample under fatigue loading were investigated at 77 K. Considering the practical operating environment, the effect of the stress ratio R, on the degradation behavior of I c under fatigue loading was also examined.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Chicken Embryo Somites to Analyze Cell Migration during Somitegenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, Sarit; Taneyhill, Lisa; Wu, Chyong; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2013-03-01

    Somites develop as round segments on the sides of the neural tube and are responsible for the development of the vertebrae and other structures. Using Atomic Force Microscopy and Micropipette techniques, we were able to apply a known force to obtain data about the differences in the mechanical properties of the somites. Using contact mode in AFM, we obtained graphs that relate distance travelled by the cantilever versus deflection of the sample. We then used Matlab to analyze the data and find the material properties of the somites. We measured the Young's modulus of the anterior and posterior parts of the somites to be around 2 +/- 0.8 kPa, but further data is needed to finalize our conclusion. Finding the mechanical properties of the posterior and anterior parts of the somites helped us to mimic those mechanical properties on polyacrylamide gels with different stiffness to determine the physiological functions of the somites and predict any mechanical abnormalities that might affect the migration of stem cells. By observing the major steps of migration, we were able to better understand how cell migration orchestrates embryonic morphogenesis with respect to their known mechanical properties.

  5. Numerical Prediction of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties During the Hot Stamping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Dongbin; Liu, Lizhong; Hu, Ping; Ma, Ning; Shen, Guozhe; Han, Xiaoqiang; Ying, Liang

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulation and prediction of microstructures and mechanical properties of products is very important in product development of hot stamping parts. With this method we can easily design changes of hot stamping products' properties prior to the manufacturing stage and this offers noticeable time and cost savings. In the present work, the hot stamping process of a U-channel with 22MnB5 boron steels is simulated by using a coupled thermo-mechanical FEM program. Then with the temperature evolution results obtained from the simulation, a model is applied to predict the microstructure evolution during the hot stamping process and mechanical properties of this U-channel. The model consists of a phase transformation model and a mechanical properties prediction model. The phase transformation model which is proposed by Li et al is used to predict the austenite decomposition into ferrite, pearlite, and bainite during the cooling process. The diffusionless austenite-martensite transformation is modeled using the Koistinen and Marburger relation. The mechanical properties prediction model is applied to predict the products' hardness distribution. The numerical simulation is evaluated by comparing simulation results with the U-channel hot stamping experiment. The numerically obtained temperature history is basically in agreement with corresponding experimental observation. The evaluation indicates the feasibility of this set of methods to be used to guide the optimization of hot stamping process parameters and the design of hot stamping tools.

  6. Centrifugal forming and mechanical properties of silicone-based elastomers for soft robotic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Parth

    This thesis describes the centrifugal forming and resulting mechanical properties of silicone-based elastomers for the manufacture of soft robotic actuators. This process is effective at removing bubbles that get entrapped within 3D-printed, enclosed molds. Conventional methods for rapid prototyping of soft robotic actuators to remove entrapped bubbles typically involve degassing under vacuum, with open-faced molds that limit the layout of formed parts to raised 2D geometries. As the functionality and complexity of soft robots increase, there is a need to mold complete 3D structures with controlled thicknesses or curvatures on multiples surfaces. In addition, characterization of the mechanical properties of common elastomers for these soft robots has lagged the development of new designs. As such, relationships between resulting material properties and processing parameters are virtually non-existent. One of the goals of this thesis is to provide guidelines and physical insights to relate the design, processing conditions, and resulting properties of soft robotic components to each other. Centrifugal forming with accelerations on the order of 100 g's is capable of forming bubble-free, true 3D components for soft robotic actuators, and resulting demonstrations in this work include an aquatic locomotor, soft gripper, and an actuator that straightens when pressurized. Finally, this work shows that the measured mechanical properties of 3D geometries fabricated within enclosed molds through centrifugal forming possess comparable mechanical properties to vacuumed materials formed from open-faced molds with raised 2D features.

  7. Effect of nanofillers on the physico-mechanical properties of load bearing bone implants.

    PubMed

    Michael, Feven Mattews; Khalid, Mohammad; Walvekar, Rashmi; Ratnam, Chantara Thevy; Ramarad, Suganti; Siddiqui, Humaira; Hoque, M Enamul

    2016-10-01

    Bones are nanocomposites consisting of a collagenous fibre network, embedded with calcium phosphates mainly hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystallites. As bones are subjected to continuous loading and unloading process every day, they often tend to become prone to fatigue and breakdown. Therefore, this review addresses the use of nanocomposites particularly polymers reinforced with nanoceramics that can be used as load bearing bone implants. Further, nanocomposite preparation and dispersion modification techniques have been highlighted along with thorough discussion on the influence that various nanofillers have on the physico-mechanical properties of nanocomposites in relation to that of natural bone properties. This review updates the nanocomposites that meet the physico-mechanical properties (strength and elasticity) as well as biocompatibility requirement of a load bearing bone implant and also attempts to highlight the gaps in the reported studies to address the fatigue and creep properties of the nanocomposites. PMID:27287178

  8. Determination of mechanical properties from depth-sensing indentation data and results of finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaenkova, M. G.; Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Zhuk, D. I.

