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Sample records for relations spin-down rates

  1. Tidal spin down rates of homogeneous triaxial viscoelastic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Kueter-Young, Andrea; Frouard, Julien; Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-08-01

    We use numerical simulations to measure the sensitivity of the tidal spin down rate of a homogeneous triaxial ellipsoid to its axis ratios by comparing the drift rate in orbital semi-major axis to that of a spherical body with the same mass, volume and simulated rheology. We use a mass-spring model approximating a viscoelastic body spinning around its shortest body axis, with spin aligned with orbital spin axis, and in circular orbit about a point mass. The torque or drift rate can be estimated from that predicted for a sphere with equivalent volume if multiplied by 0.5 (1 + b^4/a^4)(b/a)^{-4/3} (c/a)^{-α _c} where b/a and c/a are the body axis ratios and index αc ≈ 1.05 is consistent with the random lattice mass spring model simulations but αc = 4/3 suggested by scaling estimates. A homogeneous body with axis ratios 0.5 and and 0.8, like Haumea, has orbital semi-major axis drift rate about twice as fast as a spherical body with the same mass, volume and material properties. A simulation approximating a mostly rocky body but with 20% of its mass as ice concentrated at its ends has a drift rate 10 times faster than the equivalent homogeneous rocky sphere. However, this increase in drift rate is not enough to allow Haumea's satellite, Hi'iaka, to have tidally drifted away from Haumea to its current orbital semi-major axis.

  2. Reduced spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 explained as due to an asteroid disruption event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong-Bo; Huang, Yong-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Long term observations by Brook et al. reveal that the derivative of rotational frequency of PSR J0738-4042 changed abruptly in 2005. Originally, the spin-down rate was relatively stable, with the rotational frequency derivative being ‑1.14×10‑14 s‑2. After September 2005, the derivative began to rise. About 1000 days later, it arrived at another relatively stable value of about ‑0.98 × 10‑14 s‑2, indicating that the pulsar is spinning-down relatively slowly. To explain the observed change in spin-down rate, we resort to an asteroid disrupted by PSR J0738-4042. In our model, the orbital angular momentum of the asteroid is assumed to be parallel to that of the rotating pulsar, so that the pronounced reduction in the spin-down rate can be naturally explained as due to the transfer of angular momentum from the disrupted material to the central pulsar. The derived magnetospheric radius is about 7.0 × 109 cm, which is smaller than the tidal disruption radius (8.7 × 1010 cm). Our model is self-consistent. It is shown that the variability in the spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 can be quantitatively accounted for by accretion from the asteroid disrupted by the central pulsar.

  3. The variable spin-down rate of the transient magnetar XTE J1810-197

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintore, Fabio; Bernardini, Federico; Mereghetti, Sandro; Esposito, Paolo; Turolla, Roberto; Rea, Nanda; Coti Zelati, Francesco; Israel, Gian Luca; Tiengo, Andrea; Zane, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    We have analysed XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the transient magnetar XTE J1810-197 spanning more than 11 yr, from the initial phases of the 2003 outburst to the current quiescent level. We investigated the evolution of the pulsar spin period and we found evidence for two distinct regimes: during the outburst decay, dot{ν } was highly variable in the range -(2-4.5) × 10-13 Hz s-1, while during quiescence the spin-down rate was more stable at an average value of -1 × 10-13 Hz s-1. Only during ˜3000 d (from MJD 54165 to MJD 56908) in the quiescent stage it was possible to find a phase-connected timing solution, with dot{ν }=-4.9× 10^{-14} Hz s-1, and a positive second frequency derivative, ddot{ν }=1.8× 10^{-22} Hz s-2. These results are in agreement with the behaviour expected if the outburst of XTE J1810-197 was due to a strong magnetospheric twist.

  4. Exploration of spin-down rate of neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lang; Liu, Xi-Wei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-04-01

    We use the evolutionary population synthesis method to investigate the statistical properties of the wind-fed neutron-star (NS) compact (Porb < 10 d) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in our Galaxy, based on different spin-down models. Model 1 assumes that the surrounding material is treated as forming a quasi-static atmosphere. Model 2 assumes that the characteristic velocity of matter and the typical Alfvén velocity of material in the magnetospheric boundary layer are comparable to the sound speed in the external medium. We find that the spin-down rate in the supersonic propeller phase in either model 1 or model 2 is too low to produce the observed number of compact HMXBs. Model 3 assumes that the infalling material is ejected with the corotation velocity at the magnetospheric radius when the magnetospheric radius is larger than the corotation radius. Model 4 uses simple integration of the magnetic torque over the magnetosphere. Both models 3 and 4 have a larger spin down rate than that given by model 1 or 2. We also find that models 3 and 4 can predict a reasonable number of observed wind-fed NS compact HMXBs. By comparing our calculated results with the observed particular distributions of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in a Ps versus Porb diagram, we find that the subsonic propeller phase may not exist at all. However, the spin-down rates in models 3 and 4 both seem reasonable to produce the observed distribution of wind-fed NS compact HMXBs in the Ps versus Porb diagram. We cannot find which spin-down rate seems more reasonable from our calculations.

  5. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  6. A grid of MHD models for stellar mass loss and spin-down rates of solar analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    Stellar winds are believed to be the dominant factor in the spin-down of stars over time. However, stellar winds of solar analogs are poorly constrained due to observational challenges. In this paper, we present a grid of magnetohydrodynamic models to study and quantify the values of stellar mass loss and angular momentum loss rates as a function of the stellar rotation period, magnetic dipole component, and coronal base density. We derive simple scaling laws for the loss rates as a function of these parameters, and constrain the possible mass loss rate of stars with thermally driven winds. Despite the success of our scaling law in matching the results of the model, we find a deviation between the 'solar dipole' case and a real case based on solar observations that overestimates the actual solar mass loss rate by a factor of three. This implies that the model for stellar fields might require a further investigation with additional complexity. Mass loss rates in general are largely controlled by the magnetic field strength, with the wind density varying in proportion to the confining magnetic pressure B {sup 2}. We also find that the mass loss rates obtained using our grid models drop much faster with the increase in rotation period than scaling laws derived using observed stellar activity. For main-sequence solar-like stars, our scaling law for angular momentum loss versus poloidal magnetic field strength retrieves the well-known Skumanich decline of angular velocity with time, Ω{sub *}∝t {sup –1/2}, if the large-scale poloidal magnetic field scales with rotation rate as B{sub p}∝Ω{sub ⋆}{sup 2}.

  7. Spin down of rotating compact magnetized strange stars in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    We find that in general relativity slow down of the pulsar rotation due to the magnetodipolar radiation is more faster for the strange star with comparison to that for the ordinary neutron star of the same mass. Comparison with astrophysical observations on pulsars spindown data may provide an evidence for the strange star existence and, thus, serve as a test for distinguishing it from the neutron star.

  8. On the Spin-down of Intermittent Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Magnetospheres of pulsars are thought to be filled with plasma, and variations in plasma supply can affect both pulsar emission properties and spin-down rates. A number of recently discovered "intermittent" pulsars switch between two distinct states: an "on," radio-loud state, and an "off," radio-quiet state. Spin-down rates in the two states differ by a large factor, ~1.5-2.5, which is not easily understood in the context of current models. In this Letter, we present self-consistent numerical solutions of "on" and "off" states of intermittent pulsar magnetospheres. We model the "on" state as a nearly ideal force-free magnetosphere with abundant magnetospheric plasma supply. The lack of radio emission in the "off" state is associated with plasma supply disruption that results in lower plasma density on the open field lines. We model the "off" state using nearly vacuum conditions on the open field lines and nearly ideal force-free conditions on the closed field lines, where plasma can remain trapped even in the absence of pair production. The toroidal advection of plasma in the closed zone in the "off" state causes spin-downs that are a factor of ~2 higher than vacuum values, and we naturally obtain a range of spin-down ratios between the "on" and "off" states, ~1.2-2.9, which corresponds to a likely range of pulsar inclination angles of 30°-90°. We consider the implications of our model to a number of poorly understood but possibly related pulsar phenomena, including nulling, timing noise, and rotating radio transients.

  9. A QUARTER-CENTURY OF OBSERVATIONS OF COMET 10P/TEMPEL 2 AT LOWELL OBSERVATORY: CONTINUED SPIN-DOWN, COMA MORPHOLOGY, PRODUCTION RATES, AND NUMERICAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Christensen, Samantha R.; Farnham, Tony L.

    2012-11-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1983 through 2011. We measured a nucleus rotation period of 8.950 {+-} 0.002 hr from 16 nights of imaging acquired between 2010 September and 2011 January. This rotation period is longer than the period we previously measured in 1999, which was itself longer than the period measured in 1988, and demonstrates that Tempel 2 is continuing to spin down, presumably due to torques caused by asymmetric outgassing. A nearly linear jet was observed which varied little during a rotation cycle in both R and CN images acquired during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions. We measured the projected direction of this jet throughout the two apparitions and, under the assumption that the source region of the jet was near the comet's pole, determined a rotational pole direction of R.A./decl. = 151 Degree-Sign /+59 Degree-Sign from CN measurements and R.A./decl. = 173 Degree-Sign /+57 Degree-Sign from dust measurements (we estimate a circular uncertainty of 3 Degree-Sign for CN and 4 Degree-Sign for dust). Different combinations of effects likely bias both gas and dust solutions and we elected to average these solutions for a final pole direction of R.A./decl. = 162 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign /+58 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign . Photoelectric photometry was acquired on 3 nights in 1983, 2 nights in 1988, 19 nights in 1999/2000, and 10 nights in 2010/2011. The activity exhibited a steep 'turn-on' {approx}3 months prior to perihelion (the exact timing of which varies) and a relatively smooth decline after perihelion. The activity during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions was similar; limited data in 1983 and 1988 (along with IUE data from the literature) were systematically higher and the difference cannot be explained entirely by the smaller perihelion distance. We measured a 'typical' composition, in agreement with previous investigators. Monte Carlo numerical modeling with our pole solution best

  10. A Quarter-century of Observations of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 at Lowell Observatory: Continued Spin-down, Coma Morphology, Production Rates, and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.; Farnham, Tony L.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Christensen, Samantha R.

    2012-11-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1983 through 2011. We measured a nucleus rotation period of 8.950 ± 0.002 hr from 16 nights of imaging acquired between 2010 September and 2011 January. This rotation period is longer than the period we previously measured in 1999, which was itself longer than the period measured in 1988, and demonstrates that Tempel 2 is continuing to spin down, presumably due to torques caused by asymmetric outgassing. A nearly linear jet was observed which varied little during a rotation cycle in both R and CN images acquired during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions. We measured the projected direction of this jet throughout the two apparitions and, under the assumption that the source region of the jet was near the comet's pole, determined a rotational pole direction of R.A./decl. = 151°/+59° from CN measurements and R.A./decl. = 173°/+57° from dust measurements (we estimate a circular uncertainty of 3° for CN and 4° for dust). Different combinations of effects likely bias both gas and dust solutions and we elected to average these solutions for a final pole direction of R.A./decl. = 162° ± 11°/+58° ± 1°. Photoelectric photometry was acquired on 3 nights in 1983, 2 nights in 1988, 19 nights in 1999/2000, and 10 nights in 2010/2011. The activity exhibited a steep "turn-on" ~3 months prior to perihelion (the exact timing of which varies) and a relatively smooth decline after perihelion. The activity during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions was similar; limited data in 1983 and 1988 (along with IUE data from the literature) were systematically higher and the difference cannot be explained entirely by the smaller perihelion distance. We measured a "typical" composition, in agreement with previous investigators. Monte Carlo numerical modeling with our pole solution best replicated the observed coma morphology for a source region located near a comet latitude of +80° and having a

  11. Dual Spin-down States of the Pulsar J1001-5507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Buchner, S.

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-regular timing observations obtained, using the 26 m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radiotelescope near center frequencies of 1.668 and 2.272 GHz, between 1985 July and 2005 August have given a further insight into the long-term spin-down behavior of the pulsar J1001-5507 (B0959-54). Here, we show that the spin-down of the pulsar during ~20 years is dominated by dual spin-down modes characterized by two discrete and nearly stable spin-down rates (\\dot{\

  12. Switched magnetospheric regulation of pulsar spin-down.

    PubMed

    Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; Kramer, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid; Stappers, Ben

    2010-07-23

    Pulsars are famed for their rotational clocklike stability and their highly repeatable pulse shapes. However, it has long been known that there are unexplained deviations (often termed timing noise) from the rate at which we predict these clocks should run. We show that timing behavior often results from two different spin-down rates. Pulsars switch abruptly between these states, often quasi-periodically, leading to the observed spin-down patterns. We show that for six pulsars the timing noise is correlated with changes in the pulse shape. Many pulsar phenomena, including mode changing, nulling, intermittency, pulse-shape variability, and timing noise, are therefore linked and are caused by changes in the pulsar's magnetosphere. We consider the possibility that high-precision monitoring of pulse profiles could lead to the formation of highly stable pulsar clocks. PMID:20576852

  13. Spin-down Dynamics of Magnetized Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough & McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor & Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  14. SPIN-UP/SPIN-DOWN MODELS FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, R. Di; Voss, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M{sub crit}, needed for explosion. When M{sub crit} is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M{sub Ch} WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  15. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays and a New Spin-Down State of the LMC Pulsar B0540-69

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Francis E.; Guillemot, Lucas; Kust Harding, Alice; Martin, Pierrick; Smith, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The young pulsar B0540-69 in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud has the third largest spin-down luminosity of the ~2500 known pulsars. Multi-year observations with Fermi/LAT using the ephemerides from RXTE reveal that B0540-69 is the most luminous gamma-ray pulsar ever detected. Its pulsed luminosity above 100 MeV is 5.7x1036 erg/s, about 20 times brighter than the Crab Pulsar, the next brightest. The pulse profile in gamma rays is similar to that seen in X-rays and optical light; the giant radio pulses align with the shoulders of the high-energy profiles. The detection of B0540-69 in gamma rays offers a new look at particle acceleration and emission in the magnetospheres of very young pulsars. Unpulsed gamma-ray emission has also been detected from PSR J0537-6910, another young pulsar in the LMC. The two pulsars contribute most of the gamma-ray emission from the 30 Doradus nebula, indicating that cosmic rays contribute only a small part. Recent monitoring of B0540-69 with the Swift/XRT shows a large, sudden, and persistent increase in the spin-down rate of B0540-69. The relative increase in the spin-down rate of 36% is unprecedented for B0540-69. No accompanying change in the spin rate was seen, and no change was seen in the pulsed X-ray emission from B0540-69 following the change in the spin-down rate. Such large relative changes in the spin-down rate are seen in the recently discovered class of ``intermittent pulsars'', and we compare the properties of B0540-69 to such pulsars. We consider possible changes in the magnetosphere of the pulsar that could cause such a large change in the spin-down rate. These changes are likely to result in a new braking index for the pulsar. We report on continued monitoring with Swift/XRT to determine the new braking index and to detect a new state change, should it occur.

  16. DUAL SPIN-DOWN STATES OF THE PULSAR J1001-5507

    SciTech Connect

    Chukwude, A. E.; Buchner, S.

    2012-01-20

    Quasi-regular timing observations obtained, using the 26 m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory radiotelescope near center frequencies of 1.668 and 2.272 GHz, between 1985 July and 2005 August have given a further insight into the long-term spin-down behavior of the pulsar J1001-5507 (B0959-54). Here, we show that the spin-down of the pulsar during {approx}20 years is dominated by dual spin-down modes characterized by two discrete and nearly stable spin-down rates ({nu}-dot{sub low}=-0.24871x10{sup -13} s{sup -2} and {nu}-dot{sub high}=-0.25195x10{sup -13} s{sup -2}). Our analysis demonstrates that the switching of the pulsar's spin-down rate from {nu}-dot{sub low} to {nu}-dot{sub high} modes occurred over about 800 days (between about MJD 48500 and MJD 49300) at a steady rate of {approx}-4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -24} s{sup -3}, after which the pulsar was found to be slowing down 1.3% faster. It is observed that the extreme pulse profile shapes at the two spin-down modes are notably different, while the interval of steady switching between the spin-down modes is coincident with evidence for some correlated pulse shape variations. We discuss these results in light of the current understanding of various mechanisms for radio pulsar spin-down modulation.

  17. Spin-down of neutron stars by neutrino emission

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Dib, Claudio

    2010-08-15

    We study the spin-down of a neutron star during its early stages due to the neutrino emission. The mechanism we consider is the subsequent collisions of the produced neutrinos with the outer shells of the star. We find that this mechanism can indeed slow down the star rotation but only in the first tens of seconds of the core formation, which is when the appropriate conditions of flux and collision rate are met. We find that this mechanism can extract less than 1% of the star angular momentum, a result which is much less than previously estimated by other authors.

  18. Solar spin-down with internal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.; MacGregor, K. B.

    1992-09-01

    We investigate the rotational evolution of a solar-type star containing a large-scale poloidal magnetic field in its radiative core, in response to the torque applied to it by magnetically coupled wind. Our model takes into account both the generation of a toroidal magnetic component via shearing of the existing poloidal component by differential rotation, as well as the back-reaction on the differential rotation due to Lorentz forces associated with the toroidal field. Our computations demonstrate the existence of classes of large-scale poloidal magnetic fields allowing rapid spin-down of the surface layers shortly after the arrival on the zero-age main sequence, while producing weak internal differential rotation in the radiative core by the solar age. This indicates that the constraints brought about by rotational evolution of solar analogs in young clusters and by helioseismology are not incompatible with the existence of large-scale magnetic fields in stellar radiative interiors. The present surface solar rotation rate is also shown to be a poor indicator of the strength and geometry of hypothetical poloidal magnetic fields pervading the solar radiative interior.

  19. Gravitational wave emission and spin-down of young pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2014-01-20

    The rotation frequencies of young pulsars are systematically below their theoretical Kepler limit. r-modes have been suggested as a possible explanation for this observation. With the help of semi-analytic expressions that make it possible to assess the uncertainties of the r-mode scenario due to the impact of uncertainties in underlying microphysics, we perform a quantitative analysis of the spin-down and the emitted gravitational waves of young pulsars. We find that the frequency to which r-modes spin-down a young neutron star (NS) is surprisingly insensitive to both the microscopic details and the saturation amplitude. Comparing our result to astrophysical data, we show that for a range of sufficiently large saturation amplitudes r-modes provide a viable spin-down scenario and that all observed young pulsars are very likely already outside the r-mode instability region. Therefore, the most promising sources for gravitational wave detection are unobserved NSs associated with recent supernovae, and we find that advanced LIGO should be able to see several of them. Our analysis shows that despite the coupling of the spin-down and thermal evolution, a power-law spin-down with an effective braking index n {sub rm} ≤ 7 is realized. Because of this, the gravitational wave strain amplitude is completely independent of both the r-mode saturation amplitude and the microphysics and depends on the saturation mechanism only within some tens of percent. However, the gravitational wave frequency depends on the amplitude, and we provide the required expected timing parameter ranges to look for promising sources in future searches.

  20. On the Dramatic Spin-up/Spin-Down Torque Reversals in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Mathew; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    Dramatic torque reversals between spin-up and spin-down have been observed in half of the persistent X-ray pulsars monitored by the Burst and Transient Space Experiment (BATSE) all-sky monitor on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Theoretical models developed to explain early pulsar timing data can explain spin-down torques via a disk-magnetosphere interaction if the star nearly corotates with the inner accretion disk. To produce the observed BATSE torque reversals, however, these equilibrium models require the disk to alternate between two mass accretion rates, with M+/- producing accretion torques of similar magnitude but always of opposite sign. Moreover, in at least one pulsar (GX 1+4) undergoing secular spin-down, the neutron star spins down faster during brief (approximately 20 day) hard X-ray flares-this is opposite the correlation expected from standard theory, assuming that BATSE pulsed flux increases with mass accretion rate. The 10 day to 10 yr intervals between torque reversals in these systems are much longer than any characteristic magnetic or viscous timescale near the inner disk boundary and are more suggestive of a global disk phenomenon. We discuss possible explanations of the observed torque behavior. Despite the preferred sense of rotation defined by the binary orbit, the BATSE observations are surprisingly consistent with an earlier suggestion for GX 1+4: the disks in these systems somehow alternate between episodes of prograde and retrograde rotation. We are unaware of any mechanism that could produce a stable retrograde disk in a binary undergoing Roche lobe overflow, but such flip-flop behavior does occur in numerical simulations of wind-fed systems. One possibility is that the disks in some of these binaries are fed by an X-ray-excited wind.

  1. Spin-up and spin-down in a half cone: A pathological situation or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Patterson, M. D.; Zhang, K.; Kerswell, R. R.

    2012-11-01

    The spin-up and spin-down of a fluid in a rapidly rotating, fluid-filled, and closed half cone are studied both numerically and experimentally. This unusual set up is of interest because it represents a pathological case for the classical linear theory of Greenspan and Howard [J. Fluid Mech. 17, 385-404 (1963), 10.1017/S0022112063001415] since there are no closed geostrophic contours nor a denumerable set of inertial waves (even a modified theory incorporating Rossby waves by Pedlosky and Greenspan [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 291-304 (1967), 10.1017/S0022112067000321]—relies on geostrophy to leading order). The linearised spin-up/spin-down dynamics in a half cone is found to be dominated by topographical effects which force an ageostrophic leading balance and cause the large-scale starting vorticity to coherently move into the "westward" corner of the half cone for both spin-up and spin-down. Once there, viscous boundary layer effects take over as the dominant process ensuring that the spin-up/spin-down time scales conventionally with E-1/2, where E is the Ekman number. The numerical coefficient in this time scale is approximately a quarter of that for a full cone when the semi-angle is 30°. Nonlinear spin up from rest is also studied as well as an impulsive 50% reduction in the rotation rate which shows boundary layer separation and small scales. We conclude that spin-up in a rapidly rotating half cone is not pathological because the fluid dynamics is fundamentally the same as that in a container with small topography: in both topography-forced vortex stretching is to the fore.

  2. Non-monotonous character of single radio pulsar spin-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, A. V.; Beskin, G. M.; Karpov, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Our paper is dedicated to the problem of anomalous values of braking indices n obs and spin frequency second derivatives ddot ν of isolated radio pulsars. Observations of these objects for over 40 years have shown that in addition to the complex short-term irregular component in the evolution of the pulsars' frequency, secular values of its second derivative are orders of magnitude greater than the predicted theoretical ones, and in a good half of cases—they are even negative. We earlier attributed this behavior of secular values of the second derivative to the presence of a cyclic component in the secular evolution of ν( t), with a characteristic recurrence time of thousands to tens of thousand years. We continue to develop this hypothesis based on a more detailed statistical analysis of the characteristics of 297 isolated radio pulsars: we analyze the model of these objects spin-down, consisting of two components, monotonic and cyclic, and determine their parameters. We demonstrate that the monotonic spin-down component is described by the classical magnetodipolar power law with an braking index of about 3, while the large amplitude of the cyclic component causes a significant variation of the observed spin-down rate (dot ν ) (with respect to magnetodipolar one), and fully determines the anomalous values of ddot ν and n obs. An important consequence of the existence of a cyclic component of the pulsar rotational variations is the difference between their characteristic ages and respective secular values (by about 0.5-5 times). This allows to explainthe observed discrepancy of the characteristic and physical ages of some objects, as well as very large, up to 108 years, characteristic ages of some old pulsars. The paper argues that the cyclic component of the observed spin-down is due to the long-term precession of neutron stars around their magnetic axes, which, in particular, may be driven by the anomalous braking torque. In the model of purely

  3. Timing Young Pulsars: Challenges to Standard Pulsar Spin-Down Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingstone, Margaret Anne

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars which are often noted for their very regular rotation rates. Young pulsars, however, frequently exhibit two types of deviations from steady spin down, "glitches" - sudden jumps in spin frequency, which provide insight into pulsar interiors, and "timing noise," a smooth stochastic wander of the pulse phase over long time periods. The youngest pulsars also offer a window into the physics that govern pulsar spin down via the measurement of the "braking index" - a parameter that relates the observable spin frequency of the pulsar with the slowing down torque acting on the neutron star. This thesis discusses long-term timing observations of two young pulsars. First, we present observations of PSR J0205+6449, acquired with the Green Bank Telescope, the Jodrell Bank Observatory and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer . We present phase-coherent timing analyses showing timing noise and two spin-up glitches. We also present an X-ray pulse profile analysis showing that the pulsar is detected up to ∼40 keV and does not vary appreciably over four years. We report the phase offset between the radio and X-ray pulse, showing that the radio pulse leads by φ = 0.10 ± 0.01 in phase. We compile measurements of phase offsets for this and other X-ray and γ-ray pulsars and show that there is no relationship between pulse period and phase offset. Next, we present 10 years of monitoring of PSR J1846-0258 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer . We report the first measurement of the braking index for this pulsar, n = 2.65 ± 0.01, only the sixth such measurement ever made, and show that the pulsar experienced a small glitch in 2001. In May 2006, PSR J1846-0258 was briefly transformed: it exhibited a series of X-ray bursts, a dramatic increase in the source flux, and significant softening of its X-ray spectrum - behaviours best explained in the context of the magnetar model. PSR J1846-0258 was thus identified as the first rotation-powered pulsar

  4. A Magnetar Wind Nebula: the Spin-down-Powered Wind is not Enough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Gelfand, Joseph; Younes, George A.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Kust Harding, Alice; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huppenkothen, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars are a small class of slowly-rotating (P~2-12 s) highly magnetized (surface dipole fields ~10^{14}-10^{15} G) that show a variety of bursting activity, powered by the decay of their super-strong magnetic field. While many rotation-powered pulsars are surrounded by a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by their spin-down MHD wind (the prime example being the Crab nebula), only now has the first magnetar wind nebula (MWN) been discovered in X-rays, around Swift J1834.9-0846. We have analyzed this system in detail to see what can be learned from it. We find good evidence that unlike normal PWNe, this MWN cannot be powered by its spin-down MHD wind alone. A considerable contribution to the MWN energy should come from a different source, most likely sporadic outflows associated with the magnetar's bursting activity. This suggests that the MWN may serve as a calorimeter, and provide a new and robust estimate for the magnetar's long-term mean energy output rate in outflows. We also discuss other interesting aspects of this system.

  5. Beating the Spin-down Limit on Gravitational Wave Emission from the Vela Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, N.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Liguori, N.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marandi, A.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohan, M.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mosca, S.; Moscatelli, V.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pagliaroli, G.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Parameswaran, A.; Pardi, S.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pietka, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Podkaminer, J.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Salit, M.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shihan Weerathunga, T.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Stein, A. J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szokoly, G. P.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Turner, L.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vajente, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Yvert, M.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Buchner, S.; Hotan, A.; Palfreyman, J.

    2011-08-01

    We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, 1.9 × 10-24 and 2.2 × 10-24, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of 2.1 × 10-24, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect spin-down limit of 3.3 × 10-24 for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of ~10-3. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and the wave polarization angles are unknown.

  6. The influence of spin-down on thermal evolution of hybrid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Dong

    2014-11-01

    As neutron stars spin-down, quark matter may appear in the core forming so-called hybrid stars. We investigate the evolution behavior of rotating hybrid stars which have tortuous thermal evolution curves because of a change of chemical composition and the appearance of different powerful neutrino reactions in the process of spin-down. The emergence of the nucleon direct Urca processes can lead to an abrupt rise of the rate of neutrino emission. Quark deconfinement heating can both delay the cooling dramatically and raise the temperature of the stars over a period of time. Comparing the thermal evolution curves with observations, our investigation shows that the thermal evolution curves of rotating hybrid stars are consistent with the most of pulsar’s data despite the onset of fast cooling. Massive rotating hybrid stars model could be a good choice for some “cooler” stars. The Cas A supernova remnant contains a young neutron star (≈330 yr old) which is one of the most important isolated neutron stars in testing the thermal evolution theory of neutron star. We find the onset of the nucleon direct Urca process of the rotating hybrid star with heating model also could be an alternative explanation for the rapid cooling of Cas A neutron star.

  7. SPIN-DOWN MEASUREMENT OF PSR J1813-1749: THE ENERGETIC PULSAR POWERING HESS J1813-178

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Camilo, F.

    2012-07-01

    Two new X-ray timing observations of the 44.7 ms pulsar in G12.82-0.02/HESS J1813-178 were obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton to determine its precise spin-down rate. With a period derivative of P-dot 1.265 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13}, PSR J1813-1749 is the third most energetic pulsar in the Galaxy, having spin-down luminosity E-dot 5.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. Lack of pulsed detection in a deep radio search from the Green Bank Telescope, and in {gamma}-rays from Fermi, are reported. We reconsider the distance to PSR J1813-1749/G12.82-0.02 in view of its large X-ray measured column density, N{sub H} = 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}, which exceeds the visual extinction A{sub V} = 9.1 to a young stellar cluster at d = 4.8 kpc that has been associated with it. Although the distance may well be larger, existing data do not constrain it further. The small radiative output of PSR J1813-1749/G12.82-0.02 in all bands would not exceed its spin-down power at any distance in the Galactic disk.

  8. Torque Reversal and Spin-Down of the Accretion-Powered Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto L.; Bildsten, L.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Koh, D. T.; Prince, T. A.; Vaughan, B. A.; Finger, M. H.; Scott, D. M.; Wilson, R. B.

    1997-01-01

    Over 5 yr of hard X-ray (20-60 keV) monitoring of the 7.66 s accretion-powered pulsar 4U 1626-67 with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE large-area detectors has revealed that the neutron star is now steadily spinning down, in marked contrast to the steady spin-up and spin-down torques differ by only 15% with the neutron star spin changing on a timescale |v/v| approximately equals 5000 yr in both states. The current spin-down rate is itself decreasing on a timescale |v/v| approximately equals 26 yr. The long-term timing history shows small-amplitude variations on a 4000 day timescale, which are probably due to variations in the mass transfer rate. The pulsed 20-60 keV emission from 4U 1626-67 is well-fitted by a power-law spectrum with photon index gamma = 4.9 and a typical pulsed intensity of 1.5 x 10(exp -10) ergs cm (exp -2)s(exp -1). The low count rates with BATSE prohibited us from constraining the reported 42 minute binary orbit, but we can rule out long-period orbits in the range 2 days < or = P(orb) < or = 900 days. We compare the long-term torque behavior of 4U 1626-67 to other disk-fed accreting pulsars and discuss the implications of our results for the various theories of magnetic accretion torques. The abrupt change in the sign of the torque is difficult to reconcile with the extremely smooth spin-down now observed. The strength of the torque noise in 4U 1626-67, approximately 10(exp -22) Hz(exp 2)s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1), is the smallest ever measured for an accreting X-ray pulsar, and it is comparable to the timing noise seen in young radio pulsars. We close by pointing out that the core temperature and external torque (the two parameters potentially relevant to internal sources of timing noise) of an accreting neutron star are also comparable to those of young radio pulsars.

  9. Comparing models of the periodic variations in spin-down and beamwidth for PSR B1828-11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, G.; Jones, D. I.; Prix, R.

    2016-05-01

    We build a framework using tools from Bayesian data analysis to evaluate models explaining the periodic variations in spin-down and beamwidth of PSR B1828-11. The available data consist of the time-averaged spin-down rate, which displays a distinctive double-peaked modulation, and measurements of the beamwidth. Two concepts exist in the literature that are capable of explaining these variations; we formulate predictive models from these and quantitatively compare them. The first concept is phenomenological and stipulates that the magnetosphere undergoes periodic switching between two metastable states as first suggested by Lyne et al. The second concept, precession, was first considered as a candidate for the modulation of B1828-11 by Stairs et al. We quantitatively compare models built from these concepts using a Bayesian odds ratio. Because the phenomenological switching model itself was informed by these data in the first place, it is difficult to specify appropriate parameter-space priors that can be trusted for an unbiased model comparison. Therefore, we first perform a parameter estimation using the spin-down data, and then use the resulting posterior distributions as priors for model comparison on the beamwidth data. We find that a precession model with a simple circular Gaussian beam geometry fails to appropriately describe the data, while allowing for a more general beam geometry provides a good fit to the data. The resulting odds between the precession model (with a general beam geometry) and the switching model are estimated as 102.7±0.5 in favour of the precession model.

  10. CONSTRAINING THE SPIN-DOWN TIMESCALE OF THE WHITE DWARF PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiangcun; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Justham and Di Stefano et al. proposed that the white dwarf progenitor of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) may have to spin down before it can explode. As the white dwarf spin-down timescale is not well known theoretically, here we try to constrain it empirically (within the framework of this spin-down model) for progenitor systems that contain a giant donor and for which circumbinary material has been detected after the explosion: we obtain an upper limit of a few 10{sup 7}yr. Based on the study of Di Stefano and Kilic, this means that it is too early to rule out the existence of a surviving companion in SNR 0509–67.5.

  11. Constraining the Spin-down Timescale of the White Dwarf Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangcun; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Justham and Di Stefano et al. proposed that the white dwarf progenitor of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) may have to spin down before it can explode. As the white dwarf spin-down timescale is not well known theoretically, here we try to constrain it empirically (within the framework of this spin-down model) for progenitor systems that contain a giant donor and for which circumbinary material has been detected after the explosion: we obtain an upper limit of a few 107yr. Based on the study of Di Stefano & Kilic, this means that it is too early to rule out the existence of a surviving companion in SNR 0509-67.5.

  12. Experiments on spin-up and spin-down on a beta-plane

    SciTech Connect

    Jillians, W.J.; Maxworthy, T.

    1994-07-01

    We study the spin-up and spin-down of a homogeneous fluid with a free surface on an experimental `beta-plane` and describe the important features for both cases over a range of parameters. Quantitative values are found for the velocity fields using a new image processing technique that analyses a video record of particle motion and stores the results digitally. Streamlines, pressure fields, and vorticity values are found by interpolation techniques and result in a complete description of the flow characteristics. We discuss the relationship between the results of these experiments and those observed in large-scale homogeneous models of ocean circulation, e.g. Moore. This study extends the work of van Heijst et al. to the case of spin-up in a rectangular container but of nonuniform depth and we note the differences to and similarities with their observations. It is related, also, to more recent results of Maas et al., who considered spin-up on a beta-plane but in a tank of very different proportions to the one considered here. 20 refs.

  13. Spin-up/spin-down of neutron star in Be-X-ray binary system GX 304-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Mironov, A. I.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Shakura, N. I.; Kochetkova, A. Yu.; Tsygankov, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse spin-up/spin-down of the neutron star in Be-X-ray binary system GX 304-1 observed by Swift/X-ray telescope (XRT) and Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) instruments in the period of the source activity from 2010 April to 2013 January and discuss possible mechanisms of angular momentum transfer to/from the neutron star. We argue that the neutron star spin-down at quiescent states of the source with an X-ray luminosity of Lx ˜ 1034 erg s-1 between a series of Type I outbursts and spin-up during the outbursts can be explained by quasi-spherical settling accretion on to the neutron star. The outbursts occur near the neutron star periastron passages, where the density is enhanced due to the presence of an equatorial Be-disc tilted to the orbital plane. We also propose an explanation to the counterintuitive smaller spin-up rate observed at higher luminosity in a double-peak Type I outburst due to lower value of the specific angular momentum of matter captured from the quasi-spherical wind from the Be-star by the neutron star moving in an elliptical orbit with eccentricity e ≳ 0.5.

  14. THE SPIN-DOWN OF SWIFT J1822.3-1606: A NEW GALACTIC MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect

    Livingstone, M. A.; Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2011-12-20

    On 2011 July 14, a new magnetar candidate, Swift J1822.3-1606, was identified via a rate trigger on the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope. Here we present an initial analysis of the X-ray properties of the source, using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, Swift, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, spanning 2011 July 16-October 8. We measure a precise spin period of P = 8.43771968(6) s and a spin-down rate of P-dot =2.54(22) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13}, at MJD 55761.0, corresponding to an inferred surface dipole magnetic field of B = 4.7(2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, the second lowest thus far measured for a magnetar, though similar to those of 1E 2259+586 and several high-magnetic field radio pulsars. We show that the flux decay in the 1-10 keV band is best fit by a double exponential with timescales of 9 {+-} 1 and 55 {+-} 9 days. The pulsed count rate decay in the 2-10 keV band, by contrast, is better fit by a single exponential decay with timescale 15.9 {+-} 0.2 days. After increasing from {approx}35% for {approx}20 days after the onset of the outburst, the pulsed fraction in the 2-10 keV band remained constant at {approx}45%. We argue that these properties confirm this source to be a new member of the class of objects known as magnetars. We consider the distribution of magnetar periods and inferred dipole magnetic field strengths, showing that the former appears flat in the 2-12 s range, while the latter appears peaked in the 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} G range.

  15. CONSTRAINING THE SPIN-DOWN OF THE NEARBY ISOLATED NEUTRON STAR RX J0806.4-4123, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE POPULATION OF NEARBY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D. L.; Van Kerkwijk, M. H. E-mail: mhvk@astro.utoronto.c

    2009-11-01

    The nearby isolated neutron stars (INSs) are a group of seven relatively slowly rotating neutron stars that show thermal X-ray spectra, most with broad absorption features. They are interesting both because they may allow one to determine fundamental neutron-star properties by modeling their spectra, and because they appear to be a large fraction of the overall neutron-star population. Here, we describe a series of XMM -Newton observations of the nearby INS RX J0806.4-4123, taken as part of larger program of timing studies. From these, we limit the spin-down rate to nu-dot=(-4.3+-2.3)x10{sub -16}Hz s{sup -1}. This constrains the dipole magnetic field to be <3.7 x 10{sup 13} G at 2sigma, significantly less than the field of approx10{sup 14} G implied by simple models for the X-ray absorption found at 0.45 keV. We confirm that the spectrum is thermal and stable (to within a few percent), but find that the 0.45 keV absorption feature is broader and more complex than previously thought. Considering the population of INSs, we find that magnetic field decay from an initial field of approx<3 x 10{sup 14} G accounts most naturally for their timing and spectral properties, both qualitatively and in the context of the models for field decay of Pons and collaborators.

  16. Spin Down of Pulsations in the Cooling Tail of an X-ray Burst from 4U 1636-53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.

    1999-01-01

    We report the discovery with the proportional counter array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of a decrease in the frequency of X-ray brightness oscillations in the cooling tail of an X-ray burst from 4U 1636-53. This is the first direct evidence for a spin down of the pulsations seen during thermonuclear bursts. We find that the spin down episode is correlated with the appearance in this burst of an extended tail of emission with a decay timescale much longer than is seen in other bursts from 4U 1636-53 in the same set of observations. We present both time resolved energy and variability spectra during this burst and compare them with results from a second burst which shows neither a spin down episode nor an extended tail. A spectral evolution study of the "spin down" burst reveals a secondary signature of weak radius expansion, not seen in other bursts, and correlated with the spin down episode, which may indicate a secondary thermonuclear energy release. We interpret the spin down episode in the context of an angular momentum conserving shell, which is reexpanded and therefore spun down by an additional thermonuclear energy release which could also explain the extended X-ray tail.

  17. Viscous pumping and the spin-down of thermospheric gyres and jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Schubert, G.

    1986-01-01

    Strong gyres and jets can be generated at auroral latitudes in the thermosphere by enhanced electric fields during geomagnetic substorms. Typical height profiles of ion density suggest that the ion drag force should generate large curvature in the vertical profile of the winds in the highly viscous region of the thermosphere above about 200 km. It is proposed that the poststorm spin-down of these gyres and jets proceeds via Ekman circulations driven by the curvatures in the height profiles of the winds. Analytic and numerical calculations of the ageostrophic winds forced by curvature in model geostrophic wind profiles show that the ageostrophic wind speeds and directions depend mainly on the kinematic viscosity in the region of curvature and the total change in shear in the geostrophic wind. Ageostrophic wind speeds for typical thermospheric jets can exceed 200 m/s (about 50 percent of the jet winds). Spin-down times of thermospheric jets and cyclonic gyres by the Ekman pumping mechanism are estimated at less than about 6 hours.

  18. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  19. The long-term post-outburst spin down and flux relaxation of magnetar swift J1822.3–1606

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.

    2014-05-01

    The magnetar Swift J1822.3–1606 entered an outburst phase in 2011 July. Previous X-ray studies of its post-outburst rotational evolution yielded inconsistent measurements of the spin-inferred magnetic field. Here we present the timing behavior and flux relaxation from over two years of Swift, RXTE, and Chandra observations following the outburst. We find that the ambiguity in previous timing solutions was due to enhanced spin down that resembles an exponential recovery following a glitch at the outburst onset. After fitting out the effects of the recovery, we measure a long-term spin-down rate of ν-dot =(−3.0 ± 0.3)×10{sup −16} s{sup –2} which implies a dipolar magnetic field of 1.35 × 10{sup 13} G, lower than all previous estimates for this source. We also consider the post-outburst flux evolution, and fit it with both empirical and crustal cooling models. We discuss the flux relaxation in the context of both crustal cooling and magnetospheric relaxation models.

  20. Angular Momentum Transport in Magnetized Stellar Radiative Zones. II. The Solar Spin-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.; MacGregor, K. B.

    1993-11-01

    We present a large set of numerical calculations describing the rotational evolution of a solar-type star, in response to the torque exerted on it by a magnetically coupled wind emanating from its surface. We consider a situation where the internal redistribution of angular momentum in the radiative part of the envelope is dominated by magnetic stresses arising from the shearing of a preexisting, large-scale, poloidal magnetic field. By assuming a time-independent poloidal magnetic field, neglecting fluid motions in meridional planes, and restricting our attention to axisymmetric systems, we reduce the spin-down problem to solving the (coupled) ψ-components of the momentum and induction equations. Nevertheless, our computations remain dynamical, in that they take into account both the generation of a toroidal magnetic field by shearing of the preexisting poloidal field, and the back-reaction of the resulting Lorentz force on the differential rotation. It becomes possible to draw, for the first time, a reasonably realistic and quantitative picture of the effects of large-scale internal magnetic fields on the main-sequence rotational evolution of solar-type stars. We perform spin-down calculations for a standard solar model, starting from the ZAMS and extending all the way to the solar age. The wind-induced surface torque is computed using the axisymmetric formulation of Weber & Davis (1967). We consider a number of poloidal magnetic field configurations which differ both in the degree of magnetic coupling between the convective envelope and radiative core and in average strength. The rotational evolution can be divided into three more or less distinct phases: an initial phase of toroidal field buildup in the radiative zone, lasting from a few times 104 to a few times 106 yr; a second period in which oscillations set up in the radiative zone during the first phase are damped; and a third period, lasting from an age of about 107 yr onward, characterized by a state of

  1. Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum hydrodynamics of degenerated electrons: Spin-electron acoustic wave appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-03-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model of charged spin-1/2 particles contains physical quantities defined for all particles of a species including particles with spin-up and with spin-down. Different populations of states with different spin directions are included in the spin density (the magnetization). In this paper I derive a QHD model, which separately describes spin-up electrons and spin-down electrons. Hence electrons with different projections of spins on the preferable direction are considered as two different species of particles. It is shown that the numbers of particles with different spin directions do not conserve. Hence the continuity equations contain sources of particles. These sources are caused by the interactions of the spins with the magnetic field. Terms of similar nature arise in the Euler equation. The z projection of the spin density is no longer an independent variable. It is proportional to the difference between the concentrations of the electrons with spin-up and the electrons with spin-down. The propagation of waves in the magnetized plasmas of degenerate electrons is considered. Two regimes for the ion dynamics, the motionless ions and the motion of the degenerate ions as the single species with no account of the spin dynamics, are considered. It is shown that this form of the QHD equations gives all solutions obtained from the traditional form of QHD equations with no distinction of spin-up and spin-down states. But it also reveals a soundlike solution called the spin-electron acoustic wave. Coincidence of most solutions is expected since this derivation was started with the same basic equation: the Pauli equation. Solutions arise due to the different Fermi pressures for the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons in the magnetic field. The results are applied to degenerate electron gas of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals in the external magnetic field. The dispersion of the spin-electron acoustic waves in the partially spin

  2. Separated spin-up and spin-down quantum hydrodynamics of degenerated electrons: Spin-electron acoustic wave appearance.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2015-03-01

    The quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model of charged spin-1/2 particles contains physical quantities defined for all particles of a species including particles with spin-up and with spin-down. Different populations of states with different spin directions are included in the spin density (the magnetization). In this paper I derive a QHD model, which separately describes spin-up electrons and spin-down electrons. Hence electrons with different projections of spins on the preferable direction are considered as two different species of particles. It is shown that the numbers of particles with different spin directions do not conserve. Hence the continuity equations contain sources of particles. These sources are caused by the interactions of the spins with the magnetic field. Terms of similar nature arise in the Euler equation. The z projection of the spin density is no longer an independent variable. It is proportional to the difference between the concentrations of the electrons with spin-up and the electrons with spin-down. The propagation of waves in the magnetized plasmas of degenerate electrons is considered. Two regimes for the ion dynamics, the motionless ions and the motion of the degenerate ions as the single species with no account of the spin dynamics, are considered. It is shown that this form of the QHD equations gives all solutions obtained from the traditional form of QHD equations with no distinction of spin-up and spin-down states. But it also reveals a soundlike solution called the spin-electron acoustic wave. Coincidence of most solutions is expected since this derivation was started with the same basic equation: the Pauli equation. Solutions arise due to the different Fermi pressures for the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons in the magnetic field. The results are applied to degenerate electron gas of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metals in the external magnetic field. The dispersion of the spin-electron acoustic waves in the partially spin

  3. Oblique propagation of longitudinal waves in magnetized spin-1/2 plasmas: Independent evolution of spin-up and spin-down electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A. Kuz’menkov, L.S.

    2015-10-15

    We consider quantum plasmas of electrons and motionless ions. We describe separate evolution of spin-up and spin-down electrons. We present corresponding set of quantum hydrodynamic equations. We assume that plasmas are placed in an uniform external magnetic field. We account different occupation of spin-up and spin-down quantum states in equilibrium degenerate plasmas. This effect is included via equations of state for pressure of each species of electrons. We study oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We show that instead of two well-known waves (the Langmuir wave and the Trivelpiece–Gould wave), plasmas reveal four wave solutions. New solutions exist due to both the separate consideration of spin-up and spin-down electrons and different occupation of spin-up and spin-down quantum states in equilibrium state of degenerate plasmas.

  4. ON THE SPIN-DOWN AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE X-RAY PULSAR 1E 1207.4-5209

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V. E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.edu

    2011-06-01

    We analyze all of the archival X-ray timing data from the years 2000-2008 on the weakly magnetized central compact object (CCO) pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209 in an attempt to measure its dipole magnetic field strength via spin-down. because most of these observations were not planned for the purpose of phase-coherent timing, the resulting ephemeris is not unique, but is restricted to two comparably good timing solutions that correspond to B{sub s} = 9.9 x 10{sup 10} G or 2.4 x 10{sup 11} G, respectively, assuming dipole spin-down. One of these should be the correct value and the other one an alias. There are no spinning-up solutions. The smaller value of B{sub s} is close to the surface field of 8 x 10{sup 10} G that is measured independently from the unique absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of 1E 1207.4-5209, assuming that the lowest-energy line at 0.7 keV is the electron-cyclotron fundamental. We suggest that 1E 1207.4-5209 has the strongest magnetic field among CCOs, which would account for the unique presence of its cyclotron absorption spectrum, while other CCOs likely have even weaker fields for which the cyclotron fundamental falls below the observable soft X-ray band.

  5. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 1032 erg s-1, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  6. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  7. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Tong, H.; Yan, W. M.; Yuan, J. P.; Wang, N.; Xu, R. X.

    2014-06-10

    Intermittent pulsars are part-time radio pulsars. They have higher slow down rates in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate of the neutron star. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841–0500, and PSR J1832+0029) allows their magnetic fields and inclination angles to be calculated simultaneously. The theoretical braking indices of intermittent pulsars are also given. In the pulsar wind model, the density of the particle wind can always be the Goldreich-Julian density. This may ensure that different on states of intermittent pulsars are stable. The duty cycle of particle wind can be determined from timing observations. It is consistent with the duty cycle of the on state. Inclination angle and braking index observations of intermittent pulsars may help to test different models of particle acceleration. At present, the inverse Compton scattering induced space charge limited flow with field saturation model can be ruled out.

  8. Angular momentum redistribution by mixed modes in evolved low-mass stars. II. Spin-down of the core of red giants induced by mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, K.; Marques, J. P.; Goupil, M. J.; Mosser, B.; Sonoi, T.; Ouazzani, R. M.; Dupret, M. A.; Mathis, S.; Grosjean, M.

    2015-07-01

    The detection of mixed modes in subgiants and red giants by the CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions allows us to investigate the internal structure of evolved low-mass stars, from the end of the main sequence to the central helium-burning phase. In particular, the measurement of the mean core rotation rate as a function of the evolution places stringent constraints on the physical mechanisms responsible for the angular momentum redistribution in stars. It showed that the current stellar evolution codes including the modelling of rotation fail to reproduce the observations. An additional physical process that efficiently extracts angular momentum from the core is thus necessary. Our aim is to assess the ability of mixed modes to do this. To this end, we developed a formalism that provides a modelling of the wave fluxes in both the mean angular momentum and the mean energy equations in a companion paper. In this article, mode amplitudes are modelled based on recent asteroseismic observations, and a quantitative estimate of the angular momentum transfer is obtained. This is performed for a benchmark model of 1.3 M⊙ at three evolutionary stages, representative of the evolved pulsating stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler. We show that mixed modes extract angular momentum from the innermost regions of subgiants and red giants. However, this transport of angular momentum from the core is unlikely to counterbalance the effect of the core contraction in subgiants and early red giants. In contrast, for more evolved red giants, mixed modes are found efficient enough to balance and exceed the effect of the core contraction, in particular in the hydrogen-burning shell. Our results thus indicate that mixed modes are a promising candidate to explain the observed spin-down of the core of evolved red giants, but that an other mechanism is to be invoked for subgiants and early red giants.

  9. A Laboratory Exercise with Related Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    A laboratory experiment, based on a simple electric circuit that can be used to demonstrate the existence of real-world "related rates" problems, is outlined and an equation for voltage across the capacitor terminals during discharge is derived. The necessary materials, setup methods, and experimental problems are described. A student laboratory…

  10. Modeling the Multi-band Afterglow of GRB 130831A: Evidence for a Spinning-down Magnetar Dominated by Gravitational Wave Losses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, Y. F.; Zong, H. S.

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an “internal plateau” with a decay slope of ∼0.8, followed by a steep drop at around 105 s with a slope of ∼6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which the magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.

  11. Are ultralong gamma-ray bursts powered by black holes spinning down?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are violent explosions, coming from cosmological distances. They are detected in gamma-rays (also X-rays, UV, optical, radio) almost every day, and have typical durations of a few seconds to a few minutes. Some GRBs have been reported with extraordinary durations of 104 s, the so-called ultralong GRBs. It has been debated whether these form a new distinct class of events or whether they are similar to long GRBs. According to Blandford & Znajek, the spin energy of a rotating black hole can be extracted electromagnetically, should the hole be endowed with a magnetic field supported by electric currents in a surrounding disc. We argue that this can be the case for the central engines of GRBs and we show that the duration of the burst depends on the magnetic flux accumulated on the event horizon of the black hole. We thus estimate the surface magnetic field of a possible progenitor star, and we conclude that an ultralong GRB may originate from a progenitor star with a relatively low magnetic field.

  12. Relation between gastric emptying rate and rate of intraluminal lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Geypens, B J; Hiele, M I; Rutgeerts, P J

    1996-01-01

    The variable gastric emptying rate of a test meal is one of the major problems in evaluating accurately gastrointestinal physiological functions beyond the stomach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the gastric emptying rate on the rate of intraluminal lipolysis. Thirty four subjects without pancreatic disease (21 with a normal gastric emptying and 13 with a known slow gastric emptying) and 14 subjects with pancreatic disease (four without and 10 with pancreatic insufficiency) were studied using a dual labelled breath test. The test meal consisted of one egg, 60 grams of white bread, 10 grams of margarine, and 150 ml of water (350 kcal). The egg yolk was labelled with 91 mg of 13C-octanoic acid, the margarine was labelled with 296 kBq of distearyl-2-14C-octanoyl-glycerol. Breath samples were taken every 15 minutes during six hours and analysed for 13CO2 and 14CO2 content. The gastric emptying rate of the meal was evaluated by the gastric emptying coefficient, the half emptying time, and the lag phase; the rate of intraluminal lipolysis was evaluated by the six hours cumulative 14CO2 excretion. Despite a clear distinction in the rate of intraluminal lipolysis, no difference could be detected in gastric emptying rate of the test meal between subjects without and with pancreatic disease. In subjects with pancreatic insufficiency, intraluminal hydrolysis was the rate limiting process in fat assimilation; in patients without pancreatic insufficiency, however, gastric emptying could be rate limiting. Therefore, patients with known slow gastric emptying, displayed a significantly decreased rate of intraluminal lipolysis compared with normal controls. This decrease could be corrected for accurately using a correction factor based on the gastric emptying coefficient. In conclusion, the combined 13C-octanoic acid and 14C-mixed triglyceride breath test permits the measurement of gastric emptying rate and intraluminal lipolysis simultaneously in a minimally

  13. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more that 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  14. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more than 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  15. Feedback Functions, Optimization, and the Relation of Response Rate to Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Paul L.; McDowell, Jack J.; Dallery, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    The present experiment arranged a series of inverted U-shaped feedback functions relating reinforcer rate to response rate to test whether responding was consistent with an optimization account or with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate such as linear system theory's rate equation or Herrnstein's hyperbola. Reinforcer rate…

  16. "Molecular Clock" Analogs: A Relative Rates Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Although molecular clock theory is a commonly discussed facet of evolutionary biology, undergraduates are rarely presented with the underlying information of how this theory is examined relative to empirical data. Here a simple contextual exercise is presented that not only provides insight into molecular clocks, but is also a useful exercise for…

  17. Separated spin-up and spin-down evolution of degenerated electrons in two-dimensional systems: Dispersion of longitudinal collective excitations in plane and nanotube geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.; Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Applying the separated spin evolution quantum hydrodynamics to the two-dimensional electron gas in plane samples and nanotubes located in external magnetic fields we have found a novel type of waves in the electron gas which is called spin-electron acoustic wave. A separate spin-up and spin-down electrons' evolution reveals the replacement of the Langmuir wave by a pair of hybrid waves. One of the two hybrid waves is a modified Langmuir wave. Another hybrid wave is a spin-electron acoustic wave. We studied the dispersion of these waves in two-dimensional structures of electrons. We also considered the dependence of dispersion properties on spin polarization of electrons in an external magnetic field.

  18. X-ray measurement of the spin-down of CalverA: A radio- and gamma-ray-quiet pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot =(3.19± 0.08)×10{sup −15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot =6.1×10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ{sub c}≡P/2 P-dot =2.9×10{sup 5} yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 4.4 × 10{sup 11} G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot . Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  19. What Factors Shape "by" Ratings in Relation to Landmarks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hund, Alycia M.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments investigated how absolute and relative distance shape adults' and young children's ratings concerning the extent to which the term "by" describes the relation between locations. Three- and 4-year-old children and adults were asked to rate how well the word "by" described the relation between several blocks and a landmark. The…

  20. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster.

    PubMed

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L; Latham, David W; Mathieu, Robert D

    2015-01-29

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars. PMID:25539085

  1. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars.

  2. Relation of managers' personality to accident and injury rates.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Peg; Venkataraman, Ray R

    2002-12-01

    Previous research has explored the link between certain aspects of individuals' personalities and their safety behavior and accident rates. We predicted a relation between 23 managers' scores on Big Five personality dimensions and departmental accident and injury rates in a manufacturing company. Accident and injury data were provided by the organization. We found a relation between managers' personality profiles and both injury and accident rates in their departments. The findings suggest that managers with certain types of personalities may have safer work units. This has implications for the selection of managers in work environments with safety risks. PMID:12585521

  3. Broad-band modelling of short gamma-ray bursts with energy injection from magnetar spin-down and its implications for radio detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gompertz, B. P.; van der Horst, A. J.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wynn, G. A.; Wiersema, K.

    2015-03-01

    The magnetar model has been proposed to explain the apparent energy injection in the X-ray light curves of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), but its implications across the full broad-band spectrum are not well explored. We investigate the broad-band modelling of four SGRBs with evidence for energy injection in their X-ray light curves, applying a physically motivated model in which a newly formed magnetar injects energy into a forward shock as it loses angular momentum along open field lines. By performing an order of magnitude search for the underlying physical parameters in the blast wave, we constrain the characteristic break frequencies of the synchrotron spectrum against their manifestations in the available multiwavelength observations for each burst. The application of the magnetar energy injection profile restricts the successful matches to a limited family of models that are self-consistent within the magnetic dipole spin-down framework. We produce synthetic light curves that describe how the radio signatures of these SGRBs ought to have looked given the restrictions imposed by the available data, and discuss the detectability of these signatures with present-day and near-future radio telescopes. Our results show that both the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the upgraded Very Large Array are now sensitive enough to detect the radio signature within two weeks of trigger in most SGRBs, assuming our sample is representative of the population as a whole. We also find that the upcoming Square Kilometre Array will be sensitive to depths greater than those of our lower limit predictions.

  4. Component duration and relative response rates in multiple schedules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todorov, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on a multiple variable-interval 30-sec, variable interval 90-sec schedule with each component presented alternately for an equal duration. This duration of exposure was varied from 5 to 300 sec. The rate of response in the variable-interval 30-sec component relative to the rate of response in the variable-interval 90-sec component was studied. Results are plotted and discussed.

  5. Pulse Phase Dependence of Low Energy Emission Lines in an X-ray pulsar 4U 1626-67 during its spin-up and spin-down phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Aru; Paul, Biswajit; Dewangan, Gulab Chand

    2016-07-01

    We will present the results obtained from the new observation of an ultra-compact X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67, carried out with the XMM-Newton observatory. 4U 1626-67, a unique accretion powered pulsar underwent two torque reversals since its discovery in 1977. Pulse phase resolved spectroscopy of this source performed using the data from the XMM-Newton observatory during its spin-down phase revealed the dependence of the emission lines on the pulse phase. O VII emission line at 0.569 keV showed the maximum variation by factor of 4. These variations were interpreted due to warps in the accretion disk (Beri et al. 2015). Radiation pressure induced warping is also believed to be the cause for spin-down. In light of this possible explanation for spin-down torque reversal we expect different line variability during the spin-up phase. We will discuss the implications of the results obtained after performing pulse phase resolved spectroscopy using data from the EPIC-pn during the current spin-up phase. Detailed study of the prominent Neon and Oxygen line complexes with the high resolution Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) on-board XMM-Newton will also be presented.

  6. Do Dogs Know Related Rates Rather than Optimization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perruchet, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Although dogs seemingly follow the optimal path where they get to a ball thrown into the water, they certainly do not know the minimization function proposed in the calculus books. Trading the optimization problem for a related rates problem leads to a mathematically identical solution, which, it is argued here, is a more plausible model for the…

  7. Relative cooling rates derived from basalt column geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodell, Daniel; Porritt, Lucy; Russell, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    Columnar joints form as a brittle relaxation response to tensile stresses that accumulate during cooling of lava flows, pyroclastic deposits, and intrusive magma bodies. Columnar jointing forms in different deposit types, in deposits of different compositions, and different outcrop geometries. Despite this diversity, columns follow a few "rules": column diameter is inversely proportional to cooling rate (small/quick cooling times, small diameter columns), columns only ever coalesce (never bifurcate), and columnar joints always propagate parallel to but in the opposite direction of heat flow (towards the hottest part of the flow). Using these "rules," cooling histories and emplacement environments can be reconstructed. While column geometries and definitions of various columnar structures vary between authors (upper and lower colonnade and entablature vs. master cracks and pseudopillows), this study focuses on relatively simple outcrops of basalt lava within the Cheakamus River valley near Whistler, BC, Canada. The basalt lavas described here, thought to have erupted subglacially, contain columns comprising only well-defined upper and lower colonnades (i.e., no entablature). Comparing the relative thicknesses of upper and lower colonnades reveals the cooling history, relative cooling rates, and amounts of heat transferred from the upper and lower flow boundaries. Forward numerical models using the finite element method are created with Matlab using the Partial Differential Equation Toolbox to model the outcrops in the Whistler field area, and determine the cooling rates and thermal gradients experienced by the lava flows during their formation. This study finds that noticeable differences in the thickness of upper and lower colonnades within an outcrop occur only when there are large differences in cooling rates between the upper and lower flow surfaces. Modeling shows that the cooling rates must differ by approximately an order of magnitude to produce the observed

  8. Sensitivity to relative reinforcer rate in concurrent schedules: independence from relative and absolute reinforcer duration.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, A P; Blampied, N M

    2001-01-01

    Twelve pigeons responded on two keys under concurrent variable-interval (VI) schedules. Over several series of conditions, relative and absolute magnitudes of reinforcement were varied. Within each series, relative rate of reinforcement was varied and sensitivity of behavior ratios to reinforcer-rate ratios was assessed. When responding at both alternatives was maintained by equal-sized small reinforcers, sensitivity to variation in reinforcer-rate ratios was the same as when large reinforcers were used. This result was observed when the overall rate of reinforcement was constant over conditions, and also in another series of concurrent schedules in which one schedule was kept constant at VI ached 120 s. Similarly, reinforcer magnitude did not affect the rate at which response allocation approached asymptote within a condition. When reinforcer magnitudes differred between the two responses and reinforcer-rate ratios were varied, sensitivity of behavior allocation was unaffected although response bias favored the schedule that arranged the larger reinforcers. Analysis of absolute response rates ratio sensitivity to reinforcement occurrred on the two keys showed that this invariance of response despite changes in reinforcement interaction that were observed in absolute response rates on the constant VI 120-s schedule. Response rate on the constant VI 120-s schedule was inversely related to reinforcer rate on the varied key and the strength of this relation depended on the relative magnitude of reinforcers arranged on varied key. Independence of sensitivity to reinforcer-rate ratios from relative and absolute reinforcer magnitude is consistent with the relativity and independence assumtions of the matching law. PMID:11256865

  9. Simple relations between mean passage times and Kramers' stationary rate

    SciTech Connect

    Boilley, David; Jurado, Beatriz; Schmitt, Christelle

    2004-11-01

    The classical problem of the escape time of a metastable potential well in a thermal environment is generally studied by various quantities like Kramers' stationary escape rate, mean first passage time, nonlinear relaxation time, or mean last passage time. In addition, numerical simulations lead to the definition of other quantities as the long-time limit escape rate and the transient time. In this paper, we propose some simple analytical relations between all these quantities. In particular, we point out the hypothesis used to evaluate these various times in order to clarify their comparison and applicability, and show how average times include the transient time and the long-time limit of the escape rate.

