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1

Historical Roots and Future Perspectives Related to Nursing Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article traces the evolution of the development and refinement of the professional code from concerns about the ethical conduct of nurses to its present state as a professional code for all nurses. The relationship of the Ethics Committee of the American Nurses' Association to the development of the code is also discussed. (Author/MLW)

Freitas, Lorraine

1990-01-01

2

ETHICAL PERSPECTIVES IN NEUROLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The practice of neurology presents a series of ethical challenges for the clinician. These rarely have simple or straightforward solutions, but require careful consideration by the neurologist. This section of , written by colleagues with particular interest in the area of bioethics, provides a case vignette that raises one or more ethical questions related to the subject area of this

Nancy T. Rodgers-Neame; James P. Orlowski

2009-01-01

3

Relational ethics and psychosomatic assessment.  

PubMed

The main ethical perspective in the clinical relationship takes into consideration the vulnerability of the clinical condition before threats and risks that can undermine the integrity and dignity of the person. Psychosomatic medicine faces complex cases whose ethical problems cannot only be solved by applying top-down deontological or utilitarian approaches, principlism, which is limited mainly to easing ethical tensions, or a bottom-up approach, the casuistic model, case-based reasoning. In introducing vulnerability as the core of ethical questioning as a principle ontological priority over other principles, relational ethics refers to the appreciation of the responsibility of health professionals through which a health care professional and the patient 'together' can construct more reasonable and prudential courses of action with, for, and by the patient. The model of relational ethics is based on three main aspects, clinically integrated approach, science/philosophy partnership, and deliberative process, that when taken together, form an intermediate model that ensures prudent and reasonable decision-making. The three structural elements and characteristics of relational ethics create and maintain a responsible relationship between the professional and the patient being aware that the mutual vulnerability of health professional and the patient has a moral value and recognizing that their relationship will allow for personal development of each. I conceptualized the model of relational ethics as one that embraces the meta-ethical principles of vulnerability, dignity, responsibility, and respect for autonomy as they are considered by many international declarations or conventions. This model integrates three key polarities: ensure conditions of authenticity, facilitate a process of cooperative mutuality, and promote opportunities for growth and development. Relational ethics can be used to solve major ethical problems in psychosomatic medicine, capacity , informed consent, and confidentiality. PMID:22056907

Barbosa, António

2012-01-01

4

Ethics in International Business Education: Perspectives from Five Business Disciplines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines international ethics issues and perspectives from the vantage points of five disciplines in business education: economics, management, finance, accounting, and marketing. Finds an underlying theme of management awareness, accountability, and control of ethical decision-making. Suggests some ethics-related curriculum projects. (DB)

LeClair, Debbie Thorne; Clark, Robert; Ferrell, Linda; Joseph, Gilbert; Leclair, Daniel

1999-01-01

5

Ethics as a Discipline -- Background in Ethical Perspectives and Theories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a 14-page PDF that provides an overview of ethics as a discipline. The materials are designed to introduce students to the scholarly study of ethics and some of the language and concepts used in the field. This should help students investigate the relationship between their position on issues and the various ethical perspectives.

2008-01-01

6

Moral objectivity, Jurgen Habermas's discourse ethics, and public relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

While increasing attention is being paid by people in public relations to ethical theory, the predominant ethical perspective in the field is still situational. The reason for this, at least in part, is the loss of the traditional grounds of moral objectivity—tradition, religion, and universal reason. But the situational perspective fails to provide adequate standards for an ethical basis for

Roy V Leeper

1996-01-01

7

Ethical Perspectives on Evaluating Community College Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because the process of faculty evaluation in the community college gives rise to ethical concerns about what is evaluated, who is involved in the process, and how data are collected and used, the purpose of this paper is to provide a meaningful ethical perspective for conducting faculty evaluation. The authors discuss ethical issues that arise in…

Stumpf, Dan; King, Stephanie; Blendinger, Jack; Davis, Ed

2013-01-01

8

Perspectives On Human Microbiome Research Ethics  

PubMed Central

Study of ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of human microbiome research has been integral to the Human Microbiome Project (HMP). This study explores core ELSI issues that arose during the first phase of the HMP from the perspective of individuals involved in the research. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with investigators and NIH employees (“investigators”) involved in the HMP, and with individuals recruited to participate in the HMP Healthy Cohort Study at Baylor College of Medicine (“recruits”). We report findings related to three major ELSI issues: informed consent, data sharing, and return of results. Our findings demonstrate that investigators and recruits were similarly sensitive to these issues yet generally comfortable with study design in light of current knowledge about the microbiome.

McGuire, Amy L.; Achenbaum, Laura S.; Whitney, Simon N.; Slashinski, Melody J.; Versalovic, James; Keitel, Wendy A.; McCurdy, Sheryl A.

2014-01-01

9

Relational ethics in everyday practice.  

PubMed

Oncology nurses frequently encounter ethical issues in their everyday practice because of the complex needs of patients, which require the expertise of many health care providers. The involvement of various health care providers, as well as of the patient and family means there is the potential for differing views about what is best for the patient. The focus of this paper is to share a case history describing the ethical issues experienced by nurses and to illustrate how relational ethics can offer guidance for nurses caring for patients with cancer. PMID:24707705

Moore, Jane; Engel, Joyce; Prentice, Dawn

2014-01-01

10

Ethical Challenges Within Veterans Administration Healthcare Facilities: Perspectives of Managers, Clinicians, Patients, and Ethics Committee Chairpersons  

Microsoft Academic Search

To promote ethical practices, healthcare managers must understand the ethical challenges encountered by key stakeholders. To characterize ethical challenges in Veterans Administration (VA) facilities from the perspectives of managers, clinicians, patients, and ethics consultants. We conducted focus groups with patients (n = 32) and managers (n = 38); semi-structured interviews with managers (n = 31), clinicians (n = 55), and

Mary Beth Foglia; Robert A. Pearlman; Melissa Bottrell; Jane K. Altemose; Ellen Fox

2009-01-01

11

Teaching Ethics across the Public Relations Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests ways of incorporating ethics across the undergraduate public relations curriculum. Reviews current coverage of ethics in public relations principles, writing, cases, and textbooks. Suggests other methods that teachers can use to incorporate ethical pedagogical tools in all public relations courses in an effort to develop students' ethical

Hutchison, Liese L.

2002-01-01

12

Ethics Education in Family and Consumer Economics: Perspectives and Possibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines the conceptual frameworks of consequentialist and nonconsequentialist ethics as examples of two common and competing moral perspectives. Suggests possibilities for applications of ethics to issues that are common in consumer and family economics curricula. (Author/JOW)

Peterson, Audrey L.

1993-01-01

13

Euthanasia. Historical, ethical, and empiric perspectives.  

PubMed

Debates about the ethics of euthanasia date from ancient Greece and Rome. In 1870, S. D. Williams, a nonphysician, proposed that anesthetics be used to intentionally end the lives of patients. Between 1870 and 1936, a debate about the ethics of euthanasia raged in the United States and Britain. These debates predate and invoke different arguments than do debates about euthanasia in Germany. Recognizing the increased interest in euthanasia, this article reviews the definitions related to euthanasia, the historical record of debates concerning euthanasia, the arguments for and against euthanasia, the situation in the Netherlands, and the empirical data regarding euthanasia in the United States. PMID:8074593

Emanuel, E J

1994-09-12

14

An organizational perspective on ethics as a form of regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we propose a theoretical framework for analysing the history and function of ethics as a form of regulation.\\u000a Ethics in the form of codes, rules and declarations, constitutes regulatory policies, and we wish to suggest analysing such\\u000a policies from an organizational perspective. In many instances ethics policies are reactions to particular events involving\\u000a harm of patients or

Klaus Hoeyer; Niels Lynöe

2009-01-01

15

Education for Entry into Practice: An Ethical Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues of practice, licensure, and education for associate and bachelor's degree nursing indicate a lack of consensus. The perspective of an ethic of care highlights moral dilemmas that must be resolved because the current state of nursing education and practice is ethically dubious. (SK)

Hess, Joanne D.

1996-01-01

16

Ethical issues in astrobiology: a Christian perspective (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With its focus on the origin, extent, and future of life, Astrobiology raises exciting, multidisciplinary questions for science. At the same time, Astrobiology raises important questions for the humanities. For instance, the prospect of discovering extraterrestrial life - either intelligent or unintelligent - raises questions about humans’ place in the universe and our relationship with nature on planet Earth. Fundamentally, such questions are rooted in our understanding of what it means to be human. From a Christian perspective, the foundational claim about human nature is that all persons bear the "imago dei", the image of God. This concept forms the basis for how humans relate to one another (dignity) and how humans relate to nature (stewardship). For many Christians the "imago dei" also suggests that humans are at the center of the universe. The discovery of extraterrestrial life would be another scientific development - similar to evolution - that essentially de-centers humanity. For some Christian perspectives this de-centering may be problematic, but I will argue that the discovery of extraterrestrial life would actually offer a much needed theological corrective for contemporary Christians’ understanding of the "imago dei". I will make this argument by examining two clusters of ethical issues confronting Astrobiology: 1. What ethical obligations would human explorers owe to extraterrestrial life? Are there ethical obligations to protect extraterrestrial ecosystems from harm or exploitation by human explorers? Do our ethical considerations change, if the extraterrestrial life is a “second genesis;” in other words a form of life completely different and independent from the carbon-based life that we know on Earth? 2. Do we have an ethical obligation to promote life as much as we can? If human explorers discover extraterrestrial life and through examination determine that it is struggling to survive, do we have an ethical obligation to assist that ecological community to become stronger? If after a thorough investigation we determine that no life exists and that a planet is nothing more than a lifeless body of rocks and dust, do we have an ethical obligation to attempt the creation of life through a process called planetary ecosynthesis? Or, do we have the opposite obligation to respect the rocks and dust for what they are, and refrain from any attempts to engineer life on a lifeless planet? While these two clusters of issues pose new ethical questions, I will argue that from a Christian perspective the framework for responding to these challenges would remain the Genesis Creation stories and the concept of the "imago dei". However, the new ethical challenges posed by Astrobiology require a re-framing of the "imago dei" that is closer to the intent of the original scriptures and that predicts simultaneously the presence of extraterrestrial life and the de-centering of humanity.

Randolph, R. O.

2009-12-01

17

Ethical perspectives for public and environmental health: fostering autonomy and the right to know.  

PubMed Central

In this paper we develop an ethical perspective for public and environmental health practice in consideration of the "right to know" by contrasting consequential and deontological perspectives with relational ethics grounded in the concept of fostering autonomy. From the consequential perspective, disclosure of public and environmental health risks to the public depends on the expected or possible consequences. We discuss three major concerns with this perspective: respect for persons, justice, and ignorance. From a deontological perspective, the "right to know" means that there is a "duty" to communicate about all public health risks and consideration of the principles of prevention, precaution, and environmental justice. Relational ethics develops from consideration of a mutual limitation of the traditional perspectives. Relational ethics is grounded in the relationship between the public and public/environmental health providers. In this paper we develop a model for this relationship, which we call "fostering autonomy through mutually respectful relationships." Fostering autonomy is both an end in public health practice and a means to promote the principles of prevention, precaution, and environmental justice. We discuss these principles as they relate to practical issues of major disasters and contaminants in food, such as DDT, toxaphene, chlordane, and mercury.

Lambert, Timothy William; Soskolne, Colin L; Bergum, Vangie; Howell, James; Dossetor, John B

2003-01-01

18

Ethics in clinical research: the Indian perspective.  

PubMed

Ethics in clinical research focuses largely on identifying and implementing the acceptable conditions for exposure of some individuals to risks and burdens for the benefit of society at large. Ethical guidelines for clinical research were formulated only after discovery of inhumane behaviour with participants during research experiments. The Nuremberg Code was the first international code laying ethical principles for clinical research. With increasing research all over, World Health Organization formulated guidelines in the form of Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. The US laid down its guidelines for ethical principles in the Belmont Report after discovery of the Tuskegee's Syphilis study. The Indian Council of Medical Research has laid down the 'Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research on Human Subjects' in the year 2000 which were revised in 2006. It gives twelve general principles to be followed by all biomedical researchers working in the country. The Ethics Committee stands as the bridge between the researcher and the ethical guidelines of the country. The basic responsibility of the Ethics Committee is to ensure an independent, competent and timely review of all ethical aspects of the project proposals received in order to safeguard the dignity, rights, safety and well-being of all actual or potential research participants. A well-documented informed consent process is the hallmark of any ethical research work. Informed consent respects individual's autonomy, to participate or not to participate in research. Concepts of vulnerable populations, therapeutic misconception and post trial access hold special importance in ethical conduct of research, especially in developing countries like India, where most of the research participants are uneducated and economically backward. PMID:22303053

Sanmukhani, J; Tripathi, C B

2011-03-01

19

Are age and ethics related?  

PubMed

Ethical values of 171 college students at California State University, Chico, were measured, using a subset of the Rokeach (1968, 1971) Value Survey. Nonparametric statistical analysis, four value measures, and four different consistent tests of significance and probability showed, surprisingly, that the younger students were more ethical than the older students. College students under 21 scored significantly higher ethically on three out of the four measures. Younger college students valued equality, freedom, and honesty more than their older classmates did. Surprisingly also, the younger students were significantly more concerned with being helpful and intellectual and were less involved in pursuing an exciting life and in social recognition than were the older students. PMID:7815379

Sikula, A; Costa, A D

1994-11-01

20

The ethics of human genetic intervention: a postmodern perspective.  

PubMed

Gene therapy for a particular disease like Parkinson's involves ethical principles worked out for other diseases. The major ethical issues for gene therapy (and the corresponding ethical principles) are safety (nonmalfeasance), efficacy (beneficence), informed consent (autonomy), and allocation of resources (justice). Yet genetic engineering (germ-line interventions or interventions to enhance human potentialities) raises emotions and fears that might cause resistance to gene therapies. Looking at these technologies in a postmodern perspective helps one to appreciate the issues at stake in social and cultural change with a new technology such as gene therapy. While "modern" technology and ethics have focused on the autonomy of the individual, we are beginning to see a lessening of such emphasis on individualism and autonomy and more emphasis on the health of the population. Such a social change could cause technologies about which society may currently be cautious (such as human genetic interventions) to become more acceptable or even expected. PMID:9126167

Dyer, A R

1997-03-01

21

Journal Editing and Ethical Research Practice: Perspectives of Journal Editors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article offers perspectives from academics with recent journal editing experience on a range of ethical issues and dilemmas that regularly pose challenges for those in editorial roles. Each contributing author has provided commentary and reflection on a select topic that was identified in the research literature concerning academic publishing…

Randell-Moon, Holly; Anderson, Nicole; Bretag, Tracey; Burke, Anthony; Grieshaber, Sue; Lambert, Anthony; Saltmarsh, David; Yelland, Nicola

2011-01-01

22

Ethical issues of resuscitation: an American perspective.  

PubMed

Challenging issues confront emergency physicians routinely when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Ethical issues surrounding resuscitation may include issues of futility, withholding or withdrawing interventions, advance directives, family presence, practising procedures on the newly dead, palliative care, and communication. Principles of bioethics can be valuable in assessing and debating ethical dilemmas. In many cases where curative care is not possible or is not desired, the goal of medical care at the end of life is to provide comfort to the patient and family, rather than initiating technological interventions that are unlikely to benefit the patient. PMID:16143694

Marco, C A

2005-09-01

23

An Ethical Perspective for the Religious Persuader.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because religious communicators deal with issues most profound and consequential to their audiences, it is imperative that they examine their motives, aspirations, and rhetorical methods, as well as the ethical dimensions of their communication. Religion operates, along with every other rhetorical system, in the world of contingency, of the…

Dearin, Ray D.

24

Boldt v. Boldt: A pediatric ethics perspective.  

PubMed

On balance, the potential harms and benefits of circumcision in an older child or adolescent are sufficiently closely aligned that parents should be permitted to make decisions about circumcision on behalf of their children. To make a case for prohibition, medical harms would have to be of such likelihood and magnitude that no reasonable potential benefit (social, religious, cultural, or medical) could justify doing it to a child. However, I would suggest that the following additional principles should apply: (1) Informed permission from parents is essential. Only about half of the parents considering neonatal circumcision are given any substantive information about the procedure. That practice is not acceptable for a procedure that is not medically essential and carries some risk of harm. A fully informed consent is essential, and must include a balanced discussion of potential harms and benefits of the procedure to the child. Parents should be given accurate and impartial information and allowed to make an informed decision regarding what is in the best interest of the child. (2) Consent of both parents should be required when the procedure is not medically required. It should not be performed in the face of parental disagreement. (3) Absent a significant medical indication, circumcision should not be performed on older children and adolescents in the face of dissent or less than enthusiastic assent. (4) Circumcision should be performed competently and safely by adequately trained providers.29 This should include infection-control measures, a sterile environment for the procedure, and no mouth-penis contact. (5) Analgesia is safe and effective. Adequate analgesia and post-operative pain control must be provided. In the case of Jimmy Boldt, I would suggest that without some compelling medical reason for performing a circumcision, the procedure should not be performed in the absence of agreement between his parents. The fact that Jimmy's father had sole custody does not eliminate the mother's ethical right and obligation to look after the welfare of her son. While the mother may not have legal decision-making authority, that legal determination does not appear to be related either to a lack of interest in her son's welfare or an inability to carry out that role. Jimmy is her son, and she has an interest in seeing his welfare protected. Whether or not she has legal rights, I would be very reluctant to perform an elective procedure for cultural or religious reasons without the permission of both parents and the unambiguous assent of Jimmy himself. Neither appears to be present in the case as it presented to the courts. PMID:19845198

Diekema, Douglas S

2009-01-01

25

Leadership and organizational ethics: the three dimensional African perspectives.  

PubMed

This paper addresses the past, present and future aspects of African leadership and organizational ethics that have, are and will be key for any organization to sustain its systems and structures. Organizational ethics revolves around written and/or unwritten guidelines, ethical values, principles, rules and standards, that are drawn from the harmonious coexistence with the biosphere and it is how these elements are applied that dictates the style of leadership and the ethical thinking of the leaders. Africa has a wide range of complexities which are compounded by, inter alia, tribal divisiveness, selfish leadership, wealth inequality, and massive unemployment. Africans tend to draw their leadership and ethical practices and reflections from the events in the environment with which they have interacted for many years. However, in order to fully address and understand the African perspective in leadership and organizational ethics, a broad comprehension of the African diverse and complex landscape is needed through unravelling of the three dimensional existence of the people. African ethics, developed over time, unifies organizations and leadership since it is part of life and is practised, sub-consciously or unconsciously, by the people as they transform from one practice to the other, and during intergenerational transitions. Globalization, liberalization, technological changes and advancement, and market changes are rapidly transforming the environment in which organizations operate. In such a situation, an effective and true leader cannot be rigid but should be flexible, with the ability to use different leadership styles whenever the situation calls for it. Only those leaders with a three-dimensional perspective live inspiring lives, live with a cause and adopt organizational ethics and leadership styles that will stand the test of time. Despite Africa being the cradle of humankind, leadership and organizational ethics is still in its infancy and wanting, even with the new generation of young leaders. The future outlook of African organizational ethics and leadership is to be found in the intersection of changes in technology, life style, demographics and geopolitics with new trends emerging in global polity and economy. PMID:24564917

Mathooko, Jude Mutuku

2013-01-01

26

Paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity: ethical perspectives in encounters with patients in psychiatric in-patient care  

PubMed Central

Background Psychiatric staff members have the power to decide the options that frame encounters with patients. Intentional as well as unintentional framing can have a crucial impact on patients’ opportunities to be heard and participate in the process. We identified three dominant ethical perspectives in the normative medical ethics literature concerning how doctors and other staff members should frame interactions in relation to patients; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse statements describing real work situations and ethical reflections made by staff members in relation to three central perspectives in medical ethics; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. Methods All staff members involved with patients in seven adult psychiatric and six child and adolescent psychiatric clinics were given the opportunity to freely describe ethical considerations in their work by keeping an ethical diary over the course of one week and 173 persons handed in their diaries. Qualitative theory-guided content analysis was used to provide a description of staff encounters with patients and in what way these encounters were consistent with, or contrary to, the three perspectives. Results The majority of the statements could be attributed to the perspective of paternalism and several to autonomy. Only a few statements could be attributed to reciprocity, most of which concerned staff members acting contrary to the perspective. The result is presented as three perspectives containing eight values. •Paternalism; 1) promoting and restoring the health of the patient, 2) providing good care and 3) assuming responsibility. •Autonomy; 1) respecting the patient’s right to self-determination and information, 2) respecting the patient’s integrity and 3) protecting human rights. •Reciprocity; 1) involving patients in the planning and implementation of their care and 2) building trust between staff and patients. Conclusions Paternalism clearly appeared to be the dominant perspective among the participants, but there was also awareness of patients’ right to autonomy. Despite a normative trend towards reciprocity in psychiatry throughout the Western world, identifying it proved difficult in this study. This should be borne in mind by clinics when considering the need for ethical education, training and supervision.

2013-01-01

27

Ethics and organ transfer: a Merleau-Pontean perspective.  

PubMed

The article's aim is to explore human hand allograft recipients' postoperative experience of disownership and their gradual experience of their new hand as theirs, with the aid of the work of the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Many have used a Merleau-Pontinian perspective in the analysis of embodiment. Far fewer have used it in medico-ethical analysis. Drew Leder's phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale is an exception to this tendency. The article's second aim is to examine Leder's phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale. Though I find parts of Leder's approach promising, I also elaborate a line of reasoning that draws on Merleau-Ponty, that does allow us to argue for certain kinds of organ donation and against organ sale-and that avoids some of the problems with Leder's approach. This alternative route builds on the concept of the integrity of the body-subject. PMID:19343498

Zeiler, Kristin

2009-06-01

28

The ethics of euthanasia: advocates' perspectives.  

PubMed

The Netherlands is currently the only country in the world in which euthanasia is legally permissible. More specifically, Dutch law (briefly explained) allows that a doctor terminates the life of a patient of hers on his voluntary, well-considered and sustained request, if he is suffering unbearably and hopelessly. The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the Dutch debate on the moral permissibility of euthanasia so as to clarify and strengthen the various views that can be advanced in support of euthanasia. On the one view, The Pure Autonomy View (TPAV), the justification of euthanasia rests solely on the principle of respect for autonomy. That is, the reason for performing and permitting euthanasia is the patient's voluntary, well-considered and sustained, in one word: autonomous, request for euthanasia. On the alternative view, The Joint View (TJV), the principle of respect for autonomy and the principle of beneficence morally justify euthanasia together. That is, euthanasia is ethical if and partly because, since the patient is suffering unbearably and hopelessly, euthanasia is in his interest. According to this paper, there is no easy argument for one of these views rather than the other. Instead, as yet both TPAV and TJV seem inherently problematic. TPAV is unable to give a doctor a reason for performing euthanasia that appeals to her in her capacity as a doctor, such as relief of suffering. And TJV begs the question--for example, if a state were to legalize euthanasia on grounds of TJV, it would force the view upon its citizens that it may be in a person's interest to die. PMID:12083156

de Haan, Jurriaan

2002-04-01

29

Tuskegee Bioethics Center 10th anniversary presentation: "Commemorating 10 years: ethical perspectives on origin and destiny".  

PubMed

More than 70 years have passed since the beginning of the Public Health Service syphilis study in Tuskegee, Alabama, and it has been over a decade since President Bill Clinton formally apologized for it and held a ceremony for the Tuskegee study participants. The official launching of the Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care took place two years after President Clinton's apology. How might we fittingly discuss the Center's 10th Anniversary and the topic 'Commemorating 10 Years: Ethical Perspectives on Origin and Destiny'? Over a decade ago, a series of writers, many of them African Americans, wrote a text entitled 'African-American Perspectives on Biomedical Ethics'; their text was partly responsible for a prolonged reflection by others to produce a subsequent work, 'African American Bioethics: Culture, Race and Identity'. What is the relationship between the discipline of bioethics and African American culture? This and related questions are explored in this commentary. PMID:20675942

Prograis, Lawrence J

2010-08-01

30

Brainwashing, LSD, and CIA: historical and ethical perspective.  

PubMed

The history of various attempts at thought control and chemical warfare is briefly reviewed. Brainwashing, thought control, industrial and national espionage, and covert activities are becoming more sophisticated. These issues have been revived and accentuated by the Vietnam war, the Middle East Crisis, Watergate, the CIA investigations and the Patty Hearst trial. Historical perspective and the ethical implications of these activities are explored. It is suggested that there is a growing level of individual and international mistrust amounting to paranoia and complicating the issues of individual freedom, civil rights and human experimentation. PMID:863610

Buckman, J

1977-01-01

31

Struggling with the fragility of life: a relational-narrative approach to ethics in palliative nursing.  

PubMed

In nursing ethics the role of narratives and dialogue has become more prominent in recent years. The purpose of this article is to illuminate a relational-narrative approach to ethics in the context of palliative nursing. The case study presented concerns a difficult relationship between oncology nurses and a husband whose wife was hospitalized with cancer. The husband's narrative is an expression of depression, social isolation and the loss of hope. He found no meaning in the process of dying and death. The oncology nurses were not able to recognize his emotional and existential problems. A narrative perspective inspired by relational ethics indicates that participants may develop a relational narrative that seeks good for all involved in a situation. In palliative nursing this entails open communication about the fragility of life and approaching death. In relational narratives, answers to these ethical dilemmas are co-authored, contingent and contextual. PMID:16045242

Abma, Tineke A

2005-07-01

32

International Nursing Consultation: A Perspective on Ethical Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ethical issues faced by international nurse consultants are examined, and the ways in which ethical theories can be useful to nurses dealing with ethical conflicts while serving as consultants of other countries are explored. (Author/MLW)

Andrews, Margaret M.; Fargotstein, Barbara P.

1986-01-01

33

Philosophical and ethical perspectives on cardiovascular disease risk in low-wage workers.  

PubMed

One of the overriding goals of Healthy People 2010 is to reduce the health disparities observed among Americans. Because workers in small businesses tend to have little or no access to health screening or preventive health education programs, they may be unaware of their unique risk factors and are thus more at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, occupational health nurses are more likely to be available in health programs to employees in large rather than small businesses. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how nursing values and philosophy might influence public health nurses' thinking about nursing science and ethical issues relating to the risk of CVD among low-wage workers. The following questions will guide the exploration of health disparities among low-wage workers: (a) What are the health disparities observed among low-wage workers with CVD risk? (b) What are the philosophical and ethical perspectives on the issues presented? (c) Based on these findings, how should limited resources be allocated? and (d) How does this affect nursing? These approaches will provide the foundation for developing a culturally sensitive ethical and philosophical perspective to prevent CVD and promote cardiovascular health among low-wage workers. PMID:21732971

Hwang, Won Ju

2011-01-01

34

Relational ethics: when mothers suffer from psychosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objective: The goal of this review is to aid clinicians with ethical issues arising in the treatment of women who suffer from psychosis. Method: This paper is a synthesis of the recent literature in adult and child psychiatry, ethics, law, and child welfare pertaining to the topic of maternal psychosis. Topics include: family planning, the care of pregnant women

M. V. Seeman

2004-01-01

35

Ethical issues in predictive genetic testing: a public health perspective  

PubMed Central

As a result of the increase in genetic testing and the fear of discrimination by insurance companies, employers, and society as a result of genetic testing, the disciplines of ethics, public health, and genetics have converged. Whether relatives of someone with a positive predictive genetic test should be notified of the results and risks is a matter urgently in need of debate. Such a debate must encompass the moral and ethical obligations of the diagnosing physician and the patient. The decision to inform or not will vary depending on what moral theory is used. Utilising the utilitarian and libertarian theories produces different outcomes. The principles of justice and non?maleficence will also play an important role in the decision.

Fulda, K G; Lykens, K

2006-01-01

36

Ethical issues in predictive genetic testing: a public health perspective.  

PubMed

As a result of the increase in genetic testing and the fear of discrimination by insurance companies, employers, and society as a result of genetic testing, the disciplines of ethics, public health, and genetics have converged. Whether relatives of someone with a positive predictive genetic test should be notified of the results and risks is a matter urgently in need of debate. Such a debate must encompass the moral and ethical obligations of the diagnosing physician and the patient. The decision to inform or not will vary depending on what moral theory is used. Utilising the utilitarian and libertarian theories produces different outcomes. The principles of justice and non-maleficence will also play an important role in the decision. PMID:16507657

Fulda, K G; Lykens, K

2006-03-01

37

The Evolution of Ethics: Personal Perspectives of ACA Ethics Committee Chairs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a survey of the American Counseling Association Ethics Committee chairs regarding their experiences, learning, and insights in the area of professional counselor ethics resulting from their service on the committee. In addition, ethics chairs reflect on current and future trends in counselor ethics. (Contains 13 references.)…

Walden, Susan L.; Herlihy, Barbara; Ashton, Lauri

2003-01-01

38

Strikes by physicians: a historical perspective toward an ethical evaluation.  

PubMed

Current conditions surrounding the house of medicine-including corporate and government cost-containment strategies, increasing market-penetration schemes in health care, along with clinical scrutiny and the administrative control imposed under privatization by managed care firms, insurance companies, and governments-have spurred an upsurge in physician unionization, which requires a revisiting of the issue of physician strikes. Strikes by physicians have been relatively rare events in medical history. When they have occurred, they have aroused intense debate over their ethical justification among professionals and the public alike, notwithstanding what caused the strikes. As physicians and other health care providers increasingly find employment within organizations as wage-contract employees and their work becomes more highly rationalized, more physicians will join labor organizations to protect both their economic and their professional interests. As a result, these physicians will have to come to terms with the use of the strike weapon. On the surface, many health care strikes may not ever seem justifiable, but in certain defined situations a strike would be not only permissible but an ethical imperative. With an exacerbation of labor strife in the health sector in many nations, it is crucial to explore the question of what constitutes an ethical physician strike. PMID:16878396

Thompson, Stephen L; Salmon, J Warren

2006-01-01

39

Nursing ethics and its relation with power and work organization.  

PubMed

Difficulties faced in the nursing routine, mainly in hospitals, have been reported without the resulting ethical implications to workers and especially to clients, been sufficiently questioned. The work organization can be the main source of suffering to nursing workers, related to the exercise of power of different actors involved in the health institutions, which can potentially cause multiple problems and distress of ethical order. This study aims to make a critical reflection about some relations between the nursing work organization, power relations and its ethical dimension. Strategies for an ethical performance of nurses and other nursing professionals in the organization of work in the healthcare institutions point to the need of these professionals exercise power in an ethical way. PMID:17653435

Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; da Silveira, Rosemary Silva; da Silva, Mara Regina Santos; Dei Svaldi, Jacqueline Sallete; Bulhosa, Michele Salum

2007-01-01

40

Consensus statements on occupational therapy ethics related to driving.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT As part of an expert panel convened to examine evidence and practice related to diverse aspects of driving evaluation and rehabilitation, consensus statements were developed on ethics. This paper provides context for the ethical obligation of practitioners to assess and make recommendations about the ability of clients to safely perform the activity of driving. It highlights key articles from the literature as well as principles from the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards (2010). The statements support the importance of identifying impairments affecting driving, which could result in harm to the client as well as to the public. The ethical and professional obligation of practitioners to evaluate, make recommendations, and possibly report and/or refer to a driver rehabilitation specialist for further services is reinforced. PMID:24754765

Slater, Deborah Yarett

2014-04-01

41

Organ transplantation: legal, ethical and islamic perspective in Nigeria.  

PubMed

Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ/tissues transplantation in Nigeria. The government should take measures to combat transplantation tourism and the problem of national and international trafficking in human tissues and organs, ethics commission and National Transplant registry should be established in order to monitor and regulate the programme in the country. PMID:24027394

Bakari, Abubakar A; Abbo Jimeta, Umar S; Abubakar, Mohammed A; Alhassan, Sani U; Nwankwo, Emeka A

2012-07-01

42

Analyzing Ethics in the Administration of Interscholastic Sports: Three Key Gender-Related Ethical Dilemmas Faced by Educational Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Athletic administrators and decision makers within interscholastic athletics are expected to embrace a code of ethics that serves as a set of rules to guide their professional behavior. Included within this code are areas of controversy that present gender-related ethical dilemmas for administrators. Three specific ethical dilemmas involve (1)…

Whisenant, Warren A.; Pedersen, Paul M.; Clavio, Galen

2010-01-01

43

Empowering behaviour and leader fairness and integrity: Studying perceptions of ethical leader behaviour from a levels-of-analysis perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethical leadership is seen as important by many researchers and practitioners. However, empirical research on ethical leader behaviour is limited and to date multilevel research is hardly found in this area. This study examines the relationships of two forms of perceived ethical leader behaviour (fairness and integrity and empowering behaviour) with subordinates' trust and commitment from a levels-of-analysis perspective, using

Deanne N. Den Hartog; Annebel H. B. De Hoogh

2009-01-01

44

The Ethics of Writing Instruction: Issues in Theory and Practice. Perspectives on Writing: Theory, Research, Practice. Volume 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of essays reveals a keen awareness of the degree to which ethics and ethical systems are located in particular instructional contexts. The essays consider the implications of these contexts from a variety of perspectives, both theoretical and pedagogical. In the collection's first part, Ethics and the Composition Classroom, are the…

Pemberton, Michael A., Ed.

45

Learning to Care during Storytime in the Current Context: Moral Education from the Perspective of Care Ethics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through an examination of storytelling in the present context, this study addresses the teaching of moral education from the standpoint of care ethics. Through observations, interviews, and surveys in one school committed to care ethics, this study aims to show how the philosophical perspective of care ethics can inform practice. Teachers engaged…

Rabin, Colette

2011-01-01

46

Ethical Issues in Managed Care: Perspectives in Evolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a reaction to Cooper and Gottlieb's (this issue) article titled, "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Challenges that many issues addressed by Cooper and Gottlieb have been longstanding in the profession. Argues against the belief that the managed care environment is fraught with more ethical

Belar, Cynthia D.

2000-01-01

47

Ethical Considerations in Clinical Trials: An International Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethical conduct of biomedical research involving human subjects is one of the critical elements for a successful outcome of a clinical trial. Many national and international guidelines and regulations have been established to address the ethical conduct of clinical trials. This paper will describe the roles and functions of the institutional review board and the involvement of the Office for

Melody H. Lin

1998-01-01

48

Ethical Perspectives in Open and Distance Education System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, e-learning and various online education applications are used in many countries and educational institutions than ever before. Ethics deals with the principle governing ideal or good behavior, it focuses on what is right or what is wrong. Although in education, the ethical issues that they may be facing are not about of life and death…

Anitha, C.; Harsha, T. S.

2013-01-01

49

Placebo-controlled trials in psychiatric research: an ethical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The placebo-controlled trial is widely regarded as the gold standard for testing the efficacy of new treatments; however, this research design is subject to ethical controversy, especially when standard treatments of proven efficacy exist. After examining regulatory standards and ethical codes relevant to placebo-controlled trials, I offer a critique of arguments against the use of placebo control groups in psychiatric

Franklin G. Miller

2000-01-01

50

A Model of Ethical Decision Making from a Multicultural Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because shifts in the world's ethnic and racial demographics mean that the majority of the world's population is non-White (M. D'Andrea & P Arredondo, 1997), it is imperative that counselors develop a means for working ethically with a diverse clientele. In this article, the authors argue that the current Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice…

Frame, Marsha Wiggins; Williams, Carmen Braun

2005-01-01

51

The Teaching of Ethics and the Ethics of Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This presentation covers the topic of psychological ethics from two perspectives. One part of the presentation considers how ethics is presented in the classroom through both textbook consideration and specifically designed courses. The other part of the presentation considers ethical issues as they are related to the activity of teaching. Each of…

Matthews, Janet R.

52

Determiners: A Relational Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we examine from a semantic point of view a class of ex- pressions variously referred to as determiners, quantifiers, or articles. Our treatment of the meaning of these expressions reflects an idea which has its origin in the work of Montague (1970), Lewis (1972), Geach (1972), and Cresswell (1973): determiners are to be interpreted as two-place relations

Frans Zwarts; Nederlands Instituut; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen

53

Key Ethical Issues in Pediatric Research: Islamic Perspective, Iranian Experience  

PubMed Central

Objective The importance of pediatric research especially in the ethically proven trials resulted in considerable legislative attempts in association with compiling ethical guidelines. Because of children's vulnerability conducting pediatric research raises different ethical issues; the two most important of which are informed consent and risk-benefit assessment. Differences in religious and socio-cultural context limit implication of ethical standards. Methods At the aim of finding a solution we critically reviewed guidelines, and literatures as well as Islamic points in addition to comparing different viewpoints in application of ethical standards in pediatric research. Findings The literature review showed that pediatric research guidelines and authors’ viewpoints have the same basic ethical core, but there are some variations; depend on cultural, religious, and social differences. Furthermore, these standards have some limitations in defining informed consent according to child's age and capacity upon application. Conclusion In this regard Islamic approach and definition about growth development and puberty sheds light and clarifies a clearer and more rational address to the issue.

Mobasher, Mina; Salari, Pooneh; Larijani, Bagher

2012-01-01

54

Translating neuroethics: reflections from Muslim ethics: commentary on "Ethical concepts and future challenges of neuroimaging: an islamic perspective".  