    2016-04-01

    3D finite element model of indentation process with Berkovich tip was created. Using this model with different type of test materials, several series of calculations were made. These calculations lead to determination of material behavior features during indentation. Relations between material properties and its behavior during instrumented indentation were used for construction of dimensionless functions required for development the calculation algorithm, suitable to determine mechanical properties of materials by results of the depth-sensing indentation. Results of mechanical properties determination using elaborated algorithm for AISI 1020 steel grade were compared to properties obtained with standard compression tests. These two results differ by less than 10% for yield stress that evidence of a good accuracy of the proposed technique.

  9. Electronic and mechanical properties of chemically functionalized nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidasaria, Sanjay K.

    2009-12-01

    Organic and inorganic nanostructured materials, nano- and mesoscale objects and devices, and their integration into existing microelectronic technologies have been at the center of recent fundamental and applied research in nanotechnology. One of the critical needs is to develop an enhanced predictive capability of structure-property correlations and enable robust high performance systems by design. My thesis work was concerned with the theoretical and experimental studies of electronic and mechanical properties of chemically functionalized nanowires. I will first describe a theoretical approach for investigating structure-property correlations in atomic-sized metallic wires based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) for structure calculations and the Non-equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) technique for electronic transport properties simulations. This synergistic approach is shown to yield the atomic structure of the smallest niobium nanowires. Furthermore, the method was applied to simulate electronic properties of chemically functionalized graphene nanoribbons. Further, I will demonstrate an experimental technique for simultaneous measurements of force and conductance in atomic-size objects based on quartz tuning fork piezoelectric sensors. A peculiar scaling effect, relevant for a broad range of test and measurement applications, namely the squeeze film effect, was observed during the development of the sensors. Using theoretical analysis based on finite element simulations of the hydrodynamic behavior of the sensors in a broad range of ambient conditions, I explain the observed phenomenon.

  10. Size effects on mechanical and thermal properties of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md Tarekul

    Materials, from electronic to structural, exhibit properties that are sensitive to their composition and internal microstructures such as grain and precipitate sizes, crystalline phases, defects and dopants. Therefore, the research trend has been to obtain fundamental understanding in processing-structure-properties to develop new materials or new functionalities for engineering applications. The advent of nanotechnology has opened a new dimension to this research area because when material size is reduced to nanoscale, properties change significantly from the bulk values. This phenomenon expands the problem to 'size-processing-structure-propertiesfunctionalities'. The reinvigorated research for the last few decades has established size dependency of the material properties such as thermal conductivity, Young's modulus and yield strength, electrical resistivity, photo-conductance etc. It is generally accepted that classical physical laws can be used to scale down the properties up to 25-50 nm length-scale, below which their significant deviation or even breakdown occur. This dissertation probes the size effect from a different perspective by asking the question, if nanoscale size influences one physical domain, why it would not influence the coupling between two or more domains? Or in other words, if both mechanical and thermal properties are different at the nanoscale, can mechanical strain influence thermal conductivity? The hypothesis of size induced multi-domain coupling is therefore the foundation of this dissertation. It is catalyzed by the only few computational studies available in the literature while experimental validations have been non-existent owing to experimental challenges. The objective of this research is to validate this hypothesis, which will open a novel avenue to tune properties and functionalities of materials with the size induced multi-domain coupling. Single domain characterization itself is difficult at the nanoscale due to specimen

