Science.gov

Sample records for relationships including modelling

  1. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  2. A proposed model to include a residual NAPL saturation in a hysteretic capillary pressure saturation relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Geel, P. J.; Roy, S. D.

    2002-09-01

    A residual non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) present in the vadose zone can act as a contaminant source for many years as the compounds of concern partition to infiltrating groundwater and air contained in the soil voids. Current pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships do not include a residual NAPL saturation term in their formulation. This paper presents the results of series of two- and three-phase pressure cell experiments conducted to evaluate the residual NAPL saturation and its impact on the pressure-saturation relationship. A model was proposed to incorporate a residual NAPL saturation term into an existing hysteretic three-phase parametric model developed by Parker and Lenhard [Water Resour. Res. 23(12) (1987) 2187], Lenhard and Parker [Water Resour. Res. 23(12) (1987) 2197] and Lenhard [J. Contam. Hydrol. 9 (1992) 243]. The experimental results indicated that the magnitude of the residual NAPL saturation was a function of the maximum total liquid saturation reached and the water saturation. The proposed model to incorporate a residual NAPL saturation term is similar in form to the entrapment model proposed by Parker and Lenhard, which was based on an expression presented by Land [Soc. Pet. Eng. J. (June 1968) 149].

  3. Including the dynamic relationship between climatic variables and leaf area index in a hydrological model to improve streamflow prediction under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesemma, Z. K.; Wei, Y.; Peel, M. C.; Western, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is projected to enrich the atmosphere with carbon dioxide, change vegetation dynamics and influence the availability of water at the catchment scale. This study combines a nonlinear model for estimating changes in leaf area index (LAI) due to climatic fluctuations with the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) hydrological model to improve catchment streamflow prediction under a changing climate. The combined model was applied to 13 gauged sub-catchments with different land cover types (crop, pasture and tree) in the Goulburn-Broken catchment, Australia, for the "Millennium Drought" (1997-2009) relative to the period 1983-1995, and for two future periods (2021-2050 and 2071-2100) and two emission scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and RCP8.5) which were compared with the baseline historical period of 1981-2010. This region was projected to be warmer and mostly drier in the future as predicted by 38 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) runs from 15 global climate models (GCMs) and for two emission scenarios. The results showed that during the Millennium Drought there was about a 29.7-66.3 % reduction in mean annual runoff due to reduced precipitation and increased temperature. When drought-induced changes in LAI were included, smaller reductions in mean annual runoff of between 29.3 and 61.4 % were predicted. The proportional increase in runoff due to modeling LAI was 1.3-10.2 % relative to not including LAI. For projected climate change under the RCP4.5 emission scenario, ignoring the LAI response to changing climate could lead to a further reduction in mean annual runoff of between 2.3 and 27.7 % in the near-term (2021-2050) and 2.3 to 23.1 % later in the century (2071-2100) relative to modeling the dynamic response of LAI to precipitation and temperature changes. Similar results (near-term 2.5-25.9 % and end of century 2.6-24.2 %) were found for climate change under the RCP8.5 emission scenario

  4. A modification of the finite-difference model for simulation of two dimensional ground-water flow to include surface-ground water relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ozbilgin, M.M.; Dickerman, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The two-dimensional finite-difference model for simulation of groundwater flow was modified to enable simulation of surface-water/groundwater interactions during periods of low streamflow. Changes were made to the program code in order to calculate surface-water heads for, and flow either to or from, contiguous surface-water bodies; and to allow for more convenient data input. Methods of data input and output were modified and entries (RSORT and HDRIVER) were added to the COEF and CHECKI subroutines to calculate surface-water heads. A new subroutine CALC was added to the program which initiates surface-water calculations. If CALC is not specified as a simulation option, the program runs the original version. The subroutines which solve the ground-water flow equations were not changed. Recharge, evapotranspiration, surface-water inflow, number of wells, pumping rate, and pumping duration can be varied for any time period. The Manning formula was used to relate stream depth and discharge in surface-water streams. Interactions between surface water and ground water are represented by the leakage term in the ground-water flow and surface-water mass balance equations. Documentation includes a flow chart, data deck instructions, input data, output summary, and program listing. Numerical results from the modified program are in good agreement with published analytical results. (USGS)

  5. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  6. Dynamic stall simulation including turbulence modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Allet, A.; Halle, S.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the two-dimensional unsteady flow around an airfoil undergoing a Darrieus motion in dynamic stall conditions. For this purpose, a numerical solver based on the solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations expressed in a streamfunction-vorticity formulation in a non-inertial frame of reference was developed. The governing equations are solved by the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element method (FEM). Temporal discretization is achieved by second-order-accurate finite differences. The resulting global matrix system is linearized by the Newton method and solved by the generalized minimum residual method (GMRES) with an incomplete triangular factorization preconditioning (ILU). Turbulence effects are introduced in the solver by an eddy viscosity model. The investigation centers on an evaluation of the possibilities of several turbulence models, including the algebraic Cebeci-Smith model (CSM) and the nonequilibrium Johnson-King model (JKM). In an effort to predict dynamic stall features on rotating airfoils, first the authors present some testing results concerning the performance of both turbulence models for the flat plate case. Then, computed flow structure together with aerodynamic coefficients for a NACA 0015 airfoil in Darrieus motion under stall conditions are presented.

  7. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  8. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  9. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  10. Including eddies in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    The ocean is a turbulent fluid that is driven by winds and by surface exchanges of heat and moisture. It is as important as the atmosphere in governing climate through heat distribution, but so little is known about the ocean that it remains a “final frontier” on the face of the Earth. Many ocean currents are truly global in extent, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the “conveyor belt” that connects the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans by flows around the southern tips of Africa and South America. It has long been a dream of some oceanographers to supplement the very limited observational knowledge by reconstructing the currents of the world ocean from the first principles of physics on a computer. However, until very recently, the prospect of doing this was thwarted by the fact that fluctuating currents known as “mesoscale eddies” could not be explicitly included in the calculation.

  11. Seven challenges for metapopulation models of epidemics, including households models.

    PubMed

    Ball, Frank; Britton, Tom; House, Thomas; Isham, Valerie; Mollison, Denis; Pellis, Lorenzo; Scalia Tomba, Gianpaolo

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers metapopulation models in the general sense, i.e. where the population is partitioned into sub-populations (groups, patches,...), irrespective of the biological interpretation they have, e.g. spatially segregated large sub-populations, small households or hosts themselves modelled as populations of pathogens. This framework has traditionally provided an attractive approach to incorporating more realistic contact structure into epidemic models, since it often preserves analytic tractability (in stochastic as well as deterministic models) but also captures the most salient structural inhomogeneity in contact patterns in many applied contexts. Despite the progress that has been made in both the theory and application of such metapopulation models, we present here several major challenges that remain for future work, focusing on models that, in contrast to agent-based ones, are amenable to mathematical analysis. The challenges range from clarifying the usefulness of systems of weakly-coupled large sub-populations in modelling the spread of specific diseases to developing a theory for endemic models with household structure. They include also developing inferential methods for data on the emerging phase of epidemics, extending metapopulation models to more complex forms of human social structure, developing metapopulation models to reflect spatial population structure, developing computationally efficient methods for calculating key epidemiological model quantities, and integrating within- and between-host dynamics in models. PMID:25843386

  12. Modeling Emergent Macrophyte Distributions: Including Sub-dominant Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixed stands of emergent vegetation are often present following drawdowns but models of wetland plant distributions fail to include subdominant species when predicting distributions. Three variations of a spatial plant distribution cellular automaton model were developed to explo...

  13. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  14. A model for heterogeneous materials including phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Clements, B.E.; Williams, T.O.

    2005-04-15

    A model is developed for particulate composites, which includes phase transformations in one or all of the constituents. The model is an extension of the method of cells formalism. Representative simulations for a single-phase, brittle particulate (SiC) embedded in a ductile material (Ti), which undergoes a solid-solid phase transformation, are provided. Also, simulations for a tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) are included. In the WHA analyses a particulate composite, composed of tungsten particles embedded in a tungsten-iron-nickel alloy matrix, is modeled. A solid-liquid phase transformation of the matrix material is included in the WHA numerical calculations. The example problems also demonstrate two approaches for generating free energies for the material constituents. Simulations for volumetric compression, uniaxial strain, biaxial strain, and pure shear are used to demonstrate the versatility of the model.

  15. Phylogenetic Relationships of Five Asian Schilbid Genera Including Clupisoma (Siluriformes: Schilbeidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Bin; Zan, Ruiguang; Chai, Jing; Ma, Wei; Jin, Wei; Duan, Rongyao; Luo, Jing; Murphy, Robert W; Xiao, Heng; Chen, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Asian schilbid catfishes of the genera Clupisoma, Ailia, Horabagrus, Laides and Pseudeutropius are poorly understood, especially those of Clupisoma. Herein, we reconstruct the phylogeny of 38 species of catfishes belonging to 28 genera and 14 families using the concatenated mitochondrial genes COI, cytb, and 16S rRNA, as well as the nuclear genes RAG1 and RAG2. The resulting phylogenetic trees consistently place Clupisoma as the sister taxon of Laides, and the five representative Asian schilbid genera form two monophyletic groups with the relationships (Ailia (Laides, Clupisoma)) and (Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius). The so-called "Big Asia" lineage relates distantly to African schilbids. Independent analyses of the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data yield differing trees for the two Asian schilbid groups. Analyses of the mitochondrial gene data support a sister-group relationship for (Ailia (Laides, Clupisoma)) and the Sisoroidea and a sister-taxon association of (Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius) and the Bagridae. In contrast, analyses of the combined nuclear data indicate (Ailia (Laides, Clupisoma)) to be the sister group to (Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius). Our results indicate that the Horabagridae, recognized by some authors as consisting of Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius and Clupisoma does not include the latter genus. We formally erect a new family, Ailiidae fam. nov. for a monophyletic Asian group comprised of the genera Ailia, Laides and Clupisoma. PMID:26751688

  16. Phylogenetic Relationships of Five Asian Schilbid Genera Including Clupisoma (Siluriformes: Schilbeidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Ruiguang; Chai, Jing; Ma, Wei; Jin, Wei; Duan, Rongyao; Luo, Jing; Murphy, Robert W.; Xiao, Heng; Chen, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Asian schilbid catfishes of the genera Clupisoma, Ailia, Horabagrus, Laides and Pseudeutropius are poorly understood, especially those of Clupisoma. Herein, we reconstruct the phylogeny of 38 species of catfishes belonging to 28 genera and 14 families using the concatenated mitochondrial genes COI, cytb, and 16S rRNA, as well as the nuclear genes RAG1 and RAG2. The resulting phylogenetic trees consistently place Clupisoma as the sister taxon of Laides, and the five representative Asian schilbid genera form two monophyletic groups with the relationships (Ailia (Laides, Clupisoma)) and (Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius). The so-called “Big Asia” lineage relates distantly to African schilbids. Independent analyses of the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data yield differing trees for the two Asian schilbid groups. Analyses of the mitochondrial gene data support a sister-group relationship for (Ailia (Laides, Clupisoma)) and the Sisoroidea and a sister-taxon association of (Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius) and the Bagridae. In contrast, analyses of the combined nuclear data indicate (Ailia (Laides, Clupisoma)) to be the sister group to (Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius). Our results indicate that the Horabagridae, recognized by some authors as consisting of Horabagrus, Pseudeutropius and Clupisoma does not include the latter genus. We formally erect a new family, Ailiidae fam. nov. for a monophyletic Asian group comprised of the genera Ailia, Laides and Clupisoma. PMID:26751688

  17. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  18. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages.

    PubMed

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that-in comparison with real data-the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed. PMID:26931582

  19. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Tanioka, Seiichi

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  20. A sonic boom propagation model including mean flow atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamone, Joe; Sparrow, Victor W.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a time domain formulation of nonlinear lossy propagation in onedimension that also includes the effects of non-collinear mean flow in the acoustic medium. The model equation utilized is an augmented Burgers equation that includes the effects of nonlinearity, geometric spreading, atmospheric stratification, and also absorption and dispersion due to thermoviscous and molecular relaxation effects. All elements of the propagation are implemented in the time domain and the effects of non-collinear mean flow are accounted for in each term of the model equation. Previous authors have presented methods limited to showing the effects of wind on ray tracing and/or using an effective speed of sound in their model equation. The present work includes the effects of mean flow for all terms included in the augmented Burgers equation with all of the calculations performed in the time-domain. The capability to include the effects of mean flow in the acoustic medium allows one to make predictions more representative of real-world atmospheric conditions. Examples are presented for nonlinear propagation of N-waves and shaped sonic booms. [Work supported by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation.

  1. Models of Spectral Galaxy Evolution including the effects of Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C. S.; Fritze-v. Alvensleben, U.; Fricke, K. J.

    To analyse the effects of dust to the UV emission in various galaxy types we present our evolutionary synthesis models which includes dust absorption in a chemically consistent way. The time and redshift evolution of the extinction is based on the evolution of the gas content and metallicity. Comparing our model SED's with templates from Kennicutt's and Kinney et al.'s atlas we show the detailed agreement with integrated spectra of galaxies and point out the importance of aperture effects. We are able to predict the UV fluxes for different galaxy types. Combined with a cosmological model we show the differences in the evolutionary and k-corrections comparing models with and without dust.

  2. Estimation of nonlinear pilot model parameters including time delay.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Roland, V. R.; Wells, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the feasibility of using a Kalman filter estimator for the identification of unknown parameters in nonlinear dynamic systems with a time delay. The problem considered is the application of estimation theory to determine the parameters of a family of pilot models containing delayed states. In particular, the pilot-plant dynamics are described by differential-difference equations of the retarded type. The pilot delay, included as one of the unknown parameters to be determined, is kept in pure form as opposed to the Pade approximations generally used for these systems. Problem areas associated with processing real pilot response data are included in the discussion.

  3. The forecast model of relationship commitment.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Edward P

    2016-07-01

    Four studies tested the forecast model of relationship commitment, which posits that forecasts of future relationship satisfaction determine relationship commitment and prorelationship behavior in romantic relationships independently of other known predictors and partially explain the effects of these other predictors. This model was supported in 2 cross-sectional studies, a daily report study, and a study using behavioral observation, informant, and longitudinal methods. Across these studies, forecasts of future relationship satisfaction predicted relationship commitment and prorelationship behavior during relationship conflict and partially explained the effects of relationship satisfaction, quality of alternatives, and investment size. These results suggest that representations of the future have a prominent role in interpersonal processes. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27183320

  4. Comprehensive modeling of electrostatically actuated MEMS beams including uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Michael G.

    MEMS switches have offered dramatic improvements in the performance of RF systems. However, difficulties with reliability has slowed the adoption of MEMS switches in RF systems. These reliability issues are partly due to the poor manufacturing tolerances endemic to MEMS manufacturing processes. These manufacturing tolerances may cause significant variations in performance characteristics. This work focuses on electrostatically actuated MEMS beam capacitive shunt switches. A non-linear dynamic model for these switches was developed. The model accounts for a variety of physical effects including; beam stretching, residual stress, non-rigid boundary conditions, initial curvature, electrostatic fringing field, finite electrodes, squeeze film damping, and distributed contact. The effects of uncertain parameters on the outputs of the model are discovered through response surface based uncertainty quantification techniques. The model accurately predicts the actuation voltages and switching times of these MEMS switches as well as the effects of uncertain parameters. The derived model is widely applicable and accuratly reproduces the results of other models in the literature. Future researchers will be able to rapidly iterate designs and accurately understand the behavior of these switches.

  5. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes. PMID:15688141

  6. A comparison of models for supernova remnants including cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Drury, L. O'C.

    1992-11-01

    A simplified model which can follow the dynamical evolution of a supernova remnant including the acceleration of cosmic rays without carrying out full numerical simulations has been proposed by Drury, Markiewicz, & Voelk in 1989. To explore the accuracy and the merits of using such a model, we have recalculated with the simplified code the evolution of the supernova remnants considered in Jones & Kang, in which more detailed and accurate numerical simulations were done using a full hydrodynamic code based on the two-fluid approximation. For the total energy transferred to cosmic rays the two codes are in good agreement, the acceleration efficiency being the same within a factor of 2 or so. The dependence of the results of the two codes on the closure parameters for the two-fluid approximation is also qualitatively similar. The agreement is somewhat degraded in those cases where the shock is smoothed out by the cosmic rays.

  7. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  8. Low flow forecasting with data driven models that include and models that do not include hydrological knowledge - a comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stravs, L.; Brilly, M.

    2009-04-01

    Good and accurate long-term low flow forecasting is important in the fields of sustainable water management, water rights, water supply management, industrial use of freshwater, optimization of the reservoir operations for the production of electric energy and other water-related disciplines. Today, low flow forecasting is usually performed as an integrated part of calibrated rainfall-runoff models, but in our research we developed two types of simple empirical 7-day ahead low flow forecasting models by using the M5 machine learning method for the generation of regression and model trees. Development of the first type of models was based solely on the application of the M5 machine learning method (1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-and 7-day lead time low flow forecasting model trees were developed from using only past flow data and then combined to produce 7-day ahead forecast curve), while the development of the other type of models included the conceptual knowledge of linear reservoir recession functions AND application of the M5 machine learning method (we modelled the streamflow recession coefficient k as a function of the flow rate at which the 7-day low flow forecast is made and the decrease in the flow rate from the previous day). Both types of 7-day ahead low flow forecasting models were developed by using the same type and amount of data and were built for the Podhom gauging station on the Radovna River and the Medvode gauging station on the Sora River (both are Slovenian tributaries of the Sava River, which itself is a Danube River tributary). The results were compared and tested both visually and numerically.

  9. A constitutive model for the forces of a magnetic bearing including eddy currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. L.; Hebbale, K. V.

    1993-01-01

    A multiple magnet bearing can be developed from N individual electromagnets. The constitutive relationships for a single magnet in such a bearing is presented. Analytical expressions are developed for a magnet with poles arranged circumferencially. Maxwell's field equations are used so the model easily includes the effects of induced eddy currents due to the rotation of the journal. Eddy currents must be included in any dynamic model because they are the only speed dependent parameter and may lead to a critical speed for the bearing. The model is applicable to bearings using attraction or repulsion.

  10. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  11. Progress Towards an LES Wall Model Including Unresolved Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Kyle; Redman, Andrew; Aikens, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Wall models used in large eddy simulations (LES) are often based on theories for hydraulically smooth walls. While this is reasonable for many applications, there are also many where the impact of surface roughness is important. A previously developed wall model has been used primarily for jet engine aeroacoustics. However, jet simulations have not accurately captured thick initial shear layers found in some experimental data. This may partly be due to nozzle wall roughness used in the experiments to promote turbulent boundary layers. As a result, the wall model is extended to include the effects of unresolved wall roughness through appropriate alterations to the log-law. The methodology is tested for incompressible flat plate boundary layers with different surface roughness. Correct trends are noted for the impact of surface roughness on the velocity profile. However, velocity deficit profiles and the Reynolds stresses do not collapse as well as expected. Possible reasons for the discrepancies as well as future work will be presented. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. Computational resources on TACC Stampede were provided under XSEDE allocation ENG150001.

  12. Development of an Aeroelastic Analysis Including a Viscous Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant, Version 4 of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) has been developed and verified. The TURBO-AE Version 4 aeroelastic code allows flutter calculations for a fan, compressor, or turbine blade row. This code models a vibrating three-dimensional bladed disk configuration and the associated unsteady flow (including shocks, and viscous effects) to calculate the aeroelastic instability using a work-per-cycle approach. Phase-lagged (time-shift) periodic boundary conditions are used to model the phase lag between adjacent vibrating blades. The direct-store approach is used for this purpose to reduce the computational domain to a single interblade passage. A disk storage option, implemented using direct access files, is available to reduce the large memory requirements of the direct-store approach. Other researchers have implemented 3D inlet/exit boundary conditions based on eigen-analysis. Appendix A: Aeroelastic calculations based on three-dimensional euler analysis. Appendix B: Unsteady aerodynamic modeling of blade vibration using the turbo-V3.1 code.

  13. Polarimetric Models of Circumstellar Discs Including Aggregate Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Mahesh

    output files and to apply a size distribution to the data. The second circumstellar disc investigated is the debris disc of the M dwarf star AU Mic. The disc was modelled, using the radiative transfer code Hyperion, based on F606W (HST) and JHK0-band (Keck II) scattered light observations and F606Wband polarized light observations. Initially, the disc is modelled as a two component structure using two grain types: compact silicate grains and porous dirty ice water. Both models are able to reproduce the observed SED and the F606W and H-band surface brightness profiles, but are unable to fit the observed F606W degree of polarization. Therefore, a more complex/realistic grain model was examined (ballistic aggregate particles). In addition, recent millimetre observations suggest the existence of a planetesimal belt < 3 AU from the central star. This belt is included in the BAM2 model and was successful in fitting the observed SED, F606W and H-band surface brightness and F606W polarization. These results demonstrate the limitations of spherical grain models and indicate the importance of modelling more realistic dust grains.

  14. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  15. Configuration based Collisional-Radiative Model including configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busquet, Michel

    2007-11-01

    Atomic levels mixing through Configuration Interaction (CI) yields important effects. It transfers oscillator strengthes from allowed lines to forbidden lines, and produces strong shift and broadening of line arrays, although the total emissivity is almost insensitive to CI, being proportional to the average wave number. However for hi Z material, like Xe or Sn (potential xuv-ray source for micro-lithography), a non-LTE calculation accounting for all relevant levels wiill be untractable with billions of states. The model we constructed, CAVCRM (caf'e-crème), is a non-LTE C.R.M. where states are configurations but it includes C.I. to give full richness of spectral quantities, using the latest version of the HULLAC-v9 suite of codes and our newly developped algorithm for large set of states with as many as 50,000 states [1]. [1] M.Klapisch et al, this conference

  16. Modeling potentiometric measurements in topological insulators including parallel channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Diep, Vinh; Datta, Supriyo; Chen, Yong P.

    2012-08-01

    The discovery of spin-polarized states at the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators (TI) like Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 motivates intense interests in possible electrical measurements demonstrating unique signatures of these unusual states. Here we show that a three-terminal potentiometric set-up can be used to probe them by measuring the voltage change of a detecting magnet upon reversing its magnetization. We present numerical results using a nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF)-based model to show the corresponding signal quantitatively in various transport regimes. We then provide an analytical expression for the resistance (the measured voltage difference divided by an applied current) that agrees with NEGF results well in both ballistic and diffusive limits. This expression is applicable to TI surface states, two-dimensional electrons with Rashba spin-split bands, and any combination of multiple channels, including bulk parallel states in TI, which makes it useful in analyzing experimental results.

  17. A new solar cycle model including meridional circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Nash, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    A kinematic model is presented for the solar cycle which includes not only the transport of magnetic flux by supergranular diffusion and a poleward bulk flow at the sun's surface, but also the effects of turbulent diffusion and an equatorward 'return flow' beneath the surface. As in the earlier models of Babcock and Leighton, the rotational shearing of a subsurface poloidal field generates toroidal flux that erupts at the surface in the form of bipolar magnetic regions. However, such eruptions do not result in any net loss of toroidal flux from the sun (as assumed by Babcock and Leighton); instead, the large-scale toroidal field is destroyed both by 'unwinding' as the local poloidal field reverses its polarity, and by diffusion as the toroidal flux is transported equatorward by the subsurface flow and merged with its opposite hemisphere counterpart. The inclusion of meridional circulation allows stable oscillations of the magnetic field, accompanied by the equatorward progression of flux eruptions, to be achieved even in the absence of a radial gradient in the angular velocity. An illustrative case in which a subsurface flow speed of order 1 m/s and subsurface diffusion rate of order 10 sq km/s yield 22-yr oscillations in qualitative agreement with observations.

  18. Goldilocks models of higher-dimensional inflation (including modulus stabilization)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Enns, Jared J. H.; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the mechanics of inflation within simplified extra-dimensional models involving an inflaton interacting with the Einstein-Maxwell system in two extra dimensions. The models are Goldilocks-like inasmuch as they are just complicated enough to include a mechanism to stabilize the extra-dimensional size (or modulus), yet simple enough to solve explicitly the full extra-dimensional field equations using only simple tools. The solutions are not restricted to the effective 4D regime with H ll mKK (the latter referring to the characteristic mass splitting of the Kaluza-Klein excitations) because the full extra-dimensional Einstein equations are solved. This allows an exploration of inflationary physics in a controlled calculational regime away from the usual four-dimensional lamp-post. The inclusion of modulus stabilization is important because experience with string models teaches that this is usually what makes models fail: stabilization energies easily dominate the shallow potentials required by slow roll and so open up directions to evolve that are steeper than those of the putative inflationary direction. We explore (numerically and analytically) three representative kinds of inflationary scenarios within this simple setup. In one the radion is trapped in an inflaton-dependent local minimum whose non-zero energy drives inflation. Inflation ends as this energy relaxes to zero when the inflaton finds its own minimum. The other two involve power-law scaling solutions during inflation. One of these is a dynamical attractor whose features are relatively insensitive to initial conditions but whose slow-roll parameters cannot be arbitrarily small; the other is not an attractor but can roll much more slowly, until eventually transitioning to the attractor. The scaling solutions can satisfy H > mKK, but when they do standard 4D fluctuation calculations need not apply. When in a 4D regime the solutions predict η simeq 0 and so r simeq 0.11 when ns simeq 0.96 and so

  19. Energy loss in a partonic transport model including bremsstrahlung processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten; Xu Zhe

    2010-08-15

    A detailed investigation of the energy loss of gluons that traverse a thermal gluonic medium simulated within the perturbative QCD-based transport model BAMPS (a Boltzmann approach to multiparton scatterings) is presented in the first part of this work. For simplicity the medium response is neglected in these calculations. The energy loss from purely elastic interactions is compared with the case where radiative processes are consistently included based on the matrix element by Gunion and Bertsch. From this comparison, gluon multiplication processes gg{yields}ggg are found to be the dominant source of energy loss within the approach employed here. The consequences for the quenching of gluons with high transverse momentum in fully dynamic simulations of Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy of {radical}(s)=200A GeV are discussed in the second major part of this work. The results for central collisions as discussed in a previous publication are revisited, and first results on the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} for noncentral Au+Au collisions are presented. They show a decreased quenching compared to central collisions while retaining the same shape. The investigation of the elliptic flow v{sub 2} is extended up to nonthermal transverse momenta of 10 GeV, exhibiting a maximum v{sub 2} at roughly 4 to 5 GeV and a subsequent decrease. Finally the sensitivity of the aforementioned results on the specific implementation of the effective modeling of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect via a formation-time-based cutoff is explored.

  20. Modelers and policymakers : improving the relationships.

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2004-06-01

    On April 22 and 23, 2004, a diverse group of 14 policymakers, modelers, analysts, and scholars met with some 22 members of the Sandia National Laboratories staff to explores ways in which the relationships between modelers and policymakers in the energy and environment fields (with an emphasis on energy) could be made more productive for both. This report is not a transcription of that workshop, but draws very heavily on its proceedings. It first describes the concept of modeling, the varying ways in which models are used to support policymaking, and the institutional context for those uses. It then proposes that the goal of modelers and policymakers should be a relationship of mutual trust, built on a foundation of communication, supported by the twin pillars of policy relevance and technical credibility. The report suggests 20 guidelines to help modelers improve the relationship, followed by 10 guidelines to help policymakers toward the same goal.

  1. Evaluation of annual, global seismicity forecasts, including ensemble models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Matteo; Zechar, Jeremy; Marzocchi, Warner

    2013-04-01

    In 2009, the Collaboratory for the Study of the Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) initiated a prototype global earthquake forecast experiment. Three models participated in this experiment for 2009, 2010 and 2011—each model forecast the number of earthquakes above magnitude 6 in 1x1 degree cells that span the globe. Here we use likelihood-based metrics to evaluate the consistency of the forecasts with the observed seismicity. We compare model performance with statistical tests and a new method based on the peer-to-peer gambling score. The results of the comparisons are used to build ensemble models that are a weighted combination of the individual models. Notably, in these experiments the ensemble model always performs significantly better than the single best-performing model. Our results indicate the following: i) time-varying forecasts, if not updated after each major shock, may not provide significant advantages with respect to time-invariant models in 1-year forecast experiments; ii) the spatial distribution seems to be the most important feature to characterize the different forecasting performances of the models; iii) the interpretation of consistency tests may be misleading because some good models may be rejected while trivial models may pass consistency tests; iv) a proper ensemble modeling seems to be a valuable procedure to get the best performing model for practical purposes.

  2. Probabilistic constitutive relationships for cyclic material strength models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology is developed that provides a probabilistic treatment for the lifetime of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to fatigue. Material strength degradation models, based on primitive variables, include both a fatigue strength reduction model and a fatigue crack growth model. Probabilistic analysis is based on simulation, and both maximum entropy and maximum penalized likelihood methods are used for the generation of probability density functions. The resulting constitutive relationships are included in several computer programs.

  3. Constitutive modelling of evolving flow anisotropy including distortional hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Pietryga, Michael P.; Vladimirov, Ivaylo N.; Reese, Stefanie

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents a new constitutive model for anisotropic metal plasticity that takes into account the expansion or contraction (isotropic hardening), translation (kinematic hardening) and change of shape (distortional hardening) of the yield surface. The experimentally observed region of high curvature ('nose') on the yield surface in the loading direction and flattened shape in the reverse loading direction are modelled here by means of the concept of directional distortional hardening. The modelling of directional distortional hardening is accomplished by means of an evolving fourth-order tensor. The applicability of the model is illustrated by fitting experimental subsequent yield surfaces at finite plastic deformation. Comparisons with test data for aluminium low and high work hardening alloys display a good agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data.

  4. Phase relationship in three-phase composites which include a void phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper shows the relationship among polymer, particles, and voids in a three-phase composite and how some of the properties of a composite may be changed by changing the proportions of the phases. The three-phase composite is an aggregate of microspheres bonded together with a small amount of polymer which may not form a continuous matrix. The void space (third phase) is obtained by limiting the amount of polymer which is mixed with the microspheres. A ternary phase diagram is used to show the proportional relationship among the three phases, with each apex representing a volume fraction of unity for a constituent while the side opposite the apex represents a volume fraction of zero for that constituent. The vertical dimension represents some composite property such as density or strength. The effect of composition on composite properties is shown by plotting them on a binary phase diagram which represents a perpendicular plane coincident with the 0.60 volume fraction microsphere line.

  5. Laminated core modeling under rotational excitations including eddy currents and hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottauscio, Oriano; Chiampi, Mario

    2001-06-01

    This article presents a numerical model for the electromagnetic analysis of hysteretic-laminated cores under rotational excitations. The computational approach is based on the finite element solution of a two-dimensional field magnetic problem in a homogeneous structure, where the skin effect due to macroscopic eddy currents in the lamination depth is included through a generalized dynamic constitutive relationship between B and H. The proposed model, after validation, is applied to the analysis of a laminated disk, evaluating the effects of the supply frequency and distorsion on power losses and B{endash}H loops. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  6. NASA Trapezoidal Wing Computations Including Transition and Advanced Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing is computed with several turbulence models by using grids from the first High Lift Prediction Workshop in an effort to advance understanding of computational fluid dynamics modeling for this type of flowfield. Transition is accounted for in many of the computations. In particular, a recently-developed 4-equation transition model is utilized and works well overall. Accounting for transition tends to increase lift and decrease moment, which improves the agreement with experiment. Upper surface flap separation is reduced, and agreement with experimental surface pressures and velocity profiles is improved. The predicted shape of wakes from upstream elements is strongly influenced by grid resolution in regions above the main and flap elements. Turbulence model enhancements to account for rotation and curvature have the general effect of increasing lift and improving the resolution of the wing tip vortex as it convects downstream. However, none of the models improve the prediction of surface pressures near the wing tip, where more grid resolution is needed.

  7. Modeling Insurgent Dynamics Including Heterogeneity. A Statistical Physics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Manrique, Pedro; Hui, Pak Ming

    2013-05-01

    Despite the myriad complexities inherent in human conflict, a common pattern has been identified across a wide range of modern insurgencies and terrorist campaigns involving the severity of individual events—namely an approximate power-law x - α with exponent α≈2.5. We recently proposed a simple toy model to explain this finding, built around the reported loose and transient nature of operational cells of insurgents or terrorists. Although it reproduces the 2.5 power-law, this toy model assumes every actor is identical. Here we generalize this toy model to incorporate individual heterogeneity while retaining the model's analytic solvability. In the case of kinship or team rules guiding the cell dynamics, we find that this 2.5 analytic result persists—however an interesting new phase transition emerges whereby this cell distribution undergoes a transition to a phase in which the individuals become isolated and hence all the cells have spontaneously disintegrated. Apart from extending our understanding of the empirical 2.5 result for insurgencies and terrorism, this work illustrates how other statistical physics models of human grouping might usefully be generalized in order to explore the effect of diverse human social, cultural or behavioral traits.

  8. Mechanical Modeling of Foods Including Fracture and Simulation of Food Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Masamichi; Mizunuma, Hiroshi; Sonomura, Mitsuhiro; Kohyama, Kaoru; Ogoshi, Hiro

    2008-07-01

    The purposes of this research are to simulate the swallowing of foods, and to investigate the relationship between the rheological properties of foods and the swallowing. Here we proposed the mechanical modeling of foods, and simulated the compression test using the finite element method. A linear plasticity model was applied as the rheological model of the foods, and two types of computational elements were used to simulate the fracture behavior. The compression tests with a wedged plunger were simulated for tofu, banana, and biscuit, and were compared with the experimental results. Other than the homogeneous food model, the simulations were conducted for the multi-layer models. Reasonable agreements on the behaviors of compression and fracture were obtained between the simulations and the experiments including the reaction forces on the plunger.

  9. Digital elevation model visibility including Earth's curvature and atmosphere refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santossilva, Ewerton; Vieiradias, Luiz Alberto

    1990-03-01

    There are some instances in which the Earth's curvature and the atmospheric refraction, optical or electronic, are important factors when digital elevation models are used for visibility calculations. This work deals with this subject, suggesting a practical approach to solve this problem. Some examples, from real terrain data, are presented. The equipment used was an IBM-PC like computer with a SITIM graphic card.

  10. Modeling shelter-in-place including sorption on indoor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Nazaroff, William W.; Loosmore, Gwen A.; Sugiyama, Gayle A.

    2003-11-01

    Intentional or accidental large-scale airborne toxic releases (e.g. terrorist attacks or industrial accidents) can cause severe harm to nearby communities. As part of an emergency response plan, shelter-in-place (SIP) can be an effective response option, especially when evacuation is infeasible. Reasonably tight building envelopes provide some protection against exposure to peak concentrations when toxic release passes over an area. They also provide some protection in terms of cumulative exposure, if SIP is terminated promptly after the outdoor plume has passed. The purpose of this work is to quantify the level of protection offered by existing houses, and the importance of sorption/desorption to and from surfaces on the effectiveness of SIP. We examined a hypothetical chlorine gas release scenario simulated by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC). We used a standard infiltration model to calculate the distribution of time dependent infiltration rates within each census tract. Large variation in the air tightness of dwellings makes some houses more protective than others. Considering only the median air tightness, model results showed that if sheltered indoors, the total population intake of non-sorbing toxic gas is only 50% of the outdoor level 4 hours from the start of the release. Based on a sorption/desorption model by Karlsson and Huber (1996), we calculated that the sorption process would further lower the total intake of the population by an additional 50%. The potential benefit of SIP can be considerably higher if the comparison is made in terms of health effects because of the non-linear acute effect dose-response curve of many chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial substances.

  11. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the

  12. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  13. Finite difference modeling of rotor flows including wake effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Desopper, A.; Tung, C.

    1982-01-01

    Rotary wing finite difference methods are investigated. The main concern is the specification of boundary conditions to properly account for the effect of the wake on the blade. Examples are given of an approach where wake effects are introduced by specifying an equivalent angle of attack. An alternate approach is also given where discrete vortices are introduced into the finite difference grid. The resulting computations of hovering and high advance ratio cases compare well with experiment. Some consideration is also given to the modeling of low to moderate advance ratio flows.

  14. Relationship of sea level muon charge ratio to primary composition including nuclear target effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goned, A.; Shalaby, M.; Salem, A. M.; Roushdy, M.

    1985-01-01

    The discrepancy between the muon charge ratio observed at low energies and that calculated using pp data is removed by including nuclear target effects. Calculations at high energies show that the primary iron spectrum is expected to change slope from 2 to 2.2 to 2.4 to 2.5 for energies approx. 4 x 10 to the 3 GeV/nucleon if scaling features continue to the highest energies.

  15. A Generic Model of Dyadic Social Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Maroussia; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a model of dyadic social interactions and establish its correspondence with relational models theory (RMT), a theory of human social relationships. RMT posits four elementary models of relationships governing human interactions, singly or in combination: Communal Sharing, Authority Ranking, Equality Matching, and Market Pricing. To these are added the limiting cases of asocial and null interactions, whereby people do not coordinate with reference to any shared principle. Our model is rooted in the observation that each individual in a dyadic interaction can do either the same thing as the other individual, a different thing or nothing at all. To represent these three possibilities, we consider two individuals that can each act in one out of three ways toward the other: perform a social action X or Y, or alternatively do nothing. We demonstrate that the relationships generated by this model aggregate into six exhaustive and disjoint categories. We propose that four of these categories match the four relational models, while the remaining two correspond to the asocial and null interactions defined in RMT. We generalize our results to the presence of N social actions. We infer that the four relational models form an exhaustive set of all possible dyadic relationships based on social coordination. Hence, we contribute to RMT by offering an answer to the question of why there could exist just four relational models. In addition, we discuss how to use our representation to analyze data sets of dyadic social interactions, and how social actions may be valued and matched by the agents. PMID:25826403

  16. A generic model of dyadic social relationships.

    PubMed

    Favre, Maroussia; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a model of dyadic social interactions and establish its correspondence with relational models theory (RMT), a theory of human social relationships. RMT posits four elementary models of relationships governing human interactions, singly or in combination: Communal Sharing, Authority Ranking, Equality Matching, and Market Pricing. To these are added the limiting cases of asocial and null interactions, whereby people do not coordinate with reference to any shared principle. Our model is rooted in the observation that each individual in a dyadic interaction can do either the same thing as the other individual, a different thing or nothing at all. To represent these three possibilities, we consider two individuals that can each act in one out of three ways toward the other: perform a social action X or Y, or alternatively do nothing. We demonstrate that the relationships generated by this model aggregate into six exhaustive and disjoint categories. We propose that four of these categories match the four relational models, while the remaining two correspond to the asocial and null interactions defined in RMT. We generalize our results to the presence of N social actions. We infer that the four relational models form an exhaustive set of all possible dyadic relationships based on social coordination. Hence, we contribute to RMT by offering an answer to the question of why there could exist just four relational models. In addition, we discuss how to use our representation to analyze data sets of dyadic social interactions, and how social actions may be valued and matched by the agents. PMID:25826403

  17. Global model including multistep ionizations in helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seungju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-09-01

    Particle and power balance equations including stepwise ionizations are derived and solved in helium plasma. In the balance equations, two metastable states (23S1 in singlet and 21S1 triplet) are considered and followings are obtained. The plasma density linearly increases and electron temperature is relatively in constant value against the absorbed power. It is also found that the contribution to multi-step ionization respect to the single-step ionization is in the range of 8% - 23%, as the gas pressure increases from 10 mTorr to 100 mTorr. There has little variation in the collisional energy loss per electron-ion pair created (Ec). These results indicate that the stepwise ionizations are the minor effect in case of the helium plasma compared to argon plasma. This is because that helium gas has very small collisional cross sections and higher inelastic collision threshold energy resulting in the little variations for the collisional energy loss per electron-ion pair created.

  18. Building Customer Relationships: A Model for Vocational Education and Training Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarratt, Denise G.; Murphy, Tom; Lowry, Diannah

    1997-01-01

    Review of the theory of relational marketing and interviews with training providers identified a training delivery model that includes elements of trust and commitment, investment by relationship partners, and knowledge exchange, supporting relationship longevity. (SK)

  19. Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Frances L.; Matt, John; McCaw, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships (SIMOR) integrates two models addressed in the leadership literature and then highlights the importance of relationships. The Supervisor's Interactive Model of Organizational Relationships combines the modified Hersey and Blanchard model of situational leadership, the…

  20. A Probabilistic Model of Phonological Relationships from Contrast to Allophony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kathleen Currie

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a model of phonological relationships, the Probabilistic Phonological Relationship Model (PPRM), that quantifies how predictably distributed two sounds in a relationship are. It builds on a core premise of traditional phonological analysis, that the ability to define phonological relationships such as contrast and…

  1. A Mercury orientation model including non-zero obliquity and librations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    Planetary orientation models describe the orientation of the spin axis and prime meridian of planets in inertial space as a function of time. The models are required for the planning and execution of Earth-based or space-based observational work, e.g. to compute viewing geometries and to tie observations to planetary coordinate systems. The current orientation model for Mercury is inadequate because it uses an obsolete spin orientation, neglects oscillations in the spin rate called longitude librations, and relies on a prime meridian that no longer reflects its intended dynamical significance. These effects result in positional errors on the surface of ~1.5 km in latitude and up to several km in longitude, about two orders of magnitude larger than the finest image resolution currently attainable. Here we present an updated orientation model which incorporates modern values of the spin orientation, includes a formulation for longitude librations, and restores the dynamical significance to the prime meridian. We also use modern values of the orbit normal, spin axis orientation, and precession rates to quantify an important relationship between the obliquity and moment of inertia differences.

  2. A simple model clarifies the complicated relationships of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bojin; Wu, Hongrun; Kuang, Li; Qin, Jun; Du, Wenhua; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Deyi

    2014-08-01

    Real-world networks such as the Internet and WWW have many common traits. Until now, hundreds of models were proposed to characterize these traits for understanding the networks. Because different models used very different mechanisms, it is widely believed that these traits origin from different causes. However, we find that a simple model based on optimisation can produce many traits, including scale-free, small-world, ultra small-world, Delta-distribution, compact, fractal, regular and random networks. Moreover, by revising the proposed model, the community-structure networks are generated. By this model and the revised versions, the complicated relationships of complex networks are illustrated. The model brings a new universal perspective to the understanding of complex networks and provide a universal method to model complex networks from the viewpoint of optimisation.

  3. A simple model clarifies the complicated relationships of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bojin; Wu, Hongrun; Kuang, Li; Qin, Jun; Du, Wenhua; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Deyi

    2014-01-01

    Real-world networks such as the Internet and WWW have many common traits. Until now, hundreds of models were proposed to characterize these traits for understanding the networks. Because different models used very different mechanisms, it is widely believed that these traits origin from different causes. However, we find that a simple model based on optimisation can produce many traits, including scale-free, small-world, ultra small-world, Delta-distribution, compact, fractal, regular and random networks. Moreover, by revising the proposed model, the community-structure networks are generated. By this model and the revised versions, the complicated relationships of complex networks are illustrated. The model brings a new universal perspective to the understanding of complex networks and provide a universal method to model complex networks from the viewpoint of optimisation. PMID:25160506

  4. Modeling time-lagged reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships.

    PubMed

    Maynard, M Travis; Luciano, Margaret M; D'Innocenzo, Lauren; Mathieu, John E; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Employee psychological empowerment is widely accepted as a means for organizations to compete in increasingly dynamic environments. Previous empirical research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that employee psychological empowerment is positively related to several attitudinal and behavioral outcomes including job performance. While this research positions psychological empowerment as an antecedent influencing such outcomes, a close examination of the literature reveals that this relationship is primarily based on cross-sectional research. Notably, evidence supporting the presumed benefits of empowerment has failed to account for potential reciprocal relationships and endogeneity effects. Accordingly, using a multiwave, time-lagged design, we model reciprocal relationships between psychological empowerment and job performance using a sample of 441 nurses from 5 hospitals. Incorporating temporal effects in a staggered research design and using structural equation modeling techniques, our findings provide support for the conventional positive correlation between empowerment and subsequent performance. Moreover, accounting for the temporal stability of variables over time, we found support for empowerment levels as positive influences on subsequent changes in performance. Finally, we also found support for the reciprocal relationship, as performance levels were shown to relate positively to changes in empowerment over time. Theoretical and practical implications of the reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25111249

  5. Couple Infertility: From the Perspective of the Close-Relationship Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Barbara S.

    1990-01-01

    Presents Close-Relationship Model as comprehensive framework in which to examine interrelated nature of causes and effects of infertility on marital relationship. Includes these factors: physical and psychological characteristics of both partners; joint, couple characteristics; physical and social environment; and relationship itself. Discusses…

  6. Similitude requirements and scaling relationships as applied to model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Brown, J. S., Jr.; Gilbert, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The similitude requirements for the most general test conditions are presented. These similitude requirements are considered in relation to the scaling relationships, test technique, test conditions (including supersonic flow), and test objectives. Particular emphasis is placed on satisfying the various similitude requirements for incompressible and compressible flow conditions. For free flying models tests, the test velocities for incompressible flow are scaled from Froude number similitude requirements and those for compressible flow are scaled from Mach number similitude requirements. The limitations of various test techniques are indicated, with emphasis on the free flying model.

  7. Including Microbial Acclimation in Carbon Cycle Models: Letting Data Guide Model Development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, M. A.; Wang, G.; Tang, G.; Xu, X.; Jagadamma, S.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon cycle models are traditionally parameterized with ad hoc soil pools, empirical decay constants and first-order decomposition as a function of substrate supply. Decomposition of vegetative and faunal inputs, however, involves enzymatically-facilitated depolymerization by the microbial community. Traditional soil models are calibrated to match existing distribution of soil carbon, but they are not parameterized to predict the response of soil carbon to climate change due to microbial community shifts or physiological changes, i.e., acclimation. As an example, we will show how the temperature sensitivity of carbon use efficiency can influence the decomposition of different substrates and affect the release of CO2 from soil organic matter. Acclimation to warmer conditions could also involve shifts in microbial community composition or function, e.g., fungi: bacteria ratio shift. Experimental data is needed to decide how to parameterize models to accommodate functional or compositional changes. We will explore documented cases of microbial acclimation to warming, discuss methods to include microbial acclimation in carbon cycle models, and explore the need for additional experimental data to validate the next generation of microbially-facilitated carbon cycle models.

  8. Rotorcraft Transmission Noise Path Model, Including Distributed Fluid Film Bearing Impedance Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.; Hanford, Amanda D.; Shepherd, Micah R.; Campbell, Robert L.; Smith, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    A computational approach for simulating the effects of rolling element and journal bearings on the vibration and sound transmission through gearboxes has been demonstrated. The approach, using ARL/Penn State s CHAMP methodology, uses Component Mode Synthesis of housing and shafting modes computed using Finite Element (FE) models to allow for rapid adjustment of bearing impedances in gearbox models. The approach has been demonstrated on NASA GRC s test gearbox with three different bearing configurations: in the first condition, traditional rolling element (ball and roller) bearings were installed, and in the second and third conditions, the traditional bearings were replaced with journal and wave bearings (wave bearings are journal bearings with a multi-lobed wave pattern on the bearing surface). A methodology for computing the stiffnesses and damping in journal and wave bearings has been presented, and demonstrated for the journal and wave bearings used in the NASA GRC test gearbox. The FE model of the gearbox, along with the rolling element bearing coupling impedances, was analyzed to compute dynamic transfer functions between forces applied to the meshing gears and accelerations on the gearbox housing, including several locations near the bearings. A Boundary Element (BE) acoustic model was used to compute the sound radiated by the gearbox. Measurements of the Gear Mesh Frequency (GMF) tones were made by NASA GRC at several operational speeds for the rolling element and journal bearing gearbox configurations. Both the measurements and the CHAMP numerical model indicate that the journal bearings reduce vibration and noise for the second harmonic of the gear meshing tones, but show no clear benefit to using journal bearings to reduce the amplitudes of the fundamental gear meshing tones. Also, the numerical model shows that the gearbox vibrations and radiated sound are similar for journal and wave bearing configurations.

  9. Toward a Transactional Model of Parent-Adolescent Relationship Quality and Adolescent Psychological Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanti, Kostas A.; Henrich, Christopher C.; Brookmeyer, Kathryn A.; Kuperminc, Gabriel P.