  10. Reproductive Rates in Australian Rodents Are Related to Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Geffen, Eli; Rowe, Kevin C.; Yom-Tov, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Background The native rodents of Australia are commonly divided into two groups based on the time of their colonization of the Sahulian continent, which encompasses Australia, New Guinea, and the adjacent islands. The first group, the “old endemics,” is a diverse assemblage of 34 genera that are descended from a single colonization of the continent during the Pliocene. A second group, the “new endemics,” is composed of several native Rattus species that are descended from a single colonization during the Pleistocene. Finally, a third group is composed of three non-native species of Rattus and Mus introduced into Australia by humans over the last 200 years. Previous studies have claimed that the three groups differ in their reproductive rates and that this variation in rates is associated with the unique environmental conditions across Australia. We examined these hypotheses using phylogenetically controlled methods. Methodology and Results We examined the relationship between the reproductive rates of the Australian rodents and the environmental variations across the continent, as well as the epoch of their colonization of the continent. Our results revealed no significant correlation with environmental variables but a significant association between colonization age and all the reproductive parameters examined. Discussion Based on a larger phylogeny of the subfamily Murinae, we showed that significant differences in reproductive rates among colonization groups are shared with their closest relatives outside Sahul. Therefore, the lower reproductive rates in the old endemics are more likely to be the result of phylogenetic history and conservation of traits than an adaptation to the Australian environment. In the new endemics, we found a trend of increasing reproductive rates with diversification. We suggest that the differences in reproductive rates of the old endemic rodents and the native Rattus represent alternative adaptive strategies that have allowed

  11. SHAPING THE DUST MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Gall, Christa; Michałowski, Michał J. E-mail: cgall@phys.au.dk

    2014-02-20

    There is a remarkably tight relation between the observationally inferred dust masses and star-formation rates (SFRs) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, M {sub dust} ∝ SFR{sup 1.11}. Here we extend the M {sub dust}-SFR relation to the high end and show that it bends over at very large SFRs (i.e., dust masses are lower than predicted for a given SFR). We identify several distinct evolutionary processes in the diagram: (1) a star-bursting phase in which dust builds up rapidly at early times. The maximum attainable dust mass in this process is the cause of the bend-over of the relation. A high dust-formation efficiency, a bottom-light initial mass function, and negligible supernova shock dust destruction are required to produce sufficiently high dust masses. (2) A quiescent star-forming phase in which the subsequent parallel decline in dust mass and SFR gives rise to the M {sub dust}-SFR relation, through astration and dust destruction. The dust-to-gas ratio is approximately constant along the relation. We show that the power-law slope of the M {sub dust}-SFR relation is inversely proportional to the global Schmidt-Kennicutt law exponent (i.e., ∼0.9) in simple chemical evolution models. (3) A quenching phase which causes star formation to drop while the dust mass stays roughly constant or drops proportionally. Combined with merging, these processes, as well as the range in total baryonic mass, give rise to a complex population of the diagram which adds significant scatter to the original M {sub dust}-SFR relation. (4) At very high redshifts, a population of galaxies located significantly below the local relation is predicted.

  12. Relative survival rates after alternative therapies for uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Egan, K.M.; Glynn, R.J.; Howard, S.; Fante, R.G.; Albert, D.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Survival in a group of 556 patients with uveal melanoma treated by proton beam irradiation with a median follow-up of 5.3 years was compared with that of 238 patients enucleated during the same 10-year period as irradiated patients (July 1975 to December 1984) with a median follow-up of 8.8 years, and 257 patients enucleated during the preceding 10 years (January 1965 to June 1975) with a median follow-up of 17.0 years. Adjustments were made for known prognostic factors including age, tumor location, tumor height, and clinical estimate of tumor diameter (for enucleated patients this was estimated in a regression equation relating histologic to clinical measurement). The overall rate ratio for all cause mortality was 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-1.6) for the concurrent enucleation series versus proton beam, and 1.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.1) for the earlier enucleation series versus proton beam. Relative rates of metastatic death, cancer death, and all cause mortality comparing alternative treatments were found to vary with time after treatment. Interval-specific rate ratios were evaluated using proportional hazards models fitted to separate time intervals after treatment. For all three outcomes, rate ratios were over two and statistically significant for the first 2 years after treatment and closer to one and nonsignificant after year 6 comparing the two enucleation groups with proton beam. Results suggest that treatment choice has little overall influence on survival in patients with uveal melanoma.

  13. The Determination of Relative Elemental Growth Rate Profiles from Segmental Growth Rates (A Methodological Evaluation).

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. S.; Bernstein, N.

    1997-01-01

    Relative elemental growth rate (REGR) profiles describe spatial patterns of growth intensity; they are indispensable for causal growth analyses. Published methods of REGR profile determination from marking experiments fall in two classes: the profile is either described by a series of segmental growth rates, or calculated as the slope of a function describing the displacement velocities of points along the organ. The latter technique is usually considered superior for theoretical reasons, but to our knowledge, no comparative methodological study of the two approaches is currently available. We formulated a model REGR profile that resembles those reported from primary roots. We established the displacement velocity profile and derived growth trajectories, which enabled us to perform hypothetical marking experiments on the model with varying spacing of marks and durations of measurement. REGR profiles were determined from these data by alternative methods, and results were compared to the original profile. We find that with our model plotting of segmental relative growth rates versus segment position provides exact REGR profile estimations, if the initial segment length is less than 10% of the length of the whole growing zone, and if less than 20% of the growing zone is displaced past its boundary during the measurement. Based on our analysis, we discuss systematic errors that occur in marking experiments. PMID:12223680

  14. Relating Productivity Events to Holocene Bivalve Shell Growth Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntley, J. W.; Krause, R. A.; Kowalewski, M.; Romanek, C. S.; Kaufman, D. S.; Simoes, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth rate of a bivalve can be influenced by many environmental factors that can change during the life of the organism. In this contribution we present initial data from a millennium scale chronology to assess the relationship between ontogenetic growth in the bivalve Semele casali and paleoenvironmental conditions preserved in the shell using growth increment analysis, radiocarbon-calibrated amino acid racemization dating techniques, stable isotopes (C and O) and high spatial resolution (125-150 samples per cm of shell profile) trace element (Ba, Mn) analysis (LA-ICPMS). Time-averaged specimens of S. casali were dredged from two sites at 10 meters and 30 meters depth along the inner continental shelf at Ubatuba Bay in the Southeast Brazilian Bight, an area influenced by productivity pulses triggered by coastal runoff events and coastal upwelling. Seventy-five individual valves were dated using amino acid racemization (aspartic acid). Dates were calculated using an expanded version of a previously published relationship (Barbour Wood et al., 2006 Quaternary Research 323- 331) between aspartic acid ratios and AMS radiocarbon dates of twelve S. casali individuals from the same sampling locations. The resulting time series has complete coverage for the past three thousand years at centennial resolution. From this time series, a sub-sample of dated valves was selected for more detailed growth increment, stable isotope and high-resolution trace element (Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca) analyses. Oceanic productivity is expressed differentially in the trace element profiles of S. casali with elevated Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios capturing nutrient input through coastal runoff events while elevated Ba/Ca and depressed Mn/Ca ratios represent input through coastal upwelling. Fluctuations in Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca are not correlated to fluctuations in relative growth throughout the ontogeny of an individual bivalve, nor are they expected to be as periods of increased productivity are transient

  15. The effect of relative update rates on tracking performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Charles; Silbert, Mark

    2011-06-01

    In multi-sensor fusion applications, various sources of data are combined to create a coherent situational picture. The ability to track multiple targets using multiple sensors is an important problem. The data provided by these sensors can be of varying quality, such as data from RADAR and AIS. Does this varied quality of data negatively impact the tracking performance when compared to using the best data source alone? From an information-theoretic standpoint, the answer would be no. However, this paper investigates this issue and exposes a few caveats. In particular, this study addresses how the relative update rate of varying quality sensors affects tracking performance and answers the question 'Is more data always better?'

  16. Age related flow rate nomograms in a normal pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Gaum, L D; Wese, F X; Liu, T P; Wong, A K; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1989-01-01

    Uroflow studies in a normal pediatric population were analysed statistically. Single studies for 511 subjects (272 boys and 239 girls) were reviewed. Nomograms relating peak flow to volume voided and age were established. An acceptable lower limit for peak flow was obtained from the data and a volume voided range was calculated so that both criteria could be used with 90% probability to define the normal voiding situation. The mean values of peak flow rate increased with volume voided in both sexes and also with age in the male population. Different sets of nomograms, which are necessary for daily clinical evaluation, are given. They define the normal values in the normal population. PMID:2763925

  17. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  18. An Optimal Relation of Radar Reflectivity to Lightning Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thunderstorms separate charge. Most places they lift positive charge or lower negative, a few places they lift negative or lower positive. The electrical generator is stronger in some parts of the cloud than in others. Our long term goal is to map this generator. Cloud physicists tell us that uncharged ice and water particles become charged by collision, and that the charge transferred depends on size, temperature and humidity. There is still some disagreement about exactly how the charge transferred depends on size, temperature, and humidity. In principle, if we knew this ice physics, and also knew the distribution of particles everywhere in the storm, and the winds everywhere and the temperature and humidity everywhere, then we could compute everywhere the electrical power of the thunderstorm generator. In practice it is difficult to know all these things, particularly the distribution of particles, so it is difficult to use real thunderstorms to falsify cloud electrification theories. We here take one small step towards computing that map of electrical generator power, by relating radar reflectivity profiles of 2000 storms to lightning flash rates of those storms. This small step by itself doesn't falsify any existing electrification theories; it merely places weak constraints on the relation of electric generator power to cloud ice.

  19. Florida submergence curve revised: Its relation to coastal sedimentation rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, D. W.; Craighead, F.C., Sr.; Stuiver, M.

    1969-01-01

    New data substantiate as well as modify the south Florida submergence curve, which indicates that eustatic sea level has risen continuously, although at a generally decreasing rate, during the last 6500 to 7000 sidereal years (5500 standard radiocarbon years) to reach its present position. Accumulation rates of coastal deposits are similar to the rate of sea-level rise, thus supporting the generalization that submergence rates largely determine as well as limit rates of coastal sedimentation in lagoonal and estuarine areas.

  20. Omphacite breakdown reactions and relation to eclogite exhumation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric D.; Moecher, David P.

    2007-09-01

    Clinopyroxene + plagioclase (±Hbl ± Qtz) symplectites after omphacite are widely cited as evidence for prior eclogite-facies or high-pressure (HP) metamorphism. Precursor omphacite compositions of retrograde eclogites, used for reconstructing retrograde P- T paths, are commonly estimated by reintegrating symplectite phases with the assumption that the symplectite-forming reactions were isochemical. Comparisons of broadbeam symplectite compositions to adjacent unreacted pyroxene from various symplectites after clinopyroxene from the Appalachian Blue Ridge (ABR) and Western Gneiss Region (WGR) suggest that the symplectite forming reactions are largely isochemical. Endmember calculations based on reintegrated symplectite compositions from the ABR and WGR suggest that a minor Ca-Eskola (CaEs) component (XCaEs = 0.04-0.15) was present in precursor HP clinopyroxene. WGR symplectites consist of fine-grained (˜1 μm-scale), vermicular intergrowths of Pl + Cpx II ± Hbl that occur at grain boundaries or internally. ABR symplectites contain coarser (˜10 μm-scale) planar lamellae and rods of Pl + Cpx II + Qtz + Hbl within clinopyroxene cores. The contrasting textures correlate with decompression and cooling rate, and degree of overstepping of the retrograde reaction (lamellar: slow, erosionally controlled exhumation with slow/low overstepping; fine-grained, grainboundary symplectite: rapid, tectonic exhumation with rapid/high overstepping). Variations in XCaEs, Xjd, and XCaTs of precursor HP omphacite are related to the symplectic mineral assemblages that result from decompression. Quartz-normative symplectities indicate quartz-producing retrograde reactions (e.g., breakdown of precursor CaEs); quartz-free symplectities (e.g., diopside + plagioclase after omphacite) indicate quartz-consuming reactions (jd, CaTs breakdown) outpaced quartz-producing reactions.

  1. Emergent relation between surface vapor conductance and relative humidity profiles yields evaporation rates from weather data

    PubMed Central

    Salvucci, Guido D.; Gentine, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict terrestrial evapotranspiration (E) is limited by the complexity of rate-limiting pathways as water moves through the soil, vegetation (roots, xylem, stomata), canopy air space, and the atmospheric boundary layer. The impossibility of specifying the numerous parameters required to model this process in full spatial detail has necessitated spatially upscaled models that depend on effective parameters such as the surface vapor conductance (Csurf). Csurf accounts for the biophysical and hydrological effects on diffusion through the soil and vegetation substrate. This approach, however, requires either site-specific calibration of Csurf to measured E, or further parameterization based on metrics such as leaf area, senescence state, stomatal conductance, soil texture, soil moisture, and water table depth. Here, we show that this key, rate-limiting, parameter can be estimated from an emergent relationship between the diurnal cycle of the relative humidity profile and E. The relation is that the vertical variance of the relative humidity profile is less than would occur for increased or decreased evaporation rates, suggesting that land–atmosphere feedback processes minimize this variance. It is found to hold over a wide range of climate conditions (arid–humid) and limiting factors (soil moisture, leaf area, energy). With this relation, estimates of E and Csurf can be obtained globally from widely available meteorological measurements, many of which have been archived since the early 1900s. In conjunction with precipitation and stream flow, long-term E estimates provide insights and empirical constraints on projected accelerations of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:23576717

  2. Unemployment Rate, Smoking in China: Are They Related?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Shen, Jay J.; Cochran, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies on the relationship between unemployment rate and smoking have yielded mixed results. The issue in China has not been studied. This study aims to examine the influence of unemployment rate on smoking in China. Methods: Logit model and two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimation were used to estimate the effects. Estimations were done for 4585 individual over 45 using data from China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study conducted in Zhejiang and Gansu provinces in 2008 and 2012. Results: A percent increase in the unemployment rate resulted in the increase in the likelihood of smoking by a combined 9.1 percent for those who smoked including a 2.9% increase for those who smoked 1–10 cigarettes per day; a 2.8% increase for those who smoked 11–20 cigarettes per day; and a 3.4% increase for those who smoked 20 cigarettes or more per day. The effects were stronger for those who were employed. Non-drinkers were more likely to engage in smoking with increased unemployment rate. 2SLS estimation revealed the same association. Conclusions: The unemployment rate was positively associated with smoking behavior. Smoking control and intervention strategies should focus on both the individual′s characteristics and the physical environment in which unemployment rate tend to rise. PMID:26761019

  3. Age-Related Differences in Speech Rate Perception Do Not Necessarily Entail Age-Related Differences in Speech Rate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffner, Christopher C.; Newman, Rochelle S.; Dilley, Laura C.; Idsardi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A new literature has suggested that speech rate can influence the parsing of words quite strongly in speech. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between younger adults and older adults in the use of context speech rate in word segmentation, given that older adults perceive timing information differently from younger…

  4. Bouts of responding: the relation between bout rate and the rate of variable-interval reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Shull, Richard L; Grimes, Julie A; Bennett, J Adam

    2004-01-01

    By nose poking a lighted key, rats obtained food pellets on either a variable-interval schedule of reinforcement or a schedule that required an average of four additional responses after the end of tile variable-interval component (a tandem variable-interval variable-ratio 4 schedule). With both schedule types, the mean variable interval was varied between blocks of sessions from 16 min to 0.25 min. Total rate of key poking increased similarly as a function of the reinforcer rate for the two schedule types, but response rate was higher with than without the four-response requirement. Analysis of log survivor plots of interresponse times showed that key poking occurred in bouts. The rate of initiating bouts increased as a function of reinforcer rate but was either unaffected or was decreased by adding the four-response requirement. Within-bout response rate was insensitive to reinforcer rate and only inconsistently affected by the four-response requirement. For both kinds of schedule, the ratio of bout time to between-bout pause time was approximately a power function of reinforcer rate, with exponents above and below 1.0. PMID:15113134

  5. Relational Responding Modulates and Reverses Affective Ratings in Evaluative Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Macquet, Benjamin; Charley, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments explored relational responding in evaluative conditioning. In Experiment 1, the participants were trained with a computer task to make relational responses by putting CSs of different sizes in boxes in order of size. Subsequently they were instructed that these different sized CSs represented different intensities of hypothetical…

  6. Teacher-Education Graduate Surveys: Variables Related to Response Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Data on survey methodology employed in follow-up surveys of graduates was collected, via questionnaire, from 226 teacher education programs. Response rates correlated significantly with number of attempts to reach graduates. Other variables included questionnaire length, postage provisions, use of incentives, response deadline, and personalization…

  7. Problems relating to the classical rate-gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borello, L.

    1981-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed for evaluating the accuracy of classical rate-gyros. An analysis is presented of the influence of secondary input signals associated with the angular velocity components of the platform. Ways to minimize the effects of these secondary signals are examined.

  8. CREME96 and Related Error Rate Prediction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the rate of occurrence of single event effects (SEEs) in space requires knowledge of the radiation environment and the response of electronic devices to that environment. Several analytical models have been developed over the past 36 years to predict SEE rates. The first error rate calculations were performed by Binder, Smith and Holman. Bradford and Pickel and Blandford, in their CRIER (Cosmic-Ray-Induced-Error-Rate) analysis code introduced the basic Rectangular ParallelePiped (RPP) method for error rate calculations. For the radiation environment at the part, both made use of the Cosmic Ray LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra calculated by Heinrich for various absorber Depths. A more detailed model for the space radiation environment within spacecraft was developed by Adams and co-workers. This model, together with a reformulation of the RPP method published by Pickel and Blandford, was used to create the CR ME (Cosmic Ray Effects on Micro-Electronics) code. About the same time Shapiro wrote the CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program) based on the RPP method published by Bradford. It was the first code to specifically take into account charge collection from outside the depletion region due to deformation of the electric field caused by the incident cosmic ray. Other early rate prediction methods and codes include the Single Event Figure of Merit, NOVICE, the Space Radiation code and the effective flux method of Binder which is the basis of the SEFA (Scott Effective Flux Approximation) model. By the early 1990s it was becoming clear that CREME and the other early models needed Revision. This revision, CREME96, was completed and released as a WWW-based tool, one of the first of its kind. The revisions in CREME96 included improved environmental models and improved models for calculating single event effects. The need for a revision of CREME also stimulated the development of the CHIME (CRRES/SPACERAD Heavy Ion Model of the Environment) and MACREE (Modeling and

  9. Linking rates of diffusion and consumption in relation to resources.

    PubMed

    Avgar, Tal; Kuefler, Daniel; Fryxell, John M

    2011-08-01

    The functional response is a fundamental model of the relationship between consumer intake rate and resource abundance. The random walk is a fundamental model of animal movement and is well approximated by simple diffusion. Both models are central to our understanding of numerous ecological processes but are rarely linked in ecological theory. To derive a synthetic model, we draw on the common logical premise underlying these models and show how the diffusion and consumption rates of consumers depend on elementary attributes of naturally occurring consumer-resource interactions: the abundance, spatial aggregation, and traveling speed of resources as well as consumer handling time and directional persistence. We show that resource aggregation may lead to increased consumer diffusion and, in the case of mobile resources, reduced consumption rate. Resource-dependent movement patterns have traditionally been attributed to area-restricted search, reflecting adaptive decision making by the consumer. Our synthesis provides a simple alternative hypothesis that such patterns could also arise as a by-product of statistical movement mechanics. PMID:21750382

  10. Relating reconnection rate, exhaust structure and effective resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nagendra

    2014-03-15

    The magnetic reconnection structure consists of a central diffusion region (CDR) and a cone or wedge shaped reconnection exhaust containing accelerated plasma flows and electromagnetic fluctuations. We predict here the relationship among the exhaust half-cone angle (θ{sub e}), the half width (w) of the CDR, the outflow velocity V{sub o}, and the effective resistivity (η{sub eff}), which includes the effects of all the nonideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. The effective resistivity is defined as the ratio of reconnection electric field E{sub rec} to the current density J{sub y} at the X point and it essentially represents the loss of momentum from the current-carrying plasma particles due to scattering by waves, their inertia or outflux from the CDR. The relation is checked against relevant results previously reported from laboratory experiments, space observations, and simulations, showing excellent agreement. The relation can be used for estimating the ad-hoc effective resistivity often used in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of reconnection.

  11. Supernova Rates, Rise-Times, and their Relations to Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Gaitan, Santiago

    Supernovae are fundamental in astronomy: they inject high mass elements into the interstellar medium enriching the chemistry of galaxies, they feed processes of star formation and active galactic nuclei, and they have been a key for the developments in cosmology of the past decades. This dissertation presents a set of subluminous type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at z > 0.1 from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These faint and short-lived transients are found in massive and passive host galaxies. We measure a volumetric rate as a function of redshift that is different from the normal SN Ia population. The observations point towards a long delay time since the birth of the progenitors systems and argue for progenitor stars of initial low mass. We calculate a stretch-corrected rise-time since explosion to maximum brightness for different sets of SNe Ia. We find that a fiducial 17 day quadratic rise is sufficient to explain all SNe Ia, including subluminous ones, arguing for their homogeneity throughout the entire light-curve. Subluminous SNe Ia are powered by as little as 0.05 solar masses of radioactive nickel synthesized in the explosion. Theoretical models need to explain these challenging weak explosions within the framework of SNe Ia. Finally, we develop one of the first robust automated techniques to identify plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) in large photometric transient surveys. This simple method was tested with a variety of real and simulated SN samples and proved to be effective across different redshifts. Such a photometric typing will be of great power for coming surveys and will allow numerous scientific studies of SNe IIP.

  12. Comparison of the sputter rates of oxide films relative to the sputter rate of SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, D. R.; Engelhard, M. H.; Lea, A. S.; Nachimuthu, P.; Droubay, T. C.; Kim, J.; Lee, B.; Mathews, C.; Opila, R. L.; Saraf, L. V.; Stickle, W. F.; Wallace, R. M.; Wright, B. S.

    2010-09-15

    There is a growing interest in knowing the sputter rates for a wide variety of oxides because of their increasing technological importance in many different applications. To support the needs of users of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, as well as our research programs, the authors made a series of measurements of the sputter rates from oxide films that have been grown by oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, pulsed laser deposition, atomic layer deposition, electrochemical oxidation, or sputter deposition. The sputter rates for these oxide films were determined in comparison with those from thermally grown SiO{sub 2}, a common reference material for sputter rate determination. The film thicknesses and densities for most of these oxide films were measured using x-ray reflectivity. These oxide films were mounted in an x-ray photoelectron or Auger electron spectrometer for sputter rate measurements using argon ion sputtering. Although the primary objective of this work was to determine relative sputter rates at a fixed angle, the measurements also examined (i) the angle dependence of the relative sputter rates, (ii) the energy dependence of the relative sputter rates, and (iii) the extent of ion beam induced reduction for some oxides. Oxide films examined include SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, In-Sn oxide, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2} (anatase, rutile, and amorphous), and ZnO. The authors found that the sputter rates for the oxides can vary up to a factor of 2 (usually lower) from that observed for SiO{sub 2}. The ratios of sputter rates relative to those of SiO{sub 2} appear to be relatively independent of ion beam energy in the range of 1-4 kV and for incident angles <50 deg. As expected, the extent of ion beam induced reduction of the oxides varies with the sputter angle.

  13. Comparison of the Sputter Rates of Oxide Films Relative to the Sputter Rate of SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Droubay, Timothy C.; Kim, J.; Lee, B.; Mathews, C.; Opila, R. L.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Stickle, William F.; Wallace, Robert; Wright, B. S.

    2010-09-02

    Because of the increasing technological importance of oxide films for a variety of applications, there is a growing interest in knowing the sputter rates for a wide variety of oxides. To support needs of users of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User facility as well as our research programs, we have made a series of measurements of the sputter rates for oxide films that have been grown by oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (OPA-MBE), pulsed laser deposition (PLD), Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), electrochemical oxidation, or sputter deposition. The sputter rates for these oxide films were determined in comparison to the sputter rates for thermally grown SiO2, a common sputter rate reference material. The film thicknesses and densities of these films were usually measured using x-ray reflectivity (XRR). These samples were mounted in an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system or an Auger electron spectrometer for sputtering measurements using argon ion sputtering. Although the primary objective was to determine relative sputter rates at a fixed angle, the measurements were also used to determine: i) the angle dependence of the relative sputter rates; ii) the energy dependence of the relative sputter rates; and iii) the extent of ion beam reduction for the various oxides. Materials examined include: SiO2 (reference films), Al2O3, CeO2, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, HfO2, ITO (In-Sn-oxide) Ta2O5, TiO2 (anatase and rutile) and ZnO. We find that the sputter rates for the oxides can vary up to a factor of two (usually slower) from that observed for SiO2. The ratios of sputter rates to SiO2 appear to be relatively independent of ion beam energy for the range of 1kV to 4 kV and for incident angles of less than 50º. As expected, the ion beam reduction of the oxides varies with the sputter angle. These studies demonstrate that we can usually obtain sputter rate reproducibility better than 5% for similar oxide films.

  14. Protostellar spin-down: a planetary lift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, J.; Cébron, D.

    2015-11-01

    When they first appear in the HR diagram, young stars rotate at a mere 10 per cent of their break-up velocity. They must have lost most of the angular momentum initially contained in the parental cloud, the so-called angular momentum problem. We investigate here a new mechanism by which large amounts of angular momentum might be shed from young stellar systems, thus yielding slowly rotating young stars. Assuming that planets promptly form in circumstellar discs and rapidly migrate close to the central star, we investigate how the tidal and magnetic interactions between the protostar, its close-in planet(s), and the inner circumstellar disc can efficiently remove angular momentum from the central object. We find that neither the tidal torque nor the variety of magnetic torques acting between the star and the embedded planet are able to counteract the spin-up torques due to accretion and contraction. Indeed, the former are orders of magnitude weaker than the latter beyond the corotation radius and are thus unable to prevent the young star from spinning up. We conclude that star-planet interaction in the early phases of stellar evolution does not appear as a viable alternative to magnetic star-disc coupling to understand the origin of the low angular momentum content of young stars.

  15. The Relations and Comparisons between Reading Comprehension and Reading Rate of Japanese High School EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujita, Ken; Yamashita, Junko

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated the relation and comparison of reading comprehension and reading rate in Japanese high school EFL learners. One hundred and forty-eight tenth-graders in a Japanese high school participated in this study. Results showed that the relation between reading comprehension and reading rate was weak, but significant (r =…

  16. 13 CFR 120.1060 - Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information. 120.1060 Section 120.1060 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1060 Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and...

  17. 13 CFR 120.1060 - Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information. 120.1060 Section 120.1060 Business Credit and Assistance... section. The Report, Risk Rating, and Confidential Information must not be relied upon for any...

  18. 13 CFR 120.1060 - Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information. 120.1060 Section 120.1060 Business Credit and Assistance... section. The Report, Risk Rating, and Confidential Information must not be relied upon for any...

  19. 13 CFR 120.1060 - Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Confidentiality of Reports, Risk Ratings and related Confidential Information. 120.1060 Section 120.1060 Business Credit and Assistance... section. The Report, Risk Rating, and Confidential Information must not be relied upon for any...

  20. Similar relative mutation rates in the three genetic compartments of Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jimeng; Smith, David Roy; Borza, Tudor; Lee, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Levels of nucleotide substitution at silent sites in organelle versus nuclear DNAs have been used to estimate relative mutation rates among these compartments and explain lineage-specific features of genome evolution. Synonymous substitution divergence values in animals suggest that the rate of mutation in the mitochondrial DNA is 10-50 times higher than that of the nuclear DNA, whereas overall data for most seed plants support relative mutation rates in mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear DNAs of 1:3:10. Little is known about relative mutation rates in green algae, as substitution rate data is limited to only the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas. Here, we measure silent-site substitution rates in the plastid DNA of Chlamydomonas and the three genetic compartments of the streptophyte green alga Mesostigma. In contrast to the situation in animals and land plants, our results support similar relative mutation rates among the three genetic compartments of both Chlamydomonas and Mesostigma. These data are discussed in relation to published intra-species genetic diversity data for the three genetic compartments of Chlamydomonas and are ultimately used to address contemporary hypotheses on the organelle genome evolution. To guide future work, we describe evolutionary divergence data of all publically available Mesostigma viride strains and identify, for the first time, three distinct lineages of Mesostigma. PMID:21621456

  1. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-12-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  2. A cloud model-radiative model combination for determining microwave TB-rain rate relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szejwach, Gerard; Adler, Robert F.; Jobard, Esabelle; Mack, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a cloud model-radiative transfer model combination for computing average brightness temperature, T(B), is discussed. The cloud model and radiative transfer model used in this study are described. The relations between rain rate, cloud and rain water, cloud and precipitation ice, and upwelling radiance are investigated. The effects of the rain rate relations on T(B) under different climatological conditions are examined. The model-derived T(B) results are compared to the 92 and 183 GHz aircraft observations of Hakkarinen and Adler (1984, 1986) and the radar-estimated rain rate of Hakkarinen and Adler (1986); good correlation between the data is detected.

  3. The pattern of mammalian evolution and the relative rate of molecular evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Easteal, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The rates of nucleotide substitution at four genes in four orders of eutherian mammals are compared in relative rate tests using marsupial orthologs for reference. There is no evidence of systematic variation in evolutionary rate among the orders. The sequences are used to reconstruct the phylogeny of the orders using maximum likelihood, parsimony and compatibility methods. A branching order of rodent then ungulate then primate and lagomorph is overwhelmingly indicated. The nodes of the nucleotide based cladograms are widely separated in relation to the total lengths of the branches. The assumption of a star phylogeny that underlies Kimura's test for molecular evolutionary rate variation is shown to be invalid for eutherian mammals. Excess variance in nucleotide or amino acid differences between mammalian orders, above that predicted by neutral theory is explained better by variation in divergence time than by variation in evolutionary rate.

  4. Age-related changes in auditory and visual interactions in temporal rate perception

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Cassandra J.; Anderson, Andrew J.; Roach, Neil W.; McGraw, Paul V.; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how aging affects the integration of temporal rate for auditory flutter (amplitude modulation) presented with visual flicker. Since older adults were poorer at detecting auditory amplitude modulation, modulation depth was individually adjusted so that temporal rate was equally discriminable for 10 Hz flutter and flicker, thereby balancing the reliability of rate information available to each sensory modality. With age-related sensory differences normalized in this way, rate asynchrony skewed both auditory and visual rate judgments to the same extent in younger and older adults. Therefore, reliability-based weighting of temporal rate is preserved in older adults. Concurrent presentation of synchronous 10 Hz flicker and flutter improved temporal rate discrimination consistent with statistically optimal integration in younger but not older adults. In a control experiment, younger adults were presented with the same physical auditory stimulus as older adults. This time, rate asynchrony skewed perceived rate with greater auditory weighting rather than balanced integration. Taken together, our results indicate that integration of discrepant auditory and visual rates is not altered due to the healthy aging process once sensory deficits are accounted for, but that aging does abolish the minor improvement in discrimination performance seen in younger observers when concordant rates are integrated. PMID:26624937

  5. Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Wayne R.

    2010-07-01

    This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

  6. Mental workload measurement: Event-related potentials and ratings of workload and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biferno, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Event-related potentials were elicited when a digitized word representing a pilot's call-sign was presented. This auditory probe was presented during 27 workload conditions in a 3x3x3 design where the following variables were manipulated: short-term load, tracking task difficulty, and time-on-task. Ratings of workload and fatigue were obtained between each trial of a 2.5-hour test. The data of each subject were analyzed individually to determine whether significant correlations existed between subjective ratings and ERP component measures. Results indicated that a significant number of subjects had positive correlations between: (1) ratings of workload and P300 amplitude, (2) ratings of workload and N400 amplitude, and (3) ratings of fatigue and P300 amplitude. These data are the first to show correlations between ratings of workload or fatigue and ERP components thereby reinforcing their validity as measures of mental workload and fatigue.

  7. Thunderstorm cloud height-rainfall rate relations for use with satellite rainfall estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R. F.; Mack, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Observational studies of thunderstorm cloud height-rainfall rate and cloud height-volume rainfall rate relations are reviewed with significant variations being noted among climatological regimes. Analysis of the Florida (summer) and Oklahoma (spring) relations are made using a one-dimensional cloud model to ascertain the important factors in determining the individual cloud-rain relations and the differences between the two regimes. In general, the observed relations are well simulated by the model-based calculations. The generally lower predicted rain rates in Oklahoma (as compared to Florida) result from lower precipitation efficiencies which are due to a combination of larger entrainment (related to larger vertical wind shear) and drier environment. The generally steeper slope of the Oklahoma rain rate height curves is shown to be due to a stronger variation in maximum vertical velocity with cloud top height, which, in turn, is related to the greater static stability in the range of cloud tops. The impact of the regime-to-regime variations on empirical rain estimation schemes based on satellite-observed cloud height or cloud temperature information is discussed and a rain estimation approach based on model-generated cloud-rain relations is outlined.

  8. Relative rates for plasma homo- and copolymerizations of olefins in a homologous series of fluorinated ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the rate of plasma polymerization, or deposition rate, of a given monomer depends on various plasma process parameters, e.g., monomer flow rate, pressure, power, frequency (DC, rf or microwave), location of the substrate in the reactor, reactor geometry or configuration, and temperature. In contrast, little work has been done to relate deposition rates to monomer structures for a homologous series of monomers where the rates are obtained under identical plasma process parameters. For the particular series of fluorinated ethylenes (C2HxF4-x; x = 0-4), deposition rates were reported for ethylene (ET), vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE), but for plasma polymerizations carried out under different discharge conditions, e.g., pressure, current density, and electrode temperature. Apparently, relative deposition rates were reported for only two members of that series (ET, x = 4, and TFE, x = 0) for which the plasma polymerizations were conducted under identical conditions. We now present relative deposition rates for both homopolymerizations and copolymerizations of the entire series of fluorinated ethylenes (x = 0-4). Our interest in such rates stems from prior work on the plasma copolymerization of ET and TFE in which it was found that the deposition rates for the plasma copolymers, when plotted versus mol % TFE in the ET/TFE feed stock, followed a concave-downward curve situated above the straight line joining the deposition rates for the plasma homopolymers. This type of plot (observed also for an argon-ET/TFE plasma copolymerization) indicated a positive interaction between ET and TFE such that each monomer apparently "sensitized" the plasma copolymerization of the other. Since the shape of that plot is not altered if mol % TFE is replaced by F/C, the fluorine-to-carbon ratio, this paper aims (1) to show how the relative deposition rates for plasma copolymers drawn from all pairs of monomers in the C2HxF4-x series

  9. Abnormalities in Automatic Processing of Illness-Related Stimuli in Self-Rated Alexithymia

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Laura; Pintzinger, Nina M.; Tran, Ulrich S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate abnormalities in automatic information processing related to self- and observer-rated alexithymia, especially with regard to somatization, controlling for confounding variables such as depression and affect. Sample 89 healthy subjects (60% female), aged 19–71 years (M = 32.1). 58 subjects were additionally rated by an observer. Measures Alexithymia (self-rating: TAS-20, observer rating: OAS); automatic information processing (priming task including verbal [illness-related, negative, positive, neutral] and facial [negative, positive, neutral] stimuli); somatoform symptoms (SOMS-7T); confounders: depression (BDI), affect (PANAS). Results Higher self-reported alexithymia scores were associated with lower reaction times for negative (r = .19, p < .10) and positive (r = .26, p < .05) verbal primes when the target was illness-related. Self-reported alexithymia was correlated with number (r = .42, p < .01) and intensity of current somatoform symptoms (r = .36, p < .01), but unrelated to observer-rated alexithymia (r = .11, p = .42). Discussion Results indicate a faster allocation of attentional resources away from task-irrelevant information towards illness-related stimuli in alexithymia. Considering the close relationship between alexithymia and somatization, these findings are compatible with the theoretical view that alexithymics focus strongly on bodily sensations of emotional arousal. A single observer rating (OAS) does not seem to be an adequate alexithymia-measure in community samples. PMID:26090893

  10. Relative rates of evolution in the coding and control regions of African mtDNAs.

    PubMed

    Howell, Neil; Elson, Joanna L; Howell, Corinna; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2007-10-01

    Reduced median networks of African haplogroup L mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences were analyzed to determine the pattern of substitutions in both the noncoding control and coding regions. In particular, we attempted to determine the causes of the previously reported (Howell et al. 2004) violation of the molecular clock during the evolution of these sequences. In the coding region, there was a significantly higher rate of substitution at synonymous sites than at nonsynonymous sites as well as in the tRNA and rRNA genes. This is further evidence for the operation of purifying selection during human mtDNA evolution. For most sites in the control region, the relative rate of substitution was similar to the rate of neutral evolution (assumed to be most closely approximated by the substitution rate at 4-fold degenerate sites). However, there are a number of mutational hot spots in the control region, approximately 3% of the total sites, that have a rate of substitution greater than the neutral rate, at some sites by more than an order of magnitude. It is possible either that these sites are evolving under conditions of positive selection or that the substitution rate at some sites in the control region is strongly dependent upon sequence context. Finally, we obtained preliminary evidence for "nonideal" evolution in the control region, including haplogroup-specific substitution patterns and a decoupling between relative rates of substitution in the control and coding regions. PMID:17642471

  11. Gender- and age-related differences in heart rate dynamics: are women more complex than men?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S. M.; Goldberger, A. L.; Pincus, S. M.; Mietus, J.; Lipsitz, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study aimed to quantify the complex dynamics of beat-to-beat sinus rhythm heart rate fluctuations and to determine their differences as a function of gender and age. BACKGROUND. Recently, measures of heart rate variability and the nonlinear "complexity" of heart rate dynamics have been used as indicators of cardiovascular health. Because women have lower cardiovascular risk and greater longevity than men, we postulated that there are important gender-related differences in beat-to-beat heart rate dynamics. METHODS. We analyzed heart rate dynamics during 8-min segments of continuous electrocardiographic recording in healthy young (20 to 39 years old), middle-aged (40 to 64 years old) and elderly (65 to 90 years old) men (n = 40) and women (n = 27) while they performed spontaneous and metronomic (15 breaths/min) breathing. Relatively high (0.15 to 0.40 Hz) and low (0.01 to 0.15 Hz) frequency components of heart rate variability were computed using spectral analysis. The overall "complexity" of each heart rate time series was quantified by its approximate entropy, a measure of regularity derived from nonlinear dynamics ("chaos" theory). RESULTS. Mean heart rate did not differ between the age groups or genders. High frequency heart rate power and the high/low frequency power ratio decreased with age in both men and women (p < 0.05). The high/low frequency power ratio during spontaneous and metronomic breathing was greater in women than men (p < 0.05). Heart rate approximate entropy decreased with age and was higher in women than men (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS. High frequency heart rate spectral power (associated with parasympathetic activity) and the overall complexity of heart rate dynamics are higher in women than men. These complementary findings indicate the need to account for gender-as well as age-related differences in heart rate dynamics. Whether these gender differences are related to lower cardiovascular disease risk and greater longevity in

  12. Relative rate constants for the reactions of OH with methane and methyl chloroform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Atmospheric lifetimes of methane and methyl chloroform are largely determined by the rates of their reactions with hydroxyl radical. The relative lifetimes for this loss path are inversely proportional to the ratio of the corresponding rate coefficients. The relative rate constants were measured in a slow-flow, temperature-controlled photochemical reactor, and were based on rates of disappearance of the parent compounds as measured by FTIR spectroscopy. The temperature range was 277-356 K. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by 254 nm photolysis of O3 in the presence of water vapor. The preferred Arrhenius expression for the results is k(CH3CCl3)/k(CH4) = 0.62 exp (291/T), corresponding to a value of 1.65 at 298 K and 1.77 at 277 K. The respective uncertainties are 5 and 7 percent.

  13. Reconstruction of high frame rate image sequences in biomechanical related areas.

    PubMed

    Costa, Monica; Soares, Salviano; Barroso, Joao

    2010-01-01

    Regular video cameras shoot normally at 25/30 frames per second (fps). Actually there are available in the market equipments that allow us to acquire video at 1.000.000 fps. When we observe a video sequence it becomes noticeable that great part of the information remains unchanged regardless of the bit rate or frame rate used. One origin of discontinuity in video signals is directly related to movement. Several areas use high frame rate images to analyze and comprehend certain events or effects, biomechanical engineering is one of them. Biomechanics engineering studies the mechanics of a living body, especially the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure. Some examples are athlete assessment, were images are capture and then the acquired parameters are analyzed. This article describes a new methodology to decrease the space needed to store high frame rate image sequences in the specific case of biomechanical related areas. PMID:21095875

  14. Are gingival and periodontal conditions related to salivary gland flow rates in healthy individuals?

    PubMed

    Crow, H C; Ship, J A

    1995-11-01

    Some have suggested that gingival and periodontal health is related to salivary gland function; however, there are few data to support this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to determine if correlations existed between major salivary gland flow rates and gingival and periodontal conditions in people of different ages. The results suggest that there is no consistent relationship between major salivary gland flow rates and gingival and periodontal conditions in healthy people. PMID:7499648

  15. The solar cycle variation of the rates of CMEs and related activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, David F.

    1991-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are an important aspect of the physics of the corona and heliosphere. This paper presents results of a study of occurrence frequencies of CMEs and related activity tracers over more than a complete solar activity cycle. To properly estimate occurrence rates, observed CME rates must be corrected for instrument duty cycles, detection efficiencies away from the skyplane, mass detection thresholds, and geometrical considerations. These corrections are evaluated using CME data from 1976-1989 obtained with the Skylab, SMM and SOLWIND coronagraphs and the Helios-2 photometers. The major results are: (1) the occurrence rate of CMEs tends to track the activity cycle in both amplitude and phase; (2) the corrected rates from different instruments are reasonably consistent; and (3) over the long term, no one class of solar activity tracer is better correlated with CME rate than any other (with the possible exception of type II bursts).

  16. Are smoking and passive smoking related with heart rate variability in male adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Renata Melo; Farah, Breno Quintella; Santos, Carolina da Franca Bandeira Ferreira; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relation between smoking and passive smoking with heart rate variability parameters in male adolescents. Methods The sample consisted of 1,152 males, aged 14 and 19 years. Data related to smoking and passive smoking were collected using a questionnaire. RR intervals were obtained by a heart rate monitor, on supine position, for 10 minutes. After collecting the RR intervals, time (standard deviation of all RR intervals, root mean square of the squared differences between adjacent normal RR intervals and the percentage of adjacent intervals over 50ms) and frequency domains (low and high frequency and sympathovagal balance) parameters of heart rate variability were obtained. Results No significant differences between smoker and nonsmoker adolescents were observed in heart rate variability parameters (p>0.05). Similarly, heart rate variability parameters did not show significant difference between exposed and not exposed to passive smoking (p>0.05). Conclusion Cigarette smoking and passive smoking are not related to heart rate variability in adolescence. PMID:25993065

  17. Relative Rates for Plasma Homo- and Copolymerizations of Olefins in a Homologous Series of Fluorinated Ethylenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The relative rates of plasma (co)polymerizations of ethylene, vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene and tetrafluoroethylene (VF(sub x); x = 0-4, respectively) were determined in an rf, capacitively coupled, tubular reactor with external electrodes using identical plasma parameters. The averages of deposition rates obtained by both microgravimetry and ellipsometry were plotted versus the F/C ratios of the monomers or monomer blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub x)(x = 1-3) and 20 monomer blends were all located above a straight line joining the rates for VF(sub 0) and VF(sub 4), following a concave-downward plot of deposition rate versus F/C ratio similar to that reported previously for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 4) blends. The deposition rates for VF(sub m)/VF(sub n) blends (m = 3 or 4; n = 0-2) were all greater than expected for non-interacting monomers; those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 2) and VF(sub 1)/VF(sub 2) blends were all lower than expected; while those for VF(sub 0)/VF(sub 1) and VF(sub 3)/VF(sub 4) blends fen on a straightline plot versus F/C ratio, indicative of apparent non-interaction between monomers. The mechanisms for plasma (co)polymerizations of VF(sub x) monomers responsible for the wide range of relative deposition rates remain to be elucidated.

  18. New test of general relativity - Measurement of de Sitter geodetic precession rate for lunar perigee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertotti, Bruno; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Bender, Peter L.

    1987-01-01

    According to general relativity, the calculated rate of motion of lunar perigee should include a contribution of 19.2 msec/yr from geodetic precession. It is shown that existing analyses of lunar-laser-ranging data confirm the general-relativistic rate for geodetic precession with respect to the planetary dynamical frame. In addition, the comparison of earth-rotation results from lunar laser ranging and from VLBI shows that the relative drift of the planetary dynamical frame and the extragalactic VLBI reference frame is small. The estimated accuracy is about 10 percent.

  19. Plasticity in relative growth rate after a reduction in nitrogen availability is related to root morphological and physiological responses

    PubMed Central

    Useche, Antonio; Shipley, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims To maximize growth and fitness a plant must adjust its phenotype by an amount and speed that matches changes in nitrogen availability. To determine how plastic ontogenetic changes in root physiological and morphological traits interact and whether or not these responses are likely to maximize growth, ontogenetic changes in relative growth rate (RGR, proportional rate of change of plant dry mass), unit root rate (URR, rate of change of plant dry mass per unit root length or area), specific root length (SRL, root length per dry root mass), specific root area (SRA, root area per dry root mass), and other root traits before and after a decrease in nitrogen supply, were studied in ten herbaceous species. Methods Plants of each species were grown in hydroponic culture under controlled conditions in a control treatment where the supply of nitrogen remained constant at 1 mm, and in a stress treatment where the nitrogen supply was abruptly reduced from 1 to 0·01 mm during the growth period. Key Results and Conclusions In the treatment series the number of bifurcations per root area and per root length, specific root area (SRA) and length (SRL), areal (URRarea) and length-based (URRmass) unit root rate and RGR decreased, and root tissue density increased relative to the control. Species having greater plasticity in the percentage decrease in SRA at the end of the experiment also had smaller reductions in RGR; plasticity in SRA is therefore adaptive. In contrast, species which showed a greater reduction in URRarea and in the number of bifurcations per root area and per root length, showed stronger reductions in RGR; plasticity in URRarea and in the number of bifurcations per root area and per root length is therefore not adaptive. The plastic responses observed in SRA, SRL and in root tissue density constitute a set of plastic adjustments that would lead to resource conservation in response nutrient stress. PMID:20639301

  20. End of the Spectacular Decrease in Fall-Related Mortality Rate: Men Are Catching Up

    PubMed Central

    Hartholt, Klaas A.; Polinder, Suzanne; van Beeck, Ed F.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Patka, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We determined time trends in numbers and rates of fall-related mortality in an aging population, for men and women. Methods. We performed secular trend analysis of fall-related deaths in the older Dutch population (persons aged 65 years or older) from 1969 to 2008, using the national Official-Cause-of-Death-Statistics. Results. Between 1969 and 2008, the age-adjusted fall-related mortality rate decreased from 202.1 to 66.7 per 100 000 older persons (decrease of 67%). However, the annual percentage change (change per year) in mortality rates was not constant, and could be divided into 3 phases: (1) a rapid decrease until the mid-1980s (men −4.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −4.9, −3.2; women −6.5%; 95% CI, −7.1, −5.9), (2) flattening of the decrease until the mid-1990s (men −1.4%; 95% CI = −2.4, −0.4; women −2.0%; 95% CI = −3.4, −0.6), and (3) stable mortality rates for women (0.0%; 95% CI = −1.2, 1.3) and rising rates for men (1.9%; 95% CI = 0.6, 3.2) over the last decade. Conclusions. The spectacular decrease in fall-related mortality ended in the mid-1990s and is currently increasing in older men at similar rates to those seen in women. Because of the aging society, absolute numbers in fall-related deaths are increasing rapidly. PMID:22401528

  1. Age influences the relation between subjective valence ratings and emotional word use during autobiographical memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jaclyn H; DiGirolamo, Marissa A; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    Recent research reveals an age-related increase in positive autobiographical memory retrieval using a number of positivity measures, including valence ratings and positive word use. It is currently unclear whether the positivity shift in each of these measures co-occurs, or if age uniquely influences multiple components of autobiographical memory retrieval. The current study examined the correspondence between valence ratings and emotional word use in young and older adults' autobiographical memories. Positive word use in narratives was associated with valence ratings only in young adults' narratives. Older adults' narratives contained a consistent level of positive word use regardless of valence rating, suggesting that positive words and concepts may be chronically accessible to older adults during memory retrieval, regardless of subjective valence. Although a relation between negative word use in narratives and negative valence ratings was apparent in both young and older adults, it was stronger in older adults' narratives. These findings confirm that older adults do vary their word use in accordance with subjective valence, but they do so in a way that is different from young adults. The results also point to a potential dissociation between age-related changes in subjective valence and in positive word use. PMID:26274398

  2. The Effect of Changes in Relative Humidity on the Hydration Rate of Pachuca Obsidian

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The effect of relative humidity on the hydration rate of obsidian and other glasses has been debated since the early work of (I. Friedman, R. Smith, Am. Antiquity 25 (1960) 476). While more recent work has been in general agreement that a relative humidity dependence does exist, hydration profiles as a function of relative humidity have not been obtained. In this paper we present the results of a study in which samples of Pachuca obsidian were hydrated for approximately 5 days at 150 C at relative humidities ranging from 21% to 100%, and the resultant profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The results suggest that the hydration rate is, indeed, a function of relative humidity, but for the relative humidity levels commonly observed in most soils the effects on hydration dating are expected to be relatively small. In addition, analysis of the surface values as sorption isotherms and comparisons with nitrogen sorption isotherms suggests that water is relatively strongly bound to the obsidian surface. By assuming a situation in which the 'surface' refers to active centers within the glass we have shown that an adsorption model provides a useful approach to modeling the diffusive process.

  3. Decrease in rate of multiple sclerosis-related hospitalizations in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marta; Lambrelli, Dimitra; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate the rate of multiple sclerosis (MS)-related hospitalizations in Portugal and assess whether there have been temporal changes as described in other countries. Using data from the Portuguese National Discharge Registry, we observed that between 2008 and 2013 the rate of MS-related hospitalizations decreased by 44%, from 15.9/100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI: 14.9-16.9) in 2008 to 8.9/100 person-years (95% CI: 8.2-9.6) in 2013. The change in hospitalization rates is in accordance with what has been observed in other countries, and coincides with the release of new therapies for MS in Portugal.

  4. Community Colleges and Labor Market Conditions: How Does Enrollment Demand Change Relative to Local Unemployment Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Orians, Erica Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study uses fixed-effects panel data techniques to estimate the elasticity of community college enrollment demand relative to local unemployment rates. The findings suggest that community college enrollment demand is counter-cyclical to changes in the labor market, as enrollments rise during periods of weak economic conditions. Using national…

  5. Absolute and Relative Reliability of Percentage of Syllables Stuttered and Severity Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karimi, Hamid; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Jones, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS) and severity rating (SR) scales are measures in common use to quantify stuttering severity and its changes during basic and clinical research conditions. However, their reliability has not been assessed with indices measuring both relative and absolute reliability. This study was designed to provide…

  6. Alcohol-Related Vehicular Death Rates for College Students in the Commonwealth of Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James; Bauerle, Jennifer; Keller, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Determine rate of college student alcohol-related vehicular traffic fatalities in Virginia during 2007. Participants: Undergraduates at colleges and universities in Virginia. Methods: Institutions with membership in the American College Health Association were invited to participate in a survey. Data collected from institutional reports…

  7. A BASIS FOR RELATIVE GROWTH RATE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NATIVE AND INVASIVE FORBS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT The ability of invasives species to achieve higher relative growth rate (RGR) than their native counterparts has been widely documented. Little is known, however, about the underlying mechanisms driving RGR differences between native and invasive species. The objective of this study was t...

  8. Is the Physical Availability of Alcohol and Illicit Drugs Related to Neighborhood Rates of Child Maltreatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freisthler, Bridget; Needell, Barbara; Gruenewald, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the availability of alcohol and illicit drugs (as measured by alcohol outlet density and police incidents of drug sales and possessions) is related to neighborhood rates of child abuse and neglect, controlling for other neighborhood demographic characteristics. Method: Data from substantiated reports of child…

  9. Response-Time Variability Is Related to Parent Ratings of Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Martin, Cristina Dominguez; Mairena, Maria Angeles; Di Martino, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Isquith, Peter K.; Gioia, Gerard; Petkova, Eva; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD are often characterized as inconsistent across many contexts. ADHD is also associated with deficits in executive function. We examined the relationships between response time (RT) variability on five brief computer tasks to parents' ratings of ADHD-related features and executive function in a group of children with…

  10. The Acquisition of Vector Knowledge and Its Relation to Self-Rated Direction Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muehl, Karen A.; Sholl, M. Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    Self-rated sense of direction is reliably related to people's accuracy when pointing in the direction of unseen landmarks from imagined or actual perspectives. It is proposed that the cognitive substrate of accurate pointing responses is a vector representation, which is defined as an integrated network of displacement vectors. Experiment 1…

  11. Citation Rate of Highly-Cited Papers in 100 Kinesiology-Related Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    This study extended previous research on several citation-based bibliometric variables for highly cited articles in a large (N = 100) number of journals related to Kinesiology. Total citations and citation rate of the 30 most highly cited articles in each journal were identified by searchers of "Google Scholar (GS)". Other major…

  12. Understanding and Producing the Reduced Relative Construction: Evidence from Ratings, Editing and Corpora

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; McRae, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Two rating studies demonstrate that English speakers willingly produce reduced relatives with internal cause verbs (e.g., "Whisky fermented in oak barrels can have a woody taste"), and judge their acceptability based on factors known to influence ambiguity resolution, rather than on the internal/external cause distinction. Regression analyses…

  13. The Influence of Selected Academic, Demographic, and Instructional Program Related Factors on Elementary Student Retention Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Marshall, III

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of selected academic, demographic, and instructional program related factors on the retention rates of elementary school students. More specifically, this study was concerned with the relationship and predictability of the reading and mathematics variables scores, gender, ethnicity, program…

  14. The Impact of Implementation of Bundle to Reduce Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Ardison, Kym Marcel Martins; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Puga, Marcelo Lourencini; Laus, Ana Maria; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate how control bundles reduce the rate of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs) rates in critically ill patients. Methods This is a prospective before-and-after study designed to evaluate whether a set of control measures (bundle) can help prevent CVC-BSI. The bundles included a checklist that aimed to correct practices related to CVC insertion, manipulation, and maintenance based on guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results We examined 123 checklists before and 155 checklists after implementation of the training program. Compared with the pre-intervention period, CVC-BSI rates decreased. Hand hygiene techniques were used correctly. CVC-BSI incidence was 9.3 and 5.1 per 1,000 catheter-days before and after the training program, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of a bundle and training program effectively reduces CVC-BSI rates. PMID:26491498

  15. Relation between night visit rates and deprivation measures in one general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, R D; Johnstone, S P; Pearson, J C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare night visit rates in different electoral wards of one general practice with the Jarman and Townsend deprivation scores and unemployment rates. DESIGN--Analysis of computerised workload data. SETTING--General practice in centre of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire. OUTCOME MEASURE--Visits made in 588 nights to the 11,998 patients on the practice list. RESULTS--Night visit rates in 15 electoral wards varied from 19.6 to 55.3 visits per 1000 patients per year. The rates showed a significant association with the Townsend score (p = 0.004) and the unemployment rate (p = 0.03) but not with the Jarman score (p = 0.3). The Townsend score explained 49% of the variability; unemployment explained 31% and the Jarman score explained 9%. CONCLUSIONS--Even in a general practice not eligible for deprivation payments there was a 2.8-fold variation in night visit rates between wards. In this practice the Townsend score was significantly better at predicting night visit rates than the Jarman score. This method of looking at internal variation in workloads in computerised practices could give more direct data on the relation between deprivation and general practice workload than has previously been available. PMID:8518606

  16. The relation between sweat rate and weight loss when sweat is dripping off the body

    PubMed Central

    Brebner, D. F.; Kerslake, D. McK.

    1969-01-01

    1. The relation between the rate of sweat production, Ṡ, and the rate of weight loss, Ẇ, has been examined under conditions in which the rate of evaporation was small. 2. Ṡ could be found from Ẇ provided that a film of liquid was maintained over the skin surface. This could be achieved initially by immersing the subject in water containing detergent. Thereafter the film was maintained so long as the rate of weight loss exceeded about 10 g/min. 3. When the rate of weight loss was changing and the rate of evaporation was constant, Ṡ could be calculated as Ẇ + 2·5 Ẅ. 4. When the subject was constantly sprayed with water while being weighed, the correction for Ẅ became negligible. In this case there was no lower limit to the sweat rate which could be measured, but spraying considerably reduced the accuracy of the measurement. 5. The output of sweat from a ventilated capsule on the forearm correlated well with estimates of central sweating drive based on weight measurements corrected for hidromeiosis. PMID:5789946

  17. STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

  18. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive noises.

    PubMed

    Fidell, Sanford; Silvati, Laura; Pearsons, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine people judged the relative annoyance of five variable level signals and 29 impulsive and non-impulsive fixed-level signals in an adaptive paired comparison study. Signals were presented for judgment as heard indoors in a facility capable of accurately reproducing the very low-frequency content of sonic booms. When the annoyance of sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle was compared with that of sounds containing more higher-frequency energy (an aircraft flyover and an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz), the relative rate of growth of annoyance, as expressed in C-weighted SEL units, was nearly 2:1. In other words, to maintain subjective equality of annoyance, each increase in level of sonic booms had to be matched by nearly twice the increase in level of an aircraft flyover or an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of sonic booms accompanied by rattle and of non-impulsive sounds, including both low- (63-Hz octave band of noise) and high-frequency energy (1-kHz octave band of noise and an aircraft flyover), were closer to 1:1. Relative rates of growth of annoyance for sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle and low-frequency sounds (63 Hz) were also about 1:1. These differences in relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive sounds are as plausibly attributed to their relative low-frequency content as to impulsiveness per se. It may therefore be more useful for some purposes to express the annoyance of impulsive signals and other environmental noises containing substantial low-frequency energy in terms of effective (duration-corrected) loudness level rather than commonplace ASEL or CSEL. PMID:11837963

  19. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    GLENNIE, ELIZABETH; BONNEAU, KARA; VANDELLEN, MICHELLE; DODGE, KENNETH A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. Purpose/Objective/Focus This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Research Design Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time—that is, between one year’s achievement and the subsequent year’s dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. Findings/Results This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved

  20. Age-related changes in the rate of esterification of plasma cholesterol in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Carlile, S I; Kudchodkar, B J; Wang, C S; Lacko, A G

    1986-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels and selected molecular species of plasma cholesteryl esters and triglycerides were determined in 6-, 12-, 15-, 18-, 21-, and 24-month-old Fischer-344 rats. Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity was also determined using two independent methods utilizing endogenous and exogenous substrates. Plasma cholesterol levels increased up to 18 months of age and then plateaued. Of the plasma triglyceride molecular species investigated (C50, C52, C54 and C56), only the levels of C52 increased linearly with age. The concentration of other triglyceride molecular species did not change with age. The fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification showed a decreasing trend with age, whereas, the net cholesterol esterification rate showed a gradual age related increase. However, this latter parameter remained unchanged with age when the data were normalized for body weight. The cholesterol esterification rates measured using an exogenous substrate (estimating LCAT enzyme levels) showed essentially no change with age. These data indicate that changes in the levels and/or composition of lipoprotein substrate(s) for LCAT are likely causes of the observed age-related changes in the fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification. The net esterification rate of plasma cholesterol was significantly correlated with the plasma triglyceride levels when the animals for all age groups were treated as one experimental group. PMID:3959602

  1. Enhanced Atlantic sea-level rise relative to the Pacific under high carbon emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasting, J. P.; Dunne, J. P.; Stouffer, R. J.; Hallberg, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal expansion of the ocean in response to warming is an important component of historical sea-level rise. Observational studies show that the Atlantic and Southern oceans are warming faster than the Pacific Ocean. Here we present simulations using a numerical atmospheric-ocean general circulation model with an interactive carbon cycle to evaluate the impact of carbon emission rates, ranging from 2 to 25 GtC yr-1, on basin-scale ocean heat uptake and sea level. For simulations with emission rates greater than 5 GtC yr-1, sea-level rise is larger in the Atlantic than Pacific Ocean on centennial timescales. This basin-scale asymmetry is related to the shorter flushing timescales and weakening of the overturning circulation in the Atlantic. These factors lead to warmer Atlantic interior waters and greater thermal expansion. In contrast, low emission rates of 2 and 3 GtC yr-1 will cause relatively larger sea-level rise in the Pacific on millennial timescales. For a given level of cumulative emissions, sea-level rise is largest at low emission rates. We conclude that Atlantic coastal areas may be particularly vulnerable to near-future sea-level rise from present-day high greenhouse gas emission rates.

  2. A New Hypothesis for Relative High Rate of Volcanism in the Hesperian on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Li, M.; Xiao, L.; Wang, F.

    2013-12-01

    The rates of impact, weathering, erosion and valley formation on Mars all decreased greatly at the end of the Noachian. However, the average rate of volcanism stayed at a relatively high level throughout the Hesperian. The reason for extensive lava plains in the Hesperian is intriguing, since the rate of volcanism in the later time should have decreased dramatically than earlier time due to decreasing of internal thermal energy. Recent modeling results brought up 'cold and icy' against the prevalent 'warm and wet' for the early Mars, which showed tens to hundreds meters thick ice covered the Noachian highlands at a very limited total water inventory in 40 martian years. However, the thickness of ice could be much larger considering the enormous amount of water which created the channels and valleys on martian surface. In Iceland of Earth, both observation and numerical modeling results show that the great increase of rate of volcanism in the 1000-year time scale could be a result of ice sheet melting. Inspired from what has happened in Iceland, in this study, we are going to investigate the possibility of increasing the rates of volcanism by deglaciation in the Hesperian time. Our hypothesis is that the high rates of volcanism in Hesperian of Mars could also be the result of deglaciation.