PubMed

Muslim ethics is cautiously engaging developments in neuroscience. In their encounters with developments in neuroscience such as brain death and functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures, Muslim ethicists might be on the cusp of spirited debates. Science and religion perform different kinds of work and ought not to be conflated. Cultural translation is central to negotiating the complex life worlds of religious communities, Muslims included. Cultural translation involves lived encounters with modernity and its byproduct, modern science. Serious ethical debate requires more than just a mere instrumental encounter with science. A robust Muslim approach to neuroethics might require an emulsion of religion and neuroscience, thought and body, and body and soul. Yet one must anticipate that Muslim debates in neuroethics will be inflected with Muslim values, symbols and the discrete faith perspectives of this tradition with meanings that are specific to people who share this worldview and their concerns. PMID:23054670

Moosa, Ebrahim

2012-09-01

55

Mental disorders, health inequalities and ethics: A global perspective  

PubMed Central

The global burden of neuropsychiatry diseases and related mental health conditions is enormous, underappreciated and under resourced, particularly in the developing nations. The absence of adequate and quality mental health infrastructure and workforce is increasingly recognized. The ethical implications of inequalities in mental health for people and nations are profound and must be addressed in efforts to fulfil key bioethics principles of medicine and public health: respect for individuals, justice, beneficence, and non-malfeasance. Stigma and discrimination against people living with mental disorders affects their education, employment, access to care and hampers their capacity to contribute to society. Mental health well-being is closely associated to several Millennium Development Goals and economic development sectors including education, labour force participation, and productivity. Limited access to mental health care increases patient and family suffering. Unmet mental health needs have a negative effect on poverty reduction initiatives and economic development. Untreated mental conditions contribute to economic loss because they increase school and work absenteeism and dropout rates, healthcare expenditure, and unemployment. Addressing unmet mental health needs will require development of better mental health infrastructure and workforce and overall integration of mental and physical health services with primary care, especially in the developing nations.

NGUI, EMMANUEL M.; KHASAKHALA, LINCOLN; NDETEI, DAVID; ROBERTS, LAURA WEISS

2010-01-01

56

An Ecological Perspective of Power in Transformational Learning: A Case Study of Ethical Vegans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critics have argued for a better understanding of power in transformational learning. This study explored the power of normative ideologies in the transformational learning of ethical vegans. The findings indicate that Mezirow's transformation theory does not adequately account for power relations in this case of transformational learning, power was central to the transformational learning of ethical vegans, relations of power

Barbara McDonald; Ronald M. Cervero; Bradley C. Courtenay

1999-01-01

57

Perspectives on Child Abuse and Labour: Global Ethical Ideals Versus African Cultural Realities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the global and African postures on the issues of child abuse and child labour. The global ethical ideals of the issues are characterized within their various theoretical perspectives while the African cultural realities are explored through the use of focus group discussion sessions, which were organized in six rural…

Ajayi, A. O.; Torimiro, D. O.

2004-01-01

58

Ethical Concerns Related to Developing Pharmacogenomic Treatment Strategies for Addiction  

PubMed Central

Pharmacogenomics (PGx) research is poised to enable physicians to identify optimally effective treatments for individual substance abusers based on their genetic profiles. This paper addresses ethical issues related to PGx treatment strategies for addiction, focusing especially on the use of race variables in genomics research and ensuring equitable access to novel PGx treatments. Unless the field addresses the ethical challenges posed by these issues, PGx treatment innovations for addiction threaten to exacerbate already dramatic disparities in the burden of drug dependence for minority and other underserved populations.

Shields, Alexandra E.

2011-01-01

59

Ethical concerns related to developing pharmacogenomic treatment strategies for addiction.  

PubMed

Pharmacogenomics (PGx) research is poised to enable physicians to identify optimally effective treatments for individual substance abusers based on their genetic profiles. This paper addresses ethical issues related to PGx treatment strategies for addiction, focusing especially on the use of race variables in genomics research and ensuring equitable access to novel PGx treatments. Unless the field addresses the ethical challenges posed by these issues, PGx treatment innovations for addiction threaten to exacerbate already dramatic disparities in the burden of drug dependence for minority and other underserved populations. PMID:22003420

Shields, Alexandra E

2011-07-01

60

Sojourning: A Specific Wayfaring Metaphor Related to Environmental Ethics \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current trends in traveling to wilderness areas, observ- ing vanishing species and ecosystems, and participating in chal- lenging activities draw their foundations from a historical context of adventurers and explorers, Grand Tours, and romantic solitary travelers. A metaphor of sojourning is presented that provides an interpretation of wilderness travel related to ethical action and political power structures. Initial discussion looks

Karen M. Fox; Gordon Walker; Leo H. McAvoy

61

Ethical issues in the reuse of qualitative data: perspectives from literature, practice, and participants.  

PubMed

In this article, we explore ethical issues in qualitative secondary analysis through a comparison of the literature with practitioner and participant perspectives. To achieve this, we integrated critical narrative review findings with data from two discussion groups: qualitative researchers and research users/consumers. In the literature, we found that theoretical debate ran parallel to practical action rather than being integrated with it. We identified an important and novel theme of relationships that was emerging from the perspectives of researchers and users. Relationships were significant with respect to trust, sharing data, transparency and clarity, anonymity, permissions, and responsibility. We provide an example of practice development that we hope will prompt researchers to re-examine the issues in their own setting. Informing the research community of research practitioner and user perspectives on ethical issues in the reuse of qualitative data is the first step toward developing mechanisms to better integrate theoretical and empirical work. PMID:24374332

Yardley, Sarah J; Watts, Kate M; Pearson, Jennifer; Richardson, Jane C

2014-01-01

62

Protecting children from smoking in the home: an ethics of care perspective.  

PubMed

Community nurses are uniquely placed to help protect child health by facilitating the creation of smoke-free homes. However, there are a number of perceived barriers that may concern community nurses in their role of supporting parents in the creation of smoke-free homes, particularly those faced by disadvantaged parents. Arguments against intervening within the private domain of the home focus on concerns about protecting parents' autonomy to smoke within their own home and the potential for stigmatising parents who smoke, particularly mothers. Drawing on an ethics of care perspective, the authors propose an alternative perspective to the intervention in private settings. An ethics of care perspective may help to justify and encourage parents and community nurses to work in partnership to create a healthy environment for children and decrease the likelihood of children becoming smokers in the future. PMID:24784555

Rowa-Dewar, Neneh; Ritchie, Deborah

2014-05-01

63

MB 750 Values And Ethics In Cross-Cultural Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Strange Virtues by Bernard Adeney (1995) 2. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (1959) 3. Ethics and World Religions: Cross-Cultural Case Studies By Regina W. Wolfe and Christine E. Gudorf (1999) 4. Mystic Endowment: Religious Ethnography of the Warao Indians. By Johannes Wilbert (1993) 5. A reading packet to be obtained from the ESJ School of World Mission and

Michael A. Rynkiewich

2004-01-01

64

MB 750 Values and Ethics in Cross-Cultural Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reading Packet: a. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich 1955 [1949] “The Love of God and the Decay of the World,” Chapter 1 of Ethics edited by Eberhard Bethge. New York: Collier Books, Macmillan Publishing Company. Pp. 17-54. b. Benedict, Ruth 1961 [1934] “The Nature of Society,” Chapter 7 in Patterns of Culture. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. Pp. 223-250. c. Lee, Dorothy 1987 [1959

Michael A. Rynkiewich

2004-01-01

65

MS 672 Values And Ethics In Cross-Cultural Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Strange Virtues by Bernard Adeney (1995) 2. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (1959) 3. Ethics and World Religions: Cross-Cultural Case Studies By Regina W. Wolfe and Christine E. Gudorf (1999) 4. Mystic Endowment: Religious Ethnography of the Warao Indians. By Johannes Wilbert (1993) 5. A reading packet to be obtained from the ESJ School of World Mission and

Michael A. Rynkiewich

2004-01-01

66

Ethics and Morality in Software Development: A Developer's Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computers and other digital devices have become ubiquitous in our lives. Almost all aspects of our lives are in part or wholly impacted by computers and the software that runs on them. Unknowingly, we are placing our livelihoods and even our lives in the hands unknown software developers. Ethical and moral decisions made during software…

Stephenson, James H.

2010-01-01

67

A global perspective on library association codes of ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of 28 countries involves comparative content analysis of the English versions of codes of ethics proposed by professional associations. It yielded an empirically grounded typology of principles arranged in twenty categories. The most frequently identified principles were professional development, integrity, confidentiality or privacy, and free and equal access to information. While confidentiality and privacy, and equal access to

Pnina Shachaf

2005-01-01

68

The effects of computerized performance monitoring: An ethical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable controversy has surrounded the use of computerized performance monitoring (CPM) by employers. Critics of this technology contend that CPM usage raises serious ethical concerns. Beliefs that the use of computerized performance monitors results in unfair performance evaluation, stress and health problems underlie much of the current concern over this technology. A field study was undertaken to provide empirical evidence

Stephen R.. Hawk

1994-01-01

69

A Circular Evolution of Perspectives regarding Ethical Communication?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The contemporary view of ethical communication has come full circle, returning to the approach of Aristotle. Almost every public speaking textbook includes discussion of the basic concepts of what Aristotle called ethos, pathos, and logos. Of particular significance is Aristotle's conception of ethos, as elaborated in his work, "The Rhetoric."…

Cox, E. Sam

70

Codes of Ethics in Australian Education: Towards a National Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers have a dual moral responsibility as both values educators and moral agents representing the integrity of the profession. Codes of ethics and conduct in teaching articulate shared professional values and aim to provide some guidance for action around recognised issues special to the profession but are also instruments of regulation which…

Forster, Daniella J.

2012-01-01

71

Ethics in Health Research: A Social Science Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethical codes of conduct cannot be effectively implemented in isolation and may be enforced in several different ways. One, is to conscientise the members of the profession to observe the rules, second, is to effectively police the system, and a third is to create links with associated disciplines or community of practitioners who together can form a network of conscience

Tejal Barai Jaitly; Amar Jesani

2007-01-01

72

Approaching Ethical Reasoning in Nursing Research through a Communitarian Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Case studies depict dilemmas in nursing research involving protection of community rights and community informed consent. Outlines research guidelines derived from communitarian ethical frameworks that consider beneficence, justice, and respect for autonomy in the context of community. (Contains 58 references.) (SK)

Dresden, Elissa; McElmurry, Beverly J.; McCreary, Linda L.

2003-01-01

73

Institutional Responses to Medical Mistakes: Ethical and Legal Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care institutions must decide whether to inform the patient of a medical error. The barriers to disclosure are an aversion to admitting errors, a concern about implicating other practitioners, and a fear of lawsuits and liabil- ity. However, admission of medical errors is the ethical thing to do and may be required by law. When examined, the barriers to

Andrew E. Thurman

2001-01-01

74

Ethics and nuclear arms: European and American perspectives  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on the ethical and moral aspects of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include the development of a nuclear policy, war and peace in the nuclear age, the viewpoint of the German churches, the US Catholic bishops and nuclear arms, nuclear pacifism, NATO and ''first use,'' and Christian morality with regard to nuclear arms.

English, R.

1985-01-01

75

The Financial Performance of Ethical Investment Trusts: An Australian Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines whether differences in financial performance exist for investment trusts which base their portfolio selection primarily on an ethical screen, compared to indexes which incorporate a broader spectrum of investments. Results indicate that on a risk-adjusted basis there is an insignificant difference in the financial performance of these trusts against three common market benchmarks. However as to the

Lorne S. Cummings

2000-01-01

76

Ethics and Nuclear Arms: European and American Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In these 10 essays, 5 European and 5 American political and religious leaders examine the ethics of possessing and using nuclear weapons. They appraise the policy of nuclear deterrence. Protestant and Catholic viewpoints are represented. There are disagreements on details and differences in emphasis on positions and policies. There is general…

English, Raymond, Ed.

77

77 FR 67380 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery and Utilization of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Comment Request: Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery and Utilization of Hospital Ethics Consultation...Collection: Title: Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery and Utilization of Hospital Ethics Consultation...insight into the perspective and culture of surgery as it relates to ethical dilemmas in...

2012-11-09

78

76 FR 72955 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: “Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery and Utilization of Hospital...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Comment Request: ``Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery and Utilization of Hospital Ethics Consultation...Collection: Title: Ethical Dilemmas in Surgery and Utilization of Hospital Ethics Consultation...insight into the perspective and culture of surgery as it relates to ethical dilemmas in...

2011-11-28

79

Telling Secrets, Revealing Lives: Relational Ethics in Research with Intimate Others  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on relational ethics in research with intimate others. Relational ethics requires researchers to act from our hearts and minds, acknowledge our interpersonal bonds to others, and take responsibility for actions and their consequences. Calling on her own research studies, the author examines relational ethics in ethnographies in which researchers are friends with or become friends with participants

Carolyn S Ellis

2007-01-01

80

Public Health Ethics Related Training for Public Health Workforce: An Emerging Need in the United States  

PubMed Central

Background Ethics is a discipline, which primarily deals with what is moral and immoral behavior. Public Health Ethics is translation of ethical theories and concepts into practice to address complex multidimensional public health problems. The primary purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative literature review-addressing role of ethics in developing curriculum in programs and schools of public health, ethics-related instruction in schools and programs of public health and the role of ethics in developing a competent public health workforce. Methods: An open search of various health databases including Google scholar and Ebscohost yielded 15 articles related to use of ethics in public health practice or public health training and the salient features were reported. Results: Results indicated a variable amount of ethicsrelated training in schools and programs of public health along with public health practitioner training across the nation. Bioethics, medical ethics and public health ethics were found to be subspecialties’ needing separate ethical frameworks to guide decision making. Conclusions: Ethics based curricular and non-curricular training for emerging public health professionals from schools and programs of public health in the United States is extremely essential. In the current age of public health challenges faced in the United States and globally, to have an ethically untrained public health force is arguably, immoral and unethical and jeopardizes population health. There is an urgent need to develop innovative ethic based curriculums in academia as well as finding effective means to translate these curricular competencies into public health practice.

Kanekar, A; Bitto, A

2012-01-01

81

Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Making ethical decision rarely involves a simple yes or no answer. Matters of confidentiality are no different. This article examines how school counselors must draw the line between protecting a student's privacy and providing information to parents and administrators. (GCP)

Dansby-Giles, Gloria

2002-01-01

82

47 CFR 19.735-105 - Availability of ethics and other conduct related regulations and statutes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Availability of ethics and other conduct related regulations...Provisions § 19.735-105 Availability of ethics and other conduct related regulations...and to advise the Designated Agency Ethics Official that all such persons...

2013-10-01

83

Beyond speculative ethics in HRI?: ethical considerations and the relation to empirical data  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss the difference between understanding robot ethics as something that is grounded in philosophical ideas about a potential future design, and understanding robot ethics as something that is grounded in empirical data. We argue, that understanding \\

Sara Ljungblad; Stina Nylander; Mie Nørgaard

2011-01-01

84

Introduction to International Ethical Standards Related to Genetics and Genomics  

PubMed Central

The rapid advances in genetic knowledge and technology raise various, sometimes unprecedented, ethical dilemmas in the scientific community as well as the public realm. To deal with these dilemmas, the international community has prepared and issued ethical standards in various formats. In this review, seven international standards regarding genetics and genomics will be briefly introduced in chronological order. Critical reflections on them will not be provided in this review, and naturally, they have their own problems and shortcomings. However, a common set of the principles expressed in them will be highlighted here, because they are still relevant, and many of them will be more relevant in the future. Some of the interesting contents will be selected and described. After that, the morality of one recent event related to whole-genome sequencing and person-identifiable genetic data will be explored based on those international standards.

Yim, Seon-Hee; Chung, Yeun-Jun

2013-01-01

85

Ethics  

Cancer.gov

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Human Research Protection (OHRP) has mandated that all research sites outside the United States that participate in research funded by the U.S. Government must file documentation certifying that each research site observes the Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects and has an independent ethics committee. Sites participating in trials sponsored by the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) must also undergo regular on-site audits.

86

Interactive Ethics: Developing Understanding of the Social Relations of Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on a method of teaching ethics as a complex web of relationships. Used ethically vexing anecdotes elicited from practicing geographers to develop a computer-based tutorial package that allows students to interact with these anecdotes. Cautions against using this format alone in ethical instruction. (DSK)

Kearns, Robin; Le Heron, Richard; Romaniuk, Anna

1998-01-01

87

Ethics Education: Using Inductive Reasoning to Develop Individual, Group, Organizational, and Global Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethics education that prepares students to address ethical challenges at work is a multifaceted and long-term endeavor. In this article, the authors propose an inductive ethics pedagogy that begins the process of ethics education by grounding students in their own individual ethical principles. The approach centers on developing students' ethical

Taft, Susan H.; White, Judith

2007-01-01

88

Cultural, ethical, and spiritual implications of natural disasters from the survivors' perspective.  

PubMed

Cultural, ethical, and spiritual implications of disaster depend on various factors. The impact of a disaster on a particular culture depends on the people in that culture and the strength and resilience of the culture. Disasters may slow cultural development; however, typically the customs, beliefs, and value systems remain the same even if the outward expressions of culture change. Critical to survivors is the implication of aid that is culturally sensitive. Ethical questions and dilemmas associated with disasters and their management are profound. Adhering to ethical principles does not solve all of the issues related to disaster management, but awareness of their utility is important. People affected by a disaster may not be capable of responding to human rights violations, so it is the first responders who must be cognizant of their responsibility to protect the victims’ dignity and rights. Ethical treatment of survivors entails a crucial blend of knowledge about ethnic culture, religious beliefs, and human rights. A strong awareness of ethical principles is merely a beginning step to well-informed decision making in disaster situations. The literature also suggests that during a crisis, spirituality helps victims to cope. Important to any catastrophic event is the understanding that every disaster creates unique circumstances that require relief responses tailored to the specific situation. PMID:21095559

Varghese, Shainy B

2010-12-01

89

An Ecological Perspective of Power in Transformational Learning: A Case Study of Ethical Vegans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In-depth interviews with 12 ethical vegans revealed the process of becoming vegetarian. Transformative learning proved to be a journey rather than a one-time decision. Mezirow's transformative theory does not adequately account for the power relations central to this process. Therefore, transformative learning should be viewed more holistically.…

McDonald, Barbara; Cervero, Ronald M.; Courtenay, Bradley C.

1999-01-01

90

47 CFR 19.735-102 - Cross-reference to ethics and other conduct related regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cross-reference to ethics and other conduct related regulations. 19.735-102 Section...General Provisions § 19.735-102 Cross-reference to ethics and other conduct related regulations. In addition to...

2013-10-01

91

Demographic & related differences in ethical views among small businesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the effects of demographic characteristics on ethical perceptions. While earlier research has produced conflicting results regarding the predictive power of these variables, significant and definite insights were obtained with proper controls. The following predictors of ethical attitudes are examined: age, gender, marital status, education, dependent children status, region of the country and years in business, while controlling

Paul J. Serwinek

1992-01-01

92

Ethical issues relating to reproduction control and women's health  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many ethical aspects which derive from the application of reproduction control in women's health. Women's health can be enhanced if women are given the opportunity to make their own reproduction choices about sex, contraception, abortion and application of reproductive technologies. The main issues that raise ethical dilemmas following the development of assisted reproduction techniques are: the right to

J. G. Schenker; V. H. Eisenberg

1997-01-01

93

Ethical Issues Currently Being Discussed in Relation to Reproductive Medicine and the Laws Governing Reproductive Medicine  

PubMed Central

Reproductive medicine laws in Germany currently mean that the relationship status of prospective parents is taken into consideration in decisions on whether their application for assisted reproduction is approved or rejected. In the light of new forms of shared parenthood, we should ask ourselves whether the current regulations are still an appropriate way of guaranteeing the best for the child. Current medical practices and their legal basis will be illustrated using the examples of sperm, egg and embryo donation. From an ethical perspective, the question at stake is to what extent an “Ethics of Parenthood” can make it possible to act responsibly with regard to the changes occurring in forms of shared parenthood. Such an ethics is aimed at supporting parents in realising the reproductive autonomy guaranteed in the German Constitution through social and ethical aspects of the child–parent relationship.

Schleissing, S.; Kersten, J.; Thaler, C. J.; von Schonfeldt, V.

2014-01-01

94

Clinical ethics revisited  

PubMed Central

A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems.

Singer, Peter A; Pellegrino, Edmund D; Siegler, Mark

2001-01-01

95

Ethical challenges related to elder care. High level decision-makers' experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Few empirical studies have been found that explore ethical challenges among persons in high public positions that are responsible for elder care. The aim of this paper was to illuminate the meaning of being in ethically difficult situations related to elder care as experienced by high level decision-makers. METHODS: A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used to analyse the eighteen interviews

Anna-Greta Mamhidir; Mona Kihlgren; Venke Sorlie

2007-01-01

96

Was WHO SARS-related travel advisory for Toronto ethical?  

PubMed

Freedom of movement is undoubtedly a fundamental international right. However, circumstances may arise where that right must be curtailed. Was the 2003 SARS outbreak in Toronto one such circumstance? Guénaël R.M. Rodier thinks WHO's decision to impose a SARS-related travel advisory was justifiable, even reasonable, though it caused a loss of over $1.1 billion in the Greater Toronto Area. That travel to an infected area was the most common epidemiological link with SARS infections supports Rodier's position. However, as suggested in the Naylor report, issuing a travel advisory does not keep infected individuals from leaving Toronto and such individuals account for 5 of 6 cases where SARS was spread from Canada. That alone would discount Rodier's argument and the WHO decision on purely logistical grounds. But there is an ethical question as well. Was the travel advisory implemented fairly? This question is best judged using Nancy E. Kass's framework for public health. From that framework, two points are placed in immediate relief. First, the Toronto authorities were not given an opportunity to state their case to WHO before the travel advisory was implemented. Second, the framework requires that burdens be distributed fairly and the travel advisory did not do that, or even attempt to do so. PMID:17626386

Paquin, Leo J

2007-01-01

97

Concepts of animal welfare in relation to positions in animal ethics.  

PubMed

When animal ethicists deal with welfare they seem to face a dilemma: On the one hand, they recognize the necessity of welfare concepts for their ethical approaches. On the other hand, many animal ethicists do not want to be considered reformist welfarists. Moreover, animal welfare scientists may feel pressed by moral demands for a fundamental change in our attitude towards animals. The analysis of this conflict from the perspective of animal ethics shows that animal welfare science and animal ethics highly depend on each other. Welfare concepts are indispensable in the whole field of animal ethics. Evidence for this can be found by analyzing the structure of theories of animal ethics and the different ways in which these theories employ welfare concepts. Furthermore, the background of values underneath every welfare theory is essential to pursue animal welfare science. Animal ethics can make important contributions to the clarification of underlying normative assumptions with regard to the value of the animal, with regard to ideas about what is valuable for the animal, and with regard to the actions that should follow from the results of animal welfare science. PMID:21312052

Schmidt, Kirsten

2011-06-01

98

Captain America, Tuskegee, Belmont, and Righteous Guinea Pigs: Considering Scientific Ethics through Official and Subaltern Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With an eye towards a potential scientific ethics curriculum, this paper examines four contrasting discourses regarding the ethics of using human subjects in science. The first two represent official statements regarding ethics. These include the U.S.'s National Science Education Standards, that identify ethics with a professional code, and the…

Weinstein, Matthew

2008-01-01

99

Exploring the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life: Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives (PET)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Will we find life on other planets? Will we reproduce the origins of life in a laboratory? A growing number of researchers in a relatively young but exploding field of science believe that we will accomplish one or both of these goals, and possibly not that long from now. The field is astrobiology -- the NASA funded basic research program that is searching for life, the conditions for life's origins, and the essential ingredients of life both on and off (indeed, sometimes unimaginably far from) Earth, the planet we've come to take for granted as life's home in the universe. The goals of NASA's astrobiology program; to explore the origin, extent, and future of life, raise fundamental philosophical, ethical and theological questions. A serious and responsible consideration of the societal implications of the goals and discoveries of astrobiology will require the scientific community to engage with a broader academic and pubic community.As a first step in this outreach and engagement effort, the AAAS Dialogue on Science, Ethics and Religion (DoSER), with support from NASA and the John Templeton Foundation, organized a series of three workshops that began to identify and address the philosophical, ethical, and theological (PET) issues associated with astrobiology. The group assembled for the series included astrobiologists, theologians, ethicists, philosophers and historians. The workshops are listed below, all were held in Washington, DC.

;

2007-06-28

100

Ethical issues in relation to HIV care in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the universal applicability of generic codes of ethical and professional conduct in medical practice HIV remains a stigmatizing condition and certain aspects of care require particular consideration. Confidentiality is of particular concern for patients who may be anxious about others being made aware of an HIV diagnosis. At the same time, safe clinical care may require information to be

Jane Anderson

2009-01-01

101

Clinical ethics revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective

Peter A Singer; Edmund D Pellegrino; Mark Siegler

2001-01-01

102

The Effect of Gender on the Importance of Business Ethics and Managerial Decisions: A Student Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The study examined male and female business college students' perceptions regarding the need for a match between personal and corporate ethics, whether success in business depends on ethical behavior, and the types of ethical misconduct that warrant the most severe managerial disciplinary actions. Background: The literature contains…

Keith, Nancy K.; Perreault, Heidi R.; Chin, Mary; Keith, Megan

2009-01-01

103

Ethical Decision-Making by Educational Leaders: Its Foundations, Culture and More Recent Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The belief that educational leaders need to be ethical decision-makers is recent. Thomas and Bainbridge suggest that an educational leader needs to develop technical competency in ethical leadership. Yet few leaders in schools have been trained in conflict resolution of an ethical nature and little importance has been given to this within existing…

Robbins, Steven; Trabichet, Luc

2009-01-01

104

Ethical quandaries in gamete-embryo cryopreservation related to oncofertility.  

PubMed

While cancer rates continue to increase, therapy has dramatically decreased the mortality rates. The increased efficacy of current therapies may unfortunately have profound toxic effects on gamete function in both adolescent and reproductive age groups, with infertility as an expected consequence of cancer therapy. Significant progress in the advancement of fertility preservation therapies provides realistic options for future fertility in cancer survivors. However, a number of challenging issues need to be considered when presenting fertility preservation options. This overview highlights some of these considerations including religious-cultural-ethical values, access to care and cost of services, developmental capacity and consent, and posthumous reproduction. PMID:24088162

Ayensu-Coker, Leslie; Essig, Ellen; Breech, Lesley L; Lindheim, Steven

2013-01-01

105

The Ethics of Strategic Ambiguity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the concept of strategic ambiguity in communication, and addresses the ethics of strategic ambiguity from an intrapersonal perspective that considers the congruity of communicators' espoused-ethics, ethics-in-use, and behavior, where ethical judgements are based on the congruity between espoused-ethics and actual behavior. Poses questions…

Paul, Jim; Strbiak, Christy A.

1997-01-01

106

Islamic medical ethics: a primer.  

PubMed

Modern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic Medical Ethics literature, from that aimed at developing moral character to writings grounded in Islamic law. In the latter form, there is an attempt to derive an Islamic perspective on bioethical issues such as abortion, gender relations within the patient-doctor relationship, end-of-life care and euthanasia. It is hoped that the insights gained will aid both clinicians and ethicists to better understand the Islamic paradigm of medical ethics and thereby positively affect patient care. PMID:17845488

Padela, Aasim I

2007-03-01

107

How to Have a Successful Science and Ethics Discussion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students often come to class discussions with preformed opinions on many ethical issues. The challenging task for teachers is to help students learn to identify the facts of a case, recognize the underlying ethical dilemmas, and to understand the different perspectives involved. These objectives can be met successfully by following the three key components to effective discussions related to ethics and science that are discussed in this article: Content and lesson strategies, a decision-making model, and a familiarity with ethical perspectives (see Figure 1).

Chowning, Jeanne T.

2005-12-01

108

Ethical issues relating to renal transplantation from prediabetic living donor  

PubMed Central

Background In Mexico, diabetes mellitus is the main cause of end???stage kidney disease, and some patients may be transplant candidates. Organ supply is limited because of cultural issues. And, there is a lack of standardized clinical guidelines regarding organ donation. These issues highlight the tension surrounding the fact that living donors are being selected despite being prediabetic. This article presents, examines and discusses using the principles of non-maleficience, autonomy, justice and the constitutionally guaranteed right to health, the ethical considerations that arise from considering a prediabetic person as a potential kidney donor. Discussion Diabetes is an absolute contraindication for donating a kidney. However, the transplant protocols most frequently used in Mexico do not consider prediabetes as exclusion criteria. In prediabetic persons there are well known metabolic alterations that may compromise the long???term outcomes of the transplant if such donors are accepted. Even so, many of them are finally included because there are not enough donor candidates. Both, families and hospitals face the need to rapidly accept prediabetic donors before the clinical conditions of the recipient and the evolution of the disease exclude him/her as a transplant candidate; however, when using a kidney potentially damaged by prediabetes, neither the donor’s nor the recipient’s long term health is usually considered. Considering the ethical implication as well as the clinical and epidemiological evidence, we conclude that prediabetic persons are not suitable candidates for kidney donation. This recommendation should be taken into consideration by Mexican health institutions who should rewrite their transplant protocols. Summary We argue that the decision to use a kidney from a living donor known to be pre-diabetic or from those persons with family history of T2DM, obesity, hypertension, or renal failure, should be considered unethical in Mexico if the donor bases the decision to donate on socially acceptable norms rather than informed consent as understood in modern medicine.

2014-01-01

109

Ethical ideology and ethical judgment regarding ethical issues in business  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differences in ethical ideology are thought to influence individuals' reasoning about moral issues (Forsyth and Nye, 1990; Forsyth, 1992). To date, relatively little research has addressed this proposition in terms of business-related ethical issues. In the present study, four groups, representing four distinct ethical ideologies, were created based on the two dimensions of the Ethical Position Questionnaire (idealism and relativism),

Tim Barnett; Ken Bass; Gene Brown

1994-01-01

110

Living the categorical imperative: autistic perspectives on lying and truth telling-between Kant and care ethics.  

PubMed

Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be 'attractively morally innocent' and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to deception and truthfulness will be discussed in the light of two different ethical theories, illustrated by fragments from autobiographies of persons with autism. A systemizing 'Kantian' and an empathizing 'ethics of care' perspective reveal insights on high-functioning autism, truthfulness and moral behavior. Both perspectives are problematic from the point of view of a moral agent with autism. High-functioning persons with autism are, generally speaking, strong systemizes and weak empathizers. Particularly, they lack 'cognitive empathy' which would allow them to understand the position of the other person. Instead, some tend to invent a set of rules that makes their behavior compatible with the expectations of others. From a Kantian point of view, the autistic tendency to always tell the truth appears praiseworthy and should not be changed, though it creates problems in the social life of persons with autism. From a care ethics perspective, on the other hand, a way should be found to allow the high-functioning persons with autism to respect the feelings and needs of other persons as sometimes overruling the duty of truthfulness. We suggest this may even entail 'morally educating' children and adolescents with autism to become socially skilled empathic 'liars'. PMID:22065242

Jaarsma, Pier; Gelhaus, Petra; Welin, Stellan

2012-08-01

111

Public (relations) disturbances and civil disobedience: Why I use “The Yes Men Fix the World” to teach public relations ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This “best practices” essay suggests that instructors consider using the movie “The Yes Men Fix the World” as a tool for teaching and discussion of public relations ethics. Although this movie appears at first to skewer the public relations industry and its uses in the corporate sector, in fact the movie provides a number of opportunities for discussion of important

Jessalynn R. Strauss

112

The relationship between ethical positions and methodological approaches: a Scandinavian perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, based on reading ethnographic theses, books and articles and conversations with nine key informants, we have tried to describe how research ethics are approached and written about in educational ethnography in Scandinavia. The article confirms findings from previous research that there are different methodological forms of ethnography there. It adds that although ethical descriptions can of course

Dennis Beach; Anita Eriksson

2010-01-01

113

Ethics and the unintended consequences of social research: A perspective from the sociology of science  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is argued that “successful” social science requires the development of a social ethic or sense of research responsibility. An examination of impediments to ethical reflection in sociology suggests that an individualistic orientation is ineffective in coping with the unintended consequences of social research. Such consequences can be particularly harmful in the sociology of science where policy research and governmental

Kenneth E. Studer; Daryl E. Chubin

1977-01-01

114

The emergence of an ethical duty to disclose genetic research results: international perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last decade has witnessed the emergence of international ethics guidelines discussing the importance of disclosing global and also, in certain circumstances, individual genetic research results to participants. This discussion is all the more important considering the advent of pharmacogenomics and the increasing incidence of ‘translational’ genetic research in the post-genomic era. We surveyed both the literature and the ethical

Bartha Maria Knoppers; Yann Joly; Jacques Simard; Francine Durocher

2006-01-01

115

Addressing Religious Plurality--A Teacher Perspective on Minority Religion and Secular Ethics Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Finnish education system recognizes religious plurality by offering education in pupils' own religion or in secular ethics. However, little research has been undertaken on how plurality is addressed in classroom practice. This study investigates how 31 minority religion and secular ethics teachers view the task of supporting and including…

Zilliacus, Harriet

2013-01-01

116

Infusing Professional Ethics into Counselor Education Programs: A Multicultural/Social Justice Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multiculturalism and social justice counseling issues influence counselors' ethical thinking and behavior. Counselor educators are responsible for facilitating students' understanding of the relevance of multicultural/social justice counseling issues and ethical standards for professional practices. Added insights in these areas aid students to…

Pack-Brown, Sherlon P.; Thomas, Tequilla L.; Seymour, Jennifer M.

2008-01-01

117

Constructive Readings of Interactive Episodes: Examining Ethics in Physical Education from a Social Constructionist Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we illustrate how ways of thinking about ethics are tied up with sport and physical education practice and introduce an alternative approach that can help to develop ethical pedagogies. We begin by locating socio-moral education in physical education within historical and contemporary pedagogical scholarship. Our argument is that the…

Barker, Dean M.; Barker-Ruchti, Natalie; Puhse, Uwe

2013-01-01

118

Training and Performance Improvement Professionals' Perspectives on Ethical Challenges during Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethical concerns are rising in the business world. With this in mind, training and performance improvement practitioners, especially during evaluation projects, should be aware of principles and codes of ethics, and their behaviors and decisions should reflect the standards recognized by members of the professional society. A study was conducted…

Chyung, Seung Youn; Winiecki, Donald J.; Downing, Jessica L.

2010-01-01

119

Ethics and Community-Based Participatory Research: Perspectives From the Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exploring the importance of ethical issues in the conduct of community-based participatory research (CBPR) continues to be an important topic for researchers and practitioners. This article uses the Beyond Sabor Project, a CBPR project implemented in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, as a case example to discuss ethical issues such as the importance of increasing community involvement in research, ensuring

Elena M. Bastida; Tung-Sung Tseng; Corliss McKeever; Leonard Jack

2010-01-01

120

Germ-Line Gene Modification and Disease Prevention: Some Medical and Ethical Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been considerable debate about the ethics of human germ-line gene modification. As a result of recent advances in the micromanipulation of embryos and the laboratory development of transgenic mice, a lively discussion has begun concerning both the technical feasibility and the ethical acceptability of human germ-line modification for the prevention of serious disease. This article summarizes some of

Nelson A. Wivel; Leroy Walters

1993-01-01

121

Computer-Related Ethical Problems Are Focus of Conference on Values.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethical issues related to computer use on college campuses are of increasing concern, and some are studying them for possible solutions. Issues include copyright of instructional and other computer materials, rude and threatening messages on computer communication networks, and teacher behavior as a model for students. (MSE)

Wilson, David L.

1991-01-01

122

Ethics Updates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1994 by Professor Lawrence M. Hinman of the University of San Diego, the Ethics Updates site is designed primarily to be used to ethics instructors and their students. However, the site is rather interesting, so members of the general public may find themselves making a few return visits. Visitors can use the drop-down tabs on the top of the homepage to make their way through sections that cover some of the basic theories of ethics and also learn more about applied ethics in relation to such issues as animal rights, torture, and world hunger. Moving on, the "Resources" area includes case studies for discussion, a glossary of terms, classic texts in ethics, and ethics surveys. The site is rounded out by a search engine and a selection of videos that deal with various topics in ethics.

Hinman, Lawrence M.

123

Ethical evaluation of risks related to living donor transplantation programs.  

PubMed

The shortage of available cadaveric organs for transplantation and the growing demand has incresed live donation. To increase the number of transplantations from living donors, programs have been implemented to coordinate donations in direct or indirect form (cross-over, paired, and domino chain). Living donors with complex medical conditions are accepted by several transplantation programs. In this way, the number of transplants from living has exceeded that from cadaver donors in several European countries. No mortality has been reported in the case of lung, pancreas, or intestinal Living donations, but the perioperative complications range from 15% to 30% for pancreas and lung donors. In living kidney donors, the perioperative mortality is 3 per 10,000. Their frequency of end-stage renal disease does not exceed the United States rate for the general population. However, long-term follow-up studies of living donors for kidney transplantations have several limitations. The frequency of complications in live donor liver transplantation is 40%, of these, 48% are possibly life-threatening according to the Clavien classification. Residual disability, liver failure, or death has occurred in 1% of cases. The changes in live donor acceptance criteria raise ethical issues, in particular, the physician's role in evaluating and accepting the risks taken by the living donor. Some workers argue to set aside medical paternalism on behalf of the principle of donor autonomy. In this way the medical rule "primum non nocere" is overcome. Transplantation centers should reason beyond the shortage of organs and think in terms of the care for both donor and recipient. PMID:24034000

Panocchia, N; Bossola, M; Silvestri, P; Midolo, E; Teleman, A A; Tazza, L; Sacchini, D; Minacori, R; Di Pietro, M L; Spagnolo, A G

2013-09-01

124

Ethical issues in the regulation and development of engineering achievements in medical technology-a regulatory perspective.  

PubMed

A description is given of the ethical issues encountered by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its regulation of new life-saving devices. Issues related both to clinical investigation and to marketing approval of the devices are examined. The potential role of engineers in addressing these issues is discussed. PMID:18244066

Rahmoeller, G A

1988-01-01

125

Ethics and Community-Based Participatory Research: Perspectives From the Field  

PubMed Central

Exploring the importance of ethical issues in the conduct of community-based participatory research (CBPR) continues to be an important topic for researchers and practitioners. This article uses the Beyond Sabor Project, a CBPR project implemented in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, as a case example to discuss ethical issues such as the importance of increasing community involvement in research, ensuring that communities benefit from the research, sharing leadership roles, and sensitive issues regarding data collection and sharing. Thereafter, this article concludes with a brief discussion of six principles that can inform the practice of ethical conduct when implementing CBPR studies. This article also lists additional reading resources on the importance of ethics in the conduct of CBPR.