  11. Effect of diet on mechanical properties of horse's hair.

    PubMed

    Kania, Małgorzata; Mikołajewska, Dorota; Marycz, Krzysztof; Kobielarz, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the effect of diet supplementation with zinc and copper, in different chemical forms (organic and inorganic), on the mechanical properties of the hair of healthy English thoroughbred horses. Hairs were taken from 18 horses which had been fed with oats and hay for a period of 110 days. Twelve of the horses had been additionally given a daily dose of 700 g of highquality 44-ingredients Fohlengold St-Hippolyt muesli made by Muhle Ebert Dilheim. Six of them had received the muesli-containing organic zinc and copper (OS), while the other six horses had received the muesli-containing inorganic zinc and copper (IS). The mechanical properties of the hairs before and after the supplementation period were tested in a Synergie 100 (MTS) testing machine. Each of the hairs was loaded at a constant rate of 20 mm/min until rupture. Young modulus (E), breaking stress (Ru) and yield point (Rs) of the particular hairs were determined. No significant changes in the mechanical parameters were observed in the reference group in which the horses were fed with only oats and hay for the whole experimental period of 110 days. The supplementation of the diet with inorganic zinc and copper resulted in an increase in the elasticity and diameter of the hairs and in a simultaneous reduction in their strength. Whereas organic zinc and copper caused an increase in the elasticity and strength of the hairs and a simultaneous reduction in their diameter. It has been shown that the organic form of the supplemented trace zinc and copper (mainly copper) elements has a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties of the hairs since it results in an increase in both their elasticity and strength. PMID:20131751

  12. Development of a Cryogenic Mechanical Property Testing Station for Superconducting RF Cavity Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, C.; Chandrasekaran, S. K.; Baars, D.; Bieler, T.; Darbandi, P.; Wright, N.

    2010-04-01

    Recent concerns with pressure vessel codes as they relate to the construction of superconducting linacs have raised questions about mechanical proprieties of materials used in their fabrication at cryogenic temperatures. Pressure vessel engineering codes will require demonstration of a level of safety equivalent to that provided by the various ASME pressure and piping codes, so low temperature mechanical properties of niobium, titanium, and their alloys are needed. Michigan State University (MSU), in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Florida State University (FSU), is constructing a materials testing station for tensile tests of materials at room and cryogenic temperatures (300, 77, and 4 K). Once complete, the testing station will allow researchers to relate effects of different microstructures arising from manufacturing pathways, including annealing processes, crystal orientations and microstructure characteristics (e.g. welds) to the resulting mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. The paper covers the design, construction, and commissioning of the cryogenic testing station, including initial results.

  13. Mechanical properties of lunar regolith and lunar soil simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Through the Surveyor 3 and 7, and Apollo 11-17 missions a knowledge of the mechanical properties of Lunar regolith were gained. These properties, including material cohesion, friction, in-situ density, grain-size distribution and shape, and porosity, were determined by indirect means of trenching, penetration, and vane shear testing. Several of these properties were shown to be significantly different from those of terrestrial soils, such as an interlocking cohesion and tensile strength formed in the absence of moisture and particle cementation. To characterize the strength and deformation properties of Lunar regolith experiments have been conducted on a lunar soil simulant at various initial densities, fabric arrangements, and composition. These experiments included conventional triaxial compression and extension, direct tension, and combined tension-shear. Experiments have been conducted at low levels of effective confining stress. External conditions such as membrane induced confining stresses, end platten friction and material self weight have been shown to have a dramatic effect on the strength properties at low levels of confining stress. The solution has been to treat these external conditions and the specimen as a full-fledged boundary value problem rather than the idealized elemental cube of mechanics. Centrifuge modeling allows for the study of Lunar soil-structure interaction problems. In recent years centrifuge modeling has become an important tool for modeling processes that are dominated by gravity and for verifying analysis procedures and studying deformation and failure modes. Centrifuge modeling is well established for terrestrial enginering and applies equally as well to Lunar engineering. A brief review of the experiments is presented in graphic and outline form.

  14. PEGylated nanocapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide: Mechanism of formation, influence of polymer concentration on morphology and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Diou, Odile; Brûlet, Annie; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Morvan, Estelle; Berti, Romain; Astafyeva, Ksenia; Taulier, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    PEGylated nanocapsules containing a liquid core of perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) were formulated by an emulsion-evaporation process to be further used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). In an attempt to modulate their acoustic response, related to their shell thickness-to-radius ratio, the initial concentration of polymer was varied in the formulation. Indeed, thinner shells may lead to higher echogenicity. PEGylated nanocapsules morphology was studied by electron microscopy, Small Angle Neutron Scattering and (19)F NMR spectroscopy and related to their mechanical properties to allow a better understanding of their mechanism of formation. We show that the variation of polymer concentration in the formulation impacts the formation mechanism of nanocapsules, and consequently their morphology and mechanical properties. Using low concentration of Poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-b-PEG), it is impossible to reduce the shell thickness of the UCA, most probably due to dewetting of the polymer layer at the PFOB/water interface. This leads to the coexistence of thick shells along with free PFOB droplets. On the other hand, for high polymer concentration, PEGylated nanocapsules with thick shells were produced with high encapsulation efficiency. PMID:27451363

  15. "Spring theory of relativity" originating from quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremov, Alexander P.