    2008-01-01

    The present study includes externalizing problems, internalizing problems, mother-adolescent relationship quality, and father-adolescent relationship quality in the same structural equation model and tests the longitudinal reciprocal association among all four variables over a 1-year period. A transactional model in which adolescents'…

  10. Uncertainty in Measurement: A Review of Monte Carlo Simulation Using Microsoft Excel for the Calculation of Uncertainties Through Functional Relationships, Including Uncertainties in Empirically Derived Constants

    PubMed Central

    Farrance, Ian; Frenkel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (usually referred to as the GUM) provides the basic framework for evaluating uncertainty in measurement. The GUM however does not always provide clearly identifiable procedures suitable for medical laboratory applications, particularly when internal quality control (IQC) is used to derive most of the uncertainty estimates. The GUM modelling approach requires advanced mathematical skills for many of its procedures, but Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) can be used as an alternative for many medical laboratory applications. In particular, calculations for determining how uncertainties in the input quantities to a functional relationship propagate through to the output can be accomplished using a readily available spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel. The MCS procedure uses algorithmically generated pseudo-random numbers which are then forced to follow a prescribed probability distribution. When IQC data provide the uncertainty estimates the normal (Gaussian) distribution is generally considered appropriate, but MCS is by no means restricted to this particular case. With input variations simulated by random numbers, the functional relationship then provides the corresponding variations in the output in a manner which also provides its probability distribution. The MCS procedure thus provides output uncertainty estimates without the need for the differential equations associated with GUM modelling. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ease with which Microsoft Excel (or a similar spreadsheet) can be used to provide an uncertainty estimate for measurands derived through a functional relationship. In addition, we also consider the relatively common situation where an empirically derived formula includes one or more ‘constants’, each of which has an empirically derived numerical value. Such empirically derived ‘constants’ must also have associated uncertainties which propagate through the functional

  11. Validation of gyrokinetic modelling of light impurity transport including rotation in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casson, F. J.; McDermott, R. M.; Angioni, C.; Camenen, Y.; Dux, R.; Fable, E.; Fischer, R.; Geiger, B.; Manas, P.; Menchero, L.; Tardini, G.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-06-01

    Upgraded spectroscopic hardware and an improved impurity concentration calculation allow accurate determination of boron density in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. A database of boron measurements is compared to quasilinear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations including Coriolis and centrifugal rotational effects over a range of H-mode plasma regimes. The peaking of the measured boron profiles shows a strong anti-correlation with the plasma rotation gradient, via a relationship explained and reproduced by the theory. It is demonstrated that the rotodiffusive impurity flux driven by the rotation gradient is required for the modelling to reproduce the hollow boron profiles at higher rotation gradients. The nonlinear simulations validate the quasilinear approach, and, with the addition of perpendicular flow shear, demonstrate that each symmetry breaking mechanism that causes momentum transport also couples to rotodiffusion. At lower rotation gradients, the parallel compressive convection is required to match the most peaked boron profiles. The sensitivities of both datasets to possible errors is investigated, and quantitative agreement is found within the estimated uncertainties. The approach used can be considered a template for mitigating uncertainty in quantitative comparisons between simulation and experiment.

  12. A Relationship-Building Model for the Web Retail Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Fang; Head, Milena; Archer, Norm

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the effects of the Web on marketing practices. Introduces the concept and theory of relationship marketing. The relationship network concept, which typically is only applied to the business-to-business market, is discussed within the business-to-consumer market, and a new relationship-building model for the Web marketplace is proposed.…

  13. Modeling species-abundance relationships in multi-species collections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, S.; Yin, Z.; Ren, H.; Guo, Q.

    2003-01-01

    Species-abundance relationship is one of the most fundamental aspects of community ecology. Since Motomura first developed the geometric series model to describe the feature of community structure, ecologists have developed many other models to fit the species-abundance data in communities. These models can be classified into empirical and theoretical ones, including (1) statistical models, i.e., negative binomial distribution (and its extension), log-series distribution (and its extension), geometric distribution, lognormal distribution, Poisson-lognormal distribution, (2) niche models, i.e., geometric series, broken stick, overlapping niche, particulate niche, random assortment, dominance pre-emption, dominance decay, random fraction, weighted random fraction, composite niche, Zipf or Zipf-Mandelbrot model, and (3) dynamic models describing community dynamics and restrictive function of environment on community. These models have different characteristics and fit species-abundance data in various communities or collections. Among them, log-series distribution, lognormal distribution, geometric series, and broken stick model have been most widely used.

  14. Environmental assessment of biofuel chains based on ecosystem modelling, including land-use change effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielle, B.; Gagnaire, N.; Massad, R.; Prieur, V.; Python, Y.

    2012-04-01

    . Compared to the standard methodology currently used in LCA, based on fixed emissions for N2O, the use of model-derived estimates leads to a 10 to 40% reduction in the overall life-cycle GHG emissions of biofuels. This emphasizes the importance of regional factors in the relationship between agricultural inputs and emissions (altogether with biomass yields) in the outcome of LCAs. When excluding indirect land-use change effects (iLUC), 1st generation pathways enabled GHG savings ranging from 50 to 73% compared to fossile-derived equivalents, while this figure reached 88% for 2nd generation bioethanol from miscanthus. Including iLUC reduced the savings to less than 5% for bio-diesel from rapeseed, 10 to 45% for 1st generation bioethanol and to 60% for miscanthus. These figures apply to the year 2007 and should be extended to a larger number of years, but the magnitude of N2O emissions was similar between 2007, 2008 and 2009 over the Ile de France region.

  15. The Lag Model, a Turbulence Model for Wall Bounded Flows Including Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Coakley, Thomas J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new class of turbulence model is described for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows. A specific turbulence model is demonstrated, with results for favorable and adverse pressure gradient flowfields. Separation predictions are as good or better than either Spalart Almaras or SST models, do not require specification of wall distance, and have similar or reduced computational effort compared with these models.

  16. Data Base Design Using Entity-Relationship Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kathi Hogshead

    1983-01-01

    The entity-relationship (ER) approach to database design is defined, and a specific example of an ER model (personnel-payroll) is examined. The requirements for converting ER models into specific database management systems are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  17. Constitutive Relationships and Models in Continuum Theories of Multiphase Flows. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Rand (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    In April, 1989, a workshop on constitutive relationships and models in continuum theories of multiphase flows was held at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of constitutive relationships for the partial or per phase stresses, including the concept of solid phase pressure are discussed. Models used for the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the phases in a multiphase flow are also discussed. The program, abstracts, and texts of the presentations from the workshop are included.

  18. Draft: Modeling Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media Including Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Area

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, Jennifer; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2008-01-01

    We present a new numerical model for macro-scale twophase flow in porous media which is based on a physically consistent theory of multi-phase flow.The standard approach for modeling the flow of two fluid phases in a porous medium consists of a continuity equation for each phase, an extended form of Darcy’s law as well as constitutive relationships for relative permeability and capillary pressure. This approach is known to have a number of important shortcomings and, in particular, it does not account for the presence and role of fluid - fluid interfaces. An alternative is to use an extended model which is founded on thermodynamic principles and is physically consistent. In addition to the standard equations, the model uses a balance equation for specific interfacial area. The constitutive relationship for capillary pressure involves not only saturation, but also specific interfacial area. We show how parameters can be obtained for the alternative model using experimental data from a new kind of flow cell and present results of a numerical modeling study

  19. Modeling rainfall-runoff relationship using multivariate GARCH model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, R.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2013-08-01

    The traditional hydrologic time series approaches are used for modeling, simulating and forecasting conditional mean of hydrologic variables but neglect their time varying variance or the second order moment. This paper introduces the multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (MGARCH) modeling approach to show how the variance-covariance relationship between hydrologic variables varies in time. These approaches are also useful to estimate the dynamic conditional correlation between hydrologic variables. To illustrate the novelty and usefulness of MGARCH models in hydrology, two major types of MGARCH models, the bivariate diagonal VECH and constant conditional correlation (CCC) models are applied to show the variance-covariance structure and cdynamic correlation in a rainfall-runoff process. The bivariate diagonal VECH-GARCH(1,1) and CCC-GARCH(1,1) models indicated both short-run and long-run persistency in the conditional variance-covariance matrix of the rainfall-runoff process. The conditional variance of rainfall appears to have a stronger persistency, especially long-run persistency, than the conditional variance of streamflow which shows a short-lived drastic increasing pattern and a stronger short-run persistency. The conditional covariance and conditional correlation coefficients have different features for each bivariate rainfall-runoff process with different degrees of stationarity and dynamic nonlinearity. The spatial and temporal pattern of variance-covariance features may reflect the signature of different physical and hydrological variables such as drainage area, topography, soil moisture and ground water fluctuations on the strength, stationarity and nonlinearity of the conditional variance-covariance for a rainfall-runoff process.

  20. The Effects of Time-Limitations and Peer Relationships on Adult Student Learning: A Causal Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundberg, Carol

    Using data from 4,644 undergraduates, this study tested a causal model identifying effects of social integration, age, and time limiting characteristics on adult student learning. Time limiting characteristics included such constraints as off-campus responsibilities and relationships. Educationally related peer relationships were the strongest…

  1. Examining the Relationship between Physical Models and Students' Science Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Alison Riley

    Scientists engage with practices like model development and use, data analysis and interpretation, explanation construction, and argumentation in order to expand the frontiers of science, so it can be inferred that students' engagement with science practices may help them deepen their own science understanding. As one of three dimensions on which the Next Generation Science Standards is built, science practices are recognized as an important component of science instruction. However, the contexts in which these practices happen are under-researched. Furthermore, research on science practices among students tends to focus on one or two practices in isolation when, in reality, students and scientists tend to engage with multiple overlapping practices. This study focused on identifying and characterizing multiple science practices as eighth and ninth-grade Earth Science students participated in a small group collaborative problem solving activity both with and without the use of a physical model. This study found a range of sophistication in the observed science practices as well as a relationship between the frequency of those practices and the accuracy of the groups' outcomes. Based on this relationship, groups were assigned to one of three categories. Further analysis revealed that model use varied among the three categories of groups. Comparisons across these three group categories suggest that there may be a bootstrapping relationship between students' engagement with science practices and the development of their content understanding. This metaphor of bootstrapping is used to represent how students may develop deeper science content understanding through engagement with science practices and concurrently develop greater facility with science practices as they learn science content. Implications are presented for curriculum designers, teachers and teacher educators. These include recommendations for curriculum design that encourage structured opportunities for

  2. Relationships among certain joint constitutive models.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Starr, Michael James

    2004-09-01

    In a recent paper, Starr and Segalman demonstrated that any Masing model can be represented as a parallel-series Iwan model. A preponderance of the constitutive models that have been suggested for simulating mechanical joints are Masing models, and the purpose of this discussion is to demonstrate how the Iwan representation of those models can yield insight into their character. In particular, this approach can facilitate a critical comparison among numerous plausible constitutive models. It is explicitly shown that three-parameter models such as Smallwood's (Ramberg-Osgood) calculate parameters in such a manner that macro-slip is not an independent parameter, yet the model admits macro-slip. The introduction of a fourth parameter is therefore required. It is shown that when a macro-slip force is specified for the Smallwood model the result is a special case of the Segalman four-parameter model. Both of these models admit a slope discontinuity at the inception of macro-slip. A five-parameter model that has the beneficial features of Segalman's four-parameter model is proposed. This model manifests a force-displacement curve having a continuous first derivative.

  3. PAL-DS MODEL: THE PAL MODEL INCLUDING DEPOSITION AND SEDIMENTATION. USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    PAL is an acronym for an air quality model which applies a Gaussian plume diffusion algorithm to point, area, and line sources. The model is available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and can be used for estimating hourly and short-term average concentrations of non-...

  4. Modeling of microstructure property relationships in titanium-aluminum-vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiley, Jaimie Scott

    Fuzzy logic neural network models were developed to predict the room temperature tensile behavior of Ti-6Al-4V. This involved the development of a database relating microstructure to properties. This necessitated establishing heat treatment processes to develop microstructural features, mechanical testing of samples, creating rigorous stereology procedures, developing numerical models to predict mechanical behavior, and determining trends and inter-relationships relating microstructural features to mechanical properties. Microstructural features were developed using a Gleeble(TM) 1500 Thermal-mechanical simulator. Samples were obtained from mill annealed plate material and both alpha + beta forged and beta forged materials. A total of 72 samples were beta solutionized and heat treated using different heating and cooling conditions. Rigorous stereology procedures were developed to characterize the important microstructural features. The features included Widmanstatten alpha lath thickness, volume fraction of total alpha, volume fraction of Widmanstatten alpha, grain boundary alpha thickness, mean edge length, colony scale factor, and prior beta grain size factor. Chemical composition was also determined using standard chemical analysis and microscopy techniques. The samples were tested for yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation at room temperature. Results from the tests and the characterization were used to develop fuzzy logic neural network models to predict the mechanical behaviors and develop relationships between the microstructural features (using CubiCalc RTC(TM)). Results were compared to standard multi-variable regression models. The fuzzy logic neural network models were able to predict the yield, and ultimate tensile strength, within acceptable error ranges with a limited number of input data samples. The models also predicted the elongation values but with larger errors. Of particular importance, the models identified the importance of

  5. Modeling the Relationship between Prosodic Sensitivity and Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Andrew; Critten, Sarah; Lawrence, Tony; Harrison, Emily; Wood, Clare; Hughes, David

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated that prosodic sensitivity is related to early literacy development; however, the precise nature of this relationship remains unclear. It has been speculated in recent theoretical models that the observed relationship between prosodic sensitivity and early literacy might be partially mediated by children's…

  6. Extension of the ADC Charge-Collection Model to Include Multiple Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    The ADC model is a charge-collection model derived for simple p-n junction silicon diodes having a single reverse-biased p-n junction at one end and an ideal substrate contact at the other end. The present paper extends the model to include multiple junctions, and the goal is to estimate how collected charge is shared by the different junctions.

  7. Modelling Mediterranean agro-ecosystems by including agricultural trees in the LPJmL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, M.; von Bloh, W.; Shi, S.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2015-11-01

    In the Mediterranean region, climate and land use change are expected to impact on natural and agricultural ecosystems by warming, reduced rainfall, direct degradation of ecosystems and biodiversity loss. Human population growth and socioeconomic changes, notably on the eastern and southern shores, will require increases in food production and put additional pressure on agro-ecosystems and water resources. Coping with these challenges requires informed decisions that, in turn, require assessments by means of a comprehensive agro-ecosystem and hydrological model. This study presents the inclusion of 10 Mediterranean agricultural plants, mainly perennial crops, in an agro-ecosystem model (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land - LPJmL): nut trees, date palms, citrus trees, orchards, olive trees, grapes, cotton, potatoes, vegetables and fodder grasses. The model was successfully tested in three model outputs: agricultural yields, irrigation requirements and soil carbon density. With the development presented in this study, LPJmL is now able to simulate in good detail and mechanistically the functioning of Mediterranean agriculture with a comprehensive representation of ecophysiological processes for all vegetation types (natural and agricultural) and in a consistent framework that produces estimates of carbon, agricultural and hydrological variables for the entire Mediterranean basin. This development paves the way for further model extensions aiming at the representation of alternative agro-ecosystems (e.g. agroforestry), and opens the door for a large number of applications in the Mediterranean region, for example assessments of the consequences of land use transitions, the influence of management practices and climate change impacts.

  8. Modelling Mediterranean agro-ecosystems by including agricultural trees in the LPJmL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fader, M.; von Bloh, W.; Shi, S.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2015-06-01

    Climate and land use change in the Mediterranean region is expected to affect natural and agricultural ecosystems by decreases in precipitation, increases in temperature as well as biodiversity loss and anthropogenic degradation of natural resources. Demographic growth in the Eastern and Southern shores will require increases in food production and put additional pressure on agro-ecosystems and water resources. Coping with these challenges requires informed decisions that, in turn, require assessments by means of a comprehensive agro-ecosystem and hydrological model. This study presents the inclusion of 10 Mediterranean agricultural plants, mainly perennial crops, in an agro-ecosystem model (LPJmL): nut trees, date palms, citrus trees, orchards, olive trees, grapes, cotton, potatoes, vegetables and fodder grasses. The model was successfully tested in three model outputs: agricultural yields, irrigation requirements and soil carbon density. With the development presented in this study, LPJmL is now able to simulate in good detail and mechanistically the functioning of Mediterranean agriculture with a comprehensive representation of ecophysiological processes for all vegetation types (natural and agricultural) and in a consistent framework that produces estimates of carbon, agricultural and hydrological variables for the entire Mediterranean basin. This development pave the way for further model extensions aiming at the representation of alternative agro-ecosystems (e.g. agroforestry), and opens the door for a large number of applications in the Mediterranean region, for example assessments on the consequences of land use transitions, the influence of management practices and climate change impacts.

  9. Including operational data in QMRA model: development and impact of model inputs.

    PubMed

    Jaidi, Kenza; Barbeau, Benoit; Carrière, Annie; Desjardins, Raymond; Prévost, Michèle

    2009-03-01

    A Monte Carlo model, based on the Quantitative Microbial Risk Analysis approach (QMRA), has been developed to assess the relative risks of infection associated with the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in drinking water. The impact of various approaches for modelling the initial parameters of the model on the final risk assessments is evaluated. The Monte Carlo simulations that we performed showed that the occurrence of parasites in raw water was best described by a mixed distribution: log-Normal for concentrations > detection limit (DL), and a uniform distribution for concentrations < DL. The selection of process performance distributions for modelling the performance of treatment (filtration and ozonation) influences the estimated risks significantly. The mean annual risks for conventional treatment are: 1.97E-03 (removal credit adjusted by log parasite = log spores), 1.58E-05 (log parasite = 1.7 x log spores) or 9.33E-03 (regulatory credits based on the turbidity measurement in filtered water). Using full scale validated SCADA data, the simplified calculation of CT performed at the plant was shown to largely underestimate the risk relative to a more detailed CT calculation, which takes into consideration the downtime and system failure events identified at the plant (1.46E-03 vs. 3.93E-02 for the mean risk). PMID:18957777

  10. Models of Shared Leadership: Evolving Structures and Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Richardson, Don

    1988-01-01

    Explores potential changes in the power relationships among teachers and principals. Describes and analyzes the following models of teacher decision-making: (1) Instructional Leadership Teams; (2) Principals' Advisory Councils; (3) School Improvement Teams; and (4) Lead Teacher Committees. (FMW)

  11. Including latent and sensible heat fluxes from sea spray in global weather and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copsey, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Most standard weather and climate models calculate interfacial latent (evaporation) and sensible heat fluxes over the ocean based on parameterisations of atmospheric turbulence, using the wave state only in the calculation of surface roughness length. They ignore latent and sensible heat fluxes generated by sea spray, which is an acceptable assumption at low wind speeds. However at high wind speeds (> 15 m/s) a significant amount of sea spray is generated from the sea surface which, while airborne, cools to an equilibrium temperature, absorbs heat and releases moisture before re-impacting the sea surface. This could impact, for example, the total heat loss from the Southern Ocean (which is anomalously warm in Met Office coupled models) or the accuracy of tropical cyclone forecasts. A modified version of the Fairall sea spray parameterisation scheme has been tested in the Met Office Unified Model including the JULES surface exchange model in both climate and NWP mode. The fast part of the scheme models the temperature change of the droplets to an equilibrium temperature and the slow part of the scheme models the evaporation and heat absorption while the droplets remain airborne. Including this scheme in the model cools and moistens the near surface layers of the atmosphere during high wind events, including tropical cyclones. Sea spray goes on to increase the convection intensity and precipitation near the high wind events in the model.

  12. Modification of TOUGH2 to Include the Dusty Gas Model for Gas Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    WEBB, STEPHEN W.

    2001-10-01

    The GEO-SEQ Project is investigating methods for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This project, which is directed by LBNL and includes a number of other industrial, university, and national laboratory partners, is evaluating computer simulation methods including TOUGH2 for this problem. The TOUGH2 code, which is a widely used code for flow and transport in porous and fractured media, includes simplified methods for gas diffusion based on a direct application of Fick's law. As shown by Webb (1998) and others, the Dusty Gas Model (DGM) is better than Fick's Law for modeling gas-phase diffusion in porous media. In order to improve gas-phase diffusion modeling for the GEO-SEQ Project, the EOS7R module in the TOUGH2 code has been modified to include the Dusty Gas Model as documented in this report. In addition, the liquid diffusion model has been changed from a mass-based formulation to a mole-based model. Modifications for separate and coupled diffusion in the gas and liquid phases have also been completed. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's law behavior for TCE and PCE diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences are small due to the relatively high permeability (k = 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}) of the problem and the small mole fraction of the gases. Additional comparisons for lower permeabilities and higher mole fractions may be useful.

  13. The Relationships between Modelling and Argumentation from the Perspective of the Model of Modelling Diagram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonça, Paula Cristina Cardoso; Justi, Rosária

    2013-01-01

    Some studies related to the nature of scientific knowledge demonstrate that modelling is an inherently argumentative process. This study aims at discussing the relationship between modelling and argumentation by analysing data collected during the modelling-based teaching of ionic bonding and intermolecular interactions. The teaching activities…

  14. Investigating the Relationship between Students' Views of Scientific Models and Their Development of Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Lin, Jang-Long

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of models and engaging in modeling practice have been emphasized in science education. However, few studies discuss the relationships between students' views of scientific models and their ability to develop those models. Hence, this study explores the relationship between students' views of scientific models and their…

  15. Modeling the performance of direct-detection Doppler lidar systems including cloud and solar background variability.

    PubMed

    McGill, M J; Hart, W D; McKay, J A; Spinhirne, J D

    1999-10-20

    Previous modeling of the performance of spaceborne direct-detection Doppler lidar systems assumed extremely idealized atmospheric models. Here we develop a technique for modeling the performance of these systems in a more realistic atmosphere, based on actual airborne lidar observations. The resulting atmospheric model contains cloud and aerosol variability that is absent in other simulations of spaceborne Doppler lidar instruments. To produce a realistic simulation of daytime performance, we include solar radiance values that are based on actual measurements and are allowed to vary as the viewing scene changes. Simulations are performed for two types of direct-detection Doppler lidar system: the double-edge and the multichannel techniques. Both systems were optimized to measure winds from Rayleigh backscatter at 355 nm. Simulations show that the measurement uncertainty during daytime is degraded by only approximately 10-20% compared with nighttime performance, provided that a proper solar filter is included in the instrument design. PMID:18324169

  16. Nonlocal photopolymerization kinetics including multiple termination mechanisms and dark reactions. Part I. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Michael R.; Sheridan, John T.

    2009-09-15

    The photochemical processes present during free-radical-based holographic grating formation are examined. A kinetic model is presented, which includes, in a more nearly complete and physically realistic way, most of the major photochemical and nonlocal photopolymerization-driven diffusion effects. These effects include: (i) non-steady-state kinetics (ii) spatially and temporally nonlocal polymer chain growth (iii) time varying photon absorption (iv) diffusion controlled viscosity effects (v) multiple termination mechanisms, and (vi) inhibition. The convergence of the predictions of the resulting model is then examined. Comparisons with experimental results are carried out in Part II of this series of papers [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 26, 1746 (2009)].

  17. SAMI2-PE: A model of the ionosphere including multistream interhemispheric photoelectron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Swartz, W. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Huba, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    In order to improve model comparisons with recently improved incoherent scatter radar measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory we have added photoelectron transport and energy redistribution to the two dimensional SAMI2 ionospheric model. The photoelectron model uses multiple pitch angle bins, includes effects associated with curved magnetic field lines, and uses an energy degradation procedure which conserves energy on coarse, non-uniformly spaced energy grids. The photoelectron model generates secondary electron production rates and thermal electron heating rates which are then passed to the fluid equations in SAMI2. We then compare electron and ion temperatures and electron densities of this modified SAMI2 model with measurements of these parameters over a range of altitudes from 90 km to 1650 km (L = 1.26) over a 24 hour period. The new electron heating model is a significant improvement over the semi-empirical model used in SAMI2. The electron temperatures above the F-peak from the modified model qualitatively reproduce the shape of the measurements as functions of time and altitude and quantitatively agree with the measurements to within ˜30% or better during the entire day, including during the rapid temperature increase at dawn.

  18. Rabbit-Specific Ventricular Model of Cardiac Electrophysiological Function including Specialized Conduction System

    PubMed Central

    Bordas, R.; Gillow, K.; Lou, Q.; Efimov, I. R.; Gavaghan, D.; Kohl, P.; Grau, V.; Rodriguez, B.

    2011-01-01

    The function of the ventricular specialized conduction system in the heart is to ensure the coordinated electrical activation of the ventricles. It is therefore critical to the overall function of the heart, and has also been implicated as an important player in various diseases, including lethal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation and drug-induced torsades de pointes. However, current ventricular models of electrophysiology usually ignore, or include highly simplified representations of the specialized conduction system. Here, we describe the development of a image-based, species-consistent, anatomically-detailed model of rabbit ventricular electrophysiology that incorporates a detailed description of the free-running part of the specialized conduction system. Techniques used for the construction of the geometrical model of the specialized conduction system from a magnetic resonance dataset and integration of the system model into a ventricular anatomical model, developed from the same dataset, are described. Computer simulations of rabbit ventricular electrophysiology are conducted using the novel anatomical model and rabbit-specific membrane kinetics to investigate the importance of the components and properties of the conduction system in determining ventricular function under physiological conditions. Simulation results are compared to panoramic optical mapping experiments for model validation and results interpretation. Full access is provided to the anatomical models developed in this study. PMID:21672547

  19. Robust Programming Problems Based on the Mean-Variance Model Including Uncertainty Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasuike, Takashi; Ishii, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers robust programming problems based on the mean-variance model including uncertainty sets and fuzzy factors. Since these problems are not well-defined problems due to fuzzy factors, it is hard to solve them directly. Therefore, introducing chance constraints, fuzzy goals and possibility measures, the proposed models are transformed into the deterministic equivalent problems. Furthermore, in order to solve these equivalent problems efficiently, the solution method is constructed introducing the mean-absolute deviation and doing the equivalent transformations.

  20. Land surface hydrology parameterization for atmospheric general circulation models including subgrid scale spatial variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, D.; Eagleson, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    Parameterizations are developed for the representation of subgrid hydrologic processes in atmospheric general circulation models. Reasonable a priori probability density functions of the spatial variability of soil moisture and of precipitation are introduced. These are used in conjunction with the deterministic equations describing basic soil moisture physics to derive expressions for the hydrologic processes that include subgrid scale variation in parameters. The major model sensitivities to soil type and to climatic forcing are explored.

  1. The ghost of social environments past: dominance relationships include current interactions and experience carried over from previous groups

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Colby J.; Salali, Gul Deniz; Jackson, Andrew L.

    2011-01-01

    Dominance hierarchies pervade animal societies. Within a static social environment, in which group size and composition are unchanged, an individual's hierarchy rank results from intrinsic (e.g. body size) and extrinsic (e.g. previous experiences) factors. Little is known, however, about how dominance relationships are formed and maintained when group size and composition are dynamic. Using a fusion–fission protocol, we fused groups of previously isolated shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) into larger groups, and then restored groups to their original size and composition. Pre-fusion hierarchies formed independently of individuals' sizes, and were maintained within a static group via winner/loser effects. Post-fusion hierarchies differed from pre-fusion ones; losing fights during fusion led to a decline in an individual's rank between pre- and post-fusion conditions, while spending time being aggressive during fusion led to an improvement in rank. In post-fusion tanks, larger individuals achieved better ranks than smaller individuals. In conclusion, dominance hierarchies in crabs represent a complex combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, in which experiences from previous groups can carry over to affect current competitive interactions. PMID:21561961

  2. The ghost of social environments past: dominance relationships include current interactions and experience carried over from previous groups.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Colby J; Salali, Gul Deniz; Jackson, Andrew L

    2011-12-23

    Dominance hierarchies pervade animal societies. Within a static social environment, in which group size and composition are unchanged, an individual's hierarchy rank results from intrinsic (e.g. body size) and extrinsic (e.g. previous experiences) factors. Little is known, however, about how dominance relationships are formed and maintained when group size and composition are dynamic. Using a fusion-fission protocol, we fused groups of previously isolated shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) into larger groups, and then restored groups to their original size and composition. Pre-fusion hierarchies formed independently of individuals' sizes, and were maintained within a static group via winner/loser effects. Post-fusion hierarchies differed from pre-fusion ones; losing fights during fusion led to a decline in an individual's rank between pre- and post-fusion conditions, while spending time being aggressive during fusion led to an improvement in rank. In post-fusion tanks, larger individuals achieved better ranks than smaller individuals. In conclusion, dominance hierarchies in crabs represent a complex combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, in which experiences from previous groups can carry over to affect current competitive interactions. PMID:21561961

  3. Analysis of a generalized model for influenza including differential susceptibility due to immunosuppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Recently, a mathematical model of pandemic influenza was proposed including typical control strategies such as antivirals, vaccination and school closure; and considering explicitly the effects of immunity acquired from the early outbreaks on the ulterior outbreaks of the disease. In such model the algebraic expression for the basic reproduction number (without control strategies) and the effective reproduction number (with control strategies) were derived and numerically estimated. A drawback of this model of pandemic influenza is that it ignores the effects of the differential susceptibility due to immunosuppression and the effects of the complexity of the actual contact networks between individuals. We have developed a generalized model which includes such effects of heterogeneity. Specifically we consider the influence of the air network connectivity in the spread of pandemic influenza and the influence of the immunosuppresion when the population is divided in two immune classes. We use an algebraic expression, namely the Tutte polynomial, to characterize the complexity of the contact network. Until now, The influence of the air network connectivity in the spread of pandemic influenza has been studied numerically, but not algebraic expressions have been used to summarize the level of network complexity. The generalized model proposed here includes the typical control strategies previously mentioned (antivirals, vaccination and school closure) combined with restrictions on travel. For the generalized model the corresponding reproduction numbers will be algebraically computed and the effect of the contact network will be established in terms of the Tutte polynomial of the network.

  4. Modelling total duration of traffic incidents including incident detection and recovery time.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli Hojati, Ahmad; Ferreira, Luis; Washington, Simon; Charles, Phil; Shobeirinejad, Ameneh

    2014-10-01

    Traffic incidents are key contributors to non-recurrent congestion, potentially generating significant delay. Factors that influence the duration of incidents are important to understand so that effective mitigation strategies can be implemented. To identify and quantify the effects of influential factors, a methodology for studying total incident duration based on historical data from an 'integrated database' is proposed. Incident duration models are developed using a selected freeway segment in the Southeast Queensland, Australia network. The models include incident detection and recovery time as components of incident duration. A hazard-based duration modelling approach is applied to model incident duration as a function of a variety of factors that influence traffic incident duration. Parametric accelerated failure time survival models are developed to capture heterogeneity as a function of explanatory variables, with both fixed and random parameters specifications. The analysis reveals that factors affecting incident duration include incident characteristics (severity, type, injury, medical requirements, etc.), infrastructure characteristics (roadway shoulder availability), time of day, and traffic characteristics. The results indicate that event type durations are uniquely different, thus requiring different responses to effectively clear them. Furthermore, the results highlight the presence of unobserved incident duration heterogeneity as captured by the random parameter models, suggesting that additional factors need to be considered in future modelling efforts. PMID:24974360

  5. Magnetofluid Simulations of the Global Solar Wind Including Pickup Ions and Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2011-01-01

    I will describe a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind that takes into account turbulent heating of the wind by velocity and magnetic fluctuations as well as a variety of effects produced by interstellar pickup protons. In this report, the interstellar pickup protons are treated as one fluid and the protons and electrons are treated together as a second fluid. The model equations include a Reynolds decomposition of the plasma velocity and magnetic field into mean and fluctuating quantities, as well as energy transfer from interstellar pickup protons to solar wind protons that results in the deceleration of the solar wind. The model is used to simulate the global steady-state structure of the solar wind in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. Where possible, the model is compared with Voyager data. Initial results from generalization to a three-fluid model is described elsewhere in this session.

  6. A statistical model including age to predict passenger postures in the rear seats of automobiles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jangwoon; Ebert, Sheila M; Reed, Matthew P; Hallman, Jason J

    2016-06-01

    Few statistical models of rear seat passenger posture have been published, and none has taken into account the effects of occupant age. This study developed new statistical models for predicting passenger postures in the rear seats of automobiles. Postures of 89 adults with a wide range of age and body size were measured in a laboratory mock-up in seven seat configurations. Posture-prediction models for female and male passengers were separately developed by stepwise regression using age, body dimensions, seat configurations and two-way interactions as potential predictors. Passenger posture was significantly associated with age and the effects of other two-way interaction variables depended on age. A set of posture-prediction models are presented for women and men, and the prediction results are compared with previously published models. This study is the first study of passenger posture to include a large cohort of older passengers and the first to report a significant effect of age for adults. The presented models can be used to position computational and physical human models for vehicle design and assessment. Practitioner Summary: The significant effects of age, body dimensions and seat configuration on rear seat passenger posture were identified. The models can be used to accurately position computational human models or crash test dummies for older passengers in known rear seat configurations. PMID:26328769

  7. Working models of attachment and attribution processes in intimate relationships.

    PubMed

    Collins, Nancy L; Ford, Máire B; Guichard, AnaMarie C; Allard, Lisa M

    2006-02-01

    Two studies examined the link between working models of attachment and social construal processes in romantic relationships. In Study 1, individuals high in attachment-related anxiety responded to hypothetical partner transgressions by endorsing relationship-threatening attributions, experiencing emotional distress, and endorsing behavioral intentions that were likely to result in conflict. These effects emerged after controlling for pessimistic explanatory style, depressed mood, and self-esteem. In addition, the association between anxiety and emotional distress was mediated by attributions and attachment-related needs. In Study 2, anxious individuals endorsed relationship-threatening attributions for their partner's transgressions but less so for their partner's positive behaviors, and these effects occurred primarily among those in unhappy relationships. In contrast, avoidant individuals endorsed pessimistic attributions for their partner's positive behavior but less so for their partner's transgressions, and these effects occurred regardless of their level of relationship satisfaction. PMID:16382082

  8. Children and adolescents' internal models of food-sharing behavior include complex evaluations of contextual factors.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Benenson, Joyce F; Kramer, Donald L

    2003-01-01

    This study examined internal representations of food sharing in 589 children and adolescents (8-19 years of age). Questionnaires, depicting a variety of contexts in which one person was asked to share a resource with another, were used to examine participants' expectations of food-sharing behavior. Factors that were varied included the value of the resource, the relation between the two depicted actors, the quality of this relation, and gender. Results indicate that internal models of food-sharing behavior showed systematic patterns of variation, demonstrating that individuals have complex contextually based internal models at all ages, including the youngest. Examination of developmental changes in use of individual patterns is consistent with the idea that internal models reflect age-specific patterns of interactions while undergoing a process of progressive consolidation. PMID:14669890

  9. [Experimental Approach to Analysis of the Relationship between Food Environments and Lifestyle-Related Diseases, Including Cardiac Hypertrophy, Fatty Liver, and Fatigue Symptoms].

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Masahisa; Nakakuma, Miwa; Arimura, Emi; Ushikai, Miharu; Yoshida, Goichiro

    2015-01-01

    The food habit is involved in the onset and development of lifestyle-related diseases. In this review I would like to describe a historical case of vitamin B1 deficiency, as well as our case study of fatty acid metabolism abnormality due to carnitine deficiency. In history, the army and navy personnel in Japan at the end of the 19th century received food rations based on a high-carbohydrate diet including white rice, resulting in the onset of beriberi. An epidemiological study by Kenkan Takaki revealed the relationship between the onset of beriberi and rice intake. Then, Takaki was successful in preventing the onset of beriberi by changing the diet. However, the primary cause had yet to be elucidated. Finally, Christian Eijkman established an animal model of beriberi (chickens) showing peripheral neuropathy, and he identified the existence of an anti-beriberi substance, vitamin B1. This is an example of the successful control of a disease by integrating the results of epidemiological and experimental studies. In our study using a murine model of fatty acid metabolism abnormality caused by carnitine deficiency, cardiac abnormality and fatty liver developed depending on the amount of dietary fat. In addition, the mice showed disturbance of orexin neuron activity related to the sleep-arousal system, which is involved in fatigue symptoms under fasting condition, one of the states showing enhanced fatty acid metabolism. These findings suggest that fatty acid toxicity is enhanced when the mice are more dependent on fatty acid metabolism. Almost simultaneously, a human epidemiological study showed that narcolepsy, which is caused by orexin system abnormality, is associated with the polymorphism of the gene coding for carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B, which is involved in carnitine metabolism. To understand the pathological mechanism of fatty acid toxicity, not only an experimental approach using animal models, but also an epidemiological approach is necessary. The

  10. Exploring Third-Grade Student Model-Based Explanations about Plant Relationships within an Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangori, Laura; Forbes, Cory T.

    2015-12-01

    Elementary students should have opportunities to develop scientific models to reason and build understanding about how and why plants depend on relationships within an ecosystem for growth and survival. However, scientific modeling practices are rarely included within elementary science learning environments and disciplinary content is often treated as discrete pieces separate from scientific practice. Elementary students have few, if any, opportunities to reason about how individual organisms, such as plants, hold critical relationships with their surrounding environment. The purpose of this design-based research study is to build a learning performance to identify and explore the third-grade students' baseline understanding of and their reasoning about plant-ecosystem relationships when engaged in the practices of modeling. The developed learning performance integrated scientific content and core scientific activity to identify and measure how students build knowledge about the role of plants in ecosystems through the practices of modeling. Our findings indicate that the third-grade students' ideas about plant growth include abiotic and biotic relationships. Further, they used their models to reason about how and why these relationships were necessary to maintain plant stasis. However, while the majority of the third-grade students were able to identify and reason about plant-abiotic relationships, a much smaller group reasoned about plant-abiotic-animal relationships. Implications from the study suggest that modeling serves as a tool to support elementary students in reasoning about system relationships, but they require greater curricular and instructional support in conceptualizing how and why ecosystem relationships are necessary for plant growth and development. This paper is based on data from a doctoral dissertation. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 2015 international conference for the National Association for Research in Science

  11. Innovative Liner Concepts: Experiments and Impedance Modeling of Liners Including the Effect of Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Jeff; Betts, Juan Fernando; Fuller, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The study of normal impedance of perforated plate acoustic liners including the effect of bias flow was studied. Two impedance models were developed by modeling the internal flows of perforate orifices as infinite tubes with the inclusion of end corrections to handle finite length effects. These models assumed incompressible and compressible flows, respectively, between the far field and the perforate orifice. The incompressible model was used to predict impedance results for perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 5% to 15%. The predicted resistance results showed better agreement with experiments for the higher percent open area samples. The agreement also tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. For perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 1% to 5%, the compressible model was used to predict impedance results. The model predictions were closer to the experimental resistance results for the 2% to 3% open area samples. The predictions tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. The reactance results were well predicted by the models for the higher percent open area, but deteriorated as the percent open area was lowered (5%) and bias flow was increased. A fit was done on the incompressible model to the experimental database. The fit was performed using an optimization routine that found the optimal set of multiplication coefficients to the non-dimensional groups that minimized the least squares slope error between predictions and experiments. The result of the fit indicated that terms not associated with bias flow required a greater degree of correction than the terms associated with the bias flow. This model improved agreement with experiments by nearly 15% for the low percent open area (5%) samples when compared to the unfitted model. The fitted model and the unfitted model performed equally well for the higher percent open area (10% and 15%).

  12. Evaluating Modeled Variables Included in the NOAA Water Vapor Flux Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, L. S.; White, A. B.; Coleman, T.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division has a Water Vapor Flux Tool showing observed and forecast meteorological variables related to heavy precipitation. Details about this tool will be presented in a companion paper by White et al. (2015, this conference). We evaluate 3-hr precipitation forecasts from four models (the HRRR, HRRRexp, RAP, and RAPexp) that were added to the tool in Dec. 2014. The Rapid Refresh (RAP) and the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) models are run operationally by NOAA, are initialized hourly, and produce forecasts out to 15 hours. The RAP and HRRR have experimental versions (RAPexp and HRRRexp, respectively) that are run near-real time at the NOAA/ESRL/Global Systems Division. Our analysis of eight rain days includes atmospheric river events in Dec. 2014 and Feb. 2015. We evaluate the forecasts using observations at two sites near the California coast - Bodega Bay (BBY, 15 m ASL) and Cazadero (CZC, 478 m ASL), and an inland site near Colfax, CA (CFC, 643 m ASL). Various criteria were used to evaluate the forecasts. (1) The Pielke criteria: we compare the RMSE and unbiased RMSE of the model output to the standard deviation of the observations, and we compare the standard deviation of the model output to the standard deviation of the observations; (2) we compare the modeled 24-hr precipitation to the observed 24-hr precipitation; and (3) we assess the correlation coefficient between the modeled and observed precipitation. Based on these criteria, the RAP slightly outperformed the other models. Only the RAP and the HRRRexp had forecasts that met the Pielke criteria. All of the models were able to predict the observed 24-hour precipitation, within 10%, in only 8-16% of their forecasts. All models achieved a correlation coefficient value above the 90th percentile in 12.5% of their forecasts. The station most likely to have a forecast that met any of the criteria was the inland mountain station CFC; the least likely was the coastal mountain

  13. Hierarchical longitudinal models of relationships in social networks

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sudeshna; O’Malley, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Summary Motivated by the need to understand the dynamics of relationship formation and dissolution over time in real-world social networks we develop a new longitudinal model for transitions in the relationship status of pairs of individuals (“dyads”). We first specify a model for the relationship status of a single dyad and then extend it to account for important inter-dyad dependencies (e.g., transitivity – “a friend of a friend is a friend”) and heterogeneity. Model parameters are estimated using Bayesian analysis implemented via Markov chain Monte Carlo. We use the model to perform novel analyses of two diverse longitudinal friendship networks: an excerpt of the Teenage Friends and Lifestyle Study (a moderately sized network) and the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (a large network). PMID:24729637

  14. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Mätzler, C.; Wiesmann, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Schwank, M.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5-100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS) is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  15. Steady-state analysis of activated sludge processes with a settler model including sludge compression.

    PubMed

    Diehl, S; Zambrano, J; Carlsson, B

    2016-01-01

    A reduced model of a completely stirred-tank bioreactor coupled to a settling tank with recycle is analyzed in its steady states. In the reactor, the concentrations of one dominant particulate biomass and one soluble substrate component are modelled. While the biomass decay rate is assumed to be constant, growth kinetics can depend on both substrate and biomass concentrations, and optionally model substrate inhibition. Compressive and hindered settling phenomena are included using the Bürger-Diehl settler model, which consists of a partial differential equation. Steady-state solutions of this partial differential equation are obtained from an ordinary differential equation, making steady-state analysis of the entire plant difficult. A key result showing that the ordinary differential equation can be replaced with an approximate algebraic equation simplifies model analysis. This algebraic equation takes the location of the sludge-blanket during normal operation into account, allowing for the limiting flux capacity caused by compressive settling to easily be included in the steady-state mass balance equations for the entire plant system. This novel approach grants the possibility of more realistic solutions than other previously published reduced models, comprised of yet simpler settler assumptions. The steady-state concentrations, solids residence time, and the wastage flow ratio are functions of the recycle ratio. Solutions are shown for various growth kinetics; with different values of biomass decay rate, influent volumetric flow, and substrate concentration. PMID:26476681

  16. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, M.; Mätzler, C.; Wiesmann, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Schwank, M.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-03-01

    The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5-100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like and cross polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS) is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoids fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in MATLAB and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  17. A Multivariate Model of Parent-Adolescent Relationship Variables in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Cliff; Renk, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Given the importance of predicting outcomes for early adolescents, this study examines a multivariate model of parent-adolescent relationship variables, including parenting, family environment, and conflict. Participants, who completed measures assessing these variables, included 710 culturally diverse 11-14-year-olds who were attending a middle…

  18. Analytical linear energy transfer model including secondary particles: calculations along the central axis of the proton pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Pouzoulet, F; Mazal, A

    2016-01-21

    In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends on various types of parameters such as linear energy transfer (LET). An analytical model for LET calculation exists (Wilkens' model), but secondary particles are not included in this model. In the present study, we propose a correction factor, L sec, for Wilkens' model in order to take into account the LET contributions of certain secondary particles. This study includes secondary protons and deuterons, since the effects of these two types of particles can be described by the same RBE-LET relationship. L sec was evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GATE/GEANT4 platform and was defined by the ratio of the LET d distributions of all protons and deuterons and only primary protons. This method was applied to the innovative Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) delivery systems and L sec was evaluated along the beam axis. This correction factor indicates the high contribution of secondary particles in the entrance region, with L sec values higher than 1.6 for a 220 MeV clinical pencil beam. MC simulations showed the impact of pencil beam parameters, such as mean initial energy, spot size, and depth in water, on L sec. The variation of L sec with these different parameters was integrated in a polynomial function of the L sec factor in order to obtain a model universally applicable to all PBS delivery systems. The validity of this correction factor applied to Wilkens' model was verified along the beam axis of various pencil beams in comparison with MC simulations. A good agreement was obtained between the corrected analytical model and the MC calculations, with mean-LET deviations along the beam axis less than 0.05 keV μm(-1). These results demonstrate the efficacy of our new correction of the existing LET model in order to take into account secondary protons and deuterons along the pencil beam axis. PMID:26732530

  19. Analytical linear energy transfer model including secondary particles: calculations along the central axis of the proton pencil beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsolat, F.; De Marzi, L.; Pouzoulet, F.; Mazal, A.

    2016-01-01

    In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends on various types of parameters such as linear energy transfer (LET). An analytical model for LET calculation exists (Wilkens’ model), but secondary particles are not included in this model. In the present study, we propose a correction factor, L sec, for Wilkens’ model in order to take into account the LET contributions of certain secondary particles. This study includes secondary protons and deuterons, since the effects of these two types of particles can be described by the same RBE-LET relationship. L sec was evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GATE/GEANT4 platform and was defined by the ratio of the LET d distributions of all protons and deuterons and only primary protons. This method was applied to the innovative Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) delivery systems and L sec was evaluated along the beam axis. This correction factor indicates the high contribution of secondary particles in the entrance region, with L sec values higher than 1.6 for a 220 MeV clinical pencil beam. MC simulations showed the impact of pencil beam parameters, such as mean initial energy, spot size, and depth in water, on L sec. The variation of L sec with these different parameters was integrated in a polynomial function of the L sec factor in order to obtain a model universally applicable to all PBS delivery systems. The validity of this correction factor applied to Wilkens’ model was verified along the beam axis of various pencil beams in comparison with MC simulations. A good agreement was obtained between the corrected analytical model and the MC calculations, with mean-LET deviations along the beam axis less than 0.05 keV μm-1. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our new correction of the existing LET model in order to take into account secondary protons and deuterons along the pencil beam axis.

  20. AIR POLLUTION MODELS AS DESCRIPTORS OF CAUSE-EFFECT RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The problem of air pollution modeling is treated beginning from a philosophical standpoint, in which a model is viewed as a universal statement and a complementary set of singular statements from which specific cause-effect relationships are deduced; proceeding to the formulation...

  1. Exploring Third-Grade Student Model-Based Explanations about Plant Relationships within an Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zangori, Laura; Forbes, Cory T.

    2015-01-01

    Elementary students should have opportunities to develop scientific models to reason and build understanding about how and why plants depend on relationships within an ecosystem for growth and survival. However, scientific modeling practices are rarely included within elementary science learning environments and disciplinary content is often…

  2. The Relationship of Values in Elementary School 4th Grade Social Studies Textbook with the Attainments and Their Level of Being Included in Student Workbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Abdurrahman

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the relationship of values in elementary school 4th grade Social Studies textbook with the attainments and their level of being included in student workbook are tried to be determined. Case study, which is a qualitative research method, was applied for this research. To collect data, document analysis technique, which is among the…

  3. The Effects of Including Non-Thermal Particles in Flare Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, K. K.; Winter, H. D.; Larson, N. L.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we use HyLoop (Winter et al. 2011), a loop model that can incorporate the effects of both MHD and non-thermal particle populations, to simulate soft X-ray emissions in various situations. First of all, we test the effect of acceleration location on the emission in several XRT filters by simulating a series of post flare loops with different injection points for the non-thermal particle beams. We use an injection distribution peaked at the loop apex to represent a direct acceleration model, and an injection distribution peaked at the footpoints to represent the Alfvén wave interaction model. We find that footpoint injection leads to several early peaks in the apex-to-footpoint emission ratio. Second, we model a loop with cusp-shaped geometry based on the eruption model developed byLin & Forbes (2000) and Reeves & Forbes (2005a), and find that early in the flare, emission in the loop footpoints is much brighter in the XRT filters if non-thermal particles are included in the calculation. Finally, we employ a multi-loop flare model to simulate thermal emission and compare with a previous model where a semi-circular geometry was used (Reeves et al. 2007). We compare the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) emission from the two models and find that the cusp-shaped geometry leads to a smaller GOES class flare.