Bastida, Elena M.; Tseng, Tung-Sung; McKeever, Corliss; Jack, Leonard

2010-01-01

126

Information, consent and treatment of patients with morgellons disease: an ethical perspective.  

PubMed

Morgellons is a medically contested diagnosis with foremost dermatological symptoms. Patients experience fibers emerging from the skin, together with a range of other somatic, psychiatric, and neurological complaints. Within the medical community, it is generally held to be a variation of delusional parasitosis/delusional infestation, which is usually treated with antipsychotics. Little attention has been paid in the literature to the ethical aspects of treating patients with Morgellons disease. The communicative strategies suggested in the literature display significant ethical issues, primarily the use of therapeutic privilege, i.e. withholding information from the patient. Since this limits patient autonomy, that approach is ethically problematic. Instead, the physician has an ethical obligation to respect the patient's autonomy, provide full information, and seek consent before initiating a psychiatric referral. PMID:24671866

Söderfeldt, Ylva; Groß, Dominik

2014-04-01

127

Analyzing Insider Trading from the Perspectives of Utilitarian Ethics and Rights Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common view is that insider trading is always unethical and illegal. But such is not the case. Some forms of insider trading\\u000a are legal. Furthermore, applying ethical principles to insider trading causes one to conclude that it is also sometimes ethical.\\u000a This paper attempts to get past the hype, the press reports, and the political grandstanding to get to

Robert W. McGee

2010-01-01

128

Stakeholder perspectives on ethical challenges in HIV vaccine trials in South Africa.  

PubMed

There is little published literature on the ethical concerns of stakeholders in HIV vaccine trials. This study explored the ethical challenges identified by various stakeholders, through an open-ended, in-depth approach. While the few previous studies have been largely quantitative, respondents in this study had the opportunity to spontaneously identify the issues that they perceived to be of priority concern in the South African context. Stakeholders spontaneously identified the following as ethical priorities: informed consent, social harms, collaborative relationships between research stakeholders, the participation of children and adolescents, access to treatment for participants who become infected with HIV, physical harms, fair participant and community selection, confidentiality, benefits, and payment. While there is some speculation that research in developing countries poses special ethical challenges, overall no issues were identified that have not been anticipated in international guidance, literature and popular frameworks. However, the South African context affords a distinctive gloss to these expected issues; for example, respondents were concerned that the predominant selection of black participants may perpetuate racist practices of apartheid. Stakeholders should be aware of contextual factors impacting on the implementation of ethical principles. We make a series of recommendations for South African trials, including amendments to the ethical-legal framework and research policies, and, for further research. PMID:19459900

Essack, Zaynab; Koen, Jennifer; Barsdorf, Nicola; Slack, Catherine; Quayle, Michael; Milford, Cedilia; Lindegger, Graham; Ranchod, Chitra; Mukuka, Richard

2010-04-01

129

Ethics in international health research: a perspective from the developing world.  

PubMed Central

Health research plays a pivotal role in addressing inequities in health and human development, but to achieve these objectives the research must be based on sound scientific and ethical principles. Although it is accepted that ethics play a central role in health research in developing countries, much of the recent debate has focused on controversies surrounding internationally sponsored research and has taken place largely without adequate participation of the developing countries. The relationship between ethical guidelines and regulations, and indigenously sponsored and public health research has not been adequately explored. For example, while the fundamental principles of ethical health research, such as community participation, informed consent, and shared benefits and burdens, remain sacrosanct other issues, such as standards of care and prior agreements, merit greater public debate within developing countries. In particular, the relationship of existing ethical guidelines to epidemiological and public health research merits further exploration. In order to support health research in developing countries that is both relevant and meaningful, the focus must be on developing health research that promotes equity and on developing local capacity in bioethics. Only through such proactive measures can we address the emerging ethical dilemmas and challenges that globalization and the genomics revolution will bring in their wake.

Bhutta, Zulfiqar Ahmed

2002-01-01

130

Relation Between Ego Identity and Temporal Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study involved an attempt to expand Marcia’s (1975) ego identity concept to include the area of temporal perspective. Subjects were 80 Temple University male undergraduates. We measured temporal perspective with the Rappaport Time Line. We measured temporal density (percentage of experiences in each of five time zones), temporal extension (chronological time spans for the past, future, and overall), and

Herbert Rappaport; Kathy Enrich; Arnold Wilson

1985-01-01

131

Sham Surgery Trial Controls: Perspectives of Patients and Their Relatives  

PubMed Central

THIS STUDY REPORTS ON QUALITATIVE research conducted in the UK with people with Parkinson’s Disease and their relatives on the subject of “sham surgery.” It explores attitudes toward sham surgery and reasoning about hypothetical participation in a sham-controlled trial. Results showed that attitudes toward sham surgery may not necessarily predict trial participation behavior. A small majority of interviewees deemed sham surgery ethically acceptable with certain provisos, but hypothetical participation was driven primarily by disease severity and a lack of standard treatment options, with a preference for receiving the real surgery over sham. Ethical implications for patient equipoise and the autonomy of patients’ research participation decisions are discussed.

Swift, Teresa L.

2012-01-01

132

How can ethics relate to science? The case of stem cell research  

PubMed Central

We live in an era of an important turning point in the relationship between ethics (or, more accurately, bioethics) and science, notably due to both public interest and the gradual tightening of the gap in time between scientific discoveries and ethical reflection. The current bioethics debates of emerging situations (pluripotent stem cells, gene therapy, nanotechnology) have undoubtedly contributed to this change. Today, science happens and bioethics reflects on the possibilities, considers the risks, and advances proposals, which, without being scientific, can also imprint a mark on the path of scientific development. In this article, through the narrative of stem cell research, we will try to illustrate how bringing a bioethical viewpoint to the scientific debate can become a healthy exercise in both ethics and science, especially as narratives shift, as was the case in this field due to the introduction of induced pluripotent stem cells, the advent of which is not easily dissociated from the controversies related to embryo research. We should perhaps welcome this trend as promising for the future relationship between ethics and scientific research, providing a stimulus (and not a block) to the ever-evolving scientific discourse.

Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Ramalho-Santos, Joao

2013-01-01

133

Choosing embryos: ethical complexity and relational autonomy in staff accounts of PGD.  

PubMed

The technique of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is commonly explained as a way of checking the genes of embryos produced by IVF for serious genetic diseases. However, complex accounts of this technique emerged during ethics discussion groups held for PGD staff. These form part of a study exploring the social processes, meanings and institutions that frame and produce 'ethical problems' for practitioners, scientists and others working in the specialty of PGD in the UK. Two 'grey areas' raised by staff are discussed in terms of how far staff are, or in the future may be, able to support autonomous choices of women/couples: accepting 'carrier' embryos within the goal of creating a 'healthy' child; and sex selection of embryos for social reasons. These grey areas challenged the staff's resolve to offer individual informed choice, in the face of their awareness of possible collective social effects that might ensue from individual choices. We therefore argue that these new forms of choice pose a challenge to conventional models of individual autonomy used in UK genetic and reproductive counselling, and that 'relational autonomy' may be a more suitable ethical model to describe the ethical principles being drawn on by staff working in this area. PMID:18092985

Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie; Sandall, Jane; Scott, Rosamund

2007-11-01

134

Regulations and ethical considerations in animal experiments: international laws and islamic perspectives.  

PubMed

Growing usage of animals in the research projects has drawn more attention to their welfare and ethics surrounding this practice. Dissemination of information about the existing ethical consideration and alternatives in animal experiments has two important functions; first, it increases the researcher's awareness of the possible methods of using animals in the experiment, and second, to ensure that potential users are aware of the established alternatives. For example, legislations enacted in many countries during the 1980s state that laboratory animal applications should be reduced, refined and replaced wherever possible according to principles of the 3Rs. Thus, scientists around the world tried to apply the 3Rs in their biomedical researches regarding welfare of the laboratory animals. However, the Qur'an, the holy book of Muslims, and also Hadiths contain the obligatory ways to keep and treat animals since their revelations. According to Islamic viewpoint, animals represent Allah's ability and wisdom, and humans must pay attention to their health and living conditions. Several Islamic manuscripts state that animals have their own position in the creation hierarchy and humans are responsible for supplying minimal facilities and their welfare. This paper has tried to review ethical consideration in animal experiments and regarding Islamic resources in this case to encourage providing comprehensive ethical regulations in animal experiments which its establishment could be beneficial for animal ethics committees or research institutes. PMID:23407588

Naderi, Mohammad Mehdi; Sarvari, Ali; Milanifar, Alireza; Boroujeni, Sara Borjian; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

2012-07-01

135

76 FR 14777 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Labor Relations Authority  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), is adopting as final, without...also provides that the Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO) or alternate DAEO may...concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics, is adopting the interim rule...

2011-03-18

136

75 FR 79261 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Federal Labor Relations Authority  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...concurrence of the Office of Government Ethics (OGE), intends to issue an interim...supervisors and the Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO) of that disqualification...to properly implement their respective ethics programs. The FLRA, with OGE's...

2010-12-20

137

Ethical and legal framework and regulation for off-label use: European perspective  

PubMed Central

For more than 20 years the off-label use of drugs has been an essential part of the ethical and legal considerations regarding the international regulation of drug licensing. Despite a number of regulatory initiatives in the European Union, there seems to remain a largely unsatisfactory situation following a number of critical descriptions and statements from actors in the field. The present article gives an overview of the ethical and legal framework and developments in European countries and identifies existing problems and possible pathways for solutions in this important regulatory area. In addition to the presentation of the ethical and legal foundations, some attention is given to criticisms from medical practitioners to the current handling of off-label drug use. The review also focuses on the situation confronted by patients and physicians when off-label prescriptions are necessary. Through legal descriptions from a number of countries, possible solutions for future discussion of European health care policy are selected and explained.

Lenk, Christian; Duttge, Gunnar

2014-01-01

138

Community perspectives on the ethical issues surrounding adolescent HIV vaccine trials in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Summary Adolescents globally are at high risk for HIV acquisition and are the targets of HIV prevention interventions such as HIV vaccines. In order to understand stakeholders’ attitudes towards the ethical issues of adolescent involvement in HIV vaccine trials, we conducted focus group discussions with key members of a semi-urban, informal Cape Town community with high HIV prevalence in which HIV vaccine trials are taking place. Themes were identified from focus group transcripts by four researchers, and included necessity of guardian consent, age of independent consent, and confidentiality of in-trial medical results. In general, ethical adolescent HIV vaccine trials will be feasible in this community.

Jaspan, Heather B; Soka, Nosiphiwo F; Strode, Ann E; Mathews, Catherine; Mark, Daniella; Flisher, Alan J; Wood, Robin; Bekker, Linda-Gail

2008-01-01

139

Ethics in the classroom: a reflection on integrating ethical discussions in an introductory course in computer programming.  

PubMed

In this paper, we describe our recent approaches to introducing students in a beginning computer science class to the study of ethical issues related to computer science and technology. This consists of three components: lectures on ethics and technology, in-class discussion of ethical scenarios, and a reflective paper on a topic related to ethics or the impact of technology on society. We give both student reactions to these aspects, and instructor perspective on the difficulties and benefits in exposing students to these ideas. PMID:11273452

Smolarski, D C; Whitehead, T

2000-04-01

140

Linking the levels: network and relational perspectives for community psychology.  

PubMed

In this article, we assert that relationships and networks are of paramount importance for understanding and improving settings, neighborhoods, communities, and larger social systems. Despite previous acknowledgements of their relevance, relational and social network perspectives and analyses remain underrepresented in community psychological research and action. Here, we claim that network and relational perspectives can provide conceptual and empirical 'links' between levels of analysis, more fully reflecting a transactional view. We also describe some of the sophisticated methodologies that can be employed in empirical studies drawing on these perspectives. Additionally, we contend that core concepts in community psychology such as health promotion, empowerment, coalition building, and dissemination and implementation can be better understood when employing relational and network perspectives. As an introduction to this special issue of American Journal of Community Psychology, we draw out themes and key points from the articles in the issue, and offer recommendations for future advancement of these perspectives in the field. PMID:24752731

Neal, Jennifer Watling; Christens, Brian D

2014-06-01

141

Ethics and the Unintended Consequences of Social Research: A Perspective from the Sociology of Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that "successful" social science requires development of a social ethic or sense of research responsibility, and suggests that an individualistic orientation is ineffective in coping with the unintended consequences of social research. Available from: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Box 211, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, single copies…

Studer, Kenneth E.; Chubin, Daryl E.

1977-01-01

142

Reflections on "Social Justice,", "Race," "Ethnicity" and "Identity" from an Ethical Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In these reflections, I identify complexities in few constructs that are often used in educational research, although not often critically, namely, "social justice," "race," "ethnicity" and "identity." This paper suggests a non-ontological and non-epistemological approach to ethics as developed by Emmanuel Levinas as a normative means to deal with…

Atweh, Bill

2011-01-01

143

How an Exchange of Perspectives Led to Tentative Ethical Guidelines for Visual Ethnography  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Qualitative research, especially visual ethnography, is an iterative not a linear process, replete with good intentions, false starts, mistaken assumptions, miscommunication and a continually revised statement of the problem. That the camera freezes everything and everyone in the frame only complicates ethical considerations. This work, jointly…

Pope, Clive C.; De Luca, Rosemary; Tolich, Martin

2010-01-01

144

Ecological and Ethical Perspectives on Filial Responsibility: Implications for Primary Prevention with Immigrant Latino Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article considers processes from an ecological-ethical viewpoint that may help explain the high rate of school failure and dropout of immigrant Latino adolescents. Drawing from research on filial responsibility and risk and protective processes in this population, a conceptual model is presented that accounts for both negative and positive developmental outcomes. For example, it is speculated that different stressors

Gregory J. Jurkovic; Gabriel Kuperminc; Julia Perilla; Arthur Murphy; Gladys Ibañez; Sean Casey

2004-01-01

145

Dialogue and the Ethic of Responsibility: A New Perspective on Racial Harassment and Free Speech.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that resurgence of open racism has occurred at institutions of higher education in recent years. Discusses dialog as means for working toward solution to racial conflict. Suggests dialog as alternative to codes and policies to help students develop ethic of responsibility that enables them to understand and accept inherent diversities in…

Pomerantz, Norleen K.

1993-01-01

146

Ethical leadership across cultures: a comparative analysis of German and US perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines beliefs about four aspects of ethical leadership –Character/Integrity, Altruism, Collective Motivation and Encouragement– in Germany and the United States using data from Project GLOBE (Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness) and a supplemental analysis. Within the context of a push toward convergence driven by the demands of globalization and the pull toward divergence underpinned by different cultural

Gillian S. Martin; Christian J. Resick; Mary A. Keating; Marcus W. Dickson

2009-01-01

147

Pioneer or Rapist: The Ethical Implications of an Open Systems Perspective in Organizational Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is suggested that the evolution of our understanding about man and the ecological system has a significant parallel to current conceptions about organizations in their social systems. Specific arguments are made regarding managerial literature and training programs, concern for ethical behavior or social responsibility, and promising…

Dill, David D.

1977-01-01

148

Value System Changes Resulting from a Media Ethics Course: A Postmodern Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This pre- and post-test study examined value system changes resulting from a media ethics course. Over three semesters, 74 students participated in the study. They were given M. Rokeach's lists of terminal and instrumental values on the first day and again on the last day of class and asked to rank each value on the lists in terms of its…

Leslie, Larry Z.

149

Relations between Corporate Social Responsibility and Engineering Ethics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Environmental responsibility of corporations has been changed drastically in the last 20 years. In 1980s, pollution prevention was the main mandate for corporations and in 1990s global scale environmental issues such as global warming must be also considered by at least industries. In the year of 2000, United Nations decided to make a challenge towards sustainability of human activities on the Earth, and since then, every corporation must take this concept into account when policy for its own business is described. Within this framework, some companies have succeeded to be evaluated as “environmental conscious companies” and enjoyed success also in their business. The reality of sustainability is very complex and any company must consider rather long future, say more than 30 years, in the strategy of its operation. All engineers should watch the direction and the norm carefully, which their own company is now aiming at, with enough knowledge regarding the trend of total human activities in relation to the limitation of the Earth.

Yasui, Itaru

150

Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism  

PubMed Central

Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet, future research implications should include the development of a website for ongoing discussion that could contribute to a raised awareness of these concerns and potentially increase social responsibility in the medical tourism industry.

2013-01-01

151

[Ethical aspects].  

PubMed

The relation is considered between ethical choices, morals and deontology in plastic surgery of the male external genitals. Ethics dictates the behavioural model applied by an individual or group in their actions. Professional ethics--deontology--is the collection of duties governing the exercise of a certain profession. Morals are the set of rules governing an individual's life in society. Ethics, deontology and morals do not always convey the same message, since environmental, racial and religious situations, custom, and even fashion can influence a patient's demands, reflecting his desire to improve his quality of life, even only from the purely hedonistic viewpoint, and the specialist's attitude. Surgeons are increasingly tending to bend to these demands or--much worse--even encourage and foster them, with a view to financial considerations. The attitude and ethical choices available are examined in relation to surgery to lengthen or enlarge the penis. PMID:9882901

Della Morte, E; Cappellano, F; Catanzaro, F

1998-12-01

152

European perspectives on ethics and law in end-of-life care.  

PubMed

End-of-life care practices and attitudes in Europe are highly diverse, which is unsurprising given the variety of cultural and religious patterns across this region. The most marked differences are in the legal and ethical stances towards assisted dying, although there are also variations in limitation of life-sustaining treatment and the authority of advance directives to decline such treatment. Palliative care has made a rapid and impressive development in many European countries over the last decade, and alleviating symptoms at the end of life is permitted, even if the drugs used might (in the rare case) not only relieve suffering but also shorten life. Fueled by the politically led process of European harmonization, future policies and laws on end-of-life care might converge. However, at the base of many ethical conflicts there remain deeply rooted differences about promoting the sanctity of life, eradicating suffering, and respecting patients' autonomous wishes. PMID:24182375

Jox, Ralf J; Horn, Ruth J; Huxtable, Richard

2013-01-01

153

One health: perspectives on ethical issues and evidence from animal experiments.  

PubMed

Zoonoses constitute more than 60% of all known infectious diseases and 75% of emerging infectious diseases. Their impact is not monitored, prevented and treated in an integrated way. The efficacy of therapeutic interventions for zoonotic diseases is deemed to be comparable across species with scientifically valid results originating from a range of animal experiments. Ethical obligations limit the number of animals used in experiments as well as reduce repetition of studies. The evidence based on randomized controlled trails and systematic reviews for the effectiveness of health care interventions is often inconclusive. Subjecting human volunteers to risk in the absence of scientifically valid results from animal experiments is unethical. The One Health concept is a comparative, clinical approach directed towards zoonoses which present challenges to research workers and clinicians. Optimal health for all--One Health--should be underpinned by ethically conducted research in animals or humans and the results should be complementary to both. PMID:23301381

Asokan, G V; Fedorowicz, Z; Tharyan, P; Vanitha, A

2012-11-01

154

Ethical issues in clinical neuroscience research: A patient’s perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A patient-centered paradigm for clinical research and medical care is presented as a solution to the problem of declining\\u000a innovation and increasing costs and development time in the pipeline for new therapies. Fundamental differences in values\\u000a and motivations among scientists, clinicians, industry sponsor, and patients in neurotherapeutics provide a framework for\\u000a analysis of ethical conflicts and the loss of public

Perry D. Cohen; Linda Herman; Sheryl Jedlinski; Peggy Willocks; Paula Wittekind

2007-01-01

155

Ethics CORE  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ethics CORE Digital Library, funded by the National Science Foundation, "brings together information on best practices in research, ethics instruction and responding to ethical problems that arise in research and professional life." It's a remarkable site where visitors can make their way through ethics resources for dozens of different professions and activities. The Resources by Discipline area is a great place to start. Here you will find materials related to the biological sciences, business, computer & information science, along with 14 additional disciplines. The Current News area is a great place to learn about the latest updates from the field. Of note, these pieces can easily be used in the classroom or shared with colleagues. The dynamism of the site can be found at the Interact with Ethics CORE area. Active learning exercises can be found here, along with instructional materials and visitors' own lessons learned.

156

Psychiatry and political-institutional abuse from the historical perspective: the ethical lessons of the Nuremberg Trial on their 60th anniversary.  

PubMed

Sixty years ago at the Nuremberg Trials, 23 Nazi leaders were tried as war criminals, in what was known as "The Doctors' Trial". This trial exposed a perverse system of the criminal use of medicine in the fields of public health and human research. These practices, in which racial hygiene constituted one of the fundamental principles and euthanasia programmes were the most obvious consequence, violated the majority of known bioethical principles. Psychiatry played a central role in these programmes, and the mentally ill were the principal victims. The aim of the present work is to review, from the historical perspective, the antecedents of the shameful euthanasia programmes for the mentally ill, the procedures involved in their implementation and the use of mentally ill people as research material. The Nuremberg Code, a direct consequence of the Doctors' Trial, is considered to be the first international code of ethics for research with human beings, and represented an attempt to prevent any repeat of the tragedy that occurred under Nazism. Nevertheless, the last 60 years have seen continued government-endorsed psychiatric abuse and illegitimate use of psychoactive drugs in countries such as the Soviet Union or China, and even in some with a long democratic tradition, such as the United States. Even today, the improper use of psychiatry on behalf of governments is seen to be occurring in numerous parts of the globe: religious repression in China, enforced hospitalization in Russia, administration of psychoactive drugs in immigrant detention centres in Australia, and the application of the death penalty by lethal injection and psychiatric participation in coercive interrogation at military prisons, in relation to the USA. The Declaration of Madrid in 1996 constituted the most recent attempt to eradicate, from the ethical point of view, these horrendous practices. Various strategies can be used to combat such abuses, though it is uncertain how effective they are in preventing them. PMID:17223241

López-Muñoz, Francisco; Alamo, Cecilio; Dudley, Michael; Rubio, Gabriel; García-García, Pilar; Molina, Juan D; Okasha, Ahmed

2007-05-01

157

[Between autonomy and coercion: compulsory treatment in psychiatry from an ethical perspective].  

PubMed

The actual decision of the German Supreme Court fueled the old debate of the moral and legal status of compulsory treatment in psychiatry in Germany. This article sheds a light on the background of this debate and reflects on possible justifications for involuntary treatment of mentally ill patients. Furthermore it will examine the significance of psychiatric patients' advance directives and joint crisis plans in the context of medical compulsory treatment and will offer recommendations on an ethical responsible way of dealing with compulsory treatment in German psychiatric practice. PMID:24983578

Simon, Alfred

2014-07-01

158

Joining political and geographic perspectives: Geopolitics and international relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the multidisciplinary study of international relations geographical\\/geopolitical considerations are essential, and must explicitly be brought back into the concepts and theory undergirding international relations research. Based on work of (approximately) the last decade, geographical\\/geopolitical perspectives, stressing the various dimensions of spatiality, are shown to be vital components of the “contexts” within which international relations and foreign policy operate. It

Harvey Starr

1991-01-01

159

Ethics and safety in home care: perspectives on home support workers.  

PubMed

Home support workers (HSWs) encounter unique safety issues in their provision of home care. These issues raise ethical concerns, affecting the care workers provide to seniors and other recipients. This paper is derived from a subproject of a larger Canada-wide study, Safety at Home: A Pan-Canadian Home Care Safety Study, released in June 2013 by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute. Semi-structured, face-to-face, audiotaped interviews were conducted with providers, clients and informal caregivers in British Columbia, Manitoba and New Brunswick to better understand their perceptions of patient safety in home care. Using the BC data only, we then compared our findings to findings of other BC studies focusing on safety in home care that were conducted over the past decade. Through our interviews and comparative analyses it became clear that HSWs experienced significant inequities in providing home care. Utilizing a model depicting concerns of and for HSWs developed by Craven and colleagues (2012), we were able to illustrate the physical, spatial, interpersonal and temporal concerns set in the context of system design that emphasized the ethical dilemmas of HSWs in home care. Our data suggested the necessity of adding a fifth domain, organizational (system design). In this paper, we issue a call for stronger advocacy for home care and improved collaboration and resource equity between institutional care and community care. PMID:24809426

Storch, Janet; Curry, Cherie Geering; Stevenson, Lynn; Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella

2014-03-01

160

Repositioning Ethical Commitments: Participatory Action Research as a Relational Praxis of Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of participatory action research (PAR) reflects an ethical commitment to creating conditions for social change to be used by the community for their own purposes. But what are the ethical issues and responsibilities involved in participatory research? And how do these differ from the ethical guidelines mandated by our Institutional Review Boards (IRB)? Here I illustrate how participatory

Caitlin Cahill

2007-01-01

161

A Pragmatic Approach to Applied Ethics in Sport and Related Physical Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Arguing that there is still no single, noncontroversial foundation on which the world's present multi-structure of ethics can be built, this paper examines a scientific ethics approach. It is postulated that in North American culture, the approach to instruction in ethics for youth is haphazard at best. Society does not provide an adequate means…

Zeigler, Earle F.

162

Money ethic, moral conduct and work related attitudes : Field study from the public sector in Swaziland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This study aims to investigate perception of ethical and moral conduct in the public sector in Swaziland, specifically, the relationship among: money ethic, attitude towards business ethics, corruption perception, turnover intention, job performance, job satisfaction, and the demographic profile of respondents. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study was a survey using self-administered questionnaires. Using stratified sampling technique in selected organisations,

Gbolahan Gbadamosi; Patricia Joubert

2005-01-01

163

How Do We Communicate Environmental Ethics? Reflections on Environmental Education from a Kuwaiti Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper arises from a PhD research project originally designed to search for innovative ways to stimulate environmental education (EE) in Kuwaiti middle schools. The research has shown that Islam shares similar fundamental principles to those underpinning "ecocentric" perspectives emerging in the West and increasingly thought necessary for…

al-Naki, Khadija

2004-01-01

164

Mahayana Buddhism and Environmental Ethics: From the Perspective of the Consciousness-Only Doctrine  

Microsoft Academic Search

I N this article, I describe Buddhist views of nature and environment, and the contribution of the Consciousness-Only doctrine of Buddhist psychology to solving environmental problems. In particular, I empha- size an important role of the alaya consciousness in the deeper layer of our minds from the perspective of the Consciousness-Only doctrine. The alaya consciousness is the root entity that

Shuichi Yamamoto

165

An Ethics Primer: Sample Ethical Dilemmas and "The Lifeboat"  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a PDF that provides teachers with an outline of "The Lifeboat," a classical ethics dilemma. The resource includes student handouts and a group discussion activity. Also included are four other classical ethical dilemmas for students to discuss before and after learning about the classic ethical perspectives.

2008-01-01

166

Business & Society\\/Business Ethics CoursesTwenty Years at the Crossroads  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article uses a historical perspective for reviewing the evolution of Business & Society\\/Business Ethics courses at business schools and programs in the United States. The study carefully reviews the findings of 11 major studies relating to the role and number of Business & Society\\/Business Ethics courses in business school\\/program curricula. Included in these 11 studies are the results of

Denis Collins; Steven L. Wartick

1995-01-01

167

Critical reflections on evidence, ethics and effectiveness in the management of tuberculosis: public health and global perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Recent scholarly attention to public health ethics provides an opportunity to analyze several ethical issues raised by the global tuberculosis pandemic. DISCUSSION: Recently articulated frameworks for public health ethics emphasize the importance of effectiveness in the justification of public health action. This paper critically reviews the relationship between these

Geetika Verma; Ross EG Upshur; Elizabeth Rea; Solomon R Benatar

2004-01-01

168

Teaching Ethics: Telling Stories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to develop moral literacy, nursing students should be exposed to both rules- and justice-based ethics and to a feminist care perspective. They can learn to analyze and understand ethical dilemmas and to tell their own stories in order to identify the influences on their decision making. (SK)

Bowman, Ann

1995-01-01

169

Principles of Biomedical Ethics  

PubMed Central

In this presentation, I will discuss the principles of biomedical and Islamic medical ethics and an interfaith perspective on end-of-life issues. I will also discuss three cases to exemplify some of the conflicts in ethical decision-making.

Athar, Shahid

2012-01-01

170

Understanding metaphor: A relational frame perspective  

PubMed Central

The current article presents a basic functional-analytic interpretation of metaphor. This work involves an extension of Skinner's (1957) interpretation of metaphor using relational frame theory (RFT). A basic RFT interpretation of a particular metaphor is outlined, according to which the metaphor acquires its psychological effects when formal stimulus dimensions are contacted via the derivation of arbitrary stimulus relations. This interpretation sees the metaphor as involving four elements: (a) establishing two separate equivalence relations, (b) deriving an equivalence relation between these relations, (c) discriminating a formal relation via this equivalence-equivalence relation, and (d) a transformation of functions on the basis of the formal relation discriminated in the third element. In the second half of the paper, a number of important issues with regard to the RFT interpretation of metaphor are addressed.

Stewart, Ian; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

2001-01-01

171

Tracing the textures of an ethical relation to the dead: trauma, witnessing, and the "Montreal massacre".  

PubMed

This essay offers a consideration of English-language feminist memorial discourse as this has been sedimenting in Canada since the 1989 murder of 14 women at Ecole Polytechnique. The author suggests that remembrance now, almost a decade after the murders, exceeds the terms offered by a politic in which the living and the dead are connected through feminist alignment ["it could have been me"]. In its place, the author argues that there is a binding relation to the dead that is forged through understanding the murders as an event of historical trauma and rupture. She then contemplates and explores the implications of this rethinking of an ethics of relation through a situated analysis of annual memorial vigils. PMID:10538152

Rosenberg, S

1998-01-01

172

Ethics and policy perspectives on personalized medicine in the post-genomic era.  

PubMed

The completion of the human genome project and the accompanying biotechnological revolution hold great promise for the creation of pharmaceutical agents to combat not only previously incurable diseases, but also those for which therapeutics exist, yet they either cause severe adverse effects or exhibit no benefit in subsets of the population. In many instances variation in therapy response can be attributed to genetic differences, more particularly single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs). Detection of the genetic differences which affect drug response, commonly referred to as pharmacogenomics, may result in further classification of diseases, and consequently, the development of 'personalized' therapies. While of potential great benefit, the widespread use of pharmacogenomic data poses social, ethical, and economic risks that need to be addressed by regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This paper explores some of the common problems associated with the use of pharmacogenomic data including validation of the data, patient confidentiality, social stratification, economic risks faced by pharmaceutical and insurance companies, and offers suggestions for regulatory procedures to ensure the appropriate use of the data in drug development and clinical trials. PMID:16459425

Landon, Melissa R

2005-01-01

173

Ethical and practical issues regarding research in children: The European perspective  

SciTech Connect

Children, like all humans, are exposed to compounds in the environment and sometimes to drugs. The effect of this exposure cannot simply be deducted from studies in adults or animals. Effects might be different and even more dramatic than in adults due to the stage of growth and development of the infant. Around 80% of drugs used in young individuals are not licensed for use in this age group. Almost three new chemical compounds enter the environment each day. Toxicological studies in infants and children therefore are needed and ethically acceptable. However, appropriate safeguards must be taken into account. According to the Good Clinical Practice Directive of the European Parliament (2001/20) not only therapeutic, but also non-therapeutic research in infants and children is allowed, provided the study can only be conducted in children, and the results of the study in children will be of benefit to the group represented and no more than minimal harm and risk is inflicted to the children. Many more toxicological studies are needed in children and infants. Not conducting these studies is detrimental for this age group.

Sauer, P.J.J. [Department of Pediatrics, Beatrix Children's Hospital, Groningen University Medical Centre, PO Box 90.001, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: p.j.j.sauer@bkk.umcg.nl

2005-09-01

174

Are You Ethical? Please Tick Yes ? Or No ? On Researching Ethics in Business Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to explore the empirical agenda of business ethics research from a methodological perspective. It is argued that the quality of empirical research in the field remains relatively poor and unconvincing. Drawing on the distinctions between the two main philosophical positions from which methodologies in the social sciences are derived – positivism and interpretism – it is argued

Andrew Crane

1999-01-01

175

Ethics and Nanotechnology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from the Understanding Nano website introduces concepts of nanotechnology-related ethics. In addition to the reading materials, the page provides a list of websites and organizations that focus on ethics and nanotechnology.

2013-07-01

176

US perspective on gluten-related diseases  

PubMed Central

The incidence of allergy and autoimmune disease in the US and other industrialized nations is increasing, and gluten-related disorders are no exception. The US has documented a profound rise in celiac disease that cannot be fully explained by improved serological techniques or better recognition by physicians. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity, a condition only recently recognized by the medical community, has become a commonly diagnosed entity. Proteins, including gluten are increasingly being identified as a source of wheat allergy. Although the gluten free diet represents a safe and effective treatment for these conditions, there is still much to be learned about the development of gluten-related disorders and the apparent increase in incidence within the US. In this article, we present a review of current knowledge on the epidemiology of gluten-related disorders within a global context, with a focus on diagnostic trends and the evaluation of potential risk factors.

Leonard, Maureen M; Vasagar, Brintha

2014-01-01

177

Breadth of Perspective--An Important Concept for Public Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Breadth of perspective" is a significant concept for definition of public goals, especially in line with the two-way symmetric model of public relations practice. The concept involves four components: (1) awareness that more than one definition, stand, or conclusion is possible and is probably accepted as valid by significant persons or groups;…

Culbertson, Hugh M.

178

Assessing Perspective Taking in Schizophrenia Using Relational Frame Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study assessed deictic relational responding in people with schizophrenia. A perspective-taking task and a mental states attribution task were employed with a sample of 15 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 15 age-matched controls. Results revealed poorer performance of participants with schizophrenia in responding in accordance…

Villatte, Matthieu; Monestes, Jean-Louis; McHugh, Louise; Freixa i Baque, Esteve; Loas, Gwenole

2010-01-01

179

International Relations. International Perspectives on Higher Education Research. Volume 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the third volume of International Perspectives on Higher Education Research, a series which aims to feature something of the variety of research being undertaken into higher education systems and issues outside of North America. The theme of this volume is International Relations, or how students, academics, universities and higher…

Tight, Malcolm, Ed.

2005-01-01

180

A RELATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON WOMEN AND POWER  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article focuses on the fact that women and men have equal but different needs for power. Integrating a psychoanalytic relational approach with feminist theory and social psychology, the author explains gender differences and societal influences on the pursuit of power. Social psychology research indicates that women are more likely to pursue power in ways that help others, whereas men

Karen J. Maroda

2004-01-01

181

Toward a relational perspective of franchising chains  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many professional and services industries, firms try to scale up their operations by reproducing practices in new locations\\u000a through franchising arrangements, especially business format franchising. The classic but still prevailing explanations for\\u000a franchising related phenomena, especially the initiative of franchising, the propensity to franchise, and the franchise performance,\\u000a are mostly based on two orders of reasons (or a combination

Luis M. De Castro; João Mota; Sandra Marnoto

2009-01-01

182

"Someone should oversee it": Patient perspectives on the ethical issues arising with the regulation of probiotics  

PubMed Central

Background Though many probiotic products are currently available in yogurt or pill form in the United States (US), there is uncertainty surrounding the structure of regulation of these products. As more therapeutic probiotics are developed changes to existing regulatory process in the US may be required to meet the needs of patients and users in the population. Objective This study examined how patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases view the regulation of probiotics. Design We conducted a multi-site qualitative study consisting of focus groups of patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases at three tertiary hospitals: at [institutions removed for blinded review]. Results We conducted 22 focus groups with 136 patients with major gastrointestinal (GI) diseases between March and August 2009. Participants were not familiar with of existing regulation of probiotic products but wanted assurances of accurate labeling of strain as well as safety. Participants raised concerns that regulation of probiotics might be accompanied by greater costs, reduced access, and increased involvement of pharmaceutical companies. Although participants voiced significant doubt of government regulators, they felt that products containing genetically modified probiotic strains should have oversight comparable to that of pharmaceutical drugs. Discussion and conclusion If GI patient perspectives are indicative of public perceptions of therapeutic probiotics in the US, consumers may expect more rigorous regulation in the future while simultaneously wanting low costs, easy access, and low involvement of pharmaceutical companies. Manufacturers, translational scientists, clinicians, and regulators should be sensitive to consumer attitudes when designing, testing, and regulating new therapeutic probiotics.

Harrison, Krista L.; Farrell, Ruth M.; Brinich, Margaret A.; Highland, Janelle; Mercer, MaryBeth; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Tilburt, Jon; Geller, Gail; Marshall, Patricia; Sharp, Richard R.

2014-01-01

183

'Someone should oversee it': patient perspectives on the ethical issues arising with the regulation of probiotics.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Although many probiotic products are currently available in yogurt or pill form in the United States (US), there is uncertainty surrounding the structure of regulation of these products. As more therapeutic probiotics are developed, changes to existing regulatory process in the United States may be required to meet the needs of patients and users in the population. OBJECTIVE: This study examined how patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases view the regulation of probiotics. DESIGN: We conducted a multi-site qualitative study consisting of focus groups of patients with chronic gastrointestinal diseases at three tertiary hospitals: at [institutions removed for blinded review]. RESULTS: We conducted 22 focus groups with 136 patients with major gastrointestinal (GI) diseases between March and August 2009. Participants were not familiar with the existing regulation of probiotic products but wanted assurances of accurate labelling of strain as well as safety. Participants raised concerns that regulation of probiotics might be accompanied by greater costs, reduced access and increased involvement of pharmaceutical companies. Although participants voiced significant doubt of government regulators, they felt that products containing genetically modified probiotic strains should have oversight comparable to that of pharmaceutical drugs. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: If GI patient perspectives are indicative of public perceptions of therapeutic probiotics in the United States, consumers may expect more rigorous regulation in the future while simultaneously wanting low costs, easy access and low involvement of pharmaceutical companies. Manufacturers, translational scientists, clinicians and regulators should be sensitive to consumer attitudes when designing, testing and regulating new therapeutic probiotics. PMID:23279082

Harrison, Krista L; Farrell, Ruth M; Brinich, Margaret A; Highland, Janelle; Mercer, Marybeth; McCormick, Jennifer B; Tilburt, Jon; Geller, Gail; Marshall, Patricia; Sharp, Richard R

2012-12-28

184

HIV-related neuropathy: current perspectives  

PubMed Central

Distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most common neurologic complications of HIV, possibly affecting as many as 50% of all individuals infected with HIV. Two potentially neurotoxic mechanisms have been proposed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV DSP: neurotoxicity resulting from the virus and its products; as well as adverse neurotoxic effects of medications used in the treatment of HIV. Clinically, HIV DSP is characterized by a combination of signs and symptoms that include decreased deep tendon reflexes at the ankles and decreased sensation in the distal extremities as well as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and pain in a symmetric stocking–glove distribution. These symptoms are generally static or slowly progressive over time, and depending on the severity, may interfere significantly with the patient’s daily activities. In addition to the clinical picture, nerve conduction studies and skin biopsies are often pursued to support the diagnosis of HIV DSP. Anticonvulsants, antidepressants, topical agents, and nonspecific analgesics may help relieve neuropathic pain. Specifically, gabapentin, lamotrigine, pregabalin, amitriptyline, duloxetine, and high-dose topical capsaicin patches have been used in research and clinical practice. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of HIV DSP, thus facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and management of DSP in the setting of HIV.