    Compact derivation of mathematical equations similar to those of quantum and classical mechanics is given on the base of fractal decomposition of a three-dimensional space. In physical units the equations become Shrödinger and Hamilton-Jacobi equations, the wave function of a free particle associated with a virtual ring. Locally uniform motion of the ring in the physical space provides an original helix (or regular cylindrical spring) model of a relativistic theory equivalent in results with special relativity, the free particle's relativistic Lagrangian emerging automatically. Irregular spring model generates theory similar to general relativity.

  16. Bone scaffolds with homogeneous and discrete gradient mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jelen, C; Mattei, G; Montemurro, F; De Maria, C; Mattioli-Belmonte, M; Vozzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Bone TE uses a scaffold either to induce bone formation from surrounding tissue or to act as a carrier or template for implanted bone cells or other agents. We prepared different bone tissue constructs based on collagen, gelatin and hydroxyapatite using genipin as cross-linking agent. The fabricated construct did not present a release neither of collagen neither of genipin over its toxic level in the surrounding aqueous environment. Each scaffold has been mechanically characterized with compression, swelling and creep tests, and their respective viscoelastic mechanical models were derived. Mechanical characterization showed a practically elastic behavior of all samples and that compressive elastic modulus basically increases as content of HA increases, and it is strongly dependent on porosity and water content. Moreover, by considering that gradients in cellular and extracellular architecture as well as in mechanical properties are readily apparent in native tissues, we developed discrete functionally graded scaffolds (discrete FGSs) in order to mimic the graded structure of bone tissue. These new structures were mechanically characterized showing a marked anisotropy as the native bone tissue. Results obtained have shown FGSs could represent valid bone substitutes. PMID:25428038

  17. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-06-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  18. The absolute disparity anomaly and the mechanism of relative disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chopin, Adrien; Levi, Dennis; Knill, David; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    There has been a long-standing debate about the mechanisms underlying the perception of stereoscopic depth and the computation of the relative disparities that it relies on. Relative disparities between visual objects could be computed in two ways: (a) using the difference in the object's absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1) or (b) using relative disparities based on the differences in the monocular separations between objects (Hypothesis 2). To differentiate between these hypotheses, we measured stereoscopic discrimination thresholds for lines with different absolute and relative disparities. Participants were asked to judge the depth of two lines presented at the same distance from the fixation plane (absolute disparity) or the depth between two lines presented at different distances (relative disparity). We used a single stimulus method involving a unique memory component for both conditions, and no extraneous references were available. We also measured vergence noise using Nonius lines. Stereo thresholds were substantially worse for absolute disparities than for relative disparities, and the difference could not be explained by vergence noise. We attribute this difference to an absence of conscious readout of absolute disparities, termed the absolute disparity anomaly. We further show that the pattern of correlations between vergence noise and absolute and relative disparity acuities can be explained jointly by the existence of the absolute disparity anomaly and by the assumption that relative disparity information is computed from absolute disparities (Hypothesis 1). PMID:27248566

  19. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

    PubMed Central

    Finot, Eric; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Microcantilevers were first introduced as imaging probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) due to their extremely high sensitivity in measuring surface forces. The versatility of these probes, however, allows the sensing and measurement of a host of mechanical properties of various materials. Sensor parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor, amplitude of vibration and bending due to a differential stress can all be simultaneously determined for a cantilever. When measuring the mechanical properties of materials, identifying and discerning the most influential parameters responsible for the observed changes in the cantilever response are important. We will, therefore, discuss the effects of various force fields such as those induced by mass loading, residual stress, internal friction of the material, and other changes in the mechanical properties of the microcantilevers. Methods to measure variations in temperature, pressure, or molecular adsorption of water molecules are also discussed. Often these effects occur simultaneously, increasing the number of parameters that need to be concurrently measured to ensure the reliability of the sensors. We therefore systematically investigate the geometric and environmental effects on cantilever measurements including the chemical nature of the underlying interactions. To address the geometric effects we have considered cantilevers with a rectangular or circular cross section. The chemical nature is addressed by using cantilevers fabricated with metals and/or dielectrics. Selective chemical etching, swelling or changes in Young's modulus of the surface were investigated by means of polymeric and inorganic coatings. Finally to address the effect of the environment in which the cantilever operates, the Knudsen number was determined to characterize the molecule-cantilever collisions. Also bimaterial cantilevers with high thermal sensitivity were used to discern the effect of temperature variations. When appropriate

  20. Investigation on mechanical properties of basalt composite fabrics (experiment study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Mazraehshahi, H.; Zamani, H.