  4. Safe distance car-following model including backward-looking and its stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Da; Jin, Peter Jing; Pu, Yun; Ran, Bin

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this paper is the car-following behavior including backward-looking, simply called the bi-directional looking car-following behavior. This study is motivated by the potential changes of the physical properties of traffic flow caused by the fast developing intelligent transportation system (ITS), especially the new connected vehicle technology. Existing studies on this topic focused on general motors (GM) models and optimal velocity (OV) models. The safe distance car-following model, Gipps' model, which is more widely used in practice have not drawn too much attention in the bi-directional looking context. This paper explores the property of the bi-directional looking extension of Gipps' safe distance model. The stability condition of the proposed model is derived using the linear stability theory and is verified using numerical simulations. The impacts of the driver and vehicle characteristics appeared in the proposed model on the traffic flow stability are also investigated. It is found that taking into account the backward-looking effect in car-following has three types of effect on traffic flow: stabilizing, destabilizing and producing non-physical phenomenon. This conclusion is more sophisticated than the study results based on the OV bi-directional looking car-following models. Moreover, the drivers who have the smaller reaction time or the larger additional delay and think the other vehicles have larger maximum decelerations can stabilize traffic flow.

  5. A POROELASTIC MODEL FOR CELL CRAWLING INCLUDING MECHANICAL COUPLING BETWEEN CYTOSKELETAL CONTRACTION AND ACTIN POLYMERIZATION.

    PubMed

    Taber, L A; Shi, Y; Yang, L; Bayly, P V

    2011-01-01

    Much is known about the biophysical mechanisms involved in cell crawling, but how these processes are coordinated to produce directed motion is not well understood. Here, we propose a new hypothesis whereby local cytoskeletal contraction generates fluid flow through the lamellipodium, with the pressure at the front of the cell facilitating actin polymerization which pushes the leading edge forward. The contraction, in turn, is regulated by stress in the cytoskeleton. To test this hypothesis, finite element models for a crawling cell are presented. These models are based on nonlinear poroelasticity theory, modified to include the effects of active contraction and growth, which are regulated by mechanical feedback laws. Results from the models agree reasonably well with published experimental data for cell speed, actin flow, and cytoskeletal deformation in migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. The models also suggest that oscillations can occur for certain ranges of parameter values. PMID:21765817

  6. A consistent model of electroweak data including Z → b overlineb and Z → c overlinec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, K.; Graesser, M.; Hinchliffe, I.; Suzuki, M.

    1996-02-01

    We have performed an overall fit to the electroweak data with the generation blind U(1) extension of the Standard Model. As input data for fitting we have included the asymmetry parameters, the partial decay widths of Z, neutrino scattering, and atomic parity violation. The QCD coupling αs has been constrained to the world average obtained from all data except the Z width. On the basis of our fit we have constructed a viable gauge model that not only explains Rb and Rc but also provides a much better overall fit to the data than the Standard Model. Despite its phenomenological viability, our model is unfortunately not simple from the theoretical viewpoint. Atomic parity violation experiments strongly disfavor more aesthetically appealing alternatives that can be grand unified.

  7. Multifluid Simulations of the Global Solar Wind Including Pickup Ions and Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Usmanov, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    I will describe a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind that takes into account turbulent heating of the wind by velocity and magnetic fluctuations as well as a variety of effects produced by interstellar pickup protons. The interstellar pickup protons are treated in the model as one fluid and the protons and electrons are treated together as a second fluid. The model equations include a Reynolds decomposition of the plasma velocity and magnetic field into mean and fluctuating quantities, as well as energy transfer from interstellar pickup protons to solar wind protons that results in the deceleration of the solar wind. The model is used to simulate the global steady-state structure of the solar wind in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The simulation assumes that the background magnetic field on the Sun is either a dipole (aligned or tilted with respect to the solar rotation axis) or one that is deduced from solar magnetograms.

  8. Global Reference Atmospheric Models, Including Thermospheres, for Mars, Venus and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Keller, Vernon W.

    2006-01-01

    This document is the viewgraph slides of the presentation. Marshall Space Flight Center's Natural Environments Branch has developed Global Reference Atmospheric Models (GRAMs) for Mars, Venus, Earth, and other solar system destinations. Mars-GRAM has been widely used for engineering applications including systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Preliminary results are presented, comparing Mars-GRAM with measurements from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) during its aerobraking in Mars thermosphere. Venus-GRAM is based on the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA), and is suitable for similar engineering applications in the thermosphere or other altitude regions of the atmosphere of Venus. Until recently, the thermosphere in Earth-GRAM has been represented by the Marshall Engineering Thermosphere (MET) model. Earth-GRAM has recently been revised. In addition to including an updated version of MET, it now includes an option to use the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRLMSISE-00) as an alternate thermospheric model. Some characteristics and results from Venus-GRAM and Earth-GRAM thermospheres are also presented.

  9. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4–87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5–69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5–78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5–57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  10. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Marfo, Jemima Tiwaa; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4-87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5-69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5-78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5-57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  11. Kinetic modeling of rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including cell density-dependent regulation.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Marius; Schmidberger, Anke; Vogelbacher, Markus; Kühnert, Christian; Beuker, Janina; Bernard, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is under complex control of a quorum sensing-dependent regulatory network. Due to a lack of understanding of the kinetics applicable to the process and relevant interrelations of variables, current processes for rhamnolipid production are based on heuristic approaches. To systematically establish a knowledge-based process for rhamnolipid production, a deeper understanding of the time-course and coupling of process variables is required. By combining reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and experimental data, a process model for rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa PAO1 on sunflower oil was developed as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In addition, cell density-based quorum sensing dynamics were included in the model. The model comprises a total of 36 parameters, 14 of which are yield coefficients and 7 of which are substrate affinity and inhibition constants. Of all 36 parameters, 30 were derived from dedicated experimental results, literature, and databases and 6 of them were used as fitting parameters. The model is able to describe data on biomass growth, substrates, and products obtained from a reference batch process and other validation scenarios. The model presented describes the time-course and interrelation of biomass, relevant substrates, and products on a process level while including a kinetic representation of cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24770383

  12. Modeling tether-ballast asteroid diversion systems, including tether mass and elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, David B.; Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    2014-10-01

    The risk of an impact between a large asteroid and the Earth has been significant enough to attract the attention of many researchers. This paper focuses on a mitigation technique that involves the use of a long tether and ballast mass to divert an asteroid. When such a tether is modeled as massless and inelastic, results show that the method may be viable for diverting asteroids away from a collision with the Earth; the next step towards demonstrating the viability of the approach is to conduct a study which uses a more realistic tether model. This paper presents such a study, in which the tether models include tether mass and elasticity. These models verify that a tether-ballast system is capable of diverting Earth-threatening asteroids. Detailed parametric studies are presented which illustrate how system performance depends on tether mass and elasticity. Also, case studies are presented which show how more realistic models can aid in the design of tether-ballast asteroid mitigation systems. Key findings include the dangers imposed by periods during which the tether goes slack and ways to preclude this.

  13. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. PMID:26156299

  14. Does including physiology improve species distribution model predictions of responses to recent climate change?

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lauren B; Waaser, Stephanie A; MacLean, Heidi J; Fox, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Thermal constraints on development are often invoked to predict insect distributions. These constraints tend to be characterized in species distribution models (SDMs) by calculating development time based on a constant lower development temperature (LDT). Here, we assessed whether species-specific estimates of LDT based on laboratory experiments can improve the ability of SDMs to predict the distribution shifts of six U.K. butterflies in response to recent climate warming. We find that species-specific and constant (5 degrees C) LDT degree-day models perform similarly at predicting distributions during the period of 1970-1982. However, when the models for the 1970-1982 period are projected to predict distributions in 1995-1999 and 2000-2004, species-specific LDT degree-day models modestly outperform constant LDT degree-day models. Our results suggest that, while including species-specific physiology in correlative models may enhance predictions of species' distribution responses to climate change, more detailed models may be needed to adequately account for interspecific physiological differences. PMID:22352161

  15. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J.; Pinsky, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. PMID:26156299

  16. A numerical model including PID control of a multizone crystal growth furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles H.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a 2D axisymmetric combined conduction and radiation model of a multizone crystal growth furnace. The model is based on a programmable multizone furnace (PMZF) designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center for growing high quality semiconductor crystals. A novel feature of this model is a control algorithm which automatically adjusts the power in any number of independently controlled heaters to establish the desired crystal temperatures in the furnace model. The control algorithm eliminates the need for numerous trial and error runs previously required to obtain the same results. The finite element code, FIDAP, used to develop the furnace model, was modified to directly incorporate the control algorithm. This algorithm, which presently uses PID control, and the associated heat transfer model are briefly discussed. Together, they have been used to predict the heater power distributions for a variety of furnace configurations and desired temperature profiles. Examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PID controlled model in establishing isothermal, Bridgman, and other complicated temperature profies in the sample. Finally, an example is given to show how the algorithm can be used to change the desired profile with time according to a prescribed temperature-time evolution.

  17. Modeling of single char combustion, including CO oxidation in its boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Longwell, J.P.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1994-10-25

    The combustion of a char particle can be divided into a transient phase where its temperature increases as it is heated by oxidation, and heat transfer from the surrounding gas to an approximately constant temperature stage where gas phase reaction is important and which consumes most of the carbon and an extinction stage caused by carbon burnout. In this work, separate models were developed for the transient heating where gas phase reactions were unimportant and for the steady temperature stage where gas phase reactions were treated in detail. The transient char combustion model incorporates intrinsic char surface production of CO and CO{sub 2}, internal pore diffusion and external mass and heat transfer. The model provides useful information for particle ignition, burning temperature profile, combustion time, and carbon consumption rate. A gas phase reaction model incorporating the full set of 28 elementary C/H/O reactions was developed. This model calculated the gas phase CO oxidation reaction in the boundary layer at particle temperatures of 1250 K and 2500 K by using the carbon consumption rate and the burning temperature at the pseudo-steady state calculated from the temperature profile model but the transient heating was not included. This gas phase model can predict the gas species, and the temperature distributions in the boundary layer, the CO{sub 2}/CO ratio, and the location of CO oxidation. A mechanistic heat and mass transfer model was added to the temperature profile model to predict combustion behavior in a fluidized bed. These models were applied to data from the fluidized combustion of Newlands coal char particles. 52 refs., 60 figs.

  18. Modifying a telerobotic system to include robotic operation by means of dynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, G.K.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Noakes, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this study was to implement a robotic mode for the Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM), a six-degree-of-freedom master/slave teleoperator. To implement a robotic mode on a system designed for teleoperation, the effects of any change in the control schemes must be completely understood. One way to study the impact of potential modifications is to develop a model of the system. This approach is the one taken in this study. A detailed full-arm model was developed by first creating a model for individual joints of the manipulator and then incorporating each of the joint models into a single full-arm model, including link inertias and kinematic cross-coupling. Parameters were identified for each joint model to provide a match between simulated and actual responses to a pulse input. The full-arm model was tested by comparing the simulated and actual response of the ASM to simultaneous sine-wave inputs to each joint, using the model parameters identified on a joint-by-joint basis. The full-arm model was able to characterize effectively the ASM system response for the inputs studied. Robotic-mode control algorithms were tested on both the individual-joint and full-arm models. The results of these simulations indicate that a simplified master/slave control structure is the best candidate for robotic operation. This control structure was added to the ASM. Experimental results demonstrate that the ASM system is capable of repeatable robotic operation. The robotic-mode man-machine interface and data handling system are described in this paper. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  20. Multistate Statistical Modeling: A Tool to Build a Lung Cancer Microsimulation Model That Includes Parameter Uncertainty and Patient Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Mathilda L; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Coupé, V M H

    2016-01-01

    With the shift toward individualized treatment, cost-effectiveness models need to incorporate patient and tumor characteristics that may be relevant to treatment planning. In this study, we used multistate statistical modeling to inform a microsimulation model for cost-effectiveness analysis of individualized radiotherapy in lung cancer. The model tracks clinical events over time and takes patient and tumor features into account. Four clinical states were included in the model: alive without progression, local recurrence, metastasis, and death. Individual patients were simulated by repeatedly sampling a patient profile, consisting of patient and tumor characteristics. The transitioning of patients between the health states is governed by personalized time-dependent hazard rates, which were obtained from multistate statistical modeling (MSSM). The model simulations for both the individualized and conventional radiotherapy strategies demonstrated internal and external validity. Therefore, MSSM is a useful technique for obtaining the correlated individualized transition rates that are required for the quantification of a microsimulation model. Moreover, we have used the hazard ratios, their 95% confidence intervals, and their covariance to quantify the parameter uncertainty of the model in a correlated way. The obtained model will be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of individualized radiotherapy treatment planning, including the uncertainty of input parameters. We discuss the model-building process and the strengths and weaknesses of using MSSM in a microsimulation model for individualized radiotherapy in lung cancer. PMID:25732723

  1. IR spectroscopic investigations of amoxicillin trihydrate, included in the technological models sirup granules in ethylcellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasheva, L. M.; Kalinkova, G.; Minkov, E.; Krestev, V.

    1984-03-01

    Employing IR spectroscopy some technological models of amoxicillin trihydrate, included in ethyl-, methyl-, carboxymethyl- and methylhydroxyethyl-cellulose have been studied. Interactions were established only between amoxicillin trihydrate and ethylcellulose. The IR absorption spectra suggest a H-bonded antibiotic with hydroxyl groups in the ethylcellulose molecule. The IR spectral differences observed are not due to polymorphic transformation; this was proved by X-ray powder diffraction.

  2. Modeling and controller design of a wind energy conversion system including a matrix converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakati, S. Masoud

    In this thesis, a grid-connected wind-energy converter system including a matrix converter is proposed. The matrix converter, as a power electronic converter, is used to interface the induction generator with the grid and control the wind turbine shaft speed. At a given wind velocity, the mechanical power available from a wind turbine is a function of its shaft speed. Through the matrix converter, the terminal voltage and frequency of the induction generator is controlled, based on a constant V/f strategy, to adjust the turbine shaft speed and accordingly, control the active power injected into the grid to track maximum power for all wind velocities. The power factor at the interface with the grid is also controlled by the matrix converter to either ensure purely active power injection into the grid for optimal utilization of the installed wind turbine capacity or assist in regulation of voltage at the point of connection. Furthermore, the reactive power requirements of the induction generator are satisfied by the matrix converter to avoid use of self-excitation capacitors. The thesis addresses two dynamic models: a comprehensive dynamic model for a matrix converter and an overall dynamical model for the proposed wind turbine system. The developed matrix converter dynamic model is valid for both steady-state and transient analyses, and includes all required functions, i.e., control of the output voltage, output frequency, and input displacement power factor. The model is in the qdo reference frame for the matrix converter input and output voltage and current fundamental components. The validity of this model is confirmed by comparing the results obtained from the developed model and a simplified fundamental-frequency equivalent circuit-based model. In developing the overall dynamic model of the proposed wind turbine system, individual models of the mechanical aerodynamic conversion, drive train, matrix converter, and squirrel-cage induction generator are developed

  3. Personality, relationship conflict, and teamwork-related mental models.

    PubMed

    Vîrgă, Delia; Curşeu, Petru Lucian; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models. PMID:25372143

  4. Personality, Relationship Conflict, and Teamwork-Related Mental Models

    PubMed Central

    Vîrgă, Delia; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A.; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models. PMID:25372143

  5. A full model for simulation of electrochemical cells including complex behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esperilla, J. J.; Félez, J.; Romero, G.; Carretero, A.

    This communication presents a model of electrochemical cells developed in order to simulate their electrical, chemical and thermal behavior showing the differences when thermal effects are or not considered in the charge-discharge process. The work presented here has been applied to the particular case of the Pb,PbSO 4|H 2SO 4 (aq)|PbO 2,Pb cell, which forms the basis of the lead-acid batteries so widely used in the automotive industry and as traction batteries in electric or hybrid vehicles. Each half-cell is considered independently in the model. For each half-cell, in addition to the main electrode reaction, a secondary reaction is considered: the hydrogen evolution reaction in the negative electrode and the oxygen evolution reaction in the positive. The equilibrium potential is calculated with the Nernst equation, in which the activity coefficients are fitted to an exponential function using experimental data. On the other hand, the two main mechanisms that produce the overpotential are considered, that is the activation or charge transfer and the diffusion mechanisms. First, an isothermal model has been studied in order to show the behavior of the main phenomena. A more complex model has also been studied including thermal behavior. This model is very useful in the case of traction batteries in electric and hybrid vehicles where high current intensities appear. Some simulation results are also presented in order to show the accuracy of the proposed models.

  6. Producing high-accuracy lattice models from protein atomic coordinates including side chains.

    PubMed

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models. PMID:22934109

  7. Producing High-Accuracy Lattice Models from Protein Atomic Coordinates Including Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models. PMID:22934109

  8. RELAP5-3D Code Includes Athena Features and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard R. Schultz

    2006-07-01

    Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, sf6, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5- 3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper.

  9. RELAP5-3D Code Includes ATHENA Features and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, Richard A.; Davis, Cliff B.; Schultz, Richard R.

    2006-07-01

    Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, SF{sub 6}, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5-3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  10. Double-gate junctionless transistor model including short-channel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, B. C.; Ávila-Herrera, F.; Cerdeira, A.; Pavanello, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a physically based model for double-gate junctionless transistors (JLTs), continuous in all operation regimes. To describe short-channel transistors, short-channel effects (SCEs), such as increase of the channel potential due to drain bias, carrier velocity saturation and mobility degradation due to vertical and longitudinal electric fields, are included in a previous model developed for long-channel double-gate JLTs. To validate the model, an analysis is made by using three-dimensional numerical simulations performed in a Sentaurus Device Simulator from Synopsys. Different doping concentrations, channel widths and channel lengths are considered in this work. Besides that, the series resistance influence is numerically included and validated for a wide range of source and drain extensions. In order to check if the SCEs are appropriately described, besides drain current, transconductance and output conductance characteristics, the following parameters are analyzed to demonstrate the good agreement between model and simulation and the SCEs occurrence in this technology: threshold voltage (VTH), subthreshold slope (S) and drain induced barrier lowering.

  11. Model of accelerating voltage pulse in DARHT-2 including Metglas saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Thoma, Carsten

    2003-10-01

    The DARHT-2 facility (Los Alamos National Laboratory) accelerates a 2 microsecond electron beam using a series of inductive accelerating cells. The cell inductance is provided by large Metglas cores, which are driven by a pulse-forming network (PFN). We have developed a model for this circuit which includes the nonlinear and spatially varying behavior of the Metglas. Data from experiments in which a capacitor was discharged through a Metglas core are used to develop a hysteresis model, based on the Hodgdon [Ref.1] theory of ferromagnetic materials. The resulting model is used in calculations of the output of the DARHT PFN, and comparison is made to experiments in which the PFN was terminated in a dummy resistive load. 1. M. L. Hodgdon, "Mathematical Theory and Calculations of Magnetic Hysteresis Curves", IEEE Trans. Magn., v. MAG-24, n. 6, pp. 3120-2, Nov. 1988.

  12. Modeling relationships between use and nonuse values for surface water quality: A meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Robert J.; Besedin, Elena Y.; Wardwell, Ryan F.

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes a meta-analysis conducted to estimate relationships between the nonuse components of WTP for surface water quality improvements and a combination of resource, context, and study design attributes, where these attributes include estimated use values for identical improvements. Results are contrasted across four different statistical approaches: ordinary least squares, weighted least squares, multilevel models, and simultaneous equation models. Findings illustrate robust, systematic relationships between a variety of attributes and estimated nonuse WTP, in addition to a systematic empirical relationship between use and nonuse values. Results are promising with regard to the ability of meta-analysis to synthesize information regarding nonuse WTP for water quality improvements and to reveal relationships unapparent from individual stated preference models.

  13. SPheno 3.1: extensions including flavour, CP-phases and models beyond the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, W.; Staub, F.

    2012-11-01

    We describe recent extensions of the program SPhenoincluding flavour aspects, CP-phases, R-parity violation and low energy observables. In case of flavour mixing all masses of supersymmetric particles are calculated including the complete flavour structure and all possible CP-phases at the 1-loop level. We give details on implemented seesaw models, low energy observables and the corresponding extension of the SUSY Les Houches Accord. Moreover, we comment on the possibilities to include MSSM extensions in SPheno. Catalogue identifier: ADRV_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRV_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 154062 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1336037 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran95. Computer: PC running under Linux, should run in every Unix environment. Operating system: Linux, Unix. Classification: 11.6. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRV_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 153(2003)275 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The first issue is the determination of the masses and couplings of supersymmetric particles in various supersymmetric models, the R-parity conserved MSSM with generation mixing and including CP-violating phases, various seesaw extensions of the MSSM and the MSSM with bilinear R-parity breaking. Low energy data on Standard Model fermion masses, gauge couplings and electroweak gauge boson masses serve as constraints. Radiative corrections from supersymmetric particles to these inputs must be calculated. Theoretical constraints on the soft SUSY breaking parameters from a high scale theory are imposed and the parameters at the electroweak scale are obtained from the

  14. Utilization of hierarchical, stochastic relationship modeling for Hangul character recognition.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Won; Kim, Jin H

    2004-09-01

    In structural character recognition, a character is usually viewed as a set of strokes and the spatial relationships between them. Therefore, strokes and their relationships should be properly modeled for effective character representation. For this purpose, we propose a modeling scheme by which strokes as well as relationships are stochastically represented by utilizing the hierarchical characteristics of target characters. A character is defined by a multivariate random variable over the components and its probability distribution is learned from a training data set. To overcome difficulties of the learning due to the high order of the probability distribution (a problem of curse of dimensionality), the probability distribution is factorized and approximated by a set of lower-order probability distributions by applying the idea of relationship decomposition recursively to components and subcomponents. Based on the proposed method, a handwritten Hangul (Korean) character recognition system is developed. Recognition experiments conducted on a public database show the effectiveness of the proposed relationship modeling. The recognition accuracy increased by 5.5 percent in comparison to the most successful system ever reported. PMID:15742893

  15. Dimer linkage structure in retroviruses: models that include both duplex and quadruplex domains.

    PubMed

    Zarudnaya, M I; Kolomiets, I M; Potyahaylo, A L; Hovorun, D M

    2005-01-01

    Genome of all known retroviruses consists of two identical molecules of RNA, which are non-covalently linked. The most stable contact site between two RNA molecules is located near their 5' ends. The molecular interactions in the dimer linkage structure (DLS) in mature virions are currently unknown. Recently we suggested that the dimer linkage structure in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) contains both duplex and quadruplex domains and proposed a model of DLS in HIV-1Mal (Central African virus). In this paper we showed that similar models can be also built for HIV- 1Lai, a representative of the North-American and European viruses. One of the double-stranded domains in the model structures represents either an extended duplex formed by different pathways (through base pair melting and subsequent reannealing or by a recombination mechanism) or kissing loop complex. The quadruplexes contain both G- and mixed tetrads, for example, G.C.G.C or A.U.A.U. Phylogenetic analysis of 350 isolates from NCBI database showed that similar models of DLS are predictable practically for all HIV-1 isolates surveyed. A model of dimer linkage structure in Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MuSV) is also presented. The structure includes a duplex formed by the palindromic sequences and several quadruplexes. PMID:16335231

  16. Sensitivity of an atmospheric photochemistry model to chlorine perturbations including consideration of uncertainty propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Models of stratospheric photochemistry are generally tested by comparing their predictions for the composition of the present atmosphere with measurements of species concentrations. These models are then used to make predictions of the atmospheric sensitivity to perturbations. Here the problem of the sensitivity of such a model to chlorine perturbations ranging from the present influx of chlorine-containing compounds to several times that influx is addressed. The effects of uncertainties in input parameters, including reaction rate coefficients, cross sections, solar fluxes, and boundary conditions, are evaluated using a Monte Carlo method in which the values of the input parameters are randomly selected. The results are probability distributions for present atmosheric concentrations and for calculated perturbations due to chlorine from fluorocarbons. For more than 300 Monte Carlo runs the calculated ozone perturbation for continued emission of fluorocarbons at today's rates had a mean value of -6.2 percent, with a 1-sigma width of 5.5 percent. Using the same runs but only allowing the cases in which the calculated present atmosphere values of NO, NO2, and ClO at 25 km altitude fell within the range of measurements yielded a mean ozone depletion of -3 percent, with a 1-sigma deviation of 2.2 percent. The model showed a nonlinear behavior as a function of added fluorocarbons. The mean of the Monte Carlo runs was less nonlinear than the model run using mean value of the input parameters.

  17. Multiple tail models including inverse measures for structural design under uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Palaniappan

    Sampling-based reliability estimation with expensive computer models may be computationally prohibitive due to a large number of required simulations. One way to alleviate the computational expense is to extrapolate reliability estimates from observed levels to unobserved levels. Classical tail modeling techniques provide a class of models to enable this extrapolation using asymptotic theory by approximating the tail region of the cumulative distribution function (CDF). This work proposes three alternate tail extrapolation techniques including inverse measures that can complement classical tail modeling. The proposed approach, multiple tail models, applies the two classical and three alternate extrapolation techniques simultaneously to estimate inverse measures at the extrapolation regions and use the median as the best estimate. It is observed that the range of the five estimates can be used as a good approximation of the error associated with the median estimate. Accuracy and computational efficiency are competing factors in selecting sample size. Yet, as our numerical studies reveal, the accuracy lost to the reduction of computational power is very small in the proposed method. The method is demonstrated on standard statistical distributions and complex engineering examples.

  18. Modeling the relationship between land use and surface water quality.

    PubMed

    Tong, Susanna T Y; Chen, Wenli

    2002-12-01

    It is widely known that watershed hydrology is dependent on many factors, including land use, climate, and soil conditions. But the relative impacts of different types of land use on the surface water are yet to be ascertained and quantified. This research attempted to use a comprehensive approach to examine the hydrologic effects of land use at both a regional and a local scale. Statistical and spatial analyses were employed to examine the statistical and spatial relationships of land use and the flow and water quality in receiving waters on a regional scale in the State of Ohio. Besides, a widely accepted watershed-based water quality assessment tool, the Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS), was adopted to model the plausible effects of land use on water quality in a local watershed in the East Fork Little Miami River Basin. The results from the statistical analyses revealed that there was a significant relationship between land use and in-stream water quality, especially for nitrogen, phosphorus and Fecal coliform. The geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analyses identified the watersheds that have high levels of contaminants and percentages of agricultural and urban lands. Furthermore, the hydrologic and water quality modeling showed that agricultural and impervious urban lands produced a much higher level of nitrogen and phosphorus than other land surfaces. From this research, it seems that the approach adopted in this study is comprehensive, covering both the regional and local scales. It also reveals that BASINS is a very useful and reliable tool, capable of characterizing the flow and water quality conditions for the study area under different watershed scales. With little modification, these models should be able to adapt to other watersheds or to simulate other contaminants. They also can be used to study the plausible impacts of global environmental change. In addition, the information on the hydrologic

  19. DISPLAY-2: a two-dimensional shallow layer model for dense gas dispersion including complex features.

    PubMed

    Venetsanos, A G; Bartzis, J G; Würtz, J; Papailiou, D D

    2003-04-25

    A two-dimensional shallow layer model has been developed to predict dense gas dispersion, under realistic conditions, including complex features such as two-phase releases, obstacles and inclined ground. The model attempts to predict the time and space evolution of the cloud formed after a release of a two-phase pollutant into the atmosphere. The air-pollutant mixture is assumed ideal. The cloud evolution is described mathematically through the Cartesian, two-dimensional, shallow layer conservation equations for mixture mass, mixture momentum in two horizontal directions, total pollutant mass fraction (vapor and liquid) and mixture internal energy. Liquid mass fraction is obtained assuming phase equilibrium. Account is taken in the conservation equations for liquid slip and eventual liquid rainout through the ground. Entrainment of ambient air is modeled via an entrainment velocity model, which takes into account the effects of ground friction, ground heat transfer and relative motion between cloud and surrounding atmosphere. The model additionally accounts for thin obstacles effects in three ways. First a stepwise description of the obstacle is generated, following the grid cell faces, taking into account the corresponding area blockage. Then obstacle drag on the passing cloud is modeled by adding flow resistance terms in the momentum equations. Finally the effect of extra vorticity generation and entrainment enhancement behind obstacles is modeled by adding locally into the entrainment formula without obstacles, a characteristic velocity scale defined from the obstacle pressure drop and the local cloud height.The present model predictions have been compared against theoretical results for constant volume and constant flux gravity currents. It was found that deviations of the predicted cloud footprint area change with time from the theoretical were acceptably small, if one models the frictional forces between cloud and ambient air, neglecting the Richardson

  20. Relationship between Modelling Accuracy and Inflection Point Attributes of Several Equations while Modelling Stand Diameter Distributions.

    PubMed

    Duan, Aiguo; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiongqing; He, Caiyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, seven popular equations, including 3-parameter Weibull, 2-parameter Weibull, Gompertz, Logistic, Mitscherlich, Korf and R distribution, were used to model stand diameter distributions for exploring the relationship between the equations' inflection point attributes and model accuracy. A database comprised of 146 diameter frequency distributions of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantations was used to demonstrate model fitting and comparison. Results showed that the inflection points of the stand diameter cumulative percentage distribution ranged from 0.4 to 0.6, showing a 1/2 close rule. The equation's inflection point attribute was strongly related to its model accuracy. Equation with an inflection point showed much higher accuracy than that without an inflection point. The larger the effective inflection point interval of the fitting curve of the equation was, and the closer the inflection point was to 0.5 for the equations with fixed inflection points, the higher the equation's accuracy was. It could be found that the equation's inflection point had close relationship with skewness of diameter distribution and stand age, stand density, which provided a scientific basis for model selection of a stand diameter distribution for Chinese fir plantations and other tree species. PMID:26016995

  1. Relationship between Modelling Accuracy and Inflection Point Attributes of Several Equations while Modelling Stand Diameter Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Aiguo; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiongqing; He, Caiyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, seven popular equations, including 3-parameter Weibull, 2-parameter Weibull, Gompertz, Logistic, Mitscherlich, Korf and R distribution, were used to model stand diameter distributions for exploring the relationship between the equations’ inflection point attributes and model accuracy. A database comprised of 146 diameter frequency distributions of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) plantations was used to demonstrate model fitting and comparison. Results showed that the inflection points of the stand diameter cumulative percentage distribution ranged from 0.4 to 0.6, showing a 1/2 close rule. The equation’s inflection point attribute was strongly related to its model accuracy. Equation with an inflection point showed much higher accuracy than that without an inflection point. The larger the effective inflection point interval of the fitting curve of the equation was, and the closer the inflection point was to 0.5 for the equations with fixed inflection points, the higher the equation’s accuracy was. It could be found that the equation’s inflection point had close relationship with skewness of diameter distribution and stand age, stand density, which provided a scientific basis for model selection of a stand diameter distribution for Chinese fir plantations and other tree species. PMID:26016995

  2. HPTAM, a two-dimensional Heat Pipe Transient Analysis Model, including the startup from a frozen state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional Heat Pipe Transient Analysis Model, 'HPTAM,' was developed to simulate the transient operation of fully-thawed heat pipes and the startup of heat pipes from a frozen state. The model incorporates: (a) sublimation and resolidification of working fluid; (b) melting and freezing of the working fluid in the porous wick; (c) evaporation of thawed working fluid and condensation as a thin liquid film on a frozen substrate; (d) free-molecule, transition, and continuum vapor flow regimes, using the Dusty Gas Model; (e) liquid flow and heat transfer in the porous wick; and (f) thermal and hydrodynamic couplings of phases at their respective interfaces. HPTAM predicts the radius of curvature of the liquid meniscus at the liquid-vapor interface and the radial location of the working fluid level (liquid or solid) in the wick. It also includes the transverse momentum jump condition (capillary relationship of Pascal) at the liquid-vapor interface and geometrically relates the radius of curvature of the liquid meniscus to the volume fraction of vapor in the wick. The present model predicts the capillary limit and partial liquid recess (dryout) in the evaporator wick, and incorporates a liquid pooling submodel, which simulates accumulation of the excess liquid in the vapor core at the condenser end.

  3. An extended gene protein/products boolean network model including post-transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Networks Biology allows the study of complex interactions between biological systems using formal, well structured, and computationally friendly models. Several different network models can be created, depending on the type of interactions that need to be investigated. Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) are an effective model commonly used to study the complex regulatory mechanisms of a cell. Unfortunately, given their intrinsic complexity and non discrete nature, the computational study of realistic-sized complex GRNs requires some abstractions. Boolean Networks (BNs), for example, are a reliable model that can be used to represent networks where the possible state of a node is a boolean value (0 or 1). Despite this strong simplification, BNs have been used to study both structural and dynamic properties of real as well as randomly generated GRNs. Results In this paper we show how it is possible to include the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism (a key process mediated by small non-coding RNA molecules like the miRNAs) into the BN model of a GRN. The enhanced BN model is implemented in a software toolkit (EBNT) that allows to analyze boolean GRNs from both a structural and a dynamic point of view. The open-source toolkit is compatible with available visualization tools like Cytoscape and allows to run detailed analysis of the network topology as well as of its attractors, trajectories, and state-space. In the paper, a small GRN built around the mTOR gene is used to demonstrate the main capabilities of the toolkit. Conclusions The extended model proposed in this paper opens new opportunities in the study of gene regulation. Several of the successful researches done with the support of BN to understand high-level characteristics of regulatory networks, can now be improved to better understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation for example as a network-wide noise-reduction or stabilization mechanisms. PMID:25080304

  4. Mating programs including genomic relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computer mating programs have helped breeders minimize pedigree inbreeding and avoid recessive defects by mating animals with parents that have fewer common ancestors. With genomic selection, breed associations, AI organizations, and on-farm software providers could use new programs to minimize geno...

  5. Dissecting the two models of TCR structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Melvin

    2016-08-01

    There are only two comprehensive models attempting to account for the TCR structure-function relationships, referred to as the Standard or Centric model (Model I) and the Tritope model (Model II). This essay is written to analyze comparatively the two formulations of restrictive reactivity, stressing in particular the logic of each. Model I is essentially built on an analogy between the TCR and the BCR. Given a TCR with only one combining site (paratope), restrictive recognition requires that its ligand be viewed as a composite structure between the peptide and restricting element. It is this relationship that entrains a set of correlates that makes Model I untenable. Model II is predicated on the postulate that the recognition of the allele-specific determinants expressed by MHC-encoded restricting elements (R) is germline encoded and selected, whereas the recognition of peptide (P) is somatically encoded and selected. These selective pressures must operate on definable structures and this, in turn, necessitates a multiply recognitive T cell antigen receptor (TCR) with independent anti-R and anti-P paratopes that function coherently to signal restrictive reactivity. The consequences of this "two repertoire" postulate give us a concept of TCR structure quite distinct from that at present generally accepted, as well as a surprising relationship between numbers of functional TCR V gene segments and allele-specific determinants in the species. In the end, both models must deal with the relationship between the epitope-paratope interaction(s) and the signals to the T cell necessary for its differentiation and function. PMID:27114367

  6. Neural network modelling of non-linear hydrological relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahart, R. J.; See, L. M.

    2007-09-01

    Two recent studies have suggested that neural network modelling offers no worthwhile improvements in comparison to the application of weighted linear transfer functions for capturing the non-linear nature of hydrological relationships. The potential of an artificial neural network to perform simple non-linear hydrological transformations under controlled conditions is examined in this paper. Eight neural network models were developed: four full or partial emulations of a recognised non-linear hydrological rainfall-runoff model; four solutions developed on an identical set of inputs and a calculated runoff coefficient output. The use of different input combinations enabled the competencies of solutions developed on a reduced number of parameters to be assessed. The selected hydrological model had a limited number of inputs and contained no temporal component. The modelling process was based on a set of random inputs that had a uniform distribution and spanned a modest range of possibilities. The initial cloning operations permitted a direct comparison to be performed with the equation-based relationship. It also provided more general information about the power of a neural network to replicate mathematical equations and model modest non-linear relationships. The second group of experiments explored a different relationship that is of hydrological interest; the target surface contained a stronger set of non-linear properties and was more challenging. Linear modelling comparisons were performed against traditional least squares multiple linear regression solutions developed on identical datasets. The reported results demonstrate that neural networks are capable of modelling non-linear hydrological processes and are therefore appropriate tools for hydrological modelling.

  7. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    PubMed

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. PMID:27317615

  8. Relationship duration moderates associations between attachment and relationship quality: meta-analytic support for the temporal adult romantic attachment model.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Benjamin W; Smith, C Veronica; Webster, Gregory D

    2014-02-01

    Although research has examined associations between attachment dimensions and relationship outcomes, theory has ignored how these associations change over time in adult romantic relationships. We proposed the Temporal Adult Romantic Attachment (TARA) model, which predicts that the negative associations between anxious and avoidant attachment on one hand and relationship satisfaction and commitment on the other will be more negative as relationship durations increase. Meta-analyses largely confirmed that negative associations between both insecure attachment dimensions and both relationship outcomes were more negative among longer relationship durations in cross-sectional samples. We also explored gender differences in these associations. The present review not only integrates the literature on adult attachment and romantic relationship satisfaction/commitment but also highlights the importance of relationship duration as a key moderator of the associations among these variables. We discuss the broad implications of these effects and our meta-analytic findings for the TARA model, attachment theory, and romantic relationships. PMID:24026179

  9. Modeling the Relationships between Subdimensions of Environmental Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Murat; Akilli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the relationships between subdimensions of environmental literacy using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). The study was conducted by the analysis of students' answers to questionnaires data using SEM. Initially, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin and Bartlett's tests were done to test appropriateness of subdimensions to…

  10. Cultivating Knowledge Sharing through the Relationship Management Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Valerie A.; Hatzakis, Tally; Lycett, Mark; Macredie, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the relationship management maturity model (RMMM), the output of an initiative aimed at bridging the gap between business units and the IT organisation. It does this through improving and assessing knowledge sharing between business and IT staff in Finco, a large financial…

  11. Aging and Interdependence: A Theoretical Model for Close Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary

    This paper demonstrates the utility of interdependence theory for understanding older persons' social relationships. Using friendship as an exemplary case, a model of expectations for and reactions to social exchanges is described. Exchanges which are perceived to be motivated by obligation are distinguished from those which are perceived to…

  12. Violence in Young Adolescents' Relationships: A Path Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Wendy L.; Proulx, Jocelyn B.

    2008-01-01

    A structural equation model based on social cognitive theory was used to predict relationship violence from young adolescents' knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes, and alternative conflict strategies (n = 143 male and 147 female grade 7-9 students). A direct causal effect was supported for violence-tolerant attitudes and psychologically aggressive…

  13. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system including auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1993-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotor-dynamic model and assess the dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing rotor system which includes the effects of auxiliary bearings. Of particular interest is the effects of introducing sideloading into such a system during failure of the magnetic bearing. A model is developed from an experimental test facility and a number of simulation studies are performed. These results are presented and discussed.

  14. A model for Huanglongbing spread between citrus plants including delay times and human intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilamiu, Raphael G. d'A.; Ternes, Sonia; Braga, Guilherme A.; Laranjeira, Francisco F.

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this work was to present a compartmental deterministic mathematical model for representing the dynamics of HLB disease in a citrus orchard, including delay in the disease's incubation phase in the plants, and a delay period on the nymphal stage of Diaphorina citri, the most important HLB insect vector in Brazil. Numerical simulations were performed to assess the possible impacts of human detection efficiency of symptomatic plants, as well as the influence of a long incubation period of HLB in the plant.

  15. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of the Pressing Section of a Paper Machine Including Dynamic Capillary Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Printsypar, G.; Iliev, O.; Rief, S.

    2011-12-01

    Paper production is a challenging problem which attracts attention of many scientists. The process which is of our interest takes place in the pressing section of a paper machine. The paper layer is dried by means of the pressing it against fabrics, i.e. press felts. The paper-felt sandwich is transported through the press nips at high speed (for more details see [3]). Since the natural drainage of water in the felts is much longer than the drying in the pressing section we include in the consideration the dynamic capillary effect. The dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relation proposed by Hassanizadeh and Gray (see [2]) is adopted for the pressing process. One of the other issues which is taken into account while modeling the pressing section is the appearance of fully saturated regions. We include in consideration two flow regimes: the one-phase water flow and the two-phase air-water flow. It leads to a free boundary problem. We also account for the complexity of the paper-felt sandwich porous structure. Apart from the two flow regimes the computational domain is divided by layers into nonoverlapping subdomains. Then, the system of equations describing transport processes in the pressing section is stated taking into account all these features. The presented model is discretized by the finite volume method. We carry out some numerical experiments for different configurations of the pressing section (roll press, shoe press) and for parameters which are typical for paper-felt sandwich during the paper production process. The experiments show that the dynamic capillary effect has a significant influence on the distribution of pressure even for small values of the material coefficient (see Fig. 1). The obtained results are in agreement with laboratory experiment performed in [1], which states that the distribution of the pressure is not symmetric with the maximum value occurring in front of the center of the pressing nip and the minimum value less than entry

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRODUCT MODEL FOR CUT-AND-COVER TUNNELS INCLUDING DEGRADATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruga, Takashi; Yabuki, Nobuyoshi; Arai, Yasushi

    Cut-and-Cover tunnels are constructed on site. The various conditions of environments and techniques of construction make a significant influence on the quality of the tunnel. It is extremely difficult to rebuild the tunnel even if a structural trouble is found once the construction is completed. Thus, suitable maintenance is needed to ensure the tunnel is in a healthy condition. To execute better maintenance, the information on design and construction of the tunnel is vital for inspection of degradation, estimation of occurrence factors and planning of repair or refurbishing works. In this paper, we developed a product model for representing cut-and-cover tunnels including degradations for effective information use in maintenance work. As its first step, we investigated the characteristics of cut-and-cover tunnels and degradations about reinforced concrete members and developed a conceptual model. Then, we implemented the conceptual product model by expanding Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Finally, we verified the product model by applying it to a simple tunnel.

  17. A multiscale model for glioma spread including cell-tissue interactions and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Engwer, Christian; Knappitsch, Markus; Surulescu, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Glioma is a broad class of brain and spinal cord tumors arising from glia cells, which are the main brain cells that can develop into neoplasms. They are highly invasive and lead to irregular tumor margins which are not precisely identifiable by medical imaging, thus rendering a precise enough resection very difficult. The understanding of glioma spread patterns is hence essential for both radiological therapy as well as surgical treatment. In this paper we propose a multiscale model for glioma growth including interactions of the cells with the underlying tissue network, along with proliferative effects. Our current accounting for two subpopulations of cells to accomodate proliferation according to the go-or-grow dichtomoty is an extension of the setting in [16]. As in that paper, we assume that cancer cells use neuronal fiber tracts as invasive pathways. Hence, the individual structure of brain tissue seems to be decisive for the tumor spread. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is able to provide such information, thus opening the way for patient specific modeling of glioma invasion. Starting from a multiscale model involving subcellular (microscopic) and individual (mesoscale) cell dynamics, we perform a parabolic scaling to obtain an approximating reaction-diffusion-transport equation on the macroscale of the tumor cell population. Numerical simulations based on DTI data are carried out in order to assess the performance of our modeling approach. PMID:27105989

  18. Studies of Arctic stratospheric ozone in a 2-D model including some effects of zonal asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Isaksen, I.S.A.; Rognerud, B.; Stordal, F. ); Coffey, M.T.; Mankin, W.G. )

    1990-03-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged chemistry-transport model of the stratosphere has been extended to include some zonally asymmetric effects to study the chemically disturbed conditions in the Arctic winter during the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The model allows air parcels that have been in PSCs in the polar night to be exposed to sunlight during the passage south through a wave trough. Large enhancements of ClO are estimated as well as significant ozone reductions, most pronounced around the 20 km height level. The ozone depletions maximize in late March, about one month after the cease in PSC activity in the model, and amount to 5-8% in column ozone at 70{degree}N. In agreement with column measurements made from the DC-8, the model estimates an increase in the columns of HNO{sub 3} and ClONO{sub 2}, and a decrease in the HCl column within the polar vortex.

  19. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    PubMed

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch. PMID:19630504

  20. A laboratory model of the aortic root flow including the coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Fortini, Stefania; Espa, Stefania; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular flows have been extensively investigated by means of in vitro models to assess the prosthetic valve performances and to provide insight into the fluid dynamics of the heart and proximal aorta. In particular, the models for the study of the flow past the aortic valve have been continuously improved by including, among other things, the compliance of the vessel and more realistic geometries. The flow within the sinuses of Valsalva is known to play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the aortic valve since they host a recirculation region that interacts with the leaflets. The coronary arteries originate from the ostia located within two of the three sinuses, and their presence may significantly affect the fluid dynamics of the aortic root. In spite of their importance, to the extent of the authors' knowledge, coronary arteries were not included so far when modeling in vitro the transvalvular aortic flow. We present a pulse duplicator consisting of a passively pulsing ventricle, a compliant proximal aorta, and coronary arteries connected to the sinuses of Valsalva. The coronary flow is modulated by a self-regulating device mimicking the physiological mechanism, which is based on the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle during the cardiac cycle. Results show that the model reproduces satisfyingly the coronary flow. The analysis of the time evolution of the velocity and vorticity fields within the aortic root reveals the main characteristics of the backflow generated through the aorta in order to feed the coronaries during the diastole. Experiments without coronary flow have been run for comparison. Interestingly, the lifetime of the vortex forming in the sinus of Valsalva during the systole is reduced by the presence of the coronaries. As a matter of fact, at the end of the systole, that vortex is washed out because of the suction generated by the coronary flow. Correspondingly, the valve closure is delayed and faster compared to the case with

  1. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases. PMID:22194308

  2. Including sugar cane in the agro-ecosystem model ORCHIDEE-STICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, A.; Vuichard, N.; Ciais, P.; Viovy, N.

    2010-12-01

    With 4 million ha currently grown for ethanol in Brazil only, approximately half the global bioethanol production in 2005 (Smeets 2008), and a devoted land area expected to expand globally in the years to come, sugar cane is at the heart of the biofuel debate. Indeed, ethanol made from biomass is currently the most widespread option for alternative transportation fuels. It was originally promoted as a carbon neutral energy resource that could bring energy independence to countries and local opportunities to farmers, until attention was drawn to its environmental and socio-economical drawbacks. It is still not clear to which extent it is a solution or a contributor to climate change mitigation. Dynamic Global Vegetation models can help address these issues and quantify the potential impacts of biofuels on ecosystems at scales ranging from on-site to global. The global agro-ecosystem model ORCHIDEE describes water, carbon and energy exchanges at the soil-atmosphere interface for a limited number of natural and agricultural vegetation types. In order to integrate agricultural management to the simulations and to capture more accurately the specificity of crops' phenology, ORCHIDEE has been coupled with the agronomical model STICS. The resulting crop-oriented vegetation model ORCHIDEE-STICS has been used so far to simulate temperate crops such as wheat, corn and soybean. As a generic ecosystem model, each grid cell can include several vegetation types with their own phenology and management practices, making it suitable to spatial simulations. Here, ORCHIDEE-STICS is altered to include sugar cane as a new agricultural Plant functional Type, implemented and parametrized using the STICS approach. An on-site calibration and validation is then performed based on biomass and flux chamber measurements in several sites in Australia and variables such as LAI, dry weight, heat fluxes and respiration are used to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate the specific

  3. The Relationships Between Modelling and Argumentation from the Perspective of the Model of Modelling Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Mendonça, Paula Cristina; Justi, Rosária

    2013-09-01

    Some studies related to the nature of scientific knowledge demonstrate that modelling is an inherently argumentative process. This study aims at discussing the relationship between modelling and argumentation by analysing data collected during the modelling-based teaching of ionic bonding and intermolecular interactions. The teaching activities were planned from the transposition of the main modelling stages that constitute the 'Model of Modelling Diagram' so that students could experience each of such stages. All the lessons were video recorded and their transcriptions supported the elaboration of case studies for each group of students. From the analysis of the case studies, we identified argumentative situations when students performed all of the modelling stages. Our data show that the argumentative situations were related to sense making, articulating and persuasion purposes, and were closely related to the generation of explanations in the modelling processes. They also show that representations are important resources for argumentation. Our results are consistent with some of those already reported in the literature regarding the relationship between modelling and argumentation, but are also divergent when they show that argumentation is not only related to the model evaluation phase.

  4. Distinguishing sediment waves from slope failure deposits: Field examples, including the 'humboldt slide', and modelling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, H.J.; Syvitski, J.P.M.; Parker, G.; Orange, Daniel L.; Locat, J.; Hutton, E.W.H.; Imran, J.