Schutz, Sonja G; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

2013-01-01

185

The ethical and legal aspects of palliative sedation in severely brain-injured patients: a French perspective.  

PubMed

To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients are left to the physicians. Treatment-limitation decisions are made collegially, based on the presence of irreversible brain lesions responsible for chronic severe disorders of consciousness. Before these decisions are implemented, they are communicated to the relatives. Because the presence and severity of pain cannot be assessed in these patients, palliative analgesia and/or sedation should be administered. However, palliative sedation is a complex strategy that requires safeguards to prevent a drift toward hastening death or performing covert euthanasia. In addition to the law on patients' rights at the end of life passed in France on April 22, 2005, a recent revision of Article 37 of the French code of medical ethics both acknowledges that treatment-limitation decisions and palliative sedation may be required in patients with severe brain injuries and provides legal and ethical safeguards against a shift towards euthanasia. This legislation may hold value as a model for other countries where euthanasia is illegal and for countries such as Belgium and Netherlands where euthanasia is legal but not allowed in patients incapable of asking for euthanasia but in whom a treatment limitation decision has been made. PMID:21303504

Baumann, Antoine; Claudot, Frédérique; Audibert, Gérard; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Puybasset, Louis

2011-01-01

186

Ethics across the Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All colleges teach ethics across their undergraduate curricula, yet relatively few institutions do so deliberately. That is, few colleges make explicit attempts to coordinate or integrate the various ethical lessons their students might be learning. This does not mean that most colleges are bad for students' ethical development; research shows…

Matchett, Nancy J.

2008-01-01

187

The ethics of advertising, billing, and finances in psychotherapy.  

PubMed

Psychotherapists must deal with practical business matters such as advertising, billing, collecting fees, and other practice management topics. We review the enforceable standards of the American Psychological Association's (2002) Ethics Code that deal with advertising, fees, billing, and related business matters in psychotherapy. Using a principle-based perspective, we link each of the standards to overarching ethical values and illustrate the concerns with case vignettes. We argue that understanding the moral foundations of ethical standards helps psychotherapists to implement with greater integrity the spirit and the letter of the standards with regard to advertising and business practices. PMID:18386792

Knapp, Samuel; Vandecreek, Leon

2008-05-01

188

The caregivers' possibilities of providing ethically good care for older people - a study on caregivers' ethical approach.  

PubMed

In the care of older people, unexpected and unpredictable situations often occur, which sometimes involve challenging ethical decision-making. This study starts off from an ethical perspective with caritative caring as the theoretical framework. The aim of this descriptive study is to describe what possibilities care givers regard themselves to have to provide good care based on ethical values in the daily care of older persons. A total of 105 (95%) care givers answered the questionnaire. The study was conducted in a municipality in the Western part of Finland during the spring of 2007. The result shows that good care based on ethical values cannot always be guaranteed in the care of older person. There are possibilities to provide the older person with individual, dignified and safe care, and to establish a caring communion and closeness in care, but without positioning these results in relation to an ethical discussion, we cannot state that the care is good enough. PMID:23621476

Frilund, Marianne; Eriksson, Katie; Fagerström, Lisbeth

2014-06-01

189

Legal and Ethical Aspects of Informed Consent: A Nursing Research Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues related to the doctrine of informed consent for research on human subjects are discussed as they concern the conduct of nursing research. They include the subject's capacity to consent, disclosure of information, and freedom to decide. (MSE)

Cassidy, Virginia R.; Oddi, Lorys F.

1986-01-01

190

Psychoanalysis and the mind-body relation: Psychosomatic perspectives.  

PubMed

Psychosomatic medicine has been historically an important focus for psychoanalytic theorizing. The mind-body relation has special relevance for understanding psychosomatic conditions because psychological and psychodynamic factors are so intimately intertwined with physiological parameters that they cannot for all practical purposes be disentangled. Dualistic impressions of mind and body have given way to more integrated perspectives in which psychic and bodily processes are conceived of as operating within the same conceptual framework. Implications of a more integrated view of the mind-body relation are discussed in relation to emotions and psychosomatic symptoms, development of psychosomatic vulnerabilities, somatization, and alexithymia. PMID:17166087

Meissner, W W

2006-01-01

191

Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: Historical, Ethical, and Legal Issues Associated With Prescribing  

PubMed Central

The long-term effects of many drugs are unknown. Established risks are communicated to patients who participate in clinical trials during the informed consent process. However, unknown and unanticipated side effects of medications may occur years after treatment. Patients with metastatic bone cancer experience an imbalance between tumor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment. Increased cytokine release, osteoclastic activity, and uncoupled osteoblastic activity lead to weakened bone structure and osteolytic lesions. The bisphosphonates are a class of drugs available in IV and oral formulations to treat and prevent bone loss and decrease the risk of skeletal-related events. Intravenous bisphosphonates such as zoledronic acid and pamidronate disodium are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of bone pain and hypercalcemia of malignancy and the prevention of painful bone fractures in patients with metastatic bone cancer. Oral bisphosphonates such as alendronate, risedronate, and etidronate are used to reduce the risk of skeletal fractures in patients with osteoporosis and in breast cancer. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a rare but painful complication of treatment characterized by infection, exposed bone, and poor wound healing. In this article, we discuss BRONJ and identify past, present, and future ethical and legal issues surrounding bisphosphonate administration.

Faiman, Beth; Pillai, Aiswarya Lekshmi Pillai Chandran; Benghiac, Ana Gabriela

2013-01-01

192

Ethical consumerism: a view from Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

AbstractBusiness ethics and corporate social responsibility have gained more attention in recent years. However, the consumers’ perspective on ethics is still a little researched area. This study reports a survey (n?=?713) on the views of Finnish consumers about ethics in trade. Consumers’ willingness to promote business ethics as well as the obstacles to ethical consumption are investigated. The results of

Outi Uusitalo; Reetta Oksanen

2004-01-01

193

An Ethics Primer: Ethical Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a PDF that provides a short introduction to ethical questions and strategies having to do with Ethics instruction. The PDF describes an overview of ethical questions and develops student understanding of ethical questions through three different worksheets.

2008-01-01

194

Leader empathy, ethical leadership, and relations-oriented behaviors as antecedents of leader-member exchange quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Leader empathy, ethical values, and relations-oriented behavior all appear to be relevant for effective leadership, but nobody has examined how all three variables are jointly related to leader-member exchange quality (LMX). The purpose of this study is to examine these relationships and test a proposed model describing them. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data were collected with a questionnaire from subordinates

Rubina Mahsud; Gary Yukl; Greg Prussia

2010-01-01

195

Human Resource Development (HRD) Evaluation and Principles Related to the Public Interest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the issues involved in the use of ethical standards related to social responsibility using the two ethical codes: the American Evaluation Association "Guiding Principles for Evaluators" and the Academy of Human Resource Development "Standards on Ethics and Integrity." This examination will take the perspective of an internal…

Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

2009-01-01

196

Correlates of the ethics of personal conscience and the ethics of social responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tested the hypothesis that conformity and endorsement of the protestant ethic are positively related to the ethics of social responsibility, as opposed to the ethics of personal conscience. 44 male undergraduates completed macdonald's conformity scale, macdonald's poverty scale, the protestant ethic scale, and the survey of ethical values. Conformity, endorsement of the protestant ethic, and negative attitudes toward the poor

A. P. MacDonald

1971-01-01

197

Environmental Ethics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Ron Epstein of San Francisco State University has compiled this comprehensive online source of information on environmental ethics. The site is simply presented, consisting of a straightforward menu of topics that link mostly to related external Web pages. Topics covered include environmental effects of war, genetic engineering, cloning, indigenous peoples, and much more. While some of the provided links appear to be duds, anyone interested in exploring the field of environmental ethics should find this convenient and well-organized collection of links useful.

2008-06-11

198

Ethnicity/race, ethics, and epidemiology.  

PubMed Central

Ethnicity/race is a much-studied variable in epidemiology. There has been little consensus about what self-reported ethnicity/race represents, but it is a measure of some combination of genetic, socioeconomic, and cultural factors. The present article will attempt to: 1.) Elucidate the limitations of contemporary discourse on ethnicity/race that emphasizes the genetic and socioeconomic dimensions as competing explanatory frameworks; 2.) Demonstrate how considerable attention to the cultural dimension facilitates understanding of race differences in health-related outcomes; and 3.) Discuss interpretations of disparities in health status of African Americans versus European Americans from an ethical perspective. A major challenge to the discourse on ethnicity/race and health being limited to socioeconomic and genetic considerations is the lack of attention to the third alternative of a cultural perspective. The combined cultural ideologies of individualism and racism undermine the utility of epidemiologic research in health promotion and disease prevention campaigns aimed at reducing the racial gaps in health status. An ethical analysis supplements the cultural perspective. Ethics converge with culture on the notion of values influencing the study of ethnicity/race in epidemiology. A cultural approach to the use of ethnicity/race in epidemiologic research addresses methodological limitations, public health traditions, and ethical imperatives.

Whaley, Arthur L.

2003-01-01

199

Dancing through Cape Coast: ethical and practical considerations for health-related service-learning programs.  

PubMed

Short-term service-learning programs that focus on global health are expanding rapidly, spurred by students' desire to be of service in a world that has been made to seem small by new technology and universities' willingness to embrace the goal of educating global citizens. In this commentary, the author uses experiences from a recent trip she led to Ghana as a backdrop against which to explore some of the ethical and practical issues that arise when U.S. students work in health-related programs in developing countries. At minimum, the author argues, these programs should lead students to consider issues such as which basic services people are entitled to, regardless of where and in what circumstances they live, and how differences in access to social and economic resources contribute to health disparities on a global scale. She also suggests that sponsoring institutions should consider what is owed to the countries and communities in which their students learn. Finally, she underscores the circumstances under which service-learning programs can truly benefit the cause of global health. PMID:23887005

Saffran, Lise

2013-09-01

200

A clinical perspective on ethical arguments around prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for later onset inherited cancer predispositions.  

PubMed

Prenatal diagnosis (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for later onset and/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer predispositions, e.g. familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, raise a number of ethical issues. Some of these are the same as for conditions which present early in childhood, are fully penetrant and for which no/limited treatment options are possible; others relate to whether reduced penetrance and/or the availability of treatment mean that these are not serious (enough) conditions to warrant tests prior to/during pregnancy or to justify termination of pregnancy. However, attempts to reach a consensus on what counts as a serious (enough) condition in the context of PND and PGD have been unsuccessful. Such a definition may anyway be unhelpful if it cannot also take into account, for example, the woman's/couple's awareness and experience of the condition and the impact of the condition on affected individuals and their families. Individuals affected by, or at high risk of, later onset and/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer predispositions are generally supportive of access to PND and PGD for their own conditions, even if they would not consider using it themselves. Professionals working in clinical cancer genetics need to be prepared to discuss PND and PGD with this group of patients. PMID:19644768

Clancy, Tara

2010-03-01

201

Ethical considerations related to the use of mechanical support in congenital heart disease.  

PubMed

Heart failure frequently complicates congenital heart disease (CHD) in children and adults. In patients with end-stage disease, mechanical circulatory support may improve survival, quality of life, and serve as bridge to cardiac transplantation. There are many ethical issues surrounding the use of mechanical circulatory support in patients with CHD including the use of prospective and randomized trials, proper oversight of new therapies, and transparency in reporting. Additionally, there are ethical considerations relevant to the greater society as these therapies are highly resource intensive in a resource-limited society. This article will review the burden of disease of heart failure in patients with CHD, the challenges of mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation, and the ethical considerations and problems that arise for this population. PMID:23799758

Rossano, Joseph W; Kaufman, Beth D; Rame, J Eduardo

2013-01-01

202

ALS: AN ETHICAL PERSPECTIVE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, is a relentlessly progressive, fatal and presently incurable motor neuron disorder caused by degeneration of both upper and lower neurons that control voluntary skeletal muscle. ALS variants include a progressive lower motor neuron disorder, Progressive Muscular Atrophy (PMA); a progressive upper motor neuron disorder, Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS); and a progressive disorder

Leo McCluskey

203

Ethically sound technology? Guidelines for interactive ethical assessment of personal health monitoring.  

PubMed

Novel care-technologies possess a transformational potential. Future care and support may be provided via monitoring technologies such as smart devices, sensors, actors (robots) and Information and Communication Technologies. Such technologies enable care provision outside traditional care institutions, for instance in the homes of patients. Health monitoring may become "personalized" i.e. tailored to the needs of individual care recipients' but may also alter relations between care providers and care recipents, shape and form the care environment and influence values central to health-care. Starting out from a social constructivist theory of technology, an interactive ethical assessment-model is offered. The suggested model supplements a traditional analysis based on normative ethical theory (top-down approach) with interviews including relevant stakeholders (a bottom-up approach). This method has been piloted by small-scale interviews encircling stakeholder perspectives on three emerging technologies: (1) Careousel, a smart medicine-management device, (2) Robot Giraff, an interactive and mobile communication-device and (3) I-Care, a care-software that combines alarm and register system. By incorporating stakeholder perspectives into the analysis, the interactive ethical assessment model provides a richer understanding of the impact of PHM-technologies on ethical values than a traditional top-down model. If the assessment is conducted before the technology has reached the market - preferably in close interaction with developers and users - ethically sound technologies may be obtained. PMID:23920461

Palm, Elin; Nordgren, Anders; Verweij, Marcel; Collste, Göran

2013-01-01

204

Problems Related to Computer Ethics: Origins of the Problems and Suggested Solutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasing use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) help individuals to solve several everyday problems, which used to be harder, more complicated and time consuming. Even though ICTs provide individuals with many advantages, they might also serve as grounds for several societal and ethical problems which vary in accordance with…

Kuzu, Abdullah

2009-01-01

205

Ethical Issues Relative to Autonomy and Personal Control in Independent and Cognitively Impaired Elders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ethical issues surrounding health care for independent elders, those in long-term care, and those with cognitive impairments, as well as death, dying, euthanasia, and assisted suicide. Suggests that nurses should focus on older adults' choice, autonomy, and personal control. (SK)

Rice, Virginia Hill; And Others

1997-01-01

206

Ethical issues relating to the banking of umbilical cord blood in Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Umbilical cord banks are a central component, as umbilical cord tissue providers, in both medical treatment and scientific research with stem cells. But, whereas the creation of umbilical cord banks is seen as successful practice, it is perceived as a risky style of play by others. This article examines and discusses the ethical, medical and legal considerations that arise

V Moises Serrano-Delgado; Barbara Novello-Garza; Edith Valdez-Martinez

2009-01-01

207

Social Utility Theory: Guiding Labeling of VNRs as Ethical and Effective Public Relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social utility theory suggests that labeling video news release (VNR) source material is the ethical decision (Wulfemeyer & Frazier, 1992), yet the persuasion knowledge model predicts that the effectiveness of VNRs will decrease as people become aware of this PR tactic (Friestad & Wright, 1994). Our study found that positive and negative effects were heightened when subjects read about VNRs

Michelle L. M. Wood; Michelle R. Nelson; Lucy Atkinson

2008-01-01

208

Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business  

Microsoft Academic Search

As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2)

Gillian Rice

1999-01-01

209

Protecting the Residency Training Environment: A Resident's Perspective on the Ethical Boundaries in the Faculty-Resident Relationship  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This article explores ethical complexities that underlie resident-faculty relationships. The faculty-resident relationship is as complex as that between a therapist and his or her patient, but it has been far less well studied. Methods: From data obtained from psychiatry residents and faculty members regarding their experiences in this…

Mohamed, Mahmoud; Punwani, Manisha; Clay, Marjorie; Appelbaum, Paul

2005-01-01

210

Legal and Ethical Issues Related to the Management of Cultural Heritage in Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent discovery of water in darkened craters of the Moon's south pole is only the latest development drawing public and corporate interest to the possibilities of research and travel in outer space. Scientists pursuing fusion-generated power as a solution to global energy needs have also noted the relative abundance of Helium-3, an efficient fuel, on the Moon's surface, and there is the promise of other precious resources there as well. The implantation of colonies on the Moon or Mars, discussed for many decades as science fiction, therefore seems increasingly likely to happen. Some private companies and members of the public are even looking forward to the days when tourists will be able to travel for leisure beyond the earth's atmosphere. Most notably, the X Prize Foundation and Google are sponsoring a prize for the first private group to send an unmanned rover to the Moon as a way of advancing these agendas; 22 teams have registered for the competition, with some scheduled to launch by the end of 2010. Increased attention to outer space travel, exploration, and commercial exploitation has been paralleled by a rise in interest in the protection of cultural resources on Earth, such as ar-chaeological sites and historic monuments. Such sites and monuments already exist in outer space and on extraterrestrial planetary bodies. The Apollo 11 landing site, Tranquility Base, is only the most obvious example of a cultural site of outstanding significance in space. Satellites orbiting the earth -even defunct ones such as Vanguard 1, the oldest man-made object still in orbit, might be considered to have extraordinary historic and cultural value, too. As archae-ologists working on Earth have long recognized, once a site or object is damaged, it can never be perfectly restored to its original condition. Unfortunately, there are so far only a few vague guidelines, drafted in the 1960's and agreed upon by the international community, protecting mankind's cultural heritage in space. The United Nations Outer Space Treaty of 1967 -the primary document governing how nations act in outer space -is now hopelessly out-of-date. There is no mention in the treaty of cultural heritage (the UNESCO convention that concerns international protection of cultural heritage on Earth was not completed until 1970), nor was there any recognition of the role private groups and individuals might play in space exploration. This paper will outline key legal and ethical issues related to cultural heritage management and protection. It will also suggest some ways in which culturally significant sites in space can be protected for future study and even touristic appreciation.

Walsh, Justin

211

Ethical stockmanship.  

PubMed

The objective of this review is to consider the ethics of stockmanship, particularly from the perspective of the nature and extent of the duties of stockpeople to their farm animals. It will consider what science tells us about the impact of stockmanship on the animal, particularly the welfare of the farm animal. The effects of human-animal interactions on the stockperson will also be considered, since these interactions affect the work performance and job satisfaction of the stockperson and thus indirectly affect animal welfare. Animal ethics is broader than animal welfare and includes economic as well as philosophical, social, cultural and religious aspects. This paper is predicated on the view that farm animals can suffer, and that animal suffering is a key consideration in our moral obligations to animals. Housing and husbandry practices affect farm animal welfare and thus farmers and stockpeople have a responsibility to provide, at minimum, community-acceptable animal housing and husbandry standards for their animals. The farmer's or stockperson's attitudes and behaviour can directly affect the animal's welfare and thus they also have a responsibility to provide specific standards of stockmanship for these animals. However, research suggests that the behaviour of some stockpeople is not as correct as it might be. Such situations exemplify the inevitably unequal human - domestic animal relationship, and this inequality should be considered in analysing the boundary between right and wrong behaviour of humans. Thus ethical discussion, using science and other considerations and involving stockpeople, livestock industries, government and the general public, should be used to establish and assure acceptable stockperson competencies across the livestock industries. Training programs targeting the key attitudes and behaviour of stockpeople presently offer the livestock industries good opportunities to improve human-animal interactions. PMID:17470069

Hemsworth, P H

2007-05-01

212

Relational Interventions for Child Maltreatment: Past, Present, & Future Perspectives  

PubMed Central

It is well established that child maltreatment has significant deleterious effects for the individual as well as for society. We briefly review research regarding the impact of child maltreatment on the attachment relationship, highlighting the need for relational interventions for maltreated children and their families to effectively thwart negative developmental cascades that are so often observed in the context of child maltreatment. Next, historical and contemporaneous perspectives on relational interventions for individuals with histories of child maltreatment are discussed with attention to the empirical evidence for and the current evidence-based status of several relationally based interventions for child maltreatment. Differential sensitivity to the environment is then discussed as a theoretical framework with important implications for interventions for individuals who have been reared in maltreating environments. Current research on neurobiology and maltreatment is then reviewed, with an emphasis on the need for future investigations on genetic variants, epigenetics, and the efficacy of relational interventions for maltreated children. We conclude with a discussion of the tenets of developmental psychopathology, their implications for relational interventions for child maltreatment, and recommendations for advancing the development, provision, and evaluation of relational interventions for individuals with histories of child maltreatment.

Toth, Sheree L.; Gravener-Davis, Julie A.; Guild, Danielle J.; Cicchetti, Dante

2014-01-01

213

Global Ethics and Principlism  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the special relation between common morality and particular moralities in the four-principles approach and its use for global ethics. It is argued that the special dialectical relation between common morality and particular moralities is the key to bridging the gap between ethical universalism and relativism. The four-principles approach is a good model for a global bioethics by

John-Stewart Gordon

2011-01-01

214

An ethical criterion for geoscientists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anthropological researches have demonstrated that at some point in human history, man makes an evolutive jump in cultural sense: at first, he is able to perceive himself only as part of a community, later he becomes able to perceive himself as an individual. The analysis of the linguistic roots of the word "Ethics" discloses the traces of this evolutive transition and an original double meaning: on the one hand, "Ethics" contains a sense of belonging to the social fabric, on the other hand, it is related to the individual sphere. These two existential conditions (social and individual) unexpectedly co-exist in the word "Ethics". So, "Geo-Ethics" can be defined as the investigation and reflection on those values upon which to base appropriate behaviours and practices regarding the Geosphere (social dimension), but also as the analysis of the relationships between the geoscientist who acts and his own actions (individual dimension). Therefore, the meaning of the word "Geo-Ethics" calls upon geoscientists to face the responsibility of an ethical behaviour. What does this responsibility consist of and what motivations are necessary to push geoscientists to practice the Earth sciences in an ethical way? An ethical commitment exists if there is research of truth. In their activities, Geoscientists should be searchers and defenders of truth. If geoscientists give up this role, they completely empty of meaning their work. Ethical obligations arise from the possession of specific knowledge that has practical consequences. Geoscientists, as active and responsible part of society, have to serve society and the common good. The ethical criterion for a geoscientist should be rooted in his individual sphere, that is the source of any action even in the social sphere, and should have the intellectual honesty as main requirement. It includes: • respect for the truth that they look for and for other's ideas; • recognition of the value of others as valuable for themselves; • spirit of collaboration and reciprocity; • identification of a common goal, despite the diversity of views; • responsibility of their technical-cultural expertise; • opening to the comparison even in perspective of a resizing of their certainties; • reflection on the mutability of knowledge and roles; • awareness conveying scientific knowledge to others is valuable. On these bases geoscientists' activity becomes a real service for society. Geoethics should be above all an opportunity for Geoscientists to raise the awareness of their individual and social responsibility, an occasion to improve their understanding of the space and time in which they move and operate, with the perspective to contribute to the wellbeing and economic progress of mankind. Before acting and understanding how to act, Geoscientists should recognize the value of their actions, so that they will assure a real and long-lasting rootedness of practices, codes and regulations.

Peppoloni, Silvia

2013-04-01

215

A Synthesis of Ethical Decision Models for Marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contributions of current models of ethical decision making are described and evaluated on a comparative basis. From the synthesis of these frameworks an integrated model is derived. The integrated model combines both cognitive-affect and social-learning theory to produce a more complete perspective of the ethical decision process. This perspective acknowledges that ethical decision making is affected by both external

O. C. Ferrell; Larry G. Gresham; John Fraedrich

1989-01-01

216

The Asilomar Survey: Stakeholders’ Opinions on Ethical Issues Related to Brain-Computer Interfacing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research and (future) applications raise important ethical issues that need to be addressed\\u000a to promote societal acceptance and adequate policies. Here we report on a survey we conducted among 145 BCI researchers at\\u000a the 4th International BCI conference, which took place in May–June 2010 in Asilomar, California. We assessed respondents’ opinions\\u000a about a number of topics. First,

Femke Nijboer; Jens Clausen; Brendan Z. Allison; Pim Haselager

2011-01-01

217

Objections to the teaching of business ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date the teaching of business ethics has been examined from the descriptive, prescriptive, and analytical perspectives. The descriptive perspective has reviewed the existence of ethics courses (e.g., Schoenfeldtet al., 1991; Bassiry, 1990; Mahoney, 1990; Singh, 1989), their historical development (e.g., Sims and Sims, 1991), and the format and syllabi of ethics courses (e.g., Hoffman and Moore, 1982). Alternatively, the

Gael M. McDonald; Gabriel D. Donleavy

1995-01-01

218

Suicide and Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents five articles by philosophers and a psychiatrist on the ethics of suicide, as well as comments and a literature review. Discusses the rationality and morality of suicide from several philosophical viewpoints including self-ownership, Kant's theories, and a libertarian perspective. (JAC)

Battin, Margaret P., Ed.; Maris, Ronald W., Ed.

1983-01-01

219

A clinical perspective on ethical arguments around prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis for later onset inherited cancer predispositions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prenatal diagnosis (PND) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for later onset and\\/or reduced penetrance inherited cancer\\u000a predispositions, e.g. familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer\\/Lynch syndrome and hereditary\\u000a breast and ovarian cancer, raise a number of ethical issues. Some of these are the same as for conditions which present early\\u000a in childhood, are fully penetrant and for which no\\/limited treatment

Tara Clancy

2010-01-01

220

Legal and ethical issues in the regulation and development of engineering achievements in medical technology: a 2006 perspective.  

PubMed

Two papers, Legal and Ethical Issues in the Regulation and Development of Engineering Achievements in Medical Technology parts I and II were written in 1990 by three authors of diverse backgrounds and published in the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine in March of the same year. Part I of the paper discusses the existing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements that existed in 1990 to regulate the clinical trial process for medical devices, obtaining Marketing Approval and exceptions that may allow the use of unapproved devices. The paper discusses how the FDA has loosened some of the stringent regulations to further its goal of encouraging new development while protecting public health and maintaining ethical standards. Part H of the paper focuses on the ethical implications of the process of introducing a new technology to the market place, specifically in the usage of unapproved technologies for emergency use and feasibility studies. This paper discusses the topics covered in the two papers and the changes that have been made to the FDA guidelines since their publication in 1990. PMID:17959479

Malloy, Allison

2006-01-01

221

Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach.

2011-01-01

222

Managing to be ethical: debunking five business ethics myths  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the aftermath of recent corporate scandals, managers and researchers have turned their attention to questions of ethics management. We identify five common myths about business ethics and provide responses that are grounded in theory, research, and business examples. Although the scientific study of business ethics is relatively new, theory and research exist that can guide executives who are trying

Linda Klebe Trevino; Michael E. Brown

2004-01-01

223

Scientific and Ethical Issues Related to Deep Brain Stimulation for Disorders of Mood, Behavior and Thought  

PubMed Central

A two-day consensus conference was held in order to examine scientific and ethical issues in the application of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of mood and behavioral disorders such as major depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. The primary objectives of the conference were to 1) establish consensus among participants about the design of future clinical trials of DBS for disorders of mood, behavior and thought and 2) develop standards for the protection of human subjects participating in such studies. Conference participants identified 16 key points for guiding research in this growing field.

Rabins, Peter; Appleby, Brian S.; Brandt, Jason; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Dunn, Laura B.; Gabriels, Loes; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Haber, Suzanne N.; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Mari, Zoltan; Mayberg, Helen S.; McCann, Evelyn; Mink, Sallie P; Rasmussen, Steven; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Vawter, Dorothy E.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; Walkup, John; Mathews, Debra J. H.

2009-01-01

224

Ethical considerations relating to prenatal diagnosis of fetuses with Down syndrome.  

PubMed

Advances in prenatal diagnoses of genetic and chromosome disorders have brought about numerous legal and ethical concerns. There are many proponents of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion of affected fetuses who indicate that such procedures benefit society and the family as well as constitute "good" preventive medicine. Arguments against aborting affected fetuses have been proposed by people who look upon human life, including fetal life, as precious and valuable. They feel that physical and intellectual impairments are not valid reasons to recommend pregnancy termination. Prospective parents of affected fetuses with a chromosome disorder such as Down syndrome must be provided with all pertinent information, appropriate counseling, and support. PMID:1833609

Pueschel, S M

1991-08-01

225

Ethical review: Standardizing procedures and local shaping of ethical review practices.  

PubMed

Since ethical review practice has developed in relation to specific regulatory regimes and local contexts, it cannot be understood without paying attention to the institutional context of ethical review practices. We believe the tendency towards strong central governance and standardization in ethical review implies a lack of understanding of how specific local institutional contexts actually affect ethical review practices. Our question is: "How do local institutional contexts relate to the way REC's shape their formal mandate, and what are the implications for research governance?" To get in-depth insights in how REC's shape their formal mandates in every-day practice, we did a qualitative ethnographic-sociological study of three Dutch REC's in different contexts: an academic context, a care context and a commercial context. In analyzing these three REC's we paid attention to the procedures operative in REC practices, the cultures and everyday experiences of REC members, the scientific, social and financial resources that are available to REC's, and the evaluative perspective REC's employ. We conclude that specific local, institutional contexts offer valuable resources for ethical review. To track this, insight into the institutional configuration as a whole is necessary. Variations in the ways REC's shape their formal mandate should not be regarded problematic, but rather as fruitful opportunities for public learning. PMID:23921211

Jaspers, Patricia; Houtepen, Rob; Horstman, Klasien

2013-12-01

226

Brief History of pharmacy ethics in Iran  

PubMed Central

Pharmacy is an ethical profession. The aim of this study was to investigate the history of pharmacy ethics in Iran. In the ancient Persia, medical and pharmaceutical ethics were related to religious rules, and everybody had to respect it. The ethical rules were similar to some current pharmacy ethics. During Islamic era, the pharmacy ethics were edited according to the Islamic rules. After introduction of European pharmacy into Iran, the pharmacy ethics did not change and was regarded as before. By presentation of bioethics and medical ethics in recent years, new activities are carried out for better manipulation of their rules in health professions including pharmacy.

Farsam, Hassan

2009-01-01

227

Software and Ethical Softness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes some of the ethical issues relating to the illegal use of computer software and presents empirical evidence suggesting the nature and scope of the problem. Types of software are explained, including freeware and shareware; the current ethical and legal situation is described; a moral analysis is discussed; problems of rationalization are…

Strikwerda, Robert A.; Ross, John Minor

1992-01-01

228

Ethics. 1983 APME Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dealing with a variety of issues related to media ethics and press responsibility, this report presents 12 essays on editorial policy and reporters' responsibility. The essays discuss the following: (1) a reporter who posed as a jail officer to gain entry into a prison to interview an inmate, (2) a journalism professor's opinion as to the ethics

Associated Press Managing Editors.

229

New-World Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Businesses, particularly training departments, have reacted to terrorist attacks, collapse of major businesses, and wrongdoing by religious figures. Trainers have responded by offering safety and security-related training, helping establish risk-management procedures, increasing ethics training, and rewriting ethics codes. (JOW)

Hatcher, Tim

2003-01-01

230

The Ethical Employee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the extent to which the issues of business ethics and corporate social responsibility are becoming pertinent among the United Kingdom workforce. A self-completion questionnaire sought views on a range of issues relating to employment and asked about perceptions of individual companies/organizations on work and ethical issues.…

2002

231

Ethics and Dying at Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

Death at home has become increasingly common. End of life care at home creates ethical challenges that are very different from those encountered in the hospital or nursing home. Geographic disparities in rates of death at home raise ethical issues related to access to care. Home health agencies and communities make decisions, possibly ethically based, regarding investments in home-based end

Edward R. Ratner; John Y. Song

2003-01-01

232

Multidimensional relationships between paternalistic leadership and perceptions of organizational ethical climates.  

PubMed

This study investigated how paternalistic leadership is linked to ethical climates based on a multidimensional construct perspective. This experimental study utilized the partial least squares (PLS) techniques to analyze the data. Participants were 258 civil servants working in various public sectors in Taiwan, who were asked to rate their leaders' paternalistic leadership behaviors and their perception of the ethical climates in their organizations using the Paternalistic Leadership Scale and the Ethical Climate Questionnaire. Using the unidimensional constructs of paternalistic leadership and ethical climates, prior research showed vidence of a positive relationship; however, in the current study, multidimensional relations among these constructs may be positive or negative. The findings of this study suggested that leaders may implement specific types of paternalistic leadership to enhance the intended ethical climate in their organizations. PMID:23234096

Wu, Yu-Chi; Tsai, Ping Ju

2012-10-01

233

Ethics: views from IACUC members.  

PubMed

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) members were interviewed on various ethical matters, including ethics, animal ethics, science and ethics, and the use of animals in research, in order to explore their implicit ethical framework. The results revealed that IACUC members entertain rich and diverse beliefs about ethics, that are part of an implicit ethical framework which relates to different domains of knowledge, such as biology (differences between human and animals), psychology (e.g. affective relationships with pets), and so on. The results also revealed that IACUC members hold quite a restrictive view on both animal ethics and animal use in research, and that they apply implicit ethical notions, such as respect and justice, to some elements (e.g. ethical rules) of the explicit ethical framework they are provided with when performing ethical evaluations of animal use. The study suggests that IACUC members should be provided with more up-to-date information on topics such as animal ethics and animal use in research. PMID:19678730

Houde, Lisa; Dumas, Claude; Leroux, Thérèse

2009-07-01

234

The commerce of professional psychology and the new ethics code.  

PubMed

The 1992 version of the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct brings some changes in requirements and new specificity to the practice of psychology. The impact of the new code on therapeutic contracts, informed consent to psychological services, advertising, financial aspects of psychological practice, and other topics related to the commerce of professional psychology are discussed. The genesis of many new thrusts in the code is reviewed from the perspective of psychological service provider. Specific recommendations for improved attention to ethical matters in professional practice are made. PMID:12186088

Koocher, G P

1994-11-01

235

Scientific and ethical issues related to stem cell research and interventions in neurodegenerative disorders of the brain.  

PubMed

Should patients with Parkinson's disease participate in research involving stem cell treatments? Are induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) the ethical solution to the moral issues regarding embryonic stem cells? How can we adapt trial designs to best assess small numbers of patients in receipt of invasive experimental therapies? Over the last 20 years there has been a revolution in our ability to make stem cells from different sources and use them for therapeutic gain in disorders of the brain. These cells, which are defined by their capacity to proliferate indefinitely as well as differentiate into selective phenotypic cell types, are viewed as being especially attractive for studying disease processes and for grafting in patients with chronic incurable neurodegenerative disorders of the CNS such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review we briefly discuss and summarise where our understanding of stem cell biology has taken us relative to the clinic and patients, before dealing with some of the major ethical issues that work of this nature generates. This includes issues to do with the source of the cells, their ownership and exploitation along with questions about patient recruitment, consent and trial design when they translate to the clinic for therapeutic use. PMID:23665410

Barker, Roger A; de Beaufort, Inez

2013-11-01

236

To Know or Not to Know: Ethical Issues Related to Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), pathological processes start in the brain long before clinical dementia. Biomarkers reflecting brain alterations may therefore indicate disease at an early stage, enabling early diagnosis. This raises several ethical questions and the potential benefits of early diagnosis must be weighted against possible disadvantages. Currently, there are few strong arguments favouring early diagnosis, due to the lack of disease modifying therapy. Also, available diagnostic methods risk erroneous classifications, with potentially grave consequences. However, a possible benefit of early diagnosis even without disease modifying therapy is that it may enable early decision making when patients still have full decision competence, avoiding problems of hypothetical consents. It may also help identifying patients with cognitive dysfunction secondary to other diseases that may be responsive to treatment already today.

Mattsson, Niklas; Brax, David; Zetterberg, Henrik

2010-01-01

237

To know or not to know: ethical issues related to early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

In Alzheimer's disease (AD), pathological processes start in the brain long before clinical dementia. Biomarkers reflecting brain alterations may therefore indicate disease at an early stage, enabling early diagnosis. This raises several ethical questions and the potential benefits of early diagnosis must be weighted against possible disadvantages. Currently, there are few strong arguments favouring early diagnosis, due to the lack of disease modifying therapy. Also, available diagnostic methods risk erroneous classifications, with potentially grave consequences. However, a possible benefit of early diagnosis even without disease modifying therapy is that it may enable early decision making when patients still have full decision competence, avoiding problems of hypothetical consents. It may also help identifying patients with cognitive dysfunction secondary to other diseases that may be responsive to treatment already today. PMID:20798843

Mattsson, Niklas; Brax, David; Zetterberg, Henrik

2010-01-01

238

Causal Relation Analysis Tool of the Case Study in the Engineer Ethics Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In engineering ethics education, the virtual experiencing of dilemmas is essential. Learning through the case study method is a particularly effective means. Many case studies are, however, difficult to deal with because they often include many complex causal relationships and social factors. It would thus be convenient if there were a tool that could analyze the factors of a case example and organize them into a hierarchical structure to get a better understanding of the whole picture. The tool that was developed applies a cause-and-effect matrix and simple graph theory. It analyzes the causal relationship between facts in a hierarchical structure and organizes complex phenomena. The effectiveness of this tool is shown by presenting an actual example.