    2010-06-01

    To fully appreciate the role and application of composite materials to structures, correct understanding of mechanical behaviors required for selection of optimum material. Fabric reinforced composites are composed of a matrix that is reinforced with pliable fabric, glass fabric is most popular reinforcement for different application specially in aircraft structure, although other fabric material are also used. At this study new fabric material called basalt with epoxy resin introduced and mechanical behaviors of this material investigated from view point of testing. For this study two type of fabric with different thickness used. Comparison between this composite reinforcement with popular reinforcement as carbon, glass, kevlar performed. To determine mechanical properties of epoxy based basalt fabric following test procedure performed : 1). Tensile testing according to ASTM D3039 in 0° and 90° direction to find ultimate strength in tension and shear, modulus of elasticity, elangation and ultimate strain. 2). Compression testing according to EN 2850 ultimate compression strength and maximum deformation under compression loading. 3). Shear testing according to ASTM D3518-94 to find in plane shear response of polymer matrix composites materials. 4). Predict flexural properties of sandwich construction which manufactured from basalt facing with PVC foam core according to ASTM C393-94. Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material to meet the test procedure specifications [1]. For this reason six specimens were manufactured for testing and the tests were performed on them using an INSTRON machine model 5582. In the study, the effect of percent of resin in basalt reinforced composite was investigated. Also the weights of the ballast based composites with different percent of resin were measured with conventional composites. As the weight is an important parameter in aerospace industry when the designer wants to replace one material with

  1. Mechanical properties of materials with nanometer scale microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, W.D.

    1991-07-01

    For the past two years we have been engaged in a program of research on the mechanical properties of a variety of new materials with nanometer scale microstructures. These materials have been developed recently using vapor phase synthesis techniques and are available in the form of compositionally-modulated (multilayered) thin film materials and ultrafine-grained (nanocrystalline) solids. They have interesting microstructures and mechanical properties that may lead to new applications for these materials. In this report we give a brief summary of some of the results we have obtained to date in the course of this research. Other, more detailed, descriptions of some of this work can be found in the papers that we have published. These are listed at the end of this report along with a listing of the oral presentations we have given. We report briefly on our studies of the elastic properties of metallic multilayered thin films. Using indentation and microbeam deflection techniques, we have found that Au/Ni multilayers do not show supermodulus effects, contrary to some previous reports based on bulge test results. However, we have discovered large and significant substrate interaction stresses in these films which depend systematically on the composition modulation wavelength. We believe that these residual stresses may have led to bulge testing errors which in turn led to erroneous reports of supermodulus effects.

  2. Influence of Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Mechanics in Walking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Colin R; Lenhart, Rachel L; Kaiser, Jarred; Vignos, Michael F; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-02-01

    Computational knee models provide a powerful platform to investigate the effects of injury and surgery on functional knee behavior. The objective of this study was to use a multibody knee model to investigate the influence of ligament properties on tibiofemoral kinematics and cartilage contact pressures in the stance phase of walking. The knee model included 14 ligament bundles and articular cartilage contact acting across the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. The knee was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and was used to simulate knee mechanics during the stance phase of normal walking. A Monte Carlo approach was employed to assess the influence of ligament stiffness and reference strain on knee mechanics. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior capsule properties exhibited significant influence on anterior tibial translation at heel strike, with the ACL acting as the primary restraint to anterior translation in mid-stance. The MCL and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) exhibited the greatest influence on tibial rotation from heel strike through mid-stance. Simulated tibial plateau contact location was dependent on the ACL, MCL, and LCL properties, while pressure magnitudes were most dependent on the ACL. A decrease in ACL stiffness or reference strain significantly increased the average contact pressure in mid-stance, with the pressure migrating posteriorly on the medial tibial plateau. These ligament-dependent shifts in tibiofemoral cartilage contact during walking are potentially relevant to consider when investigating the causes of early-onset osteoarthritis following knee ligament injury and surgical treatment. PMID:26408997

  3. Enhancing the mechanical properties of single-crystal CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qi; Yan, Chih-Shiue; Meng, Yufei; Lai, Joseph; Krasnicki, Szczesny; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2009-09-01

    Approaches for enhancing the strength and toughness of single-crystal diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high growth rates are described. CVD processes used to grow single-crystal diamond in high density plasmas were modified to incorporate boron and nitrogen. Semi-quantitative studies of mechanical properties were carried out using Vickers indentation techniques. The introduction of boron in single-crystal CVD diamond can significantly enhance the fracture toughness of this material without sacrificing its high hardness (∼78 GPa). Growth conditions were varied to investigate its effect on boron incorporation and optical properties by means of photoluminescence, infrared, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Boron can be readily incorporated into single-crystal diamond by the methods used, but with nitrogen addition, the incorporation of boron was hindered. The spectroscopic measurements indicate that nitrogen and boron coexist in the diamond structure, which helps explain the origin of the enhanced fracture toughness of this material. Further, low pressure/high temperature annealing can enhance the intrinsic hardness of single-crystal CVD diamond by a factor of two without appreciable loss in fracture toughness. This doping and post-growth treatment of diamond may lead to new technological applications that require enhanced mechanical properties of diamond. PMID:21832321

  4. Effects of prestresses on mechanical properties of isotropic graphite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, T.; Kurumada, A.; Imamura, Y.; Kawamata, K.; Shiraishi, M.