    2002-01-01

    Migrating sediment waves have been reported in a variety of marine settings, including submarine levee-fan systems, floors of fjords, and other basin or continental slope environments. Examination of such wave fields reveals nine diagnostic characteristics. When these characteristics are applied to several features previously attributed to submarine landslide deformation, they suggest that the features should most likely be reinterpreted as migrating sediment-wave fields. Sites that have been reinterpreted include the 'Humboldt slide' on the Eel River margin in northern California, the continental slope in the Gulf of Cadiz, the continental shelf off the Malaspina Glacier in the Gulf of Alaska, and the Adriatic shelf. A reassessment of all four features strongly suggests that numerous turbidity currents, separated by intervals of ambient hemipelagic sedimentation, deposited the wave fields over thousands of years. A numerical model of hyperpycnal discharge from the Eel River, for example, shows that under certain alongshore-current conditions, such events can produce turbidity currents that flow across the 'Humboldt slide', serving as the mechanism for the development of migrating sediment waves. Numerical experiments also demonstrate that where a series of turbidity currents flows across a rough seafloor (i.e. numerical steps), sediment waves can form and migrate upslope. Hemipelagic sedimentation between turbidity current events further facilitates the upslope migration of the sediment waves. Physical modelling of turbidity currents also confirms the formation and migration of seafloor bedforms. The morphologies of sediment waves generated both numerically and physically in the laboratory bear a strong resemblance to those observed in the field, including those that were previously described as submarine landslides.

  5. Jet Noise Modeling for Coannular Nozzles Including the Effects of Chevrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Development of good predictive models for jet noise has always been plagued by the difficulty in obtaining good quality data over a wide range of conditions in different facilities.We consider such issues very carefully in selecting data to be used in developing our model. Flight effects are of critical importance, and none of the means of determining them are without significant problems. Free-jet flight simulation facilities are very useful, and can provide meaningful data so long as they can be analytically transformed to the flight frame of reference. In this report we show that different methodologies used by NASA and industry to perform this transformation produce very different results, especially in the rear quadrant; this compels us to rely largely on static data to develop our model, but we show reasonable agreement with simulated flight data when these transformation issues are considered. A persistent problem in obtaining good quality data is noise generated in the experimental facility upstream of the test nozzle: valves, elbows, obstructions, and especially the combustor can contribute significant noise, and much of this noise is of a broadband nature, easily confused with jet noise. Muffling of these sources is costly in terms of size as well as expense, and it is particularly difficult in flight simulation facilities, where compactness of hardware is very important, as discussed by Viswanathan (Ref. 13). We feel that the effects of jet density on jet mixing noise may have been somewhat obscured by these problems, leading to the variable density exponent used in most jet noise prediction procedures including our own. We investigate this issue, applying Occam s razor, (e.g., Ref. 14), in a search for the simplest physically meaningful model that adequately describes the observed phenomena. In a similar vein, we see no reason to reject the Lighthill approach; it provides a very solid basis upon which to build a predictive procedure, as we believe we

  6. Boundary element modeling of earthquake site effects including the complete incident wavefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    Numerical modeling of earthquake site effects in realistic, three-dimensional structures, including high frequencies, low surface velocities and surface topography, has not been possible simply because the amount of computer memory constrains the number of grid points available. In principle, this problem is reduced in the Boundary Element Method (BEM) since only the surface of the velocity discontinuity is discretized; wave propagation both inside and outside this boundary is computed analytically. Equivalent body forces are determined on the boundary by solving a matrix equation containing frequency-domain displacement and stress Green's functions from every point on the boundary to every other point. This matrix problem has imposed a practical limit on the size or maximum frequency of previous BEM models. Although the matrix can be quite large, it also seems to be fairly sparse. We have used iterative matrix algorithms of the PETSc package and direct solution algorithms of the ScaLAPACK on the massively parallel supercomputers at Cornell, San Diego and Michigan. Preconditioning has been applied using blockwise ILU decomposition for the iterative approach or LU decomposition for the direct approach. The matrix equation is solved using the GMRES method for the iterative approach and a tri-diagonal solver for the direct approach. Previous BEM applications typically have assumed a single, incident plane wave. However, it is clear that for more realistic ground motion simulations, we need to consider the complete incident wavefield. If we assume that the basin or three-dimensional structure of interest is embedded in a surrounding plane-layered medium, we may use the propagator matrix method to solve for the displacements and stresses at depth on the boundary. This is done in the frequency domain with integration over wavenumber so that all P, S, mode conversions, reverberations and surface waves are included. The Boundary Element Method succeeds in modeling

  7. Expanded rock blast modeling capabilities of DMC{_}BLAST, including buffer blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Preece, D.S.; Tidman, J.P.; Chung, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    A discrete element computer program named DMC{_}BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting. This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in 2-D. DMC{_}BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts. The blast modeling capabilities of DMC{_}BLAST have been expanded to include independently dipping geologic layers, top surface, bottom surface and pit floor. The pit can also now be defined using coordinates based on the toe of the bench. A method for modeling decked explosives has been developed which allows accurate treatment of the inert materials (stemming) in the explosive column and approximate treatment of different explosives in the same blasthole. A DMC{_}BLAST user can specify decking through a specific geologic layer with either inert material or a different explosive. Another new feature of DMC{_}BLAST is specification of an uplift angle which is the angle between the normal to the blasthole and a vector defining the direction of explosive loading on particles adjacent to the blasthole. A buffer (choke) blast capability has been added for situations where previously blasted material is adjacent to the free face of the bench preventing any significant lateral motion during the blast.

  8. Dynamic modelling and analysis of multi-machine power systems including wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabesh, Ahmadreza

    2005-11-01

    This thesis introduces a small-signal dynamic model, based on a frequency response approach, for the analysis of a multi-machine power system with special focus on an induction machine based wind farm. The proposed approach is an alternative method to the conventional eigenvalue analysis method which is widely employed for small-signal dynamic analyses of power systems. The proposed modelling approach is successfully applied and evaluated for a power system that (i) includes multiple synchronous generators, and (ii) a wind farm based on either fixed-speed, variable-speed, or doubly-fed induction machine based wind energy conversion units. The salient features of the proposed method, as compared with the conventional eigenvalue analysis method, are: (i) computational efficiency since the proposed method utilizes the open-loop transfer-function matrix of the system, (ii) performance indices that are obtainable based on frequency response data and quantitatively describe the dynamic behavior of the system, and (iii) capability to formulate various wind energy conversion unit, within a wind farm, in a modular form. The developed small-signal dynamic model is applied to a set of multi-machine study systems and the results are validated based on comparison (i) with digital time-domain simulation results obtained from PSCAD/EMTDC software tool, and (ii) where applicable with eigenvalue analysis results.

  9. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in a quintessence cosmological model: Including anisotropic stress of dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. T.; Xu, L. X.; Gui, Y. X.

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the quintessence cold dark matter model with constant equation of state and constant speed of sound in dark energy rest frame, including dark energy perturbation and its anisotropic stress. Comparing with the {Lambda}CDM model, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW)-power spectrums are affected by different background evolutions and dark energy perturbation. As we change the speed of sound from 1 to 0 in the quintessence cold dark matter model with given state parameters, it is found that the inclusion of dark energy anisotropic stress makes the variation of magnitude of the ISW source uncertain due to the anticorrelation between the speed of sound and the ratio of dark energy density perturbation contrast to dark matter density perturbation contrast in the ISW-source term. Thus, the magnitude of the ISW-source term is governed by the competition between the alterant multiple of (1+3/2xc-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}) and that of {delta}{sub de}/{delta}{sub m} with the variation of c-circumflex{sub s}{sup 2}.

  10. Analytical model for radiative transfer including the effects of a rough material interface.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Thomas E; Kellems, Anthony R

    2016-08-20

    The reflected and transmitted radiance due to a source located above a water surface is computed based on models for radiative transfer in continuous optical media separated by a discontinuous air-water interface with random surface roughness. The air-water interface is described as the superposition of random, unresolved roughness on a deterministic realization of a stochastic wave surface at resolved scales. Under the geometric optics assumption, the bidirectional reflection and transmission functions for the air-water interface are approximated by applying regular perturbation methods to Snell's law and including the effects of a random surface roughness component. Formal analytical solutions to the radiative transfer problem under the small-angle scattering approximation account for the effects of scattering and absorption as light propagates through the atmosphere and water and also capture the diffusive effects due to the interaction of light with the rough material interface that separates the two optical media. Results of the analytical models are validated against Monte Carlo simulations, and the approximation to the bidirectional reflection function is also compared to another well-known analytical model. PMID:27556978

  11. A model of force balance in Jupiter's magnetodisc including hot plasma pressure anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Achilleos, N.; Cowley, S. W. H.

    2015-12-01

    We present an iterative vector potential model of force balance in Jupiter's magnetodisc that includes the effects of hot plasma pressure anisotropy. The fiducial model produces results that are consistent with Galileo magnetic field and plasma data over the whole radial range of the model. The hot plasma pressure gradient and centrifugal forces dominate in the regions inward of ˜20 RJ and outward of ˜50 RJ, respectively, while for realistic values of the pressure anisotropy, the anisotropy current is either the dominant component or at least comparable with the hot plasma pressure gradient current in the region in between. With the inclusion of hot plasma pressure anisotropy, the ˜1.2 and ˜2.7° shifts in the latitudes of the main oval and Ganymede footprint, respectively, associated with variations over the observed range of the hot plasma parameter Kh, which is the product of hot pressure and unit flux tube volume, are comparable to the shifts observed in auroral images. However, the middle magnetosphere is susceptible to the firehose instability, with peak equatorial values of βh∥e-βh⊥e≃1 - 2, for Kh=2.0 - 2.5 × 107 Pa m T-1. For larger values of Kh,βh∥e-βh⊥e exceeds 2 near ˜25 RJ and the model does not converge. This suggests that small-scale plasmoid release or "drizzle" of iogenic plasma may often occur in the middle magnetosphere, thus forming a significant mode of plasma mass loss, alongside plasmoids, at Jupiter.

  12. Groundwater recharge in a hard rock aquifer: A conceptual model including surface-loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodhe, Allan; Bockgård, Niclas

    2006-11-01

    SummaryThe groundwater level in a fractured rock aquifer in Sweden was found to respond quickly to rainfall, although the bedrock was covered by 10-m-thick till soil. A considerable portion of the response was caused by surface loading, i.e., by the weight increase of the soil due to the addition of water from precipitation, whereas the rest reflected recharge. The hypothesis that the bedrock aquifer was recharged by vertical flow from groundwater in the overlying soil was tested with a simple recharge model, in which the bedrock-groundwater levels were simulated from the soil-groundwater and estimated surface-loading variation. The model had three parameters: the ratio between the equivalent vertical hydraulic conductivity governing the recharge and the storage coefficient of the bedrock reservoir, the recession coefficient for the bedrock-groundwater level, and the bedrock-groundwater level at which the outflow ceases. The model could be reasonably well calibrated and validated to head observations in one of two boreholes. The fit to the seasonal variation was similar when calibrating the model with or without surface loading, but surface loading had to be included to properly simulate individual recharge events. The relative temporal variation in the fluxes could be determined by the calibration. The variation in the recharge was from -10% to +25% in relation to the mean flux. The variation in the discharge was only ±1%. By applying a storage coefficient of the reservoir of 5 × 10 -4, the simulated mean recharge was about 20 mm yr -1. The results support the hypothesis that the bedrock-groundwater at the site is fed by local recharge from the overlying soil aquifer.

  13. Modelling and control of a microgrid including photovoltaic and wind generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Mohammed Touseef

    Extensive increase of distributed generation (DG) penetration and the existence of multiple DG units at distribution level have introduced the notion of micro-grid. This thesis develops a detailed non-linear and small-signal dynamic model of a microgrid that includes PV, wind and conventional small scale generation along with their power electronics interfaces and the filters. The models developed evaluate the amount of generation mix from various DGs for satisfactory steady state operation of the microgrid. In order to understand the interaction of the DGs on microgrid system initially two simpler configurations were considered. The first one consists of microalternator, PV and their electronics, and the second system consists of microalternator and wind system each connected to the power system grid. Nonlinear and linear state space model of each microgrid are developed. Small signal analysis showed that the large participation of PV/wind can drive the microgrid to the brink of unstable region without adequate control. Non-linear simulations are carried out to verify the results obtained through small-signal analysis. The role of the extent of generation mix of a composite microgrid consisting of wind, PV and conventional generation was investigated next. The findings of the smaller systems were verified through nonlinear and small signal modeling. A central supervisory capacitor energy storage controller interfaced through a STATCOM was proposed to monitor and enhance the microgrid operation. The potential of various control inputs to provide additional damping to the system has been evaluated through decomposition techniques. The signals identified to have damping contents were employed to design the supervisory control system. The controller gains were tuned through an optimal pole placement technique. Simulation studies demonstrate that the STATCOM voltage phase angle and PV inverter phase angle were the best inputs for enhanced stability boundaries.

  14. Relationship between X(5) models and the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Barea, Jose; Arias, Jose M.; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Enrique

    2010-08-15

    The connections between the X(5) models [the original X(5) using an infinite square well, X(5)-{beta}{sup 8}, X(5)-{beta}{sup 6}, X(5)-{beta}{sup 4}, and X(5)-{beta}{sup 2}], based on particular solutions of the geometrical Bohr Hamiltonian with harmonic potential in the {gamma} degree of freedom, and the interacting boson model (IBM) are explored. This work is the natural extension of the work presented in Garcia-Ramos and Arias, Phys. Rev. C 77, 054307 (2008) for the E(5) models. For that purpose, a quite general one- and two-body IBM Hamiltonian is used and a numerical fit to the different X(5) model energies is performed; then the obtained wave functions are used to calculate B(E2) transition rates. It is shown that within the IBM one can reproduce well the results for energies and B(E2) transition rates obtained with all these X(5) models, although the agreement is not so impressive as for the E(5) models. From the fitted IBM parameters the corresponding energy surface can be extracted and, surprisingly, only the X(5) case corresponds in the moderately large N limit to an energy surface very close to the one expected for a critical point, whereas the rest of models are situated a little further away.

  15. Relationships between Visual Static Models and Students' Written Solutions to Fraction Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Pence, Katie L.; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.; Westenskow, Arla; Shumway, Jessica; Jordan, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to deconstruct the relationship between visual static models and students' written solutions to fraction problems using a large sample of students' solutions. Participants in the study included 162 third-grade and 209 fourth-grade students from 17 different classrooms. Students' written responses to…

  16. The importance of including imperfect detection models in eDNA experimental design.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Janna R; Wijayawardena, Bhagya K; Sundaram, Mekala; Swihart, Robert K; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) is DNA that has been isolated from field samples, and it is increasingly used to infer the presence or absence of particular species in an ecosystem. However, the combination of sampling procedures and subsequent molecular amplification of eDNA can lead to spurious results. As such, it is imperative that eDNA studies include a statistical framework for interpreting eDNA presence/absence data. We reviewed published literature for studies that utilized eDNA where the species density was known and compared the probability of detecting the focal species to the sampling and analysis protocols. Although biomass of the target species and the volume per sample did not impact detectability, the number of field replicates and number of samples from each replicate were positively related to detection. Additionally, increased number of PCR replicates and increased primer specificity significantly increased detectability. Accordingly, we advocate for increased use of occupancy modelling as a method to incorporate effects of sampling effort and PCR sensitivity in eDNA study design. Based on simulation results and the hierarchical nature of occupancy models, we suggest that field replicates, as opposed to molecular replicates, result in better detection probabilities of target species. PMID:27037675

  17. INTERIOR MODELS OF SATURN: INCLUDING THE UNCERTAINTIES IN SHAPE AND ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Helled, Ravit; Guillot, Tristan

    2013-04-20

    The accurate determination of Saturn's gravitational coefficients by Cassini could provide tighter constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Also, occultation measurements provide important information on the planetary shape which is often not considered in structure models. In this paper we explore how wind velocities and internal rotation affect the planetary shape and the constraints on Saturn's interior. We show that within the geodetic approach the derived physical shape is insensitive to the assumed deep rotation. Saturn's re-derived equatorial and polar radii at 100 mbar are found to be 54,445 {+-} 10 km and 60,365 {+-} 10 km, respectively. To determine Saturn's interior, we use one-dimensional three-layer hydrostatic structure models and present two approaches to include the constraints on the shape. These approaches, however, result in only small differences in Saturn's derived composition. The uncertainty in Saturn's rotation period is more significant: with Voyager's 10{sup h}39{sup m} period, the derived mass of heavy elements in the envelope is 0-7 M{sub Circled-Plus }. With a rotation period of 10{sup h}32{sup m}, this value becomes <4 M{sub Circled-Plus }, below the minimum mass inferred from spectroscopic measurements. Saturn's core mass is found to depend strongly on the pressure at which helium phase separation occurs, and is estimated to be 5-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Lower core masses are possible if the separation occurs deeper than 4 Mbar. We suggest that the analysis of Cassini's radio occultation measurements is crucial to test shape models and could lead to constraints on Saturn's rotation profile and departures from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  18. A two-dimensional energy balance climate model including radiation and ice caps-albedo feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingyi, Chen; Jiping, Chao

    1984-11-01

    A simplified two-dimensional energy balance climate model including the solar and infrared radiation transports, the turbulent exchanges of heat in vertical and horizontal directions and the ice caps-albedo feedback is developed. The solutions show that if the atmosphere is considered as a grey body and the grey coefficient depends upon the distributions of absorption medium and cloudiness, both horizontal and vertical distribution of temperature are identical to the observation. On the other hand, comparing the models that the atmosphere is considered as a grey body with ones that the infrared radiation is parameterized as a linear function of temperature, as was considered by Budyko, Sellers(1969), then the results show that even though both of them can obtain the earth's surface temperature in agreement with the observation, the sensitivity of the climate to the changes of solar constant is very different. In the former case, the requirement for the ice edge to move southward from the normal 72°N to 50°N(i.e. where the glacial climate would take place) is that the solar constant should decrease by 13% to 16%. However, in the latter case, the climate is highly sensitive to the changes of solar radiation. In this case, the requirement of solar radiation occurring in the glacial climate should decrease by, 2% to 6%. According to the investigations mentioned above we must be careful when the parameterizations of the radiation and other processes are conducted in a climate model., otherwise the reliability of the results is suspicious.

  19. Effects of neurosteroids on a model membrane including cholesterol: A micropipette aspiration study.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Daniel; Sacchi, Mattia; Vena, Giulia; Galloni, Debora; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules supposed to affect membrane protein activity could strongly interact also with the lipid component of the membrane itself. Neurosteroids are amphiphilic molecules that bind to plasma membrane receptors of cells in the central nervous system but their effect on membrane is still under debate. For this reason it is interesting to investigate their effects on pure lipid bilayers as model systems. Using the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT), here we studied the effects of a neurosteroid, allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo) and of one of its isoforms, isoallopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), on the physical properties of pure lipid bilayers composed by DOPC/bSM/chol. Allo is a well-known positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptor activity while isoAllo acts as a non-competitive functional antagonist of Allo modulation. We found that Allo, when applied at nanomolar concentrations (50-200 nM) to a lipid bilayer model system including cholesterol, induces an increase of the lipid bilayer area and a decrease of the mechanical parameters. Conversely, isoAllo, decreases the lipid bilayer area and, when applied, at the same nanomolar concentrations, it does not affect significantly its mechanical parameters. We characterized the kinetics of Allo uptake by the lipid bilayer and we also discussed its aspects in relation to the slow kinetics of Allo gating effects on GABAA receptors. The overall results presented here show that a correlation exists between the modulation of Allo and isoAllo of GABAA receptor activity and their effects on a lipid bilayer model system containing cholesterol. PMID:25660752

  20. Extending the actor-partner interdependence model to include cross-informant data.

    PubMed

    van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Goncy, Elizabeth A

    2010-12-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current study indicate that romantic relationship satisfaction is associated with externalizing behavior problems among both females and males, but that both dyadic data and cross-informant reports are needed to understand this association. Not considering dyadic or cross-informant data may lead to different, and potentially misleading, claims. The findings from the current study provide clear evidence that incorporating cross-informant data in dyadic data analyses provides important new insights into understanding the association between romantic relationship functioning and individual outcomes. PMID:20719376

  1. [Relationship between two models of personality in old individuals].

    PubMed

    Calvet, Benjamin; Bricaud, Magali; Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The relationships between the seven dimensions of the Cloninger psychobiological model and the five factors of the Costa and McCrae model were examined in 54 elderly subjects from the French general population. The dimensions of temperament (novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence) and character (determination, cooperation, transcendence) from the Cloninger's model were measured by the temperament and character inventory whereas the five factors of Costa and McCrae model (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness) were evaluated using the NEO PI-R. Multiple regression analyses show that some dimensions of the temperament and character inventory predict some dimensions of the Big five and vice versa. Therefore we suggest that the Big five model could be related to brain monoaminergic activities. PMID:25515910

  2. Examining the relationship between school district size and science achievement in Texas including rural school administrator perceptions of challenges and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Matthew James

    Rural and small schools have almost one-third of all public school enrollment in America, yet typically have the fewest financial and research based resources. Educational models have been developed with either the urban or suburban school in mind, and the rural school is often left with no other alternative except this paradigm. Rural based educational resources are rare and the ability to access these resources for rural school districts almost non-existent. Federal and state based education agencies provide some rural educational based programs, but have had virtually no success in answering rural school issues. With federal and state interest in science initiatives, the challenge that rural schools face weigh in. To align with that focus, this study examined Texas middle school student achievement in science and its relationship with school district enrollment size. This study involved a sequential transformative mixed methodology with the quantitative phase driving the second qualitative portion. The quantitative research was a non-experimental causal-comparative study conducted to determine whether there is a significant difference between student achievement on the 2010 Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills 8 th grade science results and school district enrollment size. The school districts were distributed into four categories by size including: a) small districts (32-550); b) medium districts (551-1500); c) large districts (1501-6000); and d) mega-sized districts (6001-202,773). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the district averages from the 2010 TAKS 8th grade science assessment results and the four district enrollment groups. The second phase of the study was qualitative utilizing constructivism and critical theory to identify the issues facing rural and small school administrators concerning science based curriculum and development. These themes and issues were sought through a case study method and through use of semi

  3. Numerical Models of Slow Slip and Dynamic Rupture Including Dilatant Stabilization and Thermal Pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic observations indicate that slow-slip events (SSE) occur down-dip of locked megathrusts, in areas of high pore-pressure, p. We suggest that at low effective stress (σ -p) dilatancy stabilizes rate-weakening faults, whereas at higher (σ -p) thermal pressurization overwhelms dilatancy leading to dynamic slip. 2D simulations include rate-state (slip-law) friction with Linker-Dieterich normal stress effect, Segall-Rice dilatancy linked to state evolution, and heat and pore-fluid flow normal to the fault. The fault is loaded by down-dip slip at v∞ . We discretize the fault normal direction with log spacing, and employ explicit-implicit time integration to improve speed and accuracy. The governing equations involve numerous physical parameters, but relatively few non-dimensional groups. Ep={ɛ h}/ [2 {β (σ - p∞)}√ {{v{∞ }}/ {chyd}dc] and ET=({f_0Λ }/{2ρ cp})√ {{chydd_c v∞}}/{cth}2 represent dilatancy and shear heating efficiency, respectively. For a nominal set of parameters (given below), spatially uniform properties, and σ -p=1MPa, (Ep = 1.5 × 10-3, ET = 3 × 10-5), we find a series of propagating SSE, that are stabilized by dilatancy-induced drops in p at the rupture tips. For a broad range of parameters we observe slow-slip events driven by down-dip slip, with negative stress drop, as well as faster (but quasi-static) events that relax the accumulated stress. At 10 MPa effective stress, the models exhibit both SSE and dynamic ruptures. Following dynamic stress drops, a sequence of slow slip events is driven from the down-dip end of the fault, with generally increasing maximum slip-speeds. We also consider spatially variable (σ -p), ranging from 2 MPa down-dip to 10 MPa up-dip (with arctangent distribution such that 80% of the variation occurs across 20% of the fault), and uniform material properties. The models exhibit both SSE and dynamic events. Following a dynamic rupture there are initially no slow events, and the

  4. Extending the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to Include Cross-Informant Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.; Goncy, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper illustrates an extension of the APIM technique within a path analysis framework by using cross-informant data on the outcome variable. Data for the current study were derived from a sample of young adult heterosexual couples who had been in a romantic relationship for at least four months (N = 115 couples). The findings from the current…

  5. Fast hybrid SPECT simulation including efficient septal penetration modelling (SP-PSF).

    PubMed

    Staelens, Steven; de Wit, Tim; Beekman, Freek

    2007-06-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are degraded by the detection of scattered photons and photons that penetrate the collimator septa. In this paper, a previously proposed Monte Carlo software that employs fast object scatter simulation using convolution-based forced detection (CFD) is extended towards a wide range of medium and high energy isotopes measured using various collimators. To this end, a fast method was developed for incorporating effects of septal penetrating (SP) photons. The SP contributions are obtained by calculating the object attenuation along the path from primary emission to detection followed by sampling a pre-simulated and scalable septal penetration point spread function (SP-PSF). We found that with only a very slight reduction in accuracy, we could accelerate the SP simulation by four orders of magnitude. To achieve this, we combined: (i) coarse sampling of the activity and attenuation distribution; (ii) simulation of the penetration only for a coarse grid of detector pixels followed by interpolation and (iii) neglection of SP-PSF elements below a certain threshold. By inclusion of this SP-PSF-based simulation it became possible to model both primary and septal penetrated photons while only 10% extra computation time was added to the CFD-based Monte Carlo simulator. As a result, a SPECT simulation of a patient-like distribution including SP now takes less than 5 s per projection angle on a dual processor PC. Therefore, the simulator is well-suited as an efficient projector for fully 3D model-based reconstruction or as a fast data-set generator for applications such as image processing optimization or observer studies. PMID:17505087

  6. Defense Economic Impact Modeling System (DEIMS). Skill Categories Included within Defense Impact Modeling System Skilled Labor Demand Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    Updated Defense Economic Impact Modeling System (DEIMS) manpower data are provided. Skilled-labor demand by job categories and industrial sectors are estimated for 163 skill categories. Both defense and non-defense demands are presented for the years 1982 to 1987. The average annual percentage growth for the time period is also estimated. Data are…

  7. Quantifying the Earthquake Clustering that Independent Sources with Stationary Rates (as Included in Current Risk Models) Can Produce.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Nyst, M.; Apel, E. V.; Muir-Wood, R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent Canterbury earthquake sequence (CES) renewed public and academic awareness concerning the clustered nature of seismicity. Multiple event occurrence in short time and space intervals is reminiscent of aftershock sequences, but aftershock is a statistical definition, not a label one can give an earthquake in real-time. Aftershocks are defined collectively as what creates the Omori event rate decay after a large event or are defined as what is taken away as "dependent events" using a declustering method. It is noteworthy that depending on the declustering method used on the Canterbury earthquake sequence, the number of independent events varies a lot. This lack of unambiguous definition of aftershocks leads to the need to investigate the amount of clustering inherent in "declustered" risk models. This is the task we concentrate on in this contribution. We start from a background source model for the Canterbury region, in which 1) centroids of events of given magnitude are distributed using a latin-hypercube lattice, 2) following the range of preferential orientations determined from stress maps and focal mechanism, 3) with length determined using the local scaling relationship and 4) rates from a and b values derived from the declustered pre-2010 catalog. We then proceed to create tens of thousands of realizations of 6 to 20 year periods, and we define criteria to identify which successions of events in the region would be perceived as a sequence. Note that the spatial clustering expected is a lower end compared to a fully uniform distribution of events. Then we perform the same exercise with rates and b-values determined from the catalog including the CES. If the pre-2010 catalog was long (or rich) enough, then the computed "stationary" rates calculated from it would include the CES declustered events (by construction, regardless of the physical meaning of or relationship between those events). In regions of low seismicity rate (e.g., Canterbury before

  8. A Thermal Evolution Model of the Earth Including the Biosphere, Continental Growth and Mantle Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höning, D.; Spohn, T.

    2014-12-01

    By harvesting solar energy and converting it to chemical energy, photosynthetic life plays an important role in the energy budget of Earth [2]. This leads to alterations of chemical reservoirs eventually affecting the Earth's interior [4]. It further has been speculated [3] that the formation of continents may be a consequence of the evolution life. A steady state model [1] suggests that the Earth without its biosphere would evolve to a steady state with a smaller continent coverage and a dryer mantle than is observed today. We present a model including (i) parameterized thermal evolution, (ii) continental growth and destruction, and (iii) mantle water regassing and outgassing. The biosphere enhances the production rate of sediments which eventually are subducted. These sediments are assumed to (i) carry water to depth bound in stable mineral phases and (ii) have the potential to suppress shallow dewatering of the underlying sediments and crust due to their low permeability. We run a Monte Carlo simulation for various initial conditions and treat all those parameter combinations as success which result in the fraction of continental crust coverage observed for present day Earth. Finally, we simulate the evolution of an abiotic Earth using the same set of parameters but a reduced rate of continental weathering and erosion. Our results suggest that the origin and evolution of life could have stabilized the large continental surface area of the Earth and its wet mantle, leading to the relatively low mantle viscosity we observe at present. Without photosynthetic life on our planet, the Earth would be geodynamical less active due to a dryer mantle, and would have a smaller fraction of continental coverage than observed today. References[1] Höning, D., Hansen-Goos, H., Airo, A., Spohn, T., 2014. Biotic vs. abiotic Earth: A model for mantle hydration and continental coverage. Planetary and Space Science 98, 5-13. [2] Kleidon, A., 2010. Life, hierarchy, and the

  9. Serverification of Molecular Modeling Applications: The Rosetta Online Server That Includes Everyone (ROSIE)

    PubMed Central

    Conchúir, Shane Ó.; Der, Bryan S.; Drew, Kevin; Kuroda, Daisuke; Xu, Jianqing; Weitzner, Brian D.; Renfrew, P. Douglas; Sripakdeevong, Parin; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J.; Kuhlman, Brian; Kortemme, Tanja; Bonneau, Richard; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Das, Rhiju

    2013-01-01

    The Rosetta molecular modeling software package provides experimentally tested and rapidly evolving tools for the 3D structure prediction and high-resolution design of proteins, nucleic acids, and a growing number of non-natural polymers. Despite its free availability to academic users and improving documentation, use of Rosetta has largely remained confined to developers and their immediate collaborators due to the code’s difficulty of use, the requirement for large computational resources, and the unavailability of servers for most of the Rosetta applications. Here, we present a unified web framework for Rosetta applications called ROSIE (Rosetta Online Server that Includes Everyone). ROSIE provides (a) a common user interface for Rosetta protocols, (b) a stable application programming interface for developers to add additional protocols, (c) a flexible back-end to allow leveraging of computer cluster resources shared by RosettaCommons member institutions, and (d) centralized administration by the RosettaCommons to ensure continuous maintenance. This paper describes the ROSIE server infrastructure, a step-by-step ‘serverification’ protocol for use by Rosetta developers, and the deployment of the first nine ROSIE applications by six separate developer teams: Docking, RNA de novo, ERRASER, Antibody, Sequence Tolerance, Supercharge, Beta peptide design, NCBB design, and VIP redesign. As illustrated by the number and diversity of these applications, ROSIE offers a general and speedy paradigm for serverification of Rosetta applications that incurs negligible cost to developers and lowers barriers to Rosetta use for the broader biological community. ROSIE is available at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. PMID:23717507

  10. PORTNEUF VALLEY, IDAHO PM-10 DISPERSION MODEL INCLUDING SECONDARY CHEMICAL FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dispersion modeling effort for the Portneuf Valley, Pocatello, Idaho PM-10 attainment demonstration is underway. The model will treat the secondary chemical formation process, primarily sulfate and nitrate formation under both the aqueous and gas phases. The model will simul...

  11. Including Overweight or Obese Students in Physical Education: A Social Ecological Constraint Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weidong; Rukavina, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we propose a social ecological constraint model to study inclusion of overweight or obese students in physical education by integrating key concepts and assumptions from ecological constraint theory in motor development and social ecological models in health promotion and behavior. The social ecological constraint model proposes…

  12. Extending Galactic Habitable Zone Modelling to Include the Emergence of Intelligent Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, I. S.; Gowanlock, M. G.

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies of the Galactic Habitable Zone (GHZ) have been concerned with identifying those regions of the Galaxy that may favour the emergence of "complex life" - typically defined to be land-based life. A planet is deemed "habitable" if it meets a set of assumed criteria for supporting the emergence of such complex life. The notion of the GHZ, and the premise that sufficient chemical evolution is required for planet formation, was quantified by Gonzalez et al. (2001). This work was later broadened to include dangers to the formation and habitability of terrestrial planets by Lineweaver et al. (2004) and then studied using a Monte Carlo simulation on the resolution of individual stars in the previous work of Gowanlock et al. (2011). The model developed in the latter work considers the stellar number density distribution and formation history of the Galaxy, planet formation mechanisms and the hazards to planetary biospheres as a result of supernova sterilization events that take place in the vicinity of the planets. Based on timescales taken from the origin and evolution of complex life on Earth, the model suggests large numbers of potentially habitable planets exist in our Galaxy, with the greatest concentration likely being towards the inner Galaxy. In this work we extend the assessment of habitability to consider the potential for life to further evolve on habitable planets to the point of intelligence - which we term the propensity for the emergence of intelligent life. We assume the propensity is strongly influenced by the time durations available for evolutionary processes to proceed undisturbed by the "resetting" effect of nearby supernovae. The model of Gowanlock et al. (2011) is used to produce a representative population of habitable planets by matching major observable properties of the Milky Way. Account is taken of the birth and death dates of each habitable planet and the timing of supernova events in each planet's vicinity. The times between

  13. Evaluation of an Impedance Model for Perforates Including the Effect of Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, J. F.; Follet, J. I.; Kelly, J. J.; Thomas, R. H.

    2000-01-01

    A new bias flow impedance model is developed for perforated plates from basic principles using as little empiricisms as possible. A quality experimental database was used to determine the predictive validity of the model. Results show that the model performs better for higher (15%) rather than lower (5%) percent open area (POA) samples. Based on the least squares ratio of numerical vs. experimental results, model predictions were on average within 20% and 30% for the higher and lower (POA), respectively. It is hypothesized on the work of other investigators that at lower POAs the higher fluid velocities in the perforate's orifices start forming unsteady vortices, which is not accounted for in our model. The numerical model, in general also underpredicts the experiments. It is theorized that the actual acoustic C(sub D) is lower than the measured raylometer C(sub D) used in the model. Using a larger C(sub D) makes the numerical model predict lower impedances. The frequency domain model derived in this paper shows very good agreement with another model derived using a time domain approach.

  14. Including slot harmonics to mechanical model of two-pole induction machine with a force actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinervo, Anssi; Arkkio, Antero

    2012-10-01

    A simple mechanical model is identified for a two-pole induction machine that has a four-pole extra winding as a force actuator. The actuator can be used to suppress rotor vibrations. Forces affecting the rotor of the induction machine are separated into actuator force, purely mechanical force due to mass unbalance, and force caused by unbalanced magnetic pull from higher harmonics and unipolar flux. The force due to higher harmonics is embedded to the mechanical model. Parameters of the modified mechanical model are identified from measurements and the modifications are shown to be necessary. The force produced by the actuator is calculated using the mechanical model, direct flux measurements, and voltage and current of the force actuator. All three methods are shown to give matching results proving that the mechanical model can be used in vibration control. The test machine is shown to have time periodic behavior and discrete Fourier analysis is used to obtain time-invariant model parameters.

  15. Modeling relationships between calving traits: a comparison between standard and recursive mixed models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of structural equation models for the analysis of recursive and simultaneous relationships between phenotypes has become more popular recently. The aim of this paper is to illustrate how these models can be applied in animal breeding to achieve parameterizations of different levels of complexity and, more specifically, to model phenotypic recursion between three calving traits: gestation length (GL), calving difficulty (CD) and stillbirth (SB). All recursive models considered here postulate heterogeneous recursive relationships between GL and liabilities to CD and SB, and between liability to CD and liability to SB, depending on categories of GL phenotype. Methods Four models were compared in terms of goodness of fit and predictive ability: 1) standard mixed model (SMM), a model with unstructured (co)variance matrices; 2) recursive mixed model 1 (RMM1), assuming that residual correlations are due to the recursive relationships between phenotypes; 3) RMM2, assuming that correlations between residuals and contemporary groups are due to recursive relationships between phenotypes; and 4) RMM3, postulating that the correlations between genetic effects, contemporary groups and residuals are due to recursive relationships between phenotypes. Results For all the RMM considered, the estimates of the structural coefficients were similar. Results revealed a nonlinear relationship between GL and the liabilities both to CD and to SB, and a linear relationship between the liabilities to CD and SB. Differences in terms of goodness of fit and predictive ability of the models considered were negligible, suggesting that RMM3 is plausible. Conclusions The applications examined in this study suggest the plausibility of a nonlinear recursive effect from GL onto CD and SB. Also, the fact that the most restrictive model RMM3, which assumes that the only cause of correlation is phenotypic recursion, performs as well as the others indicates that the phenotypic recursion

  16. Age-related Changes in Respiratory Function and Daily Living. A Tentative Model Including Psychosocial Variables, Respiratory Diseases and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Facal, David; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier

    2016-01-01

    Changes in respiratory function are common in older populations and affect quality of life, social relationships, cognitive function and functional capacity. This paper reviews evidence reported in medical and psychological journals between 2000 and 2014 concerning the impact of changes in respiratory function on daily living in older adults. A tentative model establishes relationships involving respiratory function, cognitive function and functional capacities. The conclusion stresses the need for both longitudinal studies, to establish causal pathways between respiratory function and psychosocial aspects in aging, and intervention studies. PMID:26593253

  17. A model for multi-finger HBTs including current gain collapse effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlapati, Akhil; Prasad, Sheila; Vempada, Pradeep; Munshi, Kambiz

    2003-11-01

    A common-emitter equivalent circuit model which represents both the self-heating and the current collapse as feedback from the collector current to the base-emitter voltage is developed for multi-finger InGaAs/GaAs HBTs. The modified Ebers-Moll model is verified by comparing the simulated and measured results. Good agreement is also achieved for the scattering parameters and I- V characteristics confirming the validity of the model for high frequency applications.

  18. Including effects of microstructure and anisotropy in theoretical models describing hysteresis of ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, H.; Melikhov, Y.; Jiles, D. C.

    2007-10-01

    Two recent theoretical hysteresis models (Jiles-Atherton model and energetic model) are examined with respect to their capability to describe the dependence of the magnetization on magnetic field, microstructure, and anisotropy. It is shown that the classical Rayleigh law for the behavior of magnetization at low fields and the Stoner-Wohlfarth theory of domain magnetization rotation in noninteracting magnetic single domain particles can be considered as limiting cases of a more general theoretical treatment of hysteresis in ferromagnetism.

  19. Considering complementary relationship of evaporation in Budyko's hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songjun; Shao, Weiwei

    2013-04-01

    In Budyko's hydrological model, actual evaporation was partitioned from precipitation as a function of the relative magnitude of precipitation and potential evaporation. In practice, both Penman equation and Priestley-Taylor equation have been used to estimate the potential evaporation with same Budyko curve, and they are not distinguished under Budyko framework. Nevertheless, according to the complementary relationship of evaporation, the definitions of Penman equation and Priestley-Taylor equation are absolutely different. When water availability is not limited, evaporation occurs at Priestley-Taylor's evaporation (Ew, referred to as wet environment evaporation). As the surface dries without changing the available energy, the actual and Penman's potential evaporation (Epen) rates depart from Ew with opposite changes in fluxes. So the question is: what is the difference of the Budyko's hydrological model with potential evaporation estimated by Penman or Priestley-Taylor equation? How to consider the complementary relationship in Budyko framework? In this study, for both long-term (multiyear) and annual values on water balances in the 29 non-humid catchments in the middle Yellow River Basin of China, the performances of Budyko's hydrological model with potential evaporation estimated by Epen and Ew were distinguished and compared. The catchments with larger value of Ep/Ew (ratio of Penman potential evaporation to Priestley-Taylor evaporation) are characterized with smaller evaporation ratios. The value of Ep/Ew can be served as another variable besides dryness index to partition actual evaporation from precipitation. With Priestley-Taylor equation as energy supply, an empirical formula for the parameter of the Budyko in terms of Ep/Ew and curve is proposed. Therefore, the complementary relationship of evaporation should be considered in the Budyko framework.

  20. A New Finite-Conductivity Droplet Evaporation Model Including Liquid Turbulence Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanyam, M. S.; Chen, C. P.; Trinh, H. P.

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to account for finite thermal conductivity and turbulence effects within atomizing droplets of an evaporating spray is presented in this paper. The model is an extension of the T-blob and T-TAB atomization/spray model of Trinh and Chen [9]. This finite conductivity model is based on the two-temperature film theory in which the turbulence characteristics of the droplet are used to estimate the effective thermal diffusivity for the liquid-side film thickness. Both one-way and two-way coupled calculations were performed to investigate the performance cf this model against the published experimental data.

  1. Threshold voltage model of junctionless cylindrical surrounding gate MOSFETs including fringing field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    2D Analytical model of the body center potential (BCP) in short channel junctionless Cylindrical Surrounding Gate (JLCSG) MOSFETs is developed using evanescent mode analysis (EMA). This model also incorporates the gate bias dependent inner and outer fringing capacitances due to the gate-source/drain fringing fields. The developed model provides results in good agreement with simulated results for variations of different physical parameters of JLCSG MOSFET viz. gate length, channel radius, doping concentration, and oxide thickness. Using the BCP, an analytical model for the threshold voltage has been derived and validated against results obtained from 3D device simulator.

  2. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) relationships, models, and management rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William; Hendrick, Robert; Valett, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    Over 50 individual Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) research results, extracted from a review of published SEL documentation, that can be applied directly to managing software development projects are captured. Four basic categories of results are defined and discussed - environment profiles, relationships, models, and management rules. In each category, research results are presented as a single page that summarizes the individual result, lists potential uses of the result by managers, and references the original SEL documentation where the result was found. The document serves as a concise reference summary of applicable research for SEL managers.

  3. Large Eddy simulation of turbulence: A subgrid scale model including shear, vorticity, rotation, and buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1994-06-01

    The Reynolds numbers that characterize geophysical and astrophysical turbulence (Re approximately equals 108 for the planetary boundary layer and Re approximately equals 1014 for the Sun's interior) are too large to allow a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the fundamental Navier-Stokes and temperature equations. In fact, the spatial number of grid points N approximately Re9/4 exceeds the computational capability of today's supercomputers. Alternative treatments are the ensemble-time average approach, and/or the volume average approach. Since the first method (Reynolds stress approach) is largely analytical, the resulting turbulence equations entail manageable computational requirements and can thus be linked to a stellar evolutionary code or, in the geophysical case, to general circulation models. In the volume average approach, one carries out a large eddy simulation (LES) which resolves numerically the largest scales, while the unresolved scales must be treated theoretically with a subgrid scale model (SGS). Contrary to the ensemble average approach, the LES+SGS approach has considerable computational requirements. Even if this prevents (for the time being) a LES+SGS model to be linked to stellar or geophysical codes, it is still of the greatest relevance as an 'experimental tool' to be used, inter alia, to improve the parameterizations needed in the ensemble average approach. Such a methodology has been successfully adopted in studies of the convective planetary boundary layer. Experienc e with the LES+SGS approach from different fields has shown that its reliability depends on the healthiness of the SGS model for numerical stability as well as for physical completeness. At present, the most widely used SGS model, the Smagorinsky model, accounts for the effect of the shear induced by the large resolved scales on the unresolved scales but does not account for the effects of buoyancy, anisotropy, rotation, and stable stratification. The latter phenomenon

  4. An Effective Model to Increase Student Attitude and Achievement: Narrative Including Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Akcay, Husamettin

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the analogical models and narratives used to introduce and teach Grade 9 chemical covalent compounds which are relatively abstract and difficult for students. We explained each model's development during the lessons and analyzed understanding students derived from these learning materials. In this context, achievement,…

  5. Modeled hydraulic redistribution by Helianthus annuus L. matches observed data only after model modification to include nighttime transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Rockwell, F. E.; Teshera-Levye, J.; Zwieniecki, M.; Holbrook, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical, and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, while the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two eco-types of Helianthus annuus L. in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modeling formulation developed by Ryel et al. (2002) could match experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive nighttime transpiration, and though over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that nighttime transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. (2002) formulation does not include the effect of nighttime transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of nighttime transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and nighttime stomatal behavior changed, both influencing HR.

  6. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  7. A Sheath Model for Negative Ion Sources Including the Formation of a Virtual Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, R.; King, D. B.; Surrey, E.

    2011-09-26

    A one dimensional model of the sheath between the plasma and the wall in a negative ion source has been developed. The plasma consists of positive ions, electrons and negative ions. The model takes into account the emission of negative ions from the wall into the sheath and thus represents the conditions in a caesiated ion source with surface production of negative ions. At high current densities of the emitted negative ions, the sheath is unable to support the transport of all the negative ions to the plasma and a virtual cathode is formed. This model takes this into account and allows the calculation of the transported negative ions across the sheath with the virtual cathode. The model has been extended to allow the linkage between plasma conditions at the sheath edge and the plasma to be made. Comparisons are made between the results of the model and experimental measurements.

  8. Simulated village locations in Thailand: A multi-scale model including a neural network approach

    PubMed Central

    Malanson, George P.; Entwisle, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The simulation of rural land use systems, in general, and rural settlement dynamics in particular has developed with synergies of theory and methods for decades. Three current issues are: linking spatial patterns and processes, representing hierarchical relations across scales, and considering nonlinearity to address complex non-stationary settlement dynamics. We present a hierarchical simulation model to investigate complex rural settlement dynamics in Nang Rong, Thailand. This simulation uses sub-models to allocate new villages at three spatial scales. Regional and sub-regional models, which involve a nonlinear space-time autoregressive model implemented in a neural network approach, determine the number of new villages to be established. A dynamic village niche model, establishing pattern-process link, was designed to enable the allocation of villages into specific locations. Spatiotemporal variability in model performance indicates the pattern of village location changes as a settlement frontier advances from rice-growing lowlands to higher elevations. Experiments results demonstrate this simulation model can enhance our understanding of settlement development in Nang Rong and thus gain insight into complex land use systems in this area. PMID:21399748

  9. Simulated village locations in Thailand: A multi-scale model including a neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenwu; Malanson, George P; Entwisle, Barbara

    2009-04-01

    The simulation of rural land use systems, in general, and rural settlement dynamics in particular has developed with synergies of theory and methods for decades. Three current issues are: linking spatial patterns and processes, representing hierarchical relations across scales, and considering nonlinearity to address complex non-stationary settlement dynamics. We present a hierarchical simulation model to investigate complex rural settlement dynamics in Nang Rong, Thailand. This simulation uses sub-models to allocate new villages at three spatial scales. Regional and sub-regional models, which involve a nonlinear space-time autoregressive model implemented in a neural network approach, determine the number of new villages to be established. A dynamic village niche model, establishing pattern-process link, was designed to enable the allocation of villages into specific locations. Spatiotemporal variability in model performance indicates the pattern of village location changes as a settlement frontier advances from rice-growing lowlands to higher elevations. Experiments results demonstrate this simulation model can enhance our understanding of settlement development in Nang Rong and thus gain insight into complex land use systems in this area. PMID:21399748

  10. A feedback model for leukemia including cell competition and the action of the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balea, S.; Halanay, A.; Neamtu, M.

    2014-12-01

    A mathematical model, coupling the dynamics of short-term stem-like cells and mature leukocytes in leukemia with that of the immune system, is investigated. The model is described by a system of nine delay differential equations with nine delays. Three equilibrium points E0, E1, E2 are highlighted. The stability and the existence of the Hopf bifurcation for the equilibrium points are investigated. In the analysis of the model, the rate of asymmetric division and the rate of symmetric division are very important.

  11. A physical-based pMOSFETs threshold voltage model including the STI stress effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wu; Gang, Du; Xiaoyan, Liu; Lei, Sun; Jinfeng, Kang; Ruqi, Han

    2011-05-01

    The physical threshold voltage model of pMOSFETs under shallow trench isolation (STI) stress has been developed. The model is verified by 130 nm technology layout dependent measurement data. The comparison between pMOSFET and nMOSFET model simulations due to STI stress was conducted to show that STI stress induced less threshold voltage shift and more mobility shift for the pMOSFET. The circuit simulations of a nine stage ring oscillator with and without STI stress proved about 11% improvement of average delay time. This indicates the importance of STI stress consideration in circuit design.