  3. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2014-03-01

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109-1×1010 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing-donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C-H bonds are in the 1×107-1×109 mol-1 dm3 s-1 range.

  4. Phonation-related rate coding and recruitment in the genioglossus muscle.

    PubMed

    Shumway, K R; Porfirio, D J; Bailey, E F

    2015-07-01

    Motor unit recruitment was assessed in two muscles with similar muscle fiber-type compositions and that participate in skilled movements: the tongue muscle, genioglossus (GG), and the hand muscle, first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Our primary objectives were to determine in the framework of a voluntary movement whether muscle force is regulated in tongue as it is in limb, i.e., via processes of rate coding and recruitment. Recruitment in the two muscles was assessed within each subject in the context of ramp force (FDI) and in the tongue (GG) during vowel production and specifically, in the context of ramp increases in loudness, and subsequently expressed relative to the maximal. The principle findings of the study are that the general rules of recruitment and rate coding hold true for both GG and FDI, and second, that average firing rates, firing rates at recruitment and peak firing rates in GG are significantly higher than for FDI (P < 0.001) despite tasks performed across comparable force ranges (~2-40 % of max). The higher firing rates observed in the tongue within the context of phonation may be a function of that muscle's dual role as (prime) mover and hydrostatic support element. PMID:25899868

  5. Distributed patterns of event-related potentials predict subsequent ratings of abstract stimulus attributes.

    PubMed

    Bode, Stefan; Bennett, Daniel; Stahl, Jutta; Murawski, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to pleasant and rewarding visual stimuli can bias people's choices towards either immediate or delayed gratification. We hypothesised that this phenomenon might be based on carry-over effects from a fast, unconscious assessment of the abstract 'time reference' of a stimuli, i.e. how the stimulus relates to one's personal understanding and connotation of time. Here we investigated whether participants' post-experiment ratings of task-irrelevant, positive background visual stimuli for the dimensions 'arousal' (used as a control condition) and 'time reference' were related to differences in single-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) and whether they could be predicted from spatio-temporal patterns of ERPs. Participants performed a demanding foreground choice-reaction task while on each trial one task-irrelevant image (depicting objects, people and scenes) was presented in the background. Conventional ERP analyses as well as multivariate support vector regression (SVR) analyses were conducted to predict participants' subsequent ratings. We found that only SVR allowed both 'arousal' and 'time reference' ratings to be predicted during the first 200 ms post-stimulus. This demonstrates an early, automatic semantic stimulus analysis, which might be related to the high relevance of 'time reference' to everyday decision-making and preference formation. PMID:25271850

  6. Distributed Patterns of Event-Related Potentials Predict Subsequent Ratings of Abstract Stimulus Attributes

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Stefan; Bennett, Daniel; Stahl, Jutta; Murawski, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to pleasant and rewarding visual stimuli can bias people's choices towards either immediate or delayed gratification. We hypothesised that this phenomenon might be based on carry-over effects from a fast, unconscious assessment of the abstract ‘time reference’ of a stimuli, i.e. how the stimulus relates to one's personal understanding and connotation of time. Here we investigated whether participants' post-experiment ratings of task-irrelevant, positive background visual stimuli for the dimensions ‘arousal’ (used as a control condition) and ‘time reference’ were related to differences in single-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) and whether they could be predicted from spatio-temporal patterns of ERPs. Participants performed a demanding foreground choice-reaction task while on each trial one task-irrelevant image (depicting objects, people and scenes) was presented in the background. Conventional ERP analyses as well as multivariate support vector regression (SVR) analyses were conducted to predict participants' subsequent ratings. We found that only SVR allowed both ‘arousal’ and ‘time reference’ ratings to be predicted during the first 200 ms post-stimulus. This demonstrates an early, automatic semantic stimulus analysis, which might be related to the high relevance of ‘time reference’ to everyday decision-making and preference formation. PMID:25271850

  7. Injecting drug users in Scotland, 2006: Listing, number, demography, and opiate-related death-rates.

    PubMed

    King, Ruth; Bird, Sheila M; Overstall, Antony; Hay, Gordon; Hutchinson, Sharon J

    2013-06-01

    Using Bayesian capture-recapture analysis, we estimated the number of current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Scotland in 2006 from the cross-counts of 5670 IDUs listed on four data-sources: social enquiry reports (901 IDUs listed), hospital records (953), drug treatment agencies (3504), and recent Hepatitis C virus (HCV) diagnoses (827 listed as IDU-risk). Further, we accessed exact numbers of opiate-related drugs-related deaths (DRDs) in 2006 and 2007 to improve estimation of Scotland's DRD rates per 100 current IDUs. Using all four data-sources, and model-averaging of standard hierarchical log-linear models to allow for pairwise interactions between data-sources and/or demographic classifications, Scotland had an estimated 31700 IDUs in 2006 (95% credible interval: 24900-38700); but 25000 IDUs (95% CI: 20700-35000) by excluding recent HCV diagnoses whose IDU-risk can refer to past injecting. Only in the younger age-group (15-34 years) were Scotland's opiate-related DRD rates significantly lower for females than males. Older males' opiate-related DRD rate was 1.9 (1.24-2.40) per 100 current IDUs without or 1.3 (0.94-1.64) with inclusion of recent HCV diagnoses. If, indeed, Scotland had only 25000 current IDUs in 2006, with only 8200 of them aged 35+ years, the opiate-related DRD rate is higher among this older age group than has been appreciated hitherto. There is counter-balancing good news for the public health: the hitherto sharp increase in older current IDUs had stalled by 2006. PMID:23730265

  8. The influence of fatigue-induced increase in relative work rate on temperature regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kacin, Alan; Golja, Petra; Tipton, Michael J; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2008-05-01

    Heat-loss responses during steady-load exercise are affected by an increase in relative work rate induced by muscle ischaemia or hypoxaemia. The present study investigated whether progressive increases in perception of exertion and relative oxygen uptake %VO2peak which occur during prolonged steady-load exercise as a result of progressively increased peripheral fatigue, might also affect the regulation of heat loss responses and hence the exercise-induced increase in mean body temperature. Ten male subjects first performed a ramp-test to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer to evaluate their initial peak oxygen uptake (Control VO2peak). On a separate day, 120 min of cycling at constant power output corresponding to 60% of Control VO2peak was performed in thermoneutral environment (Ta = 23 degrees C, RH = 50%, wind speed = 5 m s(-1)). This was immediately followed by another maximal performance test (Fatigue VO2peak). During prolonged exercise, median (range) rating of perceived exertion for whole-body (RPEwb) increased (P < 0.01) from initial 3.5 (1-5) to 5.5 (5-9) at the end of exercise. Fatigue VO2peak and peak power output were 9 (5) and 10 (5)% lower (P < 0.01) when compared to control values. At the onset of exercise, heat production, mechanical efficiency, heat loss and mean body temperature increased towards asymptotic values, thereafter remained constant throughout the 120 min exercise, despite the concomitant progressive increase in relative work rate, as reflected in increased RPEwb and relative oxygen uptake. It is thus concluded that the increase in relative work rate induced predominantly by peripheral muscle fatigue affects neither the level of increase in mean body temperature nor the regulation of heat loss responses during prolonged steady-load exercise. PMID:18202847

  9. Degree of mutual ornamentation in birds is related to divorce rate.

    PubMed

    Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2003-09-01

    Many bird species have ornaments that are expressed equally in both sexes. I use comparative analysis to investigate why some monomorphic birds are highly ornamented, whereas others are drab. The results show a significant positive association between the degree of mutual ornamentation and divorce rate. This result is robust to the removal of the effects of phylogeny, site fidelity, residency, coloniality, nest type, mortality, body size and body-size dimorphism. The level of extra-pair paternity was not related to the degree of mutual ornamentation. I argue that these results are compatible with a process of mutual sexual selection, in which both sexes compete for access to mates. The coupled evolution of ornamentation and divorce rate, from the probable ancestral state of a high degree of ornamentation and a low divorce rate, appears to result mainly from a loss of ornamentation under mate fidelity. PMID:12964980

  10. Degree of mutual ornamentation in birds is related to divorce rate.

    PubMed Central

    Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Many bird species have ornaments that are expressed equally in both sexes. I use comparative analysis to investigate why some monomorphic birds are highly ornamented, whereas others are drab. The results show a significant positive association between the degree of mutual ornamentation and divorce rate. This result is robust to the removal of the effects of phylogeny, site fidelity, residency, coloniality, nest type, mortality, body size and body-size dimorphism. The level of extra-pair paternity was not related to the degree of mutual ornamentation. I argue that these results are compatible with a process of mutual sexual selection, in which both sexes compete for access to mates. The coupled evolution of ornamentation and divorce rate, from the probable ancestral state of a high degree of ornamentation and a low divorce rate, appears to result mainly from a loss of ornamentation under mate fidelity. PMID:12964980

  11. Muscle contraction: energy rate equations in relation to efficiency and step-size distance.

    PubMed

    Worthington, C R; Elliott, G F

    2003-09-01

    We derive the energy rate equation for muscle contraction. Our equation has only two parameters m, the maintenance heat rate and 1/S, the shortening heat coefficient. The impulsive model (previously described in earlier papers) provides a physical basis for parameter 1/S as well as for constants a and b in Hill's force-velocity equation. We develop new theory and relate the efficiency and the step-size distance to our energy rate equation. Correlation between the efficiency and the step-size distance is established. The various numbers are listed in Table 1: we use data from five different muscles in the literature. In summary, our analysis strongly supports the impulsive model as the correct model of contraction. PMID:12957311

  12. The relationship between relative solvent accessibility and evolutionary rate in protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Duncan C; Scherrer, Michael P; Zhou, Tong; Wilke, Claus O

    2011-06-01

    Recent work with Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows a linear relationship between the evolutionary rate of sites and the relative solvent accessibility (RSA) of the corresponding residues in the folded protein. Here, we aim to develop a mathematical model that can reproduce this linear relationship. We first demonstrate that two models that both seem reasonable choices (a simple model in which selection strength correlates with RSA and a more complex model based on RSA-dependent amino acid distributions) fail to reproduce the observed relationship. We then develop a model on the basis of observed site-specific amino acid distributions and show that this model behaves appropriately. We conclude that evolutionary rates are directly linked to the distribution of amino acids at individual sites. Because of this link, any future insight into the biophysical mechanisms that determine amino acid distributions will improve our understanding of evolutionary rates. PMID:21467571

  13. Heart rate-left ventricular ejection time relations - Variations during postural change and cardiovascular challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, V. Q.; Spodick, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on healthy human subjects to determine HR-LVET (Heart Rate-Left Ventricular Ejection Time) regression relations in different postures, including tilt, and during isometric exercise. The subjects were tested in the resting state in supine and sitting positions, during isometric handgrip in supine and sitting positions and during 70 deg headup tilt. The recordings included a bipolar electrocardiogram and a right external carotid pulse curve. Comparison of the HR-LVET relation for the conditions under analysis revealed differences among the respective regression equations, which can be explained by the well-established differences in stroke volume and ejection rate among these states. These differences appear to account for the fact that under conditions in which stroke volume variations should be the major determinant, slopes will be similar but intercepts will vary. Since substantial differences among intercepts are observed, caution should be exercised whenever the intercept factor is used to predict LVET for HR.

  14. Relative rates of coke formation from hydrocarbons in steam cracking of naphtha: 3. Aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kopinke, F. . Section of Remediation Research); Zimmermann, G. ); Reyniers, G.C.; Froment, G.F. )

    1993-11-01

    Relative rate constants of coke formation (k) from 18 aromatic hydrocarbons during steam cracking of naphtha at 810 C were determined by application of [sup 14]C-labeled compounds. Benzene is a poor coke precursor (k = 0.3), whereas polycyclic structures like acenaphthylene, anthracene, and chrysene have a high coking potential in the pyrolysis reactor (k = 4.5--6) as well as in the TLE section (k = 12--30). The relation between structure and coke formation rate of aromatic hydrocarbons can be interpreted on the basis of their reactivity in radical reactions. Constituents of the fuel fraction ([ge] C[sub 9]) derived from nonaromatic feed components are more efficient in the TLE fouling than those stemming from benzene derivatives.

  15. THE OBSERVED RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, DUST EXTINCTION, AND STAR FORMATION RATE IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Kewley, L. J.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Yates, R. M.

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we investigate the relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and star formation rate (SFR) using {approx}150,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR7. We show that the relation between dust extinction and SFR changes with stellar mass. For galaxies at the same stellar mass, dust extinction is anti-correlated with the SFR at stellar masses <10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. There is a sharp transition in the relation at a stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }. At larger stellar masses, dust extinction is positively correlated with the SFR for galaxies at the same stellar mass. The observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR presented in this study helps to confirm similar trends observed in the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR. The relation reported in this study provides important new constraints on the physical processes governing the chemical evolution of galaxies. The correlation between SFR and dust extinction for galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10} M {sub Sun} is shown to extend to the population of quiescent galaxies suggesting that the physical processes responsible for the observed relation between stellar mass, dust extinction, and SFR may be related to the processes leading to the shutdown of star formation in galaxies.

  16. The relation between recombination rate and patterns of molecular evolution and variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Campos, José L; Halligan, Daniel L; Haddrill, Penelope R; Charlesworth, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Genetic recombination associated with sexual reproduction increases the efficiency of natural selection by reducing the strength of Hill-Robertson interference. Such interference can be caused either by selective sweeps of positively selected alleles or by background selection (BGS) against deleterious mutations. Its consequences can be studied by comparing patterns of molecular evolution and variation in genomic regions with different rates of crossing over. We carried out a comprehensive study of the benefits of recombination in Drosophila melanogaster, both by contrasting five independent genomic regions that lack crossing over with the rest of the genome and by comparing regions with different rates of crossing over, using data on DNA sequence polymorphisms from an African population that is geographically close to the putatively ancestral population for the species, and on sequence divergence from a related species. We observed reductions in sequence diversity in noncrossover (NC) regions that are inconsistent with the effects of hard selective sweeps in the absence of recombination. Overall, the observed patterns suggest that the recombination rate experienced by a gene is positively related to an increase in the efficiency of both positive and purifying selection. The results are consistent with a BGS model with interference among selected sites in NC regions, and joint effects of BGS, selective sweeps, and a past population expansion on variability in regions of the genome that experience crossing over. In such crossover regions, the X chromosome exhibits a higher rate of adaptive protein sequence evolution than the autosomes, implying a Faster-X effect. PMID:24489114

  17. Age-related increase of resting metabolic rate in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shin-Lei; Dumas, Julie A.; Park, Denise C.; Liu, Peiying; Filbey, Francesca M.; McAdams, Carrie J.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Adinoff, Bryon; Zhang, Rong; Lu, Hanzhang

    2014-01-01

    With age, many aspects of the brain structure undergo a pronounced decline, yet individuals generally function well until advanced old age. There appear to be several compensatory mechanisms in brain aging, but their precise nature is not well characterized. Here we provide evidence that the brain of older adults expends more energy when compared to younger adults, as manifested by an age-related increase (P=0.03) in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) (N=118, men=56, ages 18 to 74). We further showed that, before the mean menopausal age of 51 years old, female and male groups have similar rates of CMRO2 increase (P=0.015) and there was no interaction between age and sex effects (P=0.85). However, when using data from the entire age range, women have a slower rate of CMRO2 change when compared to men (P<0.001 for age × sex interaction term). Thus, menopause and estrogen level may have played a role in this sex difference. Our data also revealed a possible circadian rhythm of CMRO2 in that brain metabolic rate is greater at noon than in the morning (P=0.02). This study reveals a potential neurobiological mechanism for age-related compensation in brain function and also suggests a sex-difference in its temporal pattern. PMID:24814209

  18. Temperature and rainfall are related to fertility rate after spring artificial insemination in small ruminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abecia, J. A.; Arrébola, F.; Macías, A.; Laviña, A.; González-Casquet, O.; Benítez, F.; Palacios, C.

    2016-03-01

    A total number of 1092 artificial inseminations (AIs) performed from March to May were documented over four consecutive years on 10 Payoya goat farms (36° N) and 19,392 AIs on 102 Rasa Aragonesa sheep farms (41° N) over 10 years. Mean, maximum, and minimum ambient temperatures, mean relative humidity, mean solar radiation, and total rainfall on each insemination day were recorded. Overall, fertility rates were 58 % in goats and 45 % in sheep. The fertility rates of the highest and lowest deciles of each of the meteorological variables indicated that temperature and rainfall had a significant effect on fertility in goats. Specifically, inseminations that were performed when mean (68 %), maximum (68 %), and minimum (66 %) temperatures were in the highest decile, and rainfall was in the lowest decile (59 %), had a significantly (P < 0.0001) higher proportion of does that became pregnant than did the ewes in the lowest decile (56, 54, 58, and 49 %, respectively). In sheep, the fertility rates of the highest decile of mean (62 %), maximum (62 %), and minimum (52 %) temperature, RH (52 %), THI (53 %), and rainfall (45 %) were significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than were the fertility rates among ewes in the lowest decile (46, 45, 45, 45, 46, and 43 %, respectively). In conclusion, weather was related to fertility in small ruminants after AI in spring. It remains to be determined whether scheduling the dates of insemination based on forecasted temperatures can improve the success of AI in goats and sheep.

  19. Conscientiousness mediates the relation between perceived parental socialisation and self-rated health

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Roberts, Brent W.; Hoshino, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The pathways between parenting behaviours, personality and physical health have all been separately studied. Prior research has paid little attention to the indirect effects of personality in the path between parenting behaviours and better health. The purpose of this study was to explore the mediational effects of conscientiousness on the relationships between parental socialisation of responsibility and self-rated health, and to examine potential age differences in this mediational pathway. In total, 736 female and 749 male members across Japan participated in this study. They were divided into three groups by age category: younger-, middle-aged and older-aged. Conscientiousness and health were concurrently rated, while parental socialisation of responsibility was retrospectively assessed. Our analyses revealed that parental socialisation of responsibility is positively associated with conscientiousness and self-rated health, that conscientiousness is positively associated with self-rated health, and that conscientiousness fully mediated the effect of parental socialisation of responsibility on self-rated health. The mediational links were consistent across younger, middle-aged and older-aged cohorts. Our findings suggest that greater parental socialisation of responsibility relates to higher conscientiousness, and consequently healthier adults. These findings imply that parental behaviours could be a plausible target for intervention to foster the development of conscientiousness and better health. PMID:22292501

  20. The sonochemical degradation of azobenzene and related azo dyes: Rate enhancements via Fenton's reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.M.; Destaillats, H.; Hung, H.M.; Hoffmann, M.R.

    2000-01-20

    The sonochemical degradation of aqueous solutions of azobenzene and related azo dyes (methyl orange, o-methyl red, and p-methyl red) was performed at 500 kHz and 50 W, under air, O{sub 2}, or Ar saturation at 288 K. Reaction products and intermediates were identified by HPLC-ES-MS. Total organic carbon (TOC) was also determined as a function of reaction time. The authors propose a reaction mechanism based on the observed species and the extent and rate of TOC depletion. The effects of the dye structures and of the background gas on the sonochemical bleaching rates were also investigated. The reaction rates for o-methyl red were approximately 30--40% faster than those for the other compounds. Saturating with Ar instead of air or O{sub 2} increased the pseudo first-order rate constants for the degradation by 10%. The acceleration of the sonochemical bleaching and the mineralization process upon addition of Fe(II) was also investigated in Ar-saturated methyl orange solutions. A 3-fold increase in the reaction rate was observed at optimal Fe(II) concentrations. This kinetic effect is quantitatively accounted for by a simple kinetic model based on the reaction of Fe(II) with sonochemically produced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (Fenton's reaction). This latter effect illustrates a simple way of achieving a substantial improvement in the efficiency of sonochemical degradation reactions.

  1. Relative Reinforcer Rates and Magnitudes Do Not Control Concurrent Choice Independently

    PubMed Central

    Elliffe, Douglas; Davison, Michael; Landon, Jason

    2008-01-01

    One assumption of the matching approach to choice is that different independent variables control choice independently of each other. We tested this assumption for reinforcer rate and magnitude in an extensive parametric experiment. Five pigeons responded for food reinforcement on switching-key concurrent variable-interval variable-interval schedules. Across conditions, the ratios of reinforcer rates and of reinforcer magnitudes on the two alternatives were both manipulated. Control by each independent variable, as measured by generalized-matching sensitivity, changed significantly with the ratio of the other independent variable. Analyses taking the model-comparison approach, which weighs improvement in goodness-of-fit against increasing number of free parameters, were inconclusive. These analyses compared a model assuming constant sensitivity to magnitude across all reinforcer-rate ratios with two alternative models. One of those alternatives allowed sensitivity to magnitude to vary freely across reinforcer-rate ratios, and was less efficient than the common-sensitivity model for all pigeons, according to the Schwarz-Bayes information criterion. The second alternative model constrained sensitivity to magnitude to be equal for pairs of reinforcer-rate ratios that deviated from unity by proportionately equal amounts but in opposite directions. This model was more efficient than the common-magnitude-sensitivity model for 2 of the pigeons, but not for the other 3. An analysis of variance, carried out independently of the generalized-matching analysis, also showed a significant interaction between the effects of reinforcer rate and reinforcer magnitude on choice. On balance, these results suggest that the assumption of independence inherent in the matching approach cannot be maintained. Relative reinforcer rates and magnitudes do not control choice independently. PMID:18831124

  2. Jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap estimates of growth rates in bivalve mollusks using nearest living relatives.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Troy A; Kowalewski, Michał

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of growth rates can augment ecological and paleontological applications of body-size data. However, in contrast to body-size estimates, assessing growth rates is often time-consuming, expensive, or unattainable. Here we use an indirect approach, a jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap, for efficient approximation of growth rates using nearest living relatives with known age-size relationships. The estimate is developed by (1) collecting a sample of published growth rates of closely related species, (2) calculating the average growth curve using those published age-size relationships, (3) resampling iteratively these empirically known growth curves to estimate the standard errors and confidence bands around the average growth curve, and (4) applying the resulting estimate of uncertainty to bracket age-size relationships of the species of interest. This approach was applied to three monophyletic families (Donacidae, Mactridae, and Semelidae) of mollusk bivalves, a group characterized by indeterministic shell growth, but widely used in ecological, paleontological, and geochemical research. The resulting indirect estimates were tested against two previously published geochemical studies and, in both cases, yielded highly congruent age estimates. In addition, a case study in applied fisheries was used to illustrate the potential of the proposed approach for augmenting aquaculture management practices. The resulting estimates of growth rates place body size data in a constrained temporal context and confidence intervals associated with resampling estimates allow for assessing the statistical uncertainty around derived temporal ranges. The indirect approach should allow for improved evaluation of diverse research questions, from sustainability of industrial shellfish harvesting to climatic interpretations of stable isotope proxies extracted from fossil skeletons. PMID:24071629

  3. Are beach erosion rates and sea-level rise related in Hawaii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romine, Bradley M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Barbee, Matthew M.; Anderson, Tiffany R.; Frazer, L. Neil

    2013-09-01

    The islands of Oahu and Maui, Hawaii, with significantly different rates of localized sea-level rise (SLR, approximately 65% higher rate on Maui) over the past century due to lithospheric flexure and/or variations in upper ocean water masses, provide a unique setting to investigate possible relations between historical shoreline changes and SLR. Island-wide and regional historical shoreline trends are calculated for the islands using shoreline positions measured from aerial photographs and survey charts. Historical shoreline data are optimized to reduce anthropogenic influences on shoreline change measurements. Shoreline change trends are checked for consistency using two weighted regression methods and by systematic exclusion of coastal regions based on coastal aspect (wave exposure) and coastal geomorphology. Maui experienced the greatest extent of beach erosion over the past century with 78% percent of beaches eroding compared to 52% on Oahu. Maui also had a significantly higher island-wide average shoreline change rate at - 0.13 ± 0.05 m/yr compared to Oahu at - 0.03 ± 0.03 m/yr (at the 95% Confidence Interval). Differing rates of relative SLR around Oahu and Maui remain as the best explanation for the difference in overall shoreline trends after examining other influences on shoreline change including waves, sediment supply and littoral processes, and anthropogenic changes; though, these other influences certainly remain important to shoreline change in Hawaii. The results of this study show that SLR is an important factor in historical shoreline change in Hawaii and that historical rates of shoreline change are about two orders of magnitude greater than SLR.

  4. The evolution of HPV-related anogenital cancers reported in Quebec - incidence rates and survival probabilities.

    PubMed

    Louchini, R; Goggin, P; Steben, M

    2008-01-01

    Non-cervical anogenital cancers (i.e. anal, vulvar, vaginal and penile cancers) associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), for which HPV is known to be the necessary cause of carcinogenesis, are poorly documented due to their relatively low incidence rate. The aim of this study is to describe the incidence rates of these cancers between 1984 and 2001, and their relative survival probabilities, in Quebec (Canada) between 1984 and 1998. The incidence of these cancers is on the rise, particularly anal cancer in women and, more recently (since 1993-95), vulvar cancer. Between 1984-86 and 1993-95, the 5-year relative survival probability for men with anal cancer decreased from 57% to 46%, while that for penile cancer dropped from 75% to 59%. However, during the same period, the 5-year relative survival probability for women with anal cancer rose from 56% to 65%, and remained stable for cervical and vulvar cancers, at 74% and 82%, respectively. PMID:18341764

  5. Systematic Variation of Observed Radar Reflectivity-Rainfall Rate Relations in the Tropics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, Eyal

    2000-12-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Global Validation Program provides a unique opportunity to compare radar datasets from different sites, because they are analyzed in a relatively uniform procedure. Monthly observed radar reflectivity-rainfall rate (Ze-R) relations for four different sites that are surrounded by tipping bucket gauge networks (Melbourne, Florida; Houston, Texas; Darwin, Australia; and Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of Marshall Islands) were derived. The radar and gauge data from all sites are controlled for quality using the same algorithms, which also include an automated procedure to filter unreliable rain gauge data upon comparison with radar data. The relations are generated by two different methods. The first method is based on using a power law Ze-R with a fixed exponent of 1.4, and the second is based on matching unconditional probabilities of rain rates as measured by the gauge to radar-observed reflectivities and is known as the window probability matching method (WPMM). Both methods tune the radar observations to a network of quality-controlled gauges to adjust the total monthly rainfall to match the gauges. Separate relations are generated for convective and stratiform rain, as classified by the horizontal reflectivity structure.In the WPMM-based Ze-R relations, a given Ze was matched to a much lower R in convective rainfall than in stratiform rainfall. These relations were found to be curved lines in log-log space rather than a straight-line power law. The WPMM-based Ze-R curves demonstrated systematic variation between the convective and stratiform rain, but the power law-based Ze-R curves showed no systematic trend. The systematic variation in the relations shown here contradicts previous findings in which the classification is based only on the existence or nonexistence of brightband signature. The latter indicates a higher reflectivity in stratiform rain as compared with that in convective rain, for a given rain rate. Recent studies

  6. Climatologically tuned reflectivity-rain rate relations and links to area-time integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, David; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wolff, David B.

    1990-01-01

    An effort is made to determine relationships between reflectivity (Z) and rain rate (R) which are tuned to the local climatology. The development of such relations was motivated by the need to understand the role of precipitation in controlling general circulation and in affecting such phenomena as ENSO. Attention is given to methods of deriving such relations and how they are linked to area integral rainfall measurements. In essence, the relation is tuned so that the probability distribution of reflectivity, P(Z), replicates that of R over some predetermined space-time climatic domain. Thus, the accurate measurement of the average R over any smaller domain depends on how closely the sampled P(Z) approximates the climatic P(Z). The probability matching method used is a modification of the approach of Calheiros and Zawadzki (1987) and Rosenfeld (1980). The technique is applied to data from Germany and the eastern tropical Atlantic (GATE).

  7. Genome Size Evolution in Relation to Leaf Strategy and Metabolic Rates Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Knight, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims It has been proposed that having too much DNA may carry physiological consequences for plants. The strong correlation between DNA content, cell size and cell division rate could lead to predictable morphological variation in plants, including a negative relationship with leaf mass per unit area (LMA). In addition, the possible increased demand for resources in species with high DNA content may have downstream effects on maximal metabolic efficiency, including decreased metabolic rates. Methods Tests were made for genome size-dependent variation in LMA and metabolic rates (mass-based photosynthetic rate and dark respiration rate) using our own measurements and data from a plant functional trait database (Glopnet). These associations were tested using two metrics of genome size: bulk DNA amount (2C DNA) and monoploid genome size (1Cx DNA). The data were analysed using an evolutionary framework that included a regression analysis and independent contrasts using a phylogenetic tree with estimates of molecular diversification times. A contribution index for the LMA data set was also calculated to determine which divergences have the greatest influence on the relationship between genome size and LMA. Key Results and Conclusions A significant negative association was found between bulk DNA amount and LMA in angiosperms. This was primarily a result of influential divergences that may represent early shifts in growth form. However, divergences in bulk DNA amount were positively associated with divergences in LMA, suggesting that the relationship may be indirect and mediated through other traits directly related to genome size. There was a significant negative association between genome size and metabolic rates that was driven by a basal divergence between angiosperms and gymnosperms; no significant independent contrast results were found. Therefore, it is concluded that genome size-dependent constraints acting on metabolic efficiency may not exist within

  8. Relation of ongoing deformation rates to the subduction zone process in southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; McClusky, Simon; King, Robert

    1997-11-01

    The rate and orientation of ongoing strain associated with subduction of the Pacific plate and the accretion of the Yakutat terrane to southern Alaska has been estimated at 13 sites from Global Positioning System measurements made in June 1993 and 1995. Along the Gulf of Alaska coast near Cape Yakataga, the average rate of deformation, relative to Fairbanks, was ≈38 mm/yr at N32°W. Further inland, above the region where the dip of the downgoing Pacific plate changes from about 10° to >30°, the deformation rate was ≈12mm/yr at N26°W. In the Sourdough/Paxson area, the deformation rate drops to 2-5 mm/yr and suggests a low short-term deformation rate across the Denali fault. Elastic straining of the overriding plate due to back-slip on a main thrust zone with an average dip of about 10° can account for the overall rate and distribution of short-term compressional strain across south central Alaska. Above the transitional region between unstable and stable sliding we suggest that strain associated with ≈15 mm/yr of right-lateral strike-slip occurs also. If the strain accumulated since the two 1899 earthquakes (both MW=8.1) from the offshore Pamplona fault zone to south of the Border Ranges fault (down-dip width ≈100 km) was seismically released on a single fault it would correspond to a M=8.1 earthquake.

  9. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants’ personality traits as described in the ‘Big Five Inventory’ (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits

  10. Evaluating Abstract Art: Relation between Term Usage, Subjective Ratings, Image Properties and Personality Traits.

    PubMed

    Lyssenko, Nathalie; Redies, Christoph; Hayn-Leichsenring, Gregor U

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in experimental aesthetics is the uncertainty of the terminology used in experiments. In this study, we recorded terms that are spontaneously used by participants to describe abstract artworks and studied their relation to the second-order statistical image properties of the same artworks (Experiment 1). We found that the usage frequency of some structure-describing terms correlates with statistical image properties, such as PHOG Self-Similarity, Anisotropy and Complexity. Additionally, emotion-associated terms correlate with measured color values. Next, based on the most frequently used terms, we created five different rating scales (Experiment 2) and obtained ratings of participants for the abstract paintings on these scales. We found significant correlations between descriptive score ratings (e.g., between structure and subjective complexity), between evaluative and descriptive score ratings (e.g., between preference and subjective complexity/interest) and between descriptive score ratings and statistical image properties (e.g., between interest and PHOG Self-Similarity, Complexity and Anisotropy). Additionally, we determined the participants' personality traits as described in the 'Big Five Inventory' (Goldberg, 1990; Rammstedt and John, 2005) and correlated them with the ratings and preferences of individual participants. Participants with higher scores for Neuroticism showed preferences for objectively more complex images, as well as a different notion of the term complex when compared with participants with lower scores for Neuroticism. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between objectively measured image properties and the subjective terms that participants use to describe or evaluate abstract artworks. Moreover, our results suggest that the description of abstract artworks, their evaluation and the preference of participants for their low-level statistical properties are linked to personality traits. PMID

  11. Exploring Systematic Effects in the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Gas Phase Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, O. Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that the well-established mass–metallicity relation in galaxies is correlated with a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The strength of this correlation may be used to disentangle the relative importance of different physical processes (e.g., infall of pristine gas, metal-enriched outflows) in governing chemical evolution. However, all three parameters are susceptible to biases that might affect the observed strength of the relation between them. We analyze possible sources of systematic error, including sample bias, application of signal-to-noise ratio cuts on emission lines, choice of metallicity calibration, uncertainty in stellar mass determination, aperture effects, and dust. We present the first analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity, and SFR using strong line abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. for ∼130,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and provide a detailed comparison of these diagnostics in an appendix. Using these new abundance diagnostics yields a 30%–55% weaker anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR at fixed stellar mass than that reported by Mannucci et al. We find that, for all abundance diagnostics, the anti-correlation with SFR is stronger for the relatively few galaxies whose current SFRs are elevated above their past average SFRs. This is also true for the new abundance diagnostic of Dopita et al., which gives anti-correlation between Z and SFR only in the high specific star formation rate (sSFR) regime, in contrast to the recent results of Kashino et al. The poorly constrained strength of the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR must be carefully accounted for in theoretical studies of chemical evolution.

  12. A retrospective study on related factors affecting the survival rate of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-Kyung; Lee, Ki; Lee, Yong-Sang; Park, Pil-Kyoo

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the relationship between local factors and survival rate of dental implant which had been installed and restored in Seoul Veterans Hospital dental center for past 10 years. And when the relationship is found out, it could be helpful to predict the prognosis of dental implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study of patients receiving root-shaped screw-type dental implants placed from January 2000 to December 2009 was conducted. 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients. The following data were collected from the dental records and radiographs: patient's age, gender, implant type and surface, length, diameter, location of implant placement, bone quality, prosthesis type. The correlations between these data and survival rate were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Chi-square test and odds ratio. RESULTS In all, 6385 implants were placed in 3755 patients (3120 male, 635 female; mean age 65 ± 10.58 years). 108 implants failed and the cumulative survival rate was 96.33%. There were significant differences in age, implant type and surface, length, location and prosthesis type (P<.05). No significant differences were found in relation to the following factors: gender, diameter and bone quality (P>.05). CONCLUSION Related factors such as age, implant type, length, location and prosthesis type had a significant effect on the implant survival. PMID:22259704

  13. Proliferation rates of bovine primary muscle cells relate to liveweight and carcase weight in cattle.

    PubMed

    Coles, Chantal A; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina P; Siddell, Jason P; Greenwood, Paul L; White, Jason D; McDonagh, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Muscling in cattle is largely influenced by genetic background, ultimately affecting beef yield and is of major interest to the beef industry. This investigation aimed to determine whether primary skeletal muscle cells isolated from different breeds of cattle with a varying genetic potential for muscling differ in their myogenic proliferative capacity. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the Longissimus muscle (LM) of 6 month old Angus, Hereford and Wagyu X Angus cattle. Cells were assessed for rate of proliferation and gene expression of PAX7, MYOD, MYF5, and MYOG. Proliferation rates were found to differ between breeds of cattle whereby myoblasts from Angus cattle were found to proliferate at a greater rate than those of Hereford and Wagyu X Angus during early stages of growth (5-20 hours in culture) in vitro (P < 0.05). The proliferation rates of myoblasts during early stages of culture in vitro were also found to be positively related to the liveweight and carcase weight of cattle (P < 0.05). Gene expression of MYF5 was also found to be significantly down-regulated in WagyuX compared with Angus cattle (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that early events during myogenesis are important for determining liveweight and caracase weights in cattle. PMID:25875203

  14. Proliferation Rates of Bovine Primary Muscle Cells Relate to Liveweight and Carcase Weight in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Chantal A.; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina P.; Siddell, Jason P.; Greenwood, Paul L.; White, Jason D.; McDonagh, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Muscling in cattle is largely influenced by genetic background, ultimately affecting beef yield and is of major interest to the beef industry. This investigation aimed to determine whether primary skeletal muscle cells isolated from different breeds of cattle with a varying genetic potential for muscling differ in their myogenic proliferative capacity. Primary skeletal muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the Longissimus muscle (LM) of 6 month old Angus, Hereford and Wagyu X Angus cattle. Cells were assessed for rate of proliferation and gene expression of PAX7, MYOD, MYF5, and MYOG. Proliferation rates were found to differ between breeds of cattle whereby myoblasts from Angus cattle were found to proliferate at a greater rate than those of Hereford and Wagyu X Angus during early stages of growth (5–20 hours in culture) in vitro (P < 0.05). The proliferation rates of myoblasts during early stages of culture in vitro were also found to be positively related to the liveweight and carcase weight of cattle (P < 0.05). Gene expression of MYF5 was also found to be significantly down-regulated in WagyuX compared with Angus cattle (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that early events during myogenesis are important for determining liveweight and caracase weights in cattle. PMID:25875203

  15. Predicting organic hydrogen atom transfer rate constants using the Marcus cross relation

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical reactions that involve net hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are ubiquitous in chemistry and biology, from the action of antioxidants to industrial and metalloenzyme catalysis. This report develops and validates a procedure to predict rate constants for HAT reactions of oxyl radicals (RO•) in various media. Our procedure uses the Marcus cross relation (CR) and includes adjustments for solvent hydrogen-bonding effects on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of the reactions. Kinetic solvent effects (KSEs) are included by using Ingold’s model, and thermodynamic solvent effects are accounted for by using an empirical model developed by Abraham. These adjustments are shown to be critical to the success of our combined model, referred to as the CR/KSE model. As an initial test of the CR/KSE model we measured self-exchange and cross rate constants in different solvents for reactions of the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical and the hydroxylamine 2,2′-6,6′-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-ol. Excellent agreement is observed between the calculated and directly determined cross rate constants. We then extend the model to over 30 known HAT reactions of oxyl radicals with OH or CH bonds, including biologically relevant reactions of ascorbate, peroxyl radicals, and α-tocopherol. The CR/KSE model shows remarkable predictive power, predicting rate constants to within a factor of 5 for almost all of the surveyed HAT reactions. PMID:20215463

  16. PREDICTIONS OF EVAPORATIVE LOSS RATES OF SOLUTES IN STAGNANT AND TURBENT WATERS IN RELATION TO RATES OF REFERENCE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previously published kinetic model for evaporative rates of substances into air leads to the estimation of the dependence of solute transfer coefficients on turbulence applied to the system. The ratios of the transfer coefficients of all solutes become insensitive to air turbul...

  17. Sex ratio at birth and mortality rates are negatively related in humans.

    PubMed

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary theory posits that resource availability and parental investment ability could signal offspring sex selection, in order to maximize reproductive returns. Non-human studies have provided evidence for this phenomenon, and maternal condition around the time of conception has been identified as most important factor that influence offspring sex selection. However, studies on humans have reported inconsistent results, mostly due to use of disparate measures as indicators of maternal condition. In the present study, the cross-cultural differences in human natal sex ratio were analyzed with respect to indirect measures of condition namely, life expectancy and mortality rate. Multiple regression modeling suggested that mortality rates have distinct predictive power independent of cross-cultural differences in fertility, wealth and latitude that were earlier shown to predict sex ratio at birth. These findings suggest that sex ratio variation in humans may relate to differences in parental and environmental conditions. PMID:21887320

  18. Sex Ratio at Birth and Mortality Rates Are Negatively Related in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary theory posits that resource availability and parental investment ability could signal offspring sex selection, in order to maximize reproductive returns. Non-human studies have provided evidence for this phenomenon, and maternal condition around the time of conception has been identified as most important factor that influence offspring sex selection. However, studies on humans have reported inconsistent results, mostly due to use of disparate measures as indicators of maternal condition. In the present study, the cross-cultural differences in human natal sex ratio were analyzed with respect to indirect measures of condition namely, life expectancy and mortality rate. Multiple regression modeling suggested that mortality rates have distinct predictive power independent of cross-cultural differences in fertility, wealth and latitude that were earlier shown to predict sex ratio at birth. These findings suggest that sex ratio variation in humans may relate to differences in parental and environmental conditions. PMID:21887320

  19. Heart Rate during Conflicts Predicts Post-Conflict Stress-Related Behavior in Greylag Geese

    PubMed Central

    Wascher, Claudia A. F.; Fraser, Orlaith N.; Kotrschal, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Background Social stressors are known to be among the most potent stressors in group-living animals. This is not only manifested in individual physiology (heart rate, glucocorticoids), but also in how individuals behave directly after a conflict. Certain ‘stress-related behaviors’ such as autopreening, body shaking, scratching and vigilance have been suggested to indicate an individual's emotional state. Such behaviors may also alleviate stress, but the behavioral context and physiological basis of those behaviors is still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded beat-to-beat heart rates (HR) of 22 greylag geese in response to agonistic encounters using fully implanted sensor-transmitter packages. Additionally, for 143 major events we analyzed the behavior shown by our focal animals in the first two minutes after an interaction. Our results show that the HR during encounters and characteristics of the interaction predicted the frequency and duration of behaviors shown after a conflict. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge this is the first study to quantify the physiological and behavioral responses to single agonistic encounters and to link this to post conflict behavior. Our results demonstrate that ‘stress-related behaviors’ are flexibly modulated by the characteristics of the preceding aggressive interaction and reflect the individual's emotional strain, which is linked to autonomic arousal. We found no support for the stress-alleviating hypothesis, but we propose that stress-related behaviors may play a role in communication with other group members, particularly with pair-partners. PMID:21187927

  20. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J{sup ′}/η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ′} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  1. Dependence of the Firearm-Related Homicide Rate on Gun Availability: A Mathematical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, the relationship between the legal availability of guns and the firearm-related homicide rate has been debated. It has been argued that unrestricted gun availability promotes the occurrence of firearm-induced homicides. It has also been pointed out that gun possession can protect potential victims when attacked. This paper provides a first mathematical analysis of this tradeoff, with the goal to steer the debate towards arguing about assumptions, statistics, and scientific methods. The model is based on a set of clearly defined assumptions, which are supported by available statistical data, and is formulated axiomatically such that results do not depend on arbitrary mathematical expressions. According to this framework, two alternative scenarios can minimize the gun-related homicide rate: a ban of private firearms possession, or a policy allowing the general population to carry guns. Importantly, the model identifies the crucial parameters that determine which policy minimizes the death rate, and thus serves as a guide for the design of future epidemiological studies. The parameters that need to be measured include the fraction of offenders that illegally possess a gun, the degree of protection provided by gun ownership, and the fraction of the population who take up their right to own a gun and carry it when attacked. Limited data available in the literature were used to demonstrate how the model can be parameterized, and this preliminary analysis suggests that a ban of private firearm possession, or possibly a partial reduction in gun availability, might lower the rate of firearm-induced homicides. This, however, should not be seen as a policy recommendation, due to the limited data available to inform and parameterize the model. However, the model clearly defines what needs to be measured, and provides a basis for a scientific discussion about assumptions and data. PMID:23923062

  2. Dependence of the firearm-related homicide rate on gun availability: a mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L

    2013-01-01

    In the USA, the relationship between the legal availability of guns and the firearm-related homicide rate has been debated. It has been argued that unrestricted gun availability promotes the occurrence of firearm-induced homicides. It has also been pointed out that gun possession can protect potential victims when attacked. This paper provides a first mathematical analysis of this tradeoff, with the goal to steer the debate towards arguing about assumptions, statistics, and scientific methods. The model is based on a set of clearly defined assumptions, which are supported by available statistical data, and is formulated axiomatically such that results do not depend on arbitrary mathematical expressions. According to this framework, two alternative scenarios can minimize the gun-related homicide rate: a ban of private firearms possession, or a policy allowing the general population to carry guns. Importantly, the model identifies the crucial parameters that determine which policy minimizes the death rate, and thus serves as a guide for the design of future epidemiological studies. The parameters that need to be measured include the fraction of offenders that illegally possess a gun, the degree of protection provided by gun ownership, and the fraction of the population who take up their right to own a gun and carry it when attacked. Limited data available in the literature were used to demonstrate how the model can be parameterized, and this preliminary analysis suggests that a ban of private firearm possession, or possibly a partial reduction in gun availability, might lower the rate of firearm-induced homicides. This, however, should not be seen as a policy recommendation, due to the limited data available to inform and parameterize the model. However, the model clearly defines what needs to be measured, and provides a basis for a scientific discussion about assumptions and data. PMID:23923062

  3. Heart Rate Variability and Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Bossard, Matthias; Schoen, Tobias; Schmidlin, Delia; Muff, Christoph; Maseli, Anna; Leuppi, Jörg D; Miedinger, David; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Risch, Martin; Risch, Lorenz; Conen, David

    2016-09-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea seems to have an important influence on the autonomic nervous system. In this study, we assessed the relations of sleep apnea-related parameters with 24-hour heart rate variability (HRV) in a large population of young and healthy adults. Participants aged 25 to 41 years with a body mass index <35 kg/m(2) and without known obstructive sleep apnea were included in a prospective population-based cohort study. HRV was assessed using 24-hour electrocardiographic monitoring. The SD of all normal RR intervals (SDNN) was used as the main HRV variable. Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI) were obtained from nighttime pulse oximetry with nasal airflow measurements. We defined sleep-related breathing disorders as an AHI ≥5 or an ODI ≥5. Multivariable regression models were constructed to assess the relation of HRV with either AHI or ODI. Median age of the 1,255 participants was 37 years, 47% were men, and 9.6% had an AHI ≥5. Linear inverse associations of SDNN across AHI and ODI groups were found (p for trend = 0.006 and 0.0004, respectively). The β coefficients (95% CI) for the relation between SDNN and elevated AHI were -0.20 (-0.40 to -0.11), p = 0.04 and -0.29 (-0.47 to -0.11), p = 0.002 for elevated ODI. After adjustment for 24-hour heart rate, the same β coefficients (95% CI) were -0.06 (-0.22 to 0.11), p = 0.51 and -0.14 (-0.30 to 0.01), p = 0.07, respectively. In conclusion, even early stages of sleep-related breathing disorders are inversely associated with HRV in young and healthy adults, suggesting that they are tightly linked with autonomic dysfunction. However, HRV and 24-hour heart rate seem to have common information. PMID:27553103

  4. Relation of Total and Cardiovascular Death Rates to Climate System, Temperature, Barometric Pressure, and Respiratory Infection.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bryan G; Qualls, Clifford; Kloner, Robert A; Laskey, Warren K

    2015-10-15

    A distinct seasonal pattern in total and cardiovascular death rates has been reported. The factors contributing to this pattern have not been fully explored. Seven locations (average total population 71,354,000) were selected where data were available including relatively warm, cold, and moderate temperatures. Over the period 2004 to 2009, there were 2,526,123 all-cause deaths, 838,264 circulatory deaths, 255,273 coronary heart disease deaths, and 135,801 ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) deaths. We used time series and multivariate regression modeling to explore the association between death rates and climatic factors (temperature, dew point, precipitation, barometric pressure), influenza levels, air pollution levels, hours of daylight, and day of week. Average seasonal patterns for all-cause and cardiovascular deaths were very similar across the 7 locations despite differences in climate. After adjusting for multiple covariates and potential confounders, there was a 0.49% increase in all-cause death rate for every 1°C decrease. In general, all-cause, circulatory, coronary heart disease and STEMI death rates increased linearly with decreasing temperatures. The temperature effect varied by location, including temperature's linear slope, cubic fit, positional shift on the temperature axis, and the presence of circulatory death increases in locally hot temperatures. The variable effect of temperature by location suggests that people acclimatize to local temperature cycles. All-cause and circulatory death rates also demonstrated sizable associations with influenza levels, dew point temperature, and barometric pressure. A greater understanding of how climate, temperature, and barometric pressure influence cardiovascular responses would enhance our understanding of circulatory and STEMI deaths. PMID:26297511

  5. Growth Rate and Relocation Movements of Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) Nestlings in Relation to Age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Gunnar R.; Chalfoun, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    Relocation by dependent young is a survival strategy that occurs among a wide range of taxa. The Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) lays its eggs on bare substrate and, once hatched, nestlings may relocate to new sites daily. We located and monitored eight Common Nighthawk nests in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, quantified inter-use-site distances in relation to nestling age, and calculated a nestling growth rate curve. Common Nighthawk nestlings grow in a nearly linear fashion. Nestlings moved up to 48 m in a single day and larger, older nestlings tended to move greater distances between daily use-sites.

  6. An Examination of Sunspot Number Rates of Growth and Decay in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of annual sunspot number averages, sunspot number rates of growth and decay are examined relative to both minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences using cycles 12 through present, the most reliably determined sunspot cycles. Indeed, strong correlations are found for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences years in advance. As applied to predicting sunspot minimum for cycle 24, the next cycle, its minimum appears likely to occur in 2006, especially if it is a robust cycle similar in nature to cycles 17-23.

  7. Dynamical relations for left ventricular ejection - Flow rate, momentum, force and impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Selzer, R. H.; Gordon, D. G.; Ledbetter, D. C.; Crawford, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to quantitatively evaluate left ventricular volume flow rate, momentum, force and impulse derived from application of conservation principles for mass and momentum of blood within the ventricle during the ejection phase. An automated digital image processing system was developed and applied to left ventricular angiograms which are computer processed and analyzed frame by frame to determine the dynamical relations by numerical methods. The initial experience with force and impulse has indicated that neither quantity seemed to be a sensitive indicator of coronary artery disease as evaluated by qualitative angiography for the particular patient group studied. Utilization of the dynamical relations in evaluating human left ventricular performance requires improved means of measurement and interpretation of clinical studies.

  8. Flow Rate- and Fracture Property Dependence of Fracture-Matrix Ensemble Relative Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthai, S. K.; Lang, P.; Bazrafkan, S.

    2012-12-01

    The grid-block scale ensemble relative permeability, kri of fractured porous rock with appreciable matrix permeability is of decisive interest to reservoir simulation and the prediction of production, injector-producer water breakthrough, and ultimate recovery. While the dynamic behaviour of naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) already provides many clues about (pseudo) kri on the inter-well length scale, such data are difficult to interpret because, in the subsurface, the exact fracture geometry is unknown. Here we present numerical simulation results from discrete fracture and matrix (DFM) unstructured grid hybrid FEM-FVM simulation models, predicting the shape of fracture-matrix kri curves. In contrast to our earlier work, we also simulate capillary fracture matrix transfer (CFMT) and without relying the frequently made simplifying assumption that fracture saturation reflects fracture-matrix capillary pressure equilibrium. We also employ a novel discretization of saturation which permits jump discontinuities to develop across the fracture-matrix interface. This increased physical realism permits - for the first time - to test our earlier semi-analytical model of the flow rate dependence of relative permeability, ensuing from CFMT. The sensitivity analysis presented here constrains CMFT-related flow rate dependence of kri and illustrates how it manifests itself in two geometries of layer-restricted well-developed fracture patterns mapped in the field. We have also investigated the dependence of kri on fracture aperture as computed using discrete element analysis for plausible states of in situ stress. Our results indicate that fracture-matrix ensemble relative permeability can be matched with a new semi-analytic model taking into account the fracture-matrix flux ratio, the wetted fracture-matrix interface area as a function of saturation and the breakthrough saturation. However, we also detect a scale dependence of kri requiring a more elaborate treatment.

  9. Relative Rates of Surface and Volume Synthesis Set Bacterial Cell Size.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leigh K; Theriot, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have focused on the mechanisms underlying length and width determination in rod-shaped bacteria. Here, we focus instead on cell surface area to volume ratio (SA/V) and demonstrate that SA/V homeostasis underlies size determination. We propose a model whereby the instantaneous rates of surface and volume synthesis both scale with volume. This model predicts that these relative rates dictate SA/V and that cells approach a new steady-state SA/V exponentially, with a decay constant equal to the volume growth rate. To test this, we exposed diverse bacterial species to sublethal concentrations of a cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor and observed dose-dependent decreases in SA/V. Furthermore, this decrease was exponential and had the expected decay constant. The model also quantitatively describes SA/V alterations induced by other chemical, nutritional, and genetic perturbations. We additionally present evidence for a surface material accumulation threshold underlying division, sensitizing cell length to changes in SA/V requirements. PMID:27259152

  10. Enclosure fire hazard analysis using relative energy release criteria. [burning rate and combustion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    A method for predicting the probable course of fire development in an enclosure is presented. This fire modeling approach uses a graphic plot of five fire development constraints, the relative energy release criteria (RERC), to bound the heat release rates in an enclosure as a function of time. The five RERC are flame spread rate, fuel surface area, ventilation, enclosure volume, and total fuel load. They may be calculated versus time based on the specified or empirical conditions describing the specific enclosure, the fuel type and load, and the ventilation. The calculation of these five criteria, using the common basis of energy release rates versus time, provides a unifying framework for the utilization of available experimental data from all phases of fire development. The plot of these criteria reveals the probable fire development envelope and indicates which fire constraint will be controlling during a criteria time period. Examples of RERC application to fire characterization and control and to hazard analysis are presented along with recommendations for the further development of the concept.

  11. Incidence rates of sickness absence related to mental disorders: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, growing attention has been given to the mental health of workers. One way to examine the mental health of workers is to look at the incidence rates of mental illness-related sickness absence. There is a scarcity of literature in which the incidence rates of mental illness-related sickness absence among different countries have been considered together. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to address the question: Are there similarities and differences in the incidence rates of mental disorder-related sickness absence among and within OECD identified Social Democratic, Liberal and Latin American country categories? In this paper, we seek to identify differences and similarities in the literature rather than to explain them. With this review, we lay the groundwork for and point to areas for future research as well as to raise questions regarding reasons for the differences and similarities. Methods A systematic literature search of the following databases were performed: Medline Current, Medline In-process, PsycINFO, Econlit and Web of Science. The search period covered 2002–2013. The systematic literature search focused on working adults between 18–65 years old who had not retired and who had mental and/or substance abuse disorders. Intervention studies were excluded. The search focused on medically certified sickness absences. Results A total of 3,818 unique citations were identified. Of these, 10 studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria; six were from Social Democratic countries. Their quality ranged from good to excellent. There was variation in the incidence rates reported by the studies from the Social Democratic, Liberal and Latin American countries in this review. Conclusions The results of this systematic review suggest that this is an emerging area of inquiry that needs to continue to grow. Priority areas to support growth include cross jurisdictional collaboration and development of a typology

  12. Sulfate Reduction Relative to Methane Production in High-Rate Anaerobic Digestion: Technical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Zaid; Grusenmeyer, Stéphane; Verstraete, Willy

    1986-01-01

    The effect of different substrates and different levels of sulfate and sulfide on methane production relative to sulfate reduction in high-rate anaerobic digestion was evaluated. Reactors could be acclimated so that sulfate up to a concentration of 5 g of sulfate S per liter did not significantly affect methanogenesis. Higher levels gave inhibition because of salt toxicity. Sulfate reduction was optimal at a relatively low level of sulfate, i.e., 0.5 g of sulfate S per liter, but was also not significantly affected by higher levels. Both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methane-producing bacteria adapted to much higher levels of free H2S than the values reported in the literature (50% inhibition occurred only at free H2S levels of more than 1,000 mg/liter). High levels of free H2S affected the sulfate-reducing bacteria only slightly. Formate and acetate supported the sulfate-reducing bacteria very poorly. In the high-rate reactors studied, intensive H2S formation occurred only when H2 gas or an H2 precursor such as ethanol was supplied. PMID:16347018

  13. Defensive Traits in Young Pine Trees Cluster into Two Divergent Syndromes Related to Early Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Sampedro, Luis; Zas, Rafael; Pearse, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    The combination of defensive traits leads to the evolution of 'plant defense syndromes' which should provide better protection against herbivores than individual traits on their own. Defense syndromes can be generally driven by plant phylogeny and/or biotic and abiotic factors. However, we lack a solid understanding of (i) the relative importance of shared evolution vs. convergence due to similar ecological conditions and (ii) the role of induced defense strategies in shaping defense syndromes. We investigate the relative roles of evolutionary and ecological factors shaping the deployment of pine defense syndromes including multiple constitutive and induced chemical defense traits. We performed a greenhouse experiment with seedlings of eighteen species of Pinaceae family, and measured plant growth rate, constitutive chemical defenses and their inducibility. Plant growth rate, but not phylogenetic relatedness, determined the deployment of two divergent syndromes. Slow-growing pine species living in harsh environments where tissue replacement is costly allocated more to constitutive defenses (energetically more costly to produce than induced). In contrast, fast-growing species living in resource-rich habitats had greater inducibility of their defenses, consistent with the theory of constitutive-induced defense trade-offs. This study contributes to a better understanding of evolutionary and ecological factors driving the deployment of defense syndromes. PMID:27028433

  14. Defensive Traits in Young Pine Trees Cluster into Two Divergent Syndromes Related to Early Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Sampedro, Luis; Zas, Rafael; Pearse, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    The combination of defensive traits leads to the evolution of ‘plant defense syndromes’ which should provide better protection against herbivores than individual traits on their own. Defense syndromes can be generally driven by plant phylogeny and/or biotic and abiotic factors. However, we lack a solid understanding of (i) the relative importance of shared evolution vs. convergence due to similar ecological conditions and (ii) the role of induced defense strategies in shaping defense syndromes. We investigate the relative roles of evolutionary and ecological factors shaping the deployment of pine defense syndromes including multiple constitutive and induced chemical defense traits. We performed a greenhouse experiment with seedlings of eighteen species of Pinaceae family, and measured plant growth rate, constitutive chemical defenses and their inducibility. Plant growth rate, but not phylogenetic relatedness, determined the deployment of two divergent syndromes. Slow-growing pine species living in harsh environments where tissue replacement is costly allocated more to constitutive defenses (energetically more costly to produce than induced). In contrast, fast-growing species living in resource-rich habitats had greater inducibility of their defenses, consistent with the theory of constitutive-induced defense trade-offs. This study contributes to a better understanding of evolutionary and ecological factors driving the deployment of defense syndromes. PMID:27028433

  15. On the Reversal of Star formation Rate-Density Relation at z = 1: Insights from Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue

    2014-06-01

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h -3 Mpc3 region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h -1 Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h -1 Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  16. On the reversal of star formation rate-density relation at z = 1: Insights from simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Cen, Renyue E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-06-20

    Recent surveys have found a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR)-density relation at z = 1 from that at z = 0, while the sign of the slope of the color-density relation remains unchanged. We use adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a 21 × 24 × 20 h {sup –3} Mpc{sup 3} region to examine the SFR-density and color-density relations of galaxies at z = 0 and z = 1. The local environmental density is defined by the dark matter mass in spheres of radius 1 h {sup –1} Mpc, and we probe two decades of environmental densities. Our simulations produce a large increase of SFR with density at z = 1, as in the Elbaz et al. observations. We also find a significant evolution to z = 0, where the SFR-density relation is much flatter. The simulated color-density relation is consistent from z = 1 to z = 0, in agreement with observations. We find that the increase in SFR with local density at z = 1 is due to a growing population of star-forming galaxies in higher-density environments. At z = 0 and z = 1 both the SFR and cold gas mass are correlated with the galaxy halo mass, and therefore the correlation between median halo mass and local density is an important cause of the SFR-density relation at both redshifts. However, at z = 0 the local density on 1 h {sup –1} Mpc scales affects galaxy SFRs as much as halo mass. Finally, we find indications that while at z = 0 high-density environments depress galaxy SFRs, at z = 1 high-density environments tend to increase SFRs.