Suzuki, Yoshio; Morita, Keisuke; Yasui, Mitsukuni; Tanada, Ichirou; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Aoyagi, Manabu

239

Trends in Canadian Sociology Master's Theses in Relation to Research Ethics Review, 1995-2004.  

PubMed

THIS PAPER EXAMINES TRENDS IN CANADIAN Master's theses in sociology, 1995-2004, in the course the implementation of Canada's national research-ethics guidelines (2001), using data available from ProQuest Dissertations. While there has been no decline in the number of theses completed during this period, nearly 1/4 fewer theses now involve research participants. The proportion of theses using quantitative methods shows decline; theses using qualitative methods, however, have increased significantly over time. A closer inspection qualitative theses shows an impressive increase in the proportion of theses using interviews, while the decrease in theses using field work is even more dramatic, from 40% to 5%. The decrease of theses involving field work is particularly alarming for a significant segment of sociology that must derive its material mainly from field work. Data drawn from a larger study supplement the findings in this article. PMID:19385840

van den Hoonaard, Will C

2006-12-01

240

Nursing Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing ethics in the 21st century will continue to be concerned with describing and communicating the characteristics of the “good” nurse, and describing nurses’ ethical practices. However, there is a growing concern that what constitutes nurses’ ethical practices is changing as patients are experiencing, by virtue of reduced reimbursements for health care services, limited time to be in a nurse-patient

Sara Fry

241

Clinical ethics support services: an evolving model.  

PubMed

Ethical issues arising in clinical practice are complex and clinicians must be able to manage the needs of ethically vulnerable patients and families. This paper describes a model for providing Clinical Ethics Support Services as a broad spectrum of care for management of conflict and ethically difficult situations in health care and describes how an ethics consultation process was transformed to a Holistic Care Continuum for managing the needs of ethically vulnerable patients. During a 4-year journey at a regional medical center, a Family Support Team played a central role in identification of ethically vulnerable patients/family, interdisciplinary connectivity, and iterative engagement in the clinical milieu. Concepts of professional advocacy and interdisciplinary perspectives resulted in a model for ethically sound patient care promoting communication among patients/family, staff, and professionals; clarification of interdisciplinary roles and responsibilities; establishment of mutually derived goals and shared solutions; and implementation of interventions maximizing institutional resources. PMID:22357314

Schlairet, Maura C; Kiser, Ken; Norris, Stephen

2012-01-01

242

The effectiveness of ethics education: a quasi-experimental field study.  

PubMed

Ethical conduct is the hallmark of excellence in engineering and scientific research, design, and practice. While undergraduate and graduate programs in these areas routinely emphasize ethical conduct, few receive formal ethics training as part of their curricula. The first purpose of this research study was to assess the relative effectiveness of ethics education in enhancing individuals' general knowledge of the responsible conduct of research practices and their level of moral reasoning. Secondly, we examined the effects of ethics education on the positive psychological outcomes of perspective-taking, moral efficacy, moral courage, and moral meaningfulness. To examine our research hypotheses, we utilized a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design consisting of three ethics education groups (control, embedded modules, and stand-alone courses). Findings revealed that both embedded and stand alone courses were effective in enhancing participants' perspective-taking, moral efficacy, and moral courage. Moral meaningfulness was marginally enhanced for the embedded module condition. Moral judgment and knowledge of responsible conduct of research practices were not influenced by either ethics education condition. Contrary to expectations, stand alone courses were not superior to embedded modules in influencing the positive psychological outcomes investigated. Implications of these findings for future research and practice are discussed. PMID:22212360

May, Douglas R; Luth, Matthew T

2013-06-01

243

Ethics Education Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), the Ethics Education Library seeks "to connect people interested in developing new and interesting ethics training methods and programs, to disseminate best practices and tools that have already been developed, and to ultimately foster the creation of new methods and programs for teaching students about ethical issues inherent in research and practice." Visitors to the site can take advantage of the Browse feature to look for online tutorials, syllabi, teaching modules, and case studies. The case studies section has over 5,500 items, some of which are available in full and all of which have an abstract for perusal. Additionally, visitors can use the Publications area to find books, journal articles and other published materials relating to all areas of ethics education. These materials are arranged topically into sections that include bioethics, business ethics, and media ethics. Finally, visitors can scroll through the Ethics News on the right-hand side of the page for more information about current appearances of ethics in the daily news.

2012-05-11

244

Saving lives in road traffic--ethical aspects  

PubMed Central

Aim This article aims at giving an overview of five ethical problem areas relating to traffic safety, thereby providing a general framework for analysing traffic safety from an ethical perspective and encouraging further discussion concerning problems, policies and technology in this area. Subjects and methods The problems presented in the article are criminalisation, paternalism, privacy, justice and responsibility, and the reasons for choosing these are the following. First, they are all important areas in moral philosophy. Second, they are fairly general and it should be possible to categorise more specific problems under these headings. Ethical aspects of road traffic have not received the philosophical attention they deserve. Every year, more than 1 million people die globally in traffic accidents, and 20 to 50 million people are injured. Ninety per cent of the road traffic fatalities occur in low- and middle-income countries, where it is a growing problem. Politics, economics, culture and technology affect the number of fatalities and injuries, and the measures used to combat deaths in traffic as well as the role of road traffic should be ethically scrutinised. The topics are analysed and discussed from a moral-philosophical perspective, and the discussion includes both theory and applications. Results and conclusion The author concludes with some thoughts on how the ethical discussion can be included in the public debate on how to save lives in road traffic. People in industrialised societies are so used to road traffic that it is almost seen as part of nature. Consequently, we do not acknowledge that we can introduce change and that we can affect the role we have given road traffic and cars. By acknowledging the ethical aspects of road traffic and illuminating the way the choices society makes are ethically charged, it becomes clear that there are alternative ways to design the road traffic system. The most important general conclusion is that discussion concerning these alternative ways of designing the system should be encouraged.

2009-01-01

245

Ethics on the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses ethical issues related to the Internet based on two speeches given at the Online 95 conference. Topics include pornography; copyright; libel and slander; and censorship imposed on the Internet by the secret service in Israel. (LRW)

Online & CD-ROM Review, 1996

1996-01-01

246

Ethics of environment and development  

SciTech Connect

How can we make ethical decisions about our environment in the face of increasingly conflicting needs and opinions This collection of essays offers a wide range of viewpoints representing many of the world's cultural and religious traditions to help readers better make such determinations for themselves. In this paper, the authors seek to clarify the ethical principles surrounding the concept of sustainable development. They provide a synoptic overview of the contemporary moral challenge of sustainable development and the similarities and differences in its interpretation throughout the world. In bringing together contributions by authorities in environmental ethics and developmental ethics, and by those who are addressing these questions from the perspectives of religion and humanistic philosophy, the book develops the concept of sustainability as the ethical approach to reconciling the needs of environmental conservation with economic development.

Engel, J.R.; Engel, J.G.

1990-01-01

247

Scientific evidence and best patient care practices should guide the ethics of Lyme disease activism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Johnson and Stricker published an opinion piece in the Journal of Medical Ethics presenting their perspective on the 2008 agreement between the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the Connecticut Attorney General with regard to the 2006 IDSA treatment guideline for Lyme disease. Their writings indicate that these authors hold unconventional views of a relatively common tick-transmitted bacterial infection

Paul G Auwaerter; Johan S Bakken; Raymond J Dattwyler; J Stephen Dumler; John J Halperin; Edward McSweegan; Robert B Nadelman; Susan OConnell; Sunil K Sood; Arthur Weinstein; Gary P Wormser

2010-01-01

248

Health and wellness policy ethics.  

PubMed

This perspective is an ethical brief overview and examination of "wellness" policies in the modern workplace using practical examples and a general application of utilitarianism. Many employers are implementing policies that provide incentives to employees who lead a "healthy" lifestyle. The authors address how these policies could adversely affect "non-healthy" employees. There are a wide variety of ethical issues that impact wellness policies and practices in the workplace. The authors conclude that wellness programs can be ethical, while also providing a general reflective analysis of healthcare challenges in order to reflect on the externalities associated with such policies in the workplace. PMID:24596847

Cavico, Frank J; Mujtaba, Bahaudin G

2013-08-01

249

Autonomy, Technology and Prenatal Screening: What a relational understanding of autonomy and a postphenomenological model of technology can contribute to the ethical discourse of prenatal screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis explores the contribution that both a postphenomenological understanding of technology and a relational understanding of autonomy can make to the ethical debate over prenatal screening. Postphenomenological theories of technology make the surprising move of viewing artefacts as actors without agency. This move is useful because it allows artefacts to be socially embedded and able to convey intentionality in

Lucy Langston

2009-01-01

250

‘He is now like a brother, I can even give him some blood’ – Relational ethics and material exchanges in a malaria vaccine ‘trial community’ in The Gambia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores social relations within the ‘trial community’ (staff and volunteers) of a Malaria Vaccine Trial (MVT), implemented by the Medical Research Council (MRC) in The Gambia between 2001 and 2004. It situates ethical concerns with medical research within the everyday life of scientific fieldwork. Based upon discussions with volunteers and staff, we explore processes of mediation between scientific

P. Wenzel Geissler; Ann Kelly; Babatunde Imoukhuede; Robert Pool

2008-01-01

251

The Caring Relation in Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to John Macmurray, "teaching is one of the foremost of personal relations". This paper describes that relation in some detail from the perspective of care ethics. This involves a discussion of the central elements in establishing and maintaining relations of care and trust which include listening, dialogue, critical thinking, reflective…

Noddings, Nel

2012-01-01

252

Do organizational and clinical ethics in a hospital setting need different venues?  

PubMed

The structure of ethics work in a hospital is complex. Professional ethics, research ethics and clinical ethics committees (CECs) are important parts of this structure, in addition to laws and national and institutional codes of ethics. In Norway all hospital trusts have a CEC, most of these discuss cases by means of a method which seeks to include relevant guidelines and laws into the discussion. In recent years many committees have received more cases which have concerned questions of principle. According to Ellen Fox and co-authors the traditional CEC model suffers from a number of weaknesses. Therefore, in their organization a separate body deals with organizational matters. In this paper, we discuss what is gained and what is lost by creating two separate bodies doing ethics consultation. We do this through an analysis of detailed minutes of CEC discussions in one CEC during a 6-year period. 30 % of all referrals concerned matters of principle. Some of these discussions originated in a dilemma related to a particular patient. Most of the discussions had some consequences within the hospital organization, for clinical practice, for adjustment of guidelines, or may have influenced national policy. We conclude that a multiprofessional CEC with law and ethics competency and patient representation may be well suited also for discussion of general ethical principles. A CEC is a forum which can help bridge the gap between clinicians and management by increasing understanding for each others' perspectives. PMID:24647554

Førde, Reidun; Hansen, Thor Willy Ruud

2014-06-01

253

Cultural safety as an ethic of care: a praxiological process.  

PubMed

New writings broadening the construct of cultural safety, a construct initiated in Aotearoa New Zealand, are beginning to appear in the literature. Therefore, it is considered timely to integrate these writings and advance the construct into a new theoretical model. The new model reconfigures the constructs of cultural safety and cultural competence as an ethic of care informed by a postmodern perspective. Central to the new model are three interwoven, co-occurring components: an ethic of care, which unfolds within a praxiological process shaped by the context. Context is expanded through identifying the three concepts of relationality, generic competence, and collectivity, which are integral to each client-nurse encounter. The competence associated with cultural safety as an ethic of care is always in the process of development. Clients and nurses engage in a dialogue to establish the level of cultural safety achieved at given points in a care trajectory. PMID:21844246

McEldowney, Rose; Connor, Margaret J

2011-10-01

254

[Man and animal from the ethical view  

PubMed

This review over the books, articles in Journals and newspapers in 1996 and 1997 reports about the development in the field of man-animal- and man-nature-relations. The review considers the following themes: development, trends and perspectives, philosophy, theology, eco-ethics, legal questions, animal experimentation, freedom of research, teaching and conscience, farm animals, hunting and fishing, zoo and circus, bio-technology, violence, killing, vegetarism and dignity of creatures. The review includes a bibliography with about 300 quatoations. PMID:11178503

Teutsch, Gotthard M.

1997-01-01

255

Dharma and medical ethics.  

PubMed

Despite the numerous policies, regulations and laws aimed at promoting and ensuring ethical practice in healthcare, ethical misconduct remains rampant. Perhaps something more is needed to encourage a genuine and sustained moral attitude and behaviour. To a casual reader, the regulations on ethics read merely as a list of do's and don'ts and their philosophical foundation is not clear. In actuality, morality is often grounded in philosophy. Traditionally, religious and theistic philosophies drove moral behaviour. However, this is changing due to the current trend of secularism. Hindu philosophies are among the oldest philosophies that are still thriving, and this article explores these philosophies and compares and contrasts them with some of the contemporary ethical theories to assess if they can add value to the field of medical ethics. The main theme of the article is dharma or righteous conduct, the concepts related to it and how these can have a bearing on the development of an ethical attitude and the practice of medical ethics. PMID:24152344

Seetharam, Sridevi

2013-01-01

256

Ethics Updates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Professor Lawrence M. Hinman of the University of San Diego provides ethics students with a unique kind of meta-page where the user can choose from a wide array of information formats within each of the 23 topics under the main sub-headings of ethical theory and applied ethics. Topics covered include ethical relativism, utilitarianism, race and ethnicity, and euthanasia, among others. Information formats include links to web sites, bibliographies, court decisions, legislation, relevant documents, and articles in popular and professional literature. Much of the site content is adapted from Hinman's books.

1997-01-01

257

Using Gaming To Help Nursing Students Understand Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An ethics game involves nursing students in defending actions in ethics-based scenarios. Benefits include increased confidence, ability to see multiple perspectives, values clarification, and exposure to decision-making models, professional responsibilities, ethical principles, social expectations, and legal requirements. Difficulties include…

Metcalf, Barbara L.; Yankou, Dawn

2003-01-01

258

Ethical Issues of Scientific Inquiry in Health Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph contains 13 papers on the ethics of planning, conducting, and reporting research in health sciences education. It includes four background papers and nine perspective papers. The titles are: (1) "The Imperative for Ethical Conduct in Scientific Inquiry" (Steve M. Dorman); (2) "Fundamental Principles of Ethical Research in Health…

Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr., Ed.

1994-01-01

259

The ethics of drug development and promotion: the need for a wider view.  

PubMed

Ethical issues at the interface between the medical profession and the pharmaceutical industry have generally been approached from the vantage point of medical professionalism, with a focus on conflict of interest as the key ethical concern. Although conflicts of interest remain important, other ethical issues may be obscured unless a wider perspective is adopted. Besides medical professionalism, the ethics of the clinical therapeutic relationship, ethics of public health, and business ethics all provide additional insights. PMID:23047778

Brody, Howard

2012-11-01

260

Guidance in Social and Ethical Issues Related to Clinical, Diagnostic Care and Novel Therapies for Hereditary Neuromuscular Rare Diseases: "Translating" the Translational  

PubMed Central

Drug trials in children engage with many ethical issues, from drug-related safety concerns to communication with patients and parents, and recruitment and informed consent procedures. This paper addresses the field of neuromuscular disorders where the possibility of genetic, mutation-specific treatments, has added new complexity. Not only must trial design address issues of equity of access, but researchers must also think through the implications of adopting a personalised medicine approach, which requires a precise molecular diagnosis, in addition to other implications of developing orphan drugs. It is against this background of change and complexity that the Project Ethics Council (PEC) was established within the TREAT-NMD EU Network of Excellence. The PEC is a high level advisory group that draws upon the expertise of its interdisciplinary membership which includes clinicians, lawyers, scientists, parents, representatives of patient organisations, social scientists and ethicists. In this paper we describe the establishment and terms of reference of the PEC, give an indication of the range and depth of its work and provide some analysis of the kinds of complex questions encountered. The paper describes how the PEC has responded to substantive ethical issues raised within the TREAT-NMD consortium and how it has provided a wider resource for any concerned parent, patient, or clinician to ask a question of ethical concern. Issues raised range from science related ethical issues, issues related to hereditary neuromuscular diseases and the new therapeutic approaches and questions concerning patients rights in the context of patient registries and bio-banks. We conclude by recommending the PEC as a model for similar research contexts in rare diseases.

McCormack, Pauline; Woods, Simon; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Hagger, Lynn; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Heslop, Emma; Irwin, Joseph; Kirschner, Janbernd; Moeschen, Patrick; Muntoni, Francesco; Ouillade, Marie-Christine; Rahbek, Jes; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph; Rouault, Francoise; Sejersen, Thomas; Vroom, Elizabeth; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Ferlini, Alessandra

2013-01-01

261

The "Other Voices" in Contemporary Ethical Dilemmas: The Value of the New Scholarship on Women in the Teaching of Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper indicates the need for women's studies ethics courses and the examination of student concepts of morality. It proposes the ethical study of social problems not usually considered in undergraduate classes and illustrates the importance of the study of historical perspectives and situational ethics in the teaching of complex contemporary…

Shapiro, Joan Poliner; Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll

262

Student Perspectives of the Graduation Coach's Ethic of Care on the Dropout Epidemic in a Middle Georgia Alternative High School of Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the influence of the graduation coach's ethic of care on potential dropouts (at risk high school seniors) in a Georgia alternative high school. Based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the objective of this research was to identify if the graduation coach's ethic of care had an influence on…

Burger, Kimberly R.

2009-01-01

263

Report of Ethical Considerations Workshop  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For more than four decades, planetary protection policy based on the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 has guided space missions in avoiding harmful cross-contamination during exploration. Throughout this time, the main emphasis of the policy has been based on protecting science and avoiding biological contamination. In light of new knowledge about planetary bodies and the diversity and capabilities of terrestrial microorganisms in extreme environments, as well as increased interest in human exploration activities beyond Earth orbit, it is appropriate to con-sider the ethical and policy implications of this approach. In June 2010, a workshop was held at Princeton, New Jersey, to focus on those implications, and to formulate recommendations for the space-faring nations of the world relating to concrete measures that might be undertaken to conduct space science studies and exploration within a sustainable framework that considers additional ethical perspectives as well as science protection. The workshop considered both current planetary protection policy (COSPAR, etc.) and the implications of protecting plan-ets beyond purely scientific considerations, especially in light of possible human missions of exploration. This talk provides a summary of the workshop discussions and results.

Race, Margaret; Conley, Catharine; Kminek, Gerhard; Rummel, John

264

Preaching What We Practice: Teaching Ethical Decision-Making to Computer Security Professionals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biggest challenge facing computer security researchers and professionals is not learning how to make ethical decisions; rather it is learning how to recognize ethical decisions. All too often, technology development suffers from what Langdon Winner terms technological somnambulism - we sleepwalk through our technology design, following past precedents without a second thought, and fail to consider the perspectives of other stakeholders [1]. Computer security research and practice involves a number of opportunities for ethical decisions. For example, decisions about whether or not to automatically provide security updates involve tradeoffs related to caring versus user autonomy. Decisions about online voting include tradeoffs between convenience and security. Finally, decisions about routinely screening e-mails for spam involve tradeoffs of efficiency and privacy. It is critical that these and other decisions facing computer security researchers and professionals are confronted head on as value-laden design decisions, and that computer security researchers and professionals consider the perspectives of various stakeholders in making these decisions.

Fleischmann, Kenneth R.

265

Ethically Speaking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Making ethical decisions is of the utmost importance, because peoples' lives depend on those decisions. As illustrated in the case studies, it is the individual engineering manager who ultimately decides if he or she is going to ethically make the complex decisions created by a competitive environment.

K. L. B. Cook

2008-01-01

266

Towards an Understanding of Ethical Behaviour in Small Firms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Allthough small business accounts for over 90% of businesses in U.K. and indeed elsewhere, they remain the largely uncharted area of ethics. There has not been any research based on the perspective of small business owners, to define what echical delemmas they face and how, if at all, they resolve them. This paper explores ethics from the perspective of small

S. Vyakarnam; A. Bailey; A. Myers; D. Burnett

1997-01-01

267

Nursing and euthanasia: a review of argument-based ethics literature.  

PubMed

This article gives an overview of the nursing ethics arguments on euthanasia in general, and on nurses' involvement in euthanasia in particular, through an argument-based literature review. An in-depth study of these arguments in this literature will enable nurses to engage in the euthanasia debate. We critically appraised 41 publications published between January 1987 and June 2007. Nursing ethics arguments on (nurses' involvement in) euthanasia are guided primarily by the principles of respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice. Ethical arguments related to the nursing profession are described. From a care perspective, we discuss arguments that evaluate to what degree euthanasia can be considered positively or negatively as a form of good nursing care. Most arguments in the principle-, profession- and care-orientated approaches to nursing ethics are used both pro and contra euthanasia in general, and nurses' involvement in euthanasia in particular. PMID:19528103

Quaghebeur, Toon; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Gastmans, Chris

2009-07-01

268

Professional and Ethical Issues in Computer Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CSC 385. Professional and Ethical Issues in Computer Science (1) Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in computer science. Student presentations and discussions of case studies relating to computer ethics.

Vetter, Ron

2003-04-21

269

Legal and Ethical Issues Related to the Management of Cultural Heritage in Space  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent discovery of water in darkened craters of the Moon's south pole is only the latest development drawing public and corporate interest to the possibilities of research and travel in outer space. Scientists pursuing fusion-generated power as a solution to global energy needs have also noted the relative abundance of Helium-3, an efficient fuel, on the Moon's surface, and

Justin Walsh

2010-01-01

270

Preemptive kidney transplantation: ethical issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. Preemptive kidney transplantation, as a treatment modality for end-stage renal disease, offers higher clinical advantages compared to maintenance dialysis. Nevertheless, preemptive trans- plantations raises ethical concerns, particularly regarding medical resource allocation. From an ethi- cal perspective, health care decisions should be focused on the patient's needs. Nevertheless, a fair distribution model also requires the settlement of general policy decisions.

Carlo Petrini

2009-01-01

271

The Ethics of Assisted Suicide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From social work perspective, considers ethics of assisted suicide. Discusses traditional social work value of client self-determination and identifies tensions in this ideal and conflicts with value of client well-being. Finds assisted suicide unethical, arguing that studies have shown judgment of most suicidal people to be impaired as result of…

Callahan, Jay

1994-01-01

272

Ethical Issues Relating to the Health Effects of Long Working Hours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considerable research evidence has accumulated indicating that there is an increased likelihood for illness and injury among\\u000a employees working in long-hour schedules and schedules involving unconventional shift work (e.g., night and evening shifts).\\u000a In addition, studies show that fatigue-related errors made by employees working in these kind of demanding schedules can have\\u000a serious and adverse repercussions for public safety. As

Allard E. Dembe

2009-01-01

273

Cognitive and emotional control and perspective taking and their relations to empathy in 5-year-old children.  

PubMed

The experience of empathy has been described as involving both emotional and cognitive components. The primary hypothesis tested in this study is that cognition and emotion are integrated within 2 distinct types of abilities-control and perspective taking-and that interactions between emotional and cognitive control and between affective and cognitive perspective taking would be related to children's empathic responding. We also hypothesized that boys' control and perspective-taking skills would be more strongly related to empathy than would those of girls. Fifty-seven 5-year-olds completed tasks measuring cognitive control, cognitive and affective perspective taking, and empathy, and their mothers completed a measure of children's emotional control. Results indicated that cognitive perspective taking moderated the relation between affective perspective taking and empathy. In addition, the relation between cognitive inhibitory control and empathy was moderated by gender; boys' control was positively related to empathy, but girls' control was marginally negatively related to empathy. PMID:18200891

Hinnant, J Benjamin; O'Brien, Marion

2007-09-01

274

Ethical Dilemmas in Disaster Medicine  

PubMed Central

Background Disasters may lead to ethical challenges that are different from usual medical practices. In addition, disaster situations are related with public health ethics more than medical ethics, and accordingly may require stronger effort to achieve a balance between individual and collective rights. This paper aims to review some ethical dilemmas that arise in disasters and mainly focuses on health services. Disasters vary considerably with respect to their time, place and extent; therefore, ethical questions may not always have `one-size-fits-all` answers. On the other hand, embedding ethical values and principles in every aspect of health-care is of vital importance. Reviewing legal and organizational regulations, developing health-care related guidelines, and disaster recovery plans, establishing on-call ethics committees as well as adequate in-service training of health-care workers for ethical competence are among the most critical steps. It is only by making efforts before disasters, that ethical challenges can be minimized in disaster responses.

Ozge Karadag, C; Kerim Hakan, A

2012-01-01

275

Predatory vs. Dialogic Ethics: Constructing an Illusion or Ethical Practice as the Core of Research Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ethical conduct of research is addressed from two perspectives, as a regulatory enterprise that creates an illusion of ethical practice and as a philosophical concern for equity and the imposition of power within the conceptualization and practice of research itself. The authors discuss various contemporary positions that influence…

Cannella, Gaile S.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

2007-01-01

276

Frameworks for Teaching and Learning Business Ethics within the Global Context: Background of Ethical Theories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we provide a summary of several major traditional and contemporary philosophical and psychological perspectives on ethical conduct for businesses, along with five different sets of internationally accepted ethical guidelines for corporations operating anywhere in the world. We include examples of corporate codes of conduct from…

White, Judith; Taft, Susan

2004-01-01

277

Industrial Relations Risk in the Construction Industry Industrial Relations Risk in the Construction Industry A Contractual A Contractual Perspective Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building contracts are no different from any other contract, and merely formalise a series of promises in relation to the sharing of risk. The concept of risk underlies the nature of all relations in the building industry and determines the form and conduct of the parties in those relations. In particular the way in which industrial relations risk is allocated

John Crittall

278

Is adaptive co-management ethical?  

PubMed

'Good' governance and adaptive co-management hold broad appeal due to their positive connotations and 'noble ethical claims'. This paper poses a fundamental question: is adaptive co-management ethical? In pursuing an answer to this question, the concept of adaptive co-management is succinctly summarized and three ethical perspectives (deontology, teleology and existentialism) are explored. The case of adaptive co-management in Cambodia is described and subsequently considered through the lens of ethical triangulation. The case illuminates important ethical considerations and directs attention towards the need for meditative thinking which increases the value of tradition, ecology, and culture. Giving ethics a central position makes clear the potential for adaptive co-management to be an agent for governance, which is good, right and authentic as well as an arena to embrace uncertainty. PMID:17391840

Fennell, David; Plummer, Ryan; Marschke, Melissa

2008-07-01

279

Incorporating global components into ethics education.  

PubMed

Ethics is central to science and engineering. Young engineers need to be grounded in how corporate social responsibility principles can be applied to engineering organizations to better serve the broader community. This is crucial in times of climate change and ecological challenges where the vulnerable can be impacted by engineering activities. Taking a global perspective in ethics education will help ensure that scientists and engineers can make a more substantial contribution to development throughout the world. This paper presents the importance of incorporating the global and cross culture components in the ethic education. The authors bring up a question to educators on ethics education in science and engineering in the globalized world, and its importance, necessity, and impendency. The paper presents several methods for discussion that can be used to identify the differences in ethics standards and practices in different countries; enhance the student's knowledge of ethics in a global arena. PMID:21769592

Wang, George; Thompson, Russell G

2013-03-01

280

Whose Depression Relates to Discrepancies? Testing Relations Between Informant Characteristics and Informant Discrepancies From Both Informants' Perspectives  

PubMed Central

This study examined whether mothers’ and children's depressive symptoms were each uniquely related to mother–child rating discrepancies on a multidimensional dyadic construct: domains associated with parental monitoring (i.e., Child Disclosure, Parental Knowledge, and Parental Solicitation). Participants included a community sample of 335 mother/female-caregiver and child dyads (182 girls, 153 boys; 9?16 years old). Children's depressive symptoms were consistently related to each of the three domains of mother–child discrepancies. Mothers’ depressive symptoms were related to perceived discrepancies in two domains (Child Disclosure and Parental Knowledge). Furthermore, these relations could not be accounted for by other informant characteristics (maternal stress, child age, child gender, child ethnicity). Findings provide important empirical support for theory suggesting that both informants’ perspectives meaningfully contribute to their discrepancies in perceived behavior. Consideration of both informants’ perspectives leads to valuable information as to whether any particular characteristic is an important correlate of discrepancies.

Reyes, Andres De Los; Goodman, Kimberly L.; Kliewer, Wendy; Reid-Quinones, Kathryn

2008-01-01

281

Ethical leadership.  

PubMed

In today's climate and environment, the conventional relationship between caring, economic, and administrative practices no longer serves the interest of patients, clinicians, or systems. A shift toward human caring values and an ethic of authentic healing relationships is required as systems now have to value human resources and life purposes, inner meaning, and processes for providers and patients alike. The costs of unethical behavior can be even greater for followers. When we assume the benefits of leadership, we also assume ethical burdens. It is the assertion and experience of the author that the triangle of ethics and ethical behavior, followers, and patient's outcomes are closely interrelated and affect each other in a very intimate and direct way. Unethical leadership may lead to follower disappointment and distrust, leading to lack of interest and commitment, consequently negatively impacting patient outcomes and organizational effectiveness. PMID:22864295

Keselman, David

2012-01-01

282

Ethics (lesson)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students examine some examples of ethical issues that have resulted from our expanded knowledge of neuroscience. They are asked to write a position paper describing their own point of view on one of these controversial topics.

2009-04-14

283

MLA Statement of Professional Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intends for this statement to embody reasonable norms for ethical conduct in teaching, research, and related public service activities in the modern languages and literatures. Lists seven governing premises of the statement. Examines ethical conduct in academic relationships, discussing obligations to students, colleagues, staff members, the…

ADE Bulletin, 2002

2002-01-01

284

Work-related suicide in Victoria, Australia: a broad perspective.  

PubMed

While unintentional work-related injury is increasingly recognised as important and preventable, population studies of the full range of work related suicides have received less attention. The objective of this study is to investigate the epidemiology of work-related suicide in Victoria, July 2000-December 2007. The study draws on a database of all work-related deaths reported to the Victorian Coroner, inclusive of broadly defined work-relatedness. Inclusion criteria for work-related suicide were at least one of: suicide means was work related, work stressors were identified in police reports to the Coroners or the Coroner's finding, the suicide method involved another person's work (e.g. rail suicide, heavy vehicle) or the suicide location was a workplace. Cases still open for investigation were excluded. Of 642 work-related suicides, 55% had an association with work stressors; 32% jumped or lay in front of a train or heavy vehicle; 7% involved a work location and 6% involved work agents. Work stressor cases identified included business difficulties, recent or previous work injury, unemployment/redundancy or conflict with supervisors/colleagues (including workplace bullying). Work-related suicide is a substantial problem, for which few detailed population wide studies are available. Further research is required to understand the contribution of work stressors and effective interventions. PMID:22132703

Routley, Virginia Hazel; Ozanne-Smith, Joan E

2012-01-01

285

Ethics and Intercultural Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of the use of "proteksia," a system of securing personal influence in Israel, is discussed in this article and is related to concepts of intercultural ethics. The information on the study is taken from an article "On Proteksia," by B. Danet and H. Hartman, focusing on "proteksia" as it relates to bureaucratic norms and nonbureaucratic…

Rohrlich, Beulah F.

286

Teaching medical ethics and law.  

PubMed

The teaching of medical ethics is not yet characterised by recognised, standard requirements for formal qualifications, training and experience; this is not surprising as the field is still relatively young and maturing. Under the broad issue of the requirements for teaching medical ethics are numerous more specific questions, one of which concerns whether medical ethics can be taught in isolation from considerations of the law, and vice versa. Ethics and law are cognate, though distinguishable, disciplines. In a practical, professional enterprise such as medicine, they cannot and should not be taught as separate subjects. One way of introducing students to the links and tensions between medical ethics and law is to consider the history of law via its natural and positive traditions. This encourages understanding of how medical practice is placed within the contexts of ethics and law in the pluralist societies in which most students will practise. Four examples of topics from medical ethics teaching are described to support this claim. Australasian medical ethics teachers have paid less attention to the role of law in their curricula than their United Kingdom counterparts. Questions like the one addressed here will help inform future deliberations concerning minimal requirements for teaching medical ethics. PMID:22558898

Parker, Malcolm

2012-03-01

287

Ethical Dilemmas in College Counseling Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a survey of ethical dilemmas faced by college counselors are presented. Findings and implications are discussed as they relate to types and frequencies of ethical dilemmas encountered and how they are resolved. A typical ethical dilemma is described. (Author)

Hayman, Peter M.; Covert, Joy A.

1986-01-01

288

Coaching as a profession: Ethical concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Professional Coaching Association (CPCA) recently developed a code of ethics for coaches that was based on the Canadian Psychological Association's ethical code. Because the CPCA did not use coaches' actual experiences to develop their code, we solicited sport-related ethical concerns from coaches to determine the comprehensiveness of the code. Twelve male and seven female coaches from both individual

Colleen J. Haney; Bonita C. Long; Gail Howell-jones

1998-01-01

289

Ethical Considerations in Prenatal Sex Selection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developments in assisted reproductive technologies have made it possible for couples to select the sex of a child prenatally. This article used the NASW Code of Ethics and information from the Ethics Committee of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine to consider ethical dilemmas related to social justice (for example, reinforcement of…

Hollingsworth, Leslie Doty

2005-01-01

290

Research Collections: Content/Format/Service, a Vendor's Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses issues related to managing electronic resources in academic libraries from a vendor's perspective. Topics include collection development policies; format and content; decisions to buy, borrow, or link to online resources; ethics and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition); service, cost, and value; vendors'…

Kennedy, Kit

2000-01-01

291

Centric relation definition: a historical and contemporary prosthodontic perspective.  

PubMed

Centric relation (CR) is a core topic of dentistry in general and prosthodontics in particular. The term CR has become thoroughly confusing because of many conflicting definitions. Unfortunately definition of CR changed repeatedly over past ten decades. All the existing definitions in the dental literature, for the past 81 years, are segregated into definitions from 1929 to 1970, 1970-1980, and 1980-2010 and are critically analyzed. Both PubMed (key words: centric relation/centric jaw relation) and hand searches were employed, from citation in other publications, to identify relevant articles in English language peer reviewed PubMed journals from 1956 to 2010; although the review is from 1929. Numerous definitions for CR have been given, however, no consensus exists and the definition given by a current glossary of prosthodontic terms is confusing. It relates CR to many clinically invisible parts and cannot guide a dental surgeon to record the CR following its description. The purpose of this article is not only to review all the definitions critically but to propose a self explanatory definition to minimize the confusion in the minds of dental practitioners and students for better understanding of the concept of CR. Centric relation is clinically significant since it is the only clinically repeatable jaw relation and the logical position to fabricate prosthesis. PMID:24431728

Palaskar, Jayant N; Murali, R; Bansal, Sanjay

2013-09-01

292

Global ethics and principlism.  

PubMed

This article examines the special relation between common morality and particular moralities in the four-principles approach and its use for global ethics. It is argued that the special dialectical relation between common morality and particular moralities is the key to bridging the gap between ethical universalism and relativism. The four-principles approach is a good model for a global bioethics by virtue of its ability to mediate successfully between universal demands and cultural diversity. The principle of autonomy (i.e., the idea of individual informed consent), however, does need to be revised so as to make it compatible with alternatives such as family- or community-informed consent. The upshot is that the contribution of the four-principles approach to global ethics lies in the so-called dialectical process and its power to deal with cross-cultural issues against the background of universal demands by joining them together. PMID:22073817

Gordon, John-Stewart

2011-09-01

293

Managing Headquarters-Subsidiary Relations From a Knowledge Perspective: Strategies for Transnational Media Companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to analyze how transnational media companies manage their headquarters-subsidiary relations from a knowledge perspective. Based on the knowledge-based view of the firm and recent literature, hypotheses regarding the degrees of knowledge in- and outflow are derived, covering the determinants of subsidiary autonomy, corporate socialization, transmission channels, and geographic and cultural distance. The conceptual model

Mania Strube; Nicola Berg

2011-01-01

294

Overt and Relational Aggression and Victimization: Multiple Perspectives within the School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study involved a comprehensive comparative examination of overt and relational aggression and victimization across multiple perspectives in the school setting (peers, teachers, observers in the lunchroom, self-report). Patterns of results involving sociometic status, ethnicity and gender were explored among 4th graders, with particular…

Putallaz, Martha; Grimes, Christina L.; Foster, Kristen J.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Coie, John D.; Dearing, Karen

2007-01-01

295

Relationships among Teachers' Perspectives, Self-Reported Practices, and Concerns Related to an Alternate Assessment System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A statewide survey was completed by 234 special education teachers with experience in developing assessment portfolios within the Illinois Alternate Assessment (IAA) system. Relationships between these teachers' demographics and their perspectives, concerns, and self-reported practices related to the IAA system was identified and described. These…

Kim, Young-Gyoung; Angell, Maureen E.; O'Brian, Mary; Strand, Kenneth B.; Fulk, Barbara M.; Watts, Emily H.

2006-01-01

296

Social Relations in Childhood and Adolescence: The Convoy Model Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the development of social relations has been largely fragmented along role-specific lines and dominated conceptually by attachment theory. The Convoy Model is presented as an alternative to traditional approaches that fail to capture the complexity of social relationships across time and context. Research based on the model converges…

Levitt, Mary J.

2005-01-01

297

Alcohol-related content of animated cartoons: a historical perspective.  

PubMed

This study, based on a stratified (by decade of production) random sample of 1,221 animated cartoons and 4,201 characters appearing in those cartoons, seeks to determine the prevalence of alcohol-related content; how, if at all, the prevalence changed between 1930 and 1996 (the years spanned by this research); and the types of messages that animated cartoons convey about beverage alcohol and drinking in terms of the characteristics that are associated with alcohol use, the contexts in which alcohol is used in cartoons, and the reasons why cartoon characters purportedly consume alcohol. Approximately 1 cartoon in 11 was found to contain alcohol-related content, indicating that the average child or adolescent viewer is exposed to approximately 24 alcohol-related messages each week just from the cartoons that he/she watches. Data indicated that the prevalence of alcohol-related content declined significantly over the years. Quite often, alcohol consumption was shown to result in no effects whatsoever for the drinker, and alcohol use often occurred when characters were alone. Overall, mixed, ambivalent messages were provided about drinking and the types of characters that did/not consume alcoholic beverages. PMID:24350176

Klein, Hugh; Shiffman, Kenneth S

2013-01-01

298

Relations between Money and Love in Postdivorce Families: Children's Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines and theorizes complex relations and trade-offs concerning money and love, arguing that children's viewpoint can illuminate the question of money in postdivorce families in new and insightful ways. The analysis is inspired by ideas about economic sociology put forward by Marcia Millman and Viviana Zelizer. The article argues…

Haugen, Gry Mette D.