  12. Relationship Characteristics Associated with the Experience of Hurt in Romantic Relationships: A Test of the Relational Turbulence Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theiss, Jennifer A.; Knobloch, Leanne K.; Checton, Maria G.; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate

    2009-01-01

    We employed the relational turbulence model to identify (a) relationship characteristics associated with people's appraisals of hurtful messages, and (b) features of hurtful episodes and relationship characteristics that correspond with the directness of communication about hurt. We conducted a study in which 135 dating couples reported on their…

  13. Progress in turbulence modeling for complex flow fields including effects of compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two second-order-closure turbulence models were devised that are suitable for predicting properties of complex turbulent flow fields in both incompressible and compressible fluids. One model is of the "two-equation" variety in which closure is accomplished by introducing an eddy viscosity which depends on both a turbulent mixing energy and a dissipation rate per unit energy, that is, a specific dissipation rate. The other model is a "Reynolds stress equation" (RSE) formulation in which all components of the Reynolds stress tensor and turbulent heat-flux vector are computed directly and are scaled by the specific dissipation rate. Computations based on these models are compared with measurements for the following flow fields: (a) low speed, high Reynolds number channel flows with plane strain or uniform shear; (b) equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients or effects of compressibility; and (c) flow over a convex surface with and without a pressure gradient.

  14. A Model for Predicting Grain Boundary Cracking in Polycrystalline Viscoplastic Materials Including Scale Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; Helms, K.L.E.; Hurtado, L.D.

    1999-04-06

    A model is developed herein for predicting the mechanical response of inelastic crystalline solids. Particular emphasis is given to the development of microstructural damage along grain boundaries, and the interaction of this damage with intragranular inelasticity caused by dislocation dissipation mechanisms. The model is developed within the concepts of continuum mechanics, with special emphasis on the development of internal boundaries in the continuum by utilizing a cohesive zone model based on fracture mechanics. In addition, the crystalline grains are assumed to be characterized by nonlinear viscoplastic mechanical material behavior in order to account for dislocation generation and migration. Due to the nonlinearities introduced by the crack growth and viscoplastic constitution, a numerical algorithm is utilized to solve representative problems. Implementation of the model to a finite element computational algorithm is therefore briefly described. Finally, sample calculations are presented for a polycrystalline titanium alloy with particular focus on effects of scale on the predicted response.

  15. Investigation of Structural Dynamics in a 2-Meter Square Solar Sail Model Including Axial Load Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Virgin, L. N.; Belvin, W. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a parameter study of the effect of boom axial loading on the global dynamics of a 2-meter solar sail scale model. The experimental model used is meant for building expertise in finite element analysis and experimental execution, not as a predecessor to any planned flight mission or particular design concept. The results here are to demonstrate the ability to predict and measure structural dynamics and mode shapes in the presence of axial loading.

  16. Model and parameter uncertainty in IDF relationships under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Rupa; Saha, Ujjwal; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2015-05-01

    Quantifying distributional behavior of extreme events is crucial in hydrologic designs. Intensity Duration Frequency (IDF) relationships are used extensively in engineering especially in urban hydrology, to obtain return level of extreme rainfall event for a specified return period and duration. Major sources of uncertainty in the IDF relationships are due to insufficient quantity and quality of data leading to parameter uncertainty due to the distribution fitted to the data and uncertainty as a result of using multiple GCMs. It is important to study these uncertainties and propagate them to future for accurate assessment of return levels for future. The objective of this study is to quantify the uncertainties arising from parameters of the distribution fitted to data and the multiple GCM models using Bayesian approach. Posterior distribution of parameters is obtained from Bayes rule and the parameters are transformed to obtain return levels for a specified return period. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method using Metropolis Hastings algorithm is used to obtain the posterior distribution of parameters. Twenty six CMIP5 GCMs along with four RCP scenarios are considered for studying the effects of climate change and to obtain projected IDF relationships for the case study of Bangalore city in India. GCM uncertainty due to the use of multiple GCMs is treated using Reliability Ensemble Averaging (REA) technique along with the parameter uncertainty. Scale invariance theory is employed for obtaining short duration return levels from daily data. It is observed that the uncertainty in short duration rainfall return levels is high when compared to the longer durations. Further it is observed that parameter uncertainty is large compared to the model uncertainty.

  17. Accurate and efficient modeling of global seismic wave propagation for an attenuative Earth model including the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokuni, Genti; Takenaka, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    We propose a method for modeling global seismic wave propagation through an attenuative Earth model including the center. This method enables accurate and efficient computations since it is based on the 2.5-D approach, which solves wave equations only on a 2-D cross section of the whole Earth and can correctly model 3-D geometrical spreading. We extend a numerical scheme for the elastic waves in spherical coordinates using the finite-difference method (FDM), to solve the viscoelastodynamic equation. For computation of realistic seismic wave propagation, incorporation of anelastic attenuation is crucial. Since the nature of Earth material is both elastic solid and viscous fluid, we should solve stress-strain relations of viscoelastic material, including attenuative structures. These relations represent the stress as a convolution integral in time, which has had difficulty treating viscoelasticity in time-domain computation such as the FDM. However, we now have a method using so-called memory variables, invented in the 1980s, followed by improvements in Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary values of the quality factor (Q) can be incorporated into the wave equation via an array of Zener bodies. We also introduce the multi-domain, an FD grid of several layers with different grid spacings, into our FDM scheme. This allows wider lateral grid spacings with depth, so as not to perturb the FD stability criterion around the Earth center. In addition, we propose a technique to avoid the singularity problem of the wave equation in spherical coordinates at the Earth center. We develop a scheme to calculate wavefield variables on this point, based on linear interpolation for the velocity-stress, staggered-grid FDM. This scheme is validated through a comparison of synthetic seismograms with those obtained by the Direct Solution Method for a spherically symmetric Earth model, showing excellent accuracy for our FDM scheme. As a numerical example, we apply the method to simulate seismic

  18. Deuterium and oxygen 18 in precipitation: Isotropic model, including mixed cloud processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciais, P.; Jouzel, J.

    1994-08-01

    Modeling the isotropic ratios of precipitation in cold regions meets the problem of `switching` from the vapor-liquid transition to the vapor-ice transition at the oneset of snow formation. The one-dimensional model (mixed cloud isotopic model (MCIM)) described in this paper focuses on the fractionation of water isotopes in mixed clouds, where both liquid droplets and ice crystals can coexist for a given range of temperatures. This feature is linked to the existence of specific saturation conditions within the cloud, allowing droplets to evaporate while the water vapor condensates onto ice crystals. The isotopic composition of the different airborne phases and the precipitation is calculated throughout the condensation history of an isolated air mass moving over the Antarctic ice sheet. The results of the MCIM are compared to surface snow data both for the isotopic ratios and the deuterium excesses. The sensitivity of the model is compared to previous one-dimensional models. Our main result is that accounting specifically for the microphysics of mixed stratiform clouds (Bergeron-Findesein process) does not invalidate the results of earlier modeling studies.

  19. Including sugar cane in the agro-ecosystem model ORCHIDEE-STICS: calibration and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, A.; Vuichard, N.; Ciais, P.; Viovy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Sugarcane is currently the most efficient bioenergy crop with regards to the energy produced per hectare. With approximately half the global bioethanol production in 2005, and a devoted land area expected to expand globally in the years to come, sugar cane is at the heart of the biofuel debate. Dynamic global vegetation models coupled with agronomical models are powerful and novel tools to tackle many of the environmental issues related to biofuels if they are carefully calibrated and validated against field observations. Here we adapt the agro-terrestrial model ORCHIDEE-STICS for sugar cane simulations. Observation data of LAI are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the model to parameters of nitrogen absorption and phenology, which are calibrated in a systematic way for six sites in Australia and La Reunion. We find that the optimal set of parameters is highly dependent on the sites' characteristics and that the model can reproduce satisfactorily the evolution of LAI. This careful calibration of ORCHIDEE-STICS for sugar cane biomass production for different locations and technical itineraries provides a strong basis for further analysis of the impacts of bioenergy-related land use change on carbon cycle budgets. As a next step, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to estimate the uncertainty of the model in biomass and carbon flux simulation due to its parameterization.

  20. Breather solutions of a nonlinear DNA model including a longitudinal degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, J.; Hennig, D.

    2003-05-01

    We present a model of the DNA double helix assigning three degrees of freedom to each pair of nucleotides. The model is an extension of the Barbi-Cocco-Peyrard (BCP) model in the sense that the current model allows for longitudinal motions of the nucleotides parallel to the helix axis. The molecular structure of the double helix is modelled by a system of coupled oscillators. The nucleotides are represented by point masses and coupled via point-point interaction potentials. The latter describe the covalent and hydrogen bonds responsible for the secondary structure of DNA. We obtain breather solutions using an established method for the construction of breathers on nonlinear lattices starting from the anti-coupling limit. In order to apply this method we analyse the phonon spectrum of the linearised system corresponding to our model. The obtained breathing motion consists of a local opening and re-closing of base pairs combined with a local untwist of the helix. The motions in longitudinal direction are of much lower amplitudes than the radial and angular elongations.

  1. A weighted network model for interpersonal relationship evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Ding, Jun-Feng; Xie, Yan-Bo; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2005-08-01

    A simple model is proposed to mimic and study the evolution of interpersonal relationships in a student class. The small social group is simply assumed as an undirected and weighted graph, in which students are represented by vertices, and the depth of favor or disfavor between them are denoted by the corresponding edge weight. In our model, we find that the first impression between people has a crucial influence on the final status of student relations (i.e., the final distribution of edge weights). The system displays a phase transition in the final hostility proportion depending on the initial amity possibility. We can further define the strength of vertices to describe the individual popularity, which exhibits nonlinear evolution. Meanwhile, various nonrandom perturbations to the initial system have been investigated, and simulation results are in accord with common real-life observations.

  2. Models of professional regulation: institutionalizing an agency relationship

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of medical practice can historically be understood as a second-level agency relationship whereby the state delegated authority to professional bodies to police the primary agency relationship between the individual physician and the patient. Borow, Levi and Glekin show how different national systems vary in the degree to which they insist on institutionally insulating the agency function from the promotion of private professional interests, and relate these variations to different models of the health care state. In fact these differences have even deeper roots in different “liberal” or “coordinated” varieties of capitalist political economies. Neither model is inherently more efficient than the other: what matters is the internal coherence or logic of these systems that conditions the expectations of actors in responding to particular challenges. The territory that Borow, Levi and Glekin have usefully mapped invites further exploration in this regard. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/2/1/8. PMID:23537144

  3. A two-phase solid/fluid model for dense granular flows including dilatancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Koné, El-Hadj; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [{Iverson et al.}, 2010]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [{Bouchut et al.}, 2016]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by {Jackson} [2000] based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work [{Bouchut et al.}, 2015]. In particular, {Pitman and Le} [2005] replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's model by closing the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation following {Roux and Radjai} [1998]. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To

  4. Genomic prediction of growth in pigs based on a model including additive and dominance effects.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M S; Bastiaansen, J W M; Janss, L; Knol, E F; Bovenhuis, H

    2016-06-01

    Independent of whether prediction is based on pedigree or genomic information, the focus of animal breeders has been on additive genetic effects or 'breeding values'. However, when predicting phenotypes rather than breeding values of an animal, models that account for both additive and dominance effects might be more accurate. Our aim with this study was to compare the accuracy of predicting phenotypes using a model that accounts for only additive effects (MA) and a model that accounts for both additive and dominance effects simultaneously (MAD). Lifetime daily gain (DG) was evaluated in three pig populations (1424 Pietrain, 2023 Landrace, and 2157 Large White). Animals were genotyped using the Illumina SNP60K Beadchip and assigned to either a training data set to estimate the genetic parameters and SNP effects, or to a validation data set to assess the prediction accuracy. Models MA and MAD applied random regression on SNP genotypes and were implemented in the program Bayz. The additive heritability of DG across the three populations and the two models was very similar at approximately 0.26. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by dominance effects ranged from 0.04 (Large White) to 0.11 (Pietrain), indicating that importance of dominance might be breed-specific. Prediction accuracies were higher when predicting phenotypes using total genetic values (sum of breeding values and dominance deviations) from the MAD model compared to using breeding values from both MA and MAD models. The highest increase in accuracy (from 0.195 to 0.222) was observed in the Pietrain, and the lowest in Large White (from 0.354 to 0.359). Predicting phenotypes using total genetic values instead of breeding values in purebred data improved prediction accuracy and reduced the bias of genomic predictions. Additional benefit of the method is expected when applied to predict crossbred phenotypes, where dominance levels are expected to be higher. PMID:26676611

  5. Quantitative structure-(chromatographic) retention relationship models for dissociating compounds.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Łukasz; Wiczling, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop mathematical models relating the hydrophobicity and dissociation constant of an analyte with its structure, which would be useful in predicting analyte retention times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. For that purpose a large and diverse group of 115 drugs was used to build three QSRR models combining retention-related parameters (logkw-chromatographic measure of hydrophobicity, S-slope factor from Snyder-Soczewinski equation, and pKa) with structural descriptors calculated by means of molecular modeling for both dissociated and nondissociated forms of analytes. Lasso, Stepwise and PLS regressions were used to build statistical models. Moreover a simple QSRR equations based on lipophilicity and dissociation constant parameters calculated in the ACD/Labs software were proposed and compared with quantum chemistry-based QSRR equations. The obtained relationships were further used to predict chromatographic retention times. The predictive performances of the obtained models were assessed using 10-fold cross-validation and external validation. The QSRR equations developed were simple and were characterized by satisfactory predictive performance. Application of quantum chemistry-based and ACD-based descriptors leads to similar accuracy of retention times' prediction. PMID:26960942

  6. Results of including geometric nonlinearities in an aeroelastic model of an F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated, nonlinear simulation model suitable for aeroelastic modeling of fixed-wing aircraft has been developed. While the author realizes that the subject of modeling rotating, elastic structures is not closed, it is believed that the equations of motion developed and applied herein are correct to second order and are suitable for use with typical aircraft structures. The equations are not suitable for large elastic deformation. In addition, the modeling framework generalizes both the methods and terminology of non-linear rigid-body airplane simulation and traditional linear aeroelastic modeling. Concerning the importance of angular/elastic inertial coupling in the dynamic analysis of fixed-wing aircraft, the following may be said. The rigorous inclusion of said coupling is not without peril and must be approached with care. In keeping with the same engineering judgment that guided the development of the traditional aeroelastic equations, the effect of non-linear inertial effects for most airplane applications is expected to be small. A parameter does not tell the whole story, however, and modes flagged by the parameter as significant also need to be checked to see if the coupling is not a one-way path, i.e., the inertially affected modes can influence other modes.

  7. A model of protein translation including codon bias, nonsense errors, and ribosome recycling.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Michael A; Wagner, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    We present and analyse a model of protein translation at the scale of an individual messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript. The model we develop is unique in that it incorporates the phenomena of ribosome recycling and nonsense errors. The model conceptualizes translation as a probabilistic wave of ribosome occupancy traveling down a heterogeneous medium, the mRNA transcript. Our results show that the heterogeneity of the codon translation rates along the mRNA results in short-scale spikes and dips in the wave. Nonsense errors attenuate this wave on a longer scale while ribosome recycling reinforces it. We find that the combination of nonsense errors and codon usage bias can have a large effect on the probability that a ribosome will completely translate a transcript. We also elucidate how these forces interact with ribosome recycling to determine the overall translation rate of an mRNA transcript. We derive a simple cost function for nonsense errors using our model and apply this function to the yeast (Saccharomyces cervisiae) genome. Using this function we are able to detect position dependent selection on codon bias which correlates with gene expression levels as predicted a priori. These results indirectly validate our underlying model assumptions and confirm that nonsense errors can play an important role in shaping codon usage bias. PMID:16171830

  8. Kinetic modelling of anaerobic hydrolysis of solid wastes, including disintegration processes

    SciTech Connect

    García-Gen, Santiago; Sousbie, Philippe; Rangaraj, Ganesh; Lema, Juan M.; Rodríguez, Jorge; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Torrijos, Michel

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Fractionation of solid wastes into readily and slowly biodegradable fractions. • Kinetic coefficients estimation from mono-digestion batch assays. • Validation of kinetic coefficients with a co-digestion continuous experiment. • Simulation of batch and continuous experiments with an ADM1-based model. - Abstract: A methodology to estimate disintegration and hydrolysis kinetic parameters of solid wastes and validate an ADM1-based anaerobic co-digestion model is presented. Kinetic parameters of the model were calibrated from batch reactor experiments treating individually fruit and vegetable wastes (among other residues) following a new protocol for batch tests. In addition, decoupled disintegration kinetics for readily and slowly biodegradable fractions of solid wastes was considered. Calibrated parameters from batch assays of individual substrates were used to validate the model for a semi-continuous co-digestion operation treating simultaneously 5 fruit and vegetable wastes. The semi-continuous experiment was carried out in a lab-scale CSTR reactor for 15 weeks at organic loading rate ranging between 2.0 and 4.7 g VS/L d. The model (built in Matlab/Simulink) fit to a large extent the experimental results in both batch and semi-continuous mode and served as a powerful tool to simulate the digestion or co-digestion of solid wastes.

  9. A bone remodelling model including the effect of damage on the steering of BMUs.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reina, J; Reina, I; Domínguez, J; García-Aznar, J M

    2014-04-01

    Bone remodelling in cortical bone is performed by the so-called basic multicellular units (BMUs), which produce osteons after completing the remodelling sequence. Burger et al. (2003) hypothesized that BMUs follow the direction of the prevalent local stress in the bone. More recently, Martin (2007) has shown that BMUs must be somehow guided by microstructural damage as well. The interaction of both variables, strain and damage, in the guidance of BMUs has been incorporated into a bone remodelling model for cortical bone. This model accounts for variations in porosity, anisotropy and damage level. The bone remodelling model has been applied to a finite element model of the diaphysis of a human femur. The trajectories of the BMUs have been analysed throughout the diaphysis and compared with the orientation of osteons measured experimentally. Some interesting observations, like the typical fan arrangement of osteons near the periosteum, can be explained with the proposed remodelling model. Moreover, the efficiency of BMUs in damage repairing has been shown to be greater if BMUs are guided by damage. PMID:24445006

  10. Simulation of tumor induced angiogenesis using an analytical adaptive modeling including dynamic sprouting and blood flow modeling.

    PubMed

    Naghavi, Nadia; Hosseini, Farideh S; Sardarabadi, Mohammad; Kalani, Hadi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive model for tumor induced angiogenesis is developed that integrates generation and diffusion of a growth factor originated from hypoxic cells, adaptive sprouting from a parent vessel, blood flow and structural adaptation. The proposed adaptive sprout spacing model (ASS) determines position, time and number of sprouts which are activated from a parent vessel and also the developed vascular network is modified by a novel sprout branching prediction algorithm. This algorithm couples local vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations, stresses due to the blood flow and stochastic branching to the structural reactions of each vessel segment in response to mechanical and biochemical stimuli. The results provide predictions for the time-dependent development of the network structure, including the position and diameters of each segment and the resulting distributions of blood flow and VEGF. Considering time delays between sprout progressions and number of sprouts activated at different time durations provides information about micro-vessel density in the network. Resulting insights could be useful for motivating experimental investigations of vascular pattern in tumor induced angiogenesis and development of therapies targeting angiogenesis. PMID:27179697

  11. Finding practical phenomenological models that include both photoresist behavior and etch process effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunwook; Do, Thuy; Sturtevant, John

    2015-03-01

    For more than five decades, the semiconductor industry has overcome technology challenges with innovative ideas that have continued to enable Moore's Law. It is clear that multi-patterning lithography is vital for 20nm half pitch using 193i. Multi-patterning exposure sequences and pattern multiplication processes can create complicated tolerance accounting due to the variability associated with the component processes. It is essential to ensure good predictive accuracy of compact etch models used in multipatterning simulation. New modelforms have been developed to account for etch bias behavior at 20 nm and below. The new modeling components show good results in terms of global fitness and some improved predication capability for specific features. We've also investigated a new methodology to make the etch model aware of 3D resist profiles.

  12. An animal model to investigate effectiveness and safety of conducted energy weapons (including TASER devices).

    PubMed

    Jauchem, James R

    2010-03-01

    Conducted energy weapons (CEWs) are used by law-enforcement personnel to incapacitate individuals quickly and effectively, without causing lethality. CEWs have been deployed for relatively long or repeated exposures during law-enforcement operations. The purpose of this technical note is to describe, in detail, some aspects of an anesthetized swine model used in our laboratory and to answer specific questions related to the model. In particular, tiletamine/zolazepam-induced, propofol-maintained anesthesia appears to be a useful technique for studying effects of CEW applications on muscle contraction and blood factors such as muscle enzymes. Because effects of CEWs on breathing have not been fully elucidated, a spontaneously breathing model is preferable to one in which mechanical ventilation is supplied. Placement of the swine in a supine position may facilitate measurement of muscle contractions, without compromising other physiological parameters. PMID:20141556

  13. Callisto plasma interactions: Hybrid modeling including induction by a subsurface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindkvist, Jesper; Holmström, Mats; Khurana, Krishan K.; Fatemi, Shahab; Barabash, Stas

    2015-06-01

    By using a hybrid plasma solver (ions as particles and electrons as a fluid), we have modeled the interaction between Callisto and Jupiter's magnetosphere for variable ambient plasma parameters. We compared the results with the magnetometer data from flybys (C3, C9, and C10) by the Galileo spacecraft. Modeling the interaction between Callisto and Jupiter's magnetosphere is important to establish the origin of the magnetic field perturbations observed by Galileo and thought to be related to a subsurface ocean. Using typical upstream magnetospheric plasma parameters and a magnetic dipole corresponding to the inductive response inside the moon, we show that the model results agree well with observations for the C3 and C9 flybys, but agrees poorly with the C10 flyby close to Callisto. The study does support the existence of a subsurface ocean at Callisto.

  14. End-to-end Coronagraphic Modeling Including a Low-order Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Trauger, John T.; Unwin, Stephen C.; Traub, Wesley A.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate space-based coronagraphic techniques, end-to-end modeling is necessary to simulate realistic fields containing speckles caused by wavefront errors. Real systems will suffer from pointing errors and thermal and motioninduced mechanical stresses that introduce time-variable wavefront aberrations that can reduce the field contrast. A loworder wavefront sensor (LOWFS) is needed to measure these changes at a sufficiently high rate to maintain the contrast level during observations. We implement here a LOWFS and corresponding low-order wavefront control subsystem (LOWFCS) in end-to-end models of a space-based coronagraph. Our goal is to be able to accurately duplicate the effect of the LOWFS+LOWFCS without explicitly evaluating the end-to-end model at numerous time steps.

  15. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments including activation energies and mathematical modeling of methyl halide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, O.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Buchsteiner, A.; Wischnewski, A.

    2007-09-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were carried out using the multichopper time-of-flight spectrometer V3 at the Hahn-Meitner Institut, Germany and the backscattering spectrometer at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. Activation energies for CH3X, X =F, Cl, Br, and I, were obtained. In combination with results from previous inelastic neutron scattering experiments the data were taken to describe the dynamics of the halides in terms of two different models, the single particle model and the coupling model. Coupled motions of methyl groups seem to explain the dynamics of the methyl fluoride and chloride; however, the coupling vanishes with the increase of the mass of the halide atom in CH3Br and CH3I.

  16. An independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, Hans Jürgen; Achenbach, Alexander; Kalkbrenner, Thilo; Jankowiak, Hans-Christian; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-04-01

    A new model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is introduced. The ion-molecule cross sections for net capture and net ionization are represented as weighted sums of atomic cross sections with weight factors that are determined from a geometric model of overlapping cross section areas. Results are presented for proton collisions with targets ranging from diatomic to complex polyatomic molecules. Significant improvement compared to simple additivity rule results and in general good agreement with experimental data are found. The flexibility of the approach opens up the possibility to study more detailed observables such as orientation-dependent and charge-state-correlated cross sections for a large class of complex targets ranging from biomolecules to atomic clusters.

  17. Hybrid Model for Plasma Thruster Plume Simulation Including PIC-MCC Electrons Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, A. L.; Bondar, Ye. A.; Schweigert, I. V.

    2008-12-31

    The simulation of stationary plasma thruster plume is important for spacecraft design due to possible interaction plume with spacecraft surface. Such simulations are successfully performed using the particle-in-cell technique for describing the motion of charged particles, namely the propellant ions. In conventional plume models the electrons are treated using various fluid approaches. In this work, we suggest an alternative approach, where the electron kinetics is considered 'ab initio', using the particle-in-cell--Monte Carlo collision method. To avoid the large computational expenses due to small time steps, the relaxation of simulated plume plasma is split into the fast relaxation of the electrons distribution function and the slow one of the ions. The model is self-consistent but hybrid, since the simultaneous electron and ion motion is not really modeled. The obtained electron temperature profile is in good agreement with experiment.

  18. Interspecies difference in placement of developing teeth and its relationship with cross-sectional geometry of the mandibular symphysis in four primate species including modern humans.

    PubMed

    Fukase, Hitoshi

    2012-02-01

    The form of the anthropoid mandibular symphysis has recently been addressed in association with spatial requirements for the forming anterior teeth. To evaluate potential relationships between the symphyseal shape and teeth further, the growth patterns of the symphyseal region and the positioning of the tooth crypts were examined using CT data, comparing four primate species (modern humans, chimpanzees, Japanese monkeys, and hamadryas baboons) with varied symphyseal curvature and tooth size. First, results showed that interspecies differences in overall mandibular shape including symphyseal inclination and bicanine width are consistently expressed throughout postnatal ontogeny, although local symphyseal configurations related to the superior transverse torus (STT) tended to change considerably during growth in chimpanzees. Second, the four species were found to exhibit differentiated formation positions of the incisor and canine crypts. In particular, I2 developed between I1 and C in humans with a broad bicanine space and small teeth, whereas it was positioned posterior to I1 and above C in the cercopithecines with an extremely narrow bicanine space. In chimpanzees, despite the large bicanine width, I1 and I2 grew with a large antero-posterior overlap owing to their large size. These results indicate that the dental positioning is determined in concert with the size balance of the available mandibular space and forming teeth. Finally, the positions/contours of I2 crypt were shown to correspond strongly with the STT across the taxa. This suggests that interspecies differences in symphyseal shape should be interpreted partially by the species-specific positional relationships of the developing anterior teeth. PMID:22120684

  19. Investigating the Relationship between Students' Views of Scientific Models and Their Development of Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Lin, Jang-Long

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the nature of models and engaging in modeling practice have been emphasized in science education. However, few studies discuss the relationships between students' views of scientific models and their ability to develop those models. Hence, this study explores the relationship between students' views of scientific models and their self-generated models, and also whether views of models and modeling practice may be influenced by other factors, such as science learning performance and interest. The participants were 402 ninth-grade students in Taiwan. Data were collected using the Students' Understanding of Models in Science (SUMS) survey and students' self-evaluations of their own science learning interests and performance on a Likert-scale. The students' self-developed models explaining why three different magnetic phenomena occur were also evaluated on a schema of five levels, from lower (observational and fragmented models) to higher (microscopic and coherent models).The results reveal that most students' models remained only at the level of description of observable magnetic phenomena. A small number of the students were able to visualize unseen mechanisms, but these models were fragmented. However, several students with better science learning performance were able to develop coherent microscopic models to explain the three magnetic phenomena. The analyses indicated that most sub-factors of the SUMS survey were positively correlated with students' self-developed models, science learning performance and science learning interest. This study provides implications for teaching the nature of models and modeling practice.

  20. Modelling of the structure-property relationships in the α-quartz structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Alderson, Kim; Alderson, Andrew; Leng, Jinsong

    2013-04-01

    The molecular mechanism has been employed to model the structure-property relationships of auxetic material with tetrahedral framework at the atomistic level. The germania α-quartz subject uniaxial stress loading in z direction will be investigated. The strain-dependent structure and mechanical properties will be predicted from the force field based simulations, including the transformation from positive-to-negative Poisson's ratio behaviour and vice versa.

  1. European air quality modelled by CAMx including the volatility basis set scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarelli, G.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Crippa, M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Nemitz, E.; Sellegri, K.; Äijälä, M.; Carbone, S.; Mohr, C.; O'Dowd, C.; Poulain, L.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Four periods of EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) intensive measurement campaigns (June 2006, January 2007, September-October 2008 and February-March 2009) were modelled using the regional air quality model CAMx with VBS (Volatility Basis Set) approach for the first time in Europe within the framework of the EURODELTA-III model intercomparison exercise. More detailed analysis and sensitivity tests were performed for the period of February-March 2009 and June 2006 to investigate the uncertainties in emissions as well as to improve the modelling of organic aerosols (OA). Model performance for selected gas phase species and PM2.5 was evaluated using the European air quality database Airbase. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) were found to be overestimated for all the four periods with O3 having the largest mean bias during June 2006 and January-February 2007 periods (8.93 and 12.30 ppb mean biases, respectively). In contrast, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were found to be underestimated for all the four periods. CAMx reproduced both total concentrations and monthly variations of PM2.5 very well for all the four periods with average biases ranging from -2.13 to 1.04 μg m-3. Comparisons with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer) measurements at different sites in Europe during February-March 2009, showed that in general the model over-predicts the inorganic aerosol fraction and under-predicts the organic one, such that the good agreement for PM2.5 is partly due to compensation of errors. The effect of the choice of volatility basis set scheme (VBS) on OA was investigated as well. Two sensitivity tests with volatility distributions based on previous chamber and ambient measurements data were performed. For February-March 2009 the chamber-case reduced the total OA concentrations by about 43 % on average. On the other hand, a test based on ambient measurement data increased OA concentrations by about 47 % for the same period bringing model

  2. Three-dimensional time domain model of lightning including corona effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podgorski, Andrew S.

    1991-01-01

    A new 3-D lightning model that incorporates the effect of corona is described for the first time. The new model is based on a Thin Wire Time Domain Lightning (TWTDL) Code developed previously. The TWTDL Code was verified during the 1985 and 1986 lightning seasons by the measurements conducted at the 553 m CN Tower in Toronto, Ontario. The inclusion of corona in the TWTDL code allowed study of the corona effects on the lightning current parameters and the associated electric field parameters.

  3. Modeling of damage in ductile cast iron - The effect of including plasticity in the graphite nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriollo, T.; Thorborg, J.; Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J.

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper a micro-mechanical model for investigating the stress-strain relation of ductile cast iron subjected to simple loading conditions is presented. The model is based on a unit cell containing a single spherical graphite nodule embedded in a uniform ferritic matrix, under the assumption of infinitesimal strains and plane-stress conditions. Despite the latter being a limitation with respect to full 3D models, it allows a direct comparison with experimental investigations of damage evolution on the surface of ductile cast iron components, where the stress state is biaxial in nature. In contrast to previous works on the subject, the material behaviour in both matrix and nodule is assumed to be elasto-plastic, described by the classical J2-flow theory of plasticity, and damage evolution in the matrix is taken into account via Lemaitre's isotropic model. The effects of residual stresses due to the cooling process during manufacturing are also considered. Numerical solutions are obtained using an in-house developed finite element code; proper comparison with literature in the field is given.

  4. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-09-07

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust{sup 2} and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  5. Kinetic modelling of anaerobic hydrolysis of solid wastes, including disintegration processes.

    PubMed

    García-Gen, Santiago; Sousbie, Philippe; Rangaraj, Ganesh; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Torrijos, Michel

    2015-01-01

    A methodology to estimate disintegration and hydrolysis kinetic parameters of solid wastes and validate an ADM1-based anaerobic co-digestion model is presented. Kinetic parameters of the model were calibrated from batch reactor experiments treating individually fruit and vegetable wastes (among other residues) following a new protocol for batch tests. In addition, decoupled disintegration kinetics for readily and slowly biodegradable fractions of solid wastes was considered. Calibrated parameters from batch assays of individual substrates were used to validate the model for a semi-continuous co-digestion operation treating simultaneously 5 fruit and vegetable wastes. The semi-continuous experiment was carried out in a lab-scale CSTR reactor for 15 weeks at organic loading rate ranging between 2.0 and 4.7 gVS/Ld. The model (built in Matlab/Simulink) fit to a large extent the experimental results in both batch and semi-continuous mode and served as a powerful tool to simulate the digestion or co-digestion of solid wastes. PMID:25458761

  6. The island coalescence problem: Scaling of reconnection in extended fluid models including higher-order moments

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jonathan; Huang, Yi-Min; Hakim, Ammar; Bhattacharjee, A.; Stanier, Adam; Daughton, William; Wang, Liang; Germaschewski, Kai

    2015-11-01

    As modeling of collisionless magnetic reconnection in most space plasmas with realistic parameters is beyond the capability of today's simulations, due to the separation between global and kinetic length scales, it is important to establish scaling relations in model problems so as to extrapolate to realistic scales. Recently, large scale particle-in-cell simulations of island coalescence have shown that the time averaged reconnection rate decreases with system size, while fluid systems at such large scales in the Hall regime have not been studied. Here, we perform the complementary resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall MHD, and two fluid simulations using a ten-moment model with the same geometry. In contrast to the standard Harris sheet reconnection problem, Hall MHD is insufficient to capture the physics of the reconnection region. Additionally, motivated by the results of a recent set of hybrid simulations which show the importance of ion kinetics in this geometry, we evaluate the efficacy of the ten-moment model in reproducing such results. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. LES studies of wind farms including wide turbine spacings and comparisons with the CWBL engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We present results from large eddy simulations (LES) of wind farms consisting of tens to hundreds of turbines with respective streamwise and spanwise spacings approaching 35 and 12 turbine diameters. Even in staggered farms where the distance between consecutive turbines in the flow direction is more than 50 turbine diameters, we observe visible wake effects. In aligned farms, the performance of the turbines in the fully developed regime, where the power output as function of the downstream position becomes constant, is shown to primarily depend on the streamwise distance between consecutive turbine rows. However, for other layouts the power production in the fully developed regime mainly depends on the geometrical mean turbine spacing (inverse turbine density). These findings agree very well with predictions from our recently developed coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model, which introduces a two way coupling between the wake (Jensen) and top-down model approaches (Stevens et al. JRSE 7, 023115, 2015). To further validate the CWBL model we apply it to the problem of determining the optimal wind turbine thrust coefficient for power maximization over the entire farm. The CWBL model predictions agree very well with recent LES results (Goit & Meyers, JFM 768, 5-50, 2015). FOM Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists (YES!), NSF (IIA 1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project), ERC (FP7-Ideas, 306471).

  8. The island coalescence problem: Scaling of reconnection in extended fluid models including higher-order moments

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jonathan; Huang, Yi -Min; Hakim, Ammar; Bhattacharjee, A.; Stanier, Adam; Daughton, William; Wang, Liang; Germaschewski, Kai

    2015-11-05

    As modeling of collisionless magnetic reconnection in most space plasmas with realistic parameters is beyond the capability of today's simulations, due to the separation between global and kinetic length scales, it is important to establish scaling relations in model problems so as to extrapolate to realistic scales. Furthermore, large scale particle-in-cell simulations of island coalescence have shown that the time averaged reconnection rate decreases with system size, while fluid systems at such large scales in the Hall regime have not been studied. Here, we perform the complementary resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall MHD, and two fluid simulations using a ten-moment model with the same geometry. In contrast to the standard Harris sheet reconnection problem, Hall MHD is insufficient to capture the physics of the reconnection region. Additionally, motivated by the results of a recent set of hybrid simulations which show the importance of ion kinetics in this geometry, we evaluate the efficacy of the ten-moment model in reproducing such results.

  9. The island coalescence problem: Scaling of reconnection in extended fluid models including higher-order moments

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jonathan; Huang, Yi-Min; Hakim, Ammar; Bhattacharjee, A.; Stanier, Adam; Daughton, William; Wang, Liang; Germaschewski, Kai

    2015-11-15

    As modeling of collisionless magnetic reconnection in most space plasmas with realistic parameters is beyond the capability of today's simulations, due to the separation between global and kinetic length scales, it is important to establish scaling relations in model problems so as to extrapolate to realistic scales. Recently, large scale particle-in-cell simulations of island coalescence have shown that the time averaged reconnection rate decreases with system size, while fluid systems at such large scales in the Hall regime have not been studied. Here, we perform the complementary resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall MHD, and two fluid simulations using a ten-moment model with the same geometry. In contrast to the standard Harris sheet reconnection problem, Hall MHD is insufficient to capture the physics of the reconnection region. Additionally, motivated by the results of a recent set of hybrid simulations which show the importance of ion kinetics in this geometry, we evaluate the efficacy of the ten-moment model in reproducing such results.

  10. A population-competition model for analyzing transverse optical patterns including optical control and structural anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Y. C.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Leung, P. T.; Binder, R.; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed study of a low-dimensional population-competition (PC) model suitable for analysis of the dynamics of certain modulational instability patterns in extended systems. The model is applied to analyze the transverse optical exciton-polariton patterns in semiconductor quantum well microcavities. It is shown that, despite its simplicity, the PC model describes quite well the competitions among various two-spot and hexagonal patterns when four physical parameters, representing density saturation, hexagon stabilization, anisotropy, and switching beam intensity, are varied. The combined effects of the last three parameters are given detailed considerations here. Although the model is developed in the context of semiconductor polariton patterns, its equations have more general applicability, and the results obtained here may benefit the investigation of other pattern-forming systems. The simplicity of the PC model allows us to organize all steady state solutions in a parameter space ‘phase diagram’. Each region in the phase diagram is characterized by the number and type of solutions. The main numerical task is to compute inter-region boundary surfaces, where some steady states either appear, disappear, or change their stability status. The singularity types of the boundary points, given by Catastrophe theory, are shown to provide a simple geometric overview of the boundary surfaces. With all stable and unstable steady states and the phase boundaries delimited and characterized, we have attained a comprehensive understanding of the structure of the four-parameter phase diagram. We analyze this rich structure in detail and show that it provides a transparent and organized interpretation of competitions among various patterns built on the hexagonal state space.

  11. A catchment-scale groundwater model including sewer pipe leakage in an urban system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peche, Aaron; Fuchs, Lothar; Spönemann, Peter; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: pipe leakage, urban hydrogeology, catchment scale, OpenGeoSys, HYSTEM-EXTRAN Wastewater leakage from subsurface sewer pipe defects leads to contamination of the surrounding soil and groundwater (Ellis, 2002; Wolf et al., 2004). Leakage rates at pipe defects have to be known in order to quantify contaminant input. Due to inaccessibility of subsurface pipe defects, direct (in-situ) measurements of leakage rates are tedious and associated with a high degree of uncertainty (Wolf, 2006). Proposed catchment-scale models simplify leakage rates by neglecting unsaturated zone flow or by reducing spatial dimensions (Karpf & Krebs, 2013, Boukhemacha et al., 2015). In the present study, we present a physically based 3-dimensional numerical model incorporating flow in the pipe network, in the saturated zone and in the unsaturated zone to quantify leakage rates on the catchment scale. The model consists of the pipe network flow model HYSTEM-EXTAN (itwh, 2002), which is coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). We also present the newly developed coupling scheme between the two flow models. Leakage functions specific to a pipe defect are derived from simulations of pipe leakage using spatially refined grids around pipe defects. In order to minimize computational effort, these leakage functions are built into the presented numerical model using unrefined grids around pipe defects. The resulting coupled model is capable of efficiently simulating spatially distributed pipe leakage coupled with subsurficial water flow in a 3-dimensional environment. References: Boukhemacha, M. A., Gogu, C. R., Serpescu, I., Gaitanaru, D., & Bica, I. (2015). A hydrogeological conceptual approach to study urban groundwater flow in Bucharest city, Romania. Hydrogeology Journal, 23(3), 437-450. doi:10.1007/s10040-014-1220-3. Ellis, J. B., & Revitt, D. M. (2002). Sewer losses and interactions with groundwater quality. Water Science and Technology, 45(3), 195

  12. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  13. TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: MODEL LIGHT CURVES AND STANDARD CANDLE RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude-from 0.5 to 4.0 x 10{sup 51} ergs, with a typical value of approx0.9 x 10{sup 51} ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to approx20% using only photometric data.

  14. A model for thermal oxidation of Si and SiC including material expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, T. Ioannidis, A.; Winkelmann, C.

    2015-02-28

    A model based on drift-diffusion-reaction kinetics for Si and SiC oxidation is discussed, which takes the material expansion into account with an additional convection term. The associated velocity field is determined self-consistently from the local reaction rate. The approach allows a calculation of the densities of volatile species in an nm-resolution at the oxidation front. The model is illustrated with simulation results for the growth and impurity redistribution during Si oxidation and for carbon and silicon emission during SiC oxidation. The approach can be useful for the prediction of Si and/or C interstitial distribution, which is particularly relevant for the quality of metal-oxide-semiconductor electronic devices.

  15. A kinematic eddy viscosity model including the influence of density variations and preturbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, L. S.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the kinematic eddy viscosity was developed which accounts for the turbulence produced as a result of jet interactions between adjacent streams as well as the turbulence initially present in the streams. In order to describe the turbulence contribution from jet interaction, the eddy viscosity suggested by Prandtl was adopted, and a modification was introduced to account for the effect of density variation through the mixing layer. The form of the modification was ascertained from a study of the compressible turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A kinematic eddy viscosity relation which corresponds to the initial turbulence contribution was derived by employing arguments used by Prandtl in his mixing length hypothesis. The resulting expression for self-preserving flow is similar to that which describes the mixing of a submerged jet. Application of the model has led to analytical predictions which are in good agreement with available turbulent mixing experimental data.

  16. A finite element model for wave propagation in an inhomogeneous material including experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Dahl, Milo D.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element model was developed to solve for the acoustic pressure field in a nonhomogeneous region. The derivations from the governing equations assumed that the material properties could vary with position resulting in a nonhomogeneous variable property two-dimensional wave equation. This eliminated the necessity of finding the boundary conditions between the different materials. For a two media region consisting of part air (in the duct) and part bulk absorber (in the wall), a model was used to describe the bulk absorber properties in two directions. An experiment to verify the numerical theory was conducted in a rectangular duct with no flow and absorbing material mounted on one wall. Changes in the sound field, consisting of planar waves, was measured on the wall opposite the absorbing material. As a function of distance along the duct, fairly good agreement was found in the standing wave pattern upstream of the absorber and in the decay of pressure level opposite the absorber.

  17. Ion-biomolecule collisions studied within the independent atom model including geometric screening corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    A recently introduced model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is applied to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. We present net capture and net ionization cross sections over wide ranges of impact energy and analyze the strength of the screening effect by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  18. Numerical modelling of the transport of trace gases including methane in the subsurface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Adam H.; Patel, Manish R.; Lewis, Stephen R.

    2015-04-01

    We model the transport of gas through the martian subsurface in order to quantify the timescales of release of a trace gas with a source at depth using a Fickian model of diffusion through a putative martian regolith column. The model is then applied to the case of methane to determine if diffusive transport of gas can explain previous observations of methane in the martian atmosphere. We investigate which parameters in the model have the greatest effect on transport timescales and show that the calculated diffusivity is very sensitive to the pressure profile of the subsurface, but relatively insensitive to the temperature profile, though diffusive transport may be affected by other temperature dependent properties of the subsurface such as the local vapour pressure. Uncertainties in the structure and physical conditions of the martian subsurface also introduce uncertainties in the timescales calculated. It was found that methane may take several hundred thousand Mars-years to diffuse from a source at depth. Purely diffusive transport cannot explain transient release that varies on timescales of less than one martian year from sources such as serpentinization or methanogenic organisms at depths of more than 2 km. However, diffusion of gas released by the destabilisation of methane clathrate hydrates close to the surface, for example caused by transient mass wasting events or erosion, could produce a rapidly varying flux of methane into the atmosphere of more than 10-3 kg m-2 s-1 over a duration of less than half a martian year, consistent with observations of martian methane variability. Seismic events, magmatic intrusions or impacts could also potentially produce similar patterns of release, but are far more complex to simulate.

  19. A Multiscale Progressive Failure Modeling Methodology for Composites that Includes Fiber Strength Stochastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.; Hutchins, John W.

    2014-01-01

    A multiscale modeling methodology was developed for continuous fiber composites that incorporates a statistical distribution of fiber strengths into coupled multiscale micromechanics/finite element (FE) analyses. A modified two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function, which accounts for the effect of fiber length on the probability of failure, was used to characterize the statistical distribution of fiber strengths. A parametric study using the NASA Micromechanics Analysis Code with the Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) was performed to assess the effect of variable fiber strengths on local composite failure within a repeating unit cell (RUC) and subsequent global failure. The NASA code FEAMAC and the ABAQUS finite element solver were used to analyze the progressive failure of a unidirectional SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S metal matrix composite tensile dogbone specimen at 650 degC. Multiscale progressive failure analyses were performed to quantify the effect of spatially varying fiber strengths on the RUC-averaged and global stress-strain responses and failure. The ultimate composite strengths and distribution of failure locations (predominately within the gage section) reasonably matched the experimentally observed failure behavior. The predicted composite failure behavior suggests that use of macroscale models that exploit global geometric symmetries are inappropriate for cases where the actual distribution of local fiber strengths displays no such symmetries. This issue has not received much attention in the literature. Moreover, the model discretization at a specific length scale can have a profound effect on the computational costs associated with multiscale simulations.models that yield accurate yet tractable results.

  20. The extension of a uniform canopy reflectance model to include row effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The effect of row structure is assumed to be caused by the variation in density of vegetation across rows rather than to a profile in canopy height. The calculation of crop reflectance using vegetation density modulation across rows follows a parallel procedure to that for a uniform canopy. Predictions using the row model for wheat show that the effect of changes in sun to row azimuth are greatest in Landsat Band 5 (red band) and can result in underestimation of crop vigor.

  1. Complete spectral analysis of the Jackiw-Rebbi model, including its zero mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmchi, F.; Gousheh, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a complete and exact spectral analysis of the (1+1)-dimensional model that Jackiw and Rebbi considered to show that the half-integral fermion numbers are possible due to the presence of an isolated self-charge-conjugate zero mode. The model possesses the charge and particle conjugation symmetries. These symmetries mandate the reflection symmetry of the spectrum about the line E=0. We obtain the bound-state energies and wave functions of the fermion in this model using two different methods, analytically and exactly, for every arbitrary choice of the parameters of the kink, i.e. its value at spatial infinity (θ0) and its scale of variations (μ). Then, we plot the bound-state energies of the fermion as a function of θ0. This graph enables us to consider a process of building up the kink from the trivial vacuum. We can then determine the origin and evolution of the bound-state energy levels during this process. We see that the model has a dynamical mass generation process at the first quantized level and the zero-energy fermionic mode responsible for the fractional fermion number, is always present during the construction of the kink and its origin is very peculiar, indeed. We also observe that, as expected, none of the energy levels cross one another. Moreover, we obtain analytically the continuum scattering wave functions of the fermion and then calculate the phase shifts of these wave functions. Using the information contained in the graphs of the phase shifts and the bound states, we show that our phase shifts are consistent with the weak and strong forms of the Levinson theorem. Finally, using the weak form of the Levinson theorem, we confirm that the number of the zero-energy fermionic modes is exactly one.

  2. Including network knowledge into Cox regression models for biomarker signature discovery.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Holger

    2014-03-01

    Discovery of prognostic and diagnostic biomarker gene signatures for diseases, such as cancer, is seen as a major step toward a better personalized medicine. During the last decade various methods have been proposed for that purpose. However, one important obstacle for making gene signatures a standard tool in clinical diagnosis is the typical low reproducibility of these signatures combined with the difficulty to achieve a clear biological interpretation. For that purpose in the last years there has been a growing interest in approaches that try to integrate information from molecular interaction networks. Most of these methods focus on classification problems, that is learn a model from data that discriminates patients into distinct clinical groups. Far less has been published on approaches that predict a patient's event risk. In this paper, we investigate eight methods that integrate network information into multivariable Cox proportional hazard models for risk prediction in breast cancer. We compare the prediction performance of our tested algorithms via cross-validation as well as across different datasets. In addition, we highlight the stability and interpretability of obtained gene signatures. In conclusion, we find GeneRank-based filtering to be a simple, computationally cheap and highly predictive technique to integrate network information into event time prediction models. Signatures derived via this method are highly reproducible. PMID:24430933

  3. Numerical Modeling of the Surface Fatigue Crack Propagation Including the Closure Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchinsky, Ruslan; Petinov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Presently modeling of surface fatigue crack growth for residual life assessment of structural elements is almost entirely based on application of the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, it is assumed that the crack front does not essentially change its shape, although it is not always confirmed by experiment. Furthermore, LEFM approach cannot be applied when the stress singularity vanishes due to material plasticity, one of the leading factors associated with the material degradation and fracture. Also, evaluation of stress intensity factors meets difficulties associated with changes in the stress state along the crack front circumference. An approach proposed for simulation the evolution of surface cracks based on application of the Strain-life criterion for fatigue failure and of the finite element modeling of damage accumulation. It takes into account the crack closure effect, the nonlinear behavior of damage accumulation and material compliance increasing due to the damage advance. The damage accumulation technique was applied to model the semi-elliptical crack growth from the initial defect in the steel compact specimen. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  4. Parametric reduced-order models of battery pack vibration including structural variation and prestress effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Kwon; Epureanu, Bogdan I.; Castanier, Matthew P.