  17. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO- and Nitrite scavenging: Implications for transfusion related toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y.; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Barnum, Scott R.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to the RBC. It has been suggested that these changes have a potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion related toxicities. However, mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leukodepleted RBC result in cells that inhibit nitric oxide (NO)-signaling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from hemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that NO-consumption rates increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4 fold with 42d old vs. 0d RBC. These results are likely due to the formation of smaller RBC with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBC to affect NO-formation via deoxygenated RBC mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBC did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBC stored for >25d, but not with younger RBC. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBC and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage lesion-related transfusion risk PMID:22720637

  18. Erythrocyte storage increases rates of NO and nitrite scavenging: implications for transfusion-related toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stapley, Ryan; Owusu, Benjamin Y; Brandon, Angela; Cusick, Marianne; Rodriguez, Cilina; Marques, Marisa B; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Barnum, Scott R; Weinberg, Jordan A; Lancaster, Jack R; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-09-15

    Storage of erythrocytes in blood banks is associated with biochemical and morphological changes to RBCs (red blood cells). It has been suggested that these changes have potential negative clinical effects characterized by inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction which add to other transfusion-related toxicities. However, the mechanisms linking RBC storage and toxicity remain unclear. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that storage of leucodepleted RBCs results in cells that inhibit NO (nitric oxide) signalling more so than younger cells. Using competition kinetic analyses and protocols that minimized contributions from haemolysis or microparticles, our data indicate that the consumption rates of NO increased ~40-fold and NO-dependent vasodilation was inhibited 2-4-fold comparing 42-day-old with 0-day-old RBCs. These results are probably due to the formation of smaller RBCs with increased surface area: volume as a consequence of membrane loss during storage. The potential for older RBCs to affect NO formation via deoxygenated RBC-mediated nitrite reduction was also tested. RBC storage did not affect deoxygenated RBC-dependent stimulation of nitrite-induced vasodilation. However, stored RBCs did increase the rates of nitrite oxidation to nitrate in vitro. Significant loss of whole-blood nitrite was also observed in stable trauma patients after transfusion with 1 RBC unit, with the decrease in nitrite occurring after transfusion with RBCs stored for >25 days, but not with younger RBCs. Collectively, these data suggest that increased rates of reactions between intact RBCs and NO and nitrite may contribute to mechanisms that lead to storage-lesion-related transfusion risk. PMID:22720637

  19. Relating Spontaneously Reported Extrapyramidal Adverse Events to Movement Disorder Rating Scales

    PubMed Central

    Karayal, Onur N.; Kolluri, Sheela; Vanderburg, Douglas; Kemmler, Georg; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background: While antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and akathisia remain important concerns in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, the relationship between movement disorder rating scales and spontaneously reported EPS-related adverse events (EPS-AEs) remains unexplored. Methods: Data from four randomized, placebo- and haloperidol-controlled ziprasidone trials were analyzed to examine the relationship between spontaneously reported EPS-AEs with the Simpson Angus Scale (SAS) and Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS). Categorical summaries were created for each treatment group to show the frequencies of subjects with EPS-AEs in each of the SAS and BARS categories at weeks 1, 3, and 6, and agreement between ratings was quantified by means of weighted kappa (κ). Results: In general, we found greater frequencies of EPS-AEs with increasing severity of the SAS and BARS scores. The EPS-AEs reported with a “none” SAS score ranged from 0 to 22.2%, with a “mild” SAS score from 3.3 to 29.0%, and with a “moderate” SAS score from 0 to 100%. No subjects in any treatment group reported “severe” SAS scores or corresponding EPS-AEs. Agreement between SAS scores and EPS-AEs was poor for ziprasidone and placebo (κ < 0.2) and only slightly better for haloperidol. The EPS-AEs reported with “non questionable” BARS scores ranged from 1.9 to 9.8%, with “mild moderate” BARS scores from 12.8 to 54.6%, and with “marked severe” scores from 0 to 100%. Agreement was modest for ziprasidone and placebo (κ < 0.4) and moderate for haloperidol (κ < 0.6). Conclusions: These findings may reflect either underreporting of AEs by investigators and subjects or erroneous rating scale evaluations. PMID:26116494

  20. Population-Based Age Group Specific Annual Incidence Rates of Symptomatic Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saari, Jukka M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the population-based annual incidence rates of exudative, dry and all cases of symptomatic age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in different age and sex groups. Methods. This is a one year, prospective, population-based study on all consecutive new patients with AMD in the hospital district of Central Finland. The diagnosis was confirmed in all patients with slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a Spectralis HRA + OCT device, and the Heidelberg Eye Explorer 1.6.2.0 program. Fluorescein angiograms were taken when needed. Results. The population-based annual incidence rates of all cases of symptomatic AMD increased from 0.03% (95% CI, 0.01-0.05%) in the age group 50-59 years to 0.82% (95% CI, 0.55-1.09%) in the age group 85-89 years and were 0.2% (95% CI, 0.17-0.24%) in exudative, 0.11% (95% CI, 0.09-0.14%) in dry, and 0.32% (95% CI, 0.28-0.36%) in all cases of AMD in the age group 60 years and older. During the next 20 years in Central Finland the population-based annual incidence rates can be estimated to increase to 0.27% (95% CI, 0.24-0.30%) in exudative, to 0.13% (95% CI, 0.11-0.15%) in dry, and to 0.41% (95% CI, 0.37-0.45%) in all cases of AMD in the age group 60 years and older. The population-based annual incidence of AMD did not show statistically significant differences between males and females (p>0.1). Conclusion: The population-based age-group specific annual incidence rates of symptomatic AMD of this study may help to plan health care provision for patients of AMD. PMID:25674187

  1. Controlling the relative rates of adlayer formation and removal during etching in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Nicholas Colvin Masi

    Laser desorption (LD) of the adlayer coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and plasma induced emission (PIE) of desorbed adsorbates is used to investigate the relative rates of chlorination and sputtering during the etching of Si in inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas. Such an analysis is a two-fold process: surface analysis and plasma characterization. Surface analysis of Si etching using LD-LIF and LD-PIE techniques combined with etch rate measurements have revealed that the coverage of SiCl2 and etch rate increases and coverage of Si decreases abruptly for a chlorine fraction of 75% and ion energy of 80 eV. The precise Cl2 fraction for which these abrupt changes occur increases with an increase in ion energy. These changes may be caused by local chemisorption-induced reconstruction of Si <100>. Furthermore, the chlorination and sputtering rates are increased by ˜ an order of magnitude as the plasma is changed from Ar-dominant to Cl-dominant. Characterization of the plasma included determination of the dominant ion in Cl2 plasmas using LIF and a Langmuir probe and measurement of the absolute densities of Cl2, Cl, Cl+, and At + in Cl2-Ar discharges using optical emission actinometry. These studies reveal that Cl+ is the dominant positive ion in the H-mode and the dissociation of Cl2 to Cl increases with an increase in Ar fraction due to an increase in electron temperature. Furthermore, for powers exceeding 600 W, the neutral to ion flux ratio is strongly dependent on Cl2 fraction and is attributed mostly to the decrease in Cl density. Such dependence of the flux ratio on Cl2 fraction is significant in controlling chlorination and sputtering rates not only for Si etching, but for etching other key technological materials. ICP O2 discharges were also studied for low-kappa polymeric etch applications. These studies reveal that the electron temperature is weakly dependent on rf power and O2 dissociation is low (˜2%) at the maximum rf power density of 5.7 Wcm

  2. Turnover rate of cerebrospinal fluid in female sheep: changes related to different light-dark cycles

    PubMed Central

    Thiéry, Jean-Claude; Lomet, Didier; Bougoin, Sylvain; Malpaux, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Background Sheep are seasonal breeders. The key factor governing seasonal changes in the reproductive activity of the ewe is increased negative feedback of estradiol at the level of the hypothalamus under long-day conditions. It has previously been demonstrated that when gonadotropin secretions are inhibited during long days, there is a higher concentration of estradiol in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than during short days. This suggests an involvement of the CSF and choroid plexus in the neuroendocrine regulatory loop, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown. One possible explanation of this difference in hormonal content is an effect of concentration or dilution caused by variations in CSF secretion rate. The aim of this study was thus to investigate changes in the CSF turnover rate related to light-dark cycles. Methods The turnover rate of the CSF was estimated by measuring the time taken for the recovery of intraventricular pressure (IVP) after removal of a moderate volume (0.5 to 2 ml) of CSF (slope in mmHg/min). The turnover rate was estimated three times in the same group of sheep: during a natural period of decreasing day-length corresponding to the initial period when gonadotropin activity is stimulated (SG1), during a long-day inhibitory period (IG), and finally during a short-day stimulatory period (SG2). Results The time taken and the speed of recovery of initial IVP differed between groups: 8 min 30 sec, 0.63 ± 0.07 mmHg/min(SG1), 11 min 1 sec, 0.38 ± 0.06 mmHg/min (IG) and 9 min 0 sec, 0.72 ± 0.15 mmHg/min (SG2). Time changes of IVP differed between groups (ANOVA, p < 0.005, SG1 different from IG, p < 0.05). The turnover rate in SG2: 183.16 ± 23.82 μl/min was not significantly different from SG1: 169. 23 ± 51.58 μl/min (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.41), but was significantly different from IG: 71.33 ± 16.59 μl/min (p = 0.016). Conclusion This study shows that the turnover rate of CSF in ewes changes according to the light

  3. 77 FR 73456 - Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Army Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy...: Reference: TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy. Background: The following FRA policy applies to... increases in diesel fuel prices. Miscellaneous: A copy of the TR-12 FRA Policy can be accessed via the...

  4. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  5. Relative rate and location of intra-host HIV evolution to evade cellular immunity are predictable.

    PubMed

    Barton, John P; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Butler, Thomas C; Walker, Bruce D; McMichael, Andrew J; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evolves within infected persons to escape being destroyed by the host immune system, thereby preventing effective immune control of infection. Here, we combine methods from evolutionary dynamics and statistical physics to simulate in vivo HIV sequence evolution, predicting the relative rate of escape and the location of escape mutations in response to T-cell-mediated immune pressure in a cohort of 17 persons with acute HIV infection. Predicted and clinically observed times to escape immune responses agree well, and we show that the mutational pathways to escape depend on the viral sequence background due to epistatic interactions. The ability to predict escape pathways and the duration over which control is maintained by specific immune responses open the door to rational design of immunotherapeutic strategies that might enable long-term control of HIV infection. Our approach enables intra-host evolution of a human pathogen to be predicted in a probabilistic framework. PMID:27212475

  6. Relative rate constants for the reactions of atomic oxygen with HO2 anad OH radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Relative rate constants for the reactions O + HO2 - OH + O2 (1) and O + OH - H + O2 (2) were obtained by using the discharge-flow resonance fluorescence technique at 2 torr total pressure and 299 K. HO2 radicals were generated by reacting atomic hydrogen with an excess of O2. Quasi-steady-state concentrations of OH and HO2 were established in the presence of excess atomic oxygen. Observed concentration ratios, namely the ratio of the OH concentration to the HO2 concentration, resulted in a value of 1.7 + or 0.2 for k1/k2. The error limits are twice the standard deviation obtained from the data analysis. Overall experimental error is estimated to be + or - 25 percent. This result confirms earlier direct measurements of k1 and k2 which required knowledge of absolute radical or atomic oxygen concentrations.

  7. Tide-related biological rhythm in the oxygen consumption rate of ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea uncinata).

    PubMed

    Leiva, Félix P; Niklitschek, Edwin J; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-07-01

    The effects of tidal height (high and low), acclimation to laboratory conditions (days in captivity) and oxygen level (hypoxia and normoxia) were evaluated in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea uncinata We evaluated the hypothesis that N. uncinata reduces its OCR during low tide and increases it during high tide, regardless of oxygen level or acclimation. Additionally, the existence of an endogenous rhythm in OCR was explored, and we examined whether it synchronized with tidal, diurnal or semidiurnal cycles. Unexpectedly, high OCRs were observed at low tide, during normoxia, in non-acclimated animals. Results from a second, longer experiment under normoxic conditions suggested the presence of a tide-related metabolic rhythm, a response pattern not yet demonstrated for a burrowing decapod. Although rhythms persisted for only 2 days after capture, their period of 12.8 h closely matched the semidiurnal tidal cycle that ghost shrimp confront inside their burrows. PMID:27099365

  8. Vertex evoked potentials in a rating-scale detection task: Relation to signal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vertex evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing in an auditory detection task with rating scale responses. Three values of a priori probability of signal presentation were tested. The amplitudes of the N1 and P3 components of the vertex potential associated with correct detections of the signal were found to be systematically related to the strictness of the response criterion and independent of variations in a priori signal probability. No similar evoked potential components were found associated with signal absent judgements (misses and correct rejections) regardless of the confidence level of the judgement or signal probability. These results strongly support the contention that the form of the vertex evoked response is closely correlated with the subject's psychophysical decision regarding the presence or absence of a threshold level signal.

  9. Relative rate and location of intra-host HIV evolution to evade cellular immunity are predictable

    PubMed Central

    Barton, John P.; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Butler, Thomas C.; Walker, Bruce D.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) evolves within infected persons to escape being destroyed by the host immune system, thereby preventing effective immune control of infection. Here, we combine methods from evolutionary dynamics and statistical physics to simulate in vivo HIV sequence evolution, predicting the relative rate of escape and the location of escape mutations in response to T-cell-mediated immune pressure in a cohort of 17 persons with acute HIV infection. Predicted and clinically observed times to escape immune responses agree well, and we show that the mutational pathways to escape depend on the viral sequence background due to epistatic interactions. The ability to predict escape pathways and the duration over which control is maintained by specific immune responses open the door to rational design of immunotherapeutic strategies that might enable long-term control of HIV infection. Our approach enables intra-host evolution of a human pathogen to be predicted in a probabilistic framework. PMID:27212475

  10. Body surface related flow rate nomograms in a normal pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Wese, F X; Gaum, L D; Liu, T P; Wong, A K; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1989-01-01

    Uroflow studies for 511 normal pediatric subjects (272 boys, 239 girls) were analyzed statistically. Nomograms relating peak flow to volume voided and body surface were established. An acceptable lower limit for peak flow was obtained from the data and a volume voided range was calculated so that both criteria could be used with 90% probability to define the normal voiding situation. Body surface area was found to be a more reliable index than age in the establishment of nomograms. In the male population the 90% probability applied to a significantly greater volume voided reliability. In the female population mean peak flow rate rose with increased body surface. Finally, in both sexes the 10% lower limit was closer to the regression mean, allowing a tighter distribution around this value. PMID:2763926

  11. Calibrating the Decline Rate - Peak Luminosity Relation for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Bert W.; Pruzhinskaya, Maria V.; Thijsse, Barend J.

    2015-08-01

    The correlation between peak luminosity and rate of decline in luminosity for Type I supernovae was first studied by B. W. Rust [Ph.D. thesis, Univ. of Illinois (1974) ORNL-4953] and Yu. P. Pskovskii [Sov. Astron., 21 (1977) 675] in the 1970s. Their work was little-noted until Phillips rediscovered the correlation in 1993 [ApJ, 413 (1993) L105] and attempted to derive a calibration relation using a difference quotient approximation Δm15(B) to the decline rate after peak luminosity Mmax(B). Numerical differentiation of data containing measuring errors is a notoriously unstable calculation, but Δm15(B) remains the parameter of choice for most calibration methods developed since 1993. To succeed, it should be computed from good functional fits to the lightcurves, but most workers never exhibit their fits. In the few instances where they have, the fits are not very good. Some of the 9 supernovae in the Phillips study required extinction corrections in their estimates of the Mmax(B), and so were not appropriate for establishing a calibration relation. Although the relative uncertainties in his Δm15(B) estimates were comparable to those in his Mmax(B) estimates, he nevertheless used simple linear regression of the latter on the former, rather than major-axis regression (total least squares) which would have been more appropriate.Here we determine some new calibration relations using a sample of nearby "pure" supernovae suggested by M. V. Pruzhinskaya [Astron. Lett., 37 (2011) 663]. Their parent galaxies are all in the NED collection, with good distance estimates obtained by several different methods. We fit each lightcurve with an optimal regression spline obtained by B. J. Thijsse's spline2 [Comp. in Sci. & Eng., 10 (2008) 49]. The fits, which explain more that 99% of the variance in each case, are better than anything heretofore obtained by stretching "template" lightcurves or fitting combinations of standard lightcurves. We use the fits to compute estimates of

  12. Does seed mass drive the differences in relative growth rate between growth forms?

    PubMed

    Houghton, Jennie; Thompson, Ken; Rees, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The idea that herbaceous plants have higher relative growth rates (RGRs) compared with woody plants is fundamental to many of the most influential theories in plant ecology. This difference in growth rate is thought to reflect systematic variation in physiology, allocation and leaf construction. Previous studies documenting this effect have, however, ignored differences in seed mass. As woody species often have larger seeds and RGR is negatively correlated with seed mass, it is entirely possible the lower RGRs observed in woody species is a consequence of having larger seeds rather than different growth strategies. Using a synthesis of the published literature, we explored the relationship between RGR and growth form, accounting for the effects of seed mass and study-specific effects (e.g. duration of study and pot volume), using a mixed-effects model. The model showed that herbaceous species do indeed have higher RGRs than woody species, and that the difference was independent of seed mass, thus at all seed masses, herbaceous species on average grow faster than woody ones. PMID:23677351

  13. Varying relative degradation rates of oil in different forms and environments revealed by ramped pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Pendergraft, Matthew A; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-09-16

    Degradation of oil contamination yields stabilized products by removing and transforming reactive and volatile compounds. In contaminated coastal environments, the processes of degradation are influenced by shoreline energy, which increases the surface area of the oil as well as exchange between oil, water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients. Here, a ramped pyrolysis carbon isotope technique is employed to investigate thermochemical and isotopic changes in organic material from coastal environments contaminated with oil from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oiled beach sediment, tar ball, and marsh samples were collected from a barrier island and a brackish marsh in southeast Louisiana over a period of 881 days. Stable carbon ((13)C) and radiocarbon ((14)C) isotopic data demonstrate a predominance of oil-derived carbon in the organic material. Ramped pyrolysis profiles indicate that the organic material was transformed into more stable forms. Our data indicate relative rates of stabilization in the following order, from fastest to slowest: high energy beach sediments > low energy beach sediments > marsh > tar balls. Oil was transformed most rapidly where shoreline energy and the rates of oil dispersion and exchange with water, sediments, microbes, oxygen, and nutrients were greatest. Still, isotope data reveal persistence of oil. PMID:25105342

  14. HIV in the Leather Community: Rates and Risk-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, David A.; Seal, David W.; Rintamaki, Lance; Rieger, Gerulf

    2014-01-01

    There exist many subcultures of men who have sex with men (MSM), all with differing values and health behaviors. The Leathermen comprise one such subculture, which is characterized by a heightened valuation of hypersexuality and adherence to sexual control dynamics (i.e., submission and dominance). No previous research has specifically examined this community for differences in sexual health (e.g., HIV rates) and sexual health behaviors (e.g., condom use). We conducted a large survey of men (N = 1,554) at one leather and non-leather event, collecting data from 655 Submissives, Dominants, Switches, and non-orienting Leathermen. Leathermen were 61% more likely to be HIV-positive than non-Leathermen. Decreased condom use found in HIV-positive Leathermen (relative to HIV-positive non-Leathermen) was a potential factor contributing to heightened HIV rates. Universal low condom use in Submissives engaging in receptive, and Dominants engaging in insertive, anal intercourse was an additional trend that potentially contributed to increased numbers of HIV-positive Leathermen. Our recommendation is for heightened awareness of the risks associated with sex among Leathermen, especially unprotected anal intercourse with sero-uncertain Submissives. PMID:19904599

  15. Low heart rate variability and cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Crosswell, Alexandra D.; Lockwood, Kimberly G.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is a common and often long lasting symptom for many breast cancer survivors. Fatigued survivors show evidence of elevated inflammation, but the physiological mechanisms driving inflammatory activity have not been determined. Alterations in the autonomic nervous system, and particularly parasympathetic nervous system activity, are a plausible, yet understudied contributor to cancer-related fatigue. The goal of this study was to replicate one previous study showing an association between lower parasympathetic activity and higher fatigue in breast cancer survivors (Fagundes et al., 2011), and to examine whether inflammation mediates this association. Study participants were drawn from two samples and included 84 women originally diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer prior to age 50. Participants completed questionnaires, provided blood samples for determination of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), and underwent electrocardiography (ECG) assessment for evaluation of resting heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of parasympathetic activity. Results showed that lower HRV was associated with higher fatigue (p < .05), as predicted. In bivariate analyses, HRV was also correlated with circulating concentrations of IL-6 and CRP. However, path analyses did not support inflammation as a mediator of the association between HRV and fatigue; instead, associations among these variables appeared to be driven by age and BMI. These findings identify HRV as a potential contributor to cancer-related fatigue, but suggest that inflammation does not mediate this association in younger, healthy breast cancer survivors who are several years post-treatment. The autonomic nervous system merits additional attention in research on the etiology of cancer-related fatigue. PMID:24845177

  16. Sex-specific age-related changes of information processing rate indicators during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zebec, Mislav S; Budimir, Sanja; Merkas, Marina; Szirovicza, Lajos; Zivicnjak, Miroslav

    2014-06-01

    Despite the relevant findings on non-average information processing rate (IPR) indicators-intelligence relation, and on age-related changes of some of these indicators during aging, the research on sex-specific age-related changes of these indicators during childhood and adolescence are lacking. In a transversal study, 1197 school children (598 girls) aged 8-18 have been individually measured on 5 IPR indicators--two averages (mean_t, median_t) and three non-averages (min_t, max_t, sd_t). The results corroborated the expected non-linear changes of average IPR indicators in the observed developmental period, whereby the sex difference in related developmental patterns was detected: marked age-related decrement in girls ceased at the age of 12, and in boys around the age of 13-14, after which progress in both sexes gradually ceased by the age of 18 and was less pronounced in girls. Generally similar non-linear age-related decrements of non-average indicators were registered, but they showed mutual intensity differences at specific ages and sex difference in developmental patterns was detected, analogously to average indicators. Systematic sex differences in the whole observed period were obtained only in two non-average indicators: girls showed minor sd_t and boys showed minor min_t. In specific age groups, a number of sex differences were obtained that are explainable by two possible mechanisms: earlier maturation in girls and sex bias of the IPR task content. The justifiability of separate, average and non-average, IPR indicators application was corroborated by their distribution form differences, by mutual, predominantly low and medium correlations, by the different intensity of their developmental changes and by their different ability to detect sex differences. For all registered phenomena, the theoretical and/or empirical explanations were offered from the domain of sex specific intellectual, motor and neural development, and it has been shown that non

  17. Relative in vitro growth rates of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) - the most rapidly growing higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, P; Adelmann, K; Zimmer, S; Schmidt, C; Appenroth, K-J

    2015-01-01

    Relative growth rates (RGR), doubling times (DT) and relative weekly yields (RY) of 39 clones (ecotypes) from 13 species representing all five genera of duckweeds were determined under standardised cultivation conditions. RGR ranged overall from 0.153 to 0.519 day(-1) , DT from 1.34 to 4.54 days and RY from 2.9 to 37.8 week(-1) . The RGR and RY data can be compared directly to other published findings to only a limited extent on account of missing clonal designations for and limited accessibility to previously investigated clones, as well as the use of different data denominators. However, they are consistent with the published results of other comparative duckweed studies of similar scope in showing that RGR does not vary primarily at the level of the genus or species, but rather reflects the adaptation of individual clones to specific local conditions. The RGR data support the widely held assumption that duckweeds can grow faster than other higher plants and that they can thus surpass land-based agricultural crops in productivity. Duckweeds are highly promising for the production of biomass for nutrition and energy, but extensive clonal comparison will be required to identify the most suitable isolates for this purpose. PMID:24803032

  18. Large-scale variation in boreal and temperate forest carbon turnover rate related to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Carvalhais, Nuno; Forkel, Matthias; Santoro, Maurizio; Tum, Markus; Schmullius, Christiane

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation carbon turnover processes in forest ecosystems and their dominant drivers are far from being understood at a broader scale. Many of these turnover processes act on long timescales and include a lateral dimension and thus can hardly be investigated by plot-level studies alone. Making use of remote sensing-based products of net primary production (NPP) and biomass, here we show that spatial gradients of carbon turnover rate (k) in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests are explained by different climate-related processes depending on the ecosystem. k is related to frost damage effects and the trade-off between growth and frost adaptation in boreal forests, while drought stress and climate effects on insects and pathogens can explain an elevated k in temperate forests. By identifying relevant processes underlying broadscale patterns in k, we provide the basis for a detailed exploration of these mechanisms in field studies, and ultimately the improvement of their representations in global vegetation models (GVMs).

  19. Reassessing the Relation Between Stellar Mass, Metallicity, and Star Formation Rate in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Olivia Grace; Dalcanton, Julianne; Skillman, Evan D.; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the well-established mass-metallicity relation in galaxies depends on a third parameter: star formation rate (SFR). The observed strength of this dependence varies substantially depending on the choice of metallicity calibration, but has significant implications for theories of galaxy evolution, as it constrains the interplay between infall of pristine gas, metal production due to star formation, and ejection of enriched gas from galaxies. We present a new analysis of the relation between stellar mass, gas phase metallicity and SFR for ~140,000 star-forming galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a new set of theoretically calibrated abundance diagnostics from Dopita et al. (2013), we find a weaker dependence of metallicity on SFR at fixed stellar mass than was found by previous studies using different calibration techniques for gas phase metallicity. We analyze possible biases in the derivation of mass, metallicity, and SFR that could cause the observed strength of the metallicity dependence on SFR to differ from reality, as the calculation of each of these quantities is subject to systematic errors. Chemical evolution models must carefully consider these sources of potential bias when accounting for metallicity dependence on SFR.

  20. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during vasodilation

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    The initial equilibration of /sup 125/I-labeled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw skin of 6 anesthetized rabbits. Papavarine (200 ug/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery of one limb with the contralateral limb as a control. There was a 1.2-fold increase in lymph flow (p < 0.01) with no significant change in the lymph-to-plasma total protein concentration ratio from prepopliteal lymphatics following papavarine. After reaching a constant, elevated lymph flow, tracer labeled albumin was infused to maintain the plasma activity constant for 3 hrs. The plasma volume in tissue samples was measured using /sup 131/I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity relative to plasma was significantly greater in the vasodilated hindlimb (0.30 +/- 0.07 vs 0.13 +/- 0.05; mean +/- SE; p < 0.01). Extravascular specific activity relative to plasma was greater in the vasodilated limb (0.13 +/- 0.02 vs 0.09 +/- 0.02; p < 0.05). Thus, vasodilation increased the rates at which lymph and tissue equilibrate with plasma. Also, the difference between lymph and tissue equilibration was greater in the vasodilated hindlimb.

  1. We should be using nonlinear indices when relating heart-rate dynamics to cognition and mood

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hayley; Benton, David

    2015-01-01

    Both heart rate (HR) and brain functioning involve the integrated output of a multitude of regulatory mechanisms, that are not quantified adequately by linear approximations such as means and standard deviations. It was therefore considered whether non-linear measures of HR complexity are more strongly associated with cognition and mood. Whilst resting, the inter-beat (R-R) time series of twenty-one males and twenty-four females were measured for five minutes. The data were summarised using time, frequency and nonlinear complexity measures. Attention, memory, reaction times, mood and cortisol levels were assessed. Nonlinear HR indices captured additional information, enabling a greater percentage of the variance in behaviour to be explained. On occasions non-linear indices were related to aspects for behaviour, for example focused attention and cortisol production, when time or frequency indices were not. These effects were sexually dimorphic with HR complexity being more strongly associated with the behaviour of females. It was concluded that nonlinear rather than linear methods of summarizing the HR times series offers a novel way of relating brain functioning and behaviour. It should be considered whether non-linear measures of HR complexity can be used as a biomarker of the integrated functioning of the brain. PMID:26565560

  2. Offenders, Judges, and Officers Rate the Relative Severity of Alternative Sanctions Compared to Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nathan T.; May, David C.; Wood, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Recent work suggests that offenders rate several alternatives as more severe than imprisonment. We build on this literature by comparing punishment exchange rates generated by criminal court judges with rates generated by offenders and their supervising officers. Findings reveal that none of the three groups rates prison as the most severe…

  3. The radio continuum-star formation rate relation in WSRT sings galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Heesen, Volker; Brinks, Elias; Leroy, Adam K.; Heald, George; Braun, Robert; Bigiel, Frank; Beck, Rainer E-mail: v.heesen@soton.ac.uk E-mail: heald@astron.nl E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the spatially resolved radio continuum-star formation rate (RC-SFR) relation using state-of-the-art star formation tracers in a sample of 17 THINGS galaxies. We use SFR surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) maps created by a linear combination of GALEX far-UV (FUV) and Spitzer 24 μm maps. We use RC maps at λλ22 and 18 cm from the WSRT SINGS survey and Hα emission maps to correct for thermal RC emission. We compare azimuthally averaged radial profiles of the RC and FUV/mid-IR (MIR) based Σ{sub SFR} maps and study pixel-by-pixel correlations at fixed linear scales of 1.2 and 0.7 kpc. The ratio of the integrated SFRs from the RC emission to that of the FUV/MIR-based SF tracers is R{sub int}=0.78±0.38, consistent with the relation by Condon. We find a tight correlation between the radial profiles of the radio and FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} for the entire extent of the disk. The ratio R of the azimuthally averaged radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR} agrees with the integrated ratio and has only quasi-random fluctuations with galactocentric radius that are relatively small (25%). Pixel-by-pixel plots show a tight correlation in log-log diagrams of radio to FUV/MIR-based Σ{sub SFR}, with a typical standard deviation of a factor of two. Averaged over our sample we find (Σ{sub SFR}){sub RC}∝(Σ{sub SFR}){sub hyb}{sup 0.63±0.25}, implying that data points with high Σ{sub SFR} are relatively radio dim, whereas the reverse is true for low Σ{sub SFR}. We interpret this as a result of spectral aging of cosmic-ray electrons (CREs), which are diffusing away from the star formation sites where they are injected into the interstellar medium. This is supported by our finding that the radio spectral index is a second parameter in pixel-by-pixel plots: those data points dominated by young CREs are relatively radio dim, while those dominated by old CREs are slightly more RC bright than what would be expected from a linear extrapolation. We studied the ratio R of

  4. Growth rates of North Sea macroalgae in relation to temperature, irradiance and photoperiod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, M. D.; Lüning, K.

    1980-03-01

    Three eulittoral algae (Ulva lactuca, Porphyra umbilicalis, Chondrus crispus) and one sublittoral alga (Laminaria saccharina) from Helgoland (North Sea) were cultivated in a flow-through system at different temperatures, irradiances and daylengths. In regard to temperature there was a broad optimum at 10 15° C, except in P. umbilicalis, which grew fastest at 10 °C. A growth peak at this temperature was also found in four of 17 other North Sea macroalgae, for which the growth/temperature response was studied, whereas 13 of these species exhibited a growth optimum at 15 °C, or a broad optimum at 10 15 °C. Growth was light-saturated in U. lactuca, L. saccharina and C. crispus at photon flux densities above 70 µE m-2s-1, but in P. umbilicalis above 30 µE m-2s-1. Growth rate did not decrease notably in the eulittoral species after one week in relatively strong light (250 µE m-2s-1), but by about 50 % in the case of the sublittoral L. saccharina, as compared with growth under weak light conditions (30 µE m-2s-1). In contrast, chlorophyll content decreased in the sublittoral as well as in the eulittoral species, and the greatest change in pigment content occurred in the range 30 70 µE m-2s-1. Growth rate increased continuously up to photoperiods of 24 h light per day in L. saccharina and C. crispus, whereas daylength saturation occurred at photoperiods of more than 16 h light per day in U. lactuca and P. umbilicalis.

  5. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  6. The interplay between aerobic metabolism and antipredator performance: vigilance is related to recovery rate after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Shaun S.; Reid, Donald; Marras, Stefano; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    When attacked by a predator, fish respond with a sudden fast-start motion away from the threat. Although this anaerobically-powered swimming necessitates a recovery phase which is fueled aerobically, little is known about links between escape performance and aerobic traits such as aerobic scope (AS) or recovery time after exhaustive exercise. Slower recovery ability or a reduced AS could make some individuals less likely to engage in a fast-start response or display reduced performance. Conversely, increased vigilance in some individuals could permit faster responses to an attack but also increase energy demand and prolong recovery after anaerobic exercise. We examined how AS and the ability to recover from anaerobic exercise relates to differences in fast-start escape performance in juvenile golden gray mullet at different acclimation temperatures. Individuals were acclimated to either 18, 22, or 26°C, then measured for standard and maximal metabolic rates and AS using intermittent flow respirometry. Anaerobic capacity and the time taken to recover after exercise were also assessed. Each fish was also filmed during a simulated attack to determine response latency, maximum speed and acceleration, and turning rate displayed during the escape response. Across temperatures, individuals with shorter response latencies during a simulated attack are those with the longest recovery time after exhaustive anaerobic exercise. Because a short response latency implies high preparedness to escape, these results highlight the trade-off between the increased vigilance and metabolic demand, which leads to longer recovery times in fast reactors. These results improve our understanding of the intrinsic physiological traits that generate inter-individual variability in escape ability, and emphasize that a full appreciation of trade-offs associated with predator avoidance and energy balance must include energetic costs associated with vigilance and recovery from anaerobic exercise

  7. Effectiveness Ratings of Counselors by Coached Clients Related to Attractiveness-Fitness Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Rated normal-weight and overweight male and female counselors on perceived cognitive effectiveness, warmth and empathy, leadership qualities, and global counseling effectiveness. Although all counselors were rated as competent, both male and female counselors who were overweight were rated as less able in all areas tested. (Author)

  8. Peer Ratings of Aggression: Relation to Social Skills, Behavior Problems, and Friendships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Ruth; Vaughn, Sharon

    This study examined the aggressive behaviors of children through peer ratings to teacher ratings of problem behaviors and social skills and peer ratings of friendship. Peer data are valid measures and may be more accurate than teacher or self measures because peers are more likely to be present when aggression occurs. This study examines a peer…

  9. Protein expression and oxygen consumption rate of early postmortem mitochondria relate to meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Grabež, V; Kathri, M; Phung, V; Moe, K M; Slinde, E; Skaugen, M; Saarem, K; Egelandsdal, B

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of muscle fibers from bovine semimembranosus muscle of 41 animals was investigated 3 to 4 h and 3 wk postmortem. Significant relations (P < 0.05) were found between OCR measurements and Warner-Bratzler shear force measurement. Muscles with high mitochondrial OCR after 3 to 4 h and low nonmitochondrial oxygen consumption gave more tender meat. Tender (22.92 ± 2.2 N/cm2) and tough (72.98 ± 7.2 N/cm2) meat samples (4 samples each), separated based on their OCR measurements, were selected for proteomic studies using mitochondria isolated approximately 2.5 h postmortem. Twenty-six differently expressed proteins (P < 0.05) were identified in tender meat and 19 in tough meat. In tender meat, the more prevalent antioxidant and chaperon enzymes may reduce reactive oxygen species and prolong oxygen removal by the electron transport system (ETS). Glycolytic, Krebs cycle, and ETS enzymes were also more abundant in tender meat PMID:26020220

  10. Reasoning with base rates is routine, relatively effortless, and context dependent.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, Gordon; Thompson, Valerie A

    2012-06-01

    We tested models of base rate "neglect" using a novel paradigm. Participants (N = 62) judged the probability that a hypothetical person belonged to one of two categories (e.g., nurse/doctor) on the basis of either a personality description alone (NoBR) or the personality description and a base rate probability (BR). When base rates and descriptions were congruent, judgments in the BR condition were higher and more uniform than those in the NoBR condition. In contrast, base rates had a polarizing effect on judgments when they were incongruent with the descriptions, such that estimates were either consistent with the base rates or discrepant with them. These data suggest that the form of base rate use (i.e., whether base rates will be integrated with diagnostic information) is context dependent. In addition, judgments made under instructions to respond intuitively were influenced by the base rates and took the same length of time in the two conditions. These data suggest that the use of base rates is routine and effortless and that base rate "neglect" is really a mixture of two strategies, one that is informed primarily by the base rate and the other by the personality description. PMID:22427266

  11. The Relation Between Accretion Rate And Jet Power in X-Ray Luminous Elliptical Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steven W.; Dunn, R.J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; Reynolds, C.S.; /Maryland U.

    2006-03-10

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of nine nearby, X-ray luminous elliptical galaxies with good optical velocity dispersion measurements, we show that a tight correlation exists between the Bondi accretion rates calculated from the observed gas temperature and density profiles and estimated black hole masses, and the power emerging from these systems in relativistic jets. The jet powers, which are inferred from the energies and timescales required to inflate cavities observed in the surrounding X-ray emitting gas, can be related to the accretion rates using a power law model of the form log (P{sub Bondi}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) = A + B log (P{sub jet}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}), with A = 0.62 {+-} 0.15 and B = 0.77 {+-} 0.18. Our results show that a significant fraction of the energy associated with the rest mass of material entering the Bondi accretion radius (2.4{sub -0.7}{sup +1.0} per cent, for P{sub jet} = 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) eventually emerges in the relativistic jets. Our results have significant implications for studies of accretion, jet formation and galaxy formation. The observed tight correlation suggests that the Bondi formulae provide a reasonable description of the accretion process in these systems, despite the likely presence of magnetic pressure and angular momentum in the accreting gas. The similarity of the P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} values argues that a significant fraction of the matter entering the accretion radius flows down to regions close to the black holes, where the jets are presumably formed. The tight correlation between P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} also suggests that the accretion flows are approximately stable over timescales of a few million years. Our results show that the black hole ''engines'' at the hearts of large elliptical galaxies and groups feed back sufficient energy to stem cooling and star formation, leading naturally to the observed exponential cut off at the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function.

  12. Hospital injury rates in relation to socioeconomic status and working conditions

    PubMed Central

    d'Errico, A; Punnett, L; Cifuentes, M; Boyer, J; Tessler, J; Gore, R; Scollin, P

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To describe the risk of work injury by socioeconomic status (SES) in hospital workers, and to assess whether SES gradient in injury risk is explained by differences in psychosocial, ergonomic or organisational factors at work. Methods Workforce rosters and Occupational Safety and Health Administration injury logs for a 5‐year period were obtained from two hospitals in Massachusetts. Job titles were classified into five SES strata on the basis of educational requirements and responsibilities: administrators, professionals, semiprofessionals, skilled and semiskilled workers. 13 selected psychosocial, ergonomic and organisational exposures were assigned to the hospital jobs through the national O*NET database. Rates of injury were analysed as frequency records using the Poisson regression, with job title as the unit of analysis. The risk of injury was modelled using SES alone, each exposure variable alone and then each exposure variable in combination with SES. Results An overall annual injury rate of 7.2 per 100 full‐time workers was estimated for the two hospitals combined. All SES strata except professionals showed a significant excess risk of injury compared with the highest SES category (administrators); the risk was highest among semiskilled workers (RR 5.3, p<0.001), followed by nurses (RR 3.7, p<0.001), semiprofessionals (RR 2.9, p = 0.006) and skilled workers (RR 2.6, p = 0.01). The risk of injury was significantly associated with each exposure considered except pause frequency. When workplace exposures were introduced in the regression model together with SES, four remained significant predictors of the risk of injury (decision latitude, supervisor support, force exertion and temperature extremes), whereas the RR related to SES was strongly reduced in all strata, except professionals. Conclusions A strong gradient in the risk of injury by SES was reported in a sample population of hospital workers, which was greatly attenuated by

  13. Differences in Hispanic Access and Success Rates for Health-Related Studies in Texas Health-Related Institutions: A Multiyear, Statewide Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Shelley M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine Hispanic student access and success in health-related degrees by examining enrollment and graduation rates over a period of 13 years. Archival data were obtained from the THECB consisting of the number of Hispanic students enrolled and number of degrees awarded in the health-related degrees at…

  14. Tri-Axial Accelerometry and Heart Rate Telemetry: Relation and Agreement with Behavioral Observation in Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Philip W.; Beveridge, Sandy K.; Clocksin, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    The relation and agreement of tri-axial accelerometry and heart rate telemetry in measuring moderate to vigorous physical activity were examined in association to behavioral observation during 1st- and 2nd-grade physical education. In Study 1, physical activity measures of heart rate and behavioral observation were collected on 346 participants…

  15. Relations between Perceived Competence, Importance Ratings, and Self-Worth among African American School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Leslie K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how domain-specific importance ratings affect relations between perceived competence and self-worth among African American school-age children. Importance ratings have been found to affect the strength of the relationship between perceived competence and self-worth and have implications for…

  16. Do Small Rural High Schools Differ from Larger Schools in Relation to Absentee Rates in Physical Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagestad, Pal; Ranes, Vebjorn; Welde, Boye

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were twofold: (a) to investigate how school size affects absentee rates in physical education (PE) and (b) to examine the experiences of students and teachers at a small rural high school in relation to attendance in PE at their school. The absentee rates in PE among all students (N = 6928 students) in a county in Norway were…

  17. Hikurangi Margin: Geology, Flow Rates, Water-Rock Interaction and Relative Fluid Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The subaerial part of the Hikurangi Accretionary Prism (HAP) has nearly 330 sources of saline waters (2000-26000 mg/kg Cl), SO4-rich waters, CH4-rich gases and occasional oil seeps discharging from springs, mud volcanoes and gas vents from -37.5o to -41.3o latitude, 80-100 km from the subduction margin. Discharge areas, occupying <0.01 to 11 ha each, form a band about 500 km in length with widths ranging from 25 km in the south to 75-100 km in the north and centre. All fluid discharges are cold except for two hot springs in the central and N segments and another 6 on the W margin of the HAP. The total flow rate along the HAP is at least 10 x 108L/a, with nearly 50% contributed by cold discharges. Most fluid manifestations emerge along NE-trending faults and minor structures such as anticlines and synclines. However in the N, where fluids are also discharged along NW- and EW-trending structures within the allochton, manifestations are relatively more abundant (>150 sites), discharging nearly 45% of the annual surface fluid volume along the HAP. Fluid discharges in the HAP, based on chemical and isotopic fluid compositions, consist of subducted waters derived from clay water of hydration (<50%) and seawater that had interacted at varying degrees with organic-containing sedimentary rocks at depth at different temperatures. Discharges from the central segment exhibit the lowest degree of water-rock interaction and have the highest inferred subsurface temperatures (median: 110oC compared to S at 80oC and N at 90oC), suggesting (1) more recent influx of subducted waters and (2) more rapid upflow of fluids from depth, relative to the S and N. Fluids in the S segment exhibit the highest degree of water-rock interaction suggesting longer residence time at depth, or slower fluid movement to the surface due to thicker crust or greater fluid channel tortuosity. The high concentration of isotopic He in the central and N fluids can be due to deep and highly permeable faults that

  18. Catch rates relative to angler party size with implications for monitoring angler success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Angler catch rates often are used to monitor angler success, assess the need for additional management actions, and evaluate the effectiveness of management practices. Potential linkages between catch rate and angler party size were examined to assess how party size might affect the use of catch rate as an index of angler success in recreational fisheries. Data representing 22,355 completed interviews conducted at access points in lakes and reservoirs throughout Mississippi during 1987-2003 were analyzed. Total party catch was not proportional to total party effort; thus, catch rate decreased as party size increased. Depending on the taxa targeted, the average catch rate per angler decreased 40-50% between parties of one and parties of two, although subsequent decreases were less substantial. Because party size accounted for a considerable portion of the variability in catch rate over time and space, failure to remove this variability weakens the manager's ability to detect differences or changes in catch rates. Therefore, the use of catch rates to monitor fisheries may be inappropriate unless party size is taken into account. Party size may influence the angler's ability to catch fish through a variety of processes, including partitioning a limited number of catchable fish among members of a party and party composition. When catch rates are used to estimate total catch rather than to index angler success, party size is not a concern.

  19. Structure/property relations of aluminum under varying rates and stress states

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Matthew T; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Whittington, Wilburn R; Solanki, Kiran N

    2010-11-19

    In this work we analyze the plasticity, damage, and fracture characteristics of three different processed aluminum alloys (rolled 5083-H13, cast A356-T6, and extruded 6061-T6) under varying stress states (tension, compression, and torsion) and strain rates (0.001/, 1/s., and 1000/s). The stress state difference had more of a flow stress effect than the applied strain rates for those given in this study (0.001/sec up to 1000/sec). The stress state and strain rate also had a profound effect on the damage evolution of each aluminum alloy. Tension and torsional straining gave much greater damage nucleation rates than compression. Although the damage of all three alloys was found to be void nucleation dominated, the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys incurred void damage via micron scale particles where the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy incurred void damage from two scales, micron-scale particles and nanoscale precipitates. Having two length scales of particles that participated in the damage evolution made the 6061-T6 incur a strain rate sensitive damage rate that was different than the other two aluminum alloys. Under tension, as the strain rate increased, the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy's void nucleation rate decreased, but the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys void nucleation rate increased.

  20. A Systemic Review of Autologous Fat Grafting Survival Rate and Related Severe Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nan-Ze; Huang, Jiu-Zuo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhao, Ru; Bai, Ming; Long, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Clinical application of autologous fat grafting (AFG) is quickly expanding. Despite the widely acceptance, long-term survival rate (SR) of AFG remains a question not yet solved. Meanwhile, although rare, severe complications related to AFG including vision loss, stroke even death could be seen in the literature. Data Sources: A comprehensive research of PubMed database to June 2013 was performed according to guidelines of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Fat Graft Task Force Assessment Methodology. Articles were screened using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study Selection: Data collected included patient characteristics, surgical technique, donor site, recipient site, graft amount, and quantified measurement methods. Patient cohorts were pooled, and SR was calculated. All the severe complications were also summarized according to the different clinical characteristics. Results: Of 550 articles, 16 clinical articles and 10 animal studies met the inclusion criteria and provided quantified measurement methods. Totally, 596 patients were included. SR varied from 34% to 82% in breast and 30–83% in the facial area. Nude mice were applied to investigate human fat grafting SR (38.3–52.5% after 15 weeks). Rabbits were commonly used to study animal AFG SR (14.00–14.56% after 1-year). Totally, 21 severe complications were reported, including death (2), stroke (10), vision loss (11, 8 of which accompanied with stroke), sepsis (3), multiple abscess (1) and giant fat necrotic cyst (2). Ten of these complications happened within 10 years. Conclusions: There is no unified measurement method to evaluate fat graft SR until now and no clinical evidence to show better SR according to different donor and recipient cite. Body mass index change between pre- and postoperation may be the bias factor in evaluating fat SR. Fat embolisms of the ophthalmic artery and the middle cerebral artery are the most severe complication of AFG and still lack of

  1. A Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing relative sea level: from raw data to rates of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, N.; Kemp, A. C.; Horton, B. P.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a holistic Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing the continuous and dynamic evolution of relative sea-level (RSL) change with fully quantified uncertainty. The reconstruction is produced from biological (foraminifera) and geochemical (δ13C) sea-level indicators preserved in dated cores of salt-marsh sediment. Our model is comprised of three modules: (1) A Bayesian transfer function for the calibration of foraminifera into tidal elevation, which is flexible enough to formally accommodate additional proxies (in this case bulk-sediment δ13C values), (2) A chronology developed from an existing Bchron age-depth model, and (3) An existing errors-in-variables integrated Gaussian process (EIV-IGP) model for estimating rates of sea-level change. We illustrate our approach using a case study of Common Era sea-level variability from New Jersey. USA We develop a new Bayesian transfer function (B-TF), with and without the δ13C proxy and compare our results to those from a widely-used weighted-averaging transfer function (WA-TF). The formal incorporation of a second proxy into the B-TF model results in smaller vertical uncertainties and improved accuracy for reconstructed RSL. The vertical uncertainty from the multi-proxy B-TF is ∼ 28 % smaller on average compared to the WA-TF. When evaluated against historic tide-gauge measurements, the multi-proxy B-TF most accurately reconstructs the RSL changes observed in the instrumental record (MSE = 0.003 m2). The holistic model provides a single, unifying framework for reconstructing and analysing sea level through time. This approach is suitable for reconstructing other paleoenvironmental variables using biological proxies.

  2. Interannual variability of the atmospheric CO2 growth rate: relative contribution from precipitation and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zeng, N.; Wang, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interannual variability (IAV) in atmospheric CO2 growth rate (CGR) is closely connected with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. However, sensitivities of CGR to temperature and precipitation remain largely uncertain. This paper analyzed the relationship between Mauna Loa CGR and tropical land climatic elements. We find that Mauna Loa CGR lags precipitation by 4 months with a correlation coefficient of -0.63, leads temperature by 1 month (0.77), and correlates with soil moisture (-0.65) with zero lag. Additionally, precipitation and temperature are highly correlated (-0.66), with precipitation leading by 4-5 months. Regression analysis shows that sensitivities of Mauna Loa CGR to temperature and precipitation are 2.92 ± 0.20 Pg C yr-1 K-1 and -0.46 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1 100 mm-1, respectively. Unlike some recent suggestions, these empirical relationships favor neither temperature nor precipitation as the dominant factor of CGR IAV. We further analyzed seven terrestrial carbon cycle models, from the TRENDY project, to study the processes underlying CGR IAV. All models capture well the IAV of tropical land-atmosphere carbon flux (CFTA). Sensitivities of the ensemble mean CFTA to temperature and precipitation are 3.18 ± 0.11 Pg C yr-1 K-1 and -0.67 ± 0.04 Pg C yr-1 100 mm-1, close to Mauna Loa CGR. Importantly, the models consistently show the variability in net primary productivity (NPP) dominates CGR, rather than soil respiration. Because NPP is largely driven by precipitation, this suggests a key role of precipitation in CGR IAV despite the higher CGR correlation with temperature. Understanding the relative contribution of CO2 sensitivity to precipitation and temperature has important implications for future carbon-climate feedback using such "emergent constraint".

  3. Baroreflex sensitivity assessment and heart rate variability: relation to maneuver and technique.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Sosa, S; Gaitán-González, M J; González-Camarena, R; Yáñez-Suárez, Oscar

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, we examined two baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) issues that remain uncertain: the differences among diverse BRS assessment techniques and the association between BRS and vagal outflow. Accordingly, the electrocardiogram and non-invasive arterial pressure were recorded in 27 healthy subjects, during supine with and without controlled breathing, standing, exercise, and recovery conditions. Vagal outflow was estimated by heart rate variability indexes, whereas BRS was computed by alpha-coefficient, transfer function, complex demodulation in low- and high-frequency bands, and by sequence technique. Our results indicated that only supine maneuvers showed significantly greater BRS values over the high frequency than in the low-frequency band. For maneuvers at the same frequency region, supine conditions presented a larger number of significant differences among techniques. The plots between BRS and vagal measures depicted a funnel-shaped relationship with significant log-log correlations (r=0.880-0.958). Very short latencies between systolic pressure and RR interval series in high-frequency band and strong log-log correlations between frequency bands were found. Higher variability among different baroreflex measurements was associated with higher level of vagal outflow. Methodological assumptions for each technique seem affected by non-baroreflex variation sources, and a modified responsiveness of vagal motoneurons due to distinct stimulation levels for each maneuver was suggested. Thus, highest vagal outflows corresponded to greatest BRS values, with maximum respiratory effect for the high-frequency band values. In conclusion, BRS values and differences across the tested techniques were strongly related to the vagal outflow induced by the maneuvers. PMID:16086148

  4. A Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing relative sea level: from raw data to rates of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Niamh; Kemp, Andrew C.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Parnell, Andrew C.

    2016-02-01

    We present a Bayesian hierarchical model for reconstructing the continuous and dynamic evolution of relative sea-level (RSL) change with quantified uncertainty. The reconstruction is produced from biological (foraminifera) and geochemical (δ13C) sea-level indicators preserved in dated cores of salt-marsh sediment. Our model is comprised of three modules: (1) a new Bayesian transfer (B-TF) function for the calibration of biological indicators into tidal elevation, which is flexible enough to formally accommodate additional proxies; (2) an existing chronology developed using the Bchron age-depth model, and (3) an existing Errors-In-Variables integrated Gaussian process (EIV-IGP) model for estimating rates of sea-level change. Our approach is illustrated using a case study of Common Era sea-level variability from New Jersey, USA We develop a new B-TF using foraminifera, with and without the additional (δ13C) proxy and compare our results to those from a widely used weighted-averaging transfer function (WA-TF). The formal incorporation of a second proxy into the B-TF model results in smaller vertical uncertainties and improved accuracy for reconstructed RSL. The vertical uncertainty from the multi-proxy B-TF is ˜ 28 % smaller on average compared to the WA-TF. When evaluated against historic tide-gauge measurements, the multi-proxy B-TF most accurately reconstructs the RSL changes observed in the instrumental record (mean square error = 0.003 m2). The Bayesian hierarchical model provides a single, unifying framework for reconstructing and analyzing sea-level change through time. This approach is suitable for reconstructing other paleoenvironmental variables (e.g., temperature) using biological proxies.

  5. Relative impact of mate versus pollinator availability on pollen limitation and outcrossing rates in a mass-flowering species.

    PubMed

    Delmas, C E L; Escaravage, N; Cheptou, P-O; Charrier, O; Ruzafa, S; Winterton, P; Pornon, A

    2015-01-01

    Plant mating systems are driven by several pre-pollination factors, including pollinator availability, mate availability and reproductive traits. We investigated the relative contributions of these factors to pollination and to realized outcrossing rates in the patchily distributed mass-flowering shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum. We jointly monitored pollen limitation (comparing seed set from intact and pollen-supplemented flowers), reproductive traits (herkogamy, flower size and autofertility) and mating patterns (progeny array analysis) in 28 natural patches varying in the level of pollinator availability (flower visitation rates) and of mate availability (patch floral display estimated as the total number of inflorescences per patch). Our results showed that patch floral display was the strongest determinant of pollination and of the realized outcrossing rates in this mass-flowering species. We found an increase in pollen limitation and in outcrossing rates with increasing patch floral display. Reproductive traits were not significantly related to patch floral display, while autofertility was negatively correlated to outcrossing rates. These findings suggest that mate limitation, arising from high flower visitation rates in small plant patches, resulted in low pollen limitation and high selfing rates, while pollinator limitation, arising from low flower visitation rates in large plant patches, resulted in higher pollen limitation and outcrossing rates. Pollinator-mediated selfing and geitonogamy likely alleviates pollen limitation in the case of reduced mate availability, while reduced pollinator availability (intraspecific competition for pollinator services) may result in the maintenance of high outcrossing rates despite reduced seed production. PMID:24942604

  6. Are age-related trends in suicide rates associated with life expectancy and socio-economic factors?

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajit

    2009-01-01

    Background. A recent cross-national study reported that suicide rates increased, decreased or remained unchanged with increasing age in individual countries. The relationship between age-related trends in suicide rates and child mortality rates, life expectancy and socio-economic factors was examined. Methods. Countries with an increase, decrease and no change in suicide rates with increasing age were ascertained from an earlier study (Shah, 2007a, International Psychogeriatrics, 19, 1141), which analysed data from the World Health Organisation (WHO). The relationship between age-related trends in suicide rates and (i) child mortality rates, (ii) life expectancy and (iii) markers of socio-economic status (per capita gross national domestic product (GDP) and the Gini coeffcient) was examined using data from the WHO and the United Nations. Results. The main findings were: (i) child mortality rates were significantly lower in countries with an increase in suicide rates with increasing age when compared to countries without a change in suicide rates with increasing age in males; (ii) life expectancy was significantly higher in countries with an increase in suicide rates with increasing age when compared to countries without a change in suicide rates with increasing age in males; and (iii) the Gini coefficient was significantly lower in countries with an increase in suicide rates with increasing age when compared to countries without a change or a decline in suicide rates with increasing age in females. Conclusions. Potential explanations for these findings and the interaction of life expectancy and socio-economic factors with other factors that differentially influence suicide rates in different age and sex groups requires further examination. PMID:24946117

  7. Rate of Acquiring and Processing L2 Color Words in Relation to L1 Phonological Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Chieh-Fang

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of first language (L1) phonological awareness on the rate of learning new second language (L2) color terms and the rate of processing old color terms. Two groups of 37 children participated; they differed on L1 phonological awareness measured at Grade 3. At Grade 5, over multiple trials, the children learned new L2…

  8. Problem Behavior and Heart Rate Reactivity in Adopted Adolescents: Longitudinal and Concurrent Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bimmel, Nicole; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie; De Geus, Eco J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined resting heart rate and heart rate variability and reactivity to a stressful gambling task in adopted adolescents with aggressive, delinquent, or internalizing behavior problems and adopted adolescents without behavior problems (total N=151). Early-onset delinquent adolescents showed heart rate…

  9. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennie, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Kara; vanDellen, Michelle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding…

  10. Research on Mail Surveys: Response Rates and Methods in Relation to Population Group and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.; Green, Kathy

    The purpose of this review was to look for trends across time in response rates and variables studied for published mail surveys and to compare response rates and variables studied for different target populations. Studies were identified in databases in four fields: education, psychology, business and marketing, and sociology. A total of 225…

  11. Rate constants and temperature dependences for the reactions of hydroxyl radical with several halogenated methanes, ethanes, and propanes by relative rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, K.-J.; DeMore, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    Rate constants of 15 OH reactions with halogen-substituted alkanes, C1 to C3, were studied using a relative rate technique in the temperature range 283-403 K. Compounds studied were CHF2Cl (22), CHF2Br (22B), CH3F (41), CH2F2 (32), CHF3 (23), CHClFCCl2F (122a), CHCl2CF3 (123), CHClFCF3 (124), CH3CF3 (143a), CH3CH2F (161), CF3CHFCF3 (227ea), CF3CH2CF3 (236fa), CF3CHFCHF2 (236ea), and CHF2CF2CH2F (245ca). Using CH4, CH3CCl3, CF3CF2H, and C2H6 as primary reference standards (JPL 92-20 rate constants), absolute rate constants are derived. Results are in good agreement with previous experimental results for six of the compounds studied, including CHF2Cl, CHF2Br, CH2F2, CH3CF3, CHFClCFCl2, and CF3CHFCF3. For the remainder the relative rate constants are lower than those derived from experiments in which OH loss was used to measure the reaction rate. Comparisons of the derived Arrhenius A factors with previous literature transition-state calculations show order of magnitude agreement in most cases. However, the experimental A factors show a much closer proportionality to the number of H atoms in the molecule than is evident from the transition state calculations. For most of the compounds studied, an A factor of (8 +/- 3)E-13 cm(exp 3)/(molecule s) per C-H bond is observed. A new measurement of the ratio k(CH3CCl3)/k(CH4) is reported that is in good agreement with previous data.

  12. Rates of various reactions catalyzed by ATP synthase as related to the mechanism of ATP synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Berkich, D.A.; Williams, G.D.; Masiakos, P.T.; Smith, M.B.; Boyer, P.D.; LaNoue, K.F. )

    1991-01-05

    The forward and reverse rates of the overall reaction catalyzed by the ATP synthase in intact rat heart mitochondria, as measured with 32P, were compared with the rates of two partial steps, as measured with 18O. Such rates have been measured previously, but their relationship to one another has not been determined, nor have the partial reactions been measured in intact mitochondria. The partial steps measured were the rate of medium Pi formation from bound ATP (in state 4 this also equals the rate of medium Pi into bound ATP) and the rate of formation of bound ATP from bound Pi within the catalytic site. The rates of both partial reactions can be measured by 31P NMR analysis of the 18O distribution in Pi and ATP released from the enzyme during incubation of intact mitochondria with highly labeled (18O)Pi. Data were obtained in state 3 and 4 conditions with variation in substrate concentrations, temperature, and mitochondrial membrane electrical potential gradient (delta psi m). Although neither binding nor release of ATP is necessary for phosphate/H2O exchange, in state 4 the rate of incorporation of at least one water oxygen atom into phosphate is approximately twice the rate of the overall reaction rate under a variety of conditions. This can be explained if the release of Pi or ATP at one catalytic site does not occur, unless ATP or Pi is bound at another catalytic site. Such coupling provides strong support for the previously proposed alternating site mechanism. In state 3 slow reversal of ATP synthesis occurs within the mitochondrial matrix and can be detected as incorporation of water oxygen atoms into medium Pi even though medium (32P)ATP does not give rise to 32Pi in state 3. These data can be explained by lack of translocation of ATP from the medium to the mitochondrial matrix.

  13. Relative influence of lapse rate and water vapor on the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.

    1995-03-01

    Observational data are employed in a radiative transfer model to simulate the mean variation in normalized greenhouse effect (NGE) between January and July. This is performed at a variety of locations, and the mean local rate of change in NGE with surface temperature is determined. The result is 1.5 times larger than the variation of NGE with surface temperature obtained by spatially correlating the aggregated data. This disagreement is ascribed to systematic differences between the two approaches and is interpreted as indicating the significant role that large-scale circulations as well as surface temperatures have on determining local thermal and humidity structures. The separate effects of water vapor and lapse rate variations are estimated, by simulating the January-July changes in NGE with each process in turn held constant: beyond the tropics the lapse rate feedback is found to dominate over the water vapor feedback, particularly over land; in the inter-tropics, lapse rate variations account for about a third of the change in greenhouse trapping, contributing substantially to the `super-greenhouse effect.` Utilizing a radiative-convective model, the possible effects on climate change of both lapse rate changes and water vapor feedback are compared: a global mean model cliamte is perturbed by a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide and equilibrium surface temperatures obtained for a variety of lapse rates. If, under conditions of climate change, the global mean lapse rate varies with surface temperature in the same manner as in the present-day mean seasonal cycle (increasing the lapse rate magnitude by 6%), then the lapse rate feedback amplifies the modeled water vapor feedback by 40%; conversely, a 12% reduction in the magnitude of the lapse rate completely nullifies the water vapor feedback.

  14. Components of the cannabinoid system in the dorsal periaqueductal gray are related to resting heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Seagard, Jeanne L.; Hopp, Francis A.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether variations in endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) are associated with baseline autonomic nerve activity, heart rate, and blood pressure. Blood pressure was recorded telemetrically in rats, and heart rate and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were determined. Natural variations from animal to animal provided a range of baseline values for analysis. Transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components in the dPAG were analyzed, and endocannabinoid content and catabolic enzyme activity were measured. Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased anandamide content and with decreased activity of the anandamide-hydrolyzing enzyme and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and it was negatively correlated with transcript levels of both FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a catabolic enzyme for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Autonomic tone and heart rate, but not blood pressure, were correlated to levels of FAAH mRNA. In accordance with these data, exogenous anandamide in the dPAG of anesthetized rats increased heart rate. These data indicate that in the dPAG, anandamide, a FAAH-regulated lipid, contributes to regulation of baseline heart rate through influences on autonomic outflow. PMID:27280429

  15. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  16. Predicting self-rated mental and physical health: the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Mitchell J.; Kim, Hyunji; Matthews, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4–6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures. PMID:26441786

  17. Age-adjustment and related epidemiology rates in education and research.

    PubMed

    Baker, John D; Kruckman, Laurence; George, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    A quick review of introductory textbooks reveals that while gerontology authors and instructors introduce some aspect of demography and epidemiology data, there is limited focus on age adjustment or other important epidemiology rates. The goal of this paper is to reintroduce a variety of basic epidemiology strategies such as incidence, prevalence, crude, age-specific and age-adjustment rates into the gerontology classroom. Background information and formulas for each rate, as well as examples of how they can be applied are provided. A recent change, encouraged by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, from a 1940 to a 2000 "standard million population" for ageadjusted rates, is reviewed. Finally, a teaching module with answers is provided for use in the gerontology classroom. PMID:16873207

  18. Changes in mallard breeding populations in relation to production and harvest rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.E.; Sauer, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    We used breeding population, band recovery, and hunter harvest data to examine whether rates of productivity and harvest correlated with annual changes in mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) breeding populations. Percent change in the size of the breeding population correlated positively with an index of production rate and negatively with an index of harvest rate (R2 = 0.37, F = 8.34, P < 0.005). Average harvest rate indices did not differ (W = 126, P < 0.32) between periods of increasing (1961-69) and decreasing (1970-85) populations. Indices to production tended to be lower (W = 143, P < 0.08) during 1970-85 (.hivin.x = 0.064) compared to 1961-69 (.hivin.x = 1.096).