2005-01-01

299

Book Review Essay: Brazilian Race Relations in Hemispheric Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The late Oliver C. Cox, one of the most insightful black Americans from the leftist tradition, was not often fooled. In his classic 1948 work, Caste, Class, and Race, Cox, a long-time professor of sociology at Lincoln University in Missouri, revealed the nonsensical underpinnings of what then passed for the serious study of comparative race relations among sociologists in the

Rhett S. Jones

1990-01-01

300

Women in sport – gender relations and future perspectives1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Starting off from deliberations on the ‘nature’ and significance of gender differences and gender relations, I first of all present in this contribution my theoretical framework: a constructivist approach to gender. If gender is understood as a social construction, gender differences are not ‘natural’ but acquired and enacted, and also vary according to the particular social and gender order. Currently

Gertrud Pfister

2010-01-01

301

A Relational Perspective on PTSD in Early Childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the clinical and research evidence for the importance of the relational context of posttraumatic stress disorder in young children. We review 17 studies that simultaneously assessed parental and child functioning following trauma. In many studies, despite limitations, an association between undesirable parental\\/family variables and maladaptive child outcomes has been consistently found. We present a model of the

Michael S. Scheeringa; Charles H. Zeanah

2001-01-01

302

A theoretical perspective on running-related injuries.  

PubMed

The etiology of running-related injuries remains unknown; however, an implicit theory underlies much of the conventional research and practice in the prevention of these injuries. This theory posits that the cause of running-related injuries lies in the high-impact forces experienced when the foot contacts the ground and the subsequent abnormal movement of the subtalar joint. The application of this theory is seen in the design of the modern running shoe, with cushioning, support, and motion control. However, a new theory is emerging that suggests that it is the use of these modern running shoes that has caused a maladaptive running style, which contributes to a high incidence of injury among runners. The suggested application of this theory is to cease use of the modern running shoe and transition to barefoot or minimalist running. This new running paradigm, which is at present inadequately defined, is proposed to avoid the adverse biomechanical effects of the modern running shoe. Future research should rigorously define and then test both theories regarding their ability to discover the etiology of running-related injury. Once discovered, the putative cause of running-related injury will then provide an evidence-based rationale for clinical prevention and treatment. PMID:24725045

Gallant, Jodi Lynn; Pierrynowski, Michael Raymond

2014-03-01

303

Labor Relations in the Decade Ahead: A Management Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trends of the late 1970s in educational labor relations will continue in the 1980s. There will be less legislation permitting public sector unionization, slower union organizing, tougher negotiations, more inter-union fights, more attempts to organize educational managers, greater political activity among educational unions, and increased debate…

Clark, R. Theodore, Jr.

1981-01-01

304

Alcohol-Related Content of Animated Cartoons: A Historical Perspective  

PubMed Central

This study, based on a stratified (by decade of production) random sample of 1,221 animated cartoons and 4,201 characters appearing in those cartoons, seeks to determine the prevalence of alcohol-related content; how, if at all, the prevalence changed between 1930 and 1996 (the years spanned by this research); and the types of messages that animated cartoons convey about beverage alcohol and drinking in terms of the characteristics that are associated with alcohol use, the contexts in which alcohol is used in cartoons, and the reasons why cartoon characters purportedly consume alcohol. Approximately 1 cartoon in 11 was found to contain alcohol-related content, indicating that the average child or adolescent viewer is exposed to approximately 24 alcohol-related messages each week just from the cartoons that he/she watches. Data indicated that the prevalence of alcohol-related content declined significantly over the years. Quite often, alcohol consumption was shown to result in no effects whatsoever for the drinker, and alcohol use often occurred when characters were alone. Overall, mixed, ambivalent messages were provided about drinking and the types of characters that did/not consume alcoholic beverages.

Klein, Hugh; Shiffman, Kenneth S.

2013-01-01

305

MULTIDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES IN EVENT-RELATED BRAIN POTENTIAL RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

The volume is the Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress on Event-Related Potentials of the Brain (EPIC-IV) held in Hendersonville, North Carolina in April 1976. It contains 118 manuscripts including critical reviews and data reports in the following areas of ERP resear...

306

The Terri Schiavo saga: ethical and legal aspects and implications for clinicians.  

PubMed

On March 31, 2005, Terri Schiavo (born December 3, 1963) died -- the final complication of a cardiac arrest on February 25, 1990. Her death was preceded by the withdrawal of artificially administered hydration and nutrition through a feeding tube. Prior to her death, Terri's saga was the focus of intense medical, ethical, and legal debates in the United States (US) and elsewhere. These debates were characterized by confusion about the facts, ethical principles, and laws relevant to the case. Much of the confusion revolved around a number of ethical and legal questions including: Is it ethically and legally permissible to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatments from patients who do not want the treatments? Is withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatments the same as physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia? Is artificially administered hydration and nutrition a medical treatment or mandatory care akin to bathing? What were Terri's values, preferences, and goals regarding life-sustaining treatments? In this article, the medical, ethical, and legal data related to the case and the aforementioned ethical and legal questions raised by it are reviewed. Finally, the clinical implications of the saga, such as the need for clinicians to be more proactive in educating patients about their rights related to making health care decisions, end-of-life care options, and advance care planning (e.g., completing an advance directive) are discussed. Notably, given that the Schiavo saga occurred in the US, this article is written from a US perspective. PMID:19776703

Mueller, Paul S

2009-09-01

307

Management of sorafenib-related adverse events: a clinician's perspective.  

PubMed

Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is approved for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It is being evaluated in phase II and III clinical trials, which include treatment as a single agent (locally advanced/metastatic radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer [DTC]), as part of multimodality care (HCC), and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents (metastatic breast cancer). Sorafenib-related adverse events (AEs) that commonly occur across these tumor types include hand-foot skin reaction (HSFR), rash, upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) distress (ie, diarrhea), fatigue, and hypertension. These commonly range from grade 1 to 3, per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), and often occur early in treatment. The goal for the management of these AEs is to prevent, treat, and/or minimize their effects, thereby enabling patients to remain on treatment and improve their quality of life. Proactive management, along with ongoing patient education (before and during sorafenib treatment), can help to effectively manage symptoms, often without the need for sorafenib dose modification or drug holidays. Effective management techniques for common sorafenib-related AEs, as well other important disease sequelae not directly related to treatment, are presented. Recommendations and observations are based on physician/author experience and recommendations from published literature. PMID:24576654

Brose, Marcia S; Frenette, Catherine T; Keefe, Stephen M; Stein, Stacey M

2014-02-01

308

HIV-related politics in long-term perspective.  

PubMed

Some long-term, large-scale socio-economic changes may affect the politics of HIV and other emerging viruses such as hepatitis C. It is useful to ask why the potential peace dividend of the early 1990s failed to provide adequate resources for HIV-related social and medical service delivery in developed or developing nations. This failure can be understood by looking at long-term global economic trends and the pressures they put on governments and corporations. They have produced a period in which fundamental issues of political and economic structure are at stake and, often, the response is a divide-and-rule politics to promote stability. National politics differ in terms of the extent to which such a 'politics of scapegoating' is institutionalized and in terms of which groups are scapegoated. Groups such as drug injectors, gay and bisexual men and sex traders are particularly likely to be targeted both by the scapegoaters and by HIV. Given this framework, how should public health professionals and activists engaged in HIV-related issues respond? Under what circumstances should we orient efforts upwards towards corporate, political or bureaucratic leaders? Under what circumstances, and how, should we orient towards popular forces? Relatedly, we need to consider an issue we often ignore: What do we have to offer potential allies? That is, in terms of their goals, philosophies and needs, why should they ally with us? PMID:9743731

Friedman, S R

1998-06-01

309

A relational perspective on PTSD in early childhood.  

PubMed

This paper describes the clinical and research evidence for the importance of the relational context of posttraumatic stress disorder in young children. We review 17 studies that simultaneously assessed parental and child functioning following trauma. In many studies, despite limitations, an association between undesirable parental/family variables and maladaptive child outcomes has been consistently found. We present a model of the parental/family variables as moderators and vicarious traumatic agents for symptoms in young children. Also, a Compound Model is proposed, with three distinctive patterns of the parent-child relationship that impact on posttraumatic symptomatology in young children. Implications for clinical practice and research directions are discussed. PMID:11776426

Scheering, M S; Zeanah, C H

2001-10-01

310

Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.  

PubMed

'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited. PMID:23217061

Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

2013-12-01

311

The Social Work Ethics Audit: A Risk-Management Strategy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Article integrates current knowledge on social work ethics and introduces the concept of a social work ethics audit to aid social workers in their efforts to identify pertinent ethical issues; review and assess the adequacy of their current ethics-related practices; modify their practices as needed; and monitor the implementation of these changes.…

Reamer, Frederic G.

2000-01-01

312

Everyday Ethics: Ethical Issues and Stress in Nursing Practice  

PubMed Central

Aim This paper is a report of a study of the type, frequency, and level of stress of ethical issues encountered by nurses in their everyday practice. Background Everyday ethical issues in nursing practice attract little attention but can create stress for nurses. Nurses often feel uncomfortable in addressing the ethical issues they encounter in patient care. Methods A self-administered survey was sent in 2004 to 1000 nurses in four states in four different census regions of the United States of America. The adjusted response rate was 52%. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulations and Pearson correlations. Results A total of 422 questionnaires were used in the analysis. The five most frequently-occurring and most stressful ethical and patient care issues were protecting patients' rights; autonomy and informed consent to treatment; staffing patterns; advanced care planning; and surrogate decision-making. Other common occurrences were unethical practices of healthcare professionals; breaches of patient confidentiality or right to privacy; and end-of-life decision-making. Younger nurses and those with fewer years of experience encountered ethical issues more frequently and reported higher levels of stress. Nurses from different regions also experienced specific types of ethical problems more commonly. Conclusion Nurses face daily ethical challenges in the provision of quality care. To retain nurses, targeted ethics-related interventions that address caring for an increasingly complex patient population are needed.

Ulrich, Connie M.; Taylor, Carol; Soeken, Karen; O'Donnell, Patricia; Farrar, Adrienne; Danis, Marion; Grady, Christine

2010-01-01

313

Origins of the ethical attitude.  

PubMed

This paper seeks to explore the genesis of the capacity for an ethical attitude, personally and professionally. As analysts working in intimate clinical settings, ethics is at the foundation of our professional lives, as it is at the foundation of our humanity and what it is we struggle towards in our own personal development. The ethical attitude presupposes special responsibilities that we choose to adopt in relation to another. Thus, a parallel situation pertains between caregiver and child and between analyst and patient: they are not equal partners, but nevertheless are in a situation of mutuality, shared subjectivity, and reciprocal influence. The basic premise of this paper is that the analytic attitude is an ethical attitude, and that the ethical attitude is a developmental achievement, and as such it may reach beyond the depressive position. PMID:11471333

Solomon, H M

2001-07-01

314

Ethics and maternity care: from principles to practice.  

PubMed

In this column, the associate editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education (JPE) discusses the decision to devote an issue of JPE to the ethics of childbirth and maternity care. The current crisis in maternity care mandates a careful look at the ethical principles that provide the foundation for practice. The contents of this special issue include: a broad overview of ethics of childbearing, historical perspectives and contemporary understanding of informed decision making, the ethical issues faced by childbirth educators, and the challenges and moral distress experienced by childbirth educators and other maternity care providers when their values, beliefs, and ethical standards are in conflict with standard maternity care practices. PMID:19415107

Lothian, Judith A

2009-01-01

315

A different perspective on conspicuity related motorcycle crashes.  

PubMed

The most common type of conflict in which a motorcyclist is injured or killed is a collision between a motorcycle and a car, often in priority situations. Many studies on motorcycle safety focus on the question why car drivers fail to give priority and on the poor conspicuity of motorcycles. The concept of 'looked-but-failed-to-see' crashes is a recurring item. On the other hand, it is not entirely unexpected that motorcycles have many conflicts with cars; there simply are so many cars on the road. This paper tries to unravel whether - acknowledging the differences in exposure - car drivers indeed fail to yield for motorcycles more often than for other cars. For this purpose we compared the causes of crashes on intersections (e.g. failing to give priority, speeding, etc.) between different crash types (car-motorcycle or car-car). In addition, we compared the crash causes of dual drivers (i.e. car drivers who also have their motorcycle licence) with regular car drivers. Our crash analysis suggests that car drivers do not fail to give priority to motorcycles relatively more often than to another car when this car/motorcycle approaches from a perpendicular angle. There is only one priority situation where motorcycles seem to be at a disadvantage compared to cars. This is when a car makes a left turn, and fails to give priority to an oncoming motorcycle. This specific crash scenario occurs more often when the oncoming vehicle is a motorcycle than when it is a car. We did not find a significant difference between dual drivers and regular car drivers in how often they give priority to motorcycles compared to cars. PMID:24291070

de Craen, Saskia; Doumen, Michelle J A; van Norden, Yvette

2014-02-01

316

The use of personal data from medical records and biological materials: ethical perspectives and the basis for legal restrictions in health research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the moral justification for using personal data without informed consent, from both medical records and biological materials, in research where subjects are not physically present in the study and will never have any contact with the study investigators. Although the idea of waiving the requirement for informed consent in certain investigations has been mentioned in several ethical

Enrique Regidor

2004-01-01

317

Das Problem Solidaritat: Perspektiven der padagogischen Ethik und der Kritischen Theorie = The Issue of Solidarity: Perspectives of Pedagogical Ethics and of Critical Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses "universal solidarity" as the central concept of a pedagogical ethic committed to the needs of the coming generation and of social victims. Argues that attempts to define "universal solidarity" indicate that critical theory seeks to comprehensively represent the modern moral sphere. Proposes a definition of "universal solidarity." (DSK)

Abeldt, Sonke

1997-01-01

318

Ethical voices of pediatric mental health nurses.  

PubMed

Ethical issues in pediatric mental health care have undergone little theoretical consideration and empirical study. In this exploratory ethnographic study, 20 Pediatric Mental Health Registered Nurses (PMHRNs) describe the ethical issues they believe arise from the care they deliver to children in school-age and adolescent age groups. Three major themes emerge from the interviews. These themes, the PMHRNs' relational roles, their role as advocate facilitator, and their view of the milieu as an extension of the family, are analyzed for ethical content using several ethical theories. These ethical theories are evaluated for adequacy, and an argument for the use of relational ethical theories in examining pediatric mental health ethical issues, as well as general pediatric nursing practice, is presented. PMID:10714037

Twomey, J G

2000-02-01

319

(Un)ethical behavior in organizations.  

PubMed

This review spotlights research related to ethical and unethical behavior in organizations. It builds on previous reviews and meta-analyses of the literature on (un)ethical behavior in organizations and discusses recent advances in the field. The review emphasizes how this research speaks to the influence of the organizational context on (un)ethical behavior, proceeding from a more macro to a more micro view on (un)ethical behavior and covering ethical infrastructures, interpersonal influences, individual differences, and cognitive and affective processes. The conclusion highlights opportunities for future research. PMID:23834354

Treviño, Linda Klebe; den Nieuwenboer, Niki A; Kish-Gephart, Jennifer J

2014-01-01

320

Circumstantial Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Illustrates the difficulties of managing conflicts among formal standards in codes of ethics and among professional and personal standards through two examples from evaluation practice. The mediation of human judgment reveals an inevitable subjectivity that threatens the credibility of the field. (Author/SLD)

Mabry, Linda

1999-01-01

321

Consumer ethics: An empirical investigation of factors influencing ethical judgments of the final consumer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Business and marketing ethics have come to the forefront in recent years. While consumers have been surveyed regarding their perceptions of ethical business and marketing practices, research has been minimal with regard to their ethical beliefs and ideologies. This research investigates general attitudes of consumers relative to business, government and people in general, and compares these attitudes to their beliefs

Scott J. Vitell; James Muncy

1992-01-01

322

Using a Corporate Code of Ethics to Assess Students' Ethicality: Implications for Business Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author used a corporate code of ethics as a roadmap to create 18 scenarios for assessing business students' ethicality as measured by their behavioral intention. Using a logistic regression analysis, the author also examined 8 factors that could potentially influence students' ethicality. Results indicate 6 scenarios related to 5 areas of the…

Persons, Obeua

2009-01-01

323

Ethical Fairy Tales: Using Fairy Tales as Illustrative Ethical Dilemmas with Counseling Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning to navigate ethical dilemmas is important in counseling students' training. According to the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2009 standards, counseling students must receive ethics education. A common goal for counselor educators is to assist students in translating ethical theory into…

Henderson, Kathryn L.; Malone, Stefanie L.

2012-01-01

324

Are submissive nurses ethical?: reflecting on power anorexia.  

PubMed

We believe that the notion of power anorexia, which we define as a lack of desire to exercise power, is central to reflections about nursing ethical concerns. Questioning the assumption that nurses are powerless, we argue that nurses can and do exercise power and that their actions and inactions have consequences not only for themselves, but also for those for whom they care. We propose that a feminist ethics perspective be used both to understand and to overcome nurses' power anorexia. Feminist thinkers remind us not only of oppression's psychological impact, but that stereotypical views about women are socially constructed and, therefore, can be changed. Nurses using this framework should explore the implications of a centralized notion of caring to the way we conceive of power relations in health care. Perhaps deconstructing caring by focusing on how nurses exercise power could help us to re-conceptualize nursing and promote new agendas for health and health care. PMID:12514841

Lunardi, Valeria Lerch; Peter, Elizabeth; Gastaldo, Denise

2002-01-01

325

Patients' perspective on their relatives' involvement in treatment during a short-term psychiatric hospitalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growing interest in the patient's perspective regarding mental health services, several instruments have been developed\\u000a for this area of research. However, despite the availability of multidimensional questionnaires, the dimensions evaluated\\u000a have rarely addressed the issue of the involvement of relatives in treatment. The present study aimed at documenting the preferences\\u000a and level of satisfaction of 92 patients hospitalized

M. Perreault; G. Paquin; S. Kennedy; J. Desmarais; H. Tardif

1999-01-01

326

Challenges in relating to mental health professionals: Perspectives of persons with severe mental illness.  

PubMed

A previous analysis showed that mental health service users experienced profound loneliness, struggled to relate to other people, and were careful in considering what to share with health-care professionals. Being recognized by professionals in relationships may contribute to recovery processes characterized by 'connectedness', 'hope and optimism', 'identity', 'meaning', and 'empowerment'. This paper regards people as mainly seeking contact and meaning (relational perspective) and aims to describe service users' understanding of being in relationships with professionals, and how these relationships may limit or enhance recovery. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze data from in-depth interviews. Participants described three levels of connectedness with professionals: (i) being detached; (ii) being cautious; and (iii) being open and trusting. Level of connectedness seemed to be associated with opportunities for promoted recovery. Trusting relationships may strengthen identity, provide opportunities for meaning and hope, and contribute to opening new perspectives, and lessen significance of internal voices. Adopting a relational perspective may assist professionals in recognizing the service user as a person involved in making sense of life experiences and in the process of connecting to other people. PMID:23718821

Adnøy Eriksen, Kristin; Arman, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Sundfør, Bengt; Karlsson, Bengt

2014-04-01

327

Clinical, legal and ethical implications of the intra-ocular (off-label) use of bevacizumab (avastin)--a South African perspective.  

PubMed

Choroidal neovascularisation is a potentially visually devastating element of various forms of eye pathology. Recent research has focused on neurovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) as a cause. AMD can be classified as being exudative (wet) or atrophic (dry). Wet AMD is characterised by a pathological process in which new blood vessels develop in the choroids, causing leakage of fluid and haemorrhage under the retina and leading to localised serous detachment and loss of central vision. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates growth of neovascular membranes. Treatments have until recently yielded disappointing results. Ophthalmologists are using intra-ocular injections of bevacizumab (Avastin), an anti-VEGF, to treat AMD. Avastin appears to be safe and effective in the short term, but its intra-ocular administration is entirely off-label. Avastin is registered for treating metastatic colorectal and breast cancer. The off-label use of medication is an important part of mainstream, legitimate medical practice worldwide. Lawyers representing plaintiffs injured by drugs increasingly encounter off-label use claims. From a legal/ethical point of view the off-label use of medication represents a delicate balance between the statutory regulation of medication and a physician's prerogative to prescribe medication that in his or her medical opinion will be beneficial to the patient. The main reason for the controversy created by the off-label use of Avastin is that there are anti-VEGF drugs on the market that have formal approval for the treatment of AMD (and other eye conditions). Lucentis, for example, is extremely expensive, with treatment cost approximately 50 times that of Avastin. Many patients suffering from AMD and macular oedema cannot afford the registered product. The off-label use of Avastin has passed the innovative or experimental stages, as ophthalmologists have used it regularly and openly for a long time, with good success. Such use therefore cannot be considered careless, imprudent or unprofessional. We submit that an ophthalmologist who omits to inform a patient of the availability of Avastin for this form of treatment may be found to be negligent. Protocols developed by the South African Vitreoretinal Society and endorsed by the Ophthalmological Society of South Africa for administering Avastin and other intra-ocular medication intravitreally should be strictly adhered to. PMID:19736847

Jansen, Rita-Marié; Gouws, Chris

2009-06-01

328

Some Basics about Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of ethics focuses on the role of human performance technology professionals in helping corporate ethicists. Highlights include definitions of ethics, morals, values, and business ethics; ethics in academia and in business; and application of the knowledge of ethics to decision-making. (Contains 18 references.) (LRW)

Dean, Peter J.

1994-01-01

329

The Ethic of Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article proposes the concept of an ethic of community to complement and extend other ethical frames used in education e.g. the ethics of justice, critique, and care. Proceeding from the traditional definition of ethics as the study of moral duty and obligation, ethic of community is defined as the moral responsibility to engage in communal…

Furman, Gail C.

2004-01-01

330

Our Ethical Responsibilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responding to diminished public esteem means intensifying efforts to create an ethical college climate. Educators face these ethical challenges: managing institutions ethically; teaching ethics to students, both in class and in dealing with student behavior in an educational setting; and serving as ethical leaders for the wider community. (MSE)

Perlman, Daniel H.

1992-01-01

331

Online Ethics Center for Engineering and Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Established in 1995 under a grant from the National Science Foundation, the Ethics center is designed to provide "engineers, scientists, science and engineering students with resources useful for understanding and addressing ethically significant problems that arise in their work life" or for including ethical problems in their courses. To that end, this site offers an array of resources. In the Research Ethics section, users will find activities, scenarios, case studies, and guides, as well as related links. The Cases section offers an even larger selection of proposed and actual cases along with annotated links. Among the many other offerings at the site are essays on science and engineering ethics, sample ethical codes, corporate setting ethical scenarios, and studies on diversity. Additional resources include conference listings (a bit outdated), a bibliography, a glossary, and an internal search engine.

332

The ethical group psychotherapist: a coda.  

PubMed

This concluding article of a two-part special section on the ethical group psychotherapist are highlighted: (1) the importance of the cultivation of the skill and knowledge base of the group psychotherapist in terms of pertinent legal statutes and ethical guidelines; (2) the criticalness of certain personality features related to the concept of virtue; (3) a therapist's self-awareness contributes to the capacities to think and respond ethically; (4) ethical decision making is most likely to occur when the group psychotherapist attends comprehensively to all dimensions that define the setting in which a dilemma emerges; and (5) that in the service of positive ethics, attention to the ethical dimensions of group psychotherapy practice should be continuously present. In agreement with other contributions to this section, I conclude that the commitment to the ethical practice of group psychotherapy must be made not only by the individual practitioner but also by educational and training programs and professional organizations. PMID:17266427

Brabender, Virginia

2007-01-01

333

Ethics and gastrointestinal artificial feeding.  

PubMed

Medical ethics is the study of human values as they relate to the practice of medicine. Ethics intersects with gastroenterology primarily involving issues of gastric and intestinal artificial feeding at the end of life. Language imparts meaning. Gastric artificial feeding is not the same as eating. Recent data suggest that gastric artificial feeding does not prolong life in patients with dementia and dysphagia. Given the lack of documented benefit of gastrointestinal feeding in these patients, the literature has focused on selection of appropriate patients for this medical intervention. Ethical care involves compassion, communication, consultation, and collaboration in dealing with emotionally difficult circumstances. PMID:15245701

Lipman, Timothy O

2004-08-01

334

Dentistry and ethics by the road less traveled.  

PubMed

In what may be a unique educational career path, this current dental student combined predental course requirements with courses and a master's thesis in applied medical ethics prior to entering dental education. This background has led to leadership opportunities in designing and teaching the ethics program in dental school and in the American Student Dental Association. The view of ethics from the students', rather than the practitioners', perspective is certainly formative to the future of the profession. PMID:22263364

Tiller, Chrissy

2011-01-01

335

CS 624 The Poor In Wesley's Social Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spring: Hynson, Leon O. The Wesleyan Revival: John Wesley’s Ethics for Church and State. Salem: Schmul, 1999. Dunning, H. Ray. Reflecting the Divine Image: Christian Ethics in Wesleyan Perspective. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 1998. Jennings, Theodore W. Jr. Good News to the Poor: John Wesley’s Evangelical Economics. Nashville: Abingdon, 1990. MacArthur, Kathleen Walker. The Economic Ethics of John Wesley. New

Hugo Magallanes

2001-01-01

336

Physicians' attitudes toward medical and ethical challenges for patients in the vegetative state: comparing Canadian and German perspectives in a vignette survey  

PubMed Central

Background Physicians treating patients in the vegetative state (VS) must deal with uncertainty in diagnosis and prognosis, as well as ethical issues. We examined whether physicians’ attitudes toward medical and ethical challenges vary across two national medical practice settings. Methods A comparative survey was conducted among German and Canadian specialty physicians, based on a case vignette about the VS. Similarities and differences of participants’ attitudes toward medical and ethical challenges between the two samples were analyzed with non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney-U-Test). Results The overall response rate was 13.4%. Eighty percent of all participants correctly applied the diagnostic category of VS with no significant differences between countries. Many of the participants who chose the correct diagnosis of VS attributed capabilities to the patient, particularly the ability to feel pain (70%), touch (51%) and to experience hunger and thirst (35%). A large majority of participants (94%) considered the limitation of life-sustaining treatment (LST) under certain circumstances, but more Canadian participants were in favor of always limiting LST (32% vs. 12%; Chi-square: p?

2014-01-01

337

Ethics and Public Administration: On the Italian Case and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Italy the theme of ethics and public administration has not yet found expression in a shared ethical-normative perspective and a systematic regulative framework that might help to formulate suitable principles and promote good practices. The present contribution will first provide an overview of the Italian situation, and then show the need for a philosophical foundation of the relationship between

Benedetta Giovanola

2011-01-01

338

Embracing Excellence: A Positive Approach to Ethical Decision Making  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethics courses may provoke fear and uncertainty in art therapy students and practitioners if taught from a risk management perspective, which focuses on reducing therapist exposure to risk and avoiding harm to clients. In contrast, a positive ethical approach fosters empowerment, embraces limits, and enhances trust between art therapists and their…

Hinz, Lisa D.

2011-01-01

339

Bodily selves in relation: embodied simulation as second-person perspective on intersubjectivity.  

PubMed

This article addresses basic aspects of social cognition focusing on the pivotal role played by the lived body in the constitution of our experience of others. It is suggested that before studying intersubjectivity we should better qualify the notion of the self. A minimal notion of the self, the bodily self, defined in terms of its motor potentialities, is proposed. The discovery of mirror mechanisms for action, emotions and sensations led to the proposal of an embodied approach to intersubjectivity-embodied simulation (ES) theory. ES and the related notion of neural reuse provide a new empirically based perspective on intersubjectivity, viewed first and foremost as intercorporeality. ES challenges the notion that folk psychology is the sole account of interpersonal understanding. ES is discussed within a second-person perspective on mindreading. PMID:24778374

Gallese, Vittorio

2014-01-01

340

Focus on Teaching: Ethics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that business today is concerned with the translation and application of ethical principles into everyday business life. Offers a list of Web sites on ethics and business ethics at various colleges and universities. (SR)

Worley, Rebecca B.; Dyrud, Marilyn A.

1998-01-01

341

The Ethics Connection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created and maintained by the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University, the Ethics Connection demonstrates the power of the Web as an interactive information and communication medium. This site combines excellent content, form, and function to provide teachers, researchers, community leaders, and the public "with strategies to heighten ethical awareness and improve ethical decision making." The rich information resources at the Ethics Connection include an interactive forum for the discussion of ethical issues; an extensive collection of the latest news and publications on ethics, featuring the Markkula Center's own quarterly, Issues in Ethics; a collection of several case studies on ethics, which include message boards for visitors' comments; a Practicing Ethics section, offering numerous resources for day-to-day ethical decision making; and a compilation of 900 ethical links, all of which are categorized, rated, and reviewed.

342

The influence of firm behavior on purchase intention: do consumers really care about business ethics?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posits that although behaving “ethically” should be important for its own sake, whether a firm behaves ethically or unethically may also have a significant influence on consumers’ purchase decisions. Examines the issue of unethical corporate behavior from the perspective of consumers. Addresses several questions. First, what are consumers’ expectations regarding the ethicality of corporate behavior? Second, is whether a firm

Elizabeth H. Creyer

1997-01-01

343

Ethical Problems in Pharmacy Practice: A Survey of Difficulty and Incidence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of ethical problems from pharmacists' (n=869) perspective in various practice settings found family and work experience were most influential on personal ethics, most had experienced a problem within the last year, and different ethical problems were cited as most commonly occurring and most difficult to resolve. (Author/MSE)

Haddad, Amy M.

1991-01-01

344

Ethics and gastrointestinal artificial feeding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical ethics is the study of human values as they relate to the practice of medicine. Ethics intersects with gastroenterology\\u000a primarily involving issues of gastric and intestinal artificial feeding at the end of life. Language imparts meaning. Gastric\\u000a artificial feeding is not the same as eating. Recent data suggest that gastric artificial feeding does not prolong life in\\u000a patients with

Timothy O. Lipman

2004-01-01

345

American Association for the Advancement of Science Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion: Evolution  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion (DoSER) provides this Website offering "resources on the scientific content of evolutionary theory and its place in education; historical, philosophical, legal and religious perspectives on evolution; and commentary on current issues" (including the AAAS Board Statement on the Kansas State Board of Education decision). The site is organized into seven main sections: Current Issues, Educational Resources, Scientific Resources, Perspectives, Court Cases (including the "Balanced Treatment" Law), Historical Documents (by Darwin), and Epic of Evolution (essays from a forthcoming volume). Documents at the site reflect current thinking by the leading scholars in the field of evolution and provide historical context for evaluating current thinking. A careful collection of related links augments each section. For further information, see the Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion (DoSER) homepage.

346

Reiki and related therapies in the dialysis ward: an evidence-based and ethical discussion to debate if these complementary and alternative medicines are welcomed or banned  

PubMed Central

Background Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAMs) are increasingly practiced in the general population; it is estimated that over 30% of patients with chronic diseases use CAMs on a regular basis. CAMs are also used in hospital settings, suggesting a growing interest in individualized therapies. One potential field of interest is pain, frequently reported by dialysis patients, and seldom sufficiently relieved by mainstream therapies. Gentle-touch therapies and Reiki (an energy based touch therapy) are widely used in the western population as pain relievers. By integrating evidence based approaches and providing ethical discussion, this debate discusses the pros and cons of CAMs in the dialysis ward, and whether such approaches should be welcomed or banned. Discussion In spite of the wide use of CAMs in the general population, few studies deal with the pros and cons of an integration of mainstream medicine and CAMs in dialysis patients; one paper only regarded the use of Reiki and related practices. Widening the search to chronic pain, Reiki and related practices, 419 articles were found on Medline and 6 were selected (1 Cochrane review and 5 RCTs updating the Cochrane review). According to the EBM approach, Reiki allows a statistically significant but very low-grade pain reduction without specific side effects. Gentle-touch therapy and Reiki are thus good examples of approaches in which controversial efficacy has to be balanced against no known side effect, frequent free availability (volunteer non-profit associations) and easy integration with any other pharmacological or non pharmacological therapy. While a classical evidence-based approach, showing low-grade efficacy, is likely to lead to a negative attitude towards the use of Reiki in the dialysis ward, the ethical discussion, analyzing beneficium (efficacy) together with non maleficium (side effects), justice (cost, availability and integration with mainstream therapies) and autonomy (patients’ choice) is likely to lead to a permissive-positive attitude. Summary This paper debates the current evidence on Reiki and related techniques as pain-relievers in an ethical framework, and suggests that physicians may wish to consider efficacy but also side effects, contextualization (availability and costs) and patient’s requests, according also to the suggestions of the Society for Integrative Oncology (tolerate, control efficacy and side effects).

2013-01-01

347

Universalist ethics in extraterrestrial encounter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If humanity encounters an extraterrestrial civilization, or if two extraterrestrial civilizations encounter each other, then the outcome may depend not only on the civilizations' relative strength to destroy each other but also on what ethics are held by one or both civilizations. This paper explores outcomes of encounter scenarios in which one or both civilizations hold a universalist ethical framework. Several outcomes are possible in such scenarios, ranging from one civilization destroying the other to both civilizations racing to be the first to commit suicide. Thus, attention to the ethics of both humanity and extraterrestrials is warranted in human planning for such an encounter. Additionally, the possibility of such an encounter raises profound questions for contemporary human ethics, even if such an encounter never occurs.

Baum, Seth D.

2010-02-01

348

Ethical issues in penile transplantation.  

PubMed

This article provides an overview of the ethical issues associated with penile transplantation, a form of composite tissue allografting. There is only one reported case of human penile transplantation, and, as such, this technique is considered to be experimental. The ethical issues at stake involve both the graft donor and the graft recipient. With regard to the recipient, there are significant concerns relating to surgical risks and benefits, informed consent, body image (including surgical expectations and outcomes) and compliance. Donor issues may include family consent and privacy, as well as graft harvesting (leaving the donor cadaver without a penis). Many of these ethical issues can be explored during the recipient's assessment and consent process. Because no medium-term or long-term outcome data for this procedure exist-only one such operation has ever been performed-the burdens and ethical issues concerning penile transplantation remain unknown. PMID:20835258

Zhang, Li-Chao; Zhao, Yong-Bing; Hu, Wei-Lie

2010-11-01

349

Ethical issues in penile transplantation  

PubMed Central

This article provides an overview of the ethical issues associated with penile transplantation, a form of composite tissue allografting. There is only one reported case of human penile transplantation, and, as such, this technique is considered to be experimental. The ethical issues at stake involve both the graft donor and the graft recipient. With regard to the recipient, there are significant concerns relating to surgical risks and benefits, informed consent, body image (including surgical expectations and outcomes) and compliance. Donor issues may include family consent and privacy, as well as graft harvesting (leaving the donor cadaver without a penis). Many of these ethical issues can be explored during the recipient's assessment and consent process. Because no medium-term or long-term outcome data for this procedure exist—only one such operation has ever been performed—the burdens and ethical issues concerning penile transplantation remain unknown.

Zhang, Li-Chao; Zhao, Yong-Bing; Hu, Wei-Lie

2010-01-01

350

Deinstitutionalization in Greece: Ethical problems.  

PubMed

The following paper is based on a Concerted Action which focused on the "Ethical aspects of deistinstutionalisation in mental health care" in 2001. It investigates the development and the ethical dilemmas posed by deinstitutionalization in Greece. This movement has recently undergone a very active phase but the transition from the traditional model of psychiatric care to the community based system unavoidably creates many ethical problems related to the professionals' attitude towards individual liberties, dignity and other fundamental rights of mentally ill persons. These problems exist not only in the level of the therapist-patient relationship but in the level of policy making as well as its implementation. Moreover, the paper deals with specific ethical problems such as stigmatisation and isolation in the community context, as well as the role of the family. PMID:22218080

Ploumpidis, D; Garanis-Papadatos, T; Economou, M

2008-10-01

351

The ethics of receiving.  

PubMed

As a teacher and philosopher, Dr. Kate Lindemann has spent much of her professional life thinking about morality in human relationships. Critical analyses abound about the obligations and particular responsibilities of health care providers to patients, teachers to students, etc. Such analyses often emphasize the inherent inequality, and thus vulnerability, of those who are the recipients of care or knowledge. Though familiar with the ethics of care as a moral framework, Dr. Lindemann's perspectives on such relationships were profoundly affected and forever altered after acquiring a brain injury in 1998. The current manuscript describes how her views on caring acts as not only dynamic but reciprocal have been shaped by her experiences during rehabilitation and as a person now living with disability. PMID:14750546

Lindemann, Kate

2003-01-01

352

Priority setting of ICU resources in an influenza pandemic: a qualitative study of the Canadian public's perspectives  

PubMed Central

Background Pandemic influenza may exacerbate existing scarcity of life-saving medical resources. As a result, decision-makers may be faced with making tough choices about who will receive care and who will have to wait or go without. Although previous studies have explored ethical issues in priority setting from the perspective of clinicians and policymakers, there has been little investigation into how the public views priority setting during a pandemic influenza, in particular related to intensive care resources. Methods To bridge this gap, we conducted three public town hall meetings across Canada to explore Canadian's perspectives on this ethical challenge. Town hall discussions group discussions were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Six interrelated themes emerged from the town hall discussions related to: ethical and empirical starting points for deliberation; criteria for setting priorities; pre-crisis planning; in-crisis decision-making; the need for public deliberation and input; and participants' deliberative struggle with the ethical issues. Conclusions Our findings underscore the importance of public consultation in pandemic planning for sustaining public trust in a public health emergency. Participants appreciated the empirical and ethical uncertainty of decision-making in an influenza pandemic and demonstrated nuanced ethical reasoning about priority setting of intensive care resources in an influenza pandemic. Policymakers may benefit from a better understanding the public's empirical and ethical 'starting points' in developing effective pandemic plans.