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a numerical model for the vibration of hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) battery packs to enable probabilistic forced response simulations for the effects of variations. There are two important types of variations that affect their structural response significantly: the prestress that is applied when joining the cells within a pack; and the small, random structural property discrepancies among the cells of a battery pack. The main contributions of this work are summarized as follows. In order to account for these two important variations, a new parametric reduced order model (PROM) formulation is derived by employing three key observations: (1) the stiffness matrix can be parameterized for different levels of prestress, (2) the mode shapes of a battery pack with cell-to-cell variation can be represented as a linear combination of the mode shapes of the nominal system, and (3) the frame holding each cell has vibratory motion. A numerical example of an academic battery pack with pouch cells is presented to demonstrate that the PROM captures the effects of both prestress and structural variation on battery packs. The PROM is validated numerically by comparing full-order finite element models (FEMs) of the same systems.

  5. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors. PMID:26819382

  6. A stepped leader model for lightning including charge distribution in branched channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wei; Zhang, Li; Li, Qingmin

    2014-09-14

    The stepped leader process in negative cloud-to-ground lightning plays a vital role in lightning protection analysis. As lightning discharge usually presents significant branched or tortuous channels, the charge distribution along the branched channels and the stochastic feature of stepped leader propagation were investigated in this paper. The charge density along the leader channel and the charge in the leader tip for each lightning branch were approximated by introducing branch correlation coefficients. In combination with geometric characteristics of natural lightning discharge, a stochastic stepped leader propagation model was presented based on the fractal theory. By comparing simulation results with the statistics of natural lightning discharges, it was found that the fractal dimension of lightning trajectory in simulation was in the range of that observed in nature and the calculation results of electric field at ground level were in good agreement with the measurements of a negative flash, which shows the validity of this proposed model. Furthermore, a new equation to estimate the lightning striking distance to flat ground was suggested based on the present model. The striking distance obtained by this new equation is smaller than the value estimated by previous equations, which indicates that the traditional equations may somewhat overestimate the attractive effect of the ground.

  7. Modeling ozone removal to indoor materials, including the effects of porosity, pore diameter, and thickness.

    PubMed

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    We develop an ozone transport and reaction model to determine reaction probabilities and assess the importance of physical properties such as porosity, pore diameter, and material thickness on reactive uptake of ozone to five materials. The one-dimensional model accounts for molecular diffusion from bulk air to the air-material interface, reaction at the interface, and diffusive transport and reaction through material pore volumes. Material-ozone reaction probabilities that account for internal transport and internal pore area, γ(ipa), are determined by a minimization of residuals between predicted and experimentally derived ozone concentrations. Values of γ(ipa) are generally less than effective reaction probabilities (γ(eff)) determined previously, likely because of the inclusion of diffusion into substrates and reaction with internal surface area (rather than the use of the horizontally projected external material areas). Estimates of γ(ipa) average 1 × 10(-7), 2 × 10(-7), 4 × 10(-5), 2 × 10(-5), and 4 × 10(-7) for two types of cellulose paper, pervious pavement, Portland cement concrete, and an activated carbon cloth, respectively. The transport and reaction model developed here accounts for observed differences in ozone removal to varying thicknesses of the cellulose paper, and estimates a near constant γ(ipa) as material thickness increases from 0.02 to 0.16 cm. PMID:25748309

  8. The island coalescence problem: Scaling of reconnection in extended fluid models including higher-order moments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ng, Jonathan; Huang, Yi -Min; Hakim, Ammar; Bhattacharjee, A.; Stanier, Adam; Daughton, William; Wang, Liang; Germaschewski, Kai

    2015-11-05

    As modeling of collisionless magnetic reconnection in most space plasmas with realistic parameters is beyond the capability of today's simulations, due to the separation between global and kinetic length scales, it is important to establish scaling relations in model problems so as to extrapolate to realistic scales. Furthermore, large scale particle-in-cell simulations of island coalescence have shown that the time averaged reconnection rate decreases with system size, while fluid systems at such large scales in the Hall regime have not been studied. Here, we perform the complementary resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall MHD, and two fluid simulations using a ten-moment modelmore » with the same geometry. In contrast to the standard Harris sheet reconnection problem, Hall MHD is insufficient to capture the physics of the reconnection region. Additionally, motivated by the results of a recent set of hybrid simulations which show the importance of ion kinetics in this geometry, we evaluate the efficacy of the ten-moment model in reproducing such results.« less

  9. Analytic band Monte Carlo model for electron transport in Si including acoustic and optical phonon dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eric; Dutton, Robert W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe the implementation of a Monte Carlo model for electron transport in silicon. The model uses analytic, nonparabolic electron energy bands, which are computationally efficient and sufficiently accurate for future low-voltage (<1V) nanoscale device applications. The electron-lattice scattering is incorporated using an isotropic, analytic phonon-dispersion model, which distinguishes between the optical/acoustic and the longitudinal/transverse phonon branches. We show that this approach avoids introducing unphysical thresholds in the electron distribution function, and that it has further applications in computing detailed phonon generation spectra from Joule heating. A set of deformation potentials for electron-phonon scattering is introduced and shown to yield accurate transport simulations in bulk silicon across a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The shear deformation potential is empirically determined at Ξu=6.8eV, and consequently, the isotropically averaged scattering potentials with longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons are DLA=6.39eV and DTA=3.01eV, respectively, in reasonable agreement with previous studies. The room-temperature electron mobility in strained silicon is also computed and shown to be in better agreement with the most recent phonon-limited data available. As a result, we find that electron coupling with g-type phonons is about 40% lower, and the coupling with f-type phonons is almost twice as strong as previously reported.

  10. Modeling the relationship of epigenetic modifications to transcription factor binding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Jin, Guangxu; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) and epigenetic modifications play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression, and correlations between the two types of factors have been discovered. However, methods for quantitatively studying the correlations remain limited. Here, we present a computational approach to systematically investigating how epigenetic changes in chromatin architectures or DNA sequences relate to TF binding. We implemented statistical analyses to illustrate that epigenetic modifications are predictive of TF binding affinities, without the need of sequence information. Intriguingly, by considering genome locations relative to transcription start sites (TSSs) or enhancer midpoints, our analyses show that different locations display various relationship patterns. For instance, H3K4me3, H3k9ac and H3k27ac contribute more in the regions near TSSs, whereas H3K4me1 and H3k79me2 dominate in the regions far from TSSs. DNA methylation plays relatively important roles when close to TSSs than in other regions. In addition, the results show that epigenetic modification models for the predictions of TF binding affinities are cell line-specific. Taken together, our study elucidates highly coordinated, but location- and cell type-specific relationships between epigenetic modifications and binding affinities of TFs. PMID:25820421

  11. Extending Galactic Habitable Zone Modeling to Include the Emergence of Intelligent Life.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Ian S; Gowanlock, Michael G

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies of the galactic habitable zone have been concerned with identifying those regions of the Galaxy that may favor the emergence of complex life. A planet is deemed habitable if it meets a set of assumed criteria for supporting the emergence of such complex life. In this work, we extend the assessment of habitability to consider the potential for life to further evolve to the point of intelligence--termed the propensity for the emergence of intelligent life, φI. We assume φI is strongly influenced by the time durations available for evolutionary processes to proceed undisturbed by the sterilizing effects of nearby supernovae. The times between supernova events provide windows of opportunity for the evolution of intelligence. We developed a model that allows us to analyze these window times to generate a metric for φI, and we examine here the spatial and temporal variation of this metric. Even under the assumption that long time durations are required between sterilizations to allow for the emergence of intelligence, our model suggests that the inner Galaxy provides the greatest number of opportunities for intelligence to arise. This is due to the substantially higher number density of habitable planets in this region, which outweighs the effects of a higher supernova rate in the region. Our model also shows that φI is increasing with time. Intelligent life emerged at approximately the present time at Earth's galactocentric radius, but a similar level of evolutionary opportunity was available in the inner Galaxy more than 2 Gyr ago. Our findings suggest that the inner Galaxy should logically be a prime target region for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence and that any civilizations that may have emerged there are potentially much older than our own. PMID:26274865

  12. Individual welfare maximization in electricity markets including consumer and full transmission system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, James Daniel

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation presents a new algorithm that allows a market participant to maximize its individual welfare in the electricity spot market. The use of such an algorithm in determining market equilibrium points, called Nash equilibria, is also demonstrated. The start of the algorithm is a spot market model that uses the optimal power flow (OPF), with a full representation of the transmission system. The OPF is also extended to model consumer behavior, and a thorough mathematical justification for the inclusion of the consumer model in the OPF is presented. The algorithm utilizes price and dispatch sensitivities, available from the Hessian matrix of the OPF, to help determine an optimal change in an individual's bid. The algorithm is shown to be successful in determining local welfare maxima, and the prospects for scaling the algorithm up to realistically sized systems are very good. Assuming a market in which all participants maximize their individual welfare, economic equilibrium points, called Nash equilibria, are investigated. This is done by iteratively solving the individual welfare maximization algorithm for each participant until a point is reached where all individuals stop modifying their bids. It is shown that these Nash equilibria can be located in this manner. However, it is also demonstrated that equilibria do not always exist, and are not always unique when they do exist. It is also shown that individual welfare is a highly nonconcave function resulting in many local maxima. As a result, a more global optimization technique, using a genetic algorithm (GA), is investigated. The genetic algorithm is successfully demonstrated on several systems. It is also shown that a GA can be developed using special niche methods, which allow a GA to converge to several local optima at once. Finally, the last chapter of this dissertation covers the development of a new computer visualization routine for power system analysis: contouring. The contouring algorithm is

  13. Improving Public Health DSSs by Including Saharan Dust Forecasts Through Incorporation of NASA's GOCART Model Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berglund, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 2-3 billion metric tons of soil dust are estimated to be transported in the Earth's atmosphere each year. Global transport of desert dust is believed to play an important role in many geochemical, climatological, and environmental processes. This dust carries minerals and nutrients, but it has also been shown to carry pollutants and viable microorganisms capable of harming human, animal, plant, and ecosystem health. Saharan dust, which impacts the eastern United States (especially Florida and the southeast) and U.S. Territories in the Caribbean primarily during the summer months, has been linked to increases in respiratory illnesses in this region and has been shown to carry other human, animal, and plant pathogens. For these reasons, this candidate solution recommends integrating Saharan dust distribution and concentration forecasts from the NASA GOCART global dust cycle model into a public health DSS (decision support system), such as the CDC's (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's) EPHTN (Environmental Public Health Tracking Network), for the eastern United States and Caribbean for early warning purposes regarding potential increases in respiratory illnesses or asthma attacks, potential disease outbreaks, or bioterrorism. This candidate solution pertains to the Public Health National Application but also has direct connections to Air Quality and Homeland Security. In addition, the GOCART model currently uses the NASA MODIS aerosol product as an input and uses meteorological forecasts from the NASA GEOS-DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) GEOS-4 AGCM. In the future, VIIRS aerosol products and perhaps CALIOP aerosol products could be assimilated into the GOCART model to improve the results.

  14. Double pendulum model for a tennis stroke including a collision process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    By means of adding a collision process between the ball and racket in the double pendulum model, we analyzed the tennis stroke. The ball and the racket system may be accelerated during the collision time; thus, the speed of the rebound ball does not simply depend on the angular velocity of the racket. A higher angular velocity sometimes gives a lower rebound ball speed. We numerically showed that the proper time-lagged racket rotation increased the speed of the rebound ball by 20%. We also showed that the elbow should move in the proper direction in order to add the angular velocity of the racket.

  15. Analytical model for tilting proprotor aircraft dynamics, including blade torsion and coupled bending modes, and conversion mode operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for proprotor aircraft dynamics. The rotor model includes coupled flap-lag bending modes, and blade torsion degrees of freedom. The rotor aerodynamic model is generally valid for high and low inflow, and for axial and nonaxial flight. For the rotor support, a cantilever wing is considered; incorporation of a more general support with this rotor model will be a straight-forward matter.

  16. A mixing length model for the aqueous boundary layer including the effect of wave breaking on enhancing gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelan, M. A.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A mixing length model for air-water gas transfer is developed to include the effects of wave breaking. The model requires both the shear velocity induced by the wind and the integrated wave dissipation. Both of these can be calculated for tanks and oceans by a full spectrum wave model. The gas transfer model is calibrated, with laboratory tank measurements of carbon dioxide flux, and transported to oceanic conditions to yield air-sea transfer velocity versus wind speed.

  17. Duration Models to Analyze Dating Relationship: The Controversial Role of Gift Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ming-Hui; Yu, Shihti

    2000-01-01

    Econometric duration models were used to analyze dating relationships of 225 college students. Using gifts to enhance the self, express love, and announce relationships helped ensure the success of relationships. Gifts that were too frequent or rare resulted in self-depreciation and anxiety and harmed relationships. (SK)

  18. Measurement network design including traveltime determinations to minimize model prediction uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Gijs M. C. M.; Valstar, Johan R.; van der Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.

    2008-02-01

    Traveltime determinations have found increasing application in the characterization of groundwater systems. No algorithms are available, however, to optimally design sampling strategies including this information type. We propose a first-order methodology to include groundwater age or tracer arrival time determinations in measurement network design and apply the methodology in an illustrative example in which the network design is directed at contaminant breakthrough uncertainty minimization. We calculate linearized covariances between potential measurements and the goal variables of which we want to reduce the uncertainty: the groundwater age at the control plane and the breakthrough locations of the contaminant. We assume the traveltime to be lognormally distributed and therefore logtransform the age determinations in compliance with the adopted Bayesian framework. Accordingly, we derive expressions for the linearized covariances between the transformed age determinations and the parameters and states. In our synthetic numerical example, the derived expressions are shown to provide good first-order predictions of the variance of the natural logarithm of groundwater age if the variance of the natural logarithm of the conductivity is less than 3.0. The calculated covariances can be used to predict the posterior breakthrough variance belonging to a candidate network before samples are taken. A Genetic Algorithm is used to efficiently search, among all candidate networks, for a near-optimal one. We show that, in our numerical example, an age estimation network outperforms (in terms of breakthrough uncertainty reduction) equally sized head measurement networks and conductivity measurement networks even if the age estimations are highly uncertain.

  19. A model of plasma current through a hole of Rogowski probe including sheath effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, H.; Ejiri, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Takase, Y.; Sonehara, M.; Tsujii, N.; Yamaguchi, T.; Shinya, T.; Togashi, H.; Homma, H.; Nakamura, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Yajima, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Toida, K.; Takahashi, W.; Yamazaki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In TST-2 Ohmic discharges, local current is measured using a Rogowski probe by changing the angle between the local magnetic field and the direction of the hole of the Rogowski probe. The angular dependence shows a peak when the direction of the hole is almost parallel to the local magnetic field. The obtained width of the peak was broader than that of the theoretical curve expected from the probe geometry. In order to explain this disagreement, we consider the effect of sheath in the vicinity of the Rogowski probe. A sheath model was constructed and electron orbits were numerically calculated. From the calculation, it was found that the electron orbit is affected by E × B drift due to the sheath electric field. Such orbit causes the broadening of the peak in the angular dependence and the dependence agrees with the experimental results. The dependence of the broadening on various plasma parameters was studied numerically and explained qualitatively by a simplified analytical model.

  20. Interpretation of thermoreflectance measurements with a two-temperature model including non-surface heat deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Regner, K. T.; Wei, L. C.; Malen, J. A.

    2015-12-21

    We develop a solution to the two-temperature diffusion equation in axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates to model heat transport in thermoreflectance experiments. Our solution builds upon prior solutions that account for two-channel diffusion in each layer of an N-layered geometry, but adds the ability to deposit heat at any location within each layer. We use this solution to account for non-surface heating in the transducer layer of thermoreflectance experiments that challenge the timescales of electron-phonon coupling. A sensitivity analysis is performed to identify important parameters in the solution and to establish a guideline for when to use the two-temperature model to interpret thermoreflectance data. We then fit broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR) measurements of SiO{sub 2} and platinum at a temperature of 300 K with our two-temperature solution to parameterize the gold/chromium transducer layer. We then refit BB-FDTR measurements of silicon and find that accounting for non-equilibrium between electrons and phonons in the gold layer does lessen the previously observed heating frequency dependence reported in Regner et al. [Nat. Commun. 4, 1640 (2013)] but does not completely eliminate it. We perform BB-FDTR experiments on silicon with an aluminum transducer and find limited heating frequency dependence, in agreement with time domain thermoreflectance results. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between thermoreflectance measurements with different transducers results in part from spectrally dependent phonon transmission at the transducer/silicon interface.

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SOLAR WIND INCLUDING PICKUP PROTONS AND TURBULENCE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-07-20

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons. We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 Degree-Sign -90 Degree-Sign and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  2. Modeling radiation dosimetry to predict cognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors including medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. . E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Shukla, Hemant; Sengupta, Saikat; Xiong Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Model the effects of radiation dosimetry on IQ among pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors (n = 39) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before and after treatment with postoperative, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and conformal primary-site irradiation, followed by chemotherapy. Differential dose-volume data for 5 brain volumes (total brain, supratentorial brain, infratentorial brain, and left and right temporal lobes) were correlated with IQ after surgery and at follow-up by use of linear regression. Results: When the dose distribution was partitioned into 2 levels, both had a significantly negative effect on longitudinal IQ across all 5 brain volumes. When the dose distribution was partitioned into 3 levels (low, medium, and high), exposure to the supratentorial brain appeared to have the most significant impact. For most models, each Gy of exposure had a similar effect on IQ decline, regardless of dose level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that radiation dosimetry data from 5 brain volumes can be used to predict decline in longitudinal IQ. Despite measures to reduce radiation dose and treatment volume, the volume that receives the highest dose continues to have the greatest effect, which supports current volume-reduction efforts.

  3. Hierarchical coarse-graining model for photosystem II including electron and excitation-energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2014-03-01

    We propose a hierarchical reduction scheme to cope with coupled rate equations that describe the dynamics of multi-time-scale photosynthetic reactions. To numerically solve nonlinear dynamical equations containing a wide temporal range of rate constants, we first study a prototypical three-variable model. Using a separation of the time scale of rate constants combined with identified slow variables as (quasi-)conserved quantities in the fast process, we achieve a coarse-graining of the dynamical equations reduced to those at a slower time scale. By iteratively employing this reduction method, the coarse-graining of broadly multi-scale dynamical equations can be performed in a hierarchical manner. We then apply this scheme to the reaction dynamics analysis of a simplified model for an illuminated photosystem II, which involves many processes of electron and excitation-energy transfers with a wide range of rate constants. We thus confirm a good agreement between the coarse-grained and fully (finely) integrated results for the population dynamics. PMID:24418347

  4. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  5. The evolution of massive stars including mass loss - Presupernova models and explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.; Langer, Norbert; Weaver, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars of 35, 40, 60, and 85 solar masses is followed through all stages of nuclear burning to the point of Fe core collapse. Critical nuclear reaction and mass-loss rates are varied. Efficient mass loss during the Wolf-Rayet (WR) stage is likely to lead to final masses as small as 4 solar masses. For a reasonable parameterization of the mass loss, there may be convergence of all WR stars, both single and in binaries, to a narrow band of small final masses. Our representative model, a 4.25 solar-mass WR presupernova derived from a 60 solar mass star, is followed through a simulated explosion, and its explosive nucleosynthesis and light curve are determined. Its properties are similar to those observed in Type Ib supernovae. The effects of the initial mass and mass loss on the presupernova structure of small mass WR models is also explored. Important properties of the presupernova star and its explosion can only be obtained by following the complete evolution starting on the main sequence.

  6. An Improved Heat Budget Estimation Including Bottom Effects for General Ocean Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall; Warrior, Hari; Otis, Daniel; Chen, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations of general ocean circulation models for shallow waters. The presence of a bottom significantly alters the estimated heat budget in shallow waters, which affects the corresponding thermal stratification and hence modifies the circulation. Based on the data collected during the COBOP field experiment near the Bahamas, we have used a one-dimensional turbulence closure model to show the influence of the bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The water depth has an almost one-to-one correlation with the temperature rise. Effects of varying the bottom albedo by replacing the sea grass bed with a coral sand bottom, also has an appreciable effect on the heat budget of the shallow regions. We believe that the differences in the heat budget for the shallow areas will have an influence on the local circulation processes and especially on the evaporative and long-wave heat losses for these areas. The ultimate effects on humidity and cloudiness of the region are expected to be significant as well.

  7. Modelling of metal vapour in pulsed TIG including influence of self-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwao, Toru; Mori, Yusuke; Okubo, Masato; Sakai, Tadashi; Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Yumoto, Motoshige

    2010-11-01

    Pulsed TIG (tungsten inert gas) welding is used to improve the stability and speed of arc welding, and to allow greater control over the heat input to the weld. The temperature and the radiation power density of the pulsed arc vary as a function of time, as does the distribution of metal vapour, and its effects on the arc. A self-consistent two-dimensional model of the arc and electrodes is used to calculate the properties of the arc as a function of time. Self-absorption of radiation is treated by two methods, one taking into account absorption of radiation only within the control volume of emission, and the other taking into account absorption throughout the plasma. The relation between metal vapour and radiation power density is analysed by calculating the iron vapour distribution. The results show that the transport of iron vapour is strongly affected by the fast convective flow during the peak current period. During the base current period, the region containing a low concentration of metal vapour expands because of the low convective flow. The iron vapour distribution does not closely follow the current pulses. The temperature, iron vapour and radiation power density distributions depend on the self-absorption model used. The temperature distribution becomes broader when self-absorption of radiation from all directions is considered.

  8. Violence in young adolescents' relationships: a path model.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Wendy L; Proulx, Jocelyn B

    2008-02-01

    A structural equation model based on social cognitive theory was used to predict relationship violence from young adolescents' knowledge, self-efficacy, attitudes, and alternative conflict strategies (n = 143 male and 147 female grade 7-9 students). A direct causal effect was supported for violence-tolerant attitudes and psychologically aggressive (escalation/blame) strategies on physical violence against dating partners and friends. Knowledge and self-efficacy contributed to using reasoning-based strategies, but this reduced violence only in boys' friendships. Knowledge reduced violence-tolerant attitudes, thus reducing escalation/ blame and physical violence. Attitudes toward male and female dating violence (ATMDV and ATFDV) were indicators of general attitudes toward violence among non-dating students but ATFDV affected physical violence and ATMDV affected psychological aggression for both dating boys and girls. PMID:18162636

  9. Moonlet induced wakes in planetary rings: Analytical model including eccentric orbits of moon and ring particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiß, M.; Spahn, F.; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2010-11-01

    Saturn's rings host two known moons, Pan and Daphnis, which are massive enough to clear circumferential gaps in the ring around their orbits. Both moons create wake patterns at the gap edges by gravitational deflection of the ring material (Cuzzi, J.N., Scargle, J.D. [1985]. Astrophys. J. 292, 276-290; Showalter, M.R., Cuzzi, J.N., Marouf, E.A., Esposito, L.W. [1986]. Icarus 66, 297-323). New Cassini observations revealed that these wavy edges deviate from the sinusoidal waveform, which one would expect from a theory that assumes a circular orbit of the perturbing moon and neglects particle interactions. Resonant perturbations of the edges by moons outside the ring system, as well as an eccentric orbit of the embedded moon, may partly explain this behavior (Porco, C.C., and 34 colleagues [2005]. Science 307, 1226-1236; Tiscareno, M.S., Burns, J.A., Hedman, M.M., Spitale, J.N., Porco, C.C., Murray, C.D., and the Cassini Imaging team [2005]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 37, 767; Weiss, J.W., Porco, C.C., Tiscareno, M.S., Burns, J.A., Dones, L. [2005]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 37, 767; Weiss, J.W., Porco, C.C., Tiscareno, M.S. [2009]. Astron. J. 138, 272-286). Here we present an extended non-collisional streamline model which accounts for both effects. We describe the resulting variations of the density structure and the modification of the nonlinearity parameter q. Furthermore, an estimate is given for the applicability of the model. We use the streamwire model introduced by Stewart (Stewart, G.R. [1991]. Icarus 94, 436-450) to plot the perturbed ring density at the gap edges. We apply our model to the Keeler gap edges undulated by Daphnis and to a faint ringlet in the Encke gap close to the orbit of Pan. The modulations of the latter ringlet, induced by the perturbations of Pan (Burns, J.A., Hedman, M.M., Tiscareno, M.S., Nicholson, P.D., Streetman, B.J., Colwell, J.E., Showalter, M.R., Murray, C.D., Cuzzi, J.N., Porco, C.C., and the Cassini ISS team [2005]. Bull. Am

  10. Modeling groundwater-surface water interactions including effects of morphogenetic depressions in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixio, A.; Gambolati, G.; Paniconi, C.; Putti, M.; Shestopalov, V.; Bublias, V.; Bohuslavsky, A.; Kasteltseva, N.; Rudenko, Y.

    2002-06-01

    Morphogenetic depressions or "dishes" in the Chernobyl exclusion zone play an important role in the transport of water and solutes (in particular the radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr), functioning as accumulation basins and facilitating their transfer between the surface and subsurface via return flow (under conditions of high soil water saturation) and infiltration. From a digital elevation model (DEM) of the 112-km2 study area, 583 dishes (covering about 10% of the area) are identified and classified into four geometric types, ranging in size from 2,500 to 22,500 m2, and a with a maximum depth of 2 m. The collective influence of these depressions on the hydrology of the study basin is investigated with a coupled model of three-dimensional saturated and unsaturated subsurface flow and one-dimensional (along the rill or channel direction s) hill-slope and stream overland flow. Special attention is given to the handling of dishes, applying a "lake boundary-following" procedure in the topographic analysis, a level pool routing algorithm to simulate the storage and retardation effects of these reservoirs, and a higher hydraulic conductivity in the topmost 3 m of soil relative to non-dish cells in accordance with field observations. Modeling the interactions between the surface and subsurface hydrologic regimes requires careful consideration of the distinction between potential and actual atmospheric fluxes and their conversion to ponding, overland flow, and infiltration, and this coupling is described in some detail. Further consideration is given to the treatment of snow accumulation, snowmelt, and soil freezing and thawing processes, handled via linear and step function variations over the winter months in atmospheric boundary conditions and in upper soil hydraulic conductivities. A 1-year simulation of the entire watershed is used to analyze the water table response and, at the surface, the ponding heads and the infiltration/exfiltration fluxes. Saturation patterns and

  11. Energy-based fatigue model for shape memory alloys including thermomechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yahui; Zhu, Jihong; Moumni, Ziad; Van Herpen, Alain; Zhang, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a low cycle fatigue criterion for pseudoelastic shape memory alloys to take into account thermomechanical coupling. To this end, fatigue tests are carried out at different loading rates under strain control at room temperature using NiTi wires. Temperature distribution on the specimen is measured using a high speed thermal camera. Specimens are tested to failure and fatigue lifetimes of specimens are measured. Test results show that the fatigue lifetime is greatly influenced by the loading rate: as the strain rate increases, the fatigue lifetime decreases. Furthermore, it is shown that the fatigue cracks initiate when the stored energy inside the material reaches a critical value. An energy-based fatigue criterion is thus proposed as a function of the irreversible hysteresis energy of the stabilized cycle and the loading rate. Fatigue life is calculated using the proposed model. The experimental and computational results compare well.

  12. Data Relationships: Towards a Conceptual Model of Scientific Data Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourcle, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    As the amount of data, types of processing and storage formats increase, the total number of record permutations increase dramatically. The result is an overwhelming number of records that make identifying the best data object to answer a user's needs more difficult. The issue is further complicated as each archive's data catalog may be designed around different concepts - - anything from individual files to be served, series of similarly generated and processed data, or something entirely different. Catalogs may not only be flat tables, but may be structured as multiple tables with each table being a different data series, or a normalized structure of the individual data files. Merging federated search results from archives with different catalog designs can create situations where the data object of interest is difficult to find due to an overwhelming number of seemingly similar or entirely unwanted records. We present a reference model for discussing data catalogs and the complex relationships between similar data objects. We show how the model can be used to improve scientist's ability to quickly identify the best data object for their purposes and discuss technical issues required to use this model in a federated system.

  13. ECO: A Generic Eutrophication Model Including Comprehensive Sediment-Water Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Johannes G. C.; van Beek, Jan K. L.

    2013-01-01

    The content and calibration of the comprehensive generic 3D eutrophication model ECO for water and sediment quality is presented. Based on a computational grid for water and sediment, ECO is used as a tool for water quality management to simulate concentrations and mass fluxes of nutrients (N, P, Si), phytoplankton species, detrital organic matter, electron acceptors and related substances. ECO combines integral simulation of water and sediment quality with sediment diagenesis and closed mass balances. Its advanced process formulations for substances in the water column and the bed sediment were developed to allow for a much more dynamic calculation of the sediment-water exchange fluxes of nutrients as resulting from steep concentration gradients across the sediment-water interface than is possible with other eutrophication models. ECO is to more accurately calculate the accumulation of organic matter and nutrients in the sediment, and to allow for more accurate prediction of phytoplankton biomass and water quality in response to mitigative measures such as nutrient load reduction. ECO was calibrated for shallow Lake Veluwe (The Netherlands). Due to restoration measures this lake underwent a transition from hypertrophic conditions to moderately eutrophic conditions, leading to the extensive colonization by submerged macrophytes. ECO reproduces observed water quality well for the transition period of ten years. The values of its process coefficients are in line with ranges derived from literature. ECO’s calculation results underline the importance of redox processes and phosphate speciation for the nutrient return fluxes. Among other things, the results suggest that authigenic formation of a stable apatite-like mineral in the sediment can contribute significantly to oligotrophication of a lake after a phosphorus load reduction. PMID:23844160

  14. College Women's Stay/Leave Decisions in Abusive Dating Relationships: A Prospective Analysis of an Expanded Investment Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Katie M.; Gidycz, Christine A.; Murphy, Megan J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore college women's stay/ leave decisions in abusive relationships using a prospective methodology. Participants (N = 323) completed surveys at the beginning and end of a 10-week academic quarter for course credit. A path analysis suggested that the model--which included investment model variables (i.e.,…

  15. Noninvasive model including right ventricular speckle tracking for the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mahran, Yossra; Schueler, Robert; Weber, Marcel; Pizarro, Carmen; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk; Hammerstingl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find parameters from transthorathic echocardiography (TTE) including speckle-tracking (ST) analysis of the right ventricle (RV) to identify precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). METHODS Forty-four patients with suspected PH undergoing right heart catheterization (RHC) were consecutively included (mean age 63.1 ± 14 years, 61% male gender). All patients underwent standardized TTE including ST analysis of the RV. Based on the subsequent TTE-derived measurements, the presence of PH was assessed: Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was calculated by Simpsons rule from 4Ch. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) was assessed with continuous wave Doppler of systolic tricuspid regurgitant velocity and regarded raised with values ≥ 30 mmHg as a surrogate parameter for RA pressure. A concomitantly elevated PCWP was considered a means to discriminate between the precapillary and postcapillary form of PH. PCWP was considered elevated when the E/e’ ratio was > 12 as a surrogate for LV diastolic pressure. E/e’ ratio was measured by gauging systolic and diastolic velocities of the lateral and septal mitral valve annulus using TDI mode. The results were then averaged with conventional measurement of mitral valve inflow. Furthermore, functional testing with six minutes walking distance (6MWD), ECG-RV stress signs, NT pro-BNP and other laboratory values were assessed. RESULTS PH was confirmed in 34 patients (precapillary PH, n = 15, postcapillary PH, n = 19). TTE showed significant differences in E/e’ ratio (precapillary PH: 12.3 ± 4.4, postcapillary PH: 17.3 ± 10.3, no PH: 12.1 ± 4.5, P = 0.02), LV volumes (ESV: 25.0 ± 15.0 mL, 49.9 ± 29.5 mL, 32.2 ± 13.6 mL, P = 0.027; EDV: 73.6 ± 24.0 mL, 110.6 ± 31.8 mL, 87.8 ± 33.0 mL, P = 0.021) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP: 61.2 ± 22.3 mmHg, 53.6 ± 20.1 mmHg, 31.2 ± 24.6 mmHg, P = 0.001). STRV analysis showed significant differences for apical RV longitudinal strain (RVAS: -7.5% ± 5

  16. Development of a new fertility prediction model for stallion semen, including flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Barrier Battut, I; Kempfer, A; Becker, J; Lebailly, L; Camugli, S; Chevrier, L

    2016-09-01

    Several laboratories routinely use flow cytometry to evaluate stallion semen quality. However, objective and practical tools for the on-field interpretation of data concerning fertilizing potential are scarce. A panel of nine tests, evaluating a large number of compartments or functions of the spermatozoa: motility, morphology, viability, mitochondrial activity, oxidation level, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity, "organization" of the plasma membrane, and hypoosmotic resistance, was applied to a population of 43 stallions, 33 of which showing widely differing fertilities (19%-84% pregnancy rate per cycle [PRC]). Analyses were performed either within 2 hours after semen collection or after 24-hour storage at 4 °C in INRA96 extender, on three to six ejaculates for each stallion. The aim was to provide data on the distribution of values among said population, showing within-stallion and between-stallion variability, and to determine whether appropriate combinations of tests could evaluate the fertilizing potential of each stallion. Within-stallion repeatability, defined as intrastallion correlation (r = between-stallion variance/total variance) ranged between 0.29 and 0.84 for "conventional" variables (viability, morphology, and motility), and between 0.15 and 0.81 for "cytometric" variables. Those data suggested that analyzing six ejaculates would be adequate to characterize a stallion. For most variables, except those related to DNA integrity and some motility variables, results differed significantly between immediately performed analyses and analyses performed after 24 hours at 4 °C. Two "best-fit" combinations of variables were determined. Factorial discriminant analysis using a first combination of seven variables, including the polarization of mitochondria, acrosome integrity, DNA integrity, and hypoosmotic resistance, permitted exact determination of the fertility group for each stallion: fertile, that is, PRC higher than 55%; intermediate, that is, 45

  17. Thermodynamic Modeling and Dispatch of Distributed Energy Technologies including Fuel Cell -- Gas Turbine Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarty, Dustin Fogle

    Distributed energy systems are a promising means by which to reduce both emissions and costs. Continuous generators must be responsive and highly efficiency to support building dynamics and intermittent on-site renewable power. Fuel cell -- gas turbine hybrids (FC/GT) are fuel-flexible generators capable of ultra-high efficiency, ultra-low emissions, and rapid power response. This work undertakes a detailed study of the electrochemistry, chemistry and mechanical dynamics governing the complex interaction between the individual systems in such a highly coupled hybrid arrangement. The mechanisms leading to the compressor stall/surge phenomena are studied for the increased risk posed to particular hybrid configurations. A novel fuel cell modeling method introduced captures various spatial resolutions, flow geometries, stack configurations and novel heat transfer pathways. Several promising hybrid configurations are analyzed throughout the work and a sensitivity analysis of seven design parameters is conducted. A simple estimating method is introduced for the combined system efficiency of a fuel cell and a turbine using component performance specifications. Existing solid oxide fuel cell technology is capable of hybrid efficiencies greater than 75% (LHV) operating on natural gas, and existing molten carbonate systems greater than 70% (LHV). A dynamic model is calibrated to accurately capture the physical coupling of a FC/GT demonstrator tested at UC Irvine. The 2900 hour experiment highlighted the sensitivity to small perturbations and a need for additional control development. Further sensitivity studies outlined the responsiveness and limits of different control approaches. The capability for substantial turn-down and load following through speed control and flow bypass with minimal impact on internal fuel cell thermal distribution is particularly promising to meet local demands or provide dispatchable support for renewable power. Advanced control and dispatch

  18. Using structural equation modeling to investigate relationships among ecological variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malaeb, Z.A.; Kevin, Summers J.; Pugesek, B.H.

    2000-01-01

    Structural equation modeling is an advanced multivariate statistical process with which a researcher can construct theoretical concepts, test their measurement reliability, hypothesize and test a theory about their relationships, take into account measurement errors, and consider both direct and indirect effects of variables on one another. Latent variables are theoretical concepts that unite phenomena under a single term, e.g., ecosystem health, environmental condition, and pollution (Bollen, 1989). Latent variables are not measured directly but can be expressed in terms of one or more directly measurable variables called indicators. For some researchers, defining, constructing, and examining the validity of latent variables may be the end task of itself. For others, testing hypothesized relationships of latent variables may be of interest. We analyzed the correlation matrix of eleven environmental variables from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) using methods of structural equation modeling. We hypothesized and tested a conceptual model to characterize the interdependencies between four latent variables-sediment contamination, natural variability, biodiversity, and growth potential. In particular, we were interested in measuring the direct, indirect, and total effects of sediment contamination and natural variability on biodiversity and growth potential. The model fit the data well and accounted for 81% of the variability in biodiversity and 69% of the variability in growth potential. It revealed a positive total effect of natural variability on growth potential that otherwise would have been judged negative had we not considered indirect effects. That is, natural variability had a negative direct effect on growth potential of magnitude -0.3251 and a positive indirect effect mediated through biodiversity of magnitude 0.4509, yielding a net positive total effect of 0

  19. Analysis of Prey-Predator Three Species Fishery Model with Harvesting Including Prey Refuge and Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sankar Kumar; Roy, Banani

    In this article, a prey-predator system with Holling type II functional response for the predator population including prey refuge region has been analyzed. Also a harvesting effort has been considered for the predator population. The density-dependent mortality rate for the prey, predator and super predator has been considered. The equilibria of the proposed system have been determined. Local and global stabilities for the system have been discussed. We have used the analytic approach to derive the global asymptotic stabilities of the system. The maximal predator per capita consumption rate has been considered as a bifurcation parameter to evaluate Hopf bifurcation in the neighborhood of interior equilibrium point. Also, we have used fishing effort to harvest predator population of the system as a control to develop a dynamic framework to investigate the optimal utilization of the resource, sustainability properties of the stock and the resource rent is earned from the resource. Finally, we have presented some numerical simulations to verify the analytic results and the system has been analyzed through graphical illustrations.

  20. A simple computer model of pellet/cladding interaction including stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yaung, J.Y.; Okrent, D.; Wazzan, A.R.

    1985-12-01

    Many unexpected failures, below design criteria, of light water reactor fuel cladding (Zircaloy) have been found during operational power ramps. Such a fuel rod failure can result from pellet/cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) assisted by fission product stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the Zircaloy tubing. A deterministic PCMI/SCC model has been coupled with the steady-state fuel behavior code, FRAPCON-2. The resulting code has been benchmarked (against few test cases but comprising many data points) but not fully verified. It is used to simulate two important occurrences: preramp (base) and power ramp irradiation. Because of the limitations of FRAPCON-2, the code is best suited to the simulation of mild power ramps with rates that do not exceed 0.02%/s. Computations with the code for greater power ramp rates, however, gave results which are not inconsistent with some overpower ramp experimental test results. Limited sensitivity studies are performed on the operational parameters and some fuel rod design parameters.

  1. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  2. Toward a Life Span Theory of Close Relationships: The Affective Relationships Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Keiko

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses how close relationships can be conceptualized so that they can be accurately understood over the life span. First, two typical clusters of theories of close relationships, the attachment theory and the social network theory, are compared and discussed with regard to their fundamental but controversial assumptions regarding…

  3. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  4. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  5. A gamma variate model that includes stretched exponential is a better fit for gastric emptying data from mice

    PubMed Central

    Bajzer, Željko; Gibbons, Simon J.; Coleman, Heidi D.; Linden, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive breath tests for gastric emptying are important techniques for understanding the changes in gastric motility that occur in disease or in response to drugs. Mice are often used as an animal model; however, the gamma variate model currently used for data analysis does not always fit the data appropriately. The aim of this study was to determine appropriate mathematical models to better fit mouse gastric emptying data including when two peaks are present in the gastric emptying curve. We fitted 175 gastric emptying data sets with two standard models (gamma variate and power exponential), with a gamma variate model that includes stretched exponential and with a proposed two-component model. The appropriateness of the fit was assessed by the Akaike Information Criterion. We found that extension of the gamma variate model to include a stretched exponential improves the fit, which allows for a better estimation of T1/2 and Tlag. When two distinct peaks in gastric emptying are present, a two-component model is required for the most appropriate fit. We conclude that use of a stretched exponential gamma variate model and when appropriate a two-component model will result in a better estimate of physiologically relevant parameters when analyzing mouse gastric emptying data. PMID:26045615

  6. Nutrient Models Developments Using Runoff-Nutrient Relationships in an Agricultural Prairie Basin, Manitoba.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Elliott, J. A.; Baulch, H. M.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient export to streams and lakes from agricultural activities can result in significant deterioration of water quality and aquatic ecosystem health. In Western Canada, particular concerns arise for prairie agricultural systems, which are dominated by the effects of a cold climate. Insufficient attention has been given to understand the links between cold region watershed responses and nutrient concentration and a robust watershed-scale modeling framework is needed to simulate nutrient concentration and loads. Long-term, field observations of nutrient concentration-runoff relationships were used to develop nutrient concentration models for the Tobacco Creek Model Watershed (TCMW) which drains into the Red River basin. Field observations include streamflow concentrations of N and P at multiple scales from two headwater basins. Distinct nutrient concentration-runoff models for snowmelt, rain on snow (ROS) and rainfall runoff processes were developed from observed runoff-nutrient concentration relationships. Snowmelt runoff had a moderately positive correlation with particulate nutrient concentrations but no correlation with that of dissolved nutrients. ROS runoff had a weak relationship with both particulate and dissolved nutrient concentrations. Rainfall runoff had the strongest positive correlation with particulate nutrient concentrations but no association with that of dissolved nutrients. The modeling approach also identified a clear hysteretic behavior in the relationship between runoff and particulate nutrient concentration during the 2013 snowmelt runoff event at the basin outlet gauge. The models provide insight into the hydrological controls on nutrient export from cold regions watersheds and the strong effects of inter-annual climatic variability. Snowmelt runoff is a reliable exporter of large nutrient loads while nutrient export by rainfall runoff exceeded snowmelt runoff during hydrologically wet summers such as 2002, 2005, 2011 and 2013.

  7. A Commentary on the Relationship between Model Fit and Saturated Path Models in Structural Equation Modeling Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Lee, Chun-Lung; Marcoulides, George A.; Chang, Chi

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between saturated path-analysis models and their fit to data is revisited. It is demonstrated that a saturated model need not fit perfectly or even well a given data set when fit to the raw data is examined, a criterion currently frequently overlooked by researchers utilizing path analysis modeling techniques. The potential of…

  8. Toll-like receptor 4-related immunostimulatory polysaccharides: Primary structure, activity relationships, and possible interaction models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorui; Qi, Chunhui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Wenxia; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2016-09-20

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is an important polysaccharide receptor; however, the relationships between the structures and biological activities of TLR4 and polysaccharides remain unknown. Many recent findings have revealed the primary structure of TLR4/MD-2-related polysaccharides, and several three-dimensional structure models of polysaccharide-binding proteins have been reported; and these models provide insights into the mechanisms through which polysaccharides interact with TLR4. In this review, we first discuss the origins of polysaccharides related to TLR4, including polysaccharides from higher plants, fungi, bacteria, algae, and animals. We then briefly describe the glucosidic bond types of TLR4-related heteroglycans and homoglycans and describe the typical molecular weights of TLR4-related polysaccharides. The primary structures and activity relationships of polysaccharides with TLR4/MD-2 are also discussed. Finally, based on the existing interaction models of LPS with TLR4/MD-2 and linear polysaccharides with proteins, we provide insights into the possible interaction models of polysaccharide ligands with TLR4/MD-2. To our knowledge, this review is the first to summarize the primary structures and activity relationships of TLR4-related polysaccharides and the possible mechanisms of interaction for TLR4 and TLR4-related polysaccharides. PMID:27261743

  9. Gene–disease relationship discovery based on model-driven data integration and database view definition

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, S.; Jonveaux, P.; Bicep, C.; Pierron, L.; Smaïl-Tabbone, M.; Devignes, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Computational methods are widely used to discover gene–disease relationships hidden in vast masses of available genomic and post-genomic data. In most current methods, a similarity measure is calculated between gene annotations and known disease genes or disease descriptions. However, more explicit gene–disease relationships are required for better insights into the molecular bases of diseases, especially for complex multi-gene diseases. Results: Explicit relationships between genes and diseases are formulated as candidate gene definitions that may include intermediary genes, e.g. orthologous or interacting genes. These definitions guide data modelling in our database approach for gene–disease relationship discovery and are expressed as views which ultimately lead to the retrieval of documented sets of candidate genes. A system called ACGR (Approach for Candidate Gene Retrieval) has been implemented and tested with three case studies including a rare orphan gene disease. Availability: The ACGR sources are freely available at http://bioinfo.loria.fr/projects/acgr/acgr-software/. See especially the file ‘disease_description’ and the folders ‘Xcollect_scenarios’ and ‘ACGR_views’. Contact: devignes@loria.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19042916

  10. Linear Equating for the NEAT Design: Parameter Substitution Models and Chained Linear Relationship Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael T.; Mroch, Andrew A.; Suh, Youngsuk; Ripkey, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes five linear equating models for the "nonequivalent groups with anchor test" (NEAT) design with internal anchors (i.e., the anchor test is part of the full test). The analysis employs a two-dimensional framework. The first dimension contrasts two general approaches to developing the equating relationship. Under a "parameter…

  11. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  12. Styles in Intimate Relationships: The A-R-C Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    L'Abate, Luciano

    1983-01-01

    Links internal personality differentiation to external patterns of interpersonal style. Suggests three basic styles in intimate relationships: apathy, reactivity, and conductivity. Discusses each style in detail. (RC)

  13. A nonlinear model for fluid flow in a multiple-zone composite reservoir including the quadratic gradient term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Lu; Fan, Xiang-Yu; He, Yong-Ming; Nie, Ren-Shi; Huang, Quan-Hua

    2013-08-01

    Based on material balance and Darcy's law, the governing equation with the quadratic pressure gradient term was deduced. Then the nonlinear model for fluid flow in a multiple-zone composite reservoir including the quadratic gradient term was established and solved using a Laplace transform. A series of standard log-log type curves of 1-zone (homogeneous), 2-zone and 3-zone reservoirs were plotted and nonlinear flow characteristics were analysed. The type curves governed by the coefficient of the quadratic gradient term (β) gradually deviate from those of a linear model with time elapsing. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were implemented to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The results showed that differences of pressure transients between the linear and nonlinear models increase with elapsed time and β. At the end, a successful application of the theoretical model data against the field data shows that the nonlinear model will be a good tool to evaluate formation parameters more accurately.

  14. A Model for the Supervisor-Doctoral Student Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainhard, Tim; van der Rijst, Roeland; van Tartwijk, Jan; Wubbels, Theo

    2009-01-01

    The supervisor-doctoral student interpersonal relationship is important for the success of a PhD-project. Therefore, information about doctoral students' perceptions of their relationship with their supervisor can be useful for providing detailed feedback to supervisors aiming at improving the quality of their supervision. This paper describes the…

  15. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  16. An Investment Model Analysis of Relationship Stability among Women Court-Mandated to Violence Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, Deborah L.; Moore, Todd M.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    This investigation examined relationship stability among 60 women court-mandated to violence interventions by applying a general model (i.e., Rusbult's 1980 Investment Model) to predict intentions to leave current relationships. As in past research, results showed that Investment Model predictions were supported such that court-mandated women who…

  17. A Study of the Relationship between High School Dual Enrollment Participation and College Persistence, Including Potential Intervening Variables, in Southeast Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Kimberly G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the research body of literature regarding dual enrollment, the impact and effectiveness of the program, and its relationship to college persistence. The goal was to provide information useful to governing bodies, educational leaders, parents and students. The theoretical construct, defined through the…

  18. Spectral relationships for atmospheric correction. II. Improving NASA's standard and MUMM near infra-red modeling schemes.