  19. Relation between gastric emptying rate and energy intake in children compared with adults.

    PubMed

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Geypens, B J; Hiele, M I; Rutgeerts, P J

    1995-02-01

    Measurement of gastric emptying rate of solids in children is difficult because the available methods are either invasive or induce a substantial radiation burden. In this study the newly developed 13C octanoic acid breath test was used to examine the gastric emptying rate of solids and milk in healthy children and to compare gastric emptying in children and adults. Fifteen healthy children and three groups of nine healthy adults were studied, using three different test meals labelled with 50 mg of 13C octanoic acid: a low caloric pancake (150 kcal), a high caloric pancake (250 kcal), and 210 ml of milk (134 kcal). Breath samples were taken before and at regular intervals after ingestion of the test meal, and analysed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The gastric emptying parameters were derived from the 13CO2 excretion curves by non-linear regression analysis. No significant difference was found between children and adults in the emptying rate of the low caloric solid test meal. In children as well as in adults, increasing the energy content of the solid meal resulted in a significantly slower emptying rate. The milk test meal, however, was emptied at a faster rate in adults and at slower rate in children compared with the low caloric solid test meal. Moreover, the emptying rate of milk in children was significantly slower than in adults. In conclusion, a similar gastric emptying rate of solids but a slower emptying of full cream milk was shown in children of school age compared with adults, using the non-radioactive 13C octanoic acid breath test. PMID:7883214

  20. Relation between gastric emptying rate and energy intake in children compared with adults.

    PubMed Central

    Maes, B D; Ghoos, Y F; Geypens, B J; Hiele, M I; Rutgeerts, P J

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of gastric emptying rate of solids in children is difficult because the available methods are either invasive or induce a substantial radiation burden. In this study the newly developed 13C octanoic acid breath test was used to examine the gastric emptying rate of solids and milk in healthy children and to compare gastric emptying in children and adults. Fifteen healthy children and three groups of nine healthy adults were studied, using three different test meals labelled with 50 mg of 13C octanoic acid: a low caloric pancake (150 kcal), a high caloric pancake (250 kcal), and 210 ml of milk (134 kcal). Breath samples were taken before and at regular intervals after ingestion of the test meal, and analysed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The gastric emptying parameters were derived from the 13CO2 excretion curves by non-linear regression analysis. No significant difference was found between children and adults in the emptying rate of the low caloric solid test meal. In children as well as in adults, increasing the energy content of the solid meal resulted in a significantly slower emptying rate. The milk test meal, however, was emptied at a faster rate in adults and at slower rate in children compared with the low caloric solid test meal. Moreover, the emptying rate of milk in children was significantly slower than in adults. In conclusion, a similar gastric emptying rate of solids but a slower emptying of full cream milk was shown in children of school age compared with adults, using the non-radioactive 13C octanoic acid breath test. PMID:7883214

  1. Relation between clinical and mammographic diagnosis of breast problems and the cancer/biopsy rate

    PubMed Central

    Sterns, Ernest E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the sensitivity of mammographic and clinical assessment of breast problems, independent of one another, on the ratio of cancers found to biopsies performed (cancer/biopsy rate). Design A review of diagnoses from prospectively recorded and independently assessed clinical and mammographic examinations. Setting The breast clinic in a university-affiliated hospital. Patients Patients were considered in two age groups — under 50 years and 50 years and over; 1251 patients underwent breast biopsy between September 1976 and November 1994 after clinical assessment and mammography. Main Outcome Measure The cancer diagnosis rate found on biopsy as a result of clinical and mammographic findings. Results In both age groups, mammography was significantly (p < 0.001) more sensitive than clinical assessment in cancer diagnosis but gave a significantly (p < 0.0001) higher rate of false-positive results. The cancer diagnosis rate was highest when lesions were assessed both clinically and mammographically as malignant but was of diagnostic benefit only to women in the under-50-year age group. The cancer rate was 12% when both assessments indicated a benign process and only 2% in women under age 50 years with clinically benign conditions who did not have mammography. Twenty-one percent of the biopsies were obtained in women with clinically normal breasts because of a mammographic abnormality and 17% of all the cancers found were clinically occult. Conclusions The sensitivity of clinical assessment, particularly in premenopausal women is low and the false-positive mammography rate is high, but the cancer/biopsy rate is sufficiently high to warrant breast biopsy if either diagnostic modality suggests a cancer. When neither modality suggests cancer, the cancer/biopsy rate is 12% in both age groups. PMID:8769923

  2. Heart rate in Palaemon northropi (Rankin) in relation to acute changes in thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, C.J.; Wingard, C.; Kitakis, F. )

    1991-03-15

    The Glass Shrimp (Palaemon northropi), common to shallow water/tide pool environs of Atlantic waters, was examined in a series of experiments whereby the temperature-dependence of steady-state heart rate was assessed after acute, controlled changed in their thermal environment. Collection site, tide pool variations averaged 17.2-31.6C/24 hr. period. Accordingly, steady-state heart rates were determined at 5, 15, 25, and 30C by using both timed, optical recording and impedance methods. Mean values obtained were 88bpm (5C), 181 bpm(15C), 236bpm(25C), and 52bpm(30C). Calculated Q{sub 10} determinations ranged from the limits of 1.3 to 2.1 excluding the highest temperature state used. Specimens used averaged 0.62gm wet body weight, and no significant difference between males and gravid females was found. Additionally, the impedance method employed allowed for more precise rate determinations at high heart rates: at the lower heart rates, there was no difference between optically-timed vs. impedance method. Measurement at 30C characteristically showed a severe depression of heart rate, and high mortality after determinations. It is concluded that in situ field survival of Palaemon northropi may involve a time-dependence and/or other mechanisms whereby upper environmental temperatures may be abated.

  3. On the relation between Seyfert 2 accretion rate and environment at z < 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, Georgina V.; Gurovich, Sebastián; Díaz Tello, Jorge; Söchting, Ilona K.; Lambas, Diego G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse different properties of the small-scale environment of Seyfert 2 for two samples selected according to the accretion rate parameter , R, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 7 survey. We compare the results with two control samples of non-active galaxies that cover the same redshift range, luminosity, colours, morphology, age and stellar mass content. Our study shows that both high and low accretion rate subsamples reside in bluer and lower density environments than the control samples. However, we find that this difference is at least two times stronger for the low accretion rate Seyferts. In the vicinity of Seyfert 2, red galaxies have systematically lower values of stellar mass as compared with corresponding control samples. The lower values of stellar mass for red neighbours is more significant at higher density environments and it is more evident for low accretion rate Seyfert. We also find that this effect is independent of the host's stellar mass. Our results are consistent with a scenario where active galactic nucleus occurrence is higher in lower/medium density environments with a higher merger rate and a lack of a dense intergalactic medium (that can strip gas from these systems) that provide suitable conditions for the central black hole feeding. We find this particularly evident for the low accretion rate Seyferts that could compensate through the intergalactic medium the lack of gas of their hosts.

  4. Plant and soil natural abundance delta (15)N: indicators of relative rates of nitrogen cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Templer, Pamela H; Arthur, Mary A; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C

    2007-08-01

    Watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, New York, receive among the highest rates of nitrogen (N) deposition in the northeastern United States and are beginning to show signs of N saturation. Despite similar amounts of N deposition across watersheds within the Catskill Mountains, rates of soil N cycling and N retention vary significantly among stands of different tree species. We examined the potential use of delta (15)N of plants and soils as an indicator of relative forest soil N cycling rates. We analyzed the delta (15)N of foliage, litterfall, bole wood, surface litter layer, fine roots and organic soil from single-species stands of American beech (Fagus grandifolia), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). Fine root and organic soil delta (15)N values were highest within sugar maple stands, which correlated significantly with higher rates of net mineralization and nitrification. Results from this study suggest that fine root and organic soil delta (15)N can be used as an indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling. Although not statistically significant, delta (15)N was highest within foliage, wood and litterfall of beech stands, a tree species associated with intermediate levels of soil N cycling rates and forest N retention. Our results show that belowground delta (15)N values are a better indicator of relative rates of soil N cycling than are aboveground delta (15)N values. PMID:17479293

  5. GAS REGULATION OF GALAXIES: THE EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, THE METALLICITY-MASS-STAR-FORMATION RATE RELATION, AND THE STELLAR CONTENT OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Pipino, Antonio; Peng Yingjie; Renzini, Alvio

    2013-08-01

    A very simple physical model of galaxies is one in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir with mass loss scaling with the star-formation rate (SFR). This model links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population: (1) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate (sSFR) relative to the growth of halos, (2) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (3) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of halos. The gas regulator is defined by the gas consumption timescale ({epsilon}{sup -1}) and the mass loading {lambda} of the wind outflow {lambda}{center_dot}SFR. The simplest regulator, in which {epsilon} and {lambda} are constant, sets the sSFR equal to exactly the specific accretion rate of the galaxy; more realistic situations lead to an sSFR that is perturbed from this precise relation. Because the gas consumption timescale is shorter than the timescale on which the system evolves, the metallicity Z is set primarily by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The metallicity of the gas reservoir depends on {epsilon}, {lambda}, and sSFR, and the regulator system therefore naturally produces a Z(m{sub star}, SFR) relation if {epsilon} and {lambda} depend on the stellar mass m{sub star}. Furthermore, this relation will be the same at all epochs unless the parameters {epsilon} and {lambda} themselves change with time. A so-called fundamental metallicity relation is naturally produced by these conditions. The overall mass-metallicity relation Z(m{sub star}) directly provides the fraction f{sub star}(m{sub star}) of incoming baryons that are being transformed into stars. The observed Z(m{sub star}) relation of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies implies a strong dependence of stellar mass on halo mass that reconciles the different faint-end slopes of the stellar and halo mass

  6. Relation between the location of elements in the periodic table and various organ-uptake rates.

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Ando, I; Hiraki, T; Hisada, K

    1989-01-01

    Fifty four elements and 65 radioactive compounds were examined to determine the organ uptake rates for rats 3, 24 and 48 h after i.v. injection of these compounds. They were prepared as carrier free nuclides, or containing a small amount of stable nuclide. Generally speaking, behaviors of K, Rb, Cs and Tl in all the organs were very similar to one another, but they differed from that of Na. Bivalent hard acids were avidly taken up into bone; therefore, uptake rates in soft tissues were very small. Hard acids of tri-, quadri- and pentavalence which were taken up into the soft tissue organs decreased more slowly from these organs than other ions. Soft acids such as Hg2+ were bound very firmly to the component in the kidney. Anions (with few exceptions), GeCl4 and SbCl3 were rapidly excreted in urine, so that the uptake rates in organs were low. PMID:2715001

  7. Age-related disappearance of Mayer-like heart rate waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarisch, W. R.; Ferguson, J. J.; Shannon, R. P.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of age on the principal spectral components of heart rate obtained immediately after passive upright tilt was investigated in human subjects who underwent a 60-deg tilt over 9 sec. Two groups were examined, the first of which consisting of healthy male subjects aged 22-26 years, while the second was comprised of subjects aged 65-84 years on no medication; radiograms were recorded continuously beginning just prior to tilt until 3 min posttilt. The results of spectral analysis showed that elderly subjects did not exhibit the Mayer-like heart rate waves (the 0.07-0.09 Hz oscillations) that were present in the spectra of young subjects immediately after passive upright tilt. The findings are consistent with the concept of a 'dysautonomia of aging'. It is suggested that postural stress testing with spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations may provide a useful way of assessing physiologic vs chronologic age.

  8. Self-Rated Depression Severity Relative to Clinician-Rated Depression Severity: Trait Stability and Potential Role in Familial Transmission of Suicidal Behavior.

    PubMed

    John Mann, J; Ellis, Steven P; Currier, Dianne; Zelazny, Jamie; Birmaher, Boris; Oquendo, Maria A; Kolko, David J; Stanley, Barbara; Melhem, Nadine; Burke, Ainsley K; Brent, David A

    2016-07-01

    Self-rated depression and hopelessness severity are predictors of suicide attempt in major depression. This study evaluated whether: (1) greater self-rated distress relative to severity of clinician-rated depression is a trait; (2) that trait is familial; and (3) that trait is linked to familial transmission of suicidal behavior. A total of 285 mood disorder probands and 457 offspring were assessed twice, at least 1 year apart. Family and subject intra-class correlations for self-report depression and hopelessness, controlling for clinician-rated depression severity, were computed. Mixed general linear models determined offspring-proband correlations. Within-individual intra-class correlation (ICC) for depression-hopelessness was 37.8% (bootstrap 95% CI: 31.0-46.3%). Parent-offspring ICC was 10.7% (bootstrap 95% CI: 3.5-17.8%). Suicide attempt concordant parent-offspring correlation for subjective depression was positive, but negative for attempter parent and nonattempter offspring (p = .0213 for slope interaction). Pessimism was greater in proband or offspring attempters than proband or offspring nonattempters (p < .05). Self-reported hopelessness is partly trait-dependent, and there is modest familial transmission of self-reported depression linked to suicidal behavior that may partly explain familial transmission of suicidal behavior. PMID:27046009

  9. The Influence of Relatives on the Efficiency and Error Rate of Familial Searching

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfs, Rori V.; Murphy, Erin; Song, Yun S.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of adopting the criteria used by the state of California, as described by Myers et al. (2011), for conducting familial searches. We carried out a simulation study of randomly generated profiles of related and unrelated individuals with 13-locus CODIS genotypes and YFiler® Y-chromosome haplotypes, on which the Myers protocol for relative identification was carried out. For Y-chromosome sharing first degree relatives, the Myers protocol has a high probability () of identifying their relationship. For unrelated individuals, there is a low probability that an unrelated person in the database will be identified as a first-degree relative. For more distant Y-haplotype sharing relatives (half-siblings, first cousins, half-first cousins or second cousins) there is a substantial probability that the more distant relative will be incorrectly identified as a first-degree relative. For example, there is a probability that a first cousin will be identified as a full sibling, with the probability depending on the population background. Although the California familial search policy is likely to identify a first degree relative if his profile is in the database, and it poses little risk of falsely identifying an unrelated individual in a database as a first-degree relative, there is a substantial risk of falsely identifying a more distant Y-haplotype sharing relative in the database as a first-degree relative, with the consequence that their immediate family may become the target for further investigation. This risk falls disproportionately on those ethnic groups that are currently overrepresented in state and federal databases. PMID:23967076

  10. The Effects of a Local Negative Feedback Function between Choice and Relative Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas; Marr, M. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Four pigeons were trained on two-key concurrent variable-interval schedules with no changeover delay. In Phase 1, relative reinforcers on the two alternatives were varied over five conditions from 0.1 to 0.9. In Phases 2 and 3, we instituted a molar feedback function between relative choice in an interreinforcer interval and the probability of…

  11. Relative Reinforcer Rates and Magnitudes Do Not Control Concurrent Choice Independently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliffe, Douglas; Davison, Michael; Landon, Jason

    2008-01-01

    One assumption of the matching approach to choice is that different independent variables control choice independently of each other. We tested this assumption for reinforcer rate and magnitude in an extensive parametric experiment. Five pigeons responded for food reinforcement on switching-key concurrent variable-interval variable-interval…

  12. Germination rate of Phyllospadix japonicus seeds relative to storage methods and periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Im; Lee, Kun-Seop; Son, Min Ho

    2014-03-01

    To determine the optimal storage method and longest possible storage period of Phyllospadix japonicus seeds, we examined post-storage germination rates using different storage methods and periods for P. japonicus seeds harvested in Korean coastal waters. P. japonicus seeds are classified as recalcitrant seeds with an average moisture content of 45.4%. Germination rates of P. japonicus seeds stored in seawater at 4 °C, seawater at room temperature with air supply, and an aquarium with continuous seawater circulation ranged from 35.0% to 43.5%, whereas seeds stored in seawater at 30°C, a refrigerator at -20°C, and a desiccator at room temperature did not germinate. Seeds stored at 4°C maintained germination rates of 72.5˜73.0% until 30 days of storage, but showed rapidly decreasing germination rates after 60 days and no germination after 180 days. Since few studies have investigated seed storage of P. japonicus, these results will serve as useful data for seed-based P. japonicus habitat restoration.

  13. RN Students' Ratings and Opinions Related to the Importance of Certain Clinical Teacher Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viverais-Dresler, Gloria; Kutschke, Myrtle

    2001-01-01

    Registered nurses in a bachelor's degree program (n=56) rated the following as important clinical teacher behaviors: evaluation, professional competence, interpersonal relationship, and teaching ability. They valued teachers who were approachable, fair, open, and honest and who fostered mutual respect. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  14. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity:…

  15. Self- Versus Parent-Ratings of Industriousness, Affect, and Life Satisfaction in Relation to Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Gerard J.; Davies, Janet E.; MacCann, Carolyn; Roberts, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents consult with schools on how to help their children succeed, but schools rarely consult with parents, even though most parents have considerable expertise concerning their children's thoughts, feelings, and abilities. Aims: This study compares the prediction of academic achievement from self- and parent-ratings of feelings…

  16. Relative Reaction Rates of Sulfamic Acid and Hydroxylamine with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes a study of comparative reaction rates where the reductant is in excess, as in the 1B bank in the Purex process. The results of this work apply to planned plant tests to partially substitute HAN for the ferrous sulfamate reductant in the Purex 1B bank.

  17. Heart rate variability in relation to stress in the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Vézina-Audette, Raphaël; Herry, Christophe; Burns, Patrick; Frasch, Martin; Chave, Emmanuelle; Theoret, Christine

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a safe, reliable, and accessible means to measure heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) and evaluates the use of HRV as a physiological correlate of stress in the Asian elephant. A probabilistic model indicates that HRV measurements may adequately distinguish between stressed and non-stressed elephants. PMID:26933266

  18. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  19. RELATIVE RATE CONSTANTS OF CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE LIST PESTICIDES WITH HYDROXYL RADICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to establish the rate constants for the reactions of selected pesticides listed on the US EPA Contaminant Candidate List, with UV and hydroxyl radicals (·OH). Batch experiments were conducted in phosphate buffered solution at pH 7. All pestici...

  20. Parasite infection rates of impala (Aepyceros melampus) in fenced game reserves in relation to reserve characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.

    2004-01-01

    Under certain conditions reserves can pose a threat to wildlife conservation by increasing the transmission of parasites and pathogens. In this study, I investigated associations between reserve characteristics including area, density and species richness and parasite infection rates in impala (Aepyceros melampus). Using coprological methods to measure gastrointestinal parasitism rates of impala inhabiting five fully or partially fenced game reserves in central Kenya, I found that bovid species richness was correlated with parasite taxa richness across reserves, and that prevalence rates of multi-host strongyle nematodes were higher in reserves with more species. In addition, reserve size was also implicated as a potential predictor of infection risk. Overall, these results suggest that wildlife inhabiting highly diverse and small reserves may suffer from higher than normal rates of infection. Given the potential debilitating effects increases in parasitism can have on wildlife, these results underscore the importance of considering parasite transmission dynamics in the management of small, fenced protected areas. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heart rate variability in relation to stress in the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Vézina-Audette, Raphaël; Herry, Christophe; Burns, Patrick; Frasch, Martin; Chave, Emmanuelle; Theoret, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a safe, reliable, and accessible means to measure heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) and evaluates the use of HRV as a physiological correlate of stress in the Asian elephant. A probabilistic model indicates that HRV measurements may adequately distinguish between stressed and non-stressed elephants. PMID:26933266

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes related to daughter pregnancy rate in Holstein cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT: Previously, a candidate gene approach identified 40 SNPs associated with daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) in dairy bulls. We evaluated 39 of these SNPs for relationship to DPR in a separate population of Holstein cows grouped on their predicted transmitting ability for DPR: <= -1 (n=1266) a...

  3. Relative User Ratings of MMPI-2 Computer-Based Test Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John E.; Weed, Nathan C.

    2004-01-01

    There are eight commercially available computer-based test interpretations (CBTIs) for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), of which few have been empirically evaluated. Prospective users of these programs have little scientific data to guide choice of a program. This study compared ratings of these eight CBTIs. Test users…

  4. Dynamics of cryogen deposition relative to heat extraction rate during cryogen spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Majaron, Boris; Aguilar, Guillermo; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-05-01

    Goal is to investigate how delivery nozzle design influences the cooling rate of cryogen spray as used in skin laser treatments. Cryogen was sprayed through nozzles that consist of metal tubes with either a narrow or wide diameter and two different lengths. Fast-flashlamp photography showed that the wide nozzles, in particular the long wide one, produced a cryogen jet (very small spray cone angle) rather than a spray (cone angles of about 15 degrees or higher) and appeared to atomize the cryogen less finely than the narrow nozzles. We measured the cooling rate by spraying some cryogen on an epoxy-block with thermocouples embedded. The heat extraction rate of the wide nozzles was higher than that of the narrow nozzles. The results suggest that finely atomized droplets produced by the narrow nozzles do not have enough kinetic energy to break through a layer of liquid cryogen accumulated on the object, which may act as a thermal barrier and, thus, slow down heat extraction. Presumably, larger droplets or non- broken jets ensure a more violent impact on this layer and therefore ensure an enhanced thermal contact. The margin of error for the heat extraction estimate is analyzed when using the epoxy-block. We introduce a complementary method for estimating heat extraction rate of cryogen sprays.

  5. Age-Adjustment and Related Epidemiology Rates in Education and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, John D.; Kruckman, Laurence; George, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    A quick review of introductory textbooks reveals that while gerontology authors and instructors introduce some aspect of demography and epidemiology data, there is limited focus on age adjustment or other important epidemiology rates. The goal of this paper is to reintroduce a variety of basic epidemiology strategies such as incidence, prevalence,…

  6. Situational bandwidth and the criterion-related validity of assessment center ratings: is cross-exercise convergence always desirable?

    PubMed

    Speer, Andrew B; Christiansen, Neil D; Goffin, Richard D; Goff, Maynard

    2014-03-01

    This research examines the relationship between the construct and criterion-related validity of assessment centers (ACs) based on how convergence of dimension ratings across AC exercises affects their ability to predict managerial performance. According to traditional multitrait-multimethod perspective, a high degree of convergence represents more reliable measurement and has the potential for better validity. In contrast, the concept of situational bandwidth suggests that behavior assessed under a dissimilar set of circumstances should result in a more comprehensive assessment of a candidate's tendencies even though ratings are less likely to show high convergence. To test these opposing viewpoints, data from 3 operational ACs were obtained along with experts' evaluations of exercise characteristics and supervisors' ratings of candidates' managerial performance. Across the 3 samples, AC ratings taken from exercises with dissimilar demands had higher estimates of criterion-related validity than ratings taken from similar exercises, even though the same dimension-different exercise correlations were substantially higher between similar exercises. Composites of ratings high in convergence did not emerge as better predictors of managerial performance, and validity particularly suffered when derived from ratings that converged as a result of exercises with similar demands. Implications for AC design are discussed. PMID:24364738

  7. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN STELLAR MASS, STAR FORMATION RATE, AND GAS METALLICITY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Yuu

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the relation between stellar mass (M{sub *}), star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity (Z) of galaxies, the so-called fundamental metallicity relation, in the galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We separate the galaxies into narrow redshift bins and compare the relation at different redshifts and find statistically significant (>99%) evolution. We test various observational effects that might cause seeming Z evolution and find it difficult to explain the evolution of the relation only by the observational effects. In the current sample of low-redshift galaxies, galaxies with different M{sub *} and SFR are sampled from different redshifts, and there is degeneracy between M{sub *}/SFR and redshift. Hence, it is not straightforward to distinguish a relation between Z and SFR from a relation between Z and redshift. The separation of the intrinsic relation from the redshift evolution effect is a crucial issue in the understanding of the evolution of galaxies.

  8. Simple model relating recombination rates and non-proportional light yield in scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Bizarri, Gregory; Singh, Jai; Vasil'ev, Andrey N.; Williams, Richard T.

    2008-09-24

    We present a phenomenological approach to derive an approximate expression for the local light yield along a track as a function of the rate constants of different kinetic orders of radiative and quenching processes for excitons and electron-hole pairs excited by an incident {gamma}-ray in a scintillating crystal. For excitons, the radiative and quenching processes considered are linear and binary, and for electron-hole pairs a ternary (Auger type) quenching process is also taken into account. The local light yield (Y{sub L}) in photons per MeV is plotted as a function of the deposited energy, -dE/dx (keV/cm) at any point x along the track length. This model formulation achieves a certain simplicity by using two coupled rate equations. We discuss the approximations that are involved. There are a sufficient number of parameters in this model to fit local light yield profiles needed for qualitative comparison with experiment.

  9. Understanding and producing the reduced relative construction: Evidence from ratings, editing and corpora.

    PubMed

    Hare, Mary; Tanenhaus, Michael K; McRae, Ken

    2007-04-01

    Tworating studies demonstrate that English speakers willingly produce reduced relatives with internal cause verbs (e.g., Whisky fermented in oak barrels can have a woody taste), and judge their acceptability based on factors known to influence ambiguity resolution, rather than on the internal/external cause distinction. Regression analyses demonstrate that frequency of passive usage predicts reduced relative frequency in corpora, but internal/external cause status does not. The authors conclude that reduced relatives with internal cause verbs are rare because few of these verbs occur in the passive. This contrasts with the claim in McKoon and Ratcliff (McKoon, G., & Ratcliff, R. (2003). Meaning through syntax: Language comprehension and the reduced relative clause construction. Psychological Review, 110, 490-525) that reduced relatives like The horse raced past the barn fell are rare and, when they occur, incomprehensible, because the meaning of the reduced relative construction prohibits the use of a verb with an internal cause event template. PMID:22162904

  10. Understanding and producing the reduced relative construction: Evidence from ratings, editing and corpora

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Mary; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; McRae, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Tworating studies demonstrate that English speakers willingly produce reduced relatives with internal cause verbs (e.g., Whisky fermented in oak barrels can have a woody taste), and judge their acceptability based on factors known to influence ambiguity resolution, rather than on the internal/external cause distinction. Regression analyses demonstrate that frequency of passive usage predicts reduced relative frequency in corpora, but internal/external cause status does not. The authors conclude that reduced relatives with internal cause verbs are rare because few of these verbs occur in the passive. This contrasts with the claim in McKoon and Ratcliff (McKoon, G., & Ratcliff, R. (2003). Meaning through syntax: Language comprehension and the reduced relative clause construction. Psychological Review, 110, 490–525) that reduced relatives like The horse raced past the barn fell are rare and, when they occur, incomprehensible, because the meaning of the reduced relative construction prohibits the use of a verb with an internal cause event template. PMID:22162904

  11. Inequality of Size and Size Increment in Pinus banksiana in Relation to Stand Dynamics and Annual Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Metsaranta, Juha M.; Lieffers, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in size inequality in tree populations are often attributed to changes in the mode of competition over time. The mode of competition may also fluctuate annually in response to variation in growing conditions. Factors causing growth rate to vary can also influence competition processes, and thus influence how size hierarchies develop. Methods Detailed data obtained by tree-ring reconstruction were used to study annual changes in size and size increment inequality in several even-aged, fire-origin jack pine (Pinus banksiana) stands in the boreal shield and boreal plains ecozones in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, by using the Gini and Lorenz asymmetry coefficients. Key Results The inequality of size was related to variables reflecting long-term stand dynamics (e.g. stand density, mean tree size and average competition, as quantified using a distance-weighted absolute size index). The inequality of size increment was greater and more variable than the inequality of size. Inequality of size increment was significantly related to annual growth rate at the stand level, and was higher when growth rate was low. Inequality of size increment was usually due primarily to large numbers of trees with low growth rates, except during years with low growth rate when it was often due to small numbers of trees with high growth rates. The amount of competition to which individual trees were subject was not strongly related to the inequality of size increment. Conclusions Differences in growth rate among trees during years of poor growth may form the basis for development of size hierarchies on which asymmetric competition can act. A complete understanding of the dynamics of these forests requires further evaluation of the way in which factors that influence variation in annual growth rate also affect the mode of competition and the development of size hierarchies. PMID:18089583

  12. Simulation of Rate-Related (Dead-Time) Losses In Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.G.; Norman, P.I.; Leadbeater, T.W.; Croft, S.; Philips, S.

    2008-07-01

    Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting (PNMC) based on Multiplicity Shift Register (MSR) electronics (a form of time correlation analysis) is a widely used non-destructive assay technique for quantifying spontaneously fissile materials such as Pu. At high event rates, dead-time losses perturb the count rates with the Singles, Doubles and Triples being increasingly affected. Without correction these perturbations are a major source of inaccuracy in the measured count rates and assay values derived from them. This paper presents the simulation of dead-time losses and investigates the effect of applying different dead-time models on the observed MSR data. Monte Carlo methods have been used to simulate neutron pulse trains for a variety of source intensities and with ideal detection geometry, providing an event by event record of the time distribution of neutron captures within the detection system. The action of the MSR electronics was modelled in software to analyse these pulse trains. Stored pulse trains were perturbed in software to apply the effects of dead-time according to the chosen physical process; for example, the ideal paralysable (extending) and non-paralysable models with an arbitrary dead-time parameter. Results of the simulations demonstrate the change in the observed MSR data when the system dead-time parameter is varied. In addition, the paralysable and non-paralysable models of deadtime are compared. These results form part of a larger study to evaluate existing dead-time corrections and to extend their application to correlated sources. (authors)

  13. Epilepsy-related ambiguity in rating the child behavior checklist and the teacher's report form.

    PubMed

    Oostrom, K J; Schouten, A; Kruitwagen, C L; Peters, A C; Jennekens-Schinkel, A

    2001-01-01

    Although the child behavior checklist (CBCL) and the teacher's report form (TRF) were not designed for diagnosing psychopathology in children with chronic illnesses, they have become extensively used research tools to assess behavioural problems in paediatric populations, including children with epilepsy. When applied to children with epilepsy, items like "staring blankly" or "twitching" can be rated on the basis of seizure features rather than behaviour and, hence, render behavioural scores ambiguous. The aims were detection, and evaluation of the impact, of CBCL and TRF items eliciting ambiguity when applied to children with "epilepsy only" (idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy, attending normal schools). Experts identified items that give rise to interpretational ambiguity of the ratings in epilepsy. By treating ratings on these items as missing values, their effect was evaluated in CBCL and TRF scores of 59 schoolchildren with "epilepsy only" and age and gender matched healthy classmates. Seven items of the CBCL gave rise to ambiguity of which items 5 co-occur on the TRF. Rescoring reduced psychopathology scores in children with "epilepsy only", but not in those of healthy children: the percentage of patients trespassing the clinical cut off score, on at least one of the subscales, reduced from 46 to 23% on the CBCL and from 18 to 15% on the TRF. Parents and teachers run the risk of confusing behaviour and seizure features when filling out the CBCL and TRF. In "epilepsy only", prevalence estimates of psychopathology based on the CBCL and TRF, should be considered with some reserve. PMID:11313222

  14. An evaluation of ventilation system flow rates and levels of carbon dioxide, ambient temperature, and relative humidity in restaurants.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Tan, Yin; Brown, Eric N; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2002-09-01

    Studies of the indoor air quality of restaurants have rarely focused on ventilation system performance in relation to air pollutants and climatic factors. This study was conducted in eight restaurants to examine this issue by determining the ventilation flow rates and the levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), ambient temperature, and relative humidity during at least one complete shift of serving a meal. The mean values of number of dining patrons, ventilation flow rates, and the levels of CO2, ambient temperature, and relative humidity were not significantly different in the nonsmoking dining rooms and the smoking dining rooms. The mean ventilation flow rates in individual restaurants ranged from 42-113 cubic feet per minute per person (cfm/person), overall exceeding the recommended lower limit of 30 cfm/person. The mean levels of CO2 in two restaurants (646 and 819 ppm) were below, and in the other six restaurants (ranging 1,012-1,820 ppm) were above the recommended upper limit of 1000 ppm. The levels of CO2 in each restaurant significantly correlated with the number of dining patrons and in four restaurants accumulated gradually over time. In the nonsmoking dining rooms, the levels of CO2 increased significantly as the ventilation How rates decreased. The mean ambient temperature in restaurants (ranging from 22 degrees C - 24 degrees C) were within the recommended range of 20 degrees C - 26 degrees C. The mean relative humidity in six restaurants (ranging from 46%-59%) were within the recommended upper limit of 60 percent, and in two restaurants (62% and 71%) were slightly higher than this recommended limit. It was concluded that although the mean ventilation flow rates in all restaurants exceeded the recommended value, the design of the ventilation system or the distribution of air flow rate in some sections of restaurants were not appropriate to keep the levels of CO2 and relative humidity at some measurement locations below the recommended limits. PMID:12216594

  15. Soil bacterial and fungal community dynamics in relation to Panax notoginseng death rate in a continuous cropping system

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Linlin; Xu, Jiang; Feng, Guangquan; Li, Xiwen; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Notoginseng (Panax notoginseng), a valuable herbal medicine, has high death rates in continuous cropping systems. Variation in the soil microbial community is considered the primary cause of notoginseng mortality, although the taxa responsible for crop failure remains unidentified. This study used high-throughput sequencing methods to characterize changes in the microbial community and screen microbial taxa related to the death rate. Fungal diversity significantly decreased in soils cropped with notoginseng for three years. The death rate and the fungal diversity were significantly negatively correlated, suggesting that fungal diversity might be a potential bioindicator of soil health. Positive correlation coefficients revealed that Burkholderiales, Syntrophobacteraceae, Myrmecridium, Phaeosphaeria, Fusarium, and Phoma were better adapted to colonization of diseased plants. The relative abundance of Fusarium oxysporum (R = 0.841, P < 0.05) and Phaeosphaeria rousseliana (R = 0.830, P < 0.05) were positively associated with the death rate. F. oxysporum was a pathogen of notoginseng root-rot that caused seedling death. Negative correlation coefficients indicated that Thermogemmatisporaceae, Actinosynnemataceae, Hydnodontaceae, Herpotrichiellaceae, and Coniosporium might be antagonists of pathogens, and the relative abundance of Coniosporium perforans was negatively correlated with the death rate. Our findings provide a dynamic overview of the microbial community and present a clear scope for screening beneficial microbes and pathogens of notoginseng. PMID:27549984

  16. Soil bacterial and fungal community dynamics in relation to Panax notoginseng death rate in a continuous cropping system.

    PubMed

    Dong, Linlin; Xu, Jiang; Feng, Guangquan; Li, Xiwen; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Notoginseng (Panax notoginseng), a valuable herbal medicine, has high death rates in continuous cropping systems. Variation in the soil microbial community is considered the primary cause of notoginseng mortality, although the taxa responsible for crop failure remains unidentified. This study used high-throughput sequencing methods to characterize changes in the microbial community and screen microbial taxa related to the death rate. Fungal diversity significantly decreased in soils cropped with notoginseng for three years. The death rate and the fungal diversity were significantly negatively correlated, suggesting that fungal diversity might be a potential bioindicator of soil health. Positive correlation coefficients revealed that Burkholderiales, Syntrophobacteraceae, Myrmecridium, Phaeosphaeria, Fusarium, and Phoma were better adapted to colonization of diseased plants. The relative abundance of Fusarium oxysporum (R = 0.841, P < 0.05) and Phaeosphaeria rousseliana (R = 0.830, P < 0.05) were positively associated with the death rate. F. oxysporum was a pathogen of notoginseng root-rot that caused seedling death. Negative correlation coefficients indicated that Thermogemmatisporaceae, Actinosynnemataceae, Hydnodontaceae, Herpotrichiellaceae, and Coniosporium might be antagonists of pathogens, and the relative abundance of Coniosporium perforans was negatively correlated with the death rate. Our findings provide a dynamic overview of the microbial community and present a clear scope for screening beneficial microbes and pathogens of notoginseng. PMID:27549984

  17. Effects of relative surface area and leachant composition on the {sup 137}Cs leach rate from cement waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Peric, A.D.; Plecas, I.B.; Glodic, S.D.

    1993-12-31

    Cement matrices, doped with {sup 137}Cs, were investigated to establish their physicochemical properties, mainly {sup 137}Cs leach-rate. Experiments were carried out in leachant media with different degrees of aggressiveness on the cement matrix, e.g., distilled water, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl solutions. A series of six cement samples, which were orthocylindrically-shaped, were treated in each of three leachant media. For each sample, the surface area exposed leaching relative to the total surface area was increased from 1:6 to 6:6, at increments of 1/6 of the total surface area. Expected higher {sup 137}Cs leach-rates of the samples immersed in the more aggressive environment show very specific behavior and functional relations with respect to the exposed surface area. Radionuclide leach-rate coefficients did not exhibit linear behavior. Instead, leach-rate values were best fit by exponential equations to describe cement matrix behavior in the leachants. Different empirical equations were established to describe {sup 137}Cs leach-rates in the various leachants as a function of the relative surface area of the cement matrix exposed to the leachant.

  18. On the variable timing behavior of PSR B0540-69: an almost excellent example to study the pulsar braking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Fei-Fei; Ou, Zi-Wei; Tong, Hao

    2016-05-01

    PSR B0540-69 has a braking index measurement in its persistent state: n = 2.129 ± 0.012. Recently, it has been reported to have changes in its spin-down state: a sudden 36% increase in the spin-down rate. Combining the persistent state braking index measurement with different spin-down states, PSR B0540-69 is more powerful than intermittent pulsars in constraining pulsar spin-down models. The pulsar wind model is applied to explain the variable timing behavior of PSR B0540-69. The braking index of PSR B0540-69 in its persistent state results from the combined effect of magnetic dipole radiation and particle wind. The particle density reflects the magnetospheric activity in real-time and may be responsible for the changing spin-down behavior. Corresponding to the 36% increase in the spin-down rate of PSR B0540-69, the relative increase in the particle density is 88% in the vacuum gap model. The braking index calculated with the model in the new state is n = 1.79. Future observations that measure the braking index of PSR B0540-69 in the new spin-down state will be very powerful in distinguishing between different pulsar spin-down models and different particle acceleration models in the wind braking scenario. The variable timing behavior of PSR J1846-0258 is also understandable in the pulsar wind model.

  19. Ascidian Mitogenomics: Comparison of Evolutionary Rates in Closely Related Taxa Provides Evidence of Ongoing Speciation Events

    PubMed Central

    Griggio, Francesca; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Iannelli, Fabio; Justy, Fabienne; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Xavier, Turon; Pesole, Graziano; Douzery, Emmanuel J.P.; Mastrototaro, Francesco; Gissi, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Ascidians are a fascinating group of filter-feeding marine chordates characterized by rapid evolution of both sequences and structure of their nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Moreover, they include several model organisms used to investigate complex biological processes in chordates. To study the evolutionary dynamics of ascidians at short phylogenetic distances, we sequenced 13 new mitogenomes and analyzed them, together with 15 other available mitogenomes, using a novel approach involving detailed whole-mitogenome comparisons of conspecific and congeneric pairs. The evolutionary rate was quite homogeneous at both intraspecific and congeneric level, and the lowest congeneric rates were found in cryptic (morphologically undistinguishable) and in morphologically very similar species pairs. Moreover, congeneric nonsynonymous rates (dN) were up to two orders of magnitude higher than in intraspecies pairs. Overall, a clear-cut gap sets apart conspecific from congeneric pairs. These evolutionary peculiarities allowed easily identifying an extraordinary intraspecific variability in the model ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, where most pairs show a dN value between that observed at intraspecies and congeneric level, yet consistently lower than that of the Ciona intestinalis cryptic species pair. These data suggest ongoing speciation events producing genetically distinct B. schlosseri entities. Remarkably, these ongoing speciation events were undetectable by the cox1 barcode fragment, demonstrating that, at low phylogenetic distances, the whole mitogenome has a higher resolving power than cox1. Our study shows that whole-mitogenome comparative analyses, performed on a suitable sample of congeneric and intraspecies pairs, may allow detecting not only cryptic species but also ongoing speciation events. PMID:24572017

  20. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2. PMID:25162649

  1. Numerical calculation of relative dose rates from spherical 106Ru beta sources used in ophthalmic brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva, Eduardo

    Concave beta sources of 106Ru/106Rh are used in radiotherapy to treat ophthalmic tumors. However, a problem that arises is the difficult determination of absorbed dose distributions around such sources mainly because of the small range of the electrons and the steep dose gradients. In this sense, numerical methods have been developed to calculate the dose distributions around the beta applicators. In this work a simple code in Fortran language is developed to estimate the dose rates along the central axis of 106Ru/106Rh curved plaques by numerical integration of the beta point source function and results are compared with other calculated data.

  2. Statistical Considerations in Designing Tests of Mine Detection Systems: II - Measures Related to the False Alarm Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, K.M.

    1998-08-01

    The rate at which a mine detection system falsely identifies man-made or natural clutter objects as mines is referred to as the system's false alarm rate (FAR). Generally expressed as a rate per unit area or time, the FAR is one of the primary metrics used to gauge system performance. In this report, an overview is given of statistical methods appropriate for the analysis of data relating to FAR. Techniques are presented for determining a suitable size for the clutter collection area, for summarizing the performance of a single sensor, and for comparing different sensors. For readers requiring more thorough coverage of the topics discussed, references to the statistical literature are provided. A companion report addresses statistical issues related to the estimation of mine detection probabilities.

  3. INVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AIR VELOCITY, AND AMPLIFICATION ON THE EMISSION RATES OF FUNGAL SPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the impact of relative humidity (RH), air velocity, and surface growth on the emission rates of fungal spores from the surface of contaminated material. Although the results show a complex interaction of factors, we have determined, for this limited data set,...

  4. Response Styles in Rating Scales: Simultaneous Modeling of Content-Related Effects and the Tendency to Middle or Extreme Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutz, Gerhard; Berger, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity in response styles can affect the conclusions drawn from rating scale data. In particular, biased estimates can be expected if one ignores a tendency to middle categories or to extreme categories. An adjacent categories model is proposed that simultaneously models the content-related effects and the heterogeneity in response styles.…

  5. EFFECT OF SOIL NITROGEN STRESS ON THE RELATIVE GROWTH RATE OF ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL GRASSES IN THE INTERMOUNTAIN WEST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A trade-off between inherent relative growth rate (RGR) and tolerance to low nutrient availability is a central theory in plant ecology and is predicted to be a key factor influencing invasion resistance in nutrient-poor systems. Specifically, low nutrient conditions are predicted to favor native s...

  6. Self-Rated Health in Relation to Rape and Mental Health Disorders in a National Sample of College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinzow, Heidi M.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; McCauley, Jenna L.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to employ a multivariate approach to examine the correlates of self-rated health in a college sample of women, with particular emphasis on sexual assault history and related mental health outcomes. Participants: A national sample of 2,000 female college students participated in a structured phone interview…

  7. The Power of Implicit Social Relation in Rating Prediction of Social Recommender Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reafee, Waleed; Salim, Naomie; Khan, Atif

    2016-01-01

    The explosive growth of social networks in recent times has presented a powerful source of information to be utilized as an extra source for assisting in the social recommendation problems. The social recommendation methods that are based on probabilistic matrix factorization improved the recommendation accuracy and partly solved the cold-start and data sparsity problems. However, these methods only exploited the explicit social relations and almost completely ignored the implicit social relations. In this article, we firstly propose an algorithm to extract the implicit relation in the undirected graphs of social networks by exploiting the link prediction techniques. Furthermore, we propose a new probabilistic matrix factorization method to alleviate the data sparsity problem through incorporating explicit friendship and implicit friendship. We evaluate our proposed approach on two real datasets, Last.Fm and Douban. The experimental results show that our method performs much better than the state-of-the-art approaches, which indicates the importance of incorporating implicit social relations in the recommendation process to address the poor prediction accuracy. PMID:27152663

  8. Automated Semantic Indices Related to Cognitive Function and Rate of Cognitive Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakhomov, Serguei V. S.; Hemmy, Laura S.; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study is to introduce a fully automated, computational linguistic technique to quantify semantic relations between words generated on a standard semantic verbal fluency test and to determine its cognitive and clinical correlates. Cognitive differences between patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are…

  9. Facial and Full-Length Ratings of Attractiveness Related to the Social Interactions of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory J.

    1985-01-01

    Aggressive and prosocial peer interactions were observed in 38 preschool-age children. Attractive girls received more prosocial and fewer aggressive advances than unattractive girls. There was no differential treatment of boys related to attractiveness. Results are discussed in relationship to possible developmental implications and their parallel…

  10. Fulfilling the Promise of Early Intervention: Factors Related to Rates of Delivered IFSP Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanek, Thomas T.

    2001-01-01

    This response to an article evaluating Indiana's early intervention service delivery (EC 628 669) identifies implications of the study including: service intensity is relatively light; service location and context and the process of Individualized Family Service Plan formulation should be examined; implementation should be treated as an…

  11. Chelation and effectiveness of salicylate related compounds on pyresis, sedimentation rate and hematocrit

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, J.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Fried, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of action and identification of sites of salicylates and related compounds in antipyresis were studied. Structure-activity investigations of antipyresis were made using Sprague-Dawley rats. Results showed copper was chelated by the salicylate, passes through the cell membrane, and repairs the lesion. 13 references, 2 figures. (ACR)

  12. The Power of Implicit Social Relation in Rating Prediction of Social Recommender Systems.

    PubMed

    Reafee, Waleed; Salim, Naomie; Khan, Atif

    2016-01-01

    The explosive growth of social networks in recent times has presented a powerful source of information to be utilized as an extra source for assisting in the social recommendation problems. The social recommendation methods that are based on probabilistic matrix factorization improved the recommendation accuracy and partly solved the cold-start and data sparsity problems. However, these methods only exploited the explicit social relations and almost completely ignored the implicit social relations. In this article, we firstly propose an algorithm to extract the implicit relation in the undirected graphs of social networks by exploiting the link prediction techniques. Furthermore, we propose a new probabilistic matrix factorization method to alleviate the data sparsity problem through incorporating explicit friendship and implicit friendship. We evaluate our proposed approach on two real datasets, Last.Fm and Douban. The experimental results show that our method performs much better than the state-of-the-art approaches, which indicates the importance of incorporating implicit social relations in the recommendation process to address the poor prediction accuracy. PMID:27152663

  13. Post-discharge surveillance to identify colorectal surgical site infection rates and related costs.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Khan, D; Aplin, C; Ball, J; Thomas, M; Bankart, J

    2009-07-01

    A growing number of surveillance studies have highlighted concerns with relying only on data from inpatients. Without post-discharge surveillance (PDS) data, the rate and burden of surgical site infections (SSIs) are underestimated. PDS data for colorectal surgery in the UK remains to be published. This is an important specialty to study since it is considered to have the highest SSI rate and is among the most expensive to treat. This study of colorectal SSI used a 30 day surveillance programme with telephone interviews and home visits. Each additional healthcare resource used by patients with SSI was documented and costed. Of the 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria and completed the 30 day follow-up, 29 (27%) developed SSI, of which 12 were diagnosed after discharge. The mean number of days to presentation of SSI was 13. Multivariable logistic analysis identified body mass index as the only significant risk factor. The additional cost of treating each infected patient was pound sterling 10,523, although 15% of these additional costs were met by primary care. The 5 month surveillance programme cost pound sterling 5,200 to run. An analysis of the surveillance nurse's workload showed that the nurse could be replaced by a healthcare assistant. PDS to detect SSI after colorectal surgery is necessary to provide complete data with accurate additional costs. PMID:19446918

  14. RN students' ratings and opinions related to the importance of certain clinical teacher behaviors.

    PubMed

    Viverais-Dresler, G; Kutschke, M

    2001-01-01

    Clinical teachers make a necessary and valuable contribution to clinical nursing courses with non-RN learners. This contribution is often not considered necessary in degree nursing programs with an RN student population. This study describes the perceptions of RN students and the importance they attach to certain clinical teacher behaviors. Fifty-six participants in a distance education baccalaureate nursing program completed a questionnaire, including a rating scale and open-ended questions. Based on the mean values, items were ranked in importance. Sample quotes were provided to elaborate on the highest and lowest-ranked items. Participants rated the four categories in descending order of importance: Evaluation, Professional Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Teaching Ability. The top items gave the profile of a teacher who is approachable, fair, open, honest, and who creates mutual respect. The findings support a clinical teacher for RN learners. The data also reflect similarities and differences with findings of studies with non-RN student participants. The findings of this study provide information, not available in the literature, regarding clinical teacher behaviors of significance to RN students. PMID:11868719

  15. Sensitivity of high strain rate of structural elements in relation to dynamics properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Vorobiov, Iurii S.; Ovcharova, Nataliia Iu.

    2015-09-01

    Protective structures such as process chambers, protective boxes, facing elements of vehicles, personal protection equipment, motors cases etc. widely used in modern technology has been tested in the following project. Under the influence of impact loads, the three-dimensional dynamic stress-strain state with finite dynamic displacements and deformations has arised. The deformations occur in the elastic- plastic stage. In the analysis of the high-rate deformations, the dynamic properties of the materials, which are determined based on experimental data should be taken into account. The dynamic stress state of structural elements depends essentially on the dynamic properties of the materials used. The problem is solved using the finite element method, which takes into account the specifics of the process. Boundary conditions in the element nodes must satisfy the equality movement as well as derivatives. The formed function allows to describe continuous and smooth stress changes. The numerical analysis of the dynamic stress-strain state of structural elements under impact loads, takes into account different dynamic properties of the materials. A series of numerical calculations allows to reveal the features of high-rate deformation elements of protective structures and makes recommendations to improve their dynamic strength under different loading conditions.

  16. Energy related germination and survival rates of water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H. L.; Xue, J. M.; Lai, J. N.; Wang, J. Y.; Zhang, W. M.; Miao, Q.; Yan, S.; Zhao, W. J.; He, F.; Gu, H. Y.; Wang, Y. G.

    2006-04-01

    In order to investigate the influence of ion energy on the germination and survival rates, water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds were irradiated with protons in atmosphere. The ion fluence used in this experiment was in the range of 4 × 109-1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The ion energy is from 1.1 MeV to 6.5 MeV. According to the structure of the seed and TRIM simulation, the ions with the energy of 6.5 MeV can irradiate the shoot apical meristem directly whereas the ions with the energy of 1.1 MeV cannot. The results showed that both the germination and survival rates decrease while increasing the ion fluence, and the fluence-respond curve for each energy has different character. Besides the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is generally considered as the main radiobiological target, the existence of a secondary target around SAM is proposed in this paper.

  17. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress. PMID:27526145

  18. Prediction of Substrate Removal Rates of Attached Microorganisms and of Relative Contributions of Attached and Suspended Communities at Field Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David L.; Gattie, David K.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model composed of a direct proportionality relationship between bulk water velocities and field-determined second-order microbial transformation rate coefficients, and the relative rate coefficient of a benchmark chemical, was developed for estimating the substrate removal rates of rapidly degraded chemicals by attached organisms in shallow (<1 m deep) aquatic ecosystems. Data from 31 field experiments involving the addition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid methyl ester (2,4-DME) in nine field areas were used to determine a field-derived second-order rate coefficient for microbial transformation of the ester. By using 2,4-DME as a benchmark chemical, the model was used to predict microbial transformation rates of the butoxyethyl ester of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-DBE) at five other field sites. The predicted half-lives of 2,4-DBE varied 1,500-fold and were within about a threefold range or less of the measured half-lives. Under conditions of mass transport limitation, the contributions of attached microorganisms relative to total microbial activities at various field sites were related to the ratio of water velocity, U, and depth, D, showing that historical definitions of ecosystems according to flow and depth characteristics are also valid for describing the process-related structure of ecosystems. An equation was developed for predicting the relative contributions of attached and suspended communities with values of U and D for lotic and lentic ecosystems. On the basis of this equation, attached microorganisms were expected to be insignificant in deep lentic ecosystems and suspended microorganisms were expected to be insignificant in shallow lotic systems for the same process carried out by both populations. Neglecting epiphytic microorganisms, both suspended and attached organisms were expected to be significant in wetlands. PMID:16347556

  19. Plasma urea nitrogen in relation to pregnancy rate in dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Karen, A M; Kovács, P; Beckers, J F; de Sousa, N M; Szenci, O

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this field study was to investigate the relationship of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) with the pregnancy rate in lactating Awassi × Merino ewes. One hundred and eighty-five Awassi × Merino ewes were used in the present study. Ewes were fed a diet containing 17.4% crude protein and were milked twice a day by the milking machine. The ewes were synchronized for estrus by insertion of intravaginal sponges containing 30 mg flurogestone acetate for 14 days. At the time of sponge removal each ewe was administered eCG (600 IU). All ewes were inseminated twice with fresh semen into the external os of the cervix at 48 and 56 h after sponge removal. The day of insemination was considered as Day 0 for calculating the gestational period. Blood samples were collected from each ewe at Days 0, 18 for measurement of PUN concentrations and at Day 22 after AI for measurement of pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Thirty-eight ewes (20.5%) were confirmed pregnant by PAG-RIA test at Day 22 and by ultrasonography at Day 80. The mean (±S.D.) concentration of PUN in all ewes at Day 0 was 12.7±4.6 mmol/L. There were non-significant differences in the level of PUN between pregnant and non-pregnant ewes at Days 0 (12.2±4.2 mmol/L vs. 12.8±4.7 mmol/L, respectively) and 18 (9.6±2.9 mmol/L vs. 10.4±4.0 mmol/L, respectively) after AI. Mean PUN concentrations decreased significantly from Day 0 to Day 18 after AI in both pregnant and non-pregnant ewes. By using logistic regression analysis, there was no effect of PUN concentrations on the probability of pregnancy occurrence in the studied ewes (odds ratio: 0.97; 95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.05; P=0.45). In conclusion, there was no evidence of a relationship between PUN concentration and pregnancy rate for lactating Awassi × Merino ewes in the present study because of low pregnancy rate observed. PMID:21349665

  20. Effect of Racial and Ethnic Composition of Neighborhoods in San Francisco on Rates of Mental-Health Related 911 Calls

    PubMed Central

    Kessell, Eric R.; Alvidrez, Jennifer; McConnell, William A.; Shumway, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the association between San Francisco neighborhoods’ racial/ethnic residential composition and the rate of mental-health-related 911 calls. Methods Calls to the San Francisco 911 system from January 2001 through June 2003 (n=1,341,608) were divided into mental-health-related and other calls. Police sector data in the call records were overlaid onto U.S. Census tracts to estimate sector demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the association between black, Asian, Latino and white resident percentage and rates of mental-health-related calls. Results Percent of black residents was associated with a lower rate of mental-health-related calls (IRR=.99, 95% CI .98–1.00). Percent of Asian and Latino residents had no significant effect. Conclusions The observed relationship between black residents and mental-health-related calls is not consistent with known emergency mental health service utilization patterns. The paradox between underutilization of the 911 system and overutilization of psychiatric emergency services deserves further investigation. PMID:19797379

  1. Code System to Calculate Radiation Dose Rates Relative to Spent Fuel Shipping Casks.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-05-20

    Version 00 QBF calculates and plots in a short running time, three dimensional radiation dose rate distributions in the form of contour maps on specified planes resulting from cylindrical sources loaded into vehicles or ships. Shielding effects by steel walls and shielding material layers are taken into account in addition to the shadow effect among casks. This code system identifies the critical points on which to focus when designing the radiation shielding structure and wheremore » each of the spent fuel shipping casks should be stored. The code GRAPH reads the output data file of QBF and plots it using the HGX graphics library. QBF unifies the functions of the SMART and MANYCASK codes included in CCC-482.« less

  2. Recurrence rate of febrile convulsion related to the degree of pyrexia during the first attack.

    PubMed

    el-Radhi, A S; Withana, K; Banajeh, S

    1986-06-01

    Ninety-four children consecutively admitted to the hospital between January 1980 and December 1982 with their first febrile convulsion (FC) were studied to assess the influence of the degree of pyrexia on the recurrence rate of FC. Thirty-eight of sixty-three children between 6 and 18 months of age (the peak incidence of FC) with fever above 40 degrees C were almost seven times less likely to have subsequent convulsions with fever, than those whose initial febrile convulsion was associated with a lower degree of pyrexia. It is suggested that the degree of pyrexia is a factor that influences the recurrence of FC. This may explain why some children have a reduced frequency of subsequent FC compared with others who appear to be at comparable risk. PMID:3698455

  3. Bioaccessibility of metal cations in soil is linearly related to its water exchange rate constant.

    PubMed

    Laird, Brian D; Peak, Derek; Siciliano, Steven D

    2011-05-01

    Site-specific risk assessments often incorporate the concepts of bioaccessibility (i.e., contaminant fraction released into gastrointestinal fluids) or bioavailability (i.e., contaminant fraction absorbed into systemic circulation) into the calculation of ingestion exposure. We evaluated total and bioaccessible metal concentrations for 19 soil samples under simulated stomach and duodenal conditions using an in vitro gastrointestinal model. We demonstrated that the median bioaccessibility of 23 metals ranged between <1 and 41% under simulated stomach conditions and < 1 and 63% under simulated duodenal conditions. Notably, these large differences in metal bioaccessibility were independent of equilibrium solubility and stability constants. Instead, the relationship (stomach phase R = 0.927; duodenum phase R = 0.891) between bioaccessibility and water exchange rates of metal cations (k(H₂O)) indicated that desorption kinetics may influence if not control metal bioaccessibility. PMID:21466150

  4. Two part condenser for varying the rate of condensing and related method

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2007-12-11

    A heat transfer apparatus, such as a condenser, is provided. The apparatus includes a first component with a first heat transfer element that has first component inlet and outlet ports through which a first fluid may pass. A second component is also included and likewise has a second heat transfer element with second component inlet and outlet ports to pass a second fluid. The first component has a body that can receive a third fluid for heat transfer with the first heat transfer element. The first and second components are releasably attachable with one another so that when attached both the first and second heat transfer elements effect heat transfer with the third fluid. Attachment and removal of the first and second components allows for the heat transfer rate of the apparatus to be varied. An associated method is also provided.

  5. The role of physical activity and heart rate variability for the control of work related stress

    PubMed Central

    Tonello, Laís; Rodrigues, Fábio B.; Souza, Jeniffer W. S.; Campbell, Carmen S. G.; Leicht, Anthony S.; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise are often used as tools to reduce stress and therefore the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Meanwhile, heart rate variability (HRV) has been utilized to assess both stress and PA or exercise influences. The objective of the present review was to examine the current literature in regards to workplace stress, PA/exercise and HRV to encourage further studies. We considered original articles from known databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge) over the last 10 years that examined these important factors. A total of seven studies were identified with workplace stress strongly associated with reduced HRV in workers. Longitudinal workplace PA interventions may provide a means to improve worker stress levels and potentially cardiovascular risk with mechanisms still to be clarified. Future studies are recommended to identify the impact of PA, exercise, and fitness on stress levels and HRV in workers and their subsequent influence on cardiovascular health. PMID:24600407

  6. Corrosion product identification and relative rates of corrosion of candidate metals in an irradiated air-steam environment

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T.; Swayambunathan, V.; Tani, B.S. ); Van Konynenburg, R.A. )

    1989-11-03

    Previously reported work by others indicates that dicopper trihydroxide nitrate, Cu{sub 2}NO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}, forms on copper and copper alloys subjected to irradiated moist air near room temperature. We have performed experiments over a range of temperature and humidity, and have found that this species is formed at temperatures up to at least 150{degree}C if low to intermediate relative humidities are present. At 150{degree}C and 100% relative humidity, only Cu{sub 2}O and CuO were observed. The relative general corrosion rates of the copper materials tested in 1-month experiments at dose rates of 0.7 and 2.0 kGy/h were Cu > 70/30 Cu--Ni > Al-bronze. High-nickel alloy 825 showed no observable corrosion. 29 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. [On the relation between encounter rate and population density: Are classical models of population dynamics justified?].

    PubMed

    Nedorezov, L V

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic model of migrations on a lattice and with discrete time is considered. It is assumed that space is homogenous with respect to its properties and during one time step every individual (independently of local population numbers) can migrate to nearest nodes of lattice with equal probabilities. It is also assumed that population size remains constant during certain time interval of computer experiments. The following variants of estimation of encounter rate between individuals are considered: when for the fixed time moments every individual in every node of lattice interacts with all other individuals in the node; when individuals can stay in nodes independently, or can be involved in groups in two, three or four individuals. For each variant of interactions between individuals, average value (with respect to space and time) is computed for various values of population size. The samples obtained were compared with respective functions of classic models of isolated population dynamics: Verhulst model, Gompertz model, Svirezhev model, and theta-logistic model. Parameters of functions were calculated with least square method. Analyses of deviations were performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Lilliefors test, Shapiro-Wilk test, and other statistical tests. It is shown that from traditional point of view there are no correspondence between the encounter rate and functions describing effects of self-regulatory mechanisms on population dynamics. Best fitting of samples was obtained with Verhulst and theta-logistic models when using the dataset resulted from the situation when every individual in the node interacts with all other individuals. PMID:26606790

  8. Implementation Of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs Associated With Reductions In Opioid-Related Death Rates.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Stephen W; Fry, Carrie E; Jones, Timothy F; Buntin, Melinda B

    2016-07-01

    Over the past two decades the number of opioid pain relievers sold in the United States rose dramatically. This rise in sales was accompanied by an increase in opioid-related overdose deaths. In response, forty-nine states (all but Missouri) created prescription drug monitoring programs to detect high-risk prescribing and patient behaviors. Our objectives were to determine whether the implementation or particular characteristics of the programs were effective in reducing opioid-related overdose deaths. In adjusted analyses we found that a state's implementation of a program was associated with an average reduction of 1.12 opioid-related overdose deaths per 100,000 population in the year after implementation. Additionally, states whose programs had robust characteristics-including monitoring greater numbers of drugs with abuse potential and updating their data at least weekly-had greater reductions in deaths, compared to states whose programs did not have these characteristics. We estimate that if Missouri adopted a prescription drug monitoring program and other states enhanced their programs with robust features, there would be more than 600 fewer overdose deaths nationwide in 2016, preventing approximately two deaths each day. PMID:27335101

  9. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  10. Early marine growth in relation to marine-stage survival rates for Alaska sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farley, Edward V., Jr.; Murphy, J.M.; Adkison, M.D.; Eisner, L.B.; Helle, J.H.; Moss, J.H.; Nielsen, J.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that larger juvenile sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, have higher marine-stage survival rates than smaller juvenile salmon. We used scales from returning adults (33 years of data) and trawl samples of juveniles (n = 3572) collected along the eastern Bering Sea shelf during August through September 2000-02. The size of juvenile sockeye salmon mirrored indices of their marine-stage survival rate (e.g., smaller fish had lower indices of marine-stage survival rate). However, there was no relationship between the size of sockeye salmon after their first year at sea, as estimated from archived scales, and brood-year survival size was relatively uniform over the time series, possibly indicating size-selective mortality on smaller individuals during their marine residence. Variation in size, relative abundance, and marine-stage survival rate of juvenile sockeye salmon is likely related to ocean conditions affecting their early marine migratory pathways along the eastern Bering Sea shelf.