    1998-10-01

    Graphite materials which are used for plasma facing components and other components are subjected to stresses due to the high heat flux from the fusion plasma. Some mechanical properties of graphite materials can change due to the prestresses. The property changes should be considered for the design of the plasma facing components. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of prestresses on the mechanical properties of isotropic graphite materials. Compressive prestresses were applied to two kinds of isotropic fine-grained graphites (IG-430 and IG-11) at 298 K (both), 1873 K (IG-11), 2273 K (IG-11) and 2283 K (IG-430). As a result, the decrease in Young's modulus for IG-430 due to high-temperature prestressing was 56% which was much larger than the 6.4% that was due to prestressing at 298 K. The results for IG-11 were the same as those for IG-430 graphite. This finding was considered to be due primarily to a difference in degree of the preferred orientation of crystallites in the graphite on the basis of the Bacon anisotropy factor (BAF) obtained from X-ray diffraction measurement of the prestressed specimens. Furthermore, high-temperature compressive prestressing produced an increase in the strength of the isotropic graphite, although room temperature prestressing produced no such effect. The results obtained here suggest that the isotropic graphite which is subjected to high-temperature compressive stresses can become anisotropic in service.

  5. Local Mechanical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy Nanoindentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranchida, Davide; Piccarolo, Stefano

    The analysis of mechanical properties on a nanometer scale is a useful tool for combining information concerning texture organization obtained by microscopy with the properties of individual components. Moreover, this technique promotes the understanding of the hierarchical arrangement in complex natural materials as well in the case of simpler morphologies arising from industrial processes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can bridge morphological information, obtained with outstanding resolution, to local mechanical properties. When performing an AFM nanoindentation, the rough force curve, i.e., the plot of the voltage output from the photodiode vs. the voltage applied to the piezo-scanner, can be translated into a curve of the applied load vs. the penetration depth after a series of preliminary determinations and calibrations. However, the analysis of the unloading portion of the force curves collected for polymers does not lead to a correct evaluation of Young's modulus. The high slope of the unloading curves is not linked to an elastic behavior, as would be expected, but rather to a viscoelastic effect. This can be argued on the basis that the unloading curves are superimposed on the loading curves in the case of an ideal elastic behavior, as for rubbers, or generally in the case of materials with very short relaxation times. In contrast, when the relaxation time of the sample is close to or even much larger than the indentation time scale, very high slopes are recorded.

  6. Multi-scale mechanical and transport properties of a hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, Hossein; Rahbar, Nima

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamic simulation was used to study the effect of water on the equilibrated structure and mechanical properties of cross-linked hydrogel at multiple scales. The hydrogel consisted of Polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) as epoxy and the Jeffamine, poly-oxy-alkylene-amines, as curing agent. The results for systems with various water contents indicated that the cross-links were more hydrophilic within the hydrogel structure. Effects of cross-linking on the transport properties were also investigated by computing diffusion coefficients of water molecules. A new Coarse-Grained (CG) scheme for hydrogels is proposed, and validated by comparing the transport properties with the all-atom method, demonstrating the capability of the model to capture the correct dynamic evolution of the system. The all-atom model of the hydrogel was mapped to the CG model using the MARTINI force field. This method resulted in a more realistic representation of the stiffness of the system, compared to the previous experimental studies in the literature. The variation of the stiffness of the hydrogel as a function of the water content showed that 40% water content is the optimal value for mechanical performance of the hydrogel. PMID:24967978

  7. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced by Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Tainger, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit cast features. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. Tensile mechanical properties and microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains with interior dendritic structures, described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Nanoporous Au

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Wang, Y M; Hayes, J R; Hamza, A V