    PubMed

    Goyens, C; Jamet, C; Ruddick, K G

    2013-09-01

    Spectral relationships, reflecting the spectral dependence of water-leaving reflectance, ρw(λ), can be easily implemented in current AC algorithms with the aim to improve ρw(λ) retrievals where the algorithms fail. The present study evaluates the potential of spectral relationships to improve the MUMM [Ruddick et al., 2006, Limnol. Oceanogr. 51, 1167-1179] and standard NASA [Bailey et al., 2010, Opt. Express 18, 7521-7527] near infra-red (NIR) modeling schemes included in the AC algorithm to account for non-zero ρw(λNIR), based on in situ coastal ρw(λ) and simulated Rayleigh corrected reflectance data. Two modified NIR-modeling schemes are investigated: (1) the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme is forced with bounding relationships in the red spectral domain and with a NIR polynomial relationship and, (2) the constant NIR ρw(λ) ratio used in the MUMM NIR-modeling scheme is replaced by a NIR polynomial spectral relationship. Results suggest that the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme performs better for all turbidity ranges and in particular in the blue spectral domain (percentage bias decreased by approximately 50%) when it is forced with the red and NIR spectral relationships. However, with these new constraints, more reflectance spectra are flagged due to non-physical Chlorophyll-a concentration estimations. The new polynomial-based MUMM NIR-modeling scheme yielded lower ρw(λ) retrieval errors and particularly in extremely turbid waters. However, including the polynomial NIR relationship significantly increased the sensitivity of the algorithm to errors on the selected aerosol model from nearby clear water pixels. PMID:24103991

  19. Remaining in an Abusive Relationship: An Investment Model Analysis of Nonvoluntary Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusbult, Caryl E.; Martz, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes the nature of interdependence in ongoing relationships, using an investment model to understand decisions to remain in abusive relationships. Found that feelings of commitment were greater among women who had poorer-quality economic alternatives, were more heavily invested in their relationship, and who experienced less dissatisfaction…

  20. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional (3D) mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional (2D) representations. We used a controlled, backwards design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students’ ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. PMID:26923186

  1. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  2. Information System Success Model for Customer Relationship Management System in Health Promotion Centers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. Methods The evaluation areas of the CRM system includes three areas: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Results Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. Conclusions This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems. PMID:23882416

  3. New Regression Models to Evaluate the Relationship between Biomechanics of Gymnastic Vault and Initial Vault Difficulty Values.

    PubMed

    Atiković, Almir

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this paper was to determine the relationship between biomechanical parameters of vault flights with respect to new models of initial vault difficulty values in men's artistic gymnastic. The study sample included vaults (n=64) and models (n=5) from the 2009 Code of Points (CoP) of the Federation International of Gymnastics (FIG). The dependent variable included all difficulty values ranging from 2-7.2 points, while the sample of independent variables included twelve biomechanical parameters. After implementing the regression analysis, it could be established that the best model derived only the second flight phase with 95% of explained variance. PMID:23487176

  4. NASTRAN thermal analyzer: Theory and application including a guide to modeling engineering problems, volume 1. [thermal analyzer manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer Manual describes the fundamental and theoretical treatment of the finite element method, with emphasis on the derivations of the constituent matrices of different elements and solution algorithms. Necessary information and data relating to the practical applications of engineering modeling are included.

  5. 75 FR 59071 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2B16 (CL-604 Variants (Including CL-605...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... in the Federal Register on June 2, 2010 (75 FR 30740). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have.... Model CL-600-2B16 (CL- 604 Variants (Including CL-605 Marketing Variant)) Airplanes AGENCY:...

  6. NASTRAN thermal analyzer: Theory and application including a guide to modeling engineering problems, volume 2. [sample problem library guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, C. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A sample problem library containing 20 problems covering most facets of Nastran Thermal Analyzer modeling is presented. Areas discussed include radiative interchange, arbitrary nonlinear loads, transient temperature and steady-state structural plots, temperature-dependent conductivities, simulated multi-layer insulation, and constraint techniques. The use of the major control options and important DMAP alters is demonstrated.

  7. An approach for including the stiffness and damping of elastohydrodynamic point contacts in deep groove ball bearing equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonato, Fábio; Cavalca, Katia L.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for including the Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film effects to a lateral vibration model of a deep groove ball bearing by using a novel approximation for the EHD contacts by a set of equivalent nonlinear spring and viscous damper. The fitting of the equivalent contact model used the results of a transient multi-level finite difference EHD algorithm to adjust the dynamic parameters. The comparison between the approximated model and the finite difference simulated results showed a suitable representation of the stationary and dynamic contact behaviors. The linear damping hypothesis could be shown as a rough representation of the actual hysteretic behavior of the EHD contact. Nevertheless, the overall accuracy of the model was not impaired by the use of such approximation. Further on, the inclusion of the equivalent EHD contact model is equated for both the restoring and the dissipative components of the bearing's lateral dynamics. The derived model was used to investigate the effects of the rolling element bearing lubrication on the vibration response of a rotor's lumped parameter model. The fluid film stiffening effect, previously only observable by experimentation, could be quantified using the proposed model, as well as the portion of the bearing damping provided by the EHD fluid film. Results from a laboratory rotor-bearing test rig were used to indirectly validate the proposed contact approximation. A finite element model of the rotor accounting for the lubricated bearing formulation adequately portrayed the frequency content of the bearing orbits observed on the test rig.

  8. Model Selection and Evaluation Based on Emerging Infectious Disease Data Sets including A/H1N1 and Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wendi; Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to apply simple ODE models in the area of modeling the spread of emerging infectious diseases and show the importance of model selection in estimating parameters, the basic reproduction number, turning point, and final size. To quantify the plausibility of each model, given the data and the set of four models including Logistic, Gompertz, Rosenzweg, and Richards models, the Bayes factors are calculated and the precise estimates of the best fitted model parameters and key epidemic characteristics have been obtained. In particular, for Ebola the basic reproduction numbers are 1.3522 (95% CI (1.3506, 1.3537)), 1.2101 (95% CI (1.2084, 1.2119)), 3.0234 (95% CI (2.6063, 3.4881)), and 1.9018 (95% CI (1.8565, 1.9478)), the turning points are November 7,November 17, October 2, and November 3, 2014, and the final sizes until December 2015 are 25794 (95% CI (25630, 25958)), 3916 (95% CI (3865, 3967)), 9886 (95% CI (9740, 10031)), and 12633 (95% CI (12515, 12750)) for West Africa, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, respectively. The main results confirm that model selection is crucial in evaluating and predicting the important quantities describing the emerging infectious diseases, and arbitrarily picking a model without any consideration of alternatives is problematic. PMID:26451161

  9. Research and development program for non-linear structural modeling with advanced time-temperature dependent constitutive relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a 20-month research and development program for nonlinear structural modeling with advanced time-temperature constitutive relationships are reported. The program included: (1) the evaluation of a number of viscoplastic constitutive models in the published literature; (2) incorporation of three of the most appropriate constitutive models into the MARC nonlinear finite element program; (3) calibration of the three constitutive models against experimental data using Hastelloy-X material; and (4) application of the most appropriate constitutive model to a three dimensional finite element analysis of a cylindrical combustor liner louver test specimen to establish the capability of the viscoplastic model to predict component structural response.

  10. Integrating an evidence-based intervention into clinical practice: 'transitional relationship model'.

    PubMed

    Forchuk, C; Martin, M-L; Jensen, E; Ouseley, S; Sealy, P; Beal, G; Reynolds, W; Sharkey, S

    2013-09-01

    The transitional relationship model (TRM) facilitates the discharge process by providing peer support and hospital staff involvement until a therapeutic relationship has been established with a community care provider. A quasi-experimental, action-oriented research design was employed in which psychiatric wards at six hospital sites implemented the model in three waves. Helpful strategies were identified by each wave of wards for consideration by subsequent wards. Using an ethnographic approach, qualitative data were examined to uncover experiences and perceptions of TRM implementation and to help identify key issues that were supporting or hampering implementation. Specific strategies that facilitate the implementation of TRM include: (1) the use of educational modules for on-ward hospital staff training and peer training; (2) presence of on-site champions; and (3) supportive documentation systems. Issues identified as barriers to implementation included: (1) feeling drowned, swamped and overwhelmed; (2) death by process; (3) team dynamics; and (4) changes in champions. Staged large-scale implementation of the TRM allowed for iterative improvements to the model leading to positive outcomes. This study highlights the need to address work environment issues, particularly interprofessional teams. PMID:22827453

  11. Analyzing the Validity of Relationship Banking through Agent-based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikido, Yukihito; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    This article analyzes the validity of relationship banking through agent-based modeling. In the analysis, we especially focus on the relationship between economic conditions and both lenders' and borrowers' behaviors. As a result of intensive experiments, we made the following interesting findings: (1) Relationship banking contributes to reducing bad loan; (2) relationship banking is more effective in enhancing the market growth compared to transaction banking, when borrowers' sales scale is large; (3) keener competition among lenders may bring inefficiency to the market.

  12. Generalizing the correlated chromophore domain model of reversible photodegradation to include the effects of an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2014-03-01

    All observations of photodegradation and self-healing follow the predictions of the correlated chromophore domain model [Ramini et al., Polym. Chem. 4, 4948 (2013), 10.1039/c3py00263b]. In the present work, we generalize the domain model to describe the effects of an electric field by including induced dipole interactions between molecules in a domain by means of a self-consistent field approach. This electric field correction is added to the statistical mechanical model to calculate the distribution of domains that are central to healing. Also included in the model are the dynamics due to the formation of an irreversibly damaged species, which we propose involves damage to the polymer mediated through energy transfer from a dopant molecule after absorbing a photon. As in previous studies, the model with one-dimensional domains best explains all experimental data of the population as a function of time, temperature, intensity, concentration, and now applied electric field. Though the precise nature of a domain is yet to be determined, the fact that only one-dimensional domain models are consistent with observations suggests that they might be made of correlated dye molecules along polymer chains. Furthermore, the voltage-dependent measurements suggest that the largest polarizability axis of the molecules are oriented perpendicular to the chain.

  13. Generalizing the correlated chromophore domain model of reversible photodegradation to include the effects of an applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin; Kuzyk, Mark G

    2014-03-01

    All observations of photodegradation and self-healing follow the predictions of the correlated chromophore domain model [Ramini et al., Polym. Chem. 4, 4948 (2013)]. In the present work, we generalize the domain model to describe the effects of an electric field by including induced dipole interactions between molecules in a domain by means of a self-consistent field approach. This electric field correction is added to the statistical mechanical model to calculate the distribution of domains that are central to healing. Also included in the model are the dynamics due to the formation of an irreversibly damaged species, which we propose involves damage to the polymer mediated through energy transfer from a dopant molecule after absorbing a photon. As in previous studies, the model with one-dimensional domains best explains all experimental data of the population as a function of time, temperature, intensity, concentration, and now applied electric field. Though the precise nature of a domain is yet to be determined, the fact that only one-dimensional domain models are consistent with observations suggests that they might be made of correlated dye molecules along polymer chains. Furthermore, the voltage-dependent measurements suggest that the largest polarizability axis of the molecules are oriented perpendicular to the chain. PMID:24730866

  14. USING STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELING TO INVESTIGATE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG ECOLOGICAL VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper gives an introductory account of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) and demonstrates its application using LISREL< with a model utilizing environmental data. Using nine EMAP data variables, we analyzed their correlation matrix with an SEM model. The model characterized...

  15. A simple model of the right atrium of the human heart with the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes included.

    PubMed

    Podziemski, Piotr; Zebrowski, Jan J

    2013-08-01

    Existing atrial models with detailed anatomical structure and multi-variable cardiac transmembrane current models are too complex to allow to combine an investigation of long time dycal properties of the heart rhythm with the ability to effectively simulate cardiac electrical activity during arrhythmia. Other ways of modeling need to be investigated. Moreover, many state-of-the-art models of the right atrium do not include an atrioventricular node (AVN) and only rarely--the sinoatrial node (SAN). A model of the heart tissue within the right atrium including the SAN and AVN nodes was developed. Looking for a minimal model, currently we are testing our approach on chosen well-known arrhythmias, which were until now obtained only using much more complicated models, or were only observed in a clinical setting. Ultimately, the goal is to obtain a model able to generate sequences of RR intervals specific for the arrhythmias involving the AV junction as well as for other phenomena occurring within the atrium. The model should be fast enough to allow the study of heart rate variability and arrhythmias at a time scale of thousands of heart beats in real-time. In the model of the right atrium proposed here, different kinds of cardiac tissues are described by sets of different equations, with most of them belonging to the class of Liénard nonlinear dynamical systems. We have developed a series of models of the right atrium with differing anatomical simplifications, in the form of a 2D mapping of the atrium or of an idealized cylindrical geometry, including only those anatomical details required to reproduce a given physiological phenomenon. The simulations allowed to reconstruct the phase relations between the sinus rhythm and the location and properties of a parasystolic source together with the effect of this source on the resultant heart rhythm. We model the action potential conduction time alternans through the atrioventricular AVN junction observed in cardiac tissue in

  16. Importance of including small-scale drain discharge data in the calibration of a catchment scale nitrate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Refsgaard, J.; Christensen, B. S.; Jensen, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate leaching from agricultural areas and the resulting pollution of groundwater and surface waters is one of the largest challenges in water resources management in Denmark. Nitrate can however be naturally degraded under anaerobic conditions and several studies have shown that degradation in the saturated zone removes more than 50% of the nitrate leaching in Danish catchments. For degradation of nitrate to occur in the saturated zone, nitrate must be transported under the redox interface and a correct simulation of the small-scale flow patterns within a catchment is therefore important in nitrate models. The general findings in Danish nitrate modeling studies are that the models perform well at catchment scale, but the predictability of the models decreases at smaller scale. Thus the model predictions are highly uncertain at small scale and the models cannot at present predict areas within a catchment, where the majority of the nitrate is brought under the interface and thus degraded, and areas, where nitrate is transported directly to streams and lakes without any significant reduction. The objective of this study is to test if the small scale performance of a catchment scale nitrate model can be improved by including small scale observation data in the calibration procedure. The study area is the clayey catchment to Lillebæk stream (4.7 km2), located on the island of Funen in Denmark. Due to the presence of clayey top soils subsurface drains are installed and in consequence the stream discharge is highly dominated by drain flow. An integrated transient hydrological model based on the MIKE SHE code has been developed for the study area. The model has been calibrated against hydraulic head measurements and stream discharge measurements from two stations, one covering most of the catchment and the other station approximately half, using the parameter estimator code PEST. Acceptable model performance has been achieved at catchment scale calibrating the model

  17. Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship Modeling of Rat Acute Toxicity by Oral Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Few Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies have successfully modeled large, diverse rodent toxicity endpoints. Objective: In this study, a combinatorial QSAR approach has been employed for the creation of robust and predictive models of acute toxi...

  18. PITBUL: a physics-based modeling package for imaging and tracking of airborne targets for HEL applications including active illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    Aimpoint acquisition and maintenance is critical to high energy laser (HEL) system performance. This study demonstrates the development by the AFIT/CDE of a physics-based modeling package, PITBUL, for tracking airborne targets for HEL applications, including atmospheric and sensor effects and active illumination, which is a focus of this work. High-resolution simulated imagery of the 3D airborne target in-flight as seen from the laser position is generated using the HELSEEM model, and includes solar illumination, laser illumination, and thermal emission. Both CW and pulsed laser illumination are modeled, including the effects of illuminator scintillation, atmospheric backscatter, and speckle, which are treated at a first-principles level. Realistic vertical profiles of molecular and aerosol absorption and scattering, as well as optical turbulence, are generated using AFIT/CDE's Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) model. The spatially and temporally varying effects of turbulence are calculated and applied via a fast-running wave optical method known as light tunneling. Sensor effects, for example blur, sampling, read-out noise, and random photon arrival, are applied to the imagery. Track algorithms, including centroid and Fitts correlation, as a part of a closed loop tracker are applied to the degraded imagery and scored, to provide an estimate of overall system performance. To gauge performance of a laser system against a UAV target, tracking results are presented as a function of signal to noise ratio. Additionally, validation efforts to date involving comparisons between simulated and experimental tracking of UAVs are presented.

  19. The mathematical models of electromagnetic field dynamics and heat transfer in closed electrical contacts including Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav; Sarsengeldin, Merey; Kassabek, Samat

    2016-08-01

    We represent mathematical models of electromagnetic field dynamics and heat transfer in closed symmetric and asymmetric electrical contacts including Thomson effect, which are essentially nonlinear due to the dependence of thermal and electrical conductivities on temperature. Suggested solutions are based on the assumption of identity of equipotentials and isothermal surfaces, which agrees with experimental data and valid for both linear and nonlinear cases. Well known Kohlrausch temperature-potential relation is analytically justified.

  20. A Three-Dimensional Human Atrial Model with Fiber Orientation. Electrograms and Arrhythmic Activation Patterns Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tobón, Catalina; Ruiz-Villa, Carlos A.; Heidenreich, Elvio; Romero, Lucia; Hornero, Fernando; Saiz, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The most common sustained cardiac arrhythmias in humans are atrial tachyarrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation. Areas of complex fractionated atrial electrograms and high dominant frequency have been proposed as critical regions for maintaining atrial fibrillation; however, there is a paucity of data on the relationship between the characteristics of electrograms and the propagation pattern underlying them. In this study, a realistic 3D computer model of the human atria has been developed to investigate this relationship. The model includes a realistic geometry with fiber orientation, anisotropic conductivity and electrophysiological heterogeneity. We simulated different tachyarrhythmic episodes applying both transient and continuous ectopic activity. Electrograms and their dominant frequency and organization index values were calculated over the entire atrial surface. Our simulations show electrograms with simple potentials, with little or no cycle length variations, narrow frequency peaks and high organization index values during stable and regular activity as the observed in atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia (except in areas of conduction block) and in areas closer to ectopic activity during focal atrial fibrillation. By contrast, cycle length variations and polymorphic electrograms with single, double and fragmented potentials were observed in areas of irregular and unstable activity during atrial fibrillation episodes. Our results also show: 1) electrograms with potentials without negative deflection related to spiral or curved wavefronts that pass over the recording point and move away, 2) potentials with a much greater proportion of positive deflection than negative in areas of wave collisions, 3) double potentials related with wave fragmentations or blocking lines and 4) fragmented electrograms associated with pivot points. Our model is the first human atrial model with realistic fiber orientation used to investigate the relationship between different

  1. Models of Workplace Incivility: The Relationships to Instigated Incivility and Negative Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Holm, Kristoffer; Torkelson, Eva; Bäckström, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate workplace incivility as a social process, examining its components and relationships to both instigated incivility and negative outcomes in the form of well-being, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and sleeping problems. The different components of incivility that were examined were experienced and witnessed incivility from coworkers as well as supervisors. In addition, the organizational factors, social support, control, and job demands, were included in the models. A total of 2871 (2058 women and 813 men) employees who were connected to the Swedish Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union completed an online questionnaire. Overall, the results from structural equation modelling indicate that whereas instigated incivility to a large extent was explained by witnessing coworker incivility, negative outcomes were to a high degree explained by experienced supervisor incivility via mediation through perceived low social support, low control, and high job demands. Unexpectedly, the relationships between incivility (experienced coworker and supervisor incivility, as well as witnessed supervisor incivility) and instigated incivility were moderated by perceived high control and high social support. The results highlight the importance of including different components of workplace incivility and organizational factors in future studies of the area. PMID:26557714

  2. Models of Workplace Incivility: The Relationships to Instigated Incivility and Negative Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Kristoffer; Torkelson, Eva; Bäckström, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate workplace incivility as a social process, examining its components and relationships to both instigated incivility and negative outcomes in the form of well-being, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and sleeping problems. The different components of incivility that were examined were experienced and witnessed incivility from coworkers as well as supervisors. In addition, the organizational factors, social support, control, and job demands, were included in the models. A total of 2871 (2058 women and 813 men) employees who were connected to the Swedish Hotel and Restaurant Workers Union completed an online questionnaire. Overall, the results from structural equation modelling indicate that whereas instigated incivility to a large extent was explained by witnessing coworker incivility, negative outcomes were to a high degree explained by experienced supervisor incivility via mediation through perceived low social support, low control, and high job demands. Unexpectedly, the relationships between incivility (experienced coworker and supervisor incivility, as well as witnessed supervisor incivility) and instigated incivility were moderated by perceived high control and high social support. The results highlight the importance of including different components of workplace incivility and organizational factors in future studies of the area. PMID:26557714

  3. Time-domain simulation of constitutive relations for nonlinear acoustics including relaxation for frequency power law attenuation media modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Camarena, Francisco; Redondo, Javier; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-10-01

    We report a numerical method for solving the constitutive relations of nonlinear acoustics, where multiple relaxation processes are included in a generalized formulation that allows the time-domain numerical solution by an explicit finite differences scheme. Thus, the proposed physical model overcomes the limitations of the one-way Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) type models and, due to the Lagrangian density is implicitly included in the calculation, the proposed method also overcomes the limitations of Westervelt equation in complex configurations for medical ultrasound. In order to model frequency power law attenuation and dispersion, such as observed in biological media, the relaxation parameters are fitted to both exact frequency power law attenuation/dispersion media and also empirically measured attenuation of a variety of tissues that does not fit an exact power law. Finally, a computational technique based on artificial relaxation is included to correct the non-negligible numerical dispersion of the finite difference scheme, and, on the other hand, improve stability trough artificial attenuation when shock waves are present. This technique avoids the use of high-order finite-differences schemes leading to fast calculations. The present algorithm is especially suited for practical configuration where spatial discontinuities are present in the domain (e.g. axisymmetric domains or zero normal velocity boundary conditions in general). The accuracy of the method is discussed by comparing the proposed simulation solutions to one dimensional analytical and k-space numerical solutions.

  4. Evaluation of climate models in terms of relationship between cloud fraction and cloud albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Song, H.; Lin, W.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud fraction and cloud albedo have been investigated extensively but often separately in studying cloud-climate interaction; their quantitative relationship has been much less studied and understood, in both observations and climate models. In this study, we first examine this crucial relationship by empirical analysis of observational data, both surface-based and satellite measurements. We then decipher the key variables/processes that determine the relationship using designed simulations of the single-column model of the NCAR CAM (SCAM). Finally we explore how well or poor this relationship is simulated in the AR4 climate simulations. The preliminary results indicate that all the AR4 models as a group produce a cloud fraction-albedo relationship that is literally opposite to that observed. This stark contrast between model and observational results calls for new strategies and approaches in future development of cloud parameterizations and application of observations as model constraints.

  5. The Soul Mates Model: A Seven-Stage Model for Couple's Long-Term Relationship Development and Flourishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Lama, Luisa Batthyany; De La Lama, Luis; Wittgenstein, Ariana

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the integrative soul mates relationship development model, which provides the helping professionals with a conceptual map for couples' relationship development from dating, to intimacy, to soul mating, and long-term flourishing. This model is informed by a holistic, a developmental, and a positive psychology conceptualization…

  6. Adolescents' working models and styles for relationships with parents, friends, and romantic partners.

    PubMed

    Furman, Wyndol; Simon, Valerie A; Shaffer, Laura; Bouchey, Heather A

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the links among adolescents' representations of their relationships with parents, friends, and romantic partners. Sixty-eight adolescents were interviewed three times to assess their working models for each of these types of relationships. Working models of friendships were related to working models of relationships with parents and romantic partners. Working models of relationships with parents and romantic partners were inconsistently related. A similar pattern of results was obtained for self-report measures of relational styles for the three types of relationships. Perceived experiences were also related. Specifically, support in relationships with parents tended to be related to support in romantic relationships and friendships, but the latter two were unrelated. On the other hand, self and other controlling behaviors in friendships were related to corresponding behaviors in romantic relationships. Negative interactions in the three types of relationships also tended to be related. Taken together, the findings indicate that the representations of the three types of relationships are distinct, yet related. Discussion focuses on the nature of the links among the three. PMID:14717255

  7. Identification of microstructural characteristics in lightweight aggregate concretes by micromechanical modelling including the interfacial transition zone (ITZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Y.; Ortola, S.; Beaucour, A.L.; Dumontet, H.

    2010-11-15

    An approach which combines both experimental techniques and micromechanical modelling is developed in order to characterise the elastic behaviour of lightweight aggregate concretes (LWAC). More than three hundred LWAC specimens with various lightweight aggregate types (5) of several volume ratios and three different mortar matrices (normal, HP, VHP) are tested. The modelling is based on iterative homogenisation process and includes the ITZ specificities experimentally observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In agreement with experimental measurements, the effects of mix design parameters as well as of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) on concrete mechanical performances are quantitatively analysed. Confrontations with experimental results allow identifying the elastic moduli of LWA which are difficult to determine experimentally. Whereas the traditional empirical formulas are not sufficiently precise, predictions of LWAC elastic behaviours computed with the micromechanical models appear in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  8. The Force-Frequency Relationship: Insights from Mathematical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puglisi, Jose L.; Negroni, Jorge A.; Chen-Izu, Ye; Bers, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    The force-frequency relationship has intrigued researchers since its discovery by Bowditch in 1871. Many attempts have been made to construct mathematical descriptions of this phenomenon, beginning with the simple formulation of Koch-Wesser and Blinks in 1963 to the most sophisticated ones of today. This property of cardiac muscle is amplified by…

  9. Working Models about Mother-Child Relationships in Abandoned Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Torres, Belen; Guerrero, Pilar Garcia-Calvo

    2000-01-01

    Sixty abandoned and 36 non-abandoned school-aged children were told six short stories about mother-child relationships. Abandoned children showed less positive affect attribution to the mother, more compliant behavior in the child, and more justification of the mother when her behaviors were unfair. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  10. Analyzing Cultural Models in Adolescent Accounts of Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milbrath, Constance; Ohlson, Brightstar; Eyre, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on academic achievement has led the way in demonstrating how culturally constructed meanings shape adolescent scholastic behavior. The aim of this research is to move this standpoint of analysis more centrally into the area of adolescent dating and sexuality by focusing on the cultural components of adolescent romantic relationships. This…

  11. Modeling Best Practice through Online Learning: Building Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerniglia, Ellen G.

    2011-01-01

    Students may fear that they will feel unsupported and isolated when engaged in online learning. They don't know how they will be able to build relationships with their teacher and classmates solely based on written words, without facial expressions, tone of voice, and other nonverbal communication cues. Traditionally, online learning required…

  12. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation [Ref 1]. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet

  13. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara A.; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet conduction as

  14. Three-Dimensional Computer Model of the Right Atrium Including the Sinoatrial and Atrioventricular Nodes Predicts Classical Nodal Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jue; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Zhang, Henggui; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D) anatomically-detailed model of the rabbit right atrium containing the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes to study the electrophysiology of the nodes. A model was generated based on 3D images of a rabbit heart (atria and part of ventricles), obtained using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Segmentation was carried out semi-manually. A 3D right atrium array model (∼3.16 million elements), including eighteen objects, was constructed. For description of cellular electrophysiology, the Rogers-modified FitzHugh-Nagumo model was further modified to allow control of the major characteristics of the action potential with relatively low computational resource requirements. Model parameters were chosen to simulate the action potentials in the sinoatrial node, atrial muscle, inferior nodal extension and penetrating bundle. The block zone was simulated as passive tissue. The sinoatrial node, crista terminalis, main branch and roof bundle were considered as anisotropic. We have simulated normal and abnormal electrophysiology of the two nodes. In accordance with experimental findings: (i) during sinus rhythm, conduction occurs down the interatrial septum and into the atrioventricular node via the fast pathway (conduction down the crista terminalis and into the atrioventricular node via the slow pathway is slower); (ii) during atrial fibrillation, the sinoatrial node is protected from overdrive by its long refractory period; and (iii) during atrial fibrillation, the atrioventricular node reduces the frequency of action potentials reaching the ventricles. The model is able to simulate ventricular echo beats. In summary, a 3D anatomical model of the right atrium containing the cardiac conduction system is able to simulate a wide range of classical nodal behaviours. PMID:25380074

  15. Identifying and Evaluating the Relationships that Control a Land Surface Model's Hydrological Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Mahanama, Sarith P.

    2012-01-01

    The inherent soil moisture-evaporation relationships used in today 's land surface models (LSMs) arguably reflect a lot of guesswork given the lack of contemporaneous evaporation and soil moisture observations at the spatial scales represented by regional and global models. The inherent soil moisture-runoff relationships used in the LSMs are also of uncertain accuracy. Evaluating these relationships is difficult but crucial given that they have a major impact on how the land component contributes to hydrological and meteorological variability within the climate system. The relationships, it turns out, can be examined efficiently and effectively with a simple water balance model framework. The simple water balance model, driven with multi-decadal observations covering the conterminous United States, shows how different prescribed relationships lead to different manifestations of hydrological variability, some of which can be compared directly to observations. Through the testing of a wide suite of relationships, the simple model provides estimates for the underlying relationships that operate in nature and that should be operating in LSMs. We examine the relationships currently used in a number of different LSMs in the context of the simple water balance model results and make recommendations for potential first-order improvements to these LSMs.

  16. A predator-prey model with a holling type I functional response including a predator mutual interference

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seo, G.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most widely used functional response in describing predator-prey relationships is the Holling type II functional response, where per capita predation is a smooth, increasing, and saturating function of prey density. Beddington and DeAngelis modified the Holling type II response to include interference of predators that increases with predator density. Here we introduce a predator-interference term into a Holling type I functional response. We explain the ecological rationale for the response and note that the phase plane configuration of the predator and prey isoclines differs greatly from that of the Beddington-DeAngelis response; for example, in having three possible interior equilibria rather than one. In fact, this new functional response seems to be quite unique. We used analytical and numerical methods to show that the resulting system shows a much richer dynamical behavior than the Beddington-DeAngelis response, or other typically used functional responses. For example, cyclic-fold, saddle-fold, homoclinic saddle connection, and multiple crossing bifurcations can all occur. We then use a smooth approximation to the Holling type I functional response with predator mutual interference to show that these dynamical properties do not result from the lack of smoothness, but rather from subtle differences in the functional responses. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  17. Novel relationships among ten fish model species revealed based on a phylogenomic analysis using ESTs.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Dirk; Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    2006-06-01

    The power of comparative phylogenomic analyses also depends on the amount of data that are included in such studies. We used expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from fish model species as a proof of principle approach in order to test the reliability of using ESTs for phylogenetic inference. As expected, the robustness increases with the amount of sequences. Although some progress has been made in the elucidation of the phylogeny of teleosts, relationships among the main lineages of the derived fish (Euteleostei) remain poorly defined and are still debated. We performed a phylogenomic analysis of a set of 42 of orthologous genes from 10 available fish model systems from seven different orders (Salmoniformes, Siluriformes, Cypriniformes, Tetraodontiformes, Cyprinodontiformes, Beloniformes, and Perciformes) of euteleostean fish to estimate divergence times and evolutionary relationships among those lineages. All 10 fish species serve as models for developmental, aquaculture, genomic, and comparative genetic studies. The phylogenetic signal and the strength of the contribution of each of the 42 orthologous genes were estimated with randomly chosen data subsets. Our study revealed a molecular phylogeny of higher-level relationships of derived teleosts, which indicates that the use of multiple genes produces robust phylogenies, a finding that is expected to apply to other phylogenetic issues among distantly related taxa. Our phylogenomic analyses confirm that the euteleostean superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii are monophyletic and the Protacanthopterygii and Ostariophysi are sister clades. In addition, and contrary to the traditional phylogenetic hypothesis, our analyses determine that killifish (Cyprinodontiformes), medaka (Beloniformes), and cichlids (Perciformes) appear to be more closely related to each other than either of them is to pufferfish (Tetraodontiformes). All 10 lineages split before or during the fragmentation of the supercontinent Pangea in the

  18. Phylogenetic Relationships and Biogeography of the Diatom Genus Mastogloia (Bacillariophyceae): Revision of the Section Ellipticae Including the Description of New Taxa.

    PubMed

    Pennesi, Chiara; Poulin, Michel; Totti, Cecilia

    2016-04-01

    Benthic diatoms represent an important component of aquatic ecosystems, both for their contribution to primary production and their role in the marine food web. Mastogloia is a large, mostly marine diatom genus occurring in microphytobenthic communities of temperate to tropical coastal regions. In this study, the phylogenetic relationships, based on cladistic methodologies using morphological features, among all taxa belonging to the genus Mastogloia section Ellipticae (i.e., 33 taxa) were investigated using the parsimony method. The character states that describe variations of central area, raphe, areola vela and partectal position have a tendency to be very homologous and useful in recovering phylogenies. The typical character states of this section, such as rounded apices represents an ancestral homology. The phylogenetic hypothesis supports the probable monophyletic origin of the section Ellipticae (synapomorphy). Moreover, we completed the taxonomical review of the section Ellipticae, with the description of seven species, M. cocconeiformis, M. cribrosa, M. fimbriata, M. ovata, M. pseudolatecostata, and of two species new to science, M. rosalbae and M. aegyptiaca. Finally, this study provides historical and new information on the geographical distribution of Mastogloia species. PMID:27011221

  19. Laurentian Great Lakes Phytoplankton and Their Water Quality Characteristics, Including a Diatom-Based Model for Paleoreconstruction of Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Reavie, Euan D.; Heathcote, Adam J.; Shaw Chraïbi, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent shifts in water quality and food web characteristics driven by anthropogenic impacts on the Laurentian Great Lakes warranted an examination of pelagic primary producers as tracers of environmental change. The distributions of the 263 common phytoplankton taxa were related to water quality variables to determine taxon-specific responses that may be useful in indicator models. A detailed checklist of taxa and their environmental optima are provided. Multivariate analyses indicated a strong relationship between total phosphorus (TP) and patterns in the diatom assemblages across the Great Lakes. Of the 118 common diatom taxa, 90 (76%) had a directional response along the TP gradient. We further evaluated a diatom-based transfer function for TP based on the weighted-average abundance of taxa, assuming unimodal distributions along the TP gradient. The r2 between observed and inferred TP in the training dataset was 0.79. Substantial spatial and environmental autocorrelation within the training set of samples justified the need for further model validation. A randomization procedure indicated that the actual transfer function consistently performed better than functions based on reshuffled environmental data. Further, TP was minimally confounded by other environmental variables, as indicated by the relatively large amount of unique variance in the diatoms explained by TP. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the transfer function by hindcasting TP concentrations using fossil diatom assemblages in a Lake Superior sediment core. Passive, multivariate analysis of the fossil samples against the training set indicated that phosphorus was a strong determinant of historical diatom assemblages, verifying that the transfer function was suited to reconstruct past TP in Lake Superior. Collectively, these results showed that phytoplankton coefficients for water quality can be robust indicators of Great Lakes pelagic condition. The diatom-based transfer function can be used in

  20. The relationship between aerosol model uncertainty and radiative forcing uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly

    2016-04-01

    There has been no systematic assessment of how reduction in the uncertainty of global aerosol models will feed through to the uncertainty in the predicted forcing. We use a global model perturbed parameter ensemble to show that tight observational constraint of aerosol concentrations in the model has a relatively small effect on the aerosol-related uncertainty in the calculated aerosol-cloud forcing between pre-industrial and present day periods. One factor is the low sensitivity of present-day aerosol to natural emissions that determine the pre-industrial aerosol state. But the major cause of the weak constraint is that the full uncertainty space of the model generates a large number of model variants that are "equally acceptable" compared to present-day aerosol observations. The narrow range of aerosol concentrations in the observationally constrained model gives the impression of low aerosol model uncertainty, but this hides a range of very different aerosol models. These multiple so-called "equifinal" model variants predict a wide range of forcings. Equifinality in the aerosol model means that tuning of a small number of model processes to achieve model-observation agreement could give a misleading impression of model robustness.

  1. User's Manual for HPTAM: a Two-Dimensional Heat Pipe Transient Analysis Model, Including the Startup from a Frozen State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the user's manual for 'HPTAM,' a two-dimensional Heat Pipe Transient Analysis Model. HPTAM is described in detail in the UNM-ISNPS-3-1995 report which accompanies the present manual. The model offers a menu that lists a number of working fluids and wall and wick materials from which the user can choose. HPTAM is capable of simulating the startup of heat pipes from either a fully-thawed or frozen condition of the working fluid in the wick structure. The manual includes instructions for installing and running HPTAM on either a UNIX, MS-DOS or VMS operating system. Samples for input and output files are also provided to help the user with the code.

  2. Adaptive fuzzy neural network control design via a T-S fuzzy model for a robot manipulator including actuator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Yang, Zhi-Wei

    2008-10-01

    This paper focuses on the development of adaptive fuzzy neural network control (AFNNC), including indirect and direct frameworks for an n-link robot manipulator, to achieve high-precision position tracking. In general, it is difficult to adopt a model-based design to achieve this control objective due to the uncertainties in practical applications, such as friction forces, external disturbances, and parameter variations. In order to cope with this problem, an indirect AFNNC (IAFNNC) scheme and a direct AFNNC (DAFNNC) strategy are investigated without the requirement of prior system information. In these model-free control topologies, a continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) dynamic fuzzy model with online learning ability is constructed to represent the system dynamics of an n-link robot manipulator. In the IAFNNC, an FNN estimator is designed to tune the nonlinear dynamic function vector in fuzzy local models, and then, the estimative vector is used to indirectly develop a stable IAFNNC law. In the DAFNNC, an FNN controller is directly designed to imitate a predetermined model-based stabilizing control law, and then, the stable control performance can be achieved by only using joint position information. All the IAFNNC and DAFNNC laws and the corresponding adaptive tuning algorithms for FNN weights are established in the sense of Lyapunov stability analyses to ensure the stable control performance. Numerical simulations and experimental results of a two-link robot manipulator actuated by dc servomotors are given to verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed methodologies. In addition, the superiority of the proposed control schemes is indicated in comparison with proportional-differential control, fuzzy-model-based control, T-S-type FNN control, and robust neural fuzzy network control systems. PMID:18784015

  3. Parents’ Marital Status, Conflict, and Role Modeling: Links With Adult Romantic Relationship Quality

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Galena K.; Stanley, Scott M.; Markman, Howard J.; Ragan, Erica P.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated three parental marital statuses and relationship quality among unmarried, but dating adults ages 18 to 35 (N = 1153). Those whose parents never married one another tended to report the lowest relationship quality (in terms of relationship adjustment, negative communication, commitment, and physical aggression) compared to those with divorced or married biological parents. In addition, those with divorced parents reported lower relationship adjustment and more negative communication than those with married parents. Parental conflict and the degree to which participants rated their parents’ relationship as a healthy model for their own relationships partially explained the associations between parental marital status and relationship outcomes. We suggest that this particular family type (i.e., having parents who never marry one another) needs greater attention in this field in terms of research and intervention. PMID:22822295

  4. A non-linear mathematical model for dynamic analysis of spur gears including shaft and bearing dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguven, H. Nevzat

    1991-01-01

    A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear semi-definite model with time varying mesh stiffness has been developed for the dynamic analysis of spur gears. The model includes a spur gear pair, two shafts, two inertias representing load and prime mover, and bearings. As the shaft and bearing dynamics have also been considered in the model, the effect of lateral-torsional vibration coupling on the dynamics of gears can be studied. In the nonlinear model developed several factors such as time varying mesh stiffness and damping, separation of teeth, backlash, single- and double-sided impacts, various gear errors and profile modifications have been considered. The dynamic response to internal excitation has been calculated by using the 'static transmission error method' developed. The software prepared (DYTEM) employs the digital simulation technique for the solution, and is capable of calculating dynamic tooth and mesh forces, dynamic factors for pinion and gear, dynamic transmission error, dynamic bearing forces and torsions of shafts. Numerical examples are given in order to demonstrate the effect of shaft and bearing dynamics on gear dynamics.

  5. A dose computation model for sup 241 Am vaginal applicators including the source-to-source shielding effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, R.; Park, C.H.; King, C.R.; Muench, P. )

    1990-09-01

    A dose computation model has been developed for the determination of dose distributions around vaginal plaque applicators containing encapsulated {sup 241}Am sources. Encapsulated sources of {sup 241}Am emit primarily 60-keV photons which have a half-value layer thickness of 1/8 mm of lead. This makes possible highly effective {ital in} {ital vivo} shielding of normal tissues at risk, by placing thin lead shields at appropriate places on the applicator. However, self-absorption of photons in the source material itself is intense, requiring bulky sources of about 1 cm diameter. These sources also produce considerable source-to-source shielding which must be taken into account in dose calculations. Our dose computation model for a single source employs three-dimensional integration of dose contributions from volume elements of the source including the effects of absorption and scattering of photons in the source material, titanium encapsulation, and water. An empirical correction to Berger's data on buildup factors of point, isotropic sources is made to account for the effects of anisotropic photon emission by cylindrical {sup 241}Am sources. The second part of our dose computation model takes into account source-to-source shielding effects on both primary and scattered photons for the vaginal plaque geometry. The results of the model have been verified for accuracy by comparisons with extensive dosimetry measurements using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters.

  6. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  7. CMAQ model performance enhanced when in-cloud secondary organic aerosol is included: comparisons of organic carbon predictions with measurements.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Turpin, Barbara I; Altieri, Katye E; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Mathur, Rohit; Roselle, Shawn J; Weber, Rodney J

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that low-volatility (particle-phase) organic compounds form in the atmosphere through aqueous phase reactions in clouds and aerosols. Although some models have begun including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through cloud processing, validation studies that compare predictions and measurements are needed. In this work, agreement between modeled organic carbon (OC) and aircraft measurements of water soluble OC improved for all 5 of the compared ICARTT NOAA-P3 flights during August when an in-cloud SOA (SOAcld) formation mechanism was added to CMAQ (a regional-scale atmospheric model). The improvement was most dramatic for the August 14th flight, a flight designed specifically to investigate clouds. During this flight the normalized mean bias for layer-averaged OC was reduced from -64 to -15% and correlation (r) improved from 0.5 to 0.6. Underpredictions of OC aloft by atmospheric models may be explained, in part, by this formation mechanism (SOAcld). OC formation aloft contributes to long-range pollution transport and has implications to radiative forcing, regional air quality and climate. PMID:19192800

  8. PREDICT Plus: development and validation of a prognostic model for early breast cancer that includes HER2

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, G C; Bajdik, C D; Dicks, E; Provenzano, E; Schmidt, M K; Sherman, M; Greenberg, D C; Green, A R; Gelmon, K A; Kosma, V-M; Olson, J E; Beckmann, M W; Winqvist, R; Cross, S S; Severi, G; Huntsman, D; Pylkäs, K; Ellis, I; Nielsen, T O; Giles, G; Blomqvist, C; Fasching, P A; Couch, F J; Rakha, E; Foulkes, W D; Blows, F M; Bégin, L R; van't Veer, L J; Southey, M; Nevanlinna, H; Mannermaa, A; Cox, A; Cheang, M; Baglietto, L; Caldas, C; Garcia-Closas, M; Pharoah, P D P

    2012-01-01

    Background: Predict (www.predict.nhs.uk) is an online, breast cancer prognostication and treatment benefit tool. The aim of this study was to incorporate the prognostic effect of HER2 status in a new version (Predict+), and to compare its performance with the original Predict and Adjuvant!. Methods: The prognostic effect of HER2 status was based on an analysis of data from 10 179 breast cancer patients from 14 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The hazard ratio estimates were incorporated into Predict. The validation study was based on 1653 patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer identified from the British Columbia Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit. Predicted overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) for Predict+, Predict and Adjuvant! were compared with observed outcomes. Results: All three models performed well for both OS and BCSS. Both Predict models provided better BCSS estimates than Adjuvant!. In the subset of patients with HER2-positive tumours, Predict+ performed substantially better than the other two models for both OS and BCSS. Conclusion: Predict+ is the first clinical breast cancer prognostication tool that includes tumour HER2 status. Use of the model might lead to more accurate absolute treatment benefit predictions for individual patients. PMID:22850554

  9. Including Thermal Fluctuations in Actomyosin Stable States Increases the Predicted Force per Motor and Macroscopic Efficiency in Muscle Modelling.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Lorenzo; Washio, Takumi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    Muscle contractions are generated by cyclical interactions of myosin heads with actin filaments to form the actomyosin complex. To simulate actomyosin complex stable states, mathematical models usually define an energy landscape with a corresponding number of wells. The jumps between these wells are defined through rate constants. Almost all previous models assign these wells an infinite sharpness by imposing a relatively simple expression for the detailed balance, i.e., the ratio of the rate constants depends exponentially on the sole myosin elastic energy. Physically, this assumption corresponds to neglecting thermal fluctuations in the actomyosin complex stable states. By comparing three mathematical models, we examine the extent to which this hypothesis affects muscle model predictions at the single cross-bridge, single fiber, and organ levels in a ceteris paribus analysis. We show that including fluctuations in stable states allows the lever arm of the myosin to easily and dynamically explore all possible minima in the energy landscape, generating several backward and forward jumps between states during the lifetime of the actomyosin complex, whereas the infinitely sharp minima case is characterized by fewer jumps between states. Moreover, the analysis predicts that thermal fluctuations enable a more efficient contraction mechanism, in which a higher force is sustained by fewer attached cross-bridges. PMID:27626630

  10. The Relationship between Students' Epistemologies and Model-Based Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobert, Janice; Discenna, Jennifer

    Models and modeling are frequently used as instructional tools in science education to convey important information concerning both the explanatory and structural features of topic areas in science. The efficacy of models as such rests almost entirely upon students' ability to conceptualize them as abstracted "representations" of scientific…

  11. Modeling the significance of including C redistribution when determining changes in net carbon storage along a cultivated toposequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirinda, Ngonidzashe; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Heckrath, Goswin; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo

    2016-04-01

    Globally, soil carbon (C) reserves are second only to those in the ocean, and accounts for a significant C reservoir. In the case of arable soils, the quantity of stored C is influenced by various factors (e.g. management practices). Currently, the topography related influences on in-field soil C dynamics remain largely unknown. However, topography is known to influence a multiplicity of factors that regulate C input, storage and redistribution. To understand the patterns and untangle the complexity of soil C dynamics in arable landscapes, our study was conducted with soils from shoulderslope and footslope positions on a 7.1 ha winter wheat field in western Denmark. We first collected soil samples from shoulderslope and footslope positions with various depth intervals down to 100 cm and analyzed them for physical and chemical properties including texture and soil organic C contents. In-situ carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured at different soil profile depths at both positions for a year. Soil moisture content and temperature at 5 and 40 cm depth was measured continuously. Additionally, surface soil CO2 fluxes at shoulderslope and footslope positions were measured. We then used measurement data collected from the two landscape positions to calibrate the one-dimensional mechanistic model SOILCO2 module of the HYDRUS-1D software package and obtained soil CO2 fluxes from soil profile at two landscape positions. Furthermore, we tested whether the inclusion of vertical and lateral soil C movement improved the modeling of C dynamics in cultivated landscapes. For that, soil profile CO2 fluxes were compared with those obtained using a simple process-based soil whole profile C model, C-TOOL, which was modified to include vertical and lateral movement of C on landscape. Our results highlight the need to consider vertical and lateral soil C movement in the modeling of C dynamics in cultivated landscapes, for better qualification of net carbon storage.

  12. The Exploration of the Relationship between Guessing and Latent Ability in IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Song

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between successful guessing and latent ability in IRT models. A new IRT model was developed with a guessing function integrating probability of guessing an item correctly with the examinee's ability and the item parameters. The conventional 3PL IRT model was compared with the new 2PL-Guessing model on…

  13. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase. PMID:16389087

  14. Modeling the relationship between the environment and human experiences.

    PubMed

    Vink, P; Bazley, C; Jacobs, K

    2016-08-12

    Within this special issue, different aspects of the environment are studied: aspects that are distant from the human body, close to the body and touching the human body. Consequently, different human senses are involved in these studies as well as the different consequences and effects on the brain and human behaviour. This special issue also highlights many remaining questions about the effects and relationships between environments and human beings and the need for more studies and research. In particular, future studies are needed that address long-term effects and the effects of the combinations of elements which provide comfort or discomfort. PMID:27567796

  15. Modeling study of surface ozone source-receptor relationships in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Yang, Wenyi; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Huansheng; Hu, Bo; Li, Jianjun.; Sun, Yele.; Fu, Pingqing; Zhang, Yuqia

    2016-01-01

    Ozone source-receptor relationships over East Asia have been quantitatively investigated using a chemical transport model including an on-line tracer-tagged procedure, with a particular focus on the source regions of different daily ozone mixing ratios. Comparison with observations showed that the model reproduced surface ozone and tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column densities. Long-range transport from outside East Asia contributed the greatest fraction to annual surface ozone over remote regions, the Korean peninsula, and Japan, reaching 50%-80% of total ozone. Self-contributions accounted for 5%-20% ozone in the Korean peninsula and Japan, whereas the contribution of trans-boundary transport from photochemical production in China was less than 5%-10%. At extra-high ozone levels, self-contributions reached 50%-60% in the Korean peninsula. Ozone source-receptor relationships showed high seasonal variability over East Asia. Significant transport was also found between sub-regions in China, which presents a great challenge to policy-makers because most current control strategies are confined to specific regions.