2012-01-01

353

Teaching Business Ethics or Teaching Business Ethically?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that one of the most important contexts for ethical decision-making is the nature and operation of "contemporary capitalisms." Suggests that rather than issuing a call for teaching business ethics, the author emphasizes the need for more ethical business teaching. (SG)

Stablein, Ralph

2003-01-01

354

Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE)  

NSF Publications Database

The Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE) program considers proposals for research and educational projects to improve ethics education in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports. Building on the Foundation's prior support for ethics-related research and program development, the NSF Directorates for Biological Sciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, Education and Human Resources, Engineering, and Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ...

355

[Living with Ethics, Weakness and Violence  

PubMed

The paper is based on a long term experience in discussing problems of human-animal relations under ethical aspect. Ethical philosophy tries to set the standards. How do we live with these expections? - The dangers and consequences are being discussed. In the final part the circle of consideration will be expanded on describing the conditions under which ethically motivated changes are possible. PMID:11178443

Teutsch, Gotthard

1996-01-01

356

Ethical Aspects of Information Security and Privacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter reviews ethical aspects of computer and information security and privacy. After an introduction to ethical approaches\\u000a to information technology, the focus is first on ethical aspects of computer security. These include the moral importance\\u000a of computer security, the relation between computer security and national security, the morality of hacking and computer crime,\\u000a the nature of cyberterrorism and information

Philip Brey

357

Contrasting the ethical perspectives of biospecimen research among individuals with familial risk for hereditary cancer and biomedical researchers: implications for researcher training.  

PubMed

While ethical concerns about participating in biospecimen research have been previously identified, few studies have reported the concerns among individuals with familial risk for hereditary cancer (IFRs). At the same time, biomedical researchers often lack training in discussing such concerns to potential donors. This study explores IFRs' and biomedical researchers' perceptions of ethical concerns about participating in biobanking research. In separate focus groups, IFRs and biomedical researchers participated in 90-min telephone focus groups. Focus group questions centered on knowledge about laws that protect the confidentiality of biospecimen donors, understanding of informed consent and study procedures, and preferences for being recontacted about potential incidental discovery and also study results. A total of 40 IFRs and 32 biomedical researchers participated in the focus groups. Results demonstrated discrepancies between the perceptions of IFRs and researchers. IFRs' concerns centered on health information protection; potential discrimination by insurers and employers; and preferences for being recontacted upon discovery of gene mutations or to communicate study results. Researchers perceived that participants understood laws protecting donors' privacy and (detailed study information outlined in the informed consent process), study outcomes were used to create a training tool kit to increase researchers' understanding of IFRs' concerns about biobanking. PMID:24786355

Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Koskan, Alexis; Sehovic, Ivana; Pal, Tuya; Meade, Cathy; Gwede, Clement K

2014-07-01

358

Ethical breakdowns.  

PubMed

Companies are spending a great deal of time and money to install codes of ethics, ethics training, compliance programs, and in-house watchdogs. If these efforts worked, the money would be well spent. But unethical behavior appears to be on the rise. The authors observe that even the best-intentioned executives may be unaware of their own or their employees' unethical behavior. Drawing from extensive research on cognitive biases, they offer five reasons for this blindness and suggest what to do about them. Ill-conceived goals may actually encourage negative behavior. Brainstorm unintended consequences when devising your targets. Motivated blindness makes us overlook unethical behavior when remaining ignorant would benefit us. Root out conflicts of interest. Indirect blindness softens our assessment of unethical behavior when it's carried out by third parties. Take ownership of the implications when you outsource work. The slippery slope mutes our awareness when unethical behavior develops gradually. Be alert for even trivial infractions and investigate them immediately. Overvaluing outcomes may lead us to give a pass to unethical behavior. Examine good outcomes to ensure they're not driven by unethical tactics. PMID:21510519

Bazerman, Max H; Tenbrunsel, Ann E

2011-04-01

359

Towards a dialogical ethics of interprofessionalism.  

PubMed

Contemporary medical practice brings a diverse range of professions and disciplines together in greater and closer contact. This situation of increasing complexity and changing professional roles gives rise to multifaceted ethical dilemmas and theoretical and practical concerns. In this essay we argue that for multidisciplinary relationships to be facilitated and to progress towards interdisciplinary teamwork, moral agents have to go beyond orthodox ethical systems and appeal to normative theory. We will argue that conceptualising ethics as a shared social practice may provide a useful starting point. This dialogic approach places greater emphasis on open deliberation and the articulation, negotiation, exploration and generation of new ethical perspectives in the here and now of clinical practice. PMID:15623971

Irvine, R; Kerridge, I; McPhee, J

2004-01-01

360

Research with Children: Methodological and Ethical Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Methodological and ethical challenges that researchers face when they conduct research with children are the focus of this article. The discussion is based on a study conducted with 2-6-year-old children in Iceland, where the purpose was to shed light on children's perspectives on their early childhood settings. The study is built on the…

Einarsdottir, Johanna

2007-01-01

361

Ethical and Spiritual Values in Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents a compilation of articles previously published in the journal "Counseling and Values." The follwing articles are included: (1) "Ethics and Spirituality: The Prevailing Forces Influencing the Counseling Profession" (Judith Miranti, Mary Thomas Burke); (2) "Three Contributions of a Spiritual Perspective to Counseling,…

Burke, Mary Thomas, Ed.; Miranti, Judith G., Ed.

362

Congress and the Media: The Ethical Connection.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay, an outgrowth of the Legislative Ethics and the Media Project, builds upon project meetings and interviews with members of a special task force made up of journalists representing various special ties and perspectives within the media as well as legislators, congressional staff members, and academic experts. The first of five sections…

Callahan, Daniel; And Others

363

The ethicality of altruistic corporate social responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This commentary questions commonly held assumptions about corporate social responsibility (CSR). It discusses the morality of altruistic CSR – philanthropic CSR activities that are not necessarily beneficial to the firm’s financial position. Evaluating altruistic CSR from all major ethical perspectives – utilitarianism, rights, justice and care – leads to the conclusion that, for publicly held corporations, such activity is immoral.

Geoffrey P. Lantos

2002-01-01

364

Religion & Ethics Newsweekly  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Produced by Thirteen/WNET New York, Religion & Ethics Newsweekly has been a PBS fixture since September 1997. The program takes on the important subjects of religion and ethics in a manner that is rather engaging, and the same can be said of their very fine website. Users can listen to the entire weekly show in its entirety, or download it and take it with them on their personal audio device. Educators will want to take a look at the "For Educators" area, which features a number of lesson plans and teaching tips designed to be used in conjunction with segments from the program and related websites. Finally, visitors can also search the contents of the site via a handy search engine that sits at the right-hand corner of every page.

365

American Legal Ethics Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the Cornell Law School's Legal Information Institute site (LII), the American Legal Ethics Library contains rules or codes, ethics opinions, judicial conduct codes, legal commentaries, and other materials relating to the law governing lawyers. Codes or rules are available for most of the nation's 50 states. Currently, the site also offers eleven commentaries on the "law of lawyering" for eleven different jurisdictions, written by legal scholars and major law firms in each jurisdiction's area. Another twelve narratives are in progress, including one for the European community. Accessible by topic or jurisdiction, the information is also available on CD-ROM. The hypertext format makes it easy to link from commentaries to relevant codes and rules. Roger C. Cramton, the Robert S. Stevens Professor of Law at Cornell, directs the project.

366

Institute for Global Ethics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A number of organizations and think-tanks have taken on the most pressing questions of our day, but relatively few have addressed such quandaries as basic as âÂÂAre there a core of shared, moral values?â In 1990, the Institute for Global Ethics started with this crucial inquiry and expanded their scope to work towards understanding these values. From the homepage, visitors can read through their online resources, which include the Ethics Newsline (a weekly electronic newsletter), letters from their president, and a number of topical white papers. Some of these papers have rather compelling titles, such as âÂÂEthics and the Learned Professionsâ and âÂÂCorporate Social Responsibility and Peacebuilding: A Case for Action in Israel and the Palestinian TerritoriesâÂÂ. Finally, users of the site may also wish to take a look at their calendar of upcoming seminars and lectures.

367

Comprehension: The art of not knowing. Dialogical and ethical perspectives on empathy as dialogue in personal and person-centred relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Empathy is an innate ability of the human being that develops from the early infant stage. As opposed to cognitive social perspective taking, which always aims at specific goals in order to gain some advantage for oneself, empathy is a social bridge that comes without a particular intention but always as an expression of the personal quality of solidarity. This

Peter F. Schmid

368

Presence: Immediate co-experiencing and co-responding. Phenomenological, dialogical and ethical perspectives on contact and perception in person-centred therapy and beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although this volume appears as the last in the series, it deals with the precondition to the conditions described in volumes 1 to 3. Without relationship and its perception, the other conditions would make no sense. This chapter also links the description of the single conditions and brings them together under a common perspective. It first sheds light on what

Peter F. Schmid

369

Fair shares: a preliminary framework and case analyzing the ethics of offshoring.  

PubMed

Much has been written about the offshoring phenomenon from an economic efficiency perspective. Most authors have attempted to measure the net economic effects of the strategy and many purport to show that "in the long run" that benefits will outweigh the costs. There is also a relatively large literature on implementation which describes the best way to manage the offshoring process. But what is the morality of offshoring? What is its "rightness" or "wrongness?" Little analysis of the ethics of offshoring has been completed thus far. This paper develops a preliminary framework for analyzing the ethics of offshoring and then applies this framework to basic case study of offshoring in the U.S. The paper following discusses the definition of offshoring; shifts to the basic philosophical grounding of the ethical concepts; develops a template for conducting an ethics analysis of offshoring; applies this template using basic data for offshoring in the United States; and conducts a preliminary ethical analysis of the phenomenon in that country, using a form of utilitarianism as an analytical baseline. The paper concludes with suggestions for further research. PMID:19629753

Gordon, Cameron; Zimmerman, Alan

2010-06-01

370

Ethics: A Selected Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ethics: A Selected Bibliography, now in its seventh revised edition, was compiled to support the study of ethics, one of the U.S. Army War College's enduring themes. This list, like our earlier ethics bibliographies, focuses on military ethics, as well as...

L. Garder

2010-01-01

371

Ethics in Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ethics is defined as a set of guidelines and/or rules for the conduct of individual behavior in an organization or civil society. This ethical code of conduct is intended to guide policies, practices, and decision-making for employees on behalf of the organization. This article explores the importance of ethics, the basis for making ethical

Medlin, E. Lander

2010-01-01

372

An Ethics Primer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a PDF that provides engaging, interactive, and classroom-friendly lesson ideas for integrating ethical issues into a science classroom. It also provides a basic background on ethics as a discipline, with straightforward descriptions of major ethical theories. Several decision-making frameworks are included to help students apply reasoned analysis to ethical issues.

2008-01-01

373

Seamless Integration of Ethics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ineffectiveness of business ethics education has received attention from the popular press and the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business after repeated ethics scandals. One possibility is that teaching ethics is different from other content areas because ethics is best learned when the student does not know it is being taught.…

Beggs, Jeri Mullins

2011-01-01

374

Ethics in Publication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the ethical dilemmas in publication and provides recommendations for guidelines involving publication ethics. Counselors may be confronted with a variety of ethical dilemmas such as authorship issues, student-professor research, plagiarism, and other publication problems. The American Counseling Association's "Code of Ethics and…

Jones, Karen Dayle

1999-01-01

375

Ethics Primer: Ethics and Bioethics Lessons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ethics Primer provides engaging, interactive, and classroom-friendly lesson ideas for integrating ethical issues into a science classroom. It also provides basic background on ethics as a discipline, with straightforward descriptions of major ethical theories. Several decision-making frameworks are included to help students apply reasoned analysis to ethical issues. Although the Primer is designed for secondary school science classrooms, it has been used by teachers in a variety of classes and grade levels. The Primer is free for download but the author requests information before accessing the file.

2007-01-01

376

[Ethical reflections on cell reprogramming].  

PubMed

New advances in cell reprogramming, and particularly in obtaining iPS cells, have represented a promising possibility for avoiding the use of human embryonic cells in experimental research and clinical medicine, use which is ethically unacceptable, as obtaining these cells requires the destruction of human embryos. The road travelled to arrive at the discovery of iPS cells, and especially the ethical assessment of each of the steps taken to that end, are evaluated in this paper. The ethical judgement merited by the various uses that can be made of iPS cells is also examined, because just when it seemed that iPS cells could resolve the ethical problems inherent to the use of embryonic stem cells, new possibilities for using iPS cells, especially related with human reproduction, have opened up expectations for using these cells that are far removed from the most fundamental ethical standards. We conclude that the ethical debate on cell reprogramming and particularly on the experimental and clinical use of iPS cells remains open. PMID:23130744

Aznar Lucea, Justo; Martínez, Miriam

2012-01-01

377

How society shapes the health gradient: work-related health inequalities in a comparative perspective.  

PubMed

Analyses in comparative political economy have the potential to contribute to understanding health inequalities within and between societies. This article uses a varieties of capitalism approach that groups high-income countries into coordinated market economies (CME) and liberal market economies (LME) with different labor market institutions and degrees of employment and unemployment protection that may give rise to or mediate work-related health inequalities. We illustrate this approach by presenting two longitudinal comparative studies of unemployment and health in Germany and the United States, an archetypical CME and LME. We find large differences in the relationship between unemployment and health across labor-market and institutional contexts, and these also vary by educational status. Unemployed Americans, especially of low education or not in receipt of unemployment benefits, have the poorest health outcomes. We argue for the development of a broader comparative research agenda on work-related health inequalities that incorporates life course perspectives. PMID:22429159

McLeod, Christopher B; Hall, Peter A; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Hertzman, Clyde

2012-04-01

378

Ethics in prion disease.  

PubMed

This paper is intended to discuss some of the scientific and ethical issues that are created by increased research efforts towards earlier diagnosis, as well as to treatment of, human prion diseases (and related dementias), including the resulting consequences for individuals, their families, and society. Most patients with prion disease currently are diagnosed when they are about 2/3 of the way through their disease course (Geschwind et al., 2010a; Paterson et al., 2012b), when the disease has progressed so far that even treatments that stop the disease process would probably have little benefit. Although there are currently no treatments available for prion diseases, we and others have realized that we must diagnose patients earlier and with greater accuracy so that future treatments have hope of success. As approximately 15% of prion diseases have a autosomal dominant genetic etiology, this further adds to the complexity of ethical issues, particularly regarding when to conduct genetic testing, release of genetic results, and when or if to implement experimental therapies. Human prion diseases are both infectious and transmissible; great care is required to balance the needs of the family and individual with both public health needs and strained hospital budgets. It is essential to proactively examine and address the ethical issues involved, as well as to define and in turn provide best standards of care. PMID:23906487

Bechtel, Kendra; Geschwind, Michael D

2013-11-01

379

Evaluating a national science and technology program using the human capital and relational asset perspectives.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research is to evaluate the performance of the National Science and Technology Program (NSTP) by targeting the Taiwan National Telecommunication Program (NTP) initiated in 1998. The Taiwan telecommunications industry has prospered, currently occupying key positions in global markets even though NTP seldom contributes positively to patent citation performance. Hence, the authors of this study investigate the qualitative perspective of intellectual capital rather than quantitative technological indices. The current study focuses on both human capital and relational assets through surveys of 53 principal investigators of NTP projects and 63 industrial R&D managers of telecommunications corporations in the Taiwan market. Results show that NSTP member quality and the flow of employment are good indicators of human capital and that both perform better than the middle value in the case of Taiwan NTP. In addition, we find that industrial participants are more likely to share R&D resources than other academic researchers with higher intention of co-publishing, co-funding, and sharing equipment and facilities. The industrial NTP participants also have higher expectations regarding achieving advanced technology breakthroughs in contrast to non-NTP industrial interviewees. Moreover, industrial participants with greater industry-university cooperation intensity indeed obtain a particular advantage, that is, greater knowledge acquisition from other fields related to the effect of knowledge spillovers through the particular NSTP linkage. Accordingly, from the perspectives of human capital and relational assets, the authors conclude by articulating the importance of absorptive capacity resulting from good human capital and knowledge spillover contributed by relational assets within governmental technology policy and NSTP programming. PMID:20193964

Hung, Chia-Liang; Chou, Jerome Chih-Lung; Roan, Hung-Wei

2010-11-01

380

Resources to Support Ethical Practice in Evaluation: An Interview with the Director of the National Center for Research and Professional Ethics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Where do evaluators find resources on ethics and ethical practice? This article highlights a relatively new online resource, a centerpiece project of the National Center for Professional and Research Ethics (NCPRE), which brings together information on best practices in ethics in research, academia, and business in an online portal and center. It…

Goodyear, Leslie

2012-01-01

381

Teaching Ethical Reflexivity in Information Systems: How to Equip Students to Deal with Moral and Ethical Issues of Emerging Information and Communication Technologies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching ethics to students of information systems (IS) raises a number of conceptual and content-related issues. The present paper starts out by developing a conceptual framework of moral and ethical issues that distinguishes between moral intuition, explicit morality, ethical theory and meta-ethical reflection. This conceptual framework…

Stahl, Bernd Carsten

2011-01-01

382

Overt and Relational Aggression and Victimization: Multiple Perspectives within the School Setting  

PubMed Central

The current study involved a comprehensive comparative examination of overt and relational aggression and victimization across multiple perspectives in the school setting (peers, teachers, observers in the lunchroom, self-report). Patterns of results involving sociometic status, ethnicity and gender were explored among 4th graders, with particular emphasis on girls. Controversial and rejected children were perceived as higher on both forms of aggression than other status groups, but only rejected children were reported as victims. Both European American and African American girls showed a greater tendency toward relational aggression and victimization than overt aggression or victimization. Results indicated negative outcomes associated with both relational and overt victimization and especially overt aggression for the target girl sample. Poorer adjustment and a socially unskillful behavioral profile were found to be associated with these three behaviors. However, relational aggression did not evidence a similar negative relation to adjustment nor was it related to many of the behaviors examined in the current study. Implications of these results are discussed.

Putallaz, Martha; Grimes, Christina L.; Foster, Kristen J.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Coie, John D.; Dearing, Karen

2007-01-01

383

Technology in Art Therapy: Ethical Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As technology advances, art therapy practices are adapting to the demands of a new cultural climate. Art therapists face a number of ethical challenges as they interact with increasingly diverse populations and employ new media. This article addresses some of the ethical and professional issues related to the use of technology in clinical…

Alders, Amanda; Beck, Liz; Allen, Pat B.; Mosinski, Barbara

2011-01-01

384

Understanding unethical behavior by unraveling ethical culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unethical behavior in the workplace is a widespread phenomenon. In this article a model for the ethical culture of organizations that consists of eight dimensions is employed to explain unethical behavior. The sample was composed of 341 triads consisting of a manager and two direct reports. The results show that six dimensions of ethical culture were negatively related to observed

Muel Kaptein

2011-01-01

385

Teachers' Ethical Responsibilities in a Diverse Society  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing that learning to teach cannot be separated from learning to inquire, I argue that teachers have specific relational and ethical responsibilities to their students, particularly in the context of a diverse society. Using my research experiences with Aboriginal people as examples, I propose an ethical framework based upon four underlying…

Piquemal, Nathalie

2004-01-01

386

The Teaching of Life-Line Ethics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines techniques used in teaching a course in "life-line" ethics, in which the events of conception, birth and death are related to ethical issues of abortion, suicide, euthanasia, etc. Several modes of actively involving students are described. Lists seven reference for information on bioethical issues. (CS)

Bridger, James A.

1977-01-01

387

Toward a Model for International Business Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper briefly examines the topic of business ethics and attempts to suggest a code of ethics for multinational firms. While most companies have basic policies on employee integrity, confidentiality and sexual harassment, relatively few have established policies regarding bribery, exploitive child labor, human rights violations and other issues they may encounter in the global market place (Drake, 1998). Until

Nader Asgary; Mark C. Mitschow

2002-01-01

388

Teaching Business IT Ethics: A Professional Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In UK higher education a primary aim of business IT-related qualifications is the preparation of students for a relevant career. In this article we discuss an approach to teaching business IT ethics in a university context that prepares students for the ethical problems that they may meet in their future IT careers, and we demonstrate how this…

Taylor, Mark; Moynihan, Eddie; McWilliam, Jennie; Gresty, David

2004-01-01

389

Concerns of college students regarding business ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although some attention has been devoted to assessing the attitudes and concerns of businesspeople toward ethics, relatively little attention has focused on the attitudes and concerns of tomorrow's business leaders, today's college students. In this investigation a national sample was utilized to study college students' attitudes toward business ethics, with the results being analyzed by academic classification, academic major, and

Richard F. Beltramini; Robert A. Peterson; George Kozmetsky

1984-01-01

390

The Protestant Ethic as a personality variable  

Microsoft Academic Search

Administered a scale comprised of items selected on the basis of a series of factor analyses and a battery of personality measures to 117 undergraduates in an effort to explore the psychological meaning of the protestant ethic. Scores on the Protestant Ethic Scale were positively related to the Mosher scales for Sex Guilt and Morality Conscience Guilt but were unrelated

Herbert L. Mirels; James B. Garrett

1971-01-01

391

The ethics of human reproductive cloning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable

Carson Strong

2005-01-01

392

Examining Teacher Ethical Dilemmas in Classroom Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current spotlight on assessment in education raises ethical issues as practices evolve. This study documents ethical conflicts faced by teachers in the United States regarding assessment of students. Critical incidents generated by practising teachers revealed a majority of reported conflicts related to score pollution, and conflicts…

Pope, Nakia; Green, Susan K.; Johnson, Robert L.; Mitchell, Mark

2009-01-01

393

Relations between the Development of Future Time Perspective in Three Life Domains, Investment in Learning, and Academic Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relations between the development of future time perspectives in three life domains (i.e., school and professional career, social relations, and leisure time) and changes in students' investment in learning and academic achievement were examined in this study. Participants were 584 students in the first and 584 in the second year of the lower…

Peetsma, Thea; van der Veen, Ineke

2011-01-01

394

Factors related to the nursing student-patient relationship: the patients' perspective.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe patients' perceptions of factors related to three types of student-patient relationship identified in an earlier study: mechanistic (MR), authoritative (AR) and facilitative (FR). A further aim was to identify which factors predict the type of relationship. A convenience sample of Finnish-speaking internal medicine patients was recruited. The data were collected by using a five-point Likert-type questionnaire developed for this study. Data analysis used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, one-way analysis of variance and multinomial logistic regression. Formal ethical approval for the study was obtained according to national and local directives. The results showed that a number of patients' background variables as well as contextual factors and consequences of the relationship were related to the type of relationship. In AR and FR patients had a named nursing student, a student who had enough time for the patient, and a positive perception of students' personal and professional attributes and of patients' improved health and commitment to self-care significantly more often than in MRs. A FR was also more common among patients in two-patient rooms than among patients in rooms of other sizes. Multinomial regression analysis revealed six significant predictors of FRs; university level education, several previous hospitalizations, admission to hospital for a medical problem, experience of caring for ill family member, positive perception of atmosphere during collaboration, and of student's personal and professional growth. The results provide important clues for promoting facilitative student-patient relationships and thus for enhancing the quality of nursing care. PMID:19422634

Suikkala, Arja; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Katajisto, Jouko

2009-12-01

395

The paucity of ethical analysis in allergology  

PubMed Central

While a growing body of research is uncovering the aetiology and effective treatments for allergy, research that assess the broader ethical implications of this disease is lacking significantly. This article will demonstrate both the paucity of academic research concerning ethical implications in allergy and explain why ethical analysis is integral to formulating effective health strategies for allergic disease. An exhaustive literature search of publications in French and English identified less than 35 academic articles focussed on the topic of ethics and allergy; this is a miniscule number when compared to the amount of articles published on ethical issues related to other chronic illnesses, such as obesity. It is important to demonstrate to allergy specialists the need for, and utility of, further incorporating ethical analyses in allergology; the current success of Ethical, Legal, Social Implications (ELSI) research programmes in human genetics and nanotechnology will serve as notable examples. Indeed, future research and innovation in allergy will undoubtedly encounter ethical dilemmas and the allergology community should play a significant role in helping to address these issues. However, incorporating ethical analyses in allergology does not imply that the allergology community must acquire extensive knowledge in bioethics; instead, interdisciplinary research that incorporates expertise from allergology and bioethics would enable allergy specialists to advance critical knowledge development in this largely overlooked domain of study.

2013-01-01

396

Educating for ethical leadership.  

PubMed

In this article we consider the nature of ethical leadership in nursing. An appreciation of the basis of such leadership requires an understanding of responsibility and of key intellectual and ethical qualities or virtues. We examine some of the educational and practice strategies to promote ethical leadership. We argue that there are different levels of ethical leadership. All members of the nursing workforce are ethical leaders in so far as they demonstrate a commitment to ethical practice in their everyday work and act as ethical role models for others. Nurse managers are responsible for influencing their team and for acting as arbiters between organisational and professional values. Nurse educators are role models and ethical leaders as they ensure that the explicit and hidden curriculum demonstrate a commitment to professional values. Nurses who assume political roles have an obligation to lead on ethical agenda compatible with the values of nursing. PMID:20015579

Gallagher, Ann; Tschudin, Verena

2010-04-01

397

What are applied ethics?  

PubMed

This paper explores the relationships that various applied ethics bear to each other, both in particular disciplines and more generally. The introductory section lays out the challenge of coming up with such an account and, drawing a parallel with the philosophy of science, offers that applied ethics may either be unified or disunified. The second section develops one simple account through which applied ethics are unified, vis-à-vis ethical theory. However, this is not taken to be a satisfying answer, for reasons explained. In the third section, specific applied ethics are explored: biomedical ethics; business ethics; environmental ethics; and neuroethics. These are chosen not to be comprehensive, but rather for their traditions or other illustrative purposes. The final section draws together the results of the preceding analysis and defends a disunity conception of applied ethics. PMID:20333477

Allhoff, Fritz

2011-03-01

398

Publication: an ethical imperative.  

PubMed Central

Publication of medical research is both a monitor of the researcher's ethics and an audit of the local or regional ethics committee that approved it. Selectivity of publication or of the intention to publish lessens this audit. Opinions differ about what is ethically allowable in clinical and benchtop medical research. Ethical permission and ethical monitoring of medical research are subject to a hierarchy of pyramidal controls, starting in hospital and ending with the local, institutional, or regional ethics committee. Currently, such committees function with widely varying degrees of efficiency and quality of output, and with differing viewpoints on many ethical issues. Without an a priori insistence by institutional ethics committees that there be an intention to publish all medical research involving human subjects, ethics committees cannot routinely be subject to the scrutiny or audit which they themselves demand of researchers.

Pearn, J.

1995-01-01

399

Ethics in Classroom Assessment Practices: Issues and Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student evaluations should "be ethical, fair, useful, feasible, and accurate" [JCSEE (2003). "The student evaluation standards." Arlen Gullickson, Chair. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin]. This study focuses on defining ethical behavior and examining educators' ethical judgments in relation to assessment. It describes the results from a web-based survey…

Green, Susan K.; Johnson, Robert L.; Kim, Do-Hong; Pope, Nakia S.

2007-01-01

400

Informed consent in the context of pharmacogenomic research: ethical considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the scientific research surrounding pharmacogenomics (PGx) has been relatively plentiful, the ethical research concerning this discipline has developed rather conservatively. Following investigation of the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of PGx research, as well as consulting with key stakeholders, we identified six outstanding ethical issues raised by the informed consent process in PGx research: (1) scope of consent;

H C Howard; Y Joly; D Avard; N Laplante; M Phillips; J C Tardif

2011-01-01

401

Exploring Ethical Implications for Acting Faithfully in Professional Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

The obligation to act faithfully poses ethical issues as nurses live nursing from day to day. In this column, the ethics of acting faithfully is explored in relation to four scenarios drawn from different realms of professional nursing. The scenarios illustrate ethical issues that may arise when attempting to uphold personal integrity and fulfill one's duty to act faithfully. The

F. Beryl Pilkington

2004-01-01

402

Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, focusing on introduction and applicability; preamble; general principles; and ethical standards (resolving ethical issues, competence, human relations, privacy and confidentiality, advertising and other public statements, record keeping and…

American Psychologist, 2002

2002-01-01

403

Considerations in Ethical Decision-Making and Software Piracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals are faced with the many opportunities to pirate. The decision to pirate or not may be related to an individual's attitudes toward other ethical issues. A person's ethical and moral predispositions and the judgments that they use to make decisions may be consistent across various ethical dilemmas and may indicate their likelihood to pirate software. This paper investigates the

Suzanne C. Wagner; G. Lawrence Sanders

2001-01-01

404

Validity in hermeneutic phenomenological inquiry: towards an ethics of evaluation.  

PubMed

This article explores the relationship of ethics to validity in hermeneutic phenomenological inquiry. First, the authors present a brief overview of the various discourses on validity in qualitative research that have been variously applied to hermeneutic phenomenological inquiry. Next, they examine how relational ethics is a presence to bear within this form of inquiry. Finally, they offer a set of ethical reflections to help the researcher engage in a process of ethical questioning during each step of the research process. PMID:18277790

Rashotte, Judy; Jensen, Louise

2007-12-01

405

Psychosocial Assessment of Living Organ Donors: Clinical and Ethical Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article outlines psychosocial and ethical issues to be considered when evaluating potential living organ donors. Six types of living donors are described: genetically related, emotionally related, \\

Mary Ellen Olbrisch; Sharon M. Benedict

2001-01-01

406

Business ethics, medical ethics and economic medicalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the ethical implications of economic medicalization: where non-medical problems are transformed into medical problems in order to achieve the objective of shareholder wealth maximization. After considering differences between business ethics and medical ethics, economic medicalization arising from corporate marketing strategies is detailed. Both direct-to-consumer and more traditional physician centred marketing methods are considered. In addition, the economic

Geoffrey Poitras

2009-01-01

407

Ethics was here’: Studying the language-games of ethics in the case of UK Biobank  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have seen a proliferation in discourses on ethics, not least in relation to the establishment of large genetic databases, so-called biobanks. Through an analysis of UK Biobank and its so-called Ethics and Governance Framework, this paper suggests viewing the increased attention paid to ethics as part of a special mode of regulation created through what Wittgenstein called language-games.

Klaus L. Hoeyer; Richard Tutton

2005-01-01

408

Code of Ethics: Principles for Ethical Leadership  

PubMed Central

The code of ethics for a professional association incorporates values, principles, and professional standards. A review and comparative analysis of a 1934 pledge and codes of ethics from 1957, 1977, 1988, 1998, 2004, and 2011 for a health information management association was conducted. Highlights of some changes in the healthcare delivery system are identified as a general context for the codes of ethics. The codes of ethics are examined in terms of professional values and changes in the language used to express the principles of the various codes.

Flite, Cathy A.; Harman, Laurinda B.

2013-01-01

409

Drug use and abuse: the ethical issues.  

PubMed

Drug abuse is both a personal and a public issue, raising questions about individual rights and the boundaries of law, as well as about national sovereignty and international control. Ethical issues that arise under these headings may be related to certain broad ethical positions. The implications of adopting utilitarian assumptions may be contrasted with basing ethics on a theory of individual rights, closely related to a theory of human nature. Neither position justifies a libertarian presumption against control, for, first, an individual decision to expose one's mind and personality to the control of drugs cannot be ethically justified and, second, there are no ethical reasons, nor any compelling arguments from social and political theory, for decriminalizing non-medical drug use. PMID:1638919

Almond, B

1992-01-01

410

Business Ethics Resources on WWW  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the University of British Columbia's Centre for Applied Ethics, this extensive catalog of business ethics resources is divided into eight sections including Public Sector Ethics, Publications, Codes of Ethics, and Ethics Institutions and Organizations. Each section consists of briefly indexed links, organized in alphabetical order. Business Ethics Resources on the WWW also links to a page of applied ethics resources and the Centre for Applied Ethics.

411

Ethics in American health 1: ethical approaches to health policy.  

PubMed

I trace the evolution of ethical approaches to health policy in the United States and examine a number of critical unresolved issues pertaining to the current set of frameworks. Several themes emerge. First, fair procedures claim more attention than substantive and procedural principles. Second, in the case of public deliberation, more focus has been placed on factors such as procedural mechanisms than on understanding how individuals and groups value different aspects of health and agree on health-related decisions. Third, the nation needs workable frameworks to guide collective choices about valuable social ends and their trade-offs; purely procedural strategies are limited in illuminating overarching health policy and ethics questions. There is a need to integrate consequential and procedural approaches to health ethics and policy. PMID:18703449

Ruger, Jennifer Prah

2008-10-01

412

Ethics in American Health 1: Ethical Approaches to Health Policy  

PubMed Central

I trace the evolution of ethical approaches to health policy in the United States and examine a number of critical unresolved issues pertaining to the current set of frameworks. Several themes emerge. First, fair procedures claim more attention than substantive and procedural principles. Second, in the case of public deliberation, more focus has been placed on factors such as procedural mechanisms than on understanding how individuals and groups value different aspects of health and agree on health-related decisions. Third, the nation needs workable frameworks to guide collective choices about valuable social ends and their trade-offs; purely procedural strategies are limited in illuminating overarching health policy and ethics questions. There is a need to integrate consequential and procedural approaches to health ethics and policy.

2008-01-01

413

The task of nursing ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper raises the questions: 'What do we expect from nursing ethics?' and 'Is the literature of nursing ethics any different from that of medical ethics?' It is suggested that rather than develop nursing ethics as a separate field writers in nursing ethics should take a lead in making the patient the central focus of health care ethics. The case

K M Melia

1994-01-01

414

Development and Progress of Ireland's Biobank Network: Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI), Standardized Documentation, Sample and Data Release, and International Perspective  

PubMed Central

Biobank Ireland Trust (BIT) was established in 2004 to promote and develop an Irish biobank network to benefit patients, researchers, industry, and the economy. The network commenced in 2008 with two hospital biobanks and currently consists of biobanks in the four main cancer hospitals in Ireland. The St. James's Hospital (SJH) Biobank coordinates the network. Procedures, based on ISBER and NCI guidelines, are standardized across the network. Policies and documents—Patient Consent Policy, Patient Information Sheet, Biobank Consent Form, Sample and Data Access Policy (SAP), and Sample Application Form have been agreed upon (after robust discussion) for use in each hospital. An optimum sequence for document preparation and submission for review is outlined. Once consensus is reached among the participating biobanks, the SJH biobank liaises with the Research and Ethics Committees, the Office of the Data Protection Commissioner, The National Cancer Registry (NCR), patient advocate groups, researchers, and other stakeholders. The NCR provides de-identified data from its database for researchers via unique biobank codes. ELSI issues discussed include the introduction of prospective consent across the network and the return of significant research results to patients. Only 4 of 363 patients opted to be re-contacted and re-consented on each occasion that their samples are included in a new project. It was decided, after multidisciplinary discussion, that results will not be returned to patients. The SAP is modeled on those of several international networks. Biobank Ireland is affiliated with international biobanking groups—Marble Arch International Working Group, ISBER, and ESBB. The Irish government continues to deliberate on how to fund and implement biobanking nationally. Meanwhile BIT uses every opportunity to promote awareness of the benefits of biobanking in events and in the media.

Gaffney, Eoin; Glynn, Sharon A.; Donatello, Simona; Carroll, Paul; Connolly, Elizabeth; Mc Garrigle, Sarah; Boyle, Terry; Flannery, Delia; Sullivan, Francis J.; McCormick, Paul; Griffin, Mairead; Muldoon, Cian; Fay, Joanna; O'Grady, Tony; Kay, Elaine; Eustace, Joe; Burke, Louise; Sheikh, Asim A.; Finn, Stephen; Flavin, Richard; Giles, Francis J.

2013-01-01

415

Professional Military Ethic.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Understanding the professional military ethic (PME) first requires understanding the conceptual foundations upon which it stands. This foundation includes objective morality, the sociology of professions, professional ethics in general, and the profession...

J. D. Cazier

2012-01-01

416

Ethics for Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that it is essential that business organizations establish organizational systems that require satisfactory ethical business behaviors from everyone concerned, regardless of differences in personal outlooks. Outlines what needs to be done in order to effectively teach business ethics. (SG)

Jaques, Elliott

2003-01-01

417

Ethics in Organizational Leadership.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper provides both a workable definition of, and examines those factors which may contribute to, an ethical dilemma in organizational leadership. To accomplish these purposes, it examines both individual ethical standards and the effects of legal de...

R. C. Hartjen

1984-01-01

418

Accessing the ethics of complex health care practices: would a "domains of ethics analysis" approach help?  

PubMed

This paper explores how using a "domains of ethics analysis" approach might constructively contribute to an enhanced understanding (among those without specialized ethics training) of ethically-complex health care practices through the consideration of one such sample practice, i.e., deep and continuous palliative sedation (DCPS). For this purpose, I select four sample ethics domains (from a variety of possible relevant domains) for use in the consideration of this practice, i.e., autonomous choice, motives, actions and consequences. These particular domains were chosen because of their relevance to the analysis of DCPS and their relative ease of access to those without ethics training. The analysis demonstrates that such an approach could facilitate the emergence of accessible arguments and discussion points that could enhance the understanding and appreciation of this and other health care practices with strong ethics dimensions. PMID:20505981

Kirby, Jeffrey

2010-06-01

419

Does believing that everyone else is less ethical have an impact on work behavior?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers consistently report that individuals see themselves acting far more ethically than comparable others when confronted with ethically uncertain work-related behaviors. They suggest that this belief encourages unethical conduct and contributes to the degeneration of business ethics; however, they have not specifically investigated the consequences of this belief. If undesirable work behaviors actually do occur, educators and other ethics advocates

Thomas Tyson

1992-01-01

420

Between the individual and the community: the impact of genetics on ethical models  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses how genetics is influencing ethical frameworks with particular focus on the effectiveness and appropriateness of individual and communal models. It suggests that genetics supports a relational understanding of the person and therefore that genetic ethics requires ethical models which respect both individuals and groups. First, the inadequacy of individualistic frameworks – at conceptual, ethical and practical levels

Heather Widdows

2009-01-01

421

The Ethics of Abstinence-Only and Abstinence-Plus Sexuality Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Highlights some of the ethical dilemmas present in the debate over abstinence-only and abstinence-plus sexuality education in the schools, discussing issues related to: morality, ethics, and values; limitations to codes of ethics; questions about abstinence-only sexuality education; ethics and abstinence- only sexuality education; and sexuality…

Wiley, David C.