    2005-06-16

    Nanoporous metals have recently attracted considerable interest fueled by potential sensor and actuator applications. From a material science point of view, one of the key issues in this context is the synthesis of nanoporous metals with both high tensile and compressive strength. Nanoporous gold (np-Au) has been suggested as a candidate material for this application due to its monolithic character. The material can be synthesized by electrochemically-driven dealloying of Ag-Au alloys, and exhibits an open sponge-like structure of interconnecting ligaments with a typical pore size distribution on the nanometer length scale. However, besides the observation of a ductile-brittle transition very little is known about the mechanical behavior of this material. Here, we present our results regarding the mechanical properties and the fracture behavior of np-Au. Depth-sensing nanoindentation reveals that the yield strength of np-Au is almost one order of magnitude higher than the value predicted by scaling laws developed for macroscopic open-cell foams. The unexpectedly high value of the yield strength indicates the presence of a distinct size effect of the mechanical properties due to the sub-micron dimensions of the ligaments, thus potentially opening a door to a new class of high yield strength--low density materials. The failure mechanism of np-Au under tensile stress was evaluated by microscopic examination of fracture surfaces using scanning electron microscopy. On a macroscopic level, np-Au is a very brittle material. However, microscopically np-Au is very ductile as ligaments strained by as much as 200% can be observed in the vicinity of crack tips. Cell-size effects on the microscopic failure mechanism were studied by annealing experiments whereby increasing the typical pore size/ligament diameter from {approx}100 nm to {approx}1{micro}m.

  9. Mechanical properties of foliated cataclasites from the Nobeoka thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Hiroko; Takahashi, Miki; Kimura, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Saito, Saneatsu; Hamahashi, Mari; Fukuchi, Rina; Kameda, Jun; Hamada, Yohei; Fujimoto, Koichiro; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Yujin; Hina, Shoko; Eida, Mio

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanics of plate boundary earthquakes requires a sound investigation of the deformation style and mechanical behavior not only within plate boundary faults but also in the surrounding rocks. It is critical to quantify the strain accumulation and accommodation in the entire subduction systems. Recent studies suggest that heterogeneous deformation and strain distribution in mélanges observed in many ancient accretionary prism outcrops are related to slow slip events and low frequency earthquakes [Fagereng and Sibson, 2010; Kitamura and Kimura, 2011]. However, there are few experimental studies to describe mechanical properties of mélanges and foliated cataclasites. Here, we report on triaxial deformation experiments on foliated cataclasites from the footwall of the Nobeoka thrust, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust, which is exhumated in Kyushu, southwest Japan, is considered as one of the ancient out-of-sequence faults. The Nobeoka thrust fault core, hanging wall, and foot wall rocks were recently cored and logged in a vertical borehole as a NOBELL project [Hamahashi et al., in press]. The Nobeoka thrust is recovered at 41.3 m from the ground. The hanging wall (0-41.3 m coring interval) is composed of the Kitagawa Group of phyllite of alternating beds of sandstone and shale, while the footwall (41.3-255 m) is composed of the Hyuga Group of foliated cataclasite consisting of scaly shale, tuffacious shale, sandstone, and acidic tuff. For deformation experiments, we used foliated catacalsite core samples, which are in better quality and less weathered than outcrop samples. Cylindrical samples with a diameter of 20 mm and a length of 30 mm were subsampled from the cores. The cylindrical specimen were deformed at an axial displacement rate of 0.05-0.5 μm/s, corresponding to strain rates of 1.6 ×10-6-1.6 ×10-5 s-1, and at a temperature of 250 ° C and an effective pressure (Pe) of 120 MPa (confining pressure of 200 MPa and pore pressure of 80 MPa) or 20

  10. Mechanical Property of HVOF Inconel 718 Coating for Aeronautic Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, Christophe; Fasth, Angelica; Nylen, Per

    2014-02-01

    The module of elasticity is one of the most important mechanical properties defining the strength of a material which is a prerequisite to design a component from its early stage of conception to its field of application. When a material is to be thermally sprayed, mechanical properties of the deposited layers differ from the bulk material, mainly due to the anisotropy of the highly textured coating microstructure. The mechanical response of the deposited layers significantly influences the overall performance of the coated component. It is, therefore, of importance to evaluate the effective module of elasticity of the coating. Conventional experimental methods such as microindentation, nanoindentation and four-point bending tests have been investigated and their results vary significantly, mainly due to inhomogeneous characteristics of the coating microstructure. Synchrotron radiation coupled with a tensile test rig has been proposed as an alternative method to determine the coating anisotropic elastic behavior dependence on crystallographic orientations. The investigation was performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) HVOF coatings sprayed on IN718 substrates. Combining these experimental techniques yield a deeper understanding of the nature of the HVOF coating Young's modulus and thus a tool for Design Practice for repair applications.