  11. Small impact craters in the lunar regolith - Their morphologies, relative ages, and rates of formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.; Boyce, J.M.; Hahn, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparently, there are two types of size-frequency distributions of small lunar craters (???1-100 m across): (1) crater production distributions for which the cumulative frequency of craters is an inverse function of diameter to power near 2.8, and (2) steady-state distributions for which the cumulative frequency of craters is inversely proportional to the square of their diameters. According to theory, cumulative frequencies of craters in each morphologic category within the steady-state should also be an inverse function of the square of their diameters. Some data on frequency distribution of craters by morphologic types are approximately consistent with theory, whereas other data are inconsistent with theory. A flux of crater producing objects can be inferred from size-frequency distributions of small craters on the flanks and ejecta of craters of known age. Crater frequency distributions and data on the craters Tycho, North Ray, Cone, and South Ray, when compared with the flux of objects measured by the Apollo Passive Seismometer, suggest that the flux of objects has been relatively constant over the last 100 m.y. (within 1/3 to 3 times of the flux estimated for Tycho). Steady-state frequency distributions for craters in several morphologic categories formed the basis for estimating the relative ages of craters and surfaces in a system used during the Apollo landing site mapping program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The relative ages in this system are converted to model absolute ages that have a rather broad range of values. The range of values of the absolute ages are between about 1/3 to 3 times the assigned model absolute age. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  12. Salespersons' weight and ratings of characteristics related to effectiveness of selling.

    PubMed

    Zemanek, J E; McIntyre, R P; Zemanek, A

    1998-06-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of a salesperson's weight and the interaction of weight with sex on a variety of positive personal characteristics which have been previously established. 243 purchasing agents provided data on 410 male and female salespeople who were then divided into two groups by weight. Analyses of variance were conducted using weight and sex as the independent variables and a variety of personal characteristics as dependent variables. The analysis suggested that the weight and sex of a salesperson are related to several personal characteristics. PMID:9676505

  13. Determination of tropical deforestation rates and related carbon losses from 1990 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Frédéric; Beuchle, René; Mayaux, Philippe; Stibig, Hans-Jürgen; Bodart, Catherine; Brink, Andreas; Carboni, Silvia; Desclée, Baudouin; Donnay, François; Eva, Hugh D; Lupi, Andrea; Raši, Rastislav; Seliger, Roman; Simonetti, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We estimate changes in forest cover (deforestation and forest regrowth) in the tropics for the two last decades (1990–2000 and 2000–2010) based on a sample of 4000 units of 10 ×10 km size. Forest cover is interpreted from satellite imagery at 30 × 30 m resolution. Forest cover changes are then combined with pan-tropical biomass maps to estimate carbon losses. We show that there was a gross loss of tropical forests of 8.0 million ha yr−1 in the 1990s and 7.6 million ha yr−1 in the 2000s (0.49% annual rate), with no statistically significant difference. Humid forests account for 64% of the total forest cover in 2010 and 54% of the net forest loss during second study decade. Losses of forest cover and Other Wooded Land (OWL) cover result in estimates of carbon losses which are similar for 1990s and 2000s at 887 MtC yr−1 (range: 646–1238) and 880 MtC yr−1 (range: 602–1237) respectively, with humid regions contributing two-thirds. The estimates of forest area changes have small statistical standard errors due to large sample size. We also reduce uncertainties of previous estimates of carbon losses and removals. Our estimates of forest area change are significantly lower as compared to national survey data. We reconcile recent low estimates of carbon emissions from tropical deforestation for early 2000s and show that carbon loss rates did not change between the two last decades. Carbon losses from deforestation represent circa 10% of Carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the last decade (2000–2010). Our estimates of annual removals of carbon from forest regrowth at 115 MtC yr−1 (range: 61–168) and 97 MtC yr−1 (53–141) for the 1990s and 2000s respectively are five to fifteen times lower than earlier published estimates. PMID:24753029

  14. Determination of tropical deforestation rates and related carbon losses from 1990 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Achard, Frédéric; Beuchle, René; Mayaux, Philippe; Stibig, Hans-Jürgen; Bodart, Catherine; Brink, Andreas; Carboni, Silvia; Desclée, Baudouin; Donnay, François; Eva, Hugh D; Lupi, Andrea; Raši, Rastislav; Seliger, Roman; Simonetti, Dario

    2014-08-01

    We estimate changes in forest cover (deforestation and forest regrowth) in the tropics for the two last decades (1990-2000 and 2000-2010) based on a sample of 4000 units of 10 ×10 km size. Forest cover is interpreted from satellite imagery at 30 × 30 m resolution. Forest cover changes are then combined with pan-tropical biomass maps to estimate carbon losses. We show that there was a gross loss of tropical forests of 8.0 million ha yr(-1) in the 1990s and 7.6 million ha yr(-1) in the 2000s (0.49% annual rate), with no statistically significant difference. Humid forests account for 64% of the total forest cover in 2010 and 54% of the net forest loss during second study decade. Losses of forest cover and Other Wooded Land (OWL) cover result in estimates of carbon losses which are similar for 1990s and 2000s at 887 MtC yr(-1) (range: 646-1238) and 880 MtC yr(-1) (range: 602-1237) respectively, with humid regions contributing two-thirds. The estimates of forest area changes have small statistical standard errors due to large sample size. We also reduce uncertainties of previous estimates of carbon losses and removals. Our estimates of forest area change are significantly lower as compared to national survey data. We reconcile recent low estimates of carbon emissions from tropical deforestation for early 2000s and show that carbon loss rates did not change between the two last decades. Carbon losses from deforestation represent circa 10% of Carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the last decade (2000-2010). Our estimates of annual removals of carbon from forest regrowth at 115 MtC yr(-1) (range: 61-168) and 97 MtC yr(-1) (53-141) for the 1990s and 2000s respectively are five to fifteen times lower than earlier published estimates. PMID:24753029

  15. A field survey of the partially edentate elderly: Investigation of factors related to the usage rate of removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Murai, S; Matsuda, K; Ikebe, K; Enoki, K; Hatta, K; Fujiwara, K; Maeda, Y

    2015-11-01

    Although the shortened dental arch (SDA) concept has been known to all over the world, acceptance of the SDA concept as an oral health standard can be questionable from the patients' point of view, even if it is biologically reasonable. Furthermore, because the health insurance system covers removable partial dentures (RPDs) for all citizens in Japan, SDA patients seem to prefer to receive prosthetic treatment to replace the missing teeth. However, there were few field surveys to investigate the usage rate of RPDs in Japan. The purpose of this study was to determine the usage rate of RPDs in older Japanese subjects and to investigate the factors related to the usage of RPDs. Partially edentate participants (n = 390) were included in this study. Oral examinations were conducted to record several indices. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to evaluate the relationship between the number of missing teeth and the usage rate of RPDs. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression analysis were conducted to evaluate the factors related to the usage rate of RPDs. Usage of RPDs had a significantly positive association with the number of missing distal extension teeth and bilaterally missing teeth. The usage rate of RPDs increased as the number of missing distal extension teeth increased (P for trend < 0·001). The conclusion of this study was that participants with missing distal extension teeth had higher usage rates of RPDs than other participants, and the usage rate increased as the number of missing distal extension teeth increased. PMID:26059645

  16. Circadian variation of variability and irregularity of heart rate in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation: relation to symptoms and rate control drugs.

    PubMed

    Corino, Valentina D A; Platonov, Pyotr G; Enger, Steve; Tveit, Arnljot; Ulimoen, Sara R

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate diurnal variations of the variability and irregularity of heart rate (HR) in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) with and without rate control drugs. Thirty-eight patients with permanent AF were part of an investigator-blind crossover study comparing diltiazem, verapamil, metoprolol, and carvedilol. We analyzed five Holter recordings per patient: at baseline (no rate control drug) and with each of the four drug regimens. HR, variability (SD; percentages of interval differences of successive RR intervals of >20, 50, and 80 ms; and root of the mean squared differences of successive RR intervals), and irregularity (approximate and sample entropy) parameters were computed in 20-min long nonoverlapping segments. Circadian rhythmicity was evaluated using cosinor analysis to each parameter series, which is characterized by the 24-h mean [midline statistic of rhythm (MESOR)] and excursion over the mean (amplitude). Arrhythmia-related symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire measuring symptom severity and frequency. HR and variability parameters showed a significant circadian variation in most patients, whereas only a small minority of the patients had circadian variations of irregularity parameters. Patients with circadian approximate entropy n at baseline had more severe symptoms (symptom severity: 9 ± 4 vs. 6 ± 5, P < 0.05, circadian vs. noncircadian variations). All drugs decreased the MESOR of HR and increased the MESOR of variability parameters. Only carvedilol and metoprolol decreased the normalized amplitude over 24 h of all parameters and HR. In conclusion, HR and RR variability parameters present a circadian variation in patients with permanent AF, whereas few patients demonstrated circadian fluctuations in irregularity parameters, suggesting different physiological mechanisms. PMID:26497961

  17. Highway crash rates and age-related driver limitations: Literature review and evaluation of data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P.S.; Young, J.R.; Lu, An

    1993-08-01

    American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a larger proportion of older individuals in the population. Moreover, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort a decade ago. However, they continue to take shorter trips than younger drivers and they avoid driving during congested hours. This recent demographic transformation in our society, the graying of America, coupled with the increasing mobility of the older population impose a serious highway safety issue that cannot be overlooked. Some of the major concerns are the identification of ``high-risk`` older drivers and the establishment of licensing guidelines and procedures that are based on conclusive scientific evidence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) objectives in this project can be characterized by the following tasks: Review and evaluate the 1980 American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) licensing guidelines. Determine whether the license restriction recommended in the 1980 AAMVA and NHTSA guidelines was based on scientific evidence or on judgement of medical advisors. Identify in the scientific literature any medical conditions which are found to be highly associated with highway crashes, and which are not mentioned in the 1980 guidelines. Summarize States` current licensing practices for drivers with age-related physical and mental limitations. Identify potential data sources to establish conclusive evidence on age-related functional impairments and highway crashes.

  18. General probability-matched relations between radar reflectivity and rain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wolff, David B.; Atlas, David

    1993-01-01

    An improved method for transforming radar-observed reflectivities Ze into rain rate R is presented. The method is based on a formulation of a Ze-R function constrained such that (1) the radar-retrieved pdf of R and all of its moments are identical to those determined from the gauges over a sufficiently large domain, and (2) the fraction of the time that it is raining above a low but still has an accurately measurable rain intensity is identical for both the radar and for simultaneous measurements of collocated gauges on average. Data measured by a 1.65-deg beamwidth C-band radar and 22 gauges located in the vicinity of Darwin, Australia, are used. The resultant Ze-R functions show a strong range dependence, especially for the rain regimes characterized by strong reflectivity gradients and substantial attenuation. The application of these novel Ze-R functions to the radar data produces excellent matches to the gauge measurements without any systematic bias.

  19. Growth Rate of Bumblebee Larvae is Related to Pollen Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Romain; Vanderplanck, Maryse; Roger, Nathalie; Declèves, Sylvain; Wathelet, Bernard; Rasmont, Pierre; Fournier, Denis; Michez, Denis

    2016-02-01

    The use of Bombus terrestris L. commercial colonies for outdoor and greenhouse crop pollination is currently widespread. Colony breeding includes bumblebee feeding, mostly by using the honeybee pollen loads of diverse palynological composition. Because the chemical content of pollen is highly variable, the choice of commercial blend should not be random but has to be carefully selected to ensure the optimal development of workers and then pollination efficacy. In this work, we compared the impact of three common commercial blends on the development of bumblebee microcolonies, namely, Actinidia deliciosa L., Cistus sp., and Salix sp. We focus on amino acids (i.e., composition and amount), as they are currently used as an indicator of diet performance. Five parameters were used to determine microcolonies growth rate: 1) number of eggs, 2) number of alive larvae, 3) number of ejected larvae, 4) number of pupae, and 5) total number of offspring. Syrup collection was also monitored to estimate energetic requirement for colony growth. Results revealed that the three commercial blends chemically differed in their amino acid contents, with those displaying higher concentrations (i.e., Salix sp. and A. deliciosa) accelerating microcolony development along with an increase of syrup collection. The advantages of rearing bumblebee commercial colonies using a pollen diet with an optimal amino acid content are discussed. PMID:26385047

  20. Rate-related accelerating (autodecremental) atrial pacing for reversion of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Nathan, A; Hellestrand, K; Ward, D; Spurrell, R; Camm, J

    1982-01-01

    Twenty consecutive patients with paroxysmal intra A-V nodal or atrio-ventricular tachycardia had a new tachycardia reversion pacing modality evaluated during routine electrophysiological study. The pacing was controlled by a micropressor interfaced with a stimulator connected to a right atrial pacing electrode. On detection of tachycardia the first pacing cycle interval is equal to the tachycardia cycle length minus a decrement value D. Each subsequent pacing cycle is further reduced by the same value of D, thus accelerating the pacing burst until a plateau of 100 beats/min faster than tachycardia (with an absolute lower limit of 275 beats/min) is reached. Seven different values of D (2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 34, 50 msec) were assessed in combination with three different durations of pacing P (500, 5000 msec). With P:500, only 2/20 tachycardias were terminated, but with P:1000, 16/20 were terminated. With P:5000 all were terminated and the combination successful in all patients was P:5000 and D:16. No unwanted arrhythmias were induced. In contrast, competitive constant rate overdrive atrial pacing accomplished tachycardia termination in all cases, but in four instances resulted in atrial flutter or fibrillation. Autodecremental pacing, which tends to avoid stimulation in the vulnerable period, allowed safe and successful termination of all tachycardias evaluated in this study. PMID:7069321

  1. Quantifying Knick Point Migration Rates Related to the Messinian Crisis. The Case of the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Pucher, Christoph; Robl, Jörg; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Messinian crisis is a temporally well-constrained period between 5.3 my and 5.9 my, when the strait of Gibraltar was tectonically closed and the Mediterranean Sea had consequently desiccated. This dramatic base level drop by about 1500 vertical meters had a profound influence on the geomorphic evolution of the major drainages surrounding the Mediterranean basin. In particular, it caused substantial knickpoints in the major rivers including the Rhone, the Ebro, the Po and the Nile. While the knickpoints of the Rhone and Ebro have been studied previously and the knickpoints created by the Po may lie today underneath the Po plains, the knickpoint and its migration along the Nile has not been studied and would have migrated along its current river channel. In this contribution we focus on numerical modelling of the knickpoint migration in the Nile and use our modelling results in comparison with the present day morphological analyses of the river to constrain absolute migration rates. We suspect that the first Nile cataract near Assuan, some 1000 km upstream of today's river mouth may be the relict of the Messinian salinity crisis making it to one of the fastest migrating knickpoints in the world.

  2. Diurnal Changes of Zooplankton Community Reduction Rate at Lake Outlets and Related Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Czerniawski, Robert; Sługocki, Łukasz

    2016-01-01

    The reduced zooplankton abundance at the outlet sections of lakes depends on the occurrence of preying fry. Therefore, light conditions can play a major role in the drift of zooplankton along river outlets. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of diurnal light conditions on the decline of zooplankton densities at lake outlets. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) levels were measured to determine their effect on the rate of reduced zooplankton abundance. Cladocerans and copepods showed a significantly greater reduction in abundance than rotifers and nauplii. A significant positive relationship was observed between the PAR levels and the reduced abundance of Asplanchna sp., small cladocerans, large cladocerans and Copepoda at the lake outlets. Among the rotifers, small pelagic rotifers drifted the farthest at all hours of the day. Large crustaceans, especially the large cladocerans and copepodites and adult copepods, had the lowest chance of dispersing over a wide area. Our results indicate that light conditions play an important role in the reduction of zooplankton abundance at lake outlets and have an indirect influence on the downstream food web. PMID:27392017

  3. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate measurement by VES Matic Cube 80 in relation to inflammation plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Helena; Muzzi, Chiara; Leoncini, Roberto; Scapellato, Carlo; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Furlani, Emiliano; Guerranti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Westergren method is considered as the reference procedure to measure Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) by the International Council for Standardization in Haematology. However, a closed automated method, VES Matic Cube 80 (DIESSE S.p.A., Siena, Italy), has been introduced as a new ESR measurement instrument. In this article, we report two different studies: first, we compared the two methods (Westergren and VES Matic Cube 80) and second, we correlated the inflammatory state of 248 patients with their ESR values. Total protein, albumin, C-reactive protein, and other inflammatory proteins were detected in each sample. The results obtained using VES Matic Cube 80 demonstrated a good correlation with those obtained using the Westergren method (Ordinary linear regression: y=0.955x-0.205, r(2) =0.816, P<0.05; Passing-Bablock regression equation: y=0.9153x-0.5763; Bland-Altman analysis: bias 1.2; limits of agreement -17.4-19.9) and with the inflammatory protein levels (CRP: r=0.554 and r=0.498 and Fibrinogen: r=0.699 and r=0.663 for Ves Matic Cube 80 and Westergren, respectively), supporting the hypothesis that VES Matic Cube 80 offers a fast and safe ESR determination, ensuring precision and a very good correlation with the reference method. PMID:21567468

  4. Peritraumatic Behavior Questionnaire - Observer Rated: Validation of the objective version of a measure for combat-related peritraumatic stress

    PubMed Central

    Agorastos, Agorastos; Angkaw, Abigail C; Johnson, Heather E; Hansen, Christian J; Cook, Camille V; Baker, Dewleen G

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the first third-person-rated measure assessing combat-related peritraumatic stress symptoms and evaluate its psychometric properties and war-zone applicability. METHODS: The valid assessment of peritraumatic symptoms in the theater of military operations represents a significant challenge in combat-related, mental health research, which mainly relies on retrospective, subjective self-report ratings. This longitudinal observational study used data from actively deployed troops to correlate third-person observer ratings of deployment peritraumatic behaviors [Peritraumatic Behavior Questionnaire - Observer Rated (PBQ-OR)] collected on a bi-monthly basis with post-deployment (1-wk follow-up) ratings of the previously validated PBQ self-rate version (PBQ-SR), and (3-mo follow-up) clinician assessed and self-report posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms (Clinician Administered PTSD Scale, PTSD Checklist). Cronbach’s alpha (α) and correlation coefficients were calculated to assess internal reliability and concurrent validity respectively. RESULTS: Eight hundred and sixty male Marines were included in this study after signing informed consents at pre-deployment (mean age 23.2 ± 2.6 years). Although our findings were limited by an overall sparse return rate of PBQ-OR ratings, the main results indicate satisfactory psychometric properties with good internal consistency for the PBQ-OR (α = 0.88) and high convergent and concurrent validity with 1-wk post-deployment PBQ-SR ratings and 3-mo posttraumatic stress symptoms. Overall, later PBQ-OR report date was associated with higher correlation between PBQ-OR and post-deployment measures. Kappa analysis between PBQ-OR and PBQ-SR single items, showed best agreement in questions relating of mortal peril, desire for revenge, and experience of intense physical reactions. Logistic regression demonstrated satisfactory predictive validity of PBQ-OR total score with respect to PTSD caseness (OR = 1.0513; 95%CI

  5. The spin down of the radio pulsars: Braking index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Gurevich, A. V.; Istomin, Ya. N.

    1991-01-01

    Presently, the value of the retardation dP/dt is well known for most radio pulsars. It is negative for all cases except one and is of the order of 10(exp -15). That single case is when the pulsar, which is located in the star globular system, can have a considerable acceleration leading to the opposite sign of P'= dP/dt due to the Doppler effect. Careful measurements of the period, P, also allow one to determine the variation of this retardation with the course of time- P'' = d(exp 2)P/dt(exp 2). The results of these measurements are usually represented in the form of the dimensionless retardation index n = omega'' omega/omega(exp 2)= 2 - P''P/P(exp 2) (omega is the angular velocity). The data for 21 pulsars are given. The parameter, n, is strongly undetermined both in value and sign in all cases except for four pulsars. Changes of the rotation period, P, and the inclination angle, chi, the angle between the axes of rotation and the magnetic moment are caused by two processes: the regular retardation and nutation due to deviation from the strict spherical shape of the neutron star. Losses which are caused by the currents flowing in the magnetosphere of the neutron star and by being closed on the star surface are considered. Such losses are critical for the neutron star magnetosphere which is full of dense plasma. Since the radio emission is generated in the dense plasma of the polar magnetosphere, then practically all radio pulsars are retarded by the current mechanism. The formula for the braking index is presented along with other aspects of the investigation.

  6. Spin-down of radio millisecond pulsars at genesis.

    PubMed

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2012-02-01

    Millisecond pulsars are old neutron stars that have been spun up to high rotational frequencies via accretion of mass from a binary companion star. An important issue for understanding the physics of the early spin evolution of millisecond pulsars is the impact of the expanding magnetosphere during the terminal stages of the mass-transfer process. Here, I report binary stellar evolution calculations that show that the braking torque acting on a neutron star, when the companion star decouples from its Roche lobe, is able to dissipate >50% of the rotational energy of the pulsar. This effect may explain the apparent difference in observed spin distributions between x-ray and radio millisecond pulsars and help account for the noticeable age discrepancy with their young white dwarf companions. PMID:22301314

  7. Spin-Down of the North Atlantic Subpolar Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.; Rhines, P. B.

    2004-01-01

    Dramatic changes have occurred in the mid-to-high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean as evidenced by TOPEX/Poseidon observations of sea surface height (SSH) in the subpolar gyre and the Gulf Stream. Analysis of altimeter data shows that subpolar SSH has increased during the 1990s and the geostrophic velocity derived from altimeter data shows a decline in the gyre circulation. Direct current-meter observations in the boundary current of the Labrador Sea support the trend in the 199Os, and, together with hydrographic data show that in the mid-late 1990s the trend extends deep in the water column. We find that buoyancy forcing over the northern North Atlantic has a dynamic effect consistent with the altimeter data and hydrographic observations: a weak thermohaline forcing and the subsequent decay of the domed structure of the subpolar isopycnals would give rise to the observed anticyclonic circulation trend.

  8. On the spin-down of young neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Cristian G.; Negreiros, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Rotation Powered-Pulsars (RPPs) are exposed to a long-term changes in the period of rotation, which are measured by the frequency and its derivatives, Ω, Ω˙, Ω¨, obtained from timing observations. The parameter that links these observables with pulsar deceleration is the braking index, n, which is exactly 3 for purely dipolar radiation. Few braking indices have been estimated to date, for very young pulsars, and in all cases, n < 3. These observations suggest that there are complex plasma processes in the magnetosphere of the pulsar that are not fully well understood. In the present work we revisit the magnetic torque problem for young pulsars in the approach of magnetic field growth due ohmic diffusion. We show that such approach could explain the low values of n in very young neutron stars and may be relevant to explain why a small group of neutron stars, found in young supernova remnants or CCOs, exhibit little or no evidence for the presence of a magnetic field.

  9. Peripheral intravenous therapy-related phlebitis rates in an adult population.

    PubMed

    White, S A

    2001-01-01

    To determine the incidence of peripheral intravenous therapy-related phlebitis in an adult population, 305 peripheral i.v. catheter sites were observed from the time of admission of the patient (or initiation of the first peripheral i.v. catheter) to the time of the participant's discharge from the facility (or 48 hours after the removal of the final catheter). Parameters monitored included patient demographics, diagnosis, i.v. fluids and medications, type of peripheral catheter, dwell time, and dressing integrity. Results showed that of the 10 cases of phlebitis found in nine study subjects, all were associated with catheters indwelling less than 72 hours. In three cases, although the catheter site was clear at the time of catheter removal, postinfusion phlebitis developed within 24 hours. Catheter site locations, diagnoses, medications, and i.v. fluids in these cases were varied. PMID:11836840

  10. Variability of raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relations in extreme Mediterranean precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Yu, Nan; Boudevillain, Brice; Delrieu, Guy; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2010-05-01

    Relationships between radar reflectivity and rainfall intensity can be derived by correlating weather radar and raingauge measurements. However, one should be cautious in applying such methods because of differences in the sampling characteristics of both instruments. A more appropriate manner to establish such relations is to employ raindrop size distributions sampled by a disdrometer. In literature different methods have been applied using such disdrometer data, all leading to different results. In this paper, closer attention is given to four of such techniques. The main assumption is that there exist a power-law relationship between the radar reflectivity and rainfall intensity. Two of them are based on statistical least-squares regression methods. The other two methods apply a normalization theory for the raindrop size distribution (DSD), which assumes that all DSD variability can be related to one reference variable. Here it is assumed that the normalized DSD either follows an exponential or a gamma distribution. A new method is presented to estimate the parameters of this normalized distribution, which is easy to calculate and has a shorter overall calculation time with respect to previously reported methods. Although the four different methods obtain different power-law relationships, especially for convective storm systems, they all produce appropriate results. As such, no single optimal relationship is valid but there exists a larger optimal region in the space of the Z-R relationship parameters. Those parameters obtained by the least-squares methods contain a larger amount of uncertainty. For stratiform type of events both micro-physical techniques perform less good as a result of intra-event rainfall variability.

  11. Predicting Fluctuating Rates of Hospitalizations in Relation to Influenza Epidemics and Meteorological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Batton-Hubert, Mireille; Sarazin, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In France, rates of hospital admissions increase at the peaks of influenza epidemics. Predicting influenza-associated hospitalizations could help to anticipate increased hospital activity. The purpose of this study is to identify predictors of influenza epidemics through the analysis of meteorological data, and medical data provided by general practitioners. Methods Historical data were collected from Meteo France, the Sentinelles network and hospitals’ information systems for a period of 8 years (2007–2015). First, connections between meteorological and medical data were estimated with the Pearson correlation coefficient, Principal component analysis and classification methods (Ward and k-means). Epidemic states of tested weeks were then predicted for each week during a one-year period using linear discriminant analysis. Finally, transition probabilities between epidemic states were calculated with the Markov Chain method. Results High correlations were found between influenza-associated hospitalizations and the variables: Sentinelles and emergency department admissions, and anti-correlations were found between hospitalizations and each of meteorological factors applying a time lag of: -13, -12 and -32 days respectively for temperature, absolute humidity and solar radiation. Epidemic weeks were predicted accurately with the linear discriminant analysis method; however there were many misclassifications about intermediate and non-epidemic weeks. Transition probability to an epidemic state was 100% when meteorological variables were below: 2°C, 4 g/m3 and 32 W/m2, respectively for temperature, absolute humidity and solar radiation. This probability was 0% when meteorological variables were above: 6°C, 5.8g/m3 and 74W/m2. Conclusion These results confirm a good correlation between influenza-associated hospitalizations, meteorological factors and general practitioner’s activity, the latter being the strongest predictor of hospital activity. PMID

  12. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically <0.1 wt %). The excess Mg was taken up by the calcite grains in between, stabilizing them and causing a few volume percent rodlike relicts of Mg-enriched calcite (up to 10 wt % MgO) to be left behind by the advancing reaction front. The aragonite growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  13. Relative Contributions of Geothermal Pumping and Long-Term Earthquake Rate to Seismicity at California Geothermal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, D. A.; Jackson, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    In a tectonically active area, a definitive discrimination between geothermally-induced and tectonic earthquakes is difficult to achieve. We focus our study on California's 11 major geothermal fields: Amedee, Brawley, Casa Diablo, Coso, East Mesa, The Geysers, Heber, Litchfield, Salton Sea, Susanville, and Wendel. The Geysers geothermal field is the world's largest geothermal energy producer. California's Department of Oil Gas and Geothermal Resources provides field-wide monthly injection and production volumes for each of these sites, which allows us to study the relationship between geothermal pumping activities and seismicity. Since many of the geothermal fields began injecting and producing before nearby seismic stations were installed, we use smoothed seismicity since 1932 from the ANSS catalog as a proxy for tectonic earthquake rate. We examine both geothermal pumping and long-term earthquake rate as factors that may control earthquake rate. Rather than focusing only on the largest earthquake, which is essentially a random occurrence in time, we examine how M≥4 earthquake rate density (probability per unit area, time, and magnitude) varies for each field. We estimate relative contributions to the observed earthquake rate of M≥4 from both a long-term earthquake rate (Kagan and Jackson, 2010) and pumping activity. For each geothermal field, respective earthquake catalogs (NCEDC and SCSN) are complete above at least M3 during the test period (which we tailor to each site). We test the hypothesis that the observed earthquake rate at a geothermal site during the test period is a linear combination of the long-term seismicity and pumping rates. We use a grid search to determine the confidence interval of the weighting parameters.

  14. The Relation between Star-Formation Rate and Stellar Mass of Galaxies at z ~ 1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsianis, A.; Tescari, E.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    The relation between the star-formation Rate and stellar mass (M ⋆) of galaxies represents a fundamental constraint on galaxy formation, and has been studied extensively both in observations and cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. However, the observed amplitude of the star-formation rate-stellar mass relation has not been successfully reproduced in simulations, indicating either that the halo accretion history and baryonic physics are poorly understood/modelled or that observations contain biases. In this paper, we examine the evolution of the SFR - M ⋆ relation of z ~ 1-4 galaxies and display the inconsistency between observed relations that are obtained using different techniques. We employ cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from various groups which are tuned to reproduce a range of observables and compare these with a range of observed SFR - M ⋆ relations. We find that numerical results are consistent with observations that use Spectral Energy Distribution techniques to estimate star-formation rates, dust corrections, and stellar masses. On the contrary, simulations are not able to reproduce results that were obtained by combining only UV and IR luminosities (UV+IR). These imply star-formation rates at a fixed stellar mass that are larger almost by a factor of 5 than those of Spectral Energy Distribution measurements for z ~ 1.5-4. For z < 1.5, the results from simulations, Spectral Energy Distribution fitting techniques and IR+UV conversion agree well. We find that surveys that preferably select star-forming galaxies (e.g. by adopting Lyman-break or blue selection) typically predict a larger median/average star-formation rate at a fixed stellar mass especially for high mass objects, with respect to mass selected samples and hydrodynamic simulations. Furthermore, we find remarkable agreement between the numerical results from various authors who have employed different cosmological codes and run simulations with different resolutions. This is

  15. Exposure Error Masks The Relationship Between Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Heart Rate Variability (HRV)

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Helen H.; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Objective We examined whether more precise exposure measures would better detect associations between traffic-related pollution, elemental carbon (EC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and HRV. Methods Repeated 24-h personal and ambient PM2.5, EC, and NO2 were measured for 30 people living in Atlanta, GA. The association between HRV and either ambient concentrations or personal exposures was examined using linear mixed effects models. Results Ambient PM2.5, EC, and NO2 and personal PM2.5 were not associated with HRV. Personal EC and NO2 measured 24-h prior to HRV was associated with decreased rMSSD, PNN50, and HF and with increased LF/HF. RMSSD decreased by 10.97% (95% CI: -18.00,-3.34) for an IQR change in personal EC (0.81 ug/m3). Conclusions Results indicate decreased vagal tone in response to traffic pollutants, which can best be detected with precise personal exposure measures. PMID:20595912

  16. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P.; Escala, A.; Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  17. Soluble carbohydrates and relative growth rates in chloro-, cyano- and cephalolichens: effects of temperature and nocturnal hydration.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Azharul; Gauslaa, Yngvar; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2015-11-01

    This growth chamber experiment evaluates how temperature and humidity regimes shape soluble carbohydrate pools and growth rates in lichens with different photobionts. We assessed soluble carbohydrates, relative growth rates (RGRs) and relative thallus area growth rates (RTA GRs) in Parmelia sulcata (chlorolichen), Peltigera canina (cyanolichen) and Peltigera aphthosa (cephalolichen) cultivated for 14 d (150 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ; 12-h photoperiod) at four day : night temperatures (28 : 23°C, 20 : 15°C, 13 : 8°C, 6 : 1°C) and two hydration regimes (hydration during the day, dry at night; hydration day : night). The major carbohydrates were mannitol (cephalolichen), glucose (cyanolichen) and arabitol (chlorolichen). Mannitol occurred in all species. During cultivation, total carbohydrate pools decreased in cephalo-/cyanolichens, but increased in the chlorolichen. Carbohydrates varied less than growth with temperature and humidity. All lichens grew rapidly, particularly at 13 : 8°C. RGRs and RTA GRs were significantly higher in lichens hydrated for 24 h than for 12 h. Strong photoinhibition occurred in cephalo- and cyanolichens kept in cool dry nights, resulting in positive relationships between RGR and dark-adapted photosystem II (PSII) efficiency (Fv /Fm ). RGR increased significantly with the photobiont-specific carbohydrate pools within all species. Average RGR peaked in the chlorolichen lowest in total and photobiont carbohydrates. Nocturnal hydration improved recovery from photoinhibition and/or enhanced conversion rates of photosynthates into growth. PMID:26017819

  18. Relation between annoyance and single-number quantities for rating heavy-weight floor impact sound insulation in wooden houses.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jongkwan; Sato, Hiroshi; Kurakata, Kenji; Hiramitsu, Atsuo; Tanaka, Manabu; Hirota, Tomohito

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the relation between annoyance and single-number quantities to rate heavy-weight floor impact sound insulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the subjective response of annoyance resulting from heavy-weight floor impact sounds recorded in wooden houses. Stimuli had two typical spectra and their modified versions, which simulate the precise change in frequency response resulting from insulation treatments. Results of the first experiment showed that the Zwicker's percentile loudness (N(5)) was the quantity to rate most well annoyance of heavy-weight impact sound over a wide sound level range. The second experiment revealed that arithmetic average (L(iFavg,Fmax)) of octave-band sound pressure levels measured using the time constant "fast" and Zwicker's percentile loudness (N(5)) much better described annoyance by the precise change in the sound spectrum attributable to insulation treatments than Japanese standardized single-number quantities (L(i,Fmax,r), L(iA,Fmax), and L(i,Fmax,Aw)) do. Japanese standardized single-number quantities using the A-weighting curve as a rating curve were found to be excessively influenced by the 63 Hz octave-band sound level and have the great sound level-dependences in the relation with subjective ratings. PMID:21568408

  19. Role of heart rate in the relation between regional body fat and subendocardial viability ratio in women.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Joaquin U; Hadri, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) is a measure of left ventricular function, specifically; it is an index of myocardial perfusion relative to left ventricular workload. Women have lower SEVR than men, partly due to a faster resting heart rate that reduces diastolic time (i.e., time for myocardial perfusion). It is unclear if body fat relates to SEVR, thus the purpose of this study was to examine the relation between body fat and SEVR in women. Twenty-eight middle-aged (31-45 years) and 31 older (60-80 years) women were examined. Radial artery applanation tonometry was used to calculate SEVR from a synthesized central aortic pressure wave. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess body composition including fat in the trunk, legs, android and gynoid regions. Body fat was not related (P>.05) with SEVR in older women. In middle-aged women, all measures of regional fat were correlated with heart rate (range, r=.49-.59, P≤.01) and SEVR (range, r=.43-.53, P≤.01). Android-to-gynoid ratio was identified as the strongest predictor (r(2) =-.26, P<.01) of SEVR among measures of regional fat. Middle-aged women with lower android-to-gynoid fat ratio had higher SEVR (1.96±0.33 vs 1.66±0.20, P=.009) than women with higher fat ratio, even after adjusting for age, height, daily physical activity, and aortic mean pressure (P=.02). Adjusting for heart rate or diastolic time abolished the difference in SEVR between groups (1.80±0.09 vs 1.82±0.09, P=.56). These results suggest that middle-aged women with a greater distribution of fat in the abdomen have poorer left ventricular function that is dependent on the negative influence of heart rate on diastolic time. PMID:27220028

  20. DNS assessment of relation between mean reaction and scalar dissipation rates in the flamelet regime of premixed turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaevich Lipatnikov, Andrei; Nishiki, Shinnosuke; Hasegawa, Tatsuya

    2015-05-01

    The linear relation between the mean rate of product creation and the mean scalar dissipation rate, derived in the seminal paper by K.N.C. Bray ['The interaction between turbulence and combustion', Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Vol. 17 (1979), pp. 223-233], is the cornerstone for models of premixed turbulent combustion that deal with the dissipation rate in order to close the reaction rate. In the present work, this linear relation is straightforwardly validated by analysing data computed earlier in the 3D Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of three statistically stationary, 1D, planar turbulent flames associated with the flamelet regime of premixed combustion. Although the linear relation does not hold at the leading and trailing edges of the mean flame brush, such a result is expected within the framework of Bray's theory. However, the present DNS yields substantially larger (smaller) values of an input parameter cm (or K2 = 1/(2cm - 1)), involved by the studied linear relation, when compared to the commonly used value of cm = 0.7 (or K2 = 2.5). To gain further insight into the issue and into the eventual dependence of cm on mixture composition, the DNS data are combined with the results of numerical simulations of stationary, 1D, planar laminar methane-air flames with complex chemistry, with the results being reported in terms of differently defined combustion progress variables c, i.e. the normalised temperature, density, or mole fraction of CH4, O2, CO2 or H2O. Such a study indicates the dependence of cm both on the definition of c and on the equivalence ratio. Nevertheless, K2 and cm can be estimated by processing the results of simulations of counterpart laminar premixed flames. Similar conclusions were also drawn by skipping the DNS data, but invoking a presumed beta probability density function in order to evaluate cm for the differently defined c's and various equivalence ratios.

  1. Behavior-related pauses in simple-spike activity of mouse Purkinje cells are linked to spike rate modulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying; Maran, Selva K; Dhamala, Mukesh; Jaeger, Dieter; Heck, Detlef H

    2012-06-20

    Purkinje cells (PCs) in the mammalian cerebellum express high-frequency spontaneous activity with average spike rates between 30 and 200 Hz. Cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons receive converging input from many PCs, resulting in a continuous barrage of inhibitory inputs. It has been hypothesized that pauses in PC activity trigger increases in CN spiking activity. A prediction derived from this hypothesis is that pauses in PC simple-spike activity represent relevant behavioral or sensory events. Here, we asked whether pauses in the simple-spike activity of PCs related to either fluid licking or respiration, play a special role in representing information about behavior. Both behaviors are widely represented in cerebellar PC simple-spike activity. We recorded PC activity in the vermis and lobus simplex of head-fixed mice while monitoring licking and respiratory behavior. Using cross-correlation and Granger causality analysis, we examined whether short interspike intervals (ISIs) had a different temporal relationship to behavior than long ISIs or pauses. Behavior-related simple-spike pauses occurred during low-rate simple-spike activity in both licking- and breathing-related PCs. Granger causality analysis revealed causal relationships between simple-spike pauses and behavior. However, the same results were obtained from an analysis of surrogate spike trains with gamma ISI distributions constructed to match rate modulations of behavior-related Purkinje cells. Our results therefore suggest that the occurrence of pauses in simple-spike activity does not represent additional information about behavioral or sensory events that goes beyond the simple-spike rate modulations. PMID:22723707

  2. Variability of raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relations in extreme Mediterranean precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Hazenberg, P.; Yu, N.; Boudevillain, B.; Delrieu, G.

    2010-12-01

    exponent, the prefactor of the Z-R relation tends to be larger for the more convective type events. This emphasizes the different meteorological origin of the heavy rainfall observed in the south of France as compared to other regions of the world.

  3. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I C; Levine, J S

    1986-05-01

    Biogenic emissions of nitric and nitrous oxides have important impacts on the photochemistry and chemistry of the atmosphere. Although biogenic production appears to be the overwhelming source of N(2)O, the magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is very uncertain. In soils, possible sources of NO and N(2)O include nitrification by autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. The availability of oxygen determines to a large extent the relative activities of these various groups of organisms. To better understand this influence, we investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) on the production of NO and N(2)O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO(2) in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N(2)O production was inversely proportional to pO(2). Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N(2)O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N(2)O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N(2)O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N(2)O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sparged with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N(2)O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites

  4. Heavy smoking rate trends and related factors in Korean occupational groups: analysis of KNHANES 2007–2012 data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Guen; Pang, Do-Dam; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Jong-In; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Myong, Jun-Pyo; Jang, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study was designed to investigate the smoking and heavy smoking trends and identify possible related factors among Korean male workers from 2007 to 2012 by occupational groups. Methods The data were derived from the fourth (2007–2009) and fifth (2010–2012) waves of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Occupational groups were categorised into three groups, which were non-manual, manual and service and sales groups. Age-adjusted prevalence rates of smoking and heavy smoking (>20 cigarettes/day) in men aged 25–64 years were calculated. Factors associated with heavy smoking were investigated using logistic regression analyses. Results Smoking rate in manual workers decreased gradually over time (p for trend <0.0001). Smoking rate was higher in manual than non-manual workers, but the difference reduced over time (p for trend <0.0001). Heavy smoking rate decreased from 2007 to 2012 (p for trend <0.0001). Heavy smoking rate was higher in manual than non-manual workers; however, this difference increased over time. Stress, depressive mood and long working hours (≥60 h/week) were associated with heavy smoking. Conclusions Antismoking policy should focus on current and heavy smokers. Workplace antismoking programmes should consider working hours and stress, especially in manual workers. PMID:26563212

  5. Analysis of changes in relative elemental growth rate patterns in the elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots upon gravistimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis is an important system for studying root physiology, the localized growth patterns of its roots have not been well defined, particularly during tropic responses. In order to characterize growth rate profiles along the apex of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh (ecotype Columbia) we applied small charcoal particles to the root surface and analyzed their displacement during growth using an automated video digitizer system with custom software for tracking the markers. When growing vertically, the maximum elongation rate occurred 481 +/- 50 microns back from the extreme tip of the root (tip of root cap), and the elongation zone extended back to 912 +/- 137 microns. The distal elongation zone (DEZ) has previously been described as the apical region of the elongation zone in which the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) is < or = 30% of the peak rate in the central elongation zone. By this definition, our data indicate that the basal limit of the DEZ was located 248 +/- 30 microns from the root tip. However, after gravistimulation, the growth patterns of the root changed. Within the first hour of graviresponse, the basal limit of the DEZ and the position of peak REGR shifted apically on the upper flank of the root. This was due to a combination of increased growth in the DEZ and growth inhibition in the central elongation zone. On the lower flank, the basal limit of the DEZ shifted basipetally as the REGR decreased. These factors set up the gradient of growth rate across the root, which drives curvature.

  6. The relative roles of density and climatic variation on population dynamics and fecundity rates in three contrasting ungulate species.

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, T; Milner-Gulland, E J; Clutton-Brock, T

    2000-01-01

    The relative influences of density-dependent and -independent processes on vital rates and population dynamics have been debated in ecology for over half a century, yet it is only recently that both processes have been shown to operate within the same population. However, generalizations on the role of each process across species are rare. Using a process-orientated generalized linear modelling approach we show that variations in fecundity rates in populations of three species of ungulates with contrasting life histories are associated with density and winter weather in a remarkably similar manner. However, there are differences and we speculate that they are a result of differences in size between the species. Much previous research exploring the association between vital rates, population dynamics and density-dependent and -independent processes has used pattern-orientated approaches to decompose time-series into contributions from density-dependent and -independent processes. Results from these analyses are sometimes used to infer associations between vital rates, density and climatic variables. We compare results from pattern-orientated analyses of time-series with process-orientated analyses and report that the two approaches give different results. The approach of analysing relationships between vital rates, density and climatic variables may detect important processes influencing population dynamics that time-series methodologies may overlook. PMID:12233776

  7. Heart rate changes in relation to cosmic ray intensity variability: A wide investigation in different latitudes and longitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromichalaki, Helen; Safaraly-Oghlu Babayev, Elchin; -Christina Papailiou, Maria; Dimitrova, Svetla; Kudela, Karel; Stetiarova, Jana; Giannaropoulou, Elisavet; Loucas, Panayiotis

    The increased number of recent studies over the last years, regarding the possible effect of geomagnetic disturbances and cosmic ray intensity variations may have on human physiological parameters (such as heart rate, arterial diastolic and systolic blood pressure, etc) suggests that biological objects and, particularly, human health are potentially affected by solar activity and related geophysical changes. Different scientific groups from Azerbaijan (Baku), Bulgaria (Sofia), Greece (Athens) and Slovakia (Kosice) have conducted relevant researches, separately or in cooperation with each another, using medical data from 1994 to 2008. The results of collaborative study of human heart rate changes in relation to cosmic ray intensity variations are presented in this paper. Heart rate data were digitally registered: 1) for seven functionally healthy persons on working days (including Saturdays) during experiments at the Laboratory of Heliobiology located at the Medical Centre INAM, Baku, for the time period from July 15, 2006 to March 3, 2008; 2) for 86 healthy volunteers of the Solar -Terrestrial Laboratory of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia on every working day during the autumn and spring in years of maximal solar activity, from October 1, 2001 to November 9, 2001 and from April 8, 2002 to May 28, 2002; 3) for 225 persons with no cardiac symptoms or hospital admission, of the cardiological clinic of the KAT Hospital in Athens, for the time period from 2002 to 2006; and 4) for 4018 Slovak aviators during the time period from January 1, 1994 to December 31, 2002. It should be noted that considered period covers different phases of solar activity cycles and is characterized by such time intervals of strong solar and geomagnetic activity as October -November 2003, November 2004, January and July 2005 and December 2006. The statistical methods were applied to establish a statistical significance of the effect of cosmic ray intensity variations on heart rate

  8. The contribution of coping-related variables and heart rate variability to visual search performance under pressure.

    PubMed

    Laborde, Sylvain; Lautenbach, Franziska; Allen, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Visual search performance under pressure is explored within the predictions of the neurovisceral integration model. The experimental aims of this study were: 1) to investigate the contribution of coping-related variables to baseline, task, and reactivity (task-baseline) high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), and 2) to investigate the contribution of coping-related variables and HF-HRV to visual search performance under pressure. Participants (n=96) completed self-report measures of coping-related variables (emotional intelligence, coping style, perceived stress intensity, perceived control of stress, coping effectiveness, challenge and threat, and attention strategy) and HF-HRV was measured during a visual search task under pressure. The data show that baseline HF-HRV was predicted by a trait coping-related variable, task HF-HRV was predicted by a combination of trait and state coping-related variables, and reactivity HF-HRV was predicted by a state coping-related variable. Visual search performance was predicted by coping-related variables but not by HF-HRV. PMID:25481358

  9. Power and transmission-rate orders and related documents. Office of power marketing coordination: data compiled through December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    Prior to the establishment of the Department of Energy, power from Federal projects was marketed by five power marketing agencies under the Department of the Interior. These were the Alaska Power Administration (APA), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Southeastern Power Administration(SEPA), the Southwestern Power Administration (SWPA), and the United States Bureau of Reclamation(USBR). Under the ratemaking process, in effect prior to the establishment of DOE, the rates and charges for electric power by the then four power administrations were prepared by the individual Administrators subject to confirmation and approval by the FPC. The rates and charges for electric power marketed by the USBR, were subject to final approval of the Secretary of the Interior. In 1977 the Secretary of Energy authorized the Economic Regulatory Administration (ERA) to confirm and approve all Federal power rate adjustments proposed by the five power administrations, and in December 1978 the Secretary of Energy, signed Delegation Order No. 0204-33 which delegated to the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications the authority to confirm, approve, and place in effect power and transmission rates on an interim basis and delegated to the FERC the authority to confirm and approve such rates on a final basis. The delegation order became effective January 1, 1979. This publication is a compilation of all rate orders issued by the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications during Calendar Year 1979 under that delegation order. It also includes all final confirmations and approvals by the ERA and the FERC from October 1, 1977, through December 31, 1979. For ready reference, also included are all delegation orders and departmental orders relating to Federal power marketing.

  10. Relating the Diversity, Abundance, and Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Communities to Nitrification Rates in the Coastal Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolar, B. B.; Smith, J. M.; Chavez, F.; Francis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting first step of nitrification, is an important link between reduced (ammonia) and oxidized (nitrate) nitrogen, and controls the relative distribution of these forms of inorganic nitrogen. This process is catalyzed via the ammonia monooxygenase enzyme of both ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Archaea (AOA); the α subunit of this enzyme is encoded by the amoA gene and has been used as the molecular marker to detect this process. In the ocean, AOA are typically 10-1000 times more and are likely more active than AOB, and thus are key players in the marine nitrogen cycle. Monterey Bay is a dynamic site to study nitrification, as seasonal upwelling brings deep water and nutrients into surface waters, which can promote phytoplankton blooms and impact biogeochemical processes such as the nitrogen cycle. We have sampled two sites within Monterey Bay bimonthly for two years as part of the ongoing Monterey Bay Time Series (MBTS) to quantify AOA genes, transcripts, and nitrification rates. Two ecotypes of AOA are routinely found in Monterey Bay - the 'shallow' water column A (WCA) and 'deep' water column B (WCB) clades, which are thought to have distinct physiological properties and can be distinguished based on the amoA gene sequence. Previous work has shown a strong relationship between nitrification rates in Monterey Bay with the abundance of WCA amoA genes and transcripts. Additionally, we found a correlation between the relative abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA reads (as % of total) and the absolute abundance of AOA amoA genes (determined via qPCR) in Monterey Bay and the California Current System. AOA 16S rRNA gene abundances in turn correlated significantly with changes in nitrification rate with depth, while the relative abundance of genes and transcripts binned to a single AOA (Nitrosopumilus maritimus) was not significantly correlated to nitrification rate. Further analysis of the sequenced AOA

  11. Longitudinal Assessment of Self-Harm Statements of Youth in Foster Care: Rates, Reporters, and Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Joy; Hambrick, Erin P; Tunno, Angela M; Jackson, Yo; Spangler, Amanda; Kanine, Rebecca M

    2015-12-01

    Self-harm in youth is a risk factor related to mental health and future morbidity, yet, relatively little is known about the rates and course of self-harm in youth residing in foster care. This study examined self-harm talk in foster youth based on caregiver and child report for 135 children between the ages of 8- and 11-years old. Longitudinal data on course of self-harm talk from both youth and caregivers also are provided. Caregivers identified that 24% of youth participants had disclosed a desire to die or to hurt themselves. Youth self-report revealed that 21% of children indicated a desire for self-harm, and rates of self-harm from both reporters decreased over time. While overall rates were similar across reporters, findings show discrepancies between youth self-report and caregiver report within individuals. Also, caregivers for youth in residential facilities were more likely to report youth self-harm talk than caregivers from foster home settings. PMID:25534966

  12. Natural Selection and Recombination Rate Variation Shape Nucleotide Polymorphism Across the Genomes of Three Related Populus Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Street, Nathaniel R.; Scofield, Douglas G.; Ingvarsson, Pär K.

    2016-01-01

    A central aim of evolutionary genomics is to identify the relative roles that various evolutionary forces have played in generating and shaping genetic variation within and among species. Here we use whole-genome resequencing data to characterize and compare genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism, site frequency spectrum, and population-scaled recombination rates in three species of Populus: Populus tremula, P. tremuloides, and P. trichocarpa. We find that P. tremuloides has the highest level of genome-wide variation, skewed allele frequencies, and population-scaled recombination rates, whereas P. trichocarpa harbors the lowest. Our findings highlight multiple lines of evidence suggesting that natural selection, due to both purifying and positive selection, has widely shaped patterns of nucleotide polymorphism at linked neutral sites in all three species. Differences in effective population sizes and rates of recombination largely explain the disparate magnitudes and signatures of linked selection that we observe among species. The present work provides the first phylogenetic comparative study on a genome-wide scale in forest trees. This information will also improve our ability to understand how various evolutionary forces have interacted to influence genome evolution among related species. PMID:26721855

  13. Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Classon, Elisabet; Fällman, Katarina; Wressle, Ewa; Marcusson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens. PMID:27551749

  14. Relations between Concurrent Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Depressive Symptoms, Self-Rated Health and Everyday Function in Normally Aging Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ability to predict and prevent incipient functional decline in older adults may help prolong independence. Cognition is related to everyday function and easily administered, sensitive cognitive tests may help identify at-risk individuals. Factors like depressive symptoms and self-rated health are also associated with functional ability and may be as important as cognition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between concurrent longitudinal changes in cognition, depression, self-rated health and everyday function in a well-defined cohort of healthy 85 year olds that were followed-up at the age of 90 in the Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment 85 study. Regression analyses were used to determine if cognitive decline as assessed by global (the Mini-Mental State Examination) and domain specific (the Cognitive Assessment Battery, CAB) cognitive tests predicted functional decline in the context of changes in depressive symptoms and self-rated health. Results showed deterioration in most variables and as many as 83% of these community-dwelling elders experienced functional difficulties at the age of 90. Slowing-down of processing speed as assessed by the Symbol Digits Modality Test (included in the CAB) accounted for 14% of the variance in functional decline. Worsening self-rated health accounted for an additional 6%, but no other variables reached significance. These results are discussed with an eye to possible preventive interventions that may prolong independence for the steadily growing number of normally aging old-old citizens. PMID:27551749

  15. Large-Scale Variation in Forest Carbon Turnover Rate and its Relation to Climate - Remote Sensing vs. Global Vegetation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalhais, N.; Thurner, M.; Beer, C.; Forkel, M.; Rademacher, T. T.; Santoro, M.; Tum, M.; Schmullius, C.

    2015-12-01

    While vegetation productivity is known to be strongly correlated to climate, there is a need for an improved understanding of the underlying processes of vegetation carbon turnover and their importance at a global scale. This shortcoming has been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which we recently have been able to overcome by a biomass dataset covering northern boreal and temperate forests originating from radar remote sensing. Based on state-of-the-art products on biomass and NPP, we are for the first time able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests. The implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current global vegetation models. In contrast to our observation-based findings, investigated models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well to observation-based NPP, simulated vegetation carbon stocks are severely biased compared to our biomass dataset. Current limitations lead to considerable uncertainties in the estimated vegetation carbon turnover, contributing substantially to the forest feedback to climate change. Our results are the basis for improving mortality concepts in global vegetation models and estimating their impact on the land carbon balance.

  16. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian; Yuan, Xin; Anderson, James M; Santangelo, George M

    2016-09-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov. PMID:27599104

  17. The rate and magnitude of atmospheric pressure change that aggravate pain-related behavior of nerve injured rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun; Obata, Kouei; Mizumura, Kazue

    2011-05-01

    Complaints of patients with chronic pain may increase when the weather changes. The exact mechanism for weather change-induced pain has not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that artificially lowering barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with neuropathic pain [chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spinal nerve ligation (SNL)]. In the present study, we examined the rate and magnitude of LP that aggravates neuropathic pain. We measured pain-related behaviors [number of paw lifts to von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation] in awake rats after SNL or CCI surgery, and found that rates of decompression ≥5 hPa/h and ≥10 hPa/h and magnitudes of decompression ≥5 hPa and ≥10 hPa augmented pain-related behaviors in SNL and CCI rats, respectively. These results indicate that LP within the range of natural weather patterns augments neuropathic pain in rats, and that SNL rats are more sensitive to LP than CCI rats.

  18. Dating of Pregnancy in First versus Second Trimester in Relation to Post-Term Birth Rate: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Näslund Thagaard, Ida; Krebs, Lone; Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Olesen Larsen, Severin; Holm, Jens-Christian; Christiansen, Michael; Larsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate in a national standardised setting whether the performance of ultrasound dating during the first rather than the second trimester of pregnancy had consequences regarding the definition of pre- and post-term birth rates. Methods A cohort study of 8,551 singleton pregnancies with spontaneous delivery was performed from 2006 to 2012 at Copenhagen University Hospital, Holbæk, Denmark. We determined the duration of pregnancy calculated by last menstrual period, crown rump length (CRL), biparietal diameter (1st trimester), BPD (2nd trimester), and head circumference and compared mean and median durations, the mean differences, the systematic discrepancies, and the percentages of pre-term and post-term pregnancies in relation to each method. The primary outcomes were post-term and pre-term birth rates defined by different dating methods. Results The change from use of second to first trimester measurements for dating was associated with a significant increase in the rate of post-term deliveries from 2.1–2.9% and a significant decrease in the rate of pre-term deliveries from 5.4–4.6% caused by systematic discrepancies. Thereby 25.1% would pass 41 weeks when GA is defined by CRL and 17.3% when BPD (2nd trimester) is used. Calibration for these discrepancies resulted in a lower post-term birth rate, from 3.1–1.4%, when first compared to second trimester dating was used. Conclusions Systematic discrepancies were identified when biometric formulas were used to determine duration of pregnancy. This should be corrected in clinical practice to avoid an overestimation of post-term birth and unnecessary inductions when first trimester formulas are used. PMID:26760299

  19. Intraperitoneal adipose tissue is strongly related to survival rate in a mouse cecal ligation and puncture model

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Shuhei; Takasu, Osamu; Sakamoto, Teruo; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) models exhibiting polymicrobial sepsis are considered as the gold standard in sepsis research. However, despite meticulous research being conducted in this field, only few treatment drugs are available, indicating that CLP sepsis models do not completely mimic human sepsis models. The greatest flaw in CLP models is abscess formation because the localization of inflammation caused by abscess formation increases the survival rate. Therefore, by resecting intraperitoneal adipose tissue, we developed a mouse CLP model wherein abscess formation was unlikely. Survival rates at 7 days postoperatively were compared using the Kaplan–Meier method for an intraperitoneal adipose tissue resection group (resection group, n=34), an intraperitoneal adipose tissue non-resection group (non-resection group, n=35) and a sham group (n=10). Results indicated that the survival rate was significantly higher in the non-resection group compared with the resection group. Intraperitoneal macroscopic findings in the non-resection group revealed the localization of inflammation caused by abscesses formation covered in adipose tissue. The survival rate for the sham group was 100%. Measurement of interleukin 6 (IL-6) indicated that during the 12 h after the creation of the CLP model, the median level of IL-6 was 1300 (552–3000) pg ml−1 in the non-resection group (n=19) and 3000 (1224–8595) pg ml−1 in the resection group (n=19). Meanwhile, for the sham group, IL-6 values were below measurement sensitivity in most cases (9/10 mice). Thus our results suggest that, in CLP models, intraperitoneal adipose tissue has an important role in abscess formation and is strongly related to the survival rate. PMID:26962454

  20. Relating Pneumococcal Carriage Among Children to Disease Rates Among Adults Before and After the Introduction of Conjugate Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Daniel M; Grant, Lindsay R; Weatherholtz, Robert C; Warren, Joshua L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Hammitt, Laura L

    2016-06-01

    The use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in children has a strong indirect effect on disease rates in adults. When children are vaccinated with PCVs, other serotypes that are not targeted by the vaccine can increase in frequency (serotype replacement) and reduce the direct and indirect benefits of the vaccine. To understand and predict the likely impacts of serotype replacement, it is important to know how patterns in the transmission of serotypes among children relate to disease rates in adults. We used data on pneumococcal carriage and disease from Navajo Nation children and adults collected before and after the routine use of PCVs (1998-2012). Using regression models within a Bayesian framework, we found that serotype-specific carriage and invasiveness (disease incidence divided by carriage prevalence) had similar patterns in children and adults. Moreover, carriage in children, invasiveness in children, and a serotype-specific random intercept (which captured additional variation associated with the serotypes) could predict the incidence serotype-specific pneumococcal disease in adults 18-39 years of age and those 40 years of age or older in the era of routine use of PCVs. These models could help us predict the effects of future pneumococcal vaccine use in children on disease rates in adults, and the modeling approach developed here could be used to test these findings in other settings. PMID:27188949

  1. Influence of the superposition approximation on calculated effective dose rates from galactic cosmic rays at aerospace-related altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Kyle

    2015-07-01

    The superposition approximation was commonly employed in atmospheric nuclear transport modeling until recent years and is incorporated into flight dose calculation codes such as CARI-6 and EPCARD. The useful altitude range for this approximation is investigated using Monte Carlo transport techniques. CARI-7A simulates atmospheric radiation transport of elements H-Fe using a database of precalculated galactic cosmic radiation showers calculated with MCNPX 2.7.0 and is employed here to investigate the influence of the superposition approximation on effective dose rates, relative to full nuclear transport of galactic cosmic ray primary ions. Superposition is found to produce results less than 10% different from nuclear transport at current commercial and business aviation altitudes while underestimating dose rates at higher altitudes. The underestimate sometimes exceeds 20% at approximately 23 km and exceeds 40% at 50 km. Thus, programs employing this approximation should not be used to estimate doses or dose rates for high-altitude portions of the commercial space and near-space manned flights that are expected to begin soon.

  2. Relative growth rates and compositions of aragonite and MG calcite cements in seawater: effects of temperature and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.A.; Walter, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental work shows that carbonate cement compositions and relative growth rates are controlled by changes in temperature and chemical composition of seawater. Substrate mineralogy controls cement mineralogy. Low-Mg calcite cements are favored at low temperatures. As temperature rises, aragonite precipitation becomes progressively more favored and the mole % MgCO/sub 3/ in calcite increases. Aragonite and calcite seeds of known surface area were added to natural seawater at 5, 25 and 37/sup 0/C and a p/sub CO/sup 2// of 0.01 atm. Runs were conducted at 10 times calcite saturation. Saturation state was held constant during each run by injection of titrants to replace calcium and carbonate ions lost by precipitation. Overgrowth compositions were analyzed by XRD. In all experiments, aragonite seeds had only aragonite overgrowths. Only calcite cements grew on calcite seeds. Sulfate also effects calcite precipitation rates and cement compositions. Preliminary results at 25/sup 0/C indicate that, at the same saturation state, calcite growth rates are 10 times faster in sulfate-free seawater-like solutions (Mg/Ca=5) than in normal seawater. Cements grown in sulfate-free media were enriched by 2 to 3 mole % over the calcite cements from natural seawater. This suggests that sulfate depletion of seawater should lead to a more rapid precipitation of progressively more Mg-rich calcites.