2002-01-01

422

Giftedness and Ethics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What is, or should be, the role of ethics in giftedness? In this article, I consider why ethical behavior is much harder to come by than one would expect. Ethical behavior requires completion of a series of eight steps to action, the failure of any one of which may result in a person, even one who is ethically well trained, to act in a manner that…

Sternberg, Robert J.

2012-01-01

423

Case study in psychobiographical ethics.  

PubMed

This article addresses ethical issues relative to the conduct and reporting of psychobiographical research. The author's recent psychobiographical study of World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer (1943-2008) is used to illustrate particular ethical challenges and responses in six areas: (1) institutional review board (IRB) evaluation and informed consent; (2) balancing objective research with respect for psychobiographical subject; (3) inviting subject or next-of-kin to read and comment on working drafts of psychobiography; (4) reporting never-before-revealed sensitive information on a subject; (5) role of interdisciplinary consultation in conducting psychobiography; and (6) the value and cautions of including psychological diagnoses as part of the psychological profile. A "bill of rights and responsibilities" for the psychobiographer is introduced as a stimulus for ongoing discussion and empirical research on ethical practice in psychobiography. PMID:24169418

Ponterotto, Joseph G

2013-10-01

424

The Ethics and Politics of Ethics Approval  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The regulatory scope of Human Research Ethics Committees can be problematic for a variety of reasons. Some scholars have argued the ethics approval process, for example, is antithetical to certain disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, while others are willing to give it qualified support. This article uses a case study to cast the…

Battin, Tim; Riley, Dan; Avery, Alan

2014-01-01

425

Designing an Ethics Class.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a required ethics course designed for juniors and seniors at a small Connecticut boarding school. Students explore the ethics of care and justice, examine ethical assumptions behind the school's disciplinary system, consider a series of dilemmas, and discuss complex topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and racism. A sidebar outlines…

Prager, Richard

1993-01-01

426

Ethnography\\/ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper situates discussion of the ethics of ethnographic research against the background of a theoretical and methodological debate about the relationship between ethics and method, and about the relationships between research methods and their objects. In particular, the paper investigates the implications of folding together the ethical and the empirical in research and argues that this requires the development

Michael Parker

2007-01-01

427

Making Ethics Come Alive  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Making ethics relevant to students in a business communications course continues to be a challenge. Classroom practitioners have long noted the difficulties in surmounting the contradictions students sense in business ethics instruction. Furthermore, students often perceive ethics to be largely irrelevant to the skills necessary for success in…

McQueeney, Edward

2006-01-01

428

Ethics Across the Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final project report describes a 3-year project designed to integrate ethics into all disciplines at Utah Valley State College to introduce students to ethical complications they may face in their careers and vocations. Fifty faculty members participated in the project, the major components of which involved a 2-week summer seminar in ethics;…

Utah Valley State Coll., Orem.

429

Ethics Program Review Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Executive branch departments and agencies are required by Federal statute and regulation to have an ethics program. One goal of an ethics program is to serve as a formalized and systematic means by which an agency can prevent and detect ethics violations ...

2003-01-01

430

The Ethics of Biowarfare  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, reviewed, student article alarms that nations need to take preventative measures to curb the development and proliferation of biological and chemical weapons, such as: adopting a scientific code of ethics, incorporating ethics into graduate science courses, formulating accountability mechanisms for research, and raising academic, industry, and public awareness of ethical issues.

Daniel Reyes (Santa Clara University, California;)

2003-02-01

431

Ethics for Fundraisers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for professionals and others in the field of philanthropy, this book applies ethics and ethical decision-making to fund raising. Its primary aim is to enhance the level of ethical fund raising throughout the nonprofit sector by equipping those involved with frameworks for understanding and taking principled actions and preventing…

Anderson, Albert

432

Ethics and Corporate Governance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors draw on wide professional experience to address the recent failures in corporate conduct in the United States, the emerging corrective measures and the increasing public outcry for ethical accountability in organisations and governments. They conclude that it is essential that ethics are integral to the culture of an organization; a superficial grafting on of an ethical code will

Stephen D. Potts; Ingrid Lohr Matuszewski

2004-01-01

433

Current Ethical Issues in Aging.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Articles in this special issue look at ethical issues in aging in geriatric care, improving care of the dying, the value of autonomy and respect, the role of religion in health-related decisions, protection of nursing facility residents, physician-assisted dying, conflict resolution in nursing homes, and dealing with patients' demands for…

Dubler, Nancy Neveloff, Ed.; And Others

1994-01-01

434

Ethics in E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

E-Learning environments require policies balancing different expectations of participants and considering how the users perceive ethics during online learning. As in the case of face-to-face classes; learners must show respect and tolerance among each other, and conduct civil relations and interaction based on pre-determined rules. Starting with a…

Toprak, Elif; Ozkanal, Berrin; Aydin, Sinan; Kaya, Secil

2010-01-01

435

Death Competence: An Ethical Imperative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors argued that death competence, defined as specialized skill in tolerating and managing clients' problems related to dying, death, and bereavement, is a necessary prerequisite for ethical practice in grief counseling. A selected review of the literature tracing the underpinnings of this concept reveals how a robust construct of death…

Gamino, Louis A.; Ritter, R. Hal, Jr.

2012-01-01

436

The Relation between School Leadership from a Distributed Perspective and Teachers' Organizational Commitment: Examining the Source of the Leadership Function  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In this study the relationship between school leadership and teachers' organizational commitment is examined by taking into account a distributed leadership perspective. The relation between teachers' organizational commitment and contextual variables of teachers' perceptions of the quality and the source of the supportive and supervisory…

Hulpia, Hester; Devos, Geert; Van Keer, Hilde

2011-01-01

437

Strategic Planning, Marketing & Public Relations, and Fund-Raising in Higher Education: Perspectives, Readings, and Annotated Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perspectives on college and university strategic planning, marketing and public relations, and fund-raising are offered. Also included are previously published journal articles by experts in this area, annotated bibliographies of books and journal articles on these subjects, author/title and subject indexes, and a directory of publishers. Three…

Ryans, Cynthia C.; Shanklin, William L.

438

Nanomedicine: Techniques, Potentials, and Ethical Implications  

PubMed Central

Nanotechnology is concerned with materials and systems whose structures and components exhibit novel physical, chemical, and biological properties due to their nanoscale size. This paper focuses on what is known as nanomedicine, referring to the application of nanotechnology to medicine. We consider the use and potentials of emerging nanoscience techniques in medicine such as nanosurgery, tissue engineering, and targeted drug delivery, and we discuss the ethical questions that these techniques raise. The ethical considerations involved in nanomedicine are related to risk assessment in general, somatic-cell versus germline-cell therapy, the enhancement of human capabilities, research into human embryonic stem cells and the toxicity, uncontrolled function and self-assembly of nanoparticles. The ethical considerations associated with the application of nanotechnology to medicine have not been greatly discussed. This paper aims to balance clear ethical discussion and sound science and so provide nanotechnologists and biotechnologists with tools to assess ethical problems in nanomedicine.

Ebbesen, Mette; Jensen, Thomas G.

2006-01-01

439

Evaluating institutional capacity for research ethics in Africa: a case study from Botswana  

PubMed Central

Background The increase in the volume of research conducted in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC), has brought a renewed international focus on processes for ethical conduct of research. Several programs have been initiated to strengthen the capacity for research ethics in LMIC. However, most such programs focus on individual training or development of ethics review committees. The objective of this paper is to present an approach to institutional capacity assessment in research ethics and application of this approach in the form of a case study from an institution in Africa. Methods We adapted the Octagon model originally used by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency to assess an organization along eight domains in research ethics: basic values and identity; structure and organization; ability to carry out activities; relevance of activities to stated goals; capacity of staff and management; administrative, financing and accounting systems; its relations with target groups; and the national context. We used a mixed methods approach to collect empirical data at the University of Botswana from March to December 2010. Results The overall shape of the external evaluation Octagon suggests that strengths of the University of Botswana are in the areas of structure, relevance, production and identity; while the university still needs more work in the areas of systems of finance, target groups, and environment. The Octagons also show the similarities and discrepancies between the 'external' and 'internal' evaluations and provide an opportunity for exploration of these different assessments. For example, the discrepant score for 'identity' between internal and external evaluations allows for an exploration of what constitutes a strong identity for research ethics at the University of Botswana and how it can be strengthened. Conclusions There is a general lack of frameworks for evaluating research ethics capacity in LMICs. We presented an approach that stresses evaluation from both internal and external perspectives. This case study highlights the university's rapid progress in developing research ethics capacity and points to some notable areas for improvement. We believe that such an empirically-driven and participatory assessment allows a more holistic measurement and promotion of institutional capacity strengthening for research ethics in LMICs.

2013-01-01

440

The Relations between Children's Communicative Perspective-Taking and Executive Functioning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two experiments investigated children's communicative perspective-taking ability. In Experiment 1, 4- to 5-year-old children were tested on two referential communication tasks, as well as on measures of inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. Results document children's emergent use of the perspective of their speaking…

Nilsen, Elizabeth S.; Graham, Susan A.

2009-01-01

441

An Ecological Perspective on Cumulative School and Neighborhood Risk Factors Related to Achievement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most educational reform programs, including No Child Left Behind, operate from the perspective that gaps in academic achievement can be reduced by improvements in the educational process directed by school administrators and teachers. This perspective ignores the ecological context in which underachieving schools are typically embedded. Using a…

Whipple, Sara Sepanski; Evans, Gary W.; Barry, Rachel L.; Maxwell, Lorraine E.

2010-01-01

442

Institutional ethics review of clinical study agreements.  

PubMed

Clinical Study Agreements (CSAs) can have profound effects both on the protection of human subjects and on the independence of investigators to conduct research with scientific integrity. Sponsors, institutions, and even investigators may fail to give adequate attention to these issues in the negotiation of CSAs. Despite the key role of CSAs in structuring ethically important aspects of research, they remain largely unregulated and unreviewed for adherence to ethical norms. Academic institutions routinely enter into research contracts that fail to meet adequate ethical standards. This is a failing that can have serious consequences. Accordingly, it is necessary that some independent body have the authority both to review research contracts for compliance with norms of subject protection and ethical integrity, and to reject studies that fail to meet ethical standards. Such review should take place prior to the start of research, not later. Because of its expertise and authority, the institutional ethics review board (IRB or REB) is the appropriate body to undertake such review. Much recent commentary has focused on contractual restrictions on the investigator's freedom to publish research findings. The Olivieri experience, and that of other investigators, has brought freedom of publication issues into sharp focus. Clinical study agreements also raise a number of other ethical issues relating to human subjects and research integrity, however, including disclosures relating to patient safety, data analysis and reporting, budget, confidentiality, and premature termination of the study. This paper describes the ethical issues at stake in structuring such agreements and suggests ethical standards to guide institutional ethics review. PMID:14872068

DuVal, G

2004-02-01

443

Science, human nature, and a new paradigm for ethics education.  

PubMed

For centuries, religion and philosophy have been the primary basis for efforts to guide humans to be more ethical. However, training in ethics and religion and imparting positive values and morality tests such as those emanating from the categorical imperative and the Golden Rule have not been enough to protect humankind from its bad behaviors. To improve ethics education educators must better understand aspects of human nature such as those that lead to "self-deception" and "personal bias." Through rationalizations, faulty reasoning and hidden bias, individuals trick themselves into believing there is little wrong with their own unethical behavior. The application of science to human nature offers the possibility of improving ethics education through better self-knowledge. The author recommends a new paradigm for ethics education in contemporary modern society. This includes the creation of a new field called "applied evolutionary neuro-ethics" which integrates science and social sciences to improve ethics education. The paradigm can merge traditional thinking about ethics from religious and philosophical perspectives with new ideas from applied evolutionary neuro-ethics. PMID:22711449

Lampe, Marc

2012-09-01

444

Ethics and infectious disease.  

PubMed

Bioethics apparently suffers from a misdistribution of research resources analogous to the '10/90' divide in medical research. Though infectious disease should be recognized as a topic of primary importance for bioethics, the general topic of infectious disease has received relatively little attention from the discipline of bioethics in comparison with things like abortion, euthanasia, genetics, cloning, stem cell research, and so on. The fact that the historical and potential future consequences of infectious diseases are almost unrivalled is one reason that the topic of infectious disease warrants more attention from bioethicists. The 'Black Death' eliminated one third of the European population during the 14th Century; the 1989 flu killed between 20 and 100 million people; and, in the 20th Century smallpox killed perhaps three times more people than all the wars of that period. In the contemporary world, epidemics (AIDS, multi-drug resistant turberculosis, and newly emerging infectious diseases such as SARS) continue to have dramatic consequences. A second reason why the topic of infectious disease deserves further attention is that it raises difficult ethical questions of its own. While infected individuals can threaten the health of other individuals and society as a whole, for example, public health care measures such as surveillance, isolation, and quarantine can require the infringement of widely accepted basic human rights and liberties. An important and difficult ethical question asks how to strike a balance between the utilitarian aim of promoting public health, on the one hand, and libertarian aims of protecting privacy and freedom of movement, on the other, in contexts involving diseases that are--to varying degrees--contagious, deadly, or otherwise dangerous. Third, since their burden is most heavily shouldered by the poor (in developing countries), infectious diseases involve issues of justice--which should be a central concern of ethics. I conclude by providing sociological and historical explanations of why the topic of infectious disease has not already received more attention from bioethicists. PMID:16167406

Selgelid, Michael J

2005-06-01

445

Fieldwork and social science research ethics.  

PubMed

Fieldwork as a part of social science research brings the researcher closest to the subject of research. It is a dynamic process where there is an exchange between the researcher, participants, stakeholders, gatekeepers, the community and the larger sociopolitical context in which the research problem is located. Ethical dilemmas that surface during fieldwork often pose a unique challenge to the researcher. This paper is based on field experiences during an action research study conducted with a human rights perspective. It discusses the role conflict that researchers face during fieldwork in a situation of humanitarian crisis. It raises issues pertaining to the need to extend the ethical decision-making paradigm to address ethical dilemmas arising during the course of fieldwork. PMID:18630249

Contractor, Qudsiya

2008-01-01

446

Synthetic biology ethics: a deontological assessment.  

PubMed

In this article I discuss the ethics of synthetic biology from a broadly deontological perspective, evaluating its morality in terms of the integrity of nature, the dignity of life and the relationship between God and his creation. Most ethical analyses to date have been largely consequentialist in nature; they reveal a dual use dilemma, showing that synbio has potential for great good and great evil, possibly more so than any step humanity has taken before. A deontological analysis may help to resolve this dilemma, by evaluating whether synbio is right or wrong in itself. I also assess whether deontology alone is a sufficient methodological paradigm for the proper evaluation of synbio ethics. PMID:24010856

Heavey, Patrick

2013-10-01

447

The ethical group psychotherapist.  

PubMed

Group psychotherapists in their everyday practice confront a series of ethical problems, some of which rise to the level of ethical dilemmas. This two-part special series will address how the group psychotherapist can address these problems and dilemmas in a way that leads to an ethical course of conduct. This article introduces the series by examining ethical principles and decision-making processes that are relevant to the wide range of issues that confront the group psychotherapist. The article also considers the person of the group psychotherapist him or herself and notes that certain personal qualities might create a foundation for ethical thinking and behavior. PMID:17040180

Brabender, Virginia

2006-10-01

448

Substance Use Disorder Genetic Research: Investigators and Participants Grapple with the Ethical Issues  

PubMed Central

Objective This qualitative research examined the ethical concerns regarding the psychosocial issues, research design and implementation, and application of psychiatric genetic research on substance use disorders (SUD) from multiple perspectives. Method A literature review of the bioethics literature related to psychiatric genetics and focus groups explored the ethical implications of SUD genetic research. Twenty-six National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) funded principal investigators in the field of psychiatric genetic research, 9 adolescent patients in residential SUD treatment, and 10 relatives of patients participated in focus groups (held separately). The focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and the content was analyzed. The themes that emerged from the literature and the focus group transcripts were organized using NVIVO7, a software package designed to manage, analyze and compare narrative data. Results Investigators and the literature expressed similar concerns regarding the ethical concerns associated with psychiatric genetic research including violation of privacy, misunderstanding about psychiatric genetics, stigmatization, commercialization, discrimination, eugenics, consequences of research on illegal behavior, unforeseen consequences, altered notion of individual responsibility, and others. Patients and their relatives demonstrated little familiarity with the ethical issues as identified by professionals and little concern regarding most of the potential risks. The exception was apprehension associated with potential criminal justice uses of stored genetic information and enforced therapy, which elicited some concern from all perspectives. Conclusions The challenge for further research is to identify risks and benefits of SUD research that are germane in a behaviorally disinhibited population and devise effective tools to communicate information to participants through an improved informed consent process.

Raymond, Kristen M.

2009-01-01

449

How a Deweyan science education further enables ethics education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper questions the perceived divide between ‘science’ subject matter and ‘moral’ or ‘ethical’ subject matter. A difficulty that this assumed divide produces is that science teachers often feel that there needs to be ‘special treatment’ given to certain issues which are of an ethical or moral nature and which are ‘brought into’ the science class. The case is made in this article that dealing with ethical issues in the science class should not call for a sensitivity that is beyond the expertise of the science teacher. Indeed it is argued here that science teachers in particular have a great deal to offer in enabling ethics education. To overcome this perceived divide between science and values it needs to be recognised that the educative development of learners is both scientific and moral. I shall be using a Deweyan perspective to make the case that we as science teachers can overcome this apparent divide and significantly contribute to an ethics education of our students.

Webster, Scott

2008-09-01

450

The ethics of care and treatment of sex offenders.  

PubMed

The ethics of care acknowledges the importance of establishing and maintaining practices that help people to meet their needs, develop and protect basic capabilities for problem solving, emotional functioning, and social interaction, and avoid pain and suffering. In this article, we explore the contribution an ethics of care perspective can make to work with sex offenders. First, we briefly describe five classes of ethical problems evident in work with sex offenders. Second, the concept of care is defined and a justification for a version of care theory provided. Third, we apply the care ethical theory to ethical issues with sex offenders and demonstrate its value in responding to the five classes of problems outlined earlier. PMID:20944060

Ward, Tony; Salmon, Karen

2011-09-01

451

Ethics in Human-Animal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antonites A., Odendaal J.S.J.: Ethics in Human-Animal Relationships.Acta Vet. Brno 2004, 73: 539-548. Reactions to ethical matters related to human-animal relationships are often ambiguous and are influenced by many human-related factors. Because of such variations, there is a need for guidance in this regard. Such guidelines should thus be useful in a universal sense. Due to veterinarians position as professionally

A. ANTONITES; J. S. J. ODENDAAL

2004-01-01

452

Mandatory influenza immunization for health care workers--an ethical discussion.  

PubMed

Influenza is a serious vaccine-preventable disease affecting 20% of the U.S. population each year. Vaccination of high-risk groups has been called the single most important influenza control measure by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Studies show that vaccination can lead to decreases in flu-related illness and absenteeism among health care workers, as well as fewer acute care outbreaks and reduced patient mortality in long-term care settings. However, to date, voluntary programs have achieved only a 40% vaccination rate among health care workers, causing concern among government and infectious disease organizations. This article addresses the ethical justification for mandating influenza vaccination for health care workers. Health care workers' attitudes toward vaccination are presented, as well as historical and legal perspectives on compulsory measures. The ethical principles of effectiveness, beneficence, necessity, autonomy, justice, and transparency are discussed. PMID:17260679

Steckel, Cynthia M

2007-01-01

453

Parents' perspectives on supporting children during needle-related medical procedures  

PubMed Central

When children endure needle-related medical procedures (NRMPs), different emotions arise for the child and his/her parents. Despite the parents’ own feelings, they have a key role in supporting their child through these procedures. The aim of this study is to describe the meanings of supporting children during NRMPs from the perspective of the parents. Twenty-one parents participated in this study. A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach was used and phenomenological analysis was applied. The essential meaning of the phenomenon—supporting children during an NRMP—is characterized as “keeping the child under the protection of one’s wings,” sometimes very close and sometimes a little further out under the wingtips. The essential meaning is additionally described through its constituents: paying attention to the child’s way of expressing itself, striving to maintain control, facilitating the child’s understanding, focusing the child’s attention, seeking additional support, and rewarding the child. The conclusion is that parents’ ability to be supportive can be affected when seeing their child undergo an NRMP. To regain the role as the child’s protector and to be able to keep the child “under the protection of one’s wings,” parents need support from the staff.

Karlsson, Katarina; Englund, Ann-Charlotte Dalheim; Enskar, Karin; Rydstrom, Ingela

2014-01-01

454

Childhood obesity and sleep: relatives, partners, or both?--a critical perspective on the evidence  

PubMed Central

In modern life, children are unlikely to obtain sufficient or regular sleep and waking schedules. Inadequate sleep affects the regulation of homeostatic and hormonal systems underlying somatic growth, maturation, and bioenergetics. Therefore, assessments of the obesogenic lifestyle, including as dietary and physical activity, need to be coupled with accurate evaluation of sleep quality and quantity, and coexistence of sleep apnea. Inclusion of sleep as an integral component of research studies on childhood obesity should be done as part of the study planning process. Although parents and health professionals have quantified normal patterns of activities in children, sleep has been almost completely overlooked. As sleep duration in children appears to have declined, reciprocal obesity rates have increased. Also, increases in pediatric obesity rates have markedly increased the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children. Obesity and OSAS share common pathways underlying end-organ morbidity, potentially leading to reciprocal amplificatory effects. The relative paucity of data on the topics covered in the perspective below should serve as a major incentive toward future research on these critically important concepts.

Gozal, David; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

2012-01-01

455

Becoming the denigrated other: group relations perspectives on initial reactions to a bipolar disorder diagnosis.  

PubMed

The initial reactions to a bipolar disorder diagnosis of research participants in a small, qualitative study consisted of astonishment, dread of being "mad," and extremely negative associations. All had prior mental health diagnoses, including episodes of severe depression (all but one) and alcoholism (one). All participants reported mental health histories prediagnosis and most had spent years contending with mental health labels, medications, symptoms, and hospitalizations. In addition, most participants were highly educated health professionals, quite familiar with the behaviors that the medical system considered to comprise bipolar disorder. Their negative associations to the initial bipolar disorder diagnosis, therefore, appeared inconsistent with their mental health histories and professional knowledge. This article contextualizes these initial reactions of shock and distress and proposes interpretations of these findings from societal and psychodynamic group relations perspectives. The participants' initial negative reactions are conceptualized as involving the terror of being transported from the group of "normal" people into the group of "mad" or "crazy" people, i.e., people with mental illnesses, who may constitute a societal "denigrated other." PMID:23049521

Goldberg, Susan G

2012-01-01

456

Becoming the Denigrated Other: Group Relations Perspectives on Initial Reactions to a Bipolar Disorder Diagnosis  

PubMed Central

The initial reactions to a bipolar disorder diagnosis of research participants in a small, qualitative study consisted of astonishment, dread of being “mad,” and extremely negative associations. All had prior mental health diagnoses, including episodes of severe depression (all but one) and alcoholism (one). All participants reported mental health histories prediagnosis and most had spent years contending with mental health labels, medications, symptoms, and hospitalizations. In addition, most participants were highly educated health professionals, quite familiar with the behaviors that the medical system considered to comprise bipolar disorder. Their negative associations to the initial bipolar disorder diagnosis, therefore, appeared inconsistent with their mental health histories and professional knowledge. This article contextualizes these initial reactions of shock and distress and proposes interpretations of these findings from societal and psychodynamic group relations perspectives. The participants’ initial negative reactions are conceptualized as involving the terror of being transported from the group of “normal” people into the group of “mad” or “crazy” people, i.e., people with mental illnesses, who may constitute a societal “denigrated other.”

Goldberg, Susan G.

2012-01-01

457

Engineering ethics in Puerto Rico: issues and narratives.  

PubMed

This essay discusses engineering ethics in Puerto Rico by examining the impact of the Colegio de Ingenieros y Agrimensores de Puerto Rico (CIAPR) and by outlining the constellation of problems and issues identified in workshops and retreats held with Puerto Rican engineers. Three cases developed and discussed in these workshops will help outline movements in engineering ethics beyond the compliance perspective of the CIAPR. These include the Town Z case, Copper Mining in Puerto Rico, and a hypothetical case researched by UPRM students on laptop disposal. The last section outlines four future challenges in engineering ethics pertinent to the Puerto Rican situation. PMID:18427954

Frey, William J; O'Neill-Carrillo, Efraín

2008-09-01

458

Ethics and images of suffering bodies in humanitarian medicine.  

PubMed

Media representations of suffering bodies from medical humanitarian organisations raise ethical questions, which deserve critical attention for at least three reasons. Firstly, there is a normative vacuum at the intersection of medical ethics, humanitarian ethics and the ethics of photojournalism. Secondly, the perpetuation of stereotypes of illness, famine or disasters, and their political derivations are a source of moral criticism, to which humanitarian medicine is not immune. Thirdly, accidental encounters between members of the health professions and members of the press in the humanitarian arena can result in misunderstandings and moral tension. From an ethics perspective the problem can be specified and better understood through two successive stages of reasoning. Firstly, by applying criteria of medical ethics to the concrete example of an advertising poster from a medical humanitarian organisation, I observe that media representations of suffering bodies would generally not meet ethical standards commonly applied in medical practice. Secondly, I try to identify what overriding humanitarian imperatives could outweigh such reservations. The possibility of action and the expression of moral outrage are two relevant humanitarian values which can further be spelt out through a semantic analysis of 'témoignage' (testimony). While the exact balance between the opposing sets of considerations (medical ethics and humanitarian perspectives) is difficult to appraise, awareness of all values at stake is an important initial standpoint for ethical deliberations of media representations of suffering bodies. Future pragmatic approaches to the issue should include: exploring ethical values endorsed by photojournalism, questioning current social norms about the display of suffering, collecting empirical data from past or potential victims of disasters in diverse cultural settings, and developing new canons with more creative or less problematic representations of suffering bodies than the currently accepted stereotypes. PMID:22877932

Calain, Philippe

2013-12-01

459

The ethics of suicide and suicide prevention.  

PubMed

Is suicide ever a defensible choice, particularly for the terminally ill? The present article debates this difficult question, examining the relevance of such issues as the morality, rationality, and dynamics of the suicidal act, and the legitimacy of physician-assisted suicide. Contrasting perspectives on these issues are articulated by two prominent suicidologists, as a spur to the reader's deeper reconsideration of the ethics of suicide and suicide prevention. PMID:10160540

Lester, D; Leenaars, A A

1996-01-01

460

Ethical obliqations and the dental office team.  

PubMed

A hypothetical case of alleged sexual misconduct in a practice with high employee turnover and stress is analyzed by three experts. This case commentary examines the ethical role expectations of an office manager who is not directly involved but becomes aware of the activities. The commentators bring the perspectives of a dental hygienist, academic administrator, and attorney; a teacher of behavioral sciences in a dental school; and a general dentist with many years of practice experience. PMID:24761582

Roucka, Toni M; Zarkowski, Pamela; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Patthoff, Donald E

2013-01-01

461

The Ethicality of Altruistic Corporate Social Responsibility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This personal opinion commentary,questions commonly,held assumptions about corporate social responsibility (CSR). It discusses the morality of altruistic CSR—philanthropic CSR activities that are not necessarily beneficial to the firm’s financial position. Evaluating altruistic CSR from all major ethical perspectives—utilitarianism, rights, justice, and care—leads to the conclusion that, for publicly held corporations, such activity is immoral. This is because altruistic CSR

Geoffrey P. Lantos

2001-01-01

462

Time perspective and values: An exploratory study of their relations to environmental attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the relationship between time perspective (TP), values and environmental attitudes in a sample of 247 undergraduate students based on an expanded social dilemma framework. Zimbardo and Boyd's [(1999). Putting time in perspective: A valid, reliable individual-differences metric. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77, 1271–1288] five TP dimensions (i.e., past-negative, present-hedonistic, future, past-positive, and present-fatalistic), the extended

Taciano L. Milfont; Valdiney V. Gouveia

2006-01-01

463

Opening Scenarios: A Relational Perspective on How to Deal with Multiple Therapeutic Views  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this work is to provide therapists with a conceptual outline to help them utilize theoretical and methodological\\u000a perspectives from different psychotherapy models. More specifically, we will start with three basic assumptions from the social\\u000a constructionist paradigm, particularly effective in bringing together different perspectives in therapy and providing therapists\\u000a with useful criteria for selecting among them. The assumptions

Diego Romaioli

464

Investigators' Perspectives on Translating Human Microbiome Research into Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

Background Human microbiome research has the potential to transform the practice of medicine, fundamentally shifting the ways in which we think not only about human health, illness, and disease, but also about clinical practice and public health interventions. Drawing from a larger qualitative study on ethical, legal, and social dimensions of human microbiome research, in this article we document perspectives related to the translation of human microbiome research into clinical practice, focusing particularly on implications for health, illness, and disease. Methods We conducted 60 in-depth, semi-structured interviews (2009–2010) with 63 researchers and National Institutes of Health project leaders (“investigators”) involved with human microbiome research. Interviews explored a range of ethical, legal, and social implications of human microbiome research, including investigators’ perspectives on potential strategies for translating findings to clinical practice. Using thematic content analysis, we identified and analyzed emergent themes and patterns. Results We identified three themes: (1) Investigators’ general perspectives on the clinical utility of human microbiome research, (2) Investigators’ perspectives on antibiotic use, overuse, and misuse, and (3) Investigators’ perspectives concerning future challenges of translating data to clinical practice. Conclusion The issues discussed by investigators concerning the clinical significance of human microbiome research, including embracing a new paradigm of health and disease, the importance of microbial communities, and clinical utility, will be of critical importance as this research moves forward.

Slashinski, Melody J.; Whitney, Simon N.; Achenbaum, Laura S.; Keitel, Wendy A.; McCurdy, Sheryl A.; McGuire, Amy L.

2013-01-01

465

Nurses' perspectives on supporting children during needle-related medical procedures  

PubMed Central

Children state that among their worst fears during hospitalization are those related to various nursing procedures and to injections and needles. Nurses thus have a responsibility to help children cope with needle-related medical procedures (NRMP) and the potentially negative effects of these. The aim of the study is to describe the lived experience of supporting children during NRMP, from the perspective of nurses. Fourteen nurses took part in the study, six of whom participated on two occasions thus resulting in 20 interviews. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used, and phenomenological analysis was applied. The result shows that supporting children during NRMP is characterized by a desire to meet the child in his/her own world and by an effort to reach the child's horizon of understanding regarding these actions, based on the given conditions. The essential meaning of the phenomenon is founded on the following constituents: developing relationships through conversation, being sensitive to embodied responses, balancing between tact and use of restraint, being the child's advocate, adjusting time, and maintaining belief. The discussion focuses on how nurses can support children through various types of conversation and by receiving help from the parents’ ability to be supportive, and on whether restraint can be supportive or not for children during NRMP. Our conclusion is that nurses have to see each individual child, meet him/her in their own world, and decide on supportive actions while at the same time balancing their responsibility for the completion of the NRMP. This work can be described as “balancing on a tightrope” in an unpredictable situation.

Karlsson, Katarina; Rydstrom, Ingela; Enskar, Karin; Englund, Ann-Charlotte Dalheim

2014-01-01

466

For an Ethnomethodology of healthcare ethics.  

PubMed

This paper considers the utility of Ethnomethodology (EM) for the study of healthcare ethics as part of the empirical turn in Bioethics. I give a brief introduction to EM through its respecification of sociology, the specific view on the social world this generates and EM's posture of 'indifference'. I then take a number of EM concepts and articulate each in the context of an EM study of healthcare ethics in professional practice. Having given an overview of the relationship and perspective EM might bring to the professional practice of healthcare ethics I consider whether and how such an approach could be deployed. Whilst an ethnographic study might be problematic I suggest a number of alternative methods through which such EM research could be accomplished. I conclude with the suggestion that, as a particular approach to sociological research, EM offers good deal of potential for the empirical study of healthcare ethics in practice which could result in an improved reflexive understanding of professional ethical practices in bioethics. PMID:22367525

Emmerich, Nathan

2013-12-01

467

[Ethics in nursing].  

PubMed

The conclusion reached at the end of this article is that there is a crisis in the ethics of nursing and that the focus of the ethics of nursing should be on virtues. The reconstruction of a virtue-based ethics in nursing is proposed as a solution for the current crisis in the ethics of nursing. With an analysis conducted on the ethics of nursing the story is told of an individual nurse within nursing in the South African society. Certain concepts to ethics as well as the dimensions of ethics in nursing are explained within the narrative of nursing. The institutionalisation of ethics of nursing is described based on the three ethical traditions that moved from virtues, to responsibility to human rights. An analysis of the moral practice in nursing indicates that a crisis in the ethics of nursing exist within the last tradition of human rights because of the conflict between the rights of the nurse and the patient. Through the analysis it becomes clear that no rules, codes or law can ensure moral behaviour. The control over moral behaviour should rather be internal than external. If a person does not have the virtues he or she does not understands the rules and human rights and responsibilities have a different meaning for them. PMID:9538702

Botes, A

1997-12-01

468

Teaching Ethics in Medical School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the literature regarding the teaching of ethics in medical schools. Defines medical ethics and attempts to determine the scope of medical ethics teaching. Discusses ways medical ethics could be taught and how that teaching can be assessed. Calls for increased attention into the teaching of medical ethics. (TW)

Ewan, Christine

1986-01-01

469

Is mandatory research ethics reviewing ethical?  

PubMed

Review boards responsible for vetting the ethical conduct of research have been criticised for their costliness, unreliability and inappropriate standards when evaluating some non-medical research, but the basic value of mandatory ethical review has not been questioned. When the standards that review boards use to evaluate research proposals are applied to review board practices, it is clear that review boards do not respect researchers or each other, lack merit and integrity, are not just and are not beneficent. The few benefits of mandatory ethical review come at a much greater, but mainly hidden, social cost. It is time that responsibility for the ethical conduct of research is clearly transferred to researchers, except possibly in that small proportion of cases where prospective research participants may be so intrinsically vulnerable that their well-being may need to be overseen. PMID:22865925

Dyck, Murray; Allen, Gary

2013-08-01

470

THE IMPACT OF ENVIRONMENTAL, FIRM, AND RELATIONAL FACTORS ON ENTREPRENEURS' ETHICALLY SUSPECT BEHAVIORS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY IN THE CHINESE CONTEXT (INTERACTIVE PAPER)  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is clear that given the potentially significant impacts of entrepreneurs’ ethically suspect behaviors (ESB), it is important (1) to understand their nature and (2) to identify what factors may promote or impede such behaviors. Taking a teleological view and focusing on those behaviors enacted by entrepreneurs in the service of their firm’s success and which also run counter to

Shaji A. Khan; Jintong Tang; Renhong Zhu

2011-01-01

471

Protect the child from being born: arguments against IVF from heads of the 13 licensed Dutch fertility centres, ethical and legal perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single prospective parents or parents of relatively advanced age, lesbian couples, carriers of a genetic disease, or a woman who wishes to conceive the child of her terminally ill or deceased partner are sometimes refused in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment due to their situation of increased medical and\\/or psychosocial risk. This study aimed to gain insight into the arguments against

J. A. M. Hunfeld; J. Passchier; L. L. E. Bolt; M. A. J. M. Buijsen

2004-01-01

472

Why And How Should Students In Technical Programs Be Exposed To Ethical And International Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper makes the case for infusing topics such as ethics and global perspectives into engineering and technology programs. a convincing argument for inclusion of these topics as part of course requirements in technical degree programs.

N. S. Nandagopal

1989-01-01

473

Ethics of Inquiry: Issues in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection contains seven case studies about ethical issues faced by scholars of teaching and learning, each with commentary from individuals who bring different perspectives to bear on the issues. This case-plus-commentaries format enacts a central theme of the volume, which is that there is no single right way to resolve the ethical

Hutchings, Pat, Ed.

474

Ethical and Legal Issues Regarding Selective Abortion of Fetuses with Down Syndrome.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Selective abortion of fetuses with Down syndrome is discussed in terms of abortion perspectives, genetic testing, legislation, and ethical principles. The ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, fidelity, and justice are offered as guidelines for the examination of legal standards imposed by legislation. (Author/PB)

Glover, Noreen M.; Glover, Samuel J.

1996-01-01

475

An Ethical Framework for Stem Cell Research in the European Union  

Microsoft Academic Search

The European Union is a nightmare from the perspective of the ethics and regulation of science. A hitherto insoluble problem has been the task of drafting ethical principles which do not founder on the radically different attitudes taken to the question of the moral status of the human embryo. Following the conclusions reached in an international project, EUROSTEM, we suggest

John Harris; Lisa Bortolotti; Louise Irving

2005-01-01

476

Effects of Perspective Sentences in Social Stories[TM] on Improving the Adaptive Behaviors of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Related Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effects of adding perspective sentences to Social Stories[TM] on improving the adaptive behaviors of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and related disabilities. In Study 1, two students with ASD read two different types of Social Stories: Social Story without perspective sentences (SS without PS) and Social…

Okada, Shingo; Ohtake, Yoshihisa; Yanagihara, Masafumi

2008-01-01

477

Ethical implications of diversity in disaster research.  

PubMed

Enhancing the effectiveness, efficiency, and fairness of interventions is an increasing source of concern in the field of disaster response. As a result, the expansion of the disaster relief evidence base has been identified as a pressing need. There has been a corresponding increase in discussions