  11. Study on Thermal and Mechanical Properties of EPDM Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhong-Shui; Xu, Jin-Sheng; Chen, Xiong; Jiang, Jing

    As the most common insulation material of solid rocket motors, thermal and mechanical properties of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) composite are inspected in the study. Referring to the results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), composition and morphology of EPDM composite in different thermal degradation degree are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to inspect the mechanism of thermal insulation. Mechanical properties of EPDM composite in the state of pyrolysis are investigated by uniaxial tensile tests. At the state of initial pyrolysis, composite belongs to the category of hyperelastic-viscoelastic material. The tendency of tensile strength increased and elongation decreased with increasing of heating temperature. Composite behaves as the linear rule at the state of late pyrolysis, which belongs to the category of bittle. The elasticity modulus of curves are almost the same while the heating temperature ranges from 200°C to 300°C, and then gradually go down. The tensile strength of pyrolytic material reach the highest at the heating temperature of 300°C, and the virgin material has the largest elongation.

  12. Probing mechanical properties of living cells by magnetopneumography.

    PubMed

    Möller, W; Takenaka, S; Rust, M; Stahlhofen, W; Heyder, J

    1997-01-01

    Magnetopneumography (MPG) has been used to study long-term particle clearance from human lungs as well as cellular motility of pulmonary macrophages (PMs). This study describes an extension of the method enabling the measurement of mechanical properties of PM cells in vivo. Ferromagnetic microparticles are inhaled and then retained in the alveolar region of the lungs, where they are phagocytized within hours by PMs. The magnetic particles can be rotated in weak magnetic fields, and the response to this twisting shear (force) is detected as a macroscopic magnetic field producing a measure of cytoskeletal mechanics. Cytoplasmic viscosity is very high compared with that of water and is strongly non-Newtonian. Under rotational stresses from 0.4 to 6.4 Pa, it acts like a pseudoplastic fluid showing a characteristic shear rate dependence. The viscosity as well as the stiffness of the cytoskeleton increases with increasing shear stress as seems typical for living tissue and evidence for an intact cytoskeletal matrix. The particle recoil as measured by the amount of recoverable strain following a short twisting force describes a cytoplasmic elasticity that depends on both level and duration of stress. These investigations on the mechanical properties of living human cells are promising and should lead to better understanding of cellular dysfunction in disease as well as pathways for drug administration. PMID:10174196

  13. Atomic vacancies significantly degrade the mechanical properties of phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Zhang, Ying-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Due to low formation energies, it is very easy to create atomic defects in phosphorene during its fabrication process. How these atomic defects affect its mechanical behavior, however, remain unknown. Here, we report on a systematic study of the effect of atomic vacancies on the mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that atomic vacancies induce local stress concentration and cause early bond-breaking, leading to a significant degradation of the mechanical properties of the material. More specifically, a 2% concentration of randomly distributed mono-vacancies is able to reduce the fracture strength by ∼40%. An increase in temperature from 10 to 400 K can further deteriorate the fracture strength by ∼60%. The fracture strength of defective phosphorene is also found to be affected by defect distribution. When the defects are patterned in a line, the reduction in fracture strength greatly depends on the tilt angle and the loading direction. Furthermore, we find that di-vacancies cause an even larger reduction in fracture strength than mono-vacancies when the loading is in an armchair direction. These findings provide important guidelines for the structural design of phosphorene in future applications.

  14. Mechanical properties for irradiated face-centred cubic nanocrystalline metals

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, X. Z.; Song, D. K.; Chu, H. J.; Xue, J. M.; Duan, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a self-consistent plasticity theory is proposed to model the mechanical behaviours of irradiated face-centred cubic nanocrystalline metals. At the grain level, a tensorial crystal model with both irradiation and grain size effects is applied for the grain interior (GI), whereas both grain boundary (GB) sliding with irradiation effect and GB diffusion are considered in modelling the behaviours of GBs. The elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent method with considering grain size distribution is developed to transit the microscopic behaviour of individual grains to the macroscopic properties of nanocrystals (NCs). The proposed theory is applied to model the mechanical properties of irradiated NC copper, and the feasibility and efficiency have been validated by comparing with experimental data. Numerical results show that: (i) irradiation-induced defects can lead to irradiation hardening in the GIs, but the hardening effect decreases with the grain size due to the increasing absorption of defects by GBs. Meanwhile, the absorbed defects would make the GBs softer than the unirradiated case. (ii) There exists a critical grain size for irradiated NC metals, which separates the grain size into the irradiation hardening dominant region (above the critical size) and irradiation softening dominant region (below the critical size). (iii) The distribution of grain size has a significant influence on the mechanical behaviours of both irradiated and unirradiated NCs. The proposed model can offer a valid theoretical foundation to study the irradiation effect on NC materials. PMID:27547091