  3. Direct estimation of cardiac reserve through analysis of relation between oxygen consumption and heart rate during exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, H; Honda, S; Yoshii, K; Mizoguchi, Y; Fukuda, S; Iwao, H

    1985-12-01

    In order to elucidate fundamental relationship between exercise and cardiac reserve, we investigated the parameters of regression equation (VO2 = A X HR + B) between oxygen consumption (VO2 ml/kg/min) and heart rate (HR) during exercise test (Bruce). 62 male children were divided into 3 groups based on history and clinical evaluation. HR related linearly with VO2 (average r = 0.967, range 0.90-0.993). Both of the parameters A and [B] were significantly high in Athlete (A = 0.465 +/- 0.043, [B] = 36 +/- 6.07), low in Failed (0.297 +/- 0.055, 17.4 +/- 6.1) and middle in Ordinary group (0.366 +/- 0.078, 23.5 +/- 8.6) (p less than 0.005). Based on our result of linear VO2-HR relation, and on the previously reported studies that cardiac output linearly and consistently relates with VO2, we considered the meaning of the parameters as follows; A determines the possible maximum stroke volume (SV), and B determines the HR where SV reaches plateau. In conclusion, since the SV is considered as a measure of cardiac function, measuring the parameters of VO2-HR relation allows us to isolate cardiac functional reserve through the exercise tolerance test. PMID:3831400

  4. Early heart rate responses to standardized trauma-related pictures predict posttraumatic stress disorder – a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Suendermann, Oliver; Ehlers, Anke; Boellinghaus, Inga; Gamer, Matthias; Glucksman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Trauma survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) report heightened physiological responses to a wide range of stimuli. It has been suggested that associative learning and stimulus generalization play a key role in the development of these symptoms. Some studies have found that trauma survivors with PTSD show greater physiological responses to individualized trauma reminders in the initial weeks after trauma than those without PTSD. This study investigated whether heart rate and skin conductance responses (HRR, SCR) to standardized trauma-related pictures at 1 month after the trauma predict chronic PTSD. METHOD Survivors of motor vehicle accidents or physical assaults (N=166) watched standardized trauma-related, generally threatening and neutral pictures at 1 month post- trauma while their HRR and SCR were recorded. PTSD symptoms were assessed with structured clinical interviews at 1 and 6 months; self-reports of fear responses and dissociation during trauma were obtained soon after the trauma. RESULTS At 1 month, trauma survivors with PTSD showed greater HRR to trauma-related pictures than those without PTSD, but not to general threat or neutral pictures. HRR to trauma-related pictures predicted PTSD severity at 1 and 6 months, and were related to fear and dissociation during trauma. SCR was not related to PTSD. CONCLUSION HRR to standardized trauma reminders at 1 month after the trauma differentiate between trauma survivors with and without PTSD, and predict chronic PTSD. Results are consistent with a role of associative learning in PTSD and suggest that early stimulus generalization may be an indicator of risk for chronic PTSD. PMID:20124426

  5. Age-related changes in the rate of disease transmission: implications for the design of vaccination programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R. M.; May, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical models are developed to aid in the investigation of the implications of heterogeneity in contact with infection within a community, on the design of mass vaccination programmes for the control of childhood viral and bacterial infections in developed countries. Analyses are focused on age-dependency in the rate at which individuals acquire infection, the question of 'who acquires infection from whom', and the implications of genetic variability in susceptibility to infection. Throughout, theoretical predictions are based on parameter estimates obtained from epidemiological studies and are compared with observed temporal trends in disease incidence and age-stratified serological profiles. Analysis of case notification records and serological data suggest that the rate at which individuals acquire many common infections changes from medium to high and then to low levels in the infant, child and teenage plus adult age groups respectively. Such apparent age-dependency in attack rate acts to reduce slightly the predicted levels of herd immunity required for the eradication of infections such as measles, when compared with the predictions of models based on age-independent transmission. The action of maternally derived immunity in prohibiting vaccination in infants, and the broad span of age classes over which vaccination currently takes place in the U.K., however, argue that levels of herd immunity of between 90 and 94% would be required to eliminate measles. Problems surrounding the interpretation of apparent age-related trends in the acquisition of infection and their relevance to the design of vaccination programmes, are discussed in relation to the possible role of genetically based variation in susceptibility to infection and observations on epidemics in 'virgin' populations. Heterogeneous mixing models provide predictions of changes in serology and disease incidence under the impact of mass vaccination which well mirror observed trends in England and

  6. Linear free energy relationship based estimates for the congener specific relative reductive defluorination rates of perfluorinated alkyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya; Friesen, Ken J

    2009-07-15

    Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were developed to estimate the congener specific relative rates of reductive defluorination for a suite of perfluorinated compound (PFC) classes. The LFERs were based on the semiempirically calculated lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO) using gas and aqueous phase computations with the PM6 and RM1 methods. PFC classes in the modeling effort included the C1 through C8 perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs), carboxylates (PFCAs), sulfonyl fluorides (PFSFs), sulfonamides and their derivatives (SAs), and the perfluorotelomer alcohols (PFTAls), olefins (PFTOls), and acids (PFTAcs). Gas and aqueous phase calculations using the PM6 method predict that branched PFSA, PFCA, and PFSF congeners will have more rapid reductive defluorination kinetics than their linear counterparts. The RM1 method predicts that only PFSFs will display intrahomologue dependent branching effects. For the PFSAs and PFSFs, both the PM6 and RM1 methods predict no significant difference in mean rates of reductive defluorination between the homologue groups. For the PFCAs, the PM6 method suggests no significant difference in inter-homologue mean rates of reductive defluorination, whereas the RM1 method predicts a significant increase with a lengthening perfluoroalkyl chain. All approaches used suggest that the intrahomologue variability in reduction rates increases with increasing chain length for PFSAs, PFCAs, and PFSFs, implying that the larger homologue groups in these classes will see a more rapid linearization of the congener profiles under reducing conditions than their lower homologue counterparts. Chain length has a negligible effect on the estimated rates of SA reductive defluorination, but a significant role for the fluorotelomer derivatives. Ratios of rates between the C8:C1 straight chain telomeric congeners are expected to range up to 200-fold depending on the computational combination. The kinetics for reductively defluorinating PFC

  7. Herbivory and relative growth rates of Pieris rapae are correlated with host constitutive salicylic acid and flowering time.

    PubMed

    Lariviere, Andrew; Limeri, Lisa B; Meindl, George A; Traw, M Brian

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of plants with exogenous salicylic acid (SA) improves resistance to many bacterial pathogens, but can suppress resistance to insect herbivores. While plants vary naturally in constitutive SA, whether such differences are predictive of resistance to insect herbivores has not been studied previously. We examined the possible role of this endogenous SA in structuring the interactions between the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, and ten hosts in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Because P. rapae has multiple generations that utilize different hosts across the year, we included five spring-flowering mustards and five summer-flowering mustards that co-occur in ruderal habitats in upstate New York. Under common garden conditions, the spring flowering mustards (Capsella bursa-pastoris, Draba verna, Cardamine impatiens, Barbarea vulgaris, and Arabidopsis thaliana) were significantly more resistant to P. rapae, supporting 42 % less herbivory (P = 0.015) and 64 % lower relative growth rates (P = 0.007), relative to the summer flowering mustards (Sisymbrium altissimum, Brassica nigra, Sinapis arvense, Lepidium campestre, and Arabis canadensis). Leaf total constitutive SA explained significant variation in larval herbivory (R (2)  = 75.3 %, P = 0.007) and relative growth rates (R (2)  = 59.4 %, P = 0.043). The three species with the lowest levels of constitutive SA (Capsella bursa-pastoris, Draba verna, and Cardamine impatiens) were the most resistant to larvae. Barbarea vulgaris and Arabis canadensis were notable exceptions, exhibiting high SA concentrations and intermediate resistance to P. rapae. These results suggest a curvilinear relationship between leaf constitutive SA and the herbivory by P. rapae, and they provide some insight into the ecology and possible management of this economically important crop pest. PMID:25893789

  8. Rainfall interception by bracken in open habitats — Relations between leaf area, canopy storage and drainage rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, John Iain

    1989-02-01

    A rainfall simulator has been used to investigate how the free throughfall coefficient p, canopy storage C, and drainage rate Ds, of bracken varies with projected leaf area index ( LAI) over a LAI range of 0.4 to 5.88. For field canopies p was found to be a simple exponential function of LAI. Measured maximum water shortage, Cmax was related to LAI by Cmax = 0.467 (± 0.004) LAI. Attempts to relate the measured storage and drainage rate using the modified Rutter drainage function and the recently proposed Calder drainage model were unsuccessful, primarily because both assume zero drainage at zero C. The experimental data show that C always has some positive value Cmin when drainage from the canopy ceases. Cmin was related to LAI by Cmin = (0.156 ± 0.004) LAI, and is smaller than reported values Two new asymptotic drainage functions were fitted to the data, using optimisation with excellent results: Ds = [e K( C- Cmin)] - 1 (I) Ds = A( C - Cmin) K (II) optimisation of eqns. (I) and (II) for each experiment showed that the values Cmin, K and A were simple functions of LAI. Thus both empirical expressions could be expressed as simple functions of LAI and storage, and hence generalized over the complete LAI range. Model (I) explained over 90% of the variance of Ds over the LAI range 0.4 to 5.88. If remote sensing techniques are used to obtain values of LAI, the functions presented have wide applicability to bracken growing in open habitats. Leyton et al. (1967).

  9. Efficacy of Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation on Parotid Saliva Flow Rate in Relation to Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Manu; M Raju, Srinivasa; S Mohan, Raviprakash; Tomar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Treatment with salivary substitutes and stimulation of salivary flow by either mechanical or pharmacologic methods has side effects and only provides symptomatic relief but no long-lasting results. Purpose To assess the effectiveness of extraoral transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) as a mean of stimulating salivary function in healthy adult subjects; as well as to determine the gender and age-dependent changes in salivary flow rates of unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva. Materials and Method Hundred patients were divided into two groups; Group I aged 20-40 and Group II aged ≥ 60 years. The TENS electrode pads were externally placed on the skin overlying the parotid glands. Unstimulated and stimulated parotid saliva was collected for 5 minutes each by using standardized collection techniques. Results Eighty seven of 100 subjects demonstrated increased salivary flow when stimulated via the TENS unit. Ten experienced no increase and 3 experienced a decrease. The mean unstimulated salivary flow rate was 0.01872 ml/min in Group I and 0.0088 ml/min in Group II. The mean stimulated salivary flow rate was 0.03084 ml/min (SD= 0.01248) in Group I, and 0.01556 ml/min (SD 0.0101) in Group II. After stimulation, the amount of salivary flow increased significantly in both groups (p< 0.001). Statistical comparison of the two groups revealed them to be significantly different (p< 0.001), with Group I producing more saliva. Gender-wise, no statistically significant difference was seen among the subjects in Group I (p = 0.148), and those in Group II (p= 0.448). Out of 12 subjects with 0 baseline flows, 7 continued to have no flow. Five subjects observed side effects, although minimal and transient. Conclusion The TENS unit was effective in increasing parotid gland salivary flow in healthy subjects. There was age-related but no gender-related variability in parotid salivary flow rate. PMID:27602390

  10. Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, David B.; Fisher, Brad L.

    2010-01-01

    Space-borne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multi-satellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation, climate studies, and validation of model forecasts of precipitation. This study employs four years (2003-2006) of satellite data to assess the relative performance and skill of SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), AMSR-E (Aqua) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) in estimating surface rainfall based on direct instantaneous comparisons with ground-based rain estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The relative performance of each of these satellite estimates is examined via comparisons with space- and time-coincident GV radar-based rain rate estimates. Because underlying surface terrain is known to affect the relative performance of the satellite algorithms, the data for MELB was further stratified into ocean, land and coast categories using a 0.25 terrain mask. Of all the satellite estimates compared in this study, TMI and AMSR-E exhibited considerably higher correlations and skills in estimating/observing surface precipitation. While SSM/I and AMSU-B exhibited lower correlations and skills for each of the different terrain categories, the SSM/I absolute biases trended slightly lower than AMSRE over ocean, where the observations from both emission and scattering channels were used in the retrievals. AMSU-B exhibited the least skill relative to GV in all of the relevant statistical categories, and an anomalous spike was observed in the probability distribution functions near 1.0 mm/hr. This statistical artifact appears to be related to attempts by algorithm developers to include some lighter rain rates, not easily detectable by its scatter-only frequencies. AMSU-B, however

  11. Assessing the Relative Performance of Microwave-Based Satellite Rain Rate Retrievals Using TRMM Ground Validation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, David B.; Fisher, Brad L.

    2011-01-01

    Space-borne microwave sensors provide critical rain information used in several global multi-satellite rain products, which in turn are used for a variety of important studies, including landslide forecasting, flash flood warning, data assimilation, climate studies, and validation of model forecasts of precipitation. This study employs four years (2003-2006) of satellite data to assess the relative performance and skill of SSM/I (F13, F14 and F15), AMSU-B (N15, N16 and N17), AMSR-E (Aqua) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) in estimating surface rainfall based on direct instantaneous comparisons with ground-based rain estimates from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) sites at Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ) and Melbourne, Florida (MELB). The relative performance of each of these satellite estimates is examined via comparisons with space- and time-coincident GV radar-based rain rate estimates. Because underlying surface terrain is known to affect the relative performance of the satellite algorithms, the data for MELB was further stratified into ocean, land and coast categories using a 0.25deg terrain mask. Of all the satellite estimates compared in this study, TMI and AMSR-E exhibited considerably higher correlations and skills in estimating/observing surface precipitation. While SSM/I and AMSU-B exhibited lower correlations and skills for each of the different terrain categories, the SSM/I absolute biases trended slightly lower than AMSR-E over ocean, where the observations from both emission and scattering channels were used in the retrievals. AMSU-B exhibited the least skill relative to GV in all of the relevant statistical categories, and an anomalous spike was observed in the probability distribution functions near 1.0 mm/hr. This statistical artifact appears to be related to attempts by algorithm developers to include some lighter rain rates, not easily detectable by its scatter-only frequencies. AMSU

  12. Daily supplementation with ghrelin improves in vitro bovine blastocysts formation rate and alters gene expression related to embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, Eleni; Periquesta, Eva; Messinis, Ioannis E; Tsiligianni, Theodora; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Amiridis, Georgios S

    2014-03-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide having regulatory role in the reproductive system functionality, acting mainly at central level. Because the expression of ghrelin system (ghrelin and its receptor) has been detected in the bovine ovary, the objectives of the present study were to investigate whether ghrelin can affect the developmental potential of in vitro-produced embryos, and to test their quality in terms of relative abundance of various genes related to metabolism, apoptosis and oxidation. In the first experiment, in vitro-produced zygotes were cultured in the absence (control [C]) and in the presence of three concentrations of acylated ghrelin (200 pg/mL [Ghr200], 800 pg/mL [Ghr800]; and 2000 pg/mL [Ghr2000]); blastocyst formation rates were examined on Days 7, 8, and 9. In the second experiment, only the 800 pg/mL dose of ghrelin was used. Zygotes were produced as in experiment 1 and 24 hours post insemination they were divided into 4 groups; in two groups (C; without ghrelin; Ghr800 with ghrelin), embryos were cultured without medium replacement; in the remaining two groups (Control N and GhrN), the culture medium was daily renewed. A pool of Day-7 blastocysts were snap frozen for relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, implantation, and apoptosis. In experiment 3, embryos were produced as in experiment 2, but in the absence of serum (semi-defined culture medium). In experiment 1, no differences were detected between C, Ghr200, and Ghr2000, although fewer blastocysts were produced in group Ghr800 compared with C. In experiment 2, the lowest blastocysts yield was found in Ghr800, whereas daily renewal of ghrelin (Ghr800N) resulted to increased blastocysts formation rate, which on Day 7 was the highest among groups (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocysts yield. Significant differences were detected in various relative mRNA abundance, giving an overall final notion that embryos produced in the

  13. Topographic form of the Coast Ranges of the Cascadia Margin in relation ot coastal uplift rates and plate subduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Engebretson, David C.; Mitchell, Clifton E.; Ticknor, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The Coast Ranges of the Cascadia margin are overriding the subducted Juan de Fuca/Gorda plate. We investigate the extent to which the latitudinal change in attributes related to the subduction process. These attributes include the varibale age of the subducted slab that underlies the Coast Ranges and average vertical crustal velocities of the western margin of the Coast Rnages for two markedly different time periods, the last 45 years and the last 100 kyr. These vertical crustal velocities are computed from the resurveying of highway bech marks and from the present elevation of shore platforms that have been uplifted in the late Quaternary, respectively. Topogarphy of the Coast Ranges is in part a function of the age and bouyancy of the underlying subducted plate. This is evident in the fact that the two highest topographic elements of the Coast Rnages, the Klamath Mountains and the Olympic Mountains, are underlain by youngest subducted oceanic crust. The subducted Blanco Fracture Zone in southernmost Oregon is responsible for an age discontinuity of subducted crust under the Klamath Mountains. The norhtern terminus of hte topographically higher Klamaths is offset to the north relative to the position of the underlying Blanco Fracture Zone, teh offset being in the direction of migration of the farcture zone, as dictated by relative plate motions. Vertical crustal velocities at the coast, derived from becnh mark surveys, are as much as an order of magnitude greater than vertical crustal velocities derived from uplifted shore platforms. This uplift rate discrepancy indicates that strain is accumulating on the plate margin, to be released during the next interplate earthquake. In a latitudinal sense, average Coast Rnage topography is relatively high where bench mark-derived, short-term vertical crustal velocities are highest. Becuase the shore platform vertical crustal velocities reflect longer-term, premanent uplift, we infer that a small percentage of the

  14. Topographic form of the Coast Ranges of the Cascadia Margin in relation ot coastal uplift rates and plate subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Engebretson, David C.; Mitchell, Clifton E.; Ticknor, Robert L.

    1994-06-01

    The Coast Ranges of the Cascadia margin are overriding the subducted Juan de Fuca/Gorda plate. We investigate the extent to which the latitudinal change in attributes related to the subduction process. These attributes include the varibale age of the subducted slab that underlies the Coast Ranges and average vertical crustal velocities of the western margin of the Coast Rnages for two markedly different time periods, the last 45 years and the last 100 kyr. These vertical crustal velocities are computed from the resurveying of highway bech marks and from the present elevation of shore platforms that have been uplifted in the late Quaternary, respectively. Topogarphy of the Coast Ranges is in part a function of the age and bouyancy of the underlying subducted plate. This is evident in the fact that the two highest topographic elements of the Coast Rnages, the Klamath Mountains and the Olympic Mountains, are underlain by youngest subducted oceanic crust. The subducted Blanco Fracture Zone in southernmost Oregon is responsible for an age discontinuity of subducted crust under the Klamath Mountains. The norhtern terminus of hte topographically higher Klamaths is offset to the north relative to the position of the underlying Blanco Fracture Zone, teh offset being in the direction of migration of the farcture zone, as dictated by relative plate motions. Vertical crustal velocities at the coast, derived from becnh mark surveys, are as much as an order of magnitude greater than vertical crustal velocities derived from uplifted shore platforms. This uplift rate discrepancy indicates that strain is accumulating on the plate margin, to be released during the next interplate earthquake. In a latitudinal sense, average Coast Rnage topography is relatively high where bench mark-derived, short-term vertical crustal velocities are highest. Becuase the shore platform vertical crustal velocities reflect longer-term, premanent uplift, we infer that a small percentage of the

  15. Impact of task-related changes in heart rate on estimation of hemodynamic response and model fit.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Sarah F; Ivry, Richard B; Schlerf, John E

    2016-05-15

    The blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal, as measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), is widely used as a proxy for changes in neural activity in the brain. Physiological variables such as heart rate (HR) and respiratory variation (RV) affect the BOLD signal in a way that may interfere with the estimation and detection of true task-related neural activity. This interference is of particular concern when these variables themselves show task-related modulations. We first establish that a simple movement task reliably induces a change in HR but not RV. In group data, the effect of HR on the BOLD response was larger and more widespread throughout the brain than were the effects of RV or phase regressors. The inclusion of HR regressors, but not RV or phase regressors, had a small but reliable effect on the estimated hemodynamic response function (HRF) in M1 and the cerebellum. We next asked whether the inclusion of a nested set of physiological regressors combining phase, RV, and HR significantly improved the model fit in individual participants' data sets. There was a significant improvement from HR correction in M1 for the greatest number of participants, followed by RV and phase correction. These improvements were more modest in the cerebellum. These results indicate that accounting for task-related modulation of physiological variables can improve the detection and estimation of true neural effects of interest. PMID:26944859

  16. Detecting dyads of related individuals in large collections of DNA-profiles by controlling the false discovery rate.

    PubMed

    Skaug, H J; Bérubé, M; Palsbøll, P J

    2010-07-01

    The search for pairs (dyads) of related individuals in large databases of DNA-profiles has become an increasingly important inference tool in ecology. However, the many, partly dependent, pairwise comparisons introduce statistical issues. We show that the false discovery rate (FDR) procedure is well suited to control for the proportion of false positives, i.e. dyads consisting of unrelated individuals, which under normal circumstances would have been labelled as related individuals. We verify the behaviour of the standard FDR procedure by simulation, demonstrating that the FDR procedure works satisfactory in spite of the many dependent pairwise comparisons involved in an exhaustive database screening. A computer program that implements this method is available online. In addition, we propose to implement a second stage in the procedure, in which additional independent genetic markers are used to identify the false positives. We demonstrate the application of the approach in an analysis of a DNA database consisting of 3300 individual minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) each typed at ten microsatellite loci. Applying the standard procedure with an FDR of 50% led to the identification of 74 putative dyads of 1st- or 2nd-order relatives. However, introducing the second step, which involved additional genotypes at 15 microsatellite loci, revealed that only 21 of the putative dyads can be claimed with high certainty to be true dyads. PMID:21565074

  17. Relational scaffolding of school motivation: developmental continuities in students' and parents' ratings of the importance of school goals.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, B J; Zhou, R M

    2001-03-01

    The authors investigated whether parents and students are consistent, over grade levels, in the importance they assign to school goals. Elementary and high school students (n = 178) and their parents (n = 130) completed a questionnaire addressing the personal importance of students' school goals, defined in terms of school success. Parent-child consistencies in the rating patterns of school goals over grade levels were more common than were inconsistencies. These developmental consistencies support the position that students' school goals are embedded within the parent-child relationship (J. Youniss, 1980; J. Youniss & J. Smollar, 1985) and are scaffolded within it (J. S. Bruner, 1975; L. S. Vygotsky, 1978). Potential sources of relational and phenotypic influences on school goals are discussed, as is the need for effective friendship management and school performance in high school. PMID:11338442

  18. Relative contributions of mercury bioavailability and microbial growth rate on net methylmercury production by anaerobic mixed cultures†

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H.; Deshusses, Marc A.; Porter, Kaitlyn A.; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2016-01-01

    Monomethylmercury (MeHg) is produced in many aquatic environments by anaerobic microorganisms that take up and methylate inorganic forms of Hg(II). Net methylation of Hg(II) appears to be correlated with factors that affect the activity of the anaerobic microbial community and factors that increase the bioavailability of Hg(II) to these organisms. However, the relative importance of one versus the other is difficult to elucidate even though this information can greatly assist remediation efforts and risk assessments. Here, we investigated the effects of Hg speciation (dissolved Hg and nanoparticulate HgS) and microbial activity on the net production of MeHg using two mixed microbial cultures that were enriched from marine sediments under sulfate reducing conditions. The cultures were amended with dissolved Hg (added as a dissolved nitrate salt) and nanoparticulate HgS, and grown under different carbon substrate concentrations. The results indicated that net mercury methylation was the highest for cultures incubated in the greatest carbon substrate concentration (60 mM) compared to incubations with less carbon (0.6 and 6 mM), regardless of the form of mercury amended. Net MeHg production in cultures exposed to HgS nanoparticles was significantly slower than in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg; however, the difference diminished with slower growing cultures with low carbon addition (0.6 mM). The net Hg methylation rate was found to correlate with sulfate reduction rate in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg, while methylation rate was roughly constant for cultures exposed to nanoparticulate HgS. These results indicated a potential threshold of microbial productivity: below this point net MeHg production was limited by microbial activity, regardless of Hg bioavailability. Above this threshold of productivity, Hg speciation became a contributing factor towards net MeHg production. PMID:26211614

  19. Source of nitrogen associated with recovery of relative growth rate in Arabidopsis thaliana acclimated to sustained cold treatment.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Lindsey J; Sherlock, David J; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-06-01

    To determine (1) whether acclimation of carbon metabolism to low temperatures results in recovery of the relative growth rate (RGR) of plants in the cold and (2) the source of N underpinning cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we supplied plants with a nutrient solution labelled with (15) N and subjected them to a temperature shift (from 23 to 5 °C). Whole-plant RGR of cold-treated plants was initially less than 30% of that of warm-maintained control plants. After 14 d, new leaves with a cold-acclimated phenotype emerged, with the RGR of cold-treated plants increasing by 50%; there was an associated recovery of root RGR and doubling of the net assimilation rate (NAR). The development of new tissues in the cold was supported initially by re-allocation of internal sources of N. In the longer term, the majority (80%) of N in the new leaves was derived from the external solution. Hence, both the nutrient status of the plant and the current availability of N from external sources are important in determining recovery of growth at low temperature. Collectively, our results reveal that both increased N use efficiency and increases in nitrogen content per se play a role in the recovery of carbon metabolism in the cold. PMID:25291970

  20. Daily worry is related to low heart rate variability during waking and the subsequent nocturnal sleep period.

    PubMed

    Brosschot, Jos F; Van Dijk, Eduard; Thayer, Julian F

    2007-01-01

    Stress and anxiety are risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Worry might be a mediator of their risks by prolonging their cognitive representation and concomitant CV activity. We hypothesized that daily stressors and worry, and trait anxiety and trait worry would be associated with high heart rate (HR) and low heart rate variability (HRV) during waking and the subsequent nocturnal sleep period, and that worry would mediate the effects of daily stressors. Low HRV and high HR are physiological risk factors for CV disease. Using an hourly diary, stressors, worry frequency and duration, and biobehavioral variables were measured during one day in 52 healthy subjects. During this time and the subsequent nocturnal sleep period, ambulatory ECG was measured. Stressors, worry and traits were related to higher HR and lower HRV during waking, and the effects of stressors and worry were extended into the sleeping period. Worry duration mediated the effects of stressors. The results were largely independent of biobehavioral variables including sleep quality. The results support the notion that worry, by prolonging CV activity, is a mediator of the CV risks of stress. They also imply a role for unconscious cognitive representation of stress. PMID:17020787

  1. The Gas Phase Mass Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies: Dependence on Star Formation Rate and H I Gas Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMRSFR) as well as HI-gas mass (FMRHI). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMRSFR and FMRHI across the stellar mass range 106.6-108.8 M⊙, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMRSFR (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMRSFR is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10-2.4 M⊙ yr-1, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMRHI. We also find that the FMRHI is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FMLSFR) and HI-gas mass (FMLHI). We find that the FMLHI relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FMLHI relation is not improved over the FMRHI scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMRHI is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation. Based on VLT service mode observations (Programs 081.B-0649 and 083.B-0662) gathered at the European Southern Observatory, Chile.

  2. The evolving relation between star formation rate and stellar mass in the VIDEO survey since z = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Russell; Vaccari, Mattia; Jarvis, Matt; Smith, Mathew; Giovannoli, Elodie; Häußler, Boris; Prescott, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass, M*, relation of a star-forming (SF) galaxy (SFG) sample in the XMM-LSS field to z ˜ 3.0 using the near-infrared data from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. Combining VIDEO with broad-band photometry, we use the SED fitting algorithm CIGALE to derive SFRs and M* and have adapted it to account for the full photometric redshift probability-distribution-function uncertainty. Applying an SF selection using the D4000 index, we find evidence for strong evolution in the normalization of the SFR-M* relation out to z ˜ 3 and a roughly constant slope of (SFR ∝ M_*^{α }) α = 0.69 ± 0.02 to z ˜ 1.7. We find this increases close to unity towards z ˜ 2.65. Alternatively, if we apply a colour selection, we find a distinct turnover in the SFR-M* relation between 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.0 at the high-mass end, and suggest that this is due to an increased contamination from passive galaxies. We find evolution of the specific SFR ∝ (1 + z)2.60 at log10(M*/M⊙) ˜ 10.5, out to z ≲ 2.4 with an observed flattening beyond z ˜ 2 with increased stellar mass. Comparing to a range of simulations we find the analytical scaling relation approaches, that invoke an equilibrium model, a good fit to our data, suggesting that a continual smooth accretion regulated by continual outflows may be a key driver in the overall growth of SFGs.

  3. The Gas Phase Mass Metallicity Relation for Dwarf Galaxies: Dependence on Star Formation Rate and H I Gas Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimmy; Tran, Kim-Vy; Saintonge, Amélie; Accurso, Gioacchino; Brough, Sarah; Oliva-Altamirano, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Using a sample of dwarf galaxies observed using the VIMOS IFU on the Very Large Telescope, we investigate the mass–metallicity relation (MZR) as a function of star formation rate (FMRSFR) as well as HI-gas mass (FMRHI). We combine our IFU data with a subsample of galaxies from the ALFALFA HI survey crossmatched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the FMRSFR and FMRHI across the stellar mass range 106.6–108.8 M⊙, with metallicities as low as 12 + log(O/H) = 7.67. We find the 1σ mean scatter in the MZR to be 0.05 dex. The 1σ mean scatter in the FMRSFR (0.02 dex) is significantly lower than that of the MZR. The FMRSFR is not consistent between the IFU observed galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS galaxies for SFRs lower than 10‑2.4 M⊙ yr‑1, however, this could be the result of limitations of our measurements in that regime. The lowest mean scatter (0.01 dex) is found in the FMRHI. We also find that the FMRHI is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxies and the ALFALFA/SDSS crossmatched sample. We introduce the fundamental metallicity luminosity counterpart to the FMR, again characterized in terms of SFR (FMLSFR) and HI-gas mass (FMLHI). We find that the FMLHI relation is consistent between the IFU observed dwarf galaxy sample and the larger ALFALFA/SDSS sample. However, the 1σ scatter for the FMLHI relation is not improved over the FMRHI scenario. This leads us to conclude that the FMRHI is the best candidate for a physically motivated fundamental metallicity relation. Based on VLT service mode observations (Programs 081.B-0649 and 083.B-0662) gathered at the European Southern Observatory, Chile.

  4. Decadal-scale rates of reef erosion following El Niño-related mass coral mortality.

    PubMed

    Roff, George; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Mumby, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    As the frequency and intensity of coral mortality events increase under climate change, understanding how declines in coral cover may affect the bioerosion of reef frameworks is of increasing importance. Here, we explore decadal-scale rates of bioerosion of the framework building coral Orbicella annularis by grazing parrotfish following the 1997/1998 El Niño-related mass mortality event at Long Cay, Belize. Using high-precision U-Th dating and CT scan analysis, we quantified in situ rates of external bioerosion over a 13-year period (1998-2011). Based upon the error-weighted average U-Th age of dead O. annularis skeletons, we estimate the average external bioerosion between 1998 and 2011 as 0.92 ± 0.55 cm depth. Empirical observations of herbivore foraging, and a nonlinear numerical response of parrotfish to an increase in food availability, were used to create a model of external bioerosion at Long Cay. Model estimates of external bioerosion were in close agreement with U-Th estimates (0.85 ± 0.09 cm). The model was then used to quantify how rates of external bioerosion changed across a gradient of coral mortality (i.e., from few corals experiencing mortality following coral bleaching to complete mortality). Our results indicate that external bioerosion is remarkably robust to declines in coral cover, with no significant relationship predicted between the rate of external bioerosion and the proportion of O. annularis that died in the 1998 bleaching event. The outcome was robust because the reduction in grazing intensity that follows coral mortality was compensated for by a positive numerical response of parrotfish to an increase in food availability. Our model estimates further indicate that for an O. annularis-dominated reef to maintain a positive state of reef accretion, a necessity for sustained ecosystem function, live cover of O. annularis must not drop below a ~5-10% threshold of cover. PMID:26113199

  5. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  6. A genome-wide scan for common variants affecting the rate of age-related cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    De Jager, Philip L.; Shulman, Joshua M.; Chibnik, Lori B.; Keenan, Brendan T.; Raj, Towfique; Wilson, Robert S.; Yu, Lei; Leurgans, Sue E.; Tran, Dong; Aubin, Cristin; Anderson, Christopher D.; Biffi, Alessandro; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Rosand, Jonathan; Daly, Mark J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Reiman, Eric M.; Bennett, David A.; Evans, Denis A.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is likely promoted by accumulated brain injury due to chronic conditions of aging, including neurodegenerative and vascular disease. Since common neuronal mechanisms may mediate the adaptation to diverse cerebral insults, we hypothesized that susceptibility for age-related cognitive decline may be due in part to a shared genetic network. We have therefore performed a genome-wide association study using a quantitative measure of global cognitive decline slope, based on repeated measures of 17 cognitive tests in 749 subjects from the Religious Orders Study. Top results were evaluated in three independent replication cohorts, consisting of 2,279 additional subjects with repeated cognitive testing. As expected, we find that the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) susceptibility locus, APOE, is strongly associated with rate of cognitive decline (PDISC=5.6×10−9; PJOINT=3.7×10−27). We additionally discover a variant, rs10808746, which shows consistent effects in the replication cohorts and modestly improved evidence of association in the joint analysis (PDISC=6.7×10−5; PREP=9.4×10−3; PJOINT=2.3×10−5). This variant influences the expression of two adjacent genes, PDE7A and MTFR1, which are potential regulators of inflammation and oxidative injury, respectively. Using aggregate measures of genetic risk, we find that known susceptibility loci for cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and inflammatory diseases are not significantly associated with cognitive decline in our cohort. Our results suggest that intermediate phenotypes, when coupled with larger sample sizes, may be a useful tool to dissect susceptibility loci for age-related cognitive decline and uncover shared molecular pathways with a role in neuronal injury. PMID:22054870

  7. Centenarian Rates and Life Expectancy Related to the Death Rates of Multiple Sclerosis, Asthma, and Rheumatoid Arthritis and the Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes in Children.

    PubMed

    Lens-Pechakova, Lilia S

    2016-02-01

    The autoimmune diseases are among the 10 leading causes of death for women and the number two cause of chronic illness in America as well as a predisposing factor for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Patients of some autoimmune diseases have shown a shorter life span and are a model of accelerated immunosenescence. Conversely, centenarians are used as a model of successful aging and have shown several immune parameters that are better preserved and lower levels of autoantibodies. The study reported here focused on clarifying the connection between longevity and some autoimmune and allergic diseases in 29 developed Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, because multidisciplinary analyses of the accelerated or delayed aging data could show a distinct relationship pattern, help to identify common factors, and determine new important factors that contribute to longevity and healthy aging. The relationships between the mortality rates data of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), asthma, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from one side and centenarian rates (two sets) as well as life expectancy data from the other side were assessed using regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients. The data obtained correspond to an inverse linear correlation with different degrees of linearity. This is the first observation of a clear tendency of diminishing centenarian rates or life expectancy in countries having higher death rates of asthma, MS, and RA and a higher incidence of T1D in children. The conclusion is that most probably there are common mechanistic pathways and factors affecting the above diseases and at the same time but in the opposite direction the processes of longevity. Further study, comparing genetic data, mechanistic pathways, and other factors connected to autoimmune diseases with those of longevity could clarify the processes involved, so as to promote longevity and limit the expansion of those

  8. Overlapping reading frames in closely related human papillomaviruses result in modular rates of selection within E2.

    PubMed

    Narechania, Apurva; Terai, Masanori; Burk, Robert D

    2005-05-01

    A core group of four open reading frames (ORFs) is present in all known papillomaviruses (PVs): the E1 and E2 replication/transcription proteins and the L1 and L2 structural proteins. Because they are involved in processes that are essential to PV propagation, the sequences of these proteins are well-conserved. However, sequencing of novel subtypes for human papillomaviruses (HPV) 54 (AE9) and 82 (AE2/IS39), coupled to analysis of four other closely related genital HPV pairs, indicated that E2 has a higher dN/dS ratio than E1, L1 or L2. The elevated ratio is not homogeneous across the length of the ORF, but instead varies with respect to E2's three domains. The E2 hinge region is of particular interest, because its hypervariability (dN/dS>1) differs markedly from the two domains that it joins: the transcription-activation domain and the DNA-binding domain. Deciphering whether the hinge region's high rate of non-synonymous change is the result of positive Darwinian selection or relaxed constraint depends on the evolutionary behaviour of E4, an ORF that overlaps E2. The E2 hinge region is contained within E4 and non-synonymous changes in the hinge are associated with a disproportionate amount of synonymous change in E4, a case of simultaneous positive and purifying selection in overlapping reading frames. Modular rates of selection among E2 domains are a likely consequence of the presence of an embedded E4. E4 appears to be positioned in a part of the HPV genome that can tolerate non-synonymous change and purifying selection of E4 may be indicative of its functional importance. PMID:15831941

  9. Associations between Heart Rate Variability Parameters and Housing- and Individual-Related Variables in Dairy Cows Using Canonical Correspondence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bakony, Mikolt; Hufnágel, Levente; Tőzsér, János; Jurkovich, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations between heart rate variability (HRV) parameters and some housing- and individual-related variables using the canonical correspondence analysis (CCOA) method in lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. We collected a total of 5200 5-min interbeat interval (IBI) samples from 260 animals on five commercial dairy farms [smaller-scale farms with 70 (Farm 1, n = 50) and 80 cows per farm (Farm 2, n = 40), and larger-scale farms with 850 (Farm 3, n = 66), 1900 (Farm 4, n = 60) and 1200 (Farm 5, n = 45) cows. Dependent variables included HRV parameters, which reflect the activity of the autonomic nervous system: heart rate (HR), the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) in IBIs, the standard deviation 1 (SD1), the high frequency (HF) component of HRV and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and the HF parameter (LF/HF). Explanatory variables were group size, space allowance, milking frequency, parity, daily milk yield, body condition score, locomotion score, farm, season and physical activity (lying, lying and rumination, standing, standing and rumination and feeding). Physical activity involved in standing, feeding and in rumination was associated with HRV parameters, indicating a decreasing sympathetic and an increasing vagal tone in the following order: feeding, standing, standing and rumination, lying and rumination, lying. Objects representing summer positioned close to HR and LF and far from SD1, RMSSD and HF indicate a higher sympathetic and a lower vagal activity. Objects representing autumn, spring and winter associated with increasing vagal activity, in this order. Time-domain measures of HRV were associated with most of the housing- and individual-related explanatory variables. Higher HR and lower RMSSD and SD1 were associated with higher group size, milking frequency, parity and milk yield, and low space allowance. Higher parity and milk yield were associated with higher sympathetic activity as well (higher LF

  10. Drug-Related Arrest Rates and Spatial Access to Syringe Exchange Programs in New York City Health Districts: Combined Effects on the Risk of Injection-Related Infections among Injectors

    PubMed Central

    Jarlais, Don C Des; Tempalski, Barbara; Bossak, Brian H; Ross, Zev; Friedman, Samuel R

    2011-01-01

    Drug-related law enforcement activities may undermine the protective effects of syringe exchange programs (SEPs) on local injectors’ risk of injection-related infections. We explored the spatial overlap of drug-related arrest rates and access to SEPs over time (1995-2006) in New York City health districts, and used multilevel models to investigate the relationship of these two district-level exposures to the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe. Districts with better SEP access had higher arrest rates, and arrest rates undermined SEPs’ protective relationship with unsterile injecting. Drug-related enforcement strategies targeting drug users should be de-emphasized in areas surrounding SEPs. PMID:22047790

  11. Phenolic compounds and related enzymes are not rate-limiting in browning development of fresh-cut potatoes.

    PubMed

    Cantos, Emma; Tudela, Juan Antonio; Gil, María Isabel; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2002-05-01

    The effect of minimal processing on polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and phenolic compounds was studied in five potato cultivars (Agria, Cara, Liseta, Monalisa, and Spunta). Minimal processing caused an overall increase in PPO, POD, and PAL activities. The isoform pattern of PPO was the same for all of the cultivars before and after processing. No latent PPO was detected. The isoperoxidase pattern was approximately the same among cultivars. An increase in POD activity was related to the specific induction of an acidic isoperoxidase. PAL showed an induction pattern characterized by the presence of a maximum peak of activity after 4 days of processing for all of the cultivars. The sequence of browning susceptibility of potato cultivars was as follows: Monalisa > Spunta > Liseta > Cara > Agria. Browning development was only partially correlated to PAL activity (only during the first 4 days after wounding). However, this correlation could not explain the above sequence of browning susceptibility. Minimal processing caused an increase of chlorogenic acid, whereas tyrosine content remained unchanged. In summary, no significant correlation was found between either rate or degree of browning and any other biochemical and physiological attribute investigated (PPO, POD, hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid content, and initial phenolics content as well as total and individual phenolics accumulation). PMID:11982435

  12. Primary production in the Strait of Gibraltar: Carbon fixation rates in relation to hydrodynamic and phytoplankton dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Diego; Navarro, Gabriel; Bartual, Ana; Echevarría, Fidel; Huertas, I. Emma

    2009-06-01

    Primary production was studied at nine sites distributed within the Strait of Gibraltar (Southern Spain) and North-Western (NW) Alboran Sea by analyzing photosynthesis-irradiance (P-I) relationships and integrated primary production rates in relation to the different types of Deep Chlorophyll Maxima (DCM) detected in the area. The characteristics of the DCM were examined by several methods, including flow cytometry, quantification of transparent expolymer particles and fluorimetric measurements that were applied in order to assess the photo-physiological state of the phytoplankton assemblages with respect to their species composition and water column structure (hydrology). The photosynthetic parameters (derived from P-I relationships) and integrated primary production (range 6-644 mg m -2 d -1) responded greatly to the diverse DCM identified and thereby the spatial variability of the primary production observed in the region was found to depend upon the occurrence of the different types of phytoplankton accumulations, which were themselves indicative of the previous history of the water column. The net contribution of the primary production to the air-sea CO 2 exchange process was also evaluated in the area. Results indicated that this region behaved as a net sink for the atmospheric CO 2, with the intensity of the flux being strongly modulated by the wind intensity.

  13. Experimental determination of carbonation rate in Portland cement at 25°C and relatively high CO2 partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Montegrossi, Giordano; Huet, Bruno; Virgili, Giorgio; Orlando, Andrea; Vaselli, Orlando; Marini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the alteration of Portland class G Cement at ambient temperature under a relatively high CO2 partial pressure through suitably designed laboratory experiments, in which cement hydration and carbonation are taken into account separately. First, the hydration process was carried out for 28 days to identify and quantify the hydrated solid phases formed. After the completion of hydration, accompanied by partial carbonation under atmospheric conditions, the carbonation process was investigated in a stirred micro-reactor (Parr instrument) with crushed cement samples under 10 bar or more of pure CO2(g) and MilliQ water adopting different reaction times. The reaction time was varied to constrain the reaction kinetics of the carbonation process and to investigate the evolution of secondary solid phases. Chemical and mineralogical analyses (calcimetry, chemical composition, SEM and X-ray Powder Diffraction) were carried out to characterize the secondary minerals formed during cement hydration and carbonation. Water analyses were also performed at the end of each experimental run to measure the concentrations of relevant solutes. The specific surface area of hydrated cement was measured by means of the BET method to obtain the rates of cement carbonation. Experimental outcomes were simulated by means of the PhreeqC software package. The obtained results are of interest to understand the comparatively fast cement alteration in CO2 production wells with damaged casing.

  14. On the evolution and environmental dependence of the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation since z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yusei; Smail, Ian; Kurk, Jaron; Geach, James E.; Sobral, David; Kodama, Tadayuki; Nakata, Fumiaki; Swinbank, A. M.; Best, Philip N.; Hayashi, Masao; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the correlation between galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar mass (M*) over the last ˜10 Gyr, particularly focusing on its environmental dependence. We first present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of the Hα-selected galaxies in a rich cluster Cl 0939+4713 at z = 0.4. We use wide-field Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm data to show that the optically red Hα emitters, which are most prevalent in group-scale environments, tend to have higher SFRs and higher dust extinction than the majority population of blue Hα sources. With an MIR stacking analysis, we find that the median SFR of Hα emitters is higher in higher density environment at z = 0.4. We also find that star-forming galaxies in high-density environment tend to have higher specific SFR (SSFR), although the trend is much less significant compared to that of SFR. This increase of SSFR in high-density environment is not visible when we consider the SFR derived from Hα alone, suggesting that the dust attenuation in galaxies depends on environment; galaxies in high-density environment tend to be dustier (by up to ˜0.5 mag), probably reflecting a higher fraction of nucleated, dusty starbursts in higher density environments at z = 0.4. We then discuss the environmental dependence of the SFR-M* relation for star-forming galaxies since z ˜ 2, by compiling our comparable, narrow-band-selected, large Hα emitter samples in both distant cluster environments and field environments. We find that the SSFR of Hα-selected galaxies (at the fixed mass of log (M*/M⊙) = 10) rapidly evolves as (1 + z)3, but the SFR-M* relation is independent of the environment since z ˜ 2, as far as we rely on the Hα-based SFRs (with M*-dependent extinction correction). Even if we consider the possible environmental variation in the dust attenuation, we conclude that the difference in the SFR-M* relation between cluster and field star-forming galaxies is always small (≲0.2 dex level) at any time

  15. Potential Biases in Leadership Measures: How Prototypes, Leniency, and General Satisfaction Relate to Ratings and Rankings of Transformational and Transactional Leadership Constructs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Bernard M.; Avolio, Bruce J.

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-seven employed people completed a graphic rating or a forced ranking questionnaire describing their immediate superiors. Transformational and transactional leadership constructs were examined in relation to the participant's leadership prototype, leniency in rating, and general satisfaction. Overall, forced ranking yielded more independent…

  16. Contribution of exposure, risk of crash and fatality to explain age- and sex-related differences in traffic-related cyclist mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, Virginia; Jiménez-Mejías, Eladio; Amezcua-Prieto, Carmen; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Luna-del-Castillo, Juan de Dios; Lardelli-Claret, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to quantify the percent contribution of exposure, risk of collision and fatality rate to the association of age and sex with the mortality rates among cyclists in Spain, and to track the changes in these contributions with time. Data were analyzed for 50,042 cyclists involved in road crashes in Spain from 1993 to 2011, and also for a subset of 13,119 non-infractor cyclists involved in collisions with a vehicle whose driver committed an infraction (used as a proxy sample of all cyclists on the road). We used decomposition and quasi-induced exposure methods to obtain the percent contributions of these three components to the mortality rate ratios for each age and sex group compared to males aged 25-34 years. Death rates increased with age, and the main component of this increase was fatality (around 70%). Among younger cyclists, however, the main component of increased death rates was risk of a collision. Males had higher death rates than females in every age group: this rate increased from 6.4 in the 5-14 year old group to 18.8 in the 65-79 year old group. Exposure, the main component of this increase, ranged between 70% and 90% in all age categories, although the fatality component also contributed to this increase. The contributions of exposure, risk of crash and fatality to cyclist death rates were strongly associated with age and sex. Young male cyclists were a high-risk group because all three components tended to increase their mortality rate. PMID:25658669

  17. Strain rate sensitivity of mechanical properties and related thermal activation process in a two-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Kim, Y.W.

    1997-12-31

    Tensile properties of a two-phase {gamma} titanium aluminide with duplex microstructure are tested under different strain rates from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1} at temperature from 1,123 K to 1,273 K. It is found that there exists approximate linear relationship between the flow stresses and the logarithm of the strain rate at different temperatures. The strain rate sensitivity can be explained by thermal activation theory, and dislocation climbing is identified as the rate controlling mechanism.

  18. The Relation between [O III]/Hβ and Specific Star Formation Rate in Galaxies at z ∼ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay Dickey, Claire; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Oesch, Pascal A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Leja, Joel; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Franx, Marijn; Skelton, Rosalind E.

    2016-09-01

    Recent surveys have identified a seemingly ubiquitous population of galaxies with elevated [O iii]/Hβ emission line ratios at z > 1, although the nature of this phenomenon continues to be debated. The [O iii]/Hβ line ratio is of interest because it is a main component of the standard diagnostic tools used to differentiate between active galactic nuclei and star-forming galaxies as well as the gas-phase metallicity indicators O 23 and R 23. Here, we investigate the primary driver of increased [O iii]/Hβ ratios by median-stacking rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of star-forming galaxies in the 3D-HST survey in the redshift range z ∼ 1.4–2.2. Using N = 4220 star-forming galaxies, we stack the data in bins of mass and specific star formation rates (sSFRs), respectively. After accounting for stellar Balmer absorption, we measure [O iii]λ5007 Å/Hβ down to M ∼ 109.2 M ⊙ and sSFR ∼ 10‑9.6 yr‑1, greater than an order of magnitude lower than previous work at similar redshifts. We find an offset of 0.59 ± 0.05 dex between the median ratios at z ∼ 2 and z ∼ 0 at fixed stellar mass, in agreement with existing studies. However, with respect to sSFR, the z ∼ 2 stacks all lie within 1σ of the median SDSS ratios, with an average offset of only ‑0.06 ± 0.05. We find that the excitation properties of galaxies are tightly correlated with their sSFR at both z ∼ 2 and z ∼ 0, with a relation that appears to be roughly constant over the last 10 Gyr of cosmic time.

  19. A reduced rate of in vivo dopamine transporter binding is associated with lower relative reinforcing efficacy of stimulants.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sunmee; Carroll, F Ivy; Woolverton, William L

    2006-02-01

    A slow onset of action has been hypothesized to weaken the reinforcing effects of drugs. The present study evaluated this hypothesis with slow-onset cocaine analogs, WIN 35428, RTI 31, and RTI 51. When cocaine or a cocaine analog was made available to rhesus monkeys (n = 4 or 5) for self-administration under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule with a 1-h time-out between injections, all the drugs functioned as positive reinforcers. The maximum number of injections was in the order of cocaine > WIN 35428 > RTI 31 > RTI 51. In in vivo binding in rat striatum, equipotent doses of cocaine, WIN 35428, RTI 31, and RTI 51 were estimated to displace 25% of [(3)H]WIN 35428 binding at the dopamine transporters (DAT), respectively, 5.8, 22.4, 30.8, and 44.1 min after the intravenous injection. Further, relative reinforcing efficacy was correlated with rate of DAT binding such that slower displacement of [(3)H]WIN 35428 was associated with a weaker reinforcing effect. In in vitro binding in monkey brain tissue, the cocaine analogs had higher affinity for monoamine transporter sites, but similar affinity ratios of 5-HTT/DAT, compared to cocaine. Lastly, RTI 31 was shown to function as a positive reinforcer in drug-naïve rhesus monkeys under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. Collectively, the data support the hypothesis that a slow onset at the DAT is associated with reduced reinforcing efficacy of DAT ligands. The data under both the PR and FR schedules, however, suggest that a slow onset at the DAT influence reinforcing effect only to a limited extent. PMID:15957006

  20. Heart rate deflection related to lactate performance curve and plasma catecholamine response during incremental cycle ergometer exercise.

    PubMed

    Pokan, R; Hofmann, P; Lehmann, M; Leitner, H; Eber, B; Gasser, R; Schwaberger, G; Schmid, P; Keul, J; Klein, W

    1995-01-01

    The correlation between the behaviour of the heart rate/work performance (fc/W) curve and blood lactate ([la]b) and plasma adrenaline/noradrenaline concentrations ([A]/[NA]) during incremental cycle ergometer exercise was investigated. A group of 21 male sports students was divided into two groups: group I, with a clear deflection of the fc/W curve; group II, without or with an inverse deflection of the fc/W curve. The aerobic threshold (Thaer) and the lactate turn point (LTP) were defined. Between Thaer and maximal work performance (Wmax) the behaviour of the fc/W curve as well as the behaviour of [la-]b and [A]. [NA] were described mathematically. The fc, systolic blood pressure (BPs), W, [la-]b, [A] and [NA] at rest, Thaer, LTP, Wmax, after 3 and 6 min of recovery (Re3/Re6) were calculated. A significant difference between the two groups could only be detected for fc at LTP, Re3 and Re6 (P < 0.05). No significant correlation could be found between individual fc/W-behaviour and individual time course of [la-]b, [A] and [NA]. However, a significant correlation was visible between [la-]b/W-behaviour and individual catecholamine response. These results and the fact that the different flattening at the top of the fc/W curve was related to diminished stress-dependent myocardial function led us to the conclusion that it is possible that sympathetic drive is not directly involved in mechanisms of regulation between load dependent fc and myocardial function. In addition, individual fc/W behaviour was independent of BPs and Wmax, or individual conditions of energy supply. PMID:7768241

  1. Evaluation of the relative rates of bone mineral content loss in postmenopause due to both estrogen deficiency and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gnudi, S; Mongiorgi, R; Figus, E; Bertocchi, G

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the relative rates of bone mineral content loss in postmenopause due to both estrogen deficiency and ageing, three groups of women were studied by computerized bone densitometry at the radius mid-point and at the distal point, modified according to the Abwrey technique. All women were in apparent good health and never had estrogen therapy. In the first group there were 64 women aged between 30 and 50 who were ovariectomized between 25 and 35 years of age. The second group was made up of 309 women between 50 and 55 years. In the third group there were 136 women aged 30-50 with normal ovaric function. The ordinary functions of linear polynomial regression were used to describe the variations in density with age. The percentage of postmenopausal bone loss was determined by calculating the BMC value at the start of the menopause and again twenty years later, according to the linear regression equation of postmenopausal period of each group of women in the study. The women who had natural menopause showed an average bone loss per year of 1.63% at the mid radius and 1.0% at the distal point. The ovariectomized women had an average loss of 0.85% at the mid point and 0.66% at the distal point. No significant decrease of bone mass was found before menopause. From a comparison between the two groups of women with analogous periods of menopause, it comes out that, during the first 20 years of natural menopause, estrogen deficiency is responsible for 52.5%-66.4% of the bone mineral loss, the remaining amount being attributable to other causes, connected with ageing. Estrogen deficiency is therefore, the principal factor causing bone mineral loss in natural menopause. PMID:2100526

  2. Oceanic transform fault earthquake nucleation process and source scaling relations - A numerical modeling study with rate-state friction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.; Behn, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    We use a three-dimensional strike-slip fault model in the framework of rate and state-dependent friction to investigate earthquake behavior and scaling relations on oceanic transform faults (OTFs). Gabbro friction data under hydrothermal conditions are mapped onto OTFs using temperatures from (1) a half-space cooling model, and (2) a thermal model that incorporates a visco-plastic rheology, non-Newtonian viscous flow and the effects of shear heating and hydrothermal circulation. Without introducing small-scale frictional heterogeneities on the fault, our model predicts that an OTF segment can transition between seismic and aseismic slip over many earthquake cycles, consistent with the multimode hypothesis for OTF ruptures. The average seismic coupling coefficient χ is strongly dependent on the ratio of seismogenic zone width W to earthquake nucleation size h*; χ increases by four orders of magnitude as W/h* increases from ~ 1 to 2. Specifically, the average χ = 0.15 +/- 0.05 derived from global OTF earthquake catalogs can be reached at W/h* ≈ 1.2-1.7. The modeled largest earthquake rupture area is less than the total seismogenic area and we predict a deficiency of large earthquakes on long transforms, which is also consistent with observations. Earthquake magnitude and distribution on the Gofar (East Pacific Rise) and Romanche (equatorial Mid-Atlantic) transforms are better predicted using the visco-plastic model than the half-space cooling model. We will also investigate how fault gouge porosity variation during an OTF earthquake nucleation phase may affect the seismic wave velocity structure, for which up to 3% drop was observed prior to the 2008 Mw6 Gofar earthquake.

  3. Relative Success? Determinants of College Graduation Rates in Public and Private Colleges in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Marc; Bailey, Thomas; Kienzl, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Amid growing criticism of public universities, there is little discussion of what appropriate institutional evaluation would entail. Six-year graduation rates are commonly used, and public bachelors granting institutions have lower rates than private institutions, but with the growth in non-traditional college attendance, these can be misleading.…

  4. Mothers' Expressive Style and Emotional Responses to Children's Behavior Predict Children's Prosocial and Achievement-Related Self-Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmore, Julie C.; Bradburn, Isabel S.; Costanzo, Philip R.; Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether mothers' typical expressive style and specific emotional responses to children's behaviors are linked to children's prosocial and competence self-ratings. Eight- to 12-year-old children and their mothers rated how mothers had felt when children behaved prosocially and antisocially, achieved and failed to…

  5. Respiration rate in maize roots is related to concentration of reduced nitrogen and proliferation of lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granato, T. C.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between specific rate of respiration (respiration rate per unit root dry weight) and concentration of reduced nitrogen was examined for maize (Zea mays L.) roots. Plants with 2 primary nodal root axes were grown for 8 days in a split-root hydroponic system in which NO3- was supplied to both axes at 1.0 mol m-3, to one axis at 1.0 mol m-3 and the other axis at 0.0 mol m-3, or to both axes at 0.0 mol m-3. Respiration rates and root characteristics were measured at 2-day intervals. Specific rate of respiration was positively correlated in a nonlinear relationship with concentration of reduced nitrogen. The lowest specific rates of respiration occurred when neither axis received exogenous NO3- and the concentration of reduced nitrogen in the axes was less than 9 mg g-1. The greatest rates occurred in axes that were actively absorbing NO3- and contained more than 35 mg g-1 of reduced nitrogen. At 23 mg g-1 of reduced nitrogen, below which initiation of lateral branches was decreased by 30-50%, specific rate of respiration was 17% greater for roots actively absorbing NO3- than for roots not absorbing NO3-. Increases in specific rate of respiration associated with concentrations of reduced nitrogen greater than 23 mg g-1 were concluded to be attributable primarily to proliferation of lateral branches.

  6. In situ synchrotron IR study relating temperature and heating rate to surface functional group changes in biomass.

    PubMed

    Kirtania, Kawnish; Tanner, Joanne; Kabir, Kazi Bayzid; Rajendran, Sharmen; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Three types of woody biomass were investigated under pyrolysis condition to observe the change in the surface functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique with increasing temperature under two different (5 and 150°C/min) heating rates. The experiments were carried out in situ in the infrared microscopy beamline (IRM) of the Australian Synchrotron. The capability of the beamline made it possible to focus on single particles to obtain low noise measurements without mixing with KBr. At lower heating rate, the surface functional groups were completely removed by 550°C. In case of higher heating rate, a delay was observed in losing the functional groups. Even at a high temperature, significant number of functional groups was retained after the higher heating rate experiments. This implies that at considerably high heating rates typical of industrial reactors, more functional groups will remain on the surface. PMID:24189382

  7. Observation of pressure gradient and related flow rate effect on the plasma parameters in plasma processing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Aram; Chung, Chin-Wook; Moon, Se Youn

    2011-02-15

    In industrial plasma processes, flow rate has been known to a key to control plasma processing results and has been discussed with reactive radical density, gas residence time, and surface reaction. In this study, it was observed that the increase in the flow rate can also change plasma parameters (electron temperature and plasma density) and electron energy distribution function in plasma processing reactor. Based on the measurement of gas pressure between the discharge region and the pumping port region, the considerable differences in the gas pressure between the two regions were found with increasing flow rate. It was also observed that even in the discharge region, the pressure gradient occurs at the high gas flow rate. This result shows that increasing the flow rate results in the pressure gradient and causes the changes in the plasma parameters.

  8. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Acute Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Respiratory Function in Urban Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Kulka, Ryan; Dubeau, Aimee; Martin, Christina; Wang, Daniel; Dales, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined the acute health effects of air pollution exposures experienced while cycling in traffic. Objectives: We conducted a crossover study to examine the relationship between traffic pollution and acute changes in heart rate variability. We also collected spirometry and exhaled nitric oxide measures. Methods: Forty-two healthy adults cycled for 1 hr on high- and low-traffic routes as well as indoors. Health measures were collected before cycling and 1–4 hr after the start of cycling. Ultrafine particles (UFPs; ≤ 0.1 μm in aerodynamic diameter), particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), black carbon, and volatile organic compounds were measured along each cycling route, and ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) levels were recorded from a fixed-site monitor. Mixed-effects models were used to estimate associations between air pollutants and changes in health outcome measures relative to precycling baseline values. Results: An interquartile range increase in UFP levels (18,200/cm3) was associated with a significant decrease in high-frequency power 4 hr after the start of cycling [β = –224 msec2; 95% confidence interval (CI), –386 to –63 msec2]. Ambient NO2 levels were inversely associated with the standard deviation of normal-to-normal (NN) intervals (β = –10 msec; 95% CI, –20 to –0.34 msec) and positively associated with the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power (β = 1.4; 95% CI, 0.35 to 2.5) 2 hr after the start of cycling. We also observed significant inverse associations between ambient O3 levels and the root mean square of successive differences in adjacent NN intervals 3 hr after the start of cycling. Conclusions: Short-term exposures to traffic pollution may contribute to altered autonomic modulation of the heart in the hours immediately after cycling. PMID:21672679

  9. EVALUATION OF THE MORTALITY RATE ONE YEAR AFTER HIP FRACTURE AND FACTORS RELATING TO DIMINISHED SURVIVAL AMONG ELDERLY PEOPLE

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Guilherme; Longaray, Maurício Portal; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Neto, Ary da Silva Ungaretti; Manente, Marislei; Barbosa, Luíza Barbosa Horta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mortality rate after one year and correlated preoperative factors, among patients with hip fractures. Methods: We prospectively studied 202 out of a total of 376 patients with a diagnosis of hip fracture who were admitted to the Hospital Cristo Redentor, between October 2007 and March 2009. The database with the epidemiological analysis was set up during their hospitalization, and follow–up data were obtained preferentially by phone. Results: The overall mortality rate after one year of follow-up was 28.7% or 58 deaths, among which 11 (5.45%) occurred during hospitalization. Fractures were more prevalent among women (71.3%) and rare among blacks (5%). Among the comorbidities, dementia and depression showed a statistically significant reduction in survival (p = 0.018 and 0.007, respectively). Conclusion: The mortality rate after one year of follow-up was 28.7%. Dementia and depression increased this rate. PMID:27042638

  10. Investigating the decay rates of Escherichia coli relative to Vibrio parahemolyticus and Salmonella Typhi in tropical coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon Weng; Ng, Angie Yee Fang; Bong, Chui Wei; Narayanan, Kumaran; Sim, Edmund Ui Hang; Ng, Ching Ching

    2011-02-01

    Using the size fractionation method, we measured the decay rates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the coastal waters of Peninsular Malaysia. The size fractions were total or unfiltered, <250 μm, <20 μm, <2 μm, <0.7 μm, <0.2 μm and <0.02 μm. We also carried out abiotic (inorganic nutrients) and biotic (bacterial abundance, production and protistan bacterivory) measurements at Port Dickson, Klang and Kuantan. Klang had highest nutrient concentrations whereas both bacterial production and protistan bacterivory rates were highest at Kuantan. We observed signs of protist-bacteria coupling via the following correlations: Protistan bacterivory-Bacterial Production: r = 0.773, df = 11, p < 0.01; Protist-Bacteria: r = 0.586, df = 12, p < 0.05. However none of the bacterial decay rates were correlated with the biotic variables measured. E. coli and Salmonella decay rates were generally higher in the larger fraction (>0.7 μm) than in the smaller fraction (<0.7 μm) suggesting the more important role played by protists. E. coli and Salmonella also decreased in the <0.02 μm fraction and suggested that these non-halophilic bacteria did not survive well in seawater. In contrast, Vibrio grew well in seawater. There was usually an increase in Vibrio after one day incubation. Our results confirmed that decay or loss rates of E. coli did not match that of Vibrio, and also did not correlate with Salmonella decay rates. However E. coli showed persistence where its decay rates were generally lower than Salmonella. PMID:21146847

  11. Conception rates in farm mink (Neovison vison) in relation to first mating date, age and color variety.

    PubMed

    Felska-Błaszczyk, Lidia; Lasota, Bogdan; Seremak, Beata

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of the first mating date, age and color variety on the conception rates in farm mink. We analyzed female mink reproductive performance in 492 Sapphire and 463 Standard Black females over 3 or 4 years. The analysis included the number of inefficient matings, the interval between the first inefficient mating and the efficient mating (copulation) and the conception rates. The results show a significant effect of female's age and color variety on the conception rates. The youngest, yearling females of either color needed a higher number of matings per conception, as compared to older, 2- and 3-year-old females. Black females demonstrated a higher number of inefficient matings (1.066), as compared with Sapphires (0.730). Yearling females were most often mated from 1 to 10 March, and older females from 11 to 20 March. Older females achieved better conception rates than the yearlings. Dates between 11 and 25 March proved to be the optimum for the first mating, since the highest conception rates were observed if the females had mated during this period. PMID:26434936

  12. Dynamics of tsetse natural infection rates in the Mouhoun river, Burkina Faso, in relation with environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Bouyer, Jérémy; Koné, Naférima; Bengaly, Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    In Burkina Faso, the cyclical vectors of African animal trypanosomoses (AAT) are riverine tsetse species, namely Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank (G.p.g.) and Glossina tachinoides Westwood (G.t.) (Diptera: Glossinidae). Experimental work demonstrated that environmental stress can increase the sensitivity of tsetse to trypanosome infection. Seasonal variations of the tsetse infection rates were monitored monthly over 17 months (May 2006–September 2007) in two sites (Douroula and Kadomba). In total, 1423 flies were dissected and the infection of the proboscis, middle intestine and salivary glands was noted. All the positive organs were analyzed using monospecific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. To investigate the role of different environmental factors, fly infection rates were analyzed using generalized linear mixed binomial models using the species, sex, and monthly averages of the maximum, minimum and mean daily temperatures, rainfalls, Land Surface Temperature day (LSTd) and night (LSTn) as fixed effects and the trap position as a random effect. The overall infection rate was 10% from which the predominant species was T. congolense (7.6% of the flies), followed by T. vivax (2.2% of the flies). The best model (lowest AICc) for the global infection rates was the one with the maximum daily temperature only as fixed effect (p < 0.001). For T. congolense, the best model was the one with the tsetse species, sex, maximum daily temperature and rainfalls as fixed effect, where the maximum daily temperature was the main effect (p < 0.001). The number of T. vivax infections was too low to allow the models to converge. The maturation rate of T. congolense was very high (94%), and G. t. harbored a higher maturation rate (p = 0.03). The results are discussed in view of former laboratory studies showing that temperature stress can increase the susceptibility of tsetse to trypanosomes, as well as the possibility to improve AAT risk mapping using satellite

  13. Nonstationarity in the occurrence rate of floods in the Tarim River basin, China, and related impacts of climate indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xihui; Zhang, Qiang; Singh, Vijay P.; Chen, Xi; Liu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Amplification of floods in the Xinjiang, China, has been observed, but reports on their changing properties and underlying mechanisms are not available. In this study, occurrence rates of floods in the Tarim River basin, the largest inland arid river basin in China, were analyzed using the Kernel density estimation technique and bootstrap resampling method. Also analyzed were the occurrence rates of precipitation extremes using the POT (Peak over Threshold)-based sampling method. Both stationary and non-stationary models were developed using GAMLSS (Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape) to model flood frequency with time, climate index, precipitation and temperature as major predictors. Results indicated: (1) two periods with increasing occurrence of floods, i.e., the late 1960s and the late 1990s with considerable fluctuations around 2-3 flood events during time intervals between the late 1960s and the late 1990s; (2) changes in the occurrence rates of floods were subject to nonstationarity. A persistent increase of flood frequency and magnitude was observed during the 1990s and reached a peak value; (3) AMO (Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation) and AO (Atlantic Oscillation) in winter were the key influencing climate indices impacting the occurrence rates of floods. However, NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) and SOI (South Oscillation Index) are two principle factors that influence the occurrence rates of regional floods. The AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) values indicated that compared to the influence of climate indices, occurrence rates of floods seemed to be more sensitive to temperature and precipitation changes. Results of this study are important for flood management and development of mitigation measures.

  14. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions of ferrate(VI) with phenols and hydroquinone. Correlation of rate constants with bond strengths and application of the Marcus cross relation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui; Ma, Li; Lam, William W Y; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of phenols by HFeO4(-) proceeds via a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism, as evidenced by a large deuterium isotope effect and a linear correlation between the log(rate constant) and bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of phenols. The Marcus cross relation has been applied to predict the rate constant of HAT from hydroquinone to HFeO4(-). PMID:26610053

  15. Excess heart rate and systolic blood pressure during psychological stress in relation to metabolic demand in adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular responses during exercise are matched to the increased metabolic demand, but this may not be the case during psychological stress. No studies to date have tested this hypothesis in youth. Fifty-four youth, ages 13-16 years completed two visits. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressu...

  16. Factors Related to Self-Rated Participation in Adolescents and Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability--A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidsson, Patrik; Granlund, Mats; Thyberg, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background: Self-rated participation is a clinically relevant intervention outcome for people with mild intellectual disability. The aim of this systematic review was to analyse empirical studies that explored relationships between either environmental factors or individual characteristics "and" aspects of participation in young adults with mild…

  17. An Analysis of the Factors Related to the Rate of Violent Crimes Committed by Incarcerated Female Delinquents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balthazar, Mary L.; Cook, Ruall J.

    1984-01-01

    Examined variations in female juvenile crime according to age, educational level, IQ, family structure, and geographical location. No significant relationships were found except a slight influence of age. Girls raised in mother-only homes committed a higher rate of violent crimes. (JAC)

  18. 77 FR 52279 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Comment on Proposed Urban Rates Survey and Issues Relating to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... comparability purposes solely from data collected regarding local, flat rate voice service in urban areas... FNPRM, 76 FR 73830 (November 29, 2011), 76 FR 78384 (December 16, 2011), which comprehensively reforms... telephone network (PSTN) and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) service, to the extent each is...

  19. Characteristics of Mother-Infant Communicative Interaction: Relations to the Ratings of Maternal Sensitivity and Infant Co-Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paavola, Leila; Kemppinen, Kaarina; Kunnari, Sari; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Moilanen, Irma; Ebeling, Hanna

    2006-01-01

    The present article reports a study of communicative behaviour among mothers and infants who were grouped according to the ratings of sensitivity and co-operation, respectively. The participants were 27 Finnish-speaking mothers and their 10-month-old first-born infants (13 boys and 14 girls). The study is descriptive by nature, and the data were…

  20. Therapist Sexual Orientation, Gender, and Counseling Practices as They Relate to Ratings of Helpfulness by Gay and Lesbian Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Becky J.

    1996-01-01

    Lesbian and gay volunteers (N=392) described their experiences with 923 therapists. Gay, lesbian, and bisexual therapists of both genders, and heterosexual female therapists, were rated more helpful than heterosexual male therapists. Participants also reported whether each therapist exhibited nine negative and four positive practices; such…

  1. Use of 13C-Labeled Substrates to Determine Relative Methane Production Rates in Hypersaline Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Bebout, B.; Chanton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rates and pathways of methane production were determined from photosynthetic soft microbial mats and gypsum-encrusted endoevaporites collected in hypersaline environments from California, Mexico and Chile, as well as an organic-rich mud from a pond in the El Tatio volcanic fields, Chile. Samples (mud, homogenized soft mats and endoevaporites) were incubated anaerobically with deoxygenated site water, and the increase in methane concentration through time in the headspaces of the incubation vials was used to determine methane production rates. To ascertain the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled methylamines, methanol, dimethylsulfide, acetate or bicarbonate were added to the incubations (one substrate per vial) and the stable isotopic composition of the resulting methane was measured. The vials amended with 13C-labeled methylamines produced the most 13C-enriched methane, generally followed by the 13C-labeled methanol-amended vials. The stable isotope data and the methane production rates were used to determine first order rate constants for each of the substrates at each of the sites. Estimates of individual substrate use revealed that the methylamines produced 55 to 92% of the methane generated, while methanol was responsible for another 8 to 40%.

  2. A quantitative method for determining relative colonization rates of maize callus by Fusarium graminearum for resistance gene evaluations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantitative PCR method was developed for detecting Fusarium graminearum growing in maize callus. Fungal DNA was found 12 hours after inoculation and was correlated with visual ratings. We demonstrated the efficacy of the method to quantify fungal growth in callus overexpressing a peroxidase gene ...

  3. Interdisciplinary Physics and Related Areas of Science and Technology Entropy Production Rate Changes in Lysogeny/Lysis Switch Regulation of Bacteriophage Lambda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Luo, Liao-Fu; Lin, Hao

    2011-02-01

    According to the chemical kinetic model of lysogeny/lysis switch in Escherichia coli (E. coli) infected by bacteriophage λ, the entropy production rates of steady states are calculated. The results show that the lysogenic state has lower entropy production rate than lytic state, which provides an explanation on why the lysogenic state of λ phage is so stable. We also notice that the entropy production rates of both lysogenic state and lytic state are lower than that of saddle-point and bifurcation state, which is consistent with the principle of minimum entropy production for living organism in nonequilibrium stationary state. Subsequently, the relations between CI and Cro degradation rates at two bifurcations and the changes of entropy production rate with CI and Cro degradation are deduced. The theory and method can be used to calculate entropy change in other molecular network.

  4. Relationship between herd-level incidence rate of energy-related postpartum diseases, general risk factors and claw lesions in individual dairy cows recorded at maintenance claw trimming

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Laminitis and energy-related postpartum diseases share several risk factors, indicating a common etiology. Thus, a herd’s incidence rate of energy-related postpartum diseases, such as displaced abomasum and clinical ketosis, might reflect the likelihood of cows to suffer from laminitis-related claw lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between herd-level incidence rate of displaced abomasum and clinical ketosis, general risk factors, and claw lesions in individual cows recorded at maintenance claw trimming. Methods The dataset consisted of 6773 trimmings, performed between 2004 and 2006 by professional trimmers, from 3607 Swedish Red and Swedish Holstein cows in 26 herds. The herds were classified as having a high, inconsistent-high or low incidence rate of energy-related postpartum diseases, based on the number of recorded cases of veterinary-diagnosed displaced abomasum and clinical ketosis in the Swedish national animal disease recording system during 2002 to 2006, and observations and interviews in connections with herd visits. Generalized linear mixed models were used to investigate the association between herd-level incidence rate of energy-related postpartum diseases and laminitis-related lesions including sole ulcer and sole hemorrhage; and hygiene-related lesions including interdigital dermatitis, digital dermatitis, heel-horn erosion, verrucose dermatitis, and interdigital hyperplasia; and absence of any claw lesion. Systematic effects, including first-order interactions, with P < 0.05 were included in the models. Herd classification was forced into the models, and a random effect of herd was included. Results In comparison to herds with a high incidence rate of energy-related postpartum diseases, low-incidence herds showed a lower odds ratio (OR; 0.2) for laminitis-related lesions in cows trimmed during the summer months. Low-incidence herds also showed numerically lower OR estimates for laminitis-related

  5. Articular cartilage surface failure: an investigation of the rupture rate and morphology in relation to tissue health and hydration.

    PubMed

    Fick, James M; Espino, Daniel M

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the rupture rate and morphology of articular cartilage by altering the bathing environments of healthy and degenerate bovine cartilage. Soaking tissues in either distilled water or 1.5 M NaCI saline was performed in order to render the tissues into a swollen or dehydrated state, respectively. Creep compression was applied using an 8 mm flat-ended polished indenter that contained a central pore of 450 microm in diameter, providing a consistent region for rupture to occur across all 105 tested specimens. Rupture rates were determined by varying the nominal compressive stress and the loading time. Similar rupture rates were observed with the swollen healthy and degenerate specimens, loaded with either 6 or 7MPa of nominal compressive stress over 11 and 13 min. The observed rupture rates for the dehydrated specimens loaded with 7 MPa over 60 and 90s were 20% versus 40% and 20% versus 60% for healthy and degenerate tissues, respectively. At 8 MPa of nominal compressive stress over 60 and 90s the observed rupture rates were 20% versus 60% and 40% versus 80% for healthy and degenerate tissues, respectively; with all dehydrated degenerate tissues exhibiting a greater tendency to rupture (Barnard's exact test, p < 0.05). Rupture morphologies were only different in the swollen degenerate tissues (p < 0.05). The mechanisms by which dehydration and swelling induce initial surface rupture of mildly degenerate articular cartilage differ. Dehydration increases the likelihood that the surface will rupture, however, swelling alters the observed rupture morphology. PMID:22720392

  6. Hospitalization Rates for Coronary Heart Disease in Relation to Residence Near Areas Contaminated with Persistent Organic Pollutants and Other Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Alexander V.; Carpenter, David O.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants may contribute to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). We determined the ZIP codes containing or abutting each of the approximately 900 hazardous waste sites in New York and identified the major contaminants in each. Three categories of ZIP codes were then distinguished: those containing or abutting sites contaminated with persistent organic pollutants (POPs), those containing only other types of wastes (“other waste”), and those not containing any identified hazardous waste site (“clean”). Effects of residence in each of these ZIP codes on CHD and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) hospital discharge rates were assessed with a negative binomial model, adjusting for age, sex, race, income, and health insurance coverage. Patients living in ZIP codes contaminated with POPs had a statistically significant 15.0% elevation in CHD hospital discharge rates and a 20.0% elevation in AMI discharge rates compared with clean ZIP codes. In neither of the comparisons were rates in other-waste sites significantly greater than in clean sites. In a subset of POP ZIP codes along the Hudson River, where average income is higher and there is less smoking, better diet, and more exercise, the rate of hospitalization for CHD was 35.8% greater and for AMI 39.1% greater than in clean sites. Although the cross-sectional design of the study prevents definite conclusions on causal inference, the results indirectly support the hypothesis that living near a POP-contaminated site constitutes a risk of exposure and of development of CHD and AMI. PMID:15929900

  7. M-dwarf rapid rotators and the detection of relatively young multiple M-star systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Joss, M.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R. E-mail: mattjoss@mit.edu; and others

    2014-06-20

    We have searched the Kepler light curves of ∼3900 M-star targets for evidence of periodicities that indicate, by means of the effects of starspots, rapid stellar rotation. Several analysis techniques, including Fourier transforms, inspection of folded light curves, 'sonograms', and phase tracking of individual modulation cycles, were applied in order to distinguish the periodicities due to rapid rotation from those due to stellar pulsations, eclipsing binaries, or transiting planets. We find 178 Kepler M-star targets with rotation periods, P {sub rot}, of <2 days, and 110 with P {sub rot} < 1 day. Some 30 of the 178 systems exhibit two or more independent short periods within the same Kepler photometric aperture, while several have 3 or more short periods. Adaptive optics imaging and modeling of the Kepler pixel response function for a subset of our sample support the conclusion that the targets with multiple periods are highly likely to be relatively young physical binary, triple, and even quadruple M star systems. We explore in detail the one object with four incommensurate periods all less than 1.2 days, and show that two of the periods arise from one of a close pair of stars, while the other two arise from the second star, which itself is probably a visual binary. If most of these M-star systems with multiple periods turn out to be bound M stars, this could prove a valuable way discovering young hierarchical M-star systems; the same approach may also be applicable to G and K stars. The ∼5% occurrence rate of rapid rotation among the ∼3900 M star targets is consistent with spin evolution models that include an initial contraction phase followed by magnetic braking, wherein a typical M star can spend several hundred Myr before spinning down to periods longer than 2 days.

  8. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable rates of evolution within a core genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricu...

  9. Race-Related Health Disparities and Biological Aging: Does Rate of Telomere Shortening Differ Across Blacks and Whites?

    PubMed Central

    Rewak, Marissa; Buka, Stephen; Prescott, Jennifer; De Vivo, Immaculata; Loucks, Eric B.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Non, Amy L.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent work suggests that leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a marker of cellular aging, is sensitive to effects of social stress and may also provide early indication of premature aging. Using data from a birth cohort with LTL information at birth and in middle adulthood we examined a potential source of race-based health disparity by testing the hypothesis that Blacks would demonstrate a faster rate of telomere shortening than Whites. Linear regression analyses were conducted and adjusted for pack years, BMI, education and social factors, diet, exercise, marital status, and age. At birth black individuals had LTLs that were longer, on average, than their White counterparts (b = 3.85, p < 0.01). However, rate of shortening was greater for Blacks, who showed a larger difference in length between birth and adulthood (b = 5.10, p = 0.01) as compared with Whites, resulting in smaller racial differences in absolute adult LTL. PMID:24686071

  10. A preliminary report relating frequency of vaginal intercourse to heart rate variability, Valsalva ratio, blood pressure, and cohabitation status.

    PubMed

    Brody, S; Veit, R; Rau, H

    2000-04-01

    The relationship between recalled frequency of penile-vaginal intercourse (FSI) and resting heart rate variability (HRV; an index of parasympathetic tone), resting diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) response to the Valsalva maneuver was examined in 51 healthy adults aged 20-47 (subjects scoring above the 86th percentile on the Lie scale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) were excluded). As hypothesized, greater HRV and lower DBP were both associated with greater FSI (but not masturbation or non-coital sex with a partner) in cohabiting subjects, but not in non-cohabiting subjects. Valsalva ratio was unrelated to sexual behavior. Results are discussed in terms of both the modulating role of blood pressure on a number of psychological functions and the role of parasympathetic tone in HRV, FSI, and possibly pair-bonding. PMID:10725567

  11. Do people agree about the causes of behavior? A social relations analysis of behavior ratings and causal attributions.

    PubMed

    Robins, Richard W; Mendelsohn, Gerald A; Connell, Joanie B; Kwan, Virginia S Y

    2004-02-01

    Two studies examined consistency and agreement in behavior ratings and causal attributions. In Study 1, participants (N = 280) engaged in a series of getting-acquainted conversations in one of 3 communication media (face-to-face, telephone, computer mediated); in Study 2, participants (N = 120) engaged in a competitive group task. In both studies, participants rated themselves and their interaction partners on a set of behaviors and then made attributions about the causes of those behaviors. The major findings were that (a) participants consistently favored some causal factors over others in explaining both their own and their partners' behavior, supporting the existence of generalized attributional styles; and (b) participants showed moderate self-partner and partner-partner agreement about behavior but virtually no agreement about the causes of behavior. Thus, in brief interactions people tend to see themselves and others through the lens of their stable patterns of perceiving and interpreting behavior. PMID:14769088

  12. Does Prison Crowding Predict Higher Rates of Substance Use Related Parole Violations? A Recurrent Events Multi-Level Survival Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, Michael A.; Wilson, Deirdra F.; Reid, Savanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective This administrative data-linkage cohort study examines the association between prison crowding and the rate of post-release parole violations in a random sample of prisoners released with parole conditions in California, for an observation period of two years (January 2003 through December 2004). Background Crowding overextends prison resources needed to adequately protect inmates and provide drug rehabilitation services. Violence and lack of access to treatment are known risk factors for drug use and substance use disorders. These and other psychosocial effects of crowding may lead to higher rates of recidivism in California parolees. Methods Rates of parole violation for parolees exposed to high and medium levels of prison crowding were compared to parolees with low prison crowding exposure. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a Cox model for recurrent events. Our dataset included 13070 parolees in California, combining individual level parolee data with aggregate level crowding data for multilevel analysis. Results Comparing parolees exposed to high crowding with those exposed to low crowding, the effect sizes from greatest to least were absconding violations (HR 3.56 95% CI: 3.05–4.17), drug violations (HR 2.44 95% CI: 2.00–2.98), non-violent violations (HR 2.14 95% CI: 1.73–2.64), violent and serious violations (HR 1.88 95% CI: 1.45–2.43), and technical violations (HR 1.86 95% CI: 1.37–2.53). Conclusions Prison crowding predicted higher rates of parole violations after release from prison. The effect was magnitude-dependent and particularly strong for drug charges. Further research into whether adverse prison experiences, such as crowding, are associated with recidivism and drug use in particular may be warranted. PMID:26492490

  13. Comparison of flow rates and pressure profiles for N-sequential inlets and three related seal configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, R.C.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for choked flows of fluid nitrogen over a range of reduced inlet stagnation temperatures (from 0.67 to ambient) and reduced inlet stagnation pressures to 2. Flow rate and pressure profile comparisons are made between N aligned sequential orifice inlets, a 33-tooth labyrinth seal, a 3-step seal, a cylindrical seals and the classic venturi. Seal effectiveness appears strongly dependent on upstream losses and geometry configuration.

  14. Time trends (1998-2007) in brain cancer incidence rates in relation to mobile phone use in England.

    PubMed

    de Vocht, Frank; Burstyn, Igor; Cherrie, John W

    2011-07-01

    Mobile phone use in the United Kingdom and other countries has risen steeply since the early 1990's when the first digital mobile phones were introduced. There is an ongoing controversy about whether radio frequency (RF) exposure from mobile phones increases the risk of brain cancer. However, given the widespread use and nearly two decades elapsing since mobile phones were introduced, an association should have produced a noticeable increase in the incidence of brain cancer by now. Trends in rates of newly diagnosed brain cancer cases in England between 1998 and 2007 were examined. There were no time trends in overall incidence of brain cancers for either gender, or any specific age group. Systematic increases in rates for cancers of the temporal lobe in men (0.04 new cases/year) and women (0.02/year) were observed, along with decreases in the rates of cancers of the parietal lobe (-0.03/year), cerebrum (-0.02/year) and cerebellum (-0.01/year) in men only. The increased use of mobile phones between 1985 and 2003 has not led to a noticeable change in the incidence of brain cancer in England between 1998 and 2007. The observed increase in the rate of cancers in the temporal lobe, if caused by mobile phone use, would constitute <1 additional case per 100,000 people in that period. These data do not indicate a pressing need to implement a precautionary principle by means of population-wide interventions to reduce RF exposure from mobile phones. PMID:21280060

  15. A comparison of flow rates and pressure profiles for N-sequential inlets and three related seal configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for choked flows of fluid nitrogen over a range of reduced inlet stagnation temperatures (from 0.67 to ambient) and reduced inlet stagnation pressures to 2. Flow rate and pressure profile comparisons are made between N aligned sequential orifice inlets, a 33-tooth labyrinth seal, a 3-step seal, a cylindrical seal and the classic venturi. Seal effectiveness appears strongly dependent on upstream losses and geometry configuration.

  16. A comparison of flow rates and pressure profiles for N-sequential inlets and three related seal configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for choked flows of fluid nitrogen over a range of reduced inlet stagnation temperatures (from 0.67 to ambient) and reduced inlet stagnation pressures to 2. Flow rate and pressure profile comparisons are made between N aligned sequential orifice inlets, a 33-tooth labyrinth seal, a 3-step seal, a cylindrical seals and the classic venturi. Seal effectiveness appears strongly dependent on upstream losses and geometry configuration.

  17. Birth and death rate estimates of cats and dogs in U.S. households and related factors.

    PubMed

    New, John C; Kelch, William J; Hutchison, Jennifer M; Salman, Mo D; King, Mike; Scarlett, Janet M; Kass, Philip H

    2004-01-01

    Studies report variable factors associated with dog and cat surpluses in the United States. Estimates of cat and dog birth and death rates help understand the problem. This study collected data through a commercial survey company, distributing questionnaires to 7,399 cat- and dog-owning households (HHs) in 1996. The study used an unequal probability sampling plan and reported estimates of means and variances as weighted averages. The study used estimates of HHs and companion animals for national projections. More than 9 million owned cats and dogs died during 1996-yielding crude death rates of 8.3 cat deaths/100 cats in HHs and 7.9 dog deaths/100 dogs in HHs. The study reported twice as many kitten as puppy litters, with an average litter size of 5.73 and 7.57, respectively. The study reported data on planned versus unplanned litters, reasons caregivers did not spay females, disposition of litters, and sources of animals added to HHs. These first national estimates indicate the magnitude of, and reasons for, animals leaving HHs. The crude birth rate was estimated to be 11.2 kittens/100 cats in HHs and 11.4 puppies/100 dogs in HHs. PMID:15857809

  18. A fluid response: Alpha-amylase reactions to acute laboratory stress are related to sample timing and saliva flow rate.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tamás; van Lien, René; Willemsen, Gonneke; Proctor, Gordon; Efting, Marieke; Fülöp, Márta; Bárdos, György; Veerman, Enno C I; Bosch, Jos A

    2015-07-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) is used as a sympathetic (SNS) stress marker, though its release is likely co-determined by SNS and parasympathetic (PNS) activation. The SNS and PNS show asynchronous changes during acute stressors, and sAA responses may thus vary with sample timing. Thirty-four participants underwent an eight-minute memory task (MT) and cold pressor task (CPT). Cardiovascular SNS (pre-ejection period, blood pressure) and PNS (heart rate variability) activity were monitored continuously. Unstimulated saliva was collected repeatedly during and after each laboratory stressor, and sAA concentration (U/ml) and secretion (U/minute) determined. Both stressors increased anxiety. The MT caused an immediate and continued cardiac SNS activation, but sAA concentration increased at task cessation only (+54%); i.e., when there was SNS-PNS co-activation. During the MT sAA secretion even decreased (-35%) in conjunction with flow rate and vagal tone. The CPT robustly increased blood pressure but not sAA. In summary, sAA fluctuations did not parallel changes in cardiac SNS activity or anxiety. sAA responses seem contingent on sample timing and flow rate, likely involving both SNS and PNS influences. Verification using other stressors and contexts seems warranted. PMID:25976524

  19. Rumen clearance rates in relation to the occurrence of alfalfa bloat in cattle. 1. Passage of water-soluble markers.

    PubMed

    Majak, W; Hall, J W; Rode, L M; Kalnin, C M

    1986-06-01

    Ruminal chlorophyll and rates of passage of two water-soluble markers were simultaneously determined in cattle with different susceptibilities to alfalfa bloat. The markers showed a slower rate of passage from the rumens of more susceptible cattle where the average half-lives for cobalt-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and chromium-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were 12 to 17 h. Average half-life of the markers was 8 h in the rumens of the less susceptible animals. In agreement, chloroplast particles in the liquid phase of rumen contents showed greater accumulation in animals susceptible to bloat, but many more observations were required to detect differences in chlorophyll among animals. This was partly due to the unhomogeneous dispersion of chloroplast fragments in the reticulorumen compared with the uniform distribution of the inert markers. Differences in rumen volumes (estimated from the quantity of marker administered and its initial concentration) were detected among animals, but these did not show a relationship to bloat susceptibility. In vitro studies indicated that alfalfa chloroplast particles were not readily degraded by rumen microorganisms. Our results support earlier conclusions on slower rates of salivation for cattle that bloat compared with those that do not. PMID:3091665

  20. Admission Rate of Patients with Most Common Psychiatric Disorders in Relation to Seasons and Climatic Factors During 2010/2011

    PubMed Central

    Licanin, Ifeta; Fisekovic, Saida; Babić, Sanina

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Climate and its impact on human health and mental illness have been in the focus of the research since years in the field. Aim: The aim of the research is to study the admissions rate to the psychiatric clinic in correlation to seasons and climate. Material and method: The research was conducted in a Psychiatric clinic of the Clinical Center in Sarajevo. Randomly selected subjects (aged 5-89 years, 1316 males and 1039 females) N=2355, were interviewed by the Structural Clinical Interview (SCID) which generated DSM-IV. In this retrospective-prospective, clinicalepidemiological study subjects were divided into groups according to type of disorders. Correlation between the impact of seasons and the rate of admissions to a Psychiatric clinic was analyzed. Certain data were taken from Federal Hydrometeorological Institute in Sarajevo of the climatic situation for period of the study. Results and conclusions: Of the total number of subjects who were admitted to the clinic in the period of 2010/2011 the most common diagnoses were F10-F19, F20-F29, F30-F39, F40-F48, and the suicide attempts as the separate entity. It was found correlation between certain seasons and the effects of the certain weather parameters at an increased admission rate of subjects with the certain diseases. PMID:23922518

  1. Clarifying the contribution of assessee-, dimension-, exercise-, and assessor-related effects to reliable and unreliable variance in assessment center ratings.

    PubMed

    Putka, Dan J; Hoffman, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research has evaluated the functioning of assessment center (AC) ratings, surprisingly little research has articulated and uniquely estimated the components of reliable and unreliable variance that underlie such ratings. The current study highlights limitations of existing research for estimating components of reliable and unreliable variance in AC ratings. It provides a comprehensive empirical decomposition of variance in AC ratings that: (a) explicitly accounts for assessee-, dimension-, exercise-, and assessor-related effects, (b) does so with 3 large sets of operational data from a multiyear AC program, and (c) avoids many analytic limitations and confounds that have plagued the AC literature to date. In doing so, results show that (a) the extant AC literature has masked the contribution of sizable, substantively meaningful sources of variance in AC ratings, (b) various forms of assessor bias largely appear trivial, and (c) there is far more systematic, nuanced variance present in AC ratings than previous research indicates. Furthermore, this study also illustrates how the composition of reliable and unreliable variance heavily depends on the level to which assessor ratings are aggregated (e.g., overall AC-level, dimension-level, exercise-level) and the generalizations one desires to make based on those ratings. The implications of this study for future AC research and practice are discussed. PMID:23244226

  2. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale "subjective physical and mental performance" and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. PMID:27616894

  3. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale “subjective physical and mental performance” and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. PMID:27616894

  4. Copepod community growth rates in relation to body size, temperature, and food availability in the East China Sea: a test of metabolic theory of ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. Y.; Sastri, A. R.; Gong, G. C.; Hsieh, C. H.

    2013-03-01

    Zooplankton play an essential role in marine food webs, and understanding how community-level growth rates of zooplankton vary in the field is critical for predicting how marine ecosystem function may vary in the face of environmental changes. Here, we used the artificial cohort method to examine the effects of temperature, body size, and chlorophyll concentration (a proxy for food) on weight-specific growth rates for copepod communities in the East China Sea. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that copepod community growth rates can be described by the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE), linking spatio-temporal variation of copepod growth rate with temperature and their body size. Our results generally agree with predictions made by the MTE and demonstrate that weight-specific growth rates of copepod communities in our study area are positively related with temperature and negatively related to body size. However, the regression coefficients of body size do not approach the theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we find that the deviation from the MTE predictions may be partly attributed to the effect of food availability (which is not explicitly accounted for by the MTE). In addition, significant difference in the coefficients of temperature and body size exists among taxonomic groups. Our results suggest that considering the effects of food limitation and taxonomy is necessary to better understand copepod growth rates under in situ conditions, and such effects on the MTE-based predictions need further investigation.

  5. Copepod community growth rates in relation to body size, temperature, and food availability in the East China Sea: a test of metabolic theory of ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. Y.; Sastri, A.; Gong, G. C.; Hsieh, C. H.

    2012-11-01

    Zooplankton play an essential role in marine food webs and understanding how community-level growth rates of zooplankton vary in the field is critical for predicting how marine ecosystem function may vary in the face of environmental changes. Here, we used the artificial cohort method to examine the effects of temperature, body size, and chlorophyll concentration (a proxy for food) on weight-specific growth rates for copepod communities in the East China Sea. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that copepod community growth rates can be described by the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE), linking spatio-temporal variation of copepod growth rate with temperature and their body size. Our results generally agree with predictions made by the MTE and demonstrate that weight-specific growth rates of copepod communities in our study area are positively related with temperature and negatively related to body size. However, the regression coefficients of body size do not approach the theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we find that the deviation from the MTE predictions may be partly attributed to the effect of food availability (which is not explicitly accounted for by the MTE). In addition, significant difference in the coefficients of temperature and body size exists among taxonomic groups. Our results suggest that considering the effects of food limitation and taxonomy is necessary to better understand copepod growth rates under in situ conditions, and such effects on the MTE-based prediction needs further investigation.

  6. Encounters of H and D atoms with O[sub 2] in water: Relative diffusion and reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Han, P.; Bartels, D.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Diffusive encounters of H and D atoms with O[sub 2] in water are investigated with the time-domain EPR free induction decay attenuation technique. Given the paramagnetic triplet ground state of the O[sub 2] molecule, it is expected that all H--O[sub 2] encounters will contribute to spin dephasing, regardless of whether reaction to form HO[sub 2] occurs. In H[sub 2]O the second-order spin-spin dephasing rate of H in the presence of O[sub 2] is 2.0[times]10[sup 10] M[sup [minus]1] sec[sup [minus]1] at 25 [degree]C, with an activation energy of 14.1[plus minus]0.6 kJ/mole between 8 and 80 [degree]C. In a mixture of 90% D[sub 2]O and 10% H[sub 2]O, H atom dephasing is somewhat slower in the same temperature range, with a smaller activation energy. Dephasing of D atoms in 90% D[sub 2]O is ca. 5%--10% slower than H, indicating that diffusion of D is slower than H. The results are analyzed in terms of other available data concerning H and O[sub 2] diffusion and the reaction rate in water. It seems clear that neither the Stokes Einstein hydrodynamic theory nor classical activated rate theory applies to the diffusion of light hydrophobic gases in water. We tentatively conclude that H--O[sub 2] spin exchange is slightly less efficient than can be predicted in the theoretical diffusion limit.

  7. Debris on Khumbu Glacier at the base of Mt. Everest (Nepal) and its relation to rates of ablation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. D.; Brugh, T.; Hallet, B.; Conway, H.; Rasmussen, A.

    2011-12-01

    The crest of the Himalaya is defined by massive peaks, shear rock faces and broad rivers of ice that typically disappear under a thick debris cover at lower elevations flanked by extensive morainal ramparts. Supraglacial debris alters the rate of ice ablation and therefore affects the glacier's response to climate change. At the base of Mount Everest, the Khumbu glacier and its debris cover are sustained by input of both snow and erosion-generated debris. Little is known, however, about the rate of ablation and erosion in the glaciated basin. Herein, we investigate the flux of ice and debris through use of existing data and field studies to guide estimates of contemporary erosion rates for the Khumbu basin. We determined the thickness of debris accumulating in the lower reaches through field mapping and using two geophysical techniques: electrical resistivity tomography (Wenner and Dipole-Dipole arrays) and ground penetrating radar (40 MHz frequency). During the spring of 2011, we collected continuous debris thickness profiles totaling 1.75 km in length. The results detail the spatial distribution of debris thickness under the very irregular glacier surface. The maximum thickness measured was 12 m, and, in general, the debris thickness increases downglacier, ranging from centimeters near Everest base camp to meters near Lobuche with thickest debris cover corresponding to low spots in the glacier surface topography. These debris thickness data complement and augment the sparse data already available, as well as help us develop an understanding of the spatial debris distribution that can be applied to other glaciers in the region. Additionally, the flux of debris that is advected with the ice is determined using existing surface velocity fields. We are currently developing a model of the evolution of ice and debris through time.

  8. Relation Between Simultaneous Ca and Sr Transport Rates in Isolated Segments of Vetch, Barley, and Pine Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchin, Maxine E.; Vaughan, Burton E.

    1968-01-01

    Root segments of vetch, barley, and pine were exposed to a nutrient solution containing 85Sr and 45Ca tracers. Translocation was measured from solutions containing stable ions at concentrations of 2.5 mm Ca, and at either 0.5 mm or 2.5 mm Sr. Polar transport was established between 12 and 18 hr in barley, and between 16 and 22 hr in vetch. Acropetal transport remained below 5% of basipetal transport of tracer during these intervals. Transport in both vetch and barley usually declined before an elapsed time of 24 hr unlike corn, which maintained its steady state beyond 24 hr. Pine was radically different in that it showed no difference between acropetal and basipetal transport rates and had very low rates. Sr transport in all plants studied to date paralleled that of Ca and the ratio Sr:Ca transported was equal to the ratio Sr:Ca in the nutrient. In vetch, stable Ca transport was reduced to one-fifth when Sr concentration was increased from 0.5 mm to 2.5 mm. Yet stable Sr transport did not change, indicating that the effect on transport was not due to competitive inhibition. A similar effect was less pronounced in barley, but could not be detected in pine. The magnitude of the transport rates varied considerably among the various species, corn having the greatest followed by barley, vetch, and pine in decreasing order. Transport did not correlate with root weight or surface area; it amounted to from 0.03 to 0.60 nanomoles per hr in these experiments as compared to 7 nanomoles per hr previously established in corn (in all cases, 55 mm segments, sectioned 10 mm from apex). Images PMID:5725599

  9. Quantifying Age-Related Rates of Social Contact Using Diaries in a Rural Coastal Population of Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kiti, Moses Chapa; Kinyanjui, Timothy Muiruri; Koech, Dorothy Chelagat; Munywoki, Patrick Kiio; Medley, Graham Francis; Nokes, David James

    2014-01-01

    Background Improved understanding and quantification of social contact patterns that govern the transmission dynamics of respiratory viral infections has utility in the design of preventative and control measures such as vaccination and social distancing. The objective of this study was to quantify an age-specific matrix of contact rates for a predominantly rural low-income population that would support transmission dynamic modeling of respiratory viruses. Methods and Findings From the population register of the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System, coastal Kenya, 150 individuals per age group (<1, 1–5, 6–15, 16–19, 20–49, 50 and above, in years) were selected by stratified random sampling and requested to complete a day long paper diary of physical contacts (e.g. touch or embrace). The sample was stratified by residence (rural-to-semiurban), month (August 2011 to January 2012, spanning seasonal changes in socio-cultural activities), and day of week. Usable diary responses were obtained from 568 individuals (∼50% of expected). The mean number of contacts per person per day was 17.7 (95% CI 16.7–18.7). Infants reported the lowest contact rates (mean 13.9, 95% CI 12.1–15.7), while primary school students (6–15 years) reported the highest (mean 20.1, 95% CI 18.0–22.2). Rates of contact were higher within groups of similar age (assortative), particularly within the primary school students and adults (20–49 years). Adults and older participants (>50 years) exhibited the highest inter-generational contacts. Rural contact rates were higher than semiurban (18.8 vs 15.6, p = 0.002), with rural primary school students having twice as many assortative contacts as their semiurban peers. Conclusions and Significance This is the first age-specific contact matrix to be defined for tropical Sub-Saharan Africa and has utility in age-structured models to assess the potential impact of interventions for directly transmitted respiratory infections

  10. Power and transmission rate orders and related documents. Office of Power Marketing Coordination, data compiled January 1, 1980-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1982-08-01

    This publication contains the power and transmission rate orders and related documents issued by the Department of Energy. It covers calendar years 1980 and 1981. The first publication, DOE/CE-007 covering the period from March through December 1979, was published July 1981. This publication is a compilation of all rate orders issued by the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications and the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy during calendar years 1980 and 1981 under Delegation Order No. 0204-33. It also includes all final approvals, remands, and disapprovals by the FERC, and a petition to the FERC for reconsideration by a Power Marketing Administration during 1980 and 1981. Also included are two delegation orders along with an amendment and a supplement to one delegation order, a departmental order on financial reporting, and Power and Transmission Rate Adjustment Procedures relating to federal power marketing.

  11. Engineering-Based Problem Solving Strategies in AP Calculus: An Investigation into High School Student Performance on Related Rate Free-Response Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thieken, John

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 127 high school Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus students from two schools was utilized to study the effects of an engineering design-based problem solving strategy on student performance with AP style Related Rate questions and changes in conceptions, beliefs, and influences. The research design followed a treatment-control multiple…

  12. Professor Age and Research Assistant Ratings of Passive-Avoidant and Proactive Leadership: The Role of Age-Related Work Concerns and Age Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Hannes; Bal, P. Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that, in general, older professors are rated to have more passive-avoidant leadership styles than younger professors by their research assistants. The current study investigated professors' age-related work concerns and research assistants' favorable age stereotypes as possible explanations for this finding. Data came…

  13. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing /sup 235/U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing /sup 238/U (designated tuballoy). 4 references.

  14. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183... or Less Pt. 183, Subpt. H, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183—Weights (Pounds) of...

  15. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183... or Less Pt. 183, Subpt. H, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183—Weights (Pounds) of...

  16. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183... or Less Pt. 183, Subpt. H, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183—Weights (Pounds) of...

  17. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183... or Less Pt. 183, Subpt. H, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183—Weights (Pounds) of...

  18. A Systematic Review of Consent Procedures, Participation Rates, and Main Findings of Health-Related Research in Alternative High Schools from 2010 to 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen E.; Morris, Marian; Rew, Lynn; Simonton, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a well-established link between educational attainment and health. Alternative high schools (AHSs) serve students who are at risk for school dropout. Health-related research conducted in AHSs has been sparse. Achieving high participation rates is critical to producing generalizable results and can be challenging in research with…

  19. 33 CFR Table 4 to Subpart H of... - Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Weights (Pounds) of Outboard Motor and Related Equipment for Various Boat Horsepower Ratings 4 Table 4 to Subpart H of Part 183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT...

  20. A Study of the Relative Effectiveness of Verbal and Visual Augmentation of Rate-Modified Speech in the Presentation of Technical Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Janet S.

    The relative effectiveness of verbal and visual augmentation of rate-modified speech in the presentation of technical material was investigated. Subjects were 40 graduate students who used instructional materials consisting of normal and compressed audiotape versions of the Dwyer heart script, printed copies of the script, and black and white…

  1. Viruses in non-disinfected drinking water from municipal wells are related to community rates of acute gastrointestinal illness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundwater supplies for drinking water are frequently contaminated with low-levels of human enteric virus genomes, yet evidence for waterborne disease transmission is lacking. We related qPCR-measured enteric viruses in the tap water of 14 non-chlorinating communities in the U.S. to acute gastroint...

  2. Effect of smoking on attack rates of pulmonary and pleural lesions related to exposure to asbestos dust.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, G H; Pethybridge, R J; Sheers, G

    1980-01-01

    In follow-up studies of samples of employees at two of Her Majesty's Dockyards the prevalence of asbestos-related lesions in smokers and ex-smokers was statistically significantly higher than in non-smokers even when differences in age and exposure risk were considered. PMID:7426478

  3. The Rate of Cyber Dating Abuse among Teens and How It Relates to Other Forms of Teen Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Janine M.; Dank, Meredith; Yahner, Jennifer; Lachman, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    To date, little research has documented how teens might misuse technology to harass, control, and abuse their dating partners. This study examined the extent of cyber dating abuse--abuse via technology and new media--in youth relationships and how it relates to other forms of teen dating violence. A total of 5,647 youth from ten schools in three…

  4. Application of the Ghosh & Lamb relation to the spin-up/down behavior in the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Morii, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed continuous Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image/Gas Slit Camera (MAXI/GSC) data of the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67 from 2009 October to 2013 September, and determined the pulse period and the pulse-period derivative for every 60-d interval by the epoch folding method. The obtained periods are consistent with those provided by the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor pulsar project. In all the 60-d intervals, the pulsar was observed to spin up, with the spin-up rate positively correlated with the 2-20 keV flux. We applied the accretion torque model proposed by Ghosh and Lamb (1979, ApJ, 234, 296) to the MAXI/GSC data, as well as the past data including both spin-up and spin-down phases. The "Ghosh & Lamb" relation was confirmed to successfully explain the observed relation between the spin-up/down rate and the flux. By comparing the model-predicted luminosity with the observed flux, the source distance was constrained as 5-13 kpc, which is consistent with that found by Chakrabarty (1998, ApJ, 492, 342). Conversely, if the source distance is assumed, the data can constrain the mass and radius of the neutron star, because the Ghosh & Lamb model depends on these parameters. We attempted this idea, and found that an assumed distance of, e.g., 10 kpc gives a mass in the range of 1.81-1.90 solar mass, and a radius of 11.4-11.5 km, although these results are still subject to considerable systematic uncertainties, other than distance.

  5. Sex- and age- specific relations between economic development, economic inequality and homicide rates in people aged 0-24 years: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Butchart, Alexander; Engström, Karin

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test whether relations between economic development, economic inequality, and child and youth homicide rates are sex- and age-specific, and whether a country's wealth modifies the impact of economic inequality on homicide rates. METHODS: Outcome variables were homicide rates around 1994 in males and females in the age ranges 0-4, 5-9, 10-14, 15-19 and 20-24 years from 61 countries. Predictor variables were per capita gross domestic product (GDP), GINI coefficient, percentage change in per capita gross national product (GNP) and female economic activity as a percentage of male economic activity. Relations were analysed by ordinary least squares regression. FINDINGS: All predictors explained significant variances in homicide rates in those aged 15-24. Associations were stronger for males than females and weak for children aged 0-9. Models that included female economic inequality and percentage change in GNP increased the effect in children aged 0-9 and the explained variance in females aged 20-24. For children aged 0-4, country clustering by income increased the explained variance for both sexes. For males aged 15-24, the association with economic inequality was strong in countries with low incomes and weak in those with high incomes. CONCLUSION: Relations between economic factors and child and youth homicide rates varied with age and sex. Interventions to target economic factors would have the strongest impact on rates of homicide in young adults and late adolescent males. In societies with high economic inequality, redistributing wealth without increasing per capita GDP would reduce homicide rates less than redistributions linked with overall economic development. PMID:12471400

  6. Grapevine Rootstocks Differentially Affect the Rate of Ripening and Modulate Auxin-Related Genes in Cabernet Sauvignon Berries.

    PubMed

    Corso, Massimiliano; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Ziliotto, Fiorenza; Zouine, Mohamed; Maza, Elie; Nicolato, Tommaso; Vitulo, Nicola; Meggio, Franco; Valle, Giorgio; Bouzayen, Mondher; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Lucchin, Margherita; Bonghi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In modern viticulture, grafting commercial grapevine varieties on interspecific rootstocks is a common practice required for conferring resistance to many biotic and abiotic stresses. Nevertheless, the use of rootstocks to gain these essential traits is also known to impact grape berry development and quality, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In grape berries, the onset of ripening (véraison) is regulated by a complex network of mobile signals including hormones such as auxins, ethylene, abscisic acid, and brassinosteroids. Recently, a new rootstock, designated M4, was selected based on its enhanced tolerance to water stress and medium vigor. This study investigates the effect of M4 on Cabernet Sauvignon (CS) berry development in comparison to the commercial 1103P rootstock. Physical and biochemical parameters showed that the ripening rate of CS berries is faster when grafted onto M4. A multifactorial analysis performed on mRNA-Seq data obtained from skin and pulp of berries grown in both graft combinations revealed that genes controlling auxin action (ARF and Aux/IAA) represent one of main categories affected by the rootstock genotype. Considering that the level of auxin tightly regulates the transcription of these genes, we investigated the behavior of the main gene families involved in auxin biosynthesis and conjugation. Molecular and biochemical analyses confirmed a link between the rate of berry development and the modulation of auxin metabolism. Moreover, the data indicate that this phenomenon appears to be particularly pronounced in skin tissue in comparison to the flesh. PMID:26904046

  7. Density and growth rates of spider mites in relation to phenological stages of soybean cultivars in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arnemann, Jonas André; Fiorin, Rubens Alex; Perini, Clérison Régis; Storck, Lindolfo; Curioletti, Luis Eduardo; Nachman, Gösta; Guedes, Jerson Vanderlei Carús

    2015-11-01

    The population fluctuations of spider mites on different soybean cultivars were studied in two experiments performed in the municipalities of São Sepé (experiment 1) and Santa Maria (experiment 2) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The number of cultivars was 20 in São Sepé and 25 in Santa Maria, and at each location leaves were sampled from 15 plants per cultivar every week throughout the entire plant developmental cycle, amounting to 11 and 10 samplings in experiment 1 and 2, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed that mite densities varied significantly with cultivar and time. Besides, the interaction between soybean cultivars and sampling times was significant at both locations. This indicates that the populations did not vary in the same way among cultivars over time, which is attributed to differences among the cultivars with respect to their phenology and response to spider mites. Equations for describing the mite population dynamics were estimated for each cultivar, mostly by fitting cubic equations to the weekly growth rates (per capita changes) in mite densities. We also found that the highest growth rates for mites on soybean cultivars in both locations occurred after the beginning of flowering, when the plants shifted from the vegetative to reproductive stages, about 3 weeks before reaching the peak densities. PMID:26272161

  8. Grapevine Rootstocks Differentially Affect the Rate of Ripening and Modulate Auxin-Related Genes in Cabernet Sauvignon Berries

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Massimiliano; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Ziliotto, Fiorenza; Zouine, Mohamed; Maza, Elie; Nicolato, Tommaso; Vitulo, Nicola; Meggio, Franco; Valle, Giorgio; Bouzayen, Mondher; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Lucchin, Margherita; Bonghi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In modern viticulture, grafting commercial grapevine varieties on interspecific rootstocks is a common practice required for conferring resistance to many biotic and abiotic stresses. Nevertheless, the use of rootstocks to gain these essential traits is also known to impact grape berry development and quality, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In grape berries, the onset of ripening (véraison) is regulated by a complex network of mobile signals including hormones such as auxins, ethylene, abscisic acid, and brassinosteroids. Recently, a new rootstock, designated M4, was selected based on its enhanced tolerance to water stress and medium vigor. This study investigates the effect of M4 on Cabernet Sauvignon (CS) berry development in comparison to the commercial 1103P rootstock. Physical and biochemical parameters showed that the ripening rate of CS berries is faster when grafted onto M4. A multifactorial analysis performed on mRNA-Seq data obtained from skin and pulp of berries grown in both graft combinations revealed that genes controlling auxin action (ARF and Aux/IAA) represent one of main categories affected by the rootstock genotype. Considering that the level of auxin tightly regulates the transcription of these genes, we investigated the behavior of the main gene families involved in auxin biosynthesis and conjugation. Molecular and biochemical analyses confirmed a link between the rate of berry development and the modulation of auxin metabolism. Moreover, the data indicate that this phenomenon appears to be particularly pronounced in skin tissue in comparison to the flesh. PMID:26904046

  9. Endo-[beta]-Mannanase Activity from Individual Tomato Endosperm Caps and Radicle Tips in Relation to Germination Rates.

    PubMed Central

    Still, D. W.; Bradford, K. J.

    1997-01-01

    Endo-[beta]-mannanase is hypothesized to be a rate-limiting enzyme in endosperm weakening, which is a prerequisite for radicle emergence from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds. Using a sensitive, single-seed assay, we have measured mannanase activity diffusing from excised tomato endosperm caps following treatments that alter the rate or percentage of radicle emergence. Most striking was the 100- to more than 10,000-fold range of mannanase activity detected among individual seeds of highly inbred tomato lines, which would not be detected in pooled samples. In some cases a threshold-type relationship between mannanase activity and radicle emergence was observed. However, when radicle emergence was delayed or prevented by osmoticum or abscisic acid, the initial increase in mannanase activity was unaffected or even enhanced. Partially dormant seed lots displayed a bimodal distribution of activity, with low activity apparently associated with dormant seeds in the population. Gibberellin- and abscisic acid-deficient mutant seeds exhibited a wide range of mannanase activity, consistent with their variation in hormonal sensitivity. Although the presence of mannanase activity in the endosperm cap is consistently associated with radicle emergence, it is not the sole or limiting factor under all conditions. PMID:12223590

  10. State-specific, racial and ethnic heterogeneity in trends of firearm-related fatality rates in the USA from 2000 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Kalesan, Bindu; Vasan, Sowmya; Mobily, Matthew E; Villarreal, Marcos D; Hlavacek, Patrick; Teperman, Sheldon; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Galea, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To document overall, racial, ethnic and intent-specific spatiotemporal trends of firearm-related fatality rates (FRF rates) in the USA. Design Cross-sectional study per year from 2000 to 2010. Setting USA. Participants Aggregate count of all people in the USA from 2000 to 2010. Outcome measures Data from the Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System from 2000 to 2010 was used to determine annual FRF rates per 100 000 and by states, race, ethnicity and intent. Results The average national 11-year FRF rate was 10.21/100 000, from 3.02 in Hawaii to 18.62 in Louisiana: 60% of states had higher than national rates and 41 states showed no temporal change. The average national FRF rates among African-Americans and Caucasians were 18.51 and 9.05/100 000 and among Hispanics and non-Hispanics were 7.13 and 10.13/100 000; Hispanics had a decreasing change of −0.18, p trend<0.0001. In states with increasing trends (Florida and Massachusetts), Caucasians and non-Hispanics drove the rise; while in states with decreasing trends (California, North Carolina, Arizona, Nevada, New York, Illinois, Maryland), Hispanics and African-Americans drove the fall. The average national FRF rates due to homicides (4.1/100 000) and suicides (5.8/100 000) remained constant, but varied between states. Conclusions Endemic national FRF rates mask a wide variation in time trends between states. FRF rates were twice as high in African-Americans than Caucasians but decreased among Hispanics. Efforts to identify state-specific best practices can contribute to changes in national FRF rates that remain high. PMID:25239291

  11. Personality Stability from Childhood to Midlife: Relating Teachers' Assessments in Elementary School to Observer- and Self-Ratings 40 Years Later.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Grant W; Goldberg, Lewis R; Hampson, Sarah E; Barckley, Maureen

    2013-10-01

    We report on the longitudinal stability of personality traits across an average 40 years in the Hawaii Personality and Health Cohort relating childhood teacher assessments of personality to adult self- and observer- reports. Stabilities based on self-ratings in adulthood were compared to those measured by the Structured Interview for the Five-Factor Model (SIFFM; Trull & Widiger, 1997), and trait ratings completed by interviewers. Although convergence between self-reports and observer-ratings was modest, childhood traits demonstrated similar levels of stability across methods in adulthood. Extraversion and Conscientiousness generally showed higher stabilities, whereas Neuroticism showed none. For Agreeableness and Intellect/Openness, stability was highest when assessed with observer-ratings. These findings are discussed in terms of differences in trait evaluativeness and observability across measurement methods. PMID:24039315

  12. The effect of stimulus significance on relatively sustained (tonic-like) and relatively transient (phasic-like) aspects of electrodermal, heart rate, and eyeblink response.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, A S; Taylor, K W; Weinstein, E; Riedel, J

    1985-11-01

    To examine the influence of stimulus significance on more sustained as well as transient aspects of electrodermal, cardiac (HR), and eyeblink response, a 21-sec tone was sounded in one ear or the other. A click occurred during many tones, and a light followed offset by 9 sec. Four groups were studied: one pressed a pedal immediately on hearing any click; another only on click during tone in a specified ear; a third also responded only to the specified ear, but withheld press until the light; a fourth listened without any response. Results confirmed the important role of stimulus significance in each system whether between- or within-subject comparisons were made. Sustained responses were seen only when a significant signal was sought, involving in each case sustained HR deceleration, slowed blink rate, and heightened electrodermal level. Transient response to click and light also appeared only when there were significant signals. Response to tone-onset gave more ambiguous results. ANOVAs of response magnitude suggested that onset of nonsignificant tones might have elicited ORs, while binomial tests indicated these were not elicited with better than random frequency anywhere but on those trials occurring more frequently at the experiment's onset. Interpretations consistent with both the significance hypothesis and with a distinction between automatic and voluntary ORs can be made only here. Motor response had no effect on electrodermal or eyeblink response, and on HR was associated only with increased acceleration 1-2 sec after pedal-press. Studies using small motor responses to establish stimulus significance are therefore not likely to be substantially biased by the response itself. PMID:4084626

  13. The relative rates of thiol-thioester exchange and hydrolysis for alkyl and aryl thioalkanoates in water.

    PubMed

    Bracher, Paul J; Snyder, Phillip W; Bohall, Brooks R; Whitesides, George M

    2011-10-01

    This article reports rate constants for thiol-thioester exchange (k (ex)), and for acid-mediated (k (a)), base-mediated (k (b)), and pH-independent (k (w)) hydrolysis of S-methyl thioacetate and S-phenyl 5-dimethylamino-5-oxo-thiopentanoate-model alkyl and aryl thioalkanoates, respectively-in water. Reactions such as thiol-thioester exchange or aminolysis could have generated molecular complexity on early Earth, but for thioesters to have played important roles in the origin of life, constructive reactions would have needed to compete effectively with hydrolysis under prebiotic conditions. Knowledge of the kinetics of competition between exchange and hydrolysis is also useful in the optimization of systems where exchange is used in applications such as self-assembly or reversible binding. For the alkyl thioester S-methyl thioacetate, which has been synthesized in simulated prebiotic hydrothermal vents, k (a) = 1.5 × 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1), k (b) = 1.6 × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1), and k (w) = 3.6 × 10(-8) s(-1). At pH 7 and 23°C, the half-life for hydrolysis is 155 days. The second-order rate constant for thiol-thioester exchange between S-methyl thioacetate and 2-sulfonatoethanethiolate is k (ex) = 1.7 M(-1) s(-1). At pH 7 and 23°C, with [R″S(H)] = 1 mM, the half-life of the exchange reaction is 38 h. These results confirm that conditions (pH, temperature, pK (a) of the thiol) exist where prebiotically relevant thioesters can survive hydrolysis in water for long periods of time and rates of thiol-thioester exchange exceed those of hydrolysis by several orders of magnitude. PMID:21728078

  14. Differences in globus pallidus neuronal firing rates and patterns relate to different disease biology in children with dystonia

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, V M; Valentin, A; Rey, H G; Lumsden, D E; Elze, M C; Selway, R; Alarcon, G; Lin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology underlying different types of dystonia is not yet understood. We report microelectrode data from the globus pallidus interna (GPi) and globus pallidus externa (GPe) in children undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia and investigate whether GPi and GPe firing rates differ between dystonia types. Methods Single pass microelectrode data were obtained to guide electrode position in 44 children (3.3–18.1 years, median 10.7) with the following dystonia types: 14 primary, 22 secondary Static and 8 progressive secondary to neuronal brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Preoperative stereotactic MRI determined coordinates for the GPi target. Digitised spike trains were analysed offline, blind to clinical data. Electrode placement was confirmed by a postoperative stereotactic CT scan. Findings We identified 263 GPi and 87 GPe cells. Both GPi and GPe firing frequencies differed significantly with dystonia aetiology. The median GPi firing frequency was higher in the primary group than in the secondary static group (13.5 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.002) and higher in the NBIA group than in either the primary (25 Hz vs 13.5 Hz; p=0.006) or the secondary static group (25 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.00004). The median GPe firing frequency was higher in the NBIA group than in the secondary static group (15.9 Hz vs 7 Hz; p=0.013). The NBIA group also showed a higher proportion of regularly firing GPi cells compared with the other groups (p<0.001). A higher proportion of regular GPi cells was also seen in patients with fixed/tonic dystonia compared with a phasic/dynamic dystonia phenotype (p<0.001). The GPi firing frequency showed a positive correlation with 1-year outcome from DBS measured by improvement in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS-m) score (p=0.030). This association was stronger for the non-progressive patients (p=0.006). Interpretation Pallidal firing rates and patterns differ significantly with dystonia aetiology

  15. Tackle-related injury rates and nature of injuries in South African Youth Week tournament rugby union players (under-13 to under-18): an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Nicholas; Lambert, Mike I; Viljoen, Wayne; Brown, James C; Readhead, Clint; Hendricks, Sharief

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The tackle situation is most often associated with the high injury rates in rugby union. Tackle injury epidemiology in rugby union has previously been focused on senior cohorts but less is known about younger cohorts. The aim of this study was to report on the nature and rates of tackle-related injuries in South African youth rugby union players representing their provinces at national tournaments. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Four South African Youth Week tournaments (under-13 Craven Week, under-16 Grant Khomo Week, under-18 Academy Week, under-18 Craven Week). Participants Injury data were collected from 3652 youth rugby union players (population at risk) in 2011 and 2012. Outcome measures Tackle-related injury severity (‘time-loss’ and ‘medical attention’), type and location, injury rate per 1000 h (including 95% CIs). Injury rate ratios (IRR) were calculated and modelled using a Poisson regression. A χ2 analysis was used to detect linear trends between injuries and increasing match quarters. Results The 2012 under-13 Craven Week had a significantly greater ‘time-loss’ injury rate when compared with the 2012 under-18 Academy Week (IRR=4.43; 95% CI 2.13 to 9.21, p<0.05) and under-18 Craven Week (IRR=3.52; 95% CI 1.54 to 8.00, p<0.05). The Poisson regression also revealed a higher probability of ‘overall’ (‘time-loss’ and ‘medical attention’ combined) and ‘time-loss’ tackle-related injuries occurring at the under-13 Craven Week. The proportion of ‘overall’ and ‘time-loss’ injuries increased significantly with each quarter of the match when all four tournaments were combined (p<0.05). Conclusions There was a difference in the tackle-related injury rate between the under-13 tournament and the two under-18 tournaments, and the tackle-related injury rate was higher in the final quarter of matches. Ongoing injury surveillance is required to better interpret these findings. Injury prevention strategies

  16. Identifying relatively high-risk group of coronary artery calcification based on progression rate: statistical and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Young; Yoo, Sanghyun; Lee, Jihyun; Kam, Hye