  16. Occupational value and relationships to meaning and health: elaborations of the ValMO-model.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Eklund, Mona; Persson, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates the theoretical assumption of the Value and Meaning in Occupations model. The aim was to explore the relationship between occupational value, perceived meaning, and subjective health in a sample of individuals of working age, 50 men and 250 women. Frequency of experienced values in occupations was assessed through the Occupational Value instrument with pre-defined items. Perceived meaning was operationalized and assessed by the Sense of Coherence measure. Subjective health was estimated by two questions from the SF-36 questionnaire. The analyses implied descriptive analyses, correlations, and logistic regression analyses in which sociodemographic variables were included. The findings showed highly significant relationships between occupational value and perceived meaning and when belonging to the high group of occupational value the likelihood was tripled of belonging to the high group of perceived meaning. When married or cohabitating there was double the likelihood of belonging to the high group of perceived meaning. Although perceived meaning was found to be positively associated with subjective health, working full time was the most important factor in explaining subjective health, compared with working less than full time. The results confirm assumptions in the ValMO-model, and the importance of focusing on occupational value in clinical practice is highlighted. PMID:20350271

  17. GIS-based models for water quantity and quality assessment in the Júcar River Basin, Spain, including climate change effects.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Javier; Pérez-Martín, Miguel A; Jiménez, Sara; Estrela, Teodoro; Andreu, Joaquín

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes two different GIS models - one stationary (GeoImpress) and the other non-stationary (Patrical) - that assess water quantity and quality in the Júcar River Basin District, a large river basin district (43,000km(2)) located in Spain. It aims to analyze the status of surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) bodies in relation to the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and to support measures to achieve the WFD objectives. The non-stationary model is used for quantitative analysis of water resources, including long-term water resource assessment; estimation of available GW resources; and evaluation of climate change impact on water resources. The main results obtained are the following: recent water resources have been reduced by approximately 18% compared to the reference period 1961-1990; the GW environmental volume required to accomplish the WFD objectives is approximately 30% of the GW annual resources; and the climate change impact on water resources for the short-term (2010-2040), based on a dynamic downscaling A1B scenario, implies a reduction in water resources by approximately 19% compared to 1990-2000 and a reduction of approximately 40-50% for the long-term (2070-2100), based on dynamic downscaling A2 and B2 scenarios. The model also assesses the impact of various fertilizer application scenarios on the status of future GW quality (nitrate) and if these future statuses will meet the WFD requirements. The stationary model generates data on the actual and future chemical status of SW bodies in the river basin according to the modeled scenarios and reflects the implementation of different types of measures to accomplish the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive and the WFD. Finally, the selection and prioritization of additional measures to accomplish the WFD are based on cost-effectiveness analysis. PMID:22959072

  18. Relationships among Abuse Characteristics, Coping Strategies, and Abused Women's Psychological Health: A Path Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Glennys; Lee, Christina

    2007-01-01

    We examined relationships between abuse, coping, and psychological health among 143 women who had experienced abuse in adult relationships. Measures included characteristics of the abuse, problem-focused and emotion-focused coping, Sense of Coherence, and four measures of psychological wellbeing--the SF-36 Mental Component Scale, the General…

  19. Quantitative Structure – Property Relationship Modeling of Remote Liposome Loading Of Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Cern, Ahuva; Golbraikh, Alexander; Sedykh, Aleck; Tropsha, Alexander; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Goldblum, Amiram

    2012-01-01

    Remote loading of liposomes by trans-membrane gradients is used to achieve therapeutically efficacious intra-liposome concentrations of drugs. We have developed Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR) models of remote liposome loading for a dataset including 60 drugs studied in 366 loading experiments internally or elsewhere. Both experimental conditions and computed chemical descriptors were employed as independent variables to predict the initial drug/lipid ratio (D/L) required to achieve high loading efficiency. Both binary (to distinguish high vs. low initial D/L) and continuous (to predict real D/L values) models were generated using advanced machine learning approaches and five-fold external validation. The external prediction accuracy for binary models was as high as 91–96%; for continuous models the mean coefficient R2 for regression between predicted versus observed values was 0.76–0.79. We conclude that QSPR models can be used to identify candidate drugs expected to have high remote loading capacity while simultaneously optimizing the design of formulation experiments. PMID:22154932

  20. Parental concern about vaccine safety in Canadian children partially immunized at age 2: A multivariable model including system level factors

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Schopflocher, Donald P; Vaudry, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Children who begin but do not fully complete the recommended series of childhood vaccines by 2 y of age are a much larger group than those who receive no vaccines. While parents who refuse all vaccines typically express concern about vaccine safety, it is critical to determine what influences parents of ‘partially’ immunized children. This case-control study examined whether parental concern about vaccine safety was responsible for partial immunization, and whether other personal or system-level factors played an important role. A random sample of parents of partially and completely immunized 2 y old children were selected from a Canadian regional immunization registry and completed a postal survey assessing various personal and system-level factors. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) and adjusted ORs (aOR) were calculated with logistic regression. While vaccine safety concern was associated with partial immunization (OR 7.338, 95% CI 4.138– 13.012), other variables were more strongly associated and reduced the strength of the relationship between concern and partial immunization in multivariable analysis (aOR 2.829, 95% CI 1.151 – 6.957). Other important factors included perceived disease susceptibility and severity (aOR 4.629, 95% CI 2.017 – 10.625), residential mobility (aOR 3.908, 95% CI 2.075 – 7.358), daycare use (aOR 0.310, 95% CI 0.144 - 0.671), number of needles administered at each visit (aOR 7.734, 95% CI 2.598 – 23.025) and access to a regular physician (aOR 0.219, 95% CI 0.057 – 0.846). While concern about vaccine safety may be addressed through educational strategies, this study suggests that additional program and policy-level strategies may positively impact immunization uptake. PMID:25483477

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTICITY MODEL USING NON ASSOCIATED FLOW RULE FOR HCP MATERIALS INCLUDING ZIRCONIUM FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Jeong-Whan Yoon

    2013-08-01

    In this report (prepared in collaboration with Prof. Jeong Whan Yoon, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia) a research effort was made to develop a non associated flow rule for zirconium. Since Zr is a hexagonally close packed (hcp) material, it is impossible to describe its plastic response under arbitrary loading conditions with any associated flow rule (e.g. von Mises). As a result of strong tension compression asymmetry of the yield stress and anisotropy, zirconium displays plastic behavior that requires a more sophisticated approach. Consequently, a new general asymmetric yield function has been developed which accommodates mathematically the four directional anisotropies along 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and biaxial, under tension and compression. Stress anisotropy has been completely decoupled from the r value by using non associated flow plasticity, where yield function and plastic potential have been treated separately to take care of stress and r value directionalities, respectively. This theoretical development has been verified using Zr alloys at room temperature as an example as these materials have very strong SD (Strength Differential) effect. The proposed yield function reasonably well models the evolution of yield surfaces for a zirconium clock rolled plate during in plane and through thickness compression. It has been found that this function can predict both tension and compression asymmetry mathematically without any numerical tolerance and shows the significant improvement compared to any reported functions. Finally, in the end of the report, a program of further research is outlined aimed at constructing tensorial relationships for the temperature and fluence dependent creep surfaces for Zr, Zircaloy 2, and Zircaloy 4.

  2. Validating the Relationship Qualities of Influence and Persuasion with the Family Social Relations Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Rachel Oakley; Bagozzi, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the family social relations model (SRM) to test for the personal relationship qualities of influence and persuasion in the family decision-making context of buying a new car. Uncovers patterns in the relationship qualities of influence and persuasion across three decisions families make when buying a new car (i.e., how much to spend, car…

  3. Scale and hierarchical relationships when incorporating observed data into fish models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying correlations between environmental variables and fish presence or density is usually the main focus of efforts to model fish-habitat relationships. These relationships, however, can be confounded by scale and hierarchical effects. In particular the strength of fish –...

  4. The Roots and Consequences of Early Mother-Child Relationship: A Multilevel Model of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitamo, Leila

    Part of an ongoing longitudinal research project, a study was made to develop a method and a multilevel model for evaluating at its earliest stages the relationship between a mother and her child. The main hypothesis of the study was that the early mother-child relationship, consisting of maternal responses and a mother's images of her role in…

  5. Risk Models of Dating Aggression across Different Adolescent Relationships: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tricia S.; Connolly, Jennifer; Pepler, Debra; Craig, Wendy; Laporte, Lise

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined physical dating aggression in different adolescent relationships and assessed linear, threshold, and moderator risk models for recurrent aggressive relationships. The 621 participants (59% girls, 41% boys) were drawn from a 1-year longitudinal survey of Canadian high school youths ranging from Grade 9 through Grade 12.…

  6. Adapting the Interpersonal Process Model of Intimacy to Enhance the Co-Leader Relationship during Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, David D.; Fernando, Delini M.

    2012-01-01

    Group work literature acknowledges that the group co-leader relationship influences the development of group members and the group as a whole. However, little direction has been offered for supervisors of group co-leaders to facilitate the development of the co-leader relationship. Reis and Shaver's (1988) interpersonal process model of intimacy…

  7. Modeling of astigmatic-elliptical beam shaping during fs-laser waveguide writing including beam truncation and diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz De la Cruz, A.; Ferrer, A.; del Hoyo, J.; Siegel, J.; Solis, J.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we report a model for accurately calculating the focal volumes corresponding to astigmatic elliptical beams used in fs-laser waveguide writing. The model is based on the use of the ABCD matrix formalism for the propagation of a Gaussian beam. The code includes the effects of propagation on the astigmatic elliptical beam, and the effects of beam truncation and diffraction at the entrance pupil of the focusing objective due to beam clipping when overfilling the pupil. The results predict that for a given astigmatism value and propagation distance it is possible to efficiently suppress the astigmatic focus closer to the surface. This explains previous experimental results where single structure waveguides with controllable aspect-ratio were fabricated using astigmatic-elliptical beams. Furthermore, we investigate the respective roles of astigmatism and beam propagation, as well as the strong impact of truncation and diffraction effects caused by clipping the beam at the pupil of the focusing optics. Finally, based on the results from our model, we present some practical considerations in terms of beam propagation and phase wrapping constraints.

  8. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80 °C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  9. Evaluation and optimization of a micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack model including an integrated cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hering, Martin; Brouwer, Jacob; Winkler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    A micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack model including an integrated cooling system was developed using a quasi three-dimensional, spatially resolved, transient thermodynamic, physical and electrochemical model that accounts for the complex geometrical relations between the cells and cooling-tubes. For the purpose of model evaluation, reference operating, geometrical and material properties are determined. The reference stack design is composed of 3294 cells, with a diameter of 2 mm, and 61 cooling-tubes. The stack is operated at a power density of 300 mW/cm2 and air is used as the cooling fluid inside the integrated cooling system. Regarding the performance, the reference design achieves an electrical stack efficiency of around 57% and a power output of 1.1 kW. The maximum occurring temperature of the positive electrode electrolyte negative electrode (PEN)-structure is 1369 K. As a result of a design of experiments, parameters of a best-case design are determined. The best-case design achieves a comparable power output of 1.1 kW with an electrical efficiency of 63% and a maximum occurring temperature of the PEN-structure of 1268 K. Nevertheless, the best-case design has an increased volume based on the higher diameter of 3 mm and increased spacing between the cells.

  10. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M.; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80°C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  11. Including local rainfall dynamics and uncertain boundary conditions into a 2-D regional-local flood modelling cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, María; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim E.; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jerónimo

    2016-04-01

    Flood inundation models require appropriate boundary conditions to be specified at the limits of the domain, which commonly consist of upstream flow rate and downstream water level. These data are usually acquired from gauging stations on the river network where measured water levels are converted to discharge via a rating curve. Derived streamflow estimates are therefore subject to uncertainties in this rating curve, including extrapolating beyond the maximum observed ratings magnitude. In addition, the limited number of gauges in reach-scale studies often requires flow to be routed from the nearest upstream gauge to the boundary of the model domain. This introduces additional uncertainty, derived not only from the flow routing method used, but also from the additional lateral rainfall-runoff contributions downstream of the gauging point. Although generally assumed to have a minor impact on discharge in fluvial flood modeling, this local hydrological input may become important in a sparse gauge network or in events with significant local rainfall. In this study, a method to incorporate rating curve uncertainty and the local rainfall-runoff dynamics into the predictions of a reach-scale flood inundation model is proposed. Discharge uncertainty bounds are generated by applying a non-parametric local weighted regression approach to stage-discharge measurements for two gauging stations, while measured rainfall downstream from these locations is cascaded into a hydrological model to quantify additional inflows along the main channel. A regional simplified-physics hydraulic model is then applied to combine these inputs and generate an ensemble of discharge and water elevation time series at the boundaries of a local-scale high complexity hydraulic model. Finally, the effect of these rainfall dynamics and uncertain boundary conditions are evaluated on the local-scale model. Improvements in model performance when incorporating these processes are quantified using observed

  12. Factor Models for Assessing the Relationship between Creativity and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John; Rogers, H. Jane

    1986-01-01

    This article demonstrates that the usual first-order factor model is inappropriate for analyzing the factor structure of creativity and intelligence tests. An alternative model that allows for the estimation of unique covariance between the fluency and originality scores is proposed. (Author/JAZ)

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Mathematical Modelling and Classroom Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Trevor; Sheehy, Joanne; Brown, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that the discourse of the mathematics classroom impacts on the practices that students engage when modelling mathematics. Using excerpts of a Year 12 student's report on modelling Newton's law of cooling, this paper argues that when students engage with the discourse of their mathematics classroom in a manner that…

  14. Including the effects of elastic compressibility and volume changes in geodynamical modeling of crust-lithosphere-mantle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Monserrat, Albert; Morgan, Jason P.

    2016-04-01

    Materials in Earth's interior are exposed to thermomechanical (e.g. variations in stress/pressure and temperature) and chemical (e.g. phase changes, serpentinization, melting) processes that are associated with volume changes. Most geodynamical codes assume the incompressible Boussinesq approximation, where changes in density due to temperature or phase change effect buoyancy, yet volumetric changes are not allowed, and mass is not locally conserved. Elastic stresses induced by volume changes due to thermal expansion, serpentinization, and melt intrusion should cause 'cold' rocks to brittlely fail at ~1% strain. When failure/yielding is an important rheological feature, we think it plausible that volume-change-linked stresses may have a significant influence on the localization of deformation. Here we discuss a new Lagrangian formulation for "elasto-compressible -visco-plastic" flow. In this formulation, the continuity equation has been generalised from a Boussinesq incompressible formulation to include recoverable, elastic, volumetric deformations linked to the local state of mean compressive stress. This formulation differs from the 'anelastic approximation' used in compressible viscous flow in that pressure- and temperature- dependent volume changes are treated as elastic deformation for a given pressure, temperature, and composition/phase. This leads to a visco-elasto-plastic formulation that can model the effects of thermal stresses, pressure-dependent volume changes, and local phase changes. We use a modified version of the (Miliman-based) FEM code M2TRI to run a set of numerical experiments for benchmarking purposes. Three benchmarks are being used to assess the accuracy of this formulation: (1) model the effects on density of a compressible mantle under the influence of gravity; (2) model the deflection of a visco-elastic beam under the influence of gravity, and its recovery when gravitational loading is artificially removed; (3) Modelling the stresses

  15. Bidirectional relationship between chronic kidney and periodontal disease: a study using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Taylor, George W; West, Brady T; McCarthy, Ellen T

    2011-02-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with diabetes, heart disease, and chronic kidney disease (CKD), relationships postulated to be due in part to vascular inflammation. A bidirectional relationship between CKD and periodontal disease is plausible, though this relationship has not been previously reported. In this study, we assessed the potential for connections between CKD and periodontal disease, and mediators of these relationships using structural equation models of data from 11,211 adults ≥ 18 years of age who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to test the hypothesis that periodontal disease was independently associated with CKD. Given the potential that the periodontal disease and CKD relationship may be bidirectional, a two-step analytic approach was used that involved tests for mediation and structural equation models to examine more complex direct and indirect effects of periodontal disease on CKD, and vice versa. In two separate models, periodontal disease (adjusted odds ratio of 1.62), edentulism (adjusted odds ratio of 1.83), and the periodontal disease score were associated with CKD when simultaneously adjusting for 14 other factors. Altogether, three of four structural equation models support the hypothesized relationship. Thus, our analyses support a bidirectional relationship between CKD and periodontal disease, mediated by hypertension and the duration of diabetes. PMID:20927035

  16. The Use of Haemoglobin as a Model for Teaching the Relationship Between Structure and Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggins, F. W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Presents information about an atomic model of haemoglobin and describes the oxygenation mechanism as a teaching principle to illustrate the relationship between structure and function at the molecular level. (Author/PEB)

  17. A Conceptual Model of Relationships among Constructivist Learning Environment Perceptions, Epistemological Beliefs, and Learning Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkal, Kudret; Tekkaya, Ceren; Cakiroglu, Jale; Sungur, Semra

    2009-01-01

    This study proposed a conceptual model of relationships among constructivist learning environment perception variables (Personal Relevance, Uncertainty, Critical Voice, Shared Control, and Student Negotiation), scientific epistemological belief variables (fixed and tentative), and learning approach. It was proposed that learning environment…

  18. Evaluation of a nonlinear parameter extraction mathematical model including the term C(subm(sub delta e squared))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suit, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Shuttle flight test data were used to determine values for the short-period parameters. The best identified, as judged by its estimated standard deviation, was the elevon effectiveness parameter C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)). However, the scatter about the preflight prediction of C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)) was large. Other investigators have suggested that adding nonlinear terms to the mathematical model used to identify C (sub m (sub sigma e)) could reduce the scatter. The results of this investigation show that C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)) is the only identifiable nonlinear parameter applicable and that the changes in C (sub m (sub sigma e)) values when C (sub m (sub sigma e squared)) is included are in the order of ten percent for the data estimated.

  19. EMF 7 model comparisons: key relationships and parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, B.G.

    1983-12-01

    A simplified textbook model of aggregate demand and supply interprets the similarities and differences in the price and income responses of the various EMF 7 models to oil and policy shocks. The simplified model is a marriage of Hicks' classic IS-LM formulation of the Keynesian theory of effective demand with a rudimentary model of aggregate supply, combining a structural Phillips curve for wage determination and a markup theory of price determination. The reduced-form income equation from the fix-price IS-LM model is used to define an aggregate demand (AD) locus in P-Y space, showing alternative pairs of the implicit GNP deflator and real GNP which would simultaneously satisfy the saving-investment identity and the condition for money market equilibrium. An aggregate supply (AS) schedule is derived by a similar reduction of relations between output and labor demand, unemployment and wage inflation, and the wage-price-productivity nexus governing markup pricing. Given a particular econometric model it is possible to derive IS and LM curves algebraically. The resulting locuses would show alternative combinations of interest rate and real income which equilibrate real income identity on the IS side and the demand and supply of money on the LM side. By further substitution the reduced form fix-price income relation could be obtained for direct quantification of the AD locus. The AS schedule is obtainable by algebraic reduction of the structural supply side equations.

  20. A Rapid Approach to Modeling Species-Habitat Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Geoffrey M.; Breinger, David R.; Stolen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    A growing number of species require conservation or management efforts. Success of these activities requires knowledge of the species' occurrence pattern. Species-habitat models developed from GIS data sources are commonly used to predict species occurrence but commonly used data sources are often developed for purposes other than predicting species occurrence and are of inappropriate scale and the techniques used to extract predictor variables are often time consuming and cannot be repeated easily and thus cannot efficiently reflect changing conditions. We used digital orthophotographs and a grid cell classification scheme to develop an efficient technique to extract predictor variables. We combined our classification scheme with a priori hypothesis development using expert knowledge and a previously published habitat suitability index and used an objective model selection procedure to choose candidate models. We were able to classify a large area (57,000 ha) in a fraction of the time that would be required to map vegetation and were able to test models at varying scales using a windowing process. Interpretation of the selected models confirmed existing knowledge of factors important to Florida scrub-jay habitat occupancy. The potential uses and advantages of using a grid cell classification scheme in conjunction with expert knowledge or an habitat suitability index (HSI) and an objective model selection procedure are discussed.

  1. Density Predictions of Mercury's Exosphere Utilizing HEMO, the Hermean Exosphere Model of Oxygen, Including the Effects of Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotheer, E.; Mangano, V.; Livi, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The work presented here builds on the results of Grotheer & Livi [2014], which found that the majority of the vapor produced due to meteoroid impacts on Mercury is caused by meteoroids with masses 4.2 x 10-7 g ≤ m ≤ 8.3 x 10-2 g. Meteoroids with a mass of 2.1 x 10-4 g are the largest contributors to the vapor released by meteoroid impacts, thus here we focus on meteoroids with such masses as an input to a particle tracing simulation called the Hermean Exosphere Model of Oxygen (HEMO). The HEMO simulations include 36 different particle species which can be released via meteoritic impact vaporization, based on the abundances determined by Berezhnoy & Klumov [2008]. After the initial simulation of the meteoroid impact, the released particles are affected by the gravitational pull of the planet Mercury, as well as the Sun's radiation. Particles may be photoionized or in the case of molecules also photodissociated. Due to the effects of photodissociation, a total of 38 species are actually present in the simulation, since 2 species are not directly released by impact vaporization but may be created due to photodissociation. These simulations record various pieces of information about each simulated particle, including position and velocity, for each time-step of the model. This information is then utilized to construct density profiles for each simulation run, as well as for aggregates of simulation runs with similar input parameters. The results are intended to aid the interpretation of results from the MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions to Mercury, with a particular focus on atomic and molecular oxygen. ReferencesAlexey A. Berezhnoy and Boris A. Klumov. Impacts as sources of the exosphere on Mercury. Icarus, 195(2): 511-522, 2008. Emmanuel B. Grotheer and Stefano A. Livi. Small meteoroids' major contribution to Mercury's exosphere. Icarus, 227(1): 1-7, 2014.

  2. Reappraising the Relationships between Physics Students' Mental Models and Predictions: An Example of Heat Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Guo-Li

    2013-01-01

    Although prediction is claimed to be a prime function of mental models, to what extent students can run their mental models to make predictions of physical phenomena remains uncertain. The purpose of this study, therefore, was first to investigate 30 physics students' mental models of heat convection, and then to examine the relationship between…

  3. Victim's Response Cycle: A Model for Understanding the Incestuous Victim-Offender Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Roper, Liza

    1996-01-01

    The victim-response cycle model focuses on specific aspects of the relationship that victims have with their offenders which contribute to the degree of trauma that victims experience. This model addresses attachment and learned coping responses to assist clinicians in treating symptomatic behavior. A case example demonstrating the model is…

  4. Porcine skin visible lesion thresholds for near-infrared lasers including modeling at two pulse durations and spot sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Polhamus, Garrett D.; Roach, William P.; Stolarski, David J.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Stockton, Kevin; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Chen, Bo; Welch, Ashley J.

    2006-07-01

    With the advent of such systems as the airborne laser and advanced tactical laser, high-energy lasers that use 1315-nm wavelengths in the near-infrared band will soon present a new laser safety challenge to armed forces and civilian populations. Experiments in nonhuman primates using this wavelength have demonstrated a range of ocular injuries, including corneal, lenticular, and retinal lesions as a function of pulse duration. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) laser safety standards have traditionally been based on experimental data, and there is scant data for this wavelength. We are reporting minimum visible lesion (MVL) threshold measurements using a porcine skin model for two different pulse durations and spot sizes for this wavelength. We also compare our measurements to results from our model based on the heat transfer equation and rate process equation, together with actual temperature measurements on the skin surface using a high-speed infrared camera. Our MVL-ED50 thresholds for long pulses (350 µs) at 24-h postexposure are measured to be 99 and 83 Jcm-2 for spot sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 mm diam, respectively. Q-switched laser pulses of 50 ns have a lower threshold of 11 Jcm-2 for a 5-mm-diam top-hat laser pulse.

  5. An investigation of turbulence modeling in transonic fans including a novel implementation of an implicit k-[var epsilon] turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.G.; Jennions, I.K. )

    1993-04-01

    An explicit Navier-Stokes solver has been written with the option of using one of two types of turbulence model. One is the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model and the other is an implicit k-[var epsilon] model which has been coupled with the explicit Navier-Stokes solver in a novel way. This type of coupling, which uses two different solution methods, is unique and combines the overall robustness of the implicit k-[var epsilon] solver with the simplicity of the explicit solver. The resulting code has been applied to the solution of the flow in a transonic fan rotor, which has been experimentally investigated by Wennerstrom. Five separate solutions, each identical except for the turbulence modeling details, have been obtained and compared with the experimental results. The five different turbulence models run were: the standard Baldwin-Lomax model both with and without wall functions, the Baldwin-Lomax model with modified constants and wall functions, a standard k-[var epsilon] model, and an extended k-[var epsilon] model, which accounts for multiple time scales by adding an extra term to the dissipation equation. In general, as the model includes more of the physics, the computed shock position becomes closer to the experimental results.

  6. Modeling perceived relationships between melody, harmony, and key.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W F

    1993-01-01

    Perceptual relationships between four-voice harmonic sequences and single voices were examined in three experiments. In Experiment 1, listeners rated the extent to which single voices were musically consistent with harmonic sequences. When harmonic sequences did not change key, judgments were influenced by three sources of congruency: melody (whether the single voice was the same as the soprano voice of the harmonic sequence), chord progression (whether the single voice could be harmonized to give rise to the chord progression of the harmonic sequence), and key structure (whether or not the single voice implied modulation). When key changes occurred, sensitivity to sources of congruency was reduced. In Experiment 2, another interpretation of the results was examined: that consistency ratings were based on congruency in well-formedness. Listeners provided well-formedness ratings of the single voices and harmonic sequences. A multiple regression analysis suggested that consistency ratings were based not merely on well-formedness but on congruency in melody, chord progression, and key structure. In Experiment 3, listeners rated the extent of modulation in harmonic sequences and in each voice of the sequences. Discrimination between modulation conditions was greater for single voices than for harmonic sequences, suggesting that abstraction of key from melody may occur without reference to implied harmony. A partially hierarchical system for processing melody, harmony, and key is proposed. PMID:8433901

  7. Relationship between Cole-Cole model parameters and spectral decomposition parameters derived from SIP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are commonly analysed using phenomenological models. Among these models the Cole-Cole (CC) model is the most popular choice to describe the strength and frequency dependence of distinct polarization peaks in the data. More flexibility regarding the shape of the spectrum is provided by decomposition schemes. Here the spectral response is decomposed into individual responses of a chosen elementary relaxation model, mathematically acting as kernel in the involved integral, based on a broad range of relaxation times. A frequently used kernel function is the Debye model, but also the CC model with some other a priorly specified frequency dispersion (e.g. Warburg model) has been proposed as kernel in the decomposition. The different decomposition approaches in use, also including conductivity and resistivity formulations, pose the question to which degree the integral spectral parameters typically derived from the obtained relaxation time distribution are biased by the approach itself. Based on synthetic SIP data sampled from an ideal CC response, we here investigate how the two most important integral output parameters deviate from the corresponding CC input parameters. We find that the total chargeability may be underestimated by up to 80 per cent and the mean relaxation time may be off by up to three orders of magnitude relative to the original values, depending on the frequency dispersion of the analysed spectrum and the proximity of its peak to the frequency range limits considered in the decomposition. We conclude that a quantitative comparison of SIP parameters across different studies, or the adoption of parameter relationships from other studies, for example when transferring laboratory results to the field, is only possible on the basis of a consistent spectral analysis procedure. This is particularly important when comparing effective CC parameters with spectral parameters derived from decomposition results.

  8. Receiving, Giving, and Taking in Relationships: A Developmental Psychological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article identifies the different stages or levels of psychosocial maturity in receiving, giving, and taking as indicators of the level of development of a given family or client. The proposed model spotlights specific beliefs, attitudes, and myths that guide client interactions and establishes baselines of behavior and setting goals for…

  9. The Prototype Hypothesis and the Origins of Attachment Working Models: Adult Relationships with Parents and Romantic Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Gretchen; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Used Current Relationship Interview (CRI) to examine correspondence between adults' models of their current love relationships and generalized attachment models accessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). Found that early experience influences later relationships, but little support for the idea that a working model formed by caregiver-child…

  10. Parametric modeling for quantitative analysis of pulmonary structure to function relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Holmes, David R., III; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2005-04-01

    While lung anatomy is well understood, pulmonary structure-to-function relationships such as the complex elastic deformation of the lung during respiration are less well documented. Current methods for studying lung anatomy include conventional chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging with polarized gases (MRI scan). Pulmonary physiology can be studied using spirometry or V/Q nuclear medicine tests (V/Q scan). V/Q scanning and MRI scans may demonstrate global and regional function. However, each of these individual imaging methods lacks the ability to provide high-resolution anatomic detail, associated pulmonary mechanics and functional variability of the entire respiratory cycle. Specifically, spirometry provides only a one-dimensional gross estimate of pulmonary function, and V/Q scans have poor spatial resolution, reducing its potential for regional assessment of structure-to-function relationships. We have developed a method which utilizes standard clinical CT scanning to provide data for computation of dynamic anatomic parametric models of the lung during respiration which correlates high-resolution anatomy to underlying physiology. The lungs are segmented from both inspiration and expiration three-dimensional (3D) data sets and transformed into a geometric description of the surface of the lung. Parametric mapping of lung surface deformation then provides a visual and quantitative description of the mechanical properties of the lung. Any alteration in lung mechanics is manifest by alterations in normal deformation of the lung wall. The method produces a high-resolution anatomic and functional composite picture from sparse temporal-spatial methods which quantitatively illustrates detailed anatomic structure to pulmonary function relationships impossible for translational methods to provide.

  11. CO{sub 2} corrosion model for carbon steel including a wall shear stress model for multiphase flow and limits for production rate to avoid mesa attack

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, A.M.K.; Santvedt, T.

    1999-11-01

    A corrosion rate model is developed for carbon steel in water containing CO{sub 2} at different temperatures, pH`s, CO{sub 2} fugacities and wall shear stresses. The model is based on loop experiments at temperatures from 20--160 C. The data are taken from a database containing more than 2,400 data points at various temperatures, CO{sub 2} fugacities, pH`s and wall shear stresses. To find the best fit of the data, data for each temperature present in the data base was evaluated separately to find typical trends for the change in corrosion rate versus CO{sub 2} fugacity, wall shear stress and pH. To facilitate use of the corrosion model a simplified method for calculating wall shear stress in multiphase flow is included. This model includes a viscosity model for dispersions and is developed for oil wet and water wet flow. Criteria for the maximum production rate to avoid mesa attach in straight sections and behind welds is also included.

  12. Estimating species - area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Connor, Edward F; Royle, J Andrew; Itoh, Katsuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Taki, Hisatomo; Mishima, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Models and data used to describe species-area relationships confound sampling with ecological process as they fail to acknowledge that estimates of species richness arise due to sampling. This compromises our ability to make ecological inferences from and about species-area relationships. We develop and illustrate hierarchical community models of abundance and frequency to estimate species richness. The models we propose separate sampling from ecological processes by explicitly accounting for the fact that sampled patches are seldom completely covered by sampling plots and that individuals present in the sampling plots are imperfectly detected. We propose a multispecies abundance model in which community assembly is treated as the summation of an ensemble of species-level Poisson processes and estimate patch-level species richness as a derived parameter. We use sampling process models appropriate for specific survey methods. We propose a multispecies frequency model that treats the number of plots in which a species occurs as a binomial process. We illustrate these models using data collected in surveys of early-successional bird species and plants in young forest plantation patches. Results indicate that only mature forest plant species deviated from the constant density hypothesis, but the null model suggested that the deviations were too small to alter the form of species-area relationships. Nevertheless, results from simulations clearly show that the aggregate pattern of individual species density-area relationships and occurrence probability-area relationships can alter the form of species-area relationships. The plant community model estimated that only half of the species present in the regional species pool were encountered during the survey. The modeling framework we propose explicitly accounts for sampling processes so that ecological processes can be examined free of sampling artefacts. Our modeling approach is extensible and could be applied to a

  13. Estimating species – area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaura, Yuichi; Connor, Edward F.; Royle, Andy; Itoh, Katsuo; Sato, Kiyoshi; Taki, Hisatomo; Mishima, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Models and data used to describe species–area relationships confound sampling with ecological process as they fail to acknowledge that estimates of species richness arise due to sampling. This compromises our ability to make ecological inferences from and about species–area relationships. We develop and illustrate hierarchical community models of abundance and frequency to estimate species richness. The models we propose separate sampling from ecological processes by explicitly accounting for the fact that sampled patches are seldom completely covered by sampling plots and that individuals present in the sampling plots are imperfectly detected. We propose a multispecies abundance model in which community assembly is treated as the summation of an ensemble of species-level Poisson processes and estimate patch-level species richness as a derived parameter. We use sampling process models appropriate for specific survey methods. We propose a multispecies frequency model that treats the number of plots in which a species occurs as a binomial process. We illustrate these models using data collected in surveys of early-successional bird species and plants in young forest plantation patches. Results indicate that only mature forest plant species deviated from the constant density hypothesis, but the null model suggested that the deviations were too small to alter the form of species–area relationships. Nevertheless, results from simulations clearly show that the aggregate pattern of individual species density–area relationships and occurrence probability–area relationships can alter the form of species–area relationships. The plant community model estimated that only half of the species present in the regional species pool were encountered during the survey. The modeling framework we propose explicitly accounts for sampling processes so that ecological processes can be examined free of sampling artefacts. Our modeling approach is extensible and could be applied

  14. Bayesian Geostatistical Model-Based Estimates of Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection in Nigeria, Including Annual Deworming Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Akinola S.; Ekpo, Uwem F.; Karagiannis-Voules, Dimitrios-Alexios; Abe, Eniola M.; Olamiju, Francisca O.; Isiyaku, Sunday; Okoronkwo, Chukwu; Saka, Yisa; Nebe, Obiageli J.; Braide, Eka I.; Mafiana, Chiedu F.; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Background The acceleration of the control of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in Nigeria, emphasizing preventive chemotherapy, has become imperative in light of the global fight against neglected tropical diseases. Predictive risk maps are an important tool to guide and support control activities. Methodology STH infection prevalence data were obtained from surveys carried out in 2011 using standard protocols. Data were geo-referenced and collated in a nationwide, geographic information system database. Bayesian geostatistical models with remotely sensed environmental covariates and variable selection procedures were utilized to predict the spatial distribution of STH infections in Nigeria. Principal Findings We found that hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Trichuris trichiura infections are endemic in 482 (86.8%), 305 (55.0%), and 55 (9.9%) locations, respectively. Hookworm and A. lumbricoides infection co-exist in 16 states, while the three species are co-endemic in 12 states. Overall, STHs are endemic in 20 of the 36 states of Nigeria, including the Federal Capital Territory of Abuja. The observed prevalence at endemic locations ranged from 1.7% to 51.7% for hookworm, from 1.6% to 77.8% for A. lumbricoides, and from 1.0% to 25.5% for T. trichiura. Model-based predictions ranged from 0.7% to 51.0% for hookworm, from 0.1% to 82.6% for A. lumbricoides, and from 0.0% to 18.5% for T. trichiura. Our models suggest that day land surface temperature and dense vegetation are important predictors of the spatial distribution of STH infection in Nigeria. In 2011, a total of 5.7 million (13.8%) school-aged children were predicted to be infected with STHs in Nigeria. Mass treatment at the local government area level for annual or bi-annual treatment of the school-aged population in Nigeria in 2011, based on World Health Organization prevalence thresholds, were estimated at 10.2 million tablets. Conclusions/Significance The predictive risk maps and estimated

  15. The relationship between observed fatigue damage and life estimation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurath, Peter; Socie, Darrell F.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the surface of laboratory specimens subjected to axial and torsional fatigue loadings has resulted in the identification of three damage fatigue phenomena: crack nucleation, shear crack growth, and tensile crack growth. Material, microstructure, state of stress/strain, and loading amplitude all influence which of the three types of fatigue damage occurs during a dominant fatigue life fraction. Fatigue damage maps are employed to summarize the experimental observations. Appropriate bulk stress/strain damage parameters are suggested to model fatigue damage for the dominant fatigue life fraction. Extension of the damage map concept to more complex loadings is presented.

  16. The influence of dynamic vegetation models including harvest and fertilization management on the energy fluxes and the feedback effects between the weather and the land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Christian; Biernath, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Heinlein, Florian; Priesack, Eckart

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show that uncertainties in regional and global weather and climate simulations are partly caused by inadequate descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Particularly relevant for the improvement of regional weather forecast are models which better describe the feedback fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere, which influences surface temperature, surface air pressure and the amount and frequency of precipitation events. Aim of this study was to examine the differences between weather simulation results by the "Regional Climate and Weather Forecast Model" (WRF) using either the frequently applied land surface model NOAH or Expert-N. Where the standard model NOAH distinguish between vegetation class specific monthly changing soil cover values (leaf area index) and defined soil characteristics, Expert-N is an ecosystem model that allows the application of more mechanistic soil and plant sub-models including the management of soil and vegetation and effects of water and nutrient availability on plant growth are considered. The WRF-NOAH model was applied with a default land surface configuration typical for the simulation domain Bavaria, Germany. Expert-N was configured using the Hurley Pasture Model to simulate plant growth and calibrated using vegetation, management and soil data from one grassland site. Both models were applied to the simulation domain. The simulation results of energy fluxes in both models between the land surface and the atmosphere were compared with each other's and with weather data from about 100 weather stations in Bavaria using statistical methods. The influence of different harvest scenarios on the energy fluxes is discussed. The simulation shows the high impact of vegetation management on the energy fluxes which caused significant differences between weather characteristics such as the simulated surface temperatures and precipitation events on the regional scale. Therefore, we conclude that weather forecast

  17. Receptor modelling of fine particles in Southern England using CMB including comparison with AMS-PMF factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Cumberland, S. A.; Harrison, R. M.; Allan, J.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.

    2014-09-01

    PM2.5 was collected during a winter campaign at two southern England sites, urban background North Kensington (NK) and rural Harwell (HAR), in January-February 2012. Multiple organic and inorganic source tracers were analysed and used in a Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model, which apportioned seven separate primary sources, that explained on average 53% (NK) and 56% (HAR) of the organic carbon (OC), including traffic, woodsmoke, food cooking, coal combustion, vegetative detritus, natural gas and dust/soil. With the addition of source tracers for secondary biogenic aerosol at the NK site, 79% of organic carbon was accounted for. Secondary biogenic sources were represented by oxidation products of α-pinene and isoprene, but only the former made a substantial contribution to OC. Particle source contribution estimates for PM2.5 mass were obtained by the conversion of the OC estimates and combining with inorganic components ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulphate and sea salt. Good mass closure was achieved with 8% (92% with the addition of the secondary biogenic source) and 83% of the PM2.5 mass explained at NK and HAR respectively, with the remainder being secondary organic matter. While the most important sources of OC are vehicle exhaust (21 and 16%) and woodsmoke (15% and 28%) at NK and HAR respectively, food cooking emissions are also significant, particularly at the urban NK site (11% of OC), in addition to the secondary biogenic source, only measured at NK, which represented about 26%. In comparison, the major source components for PM2.5 at NK and HAR are inorganic ammonium salts (51 and 56%), vehicle exhaust emissions (8 and 6%), secondary biogenic (10% measured at NK only), woodsmoke (4 and 7%) and sea salt (7 and 8%), whereas food cooking (4% and 1%) showed relatively smaller contributions to PM2.5. Results from the CMB model were compared with source contribution estimates derived from the AMS-PMF method. The overall mass of organic matter accounted for is

  18. Receptor modelling of fine particles in southern England using CMB including comparison with AMS-PMF factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Cumberland, S. A.; Harrison, R. M.; Allan, J.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.

    2015-02-01

    PM2.5 was collected during a winter campaign at two southern England sites, urban background North Kensington (NK) and rural Harwell (HAR), in January-February 2012. Multiple organic and inorganic source tracers were analysed and used in a Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model, which apportioned seven separate primary sources, that explained on average 53% (NK) and 56% (HAR) of the organic carbon (OC), including traffic, woodsmoke, food cooking, coal combustion, vegetative detritus, natural gas and dust/soil. With the addition of source tracers for secondary biogenic aerosol at the NK site, 79% of organic carbon was accounted for. Secondary biogenic sources were represented by oxidation products of α-pinene and isoprene, but only the former made a substantial contribution to OC. Particle source contribution estimates for PM2.5 mass were obtained by the conversion of the OC estimates and combining with inorganic components ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sea salt. Good mass closure was achieved with 81% (92% with the addition of the secondary biogenic source) and 83% of the PM2.5 mass explained at NK and HAR respectively, with the remainder being secondary organic matter. While the most important sources of OC are vehicle exhaust (21 and 16%) and woodsmoke (15 and 28%) at NK and HAR respectively, food cooking emissions are also significant, particularly at the urban NK site (11% of OC), in addition to the secondary biogenic source, only measured at NK, which represented about 26%. In comparison, the major source components for PM2.5 at NK and HAR are inorganic ammonium salts (51 and 56%), vehicle exhaust emissions (8 and 6%), secondary biogenic (10% measured at NK only), woodsmoke (4 and 7%) and sea salt (7 and 8%), whereas food cooking (4 and 1%) showed relatively smaller contributions to PM2.5. Results from the CMB model were compared with source contribution estimates derived from the AMS-PMF method. The overall mass of organic matter accounted for is rather

  19. Reappraising the relationships between physics students' mental models and predictions: An example of heat convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Guo-Li

    2013-06-01

    Although prediction is claimed to be a prime function of mental models, to what extent students can run their mental models to make predictions of physical phenomena remains uncertain. The purpose of this study, therefore, was first to investigate 30 physics students’ mental models of heat convection, and then to examine the relationship between their mental models and predictions of convection-related phenomena. A series of semistructured interviews was conducted to probe the participants’ mental models and predictions of heat convection, and the constant comparative method was adopted for data analysis. The results reveal that the participants held a variety of mental models of heat convection, and nearly half held flawed mental models rather than a scientifically compatible one. In addition, while many participants attempted to run their mental models to make a prediction at the beginning stage of solving an interview problem, the relationship between the models and predictions became increasingly complex as the problem solving process continued. The relationships between mental models and predictions, however, could be better understood by considering the completeness of a mental model, the scale of analyzing mental models, and the retrieval of different formats of mental representations.

  20. The Relationship of Coping, Self-Worth, and Subjective Well-Being: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Catalano, Denise; Ebener, Deborah J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between various coping-related variables and the evaluation of self-worth and subjective well-being among persons with spinal cord injury. Positive coping variables included hope, proactive coping style, and sense of humor, whereas negative coping variables included perceptions of stress,…

  1. HIV Risk, Partner Violence, and Relationship Power Among Filipino Young Women: Testing a Structural Model

    PubMed Central

    LUCEA, MARGUERITE B.; HINDIN, MICHELLE J.; KUB, JOAN; CAMPBELL, JACQUELYN C.

    2012-01-01

    A person’s ability to minimize HIV risk is embedded in a complex, multidimensional context. In this study, we tested a model of how relationship power impacts IPV victimization, which in turn impacts HIV risk behaviors. We analyzed data from 474 young adult women (aged 15–31) in Cebu Province, Philippines, using structural equation modeling, and demonstrated good fit for the models. High relationship power is directly associated with increased IPV victimization, and IPV victimization is positively associated with increased HIV risk. We highlight in this article the complex dynamics to consider in HIV risk prevention among these young women. PMID:22420674

  2. The relationship between sea-level and bottom pressure variability in an eddy permitting ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Rory J.; Hughes, Chris W.

    2008-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between sea-level (after application of an inverse-barometer correction) and ocean bottom pressure, in an eddy-permitting ocean model. We find the presence of eddies can disrupt this relationship even on timescales as short as 10-20 days, but only in the regions of most energetic eddy variability. Away from eddies, the relationship is similar to that seen in a coarser-resolution model, with a tight relationship between sea-level and bottom pressure at high frequencies, but with significant correlations between sea-level and bottom pressure at interannual timescales seen only in shelf sea regions. In the deep ocean, regions where sea-level and bottom pressure remain related out to the longest timescales are in the Arctic Ocean and regions of the Southern Ocean, where particularly large amplitude barotropic fluctuations are found but where the mesoscale signal is weak.

  3. A continuum model for pressure-flow relationship in human pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhou, Qinlian; Gao, Jian; Yen, R T

    2011-06-01

    A continuum model was introduced to analyze the pressure-flow relationship for steady flow in human pulmonary circulation. The continuum approach was based on the principles of continuum mechanics in conjunction with detailed measurement of vascular geometry, vascular elasticity and blood rheology. The pulmonary arteries and veins were considered as elastic tubes and the "fifth-power law" was used to describe the pressure-flow relationship. For pulmonary capillaries, the "sheet-flow" theory was employed and the pressure-flow relationship was represented by the "fourth-power law". In this paper, the pressure-flow relationship for the whole pulmonary circulation and the longitudinal pressure distribution along the streamlines were studied. Our computed data showed general agreement with the experimental data for the normal subjects and the patients with mitral stenosis and chronic bronchitis in the literature. In conclusion, our continuum model can be used to predict the changes of steady flow in human pulmonary circulation. PMID:21608412

  4. Coping with Relationship Stressors: The Impact of Different Working Models of Attachment and Links to Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    The study explores the role of working models of attachment in the process of coping with relationship stressors with a focus on long-term adaptation. In a 7-year longitudinal study of 112 participants, stress and coping were assessed during adolescence and emerging adulthood. In addition, working models of attachment were assessed by employing…

  5. Relationships among Adolescents' Leisure Motivation, Leisure Involvement, and Leisure Satisfaction: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Li, Ren-Hau; Chen, Sheng-Hwang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to test a cause-and-effect model of factors affecting leisure satisfaction among Taiwanese adolescents. A structural equation model was proposed in which the relationships among leisure motivation, leisure involvement, and leisure satisfaction were explored. The study collected data from 701 adolescent…

  6. Predictor Relationships between Values Held by Married Individuals, Resilience and Conflict Resolution Styles: A Model Suggestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosun, Fatma; Dilmac, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to reveal the predictor relationships between the values held by married individuals, resilience and conflict resolution styles. The research adopts a relational screening model that is a sub-type of the general screening model. The sample of the research consists of 375 married individuals, of which 173 are…

  7. The Learning-Teaching Nexus: Modelling the Learning-Teaching Relationship in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knewstubb, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The teaching-learning relationship is often described as a conversation. However, many models of teaching and learning depict the worlds of teacher and learner as enclosed and inaccessible, linked by apparently transferred communicative meanings. A new interdisciplinary learning-teaching nexus (LTN) model combines perspectives from higher…

  8. Evaluating Competing Models of the Relationship between Inspection Time and Psychometric Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, J. R.; Deary, Ian J.; Allan, Katherine M.; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    1998-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test models of the relationship between inspection time (IT) and psychometric measures of intelligence in a sample of 134 healthy adults in the United Kingdom. A nested structural equation modeling approach shows that IT is most strongly associated with the Perceptual-Organizational factor of the Wechsler…

  9. Modeling the Relationships among Students' Motivational Beliefs, Metacognitive Strategy Use, and Effort Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sungur, Semra

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a path model was utilised to model the relationships among motivational beliefs, metacognitive strategy use, and effort regulation in science courses. There were 391 high-school students participating in the study. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire was used to measure students' motivational beliefs, metacognitive…

  10. Models and Domains of Supervision and Their Relationship to Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, William M.

    2007-01-01

    The author describes four models of supervision--administrative, traditional mental health, relationship-based, and mindfulness practice--with their corresponding domains of staff development. Each model's communication style, participant roles, and assumptions of how change occurs provide a framework for understanding the relative needs…

  11. The Impact of Consultation Models on Interpersonal Relationships during Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neall, Michael Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Client-centered and consultee-centered consultation models are predominately used in K-12 schools to meet the needs of at-risk learners and ensure equitable access to educational services. Although the efficacy of both models has significant support in the literature, studies regarding relationships formed during problem solving in consultation…

  12. A Response to Estelle R. Jorgensen, "Four Philosophical Models of the Relationship between Theory and Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2005-01-01

    Each of the four philosophical models that Estelle Jorgensen has put forth contests, adheres to, or adjusts the hierarchical relationships between dualities, specifically the theory and practice of musical learning. Moreover, models of polarity, according to Jorgensen, accommodate dualities by buffering edges, emphasizing the interconnectedness of…

  13. The Family of Origin Parachute Model: Landing Safely in Adult Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Dean M.; Gardner, Brandt C.; Taniguchi, Narumi

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the utility of the family of origin parachute model in predicting longitudinal outcomes for couples in romantic relationships. This conceptual model contains common family variables that are theoretically and empirically related to later adult functioning and are believed to influence attitudes that adult children develop…

  14. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  15. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance. PMID:26254660

  16. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ben, Mauro Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-07

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  17. Monitoring and modeling wetland chloride concentrations in relationship to oil and gas development.

    PubMed

    Post van der Burg, Max; Tangen, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Extraction of oil and gas via unconventional methods is becoming an important aspect of energy production worldwide. Studying the effects of this development in countries where these technologies are being widely used may provide other countries, where development may be proposed, with some insight in terms of concerns associated with development. A fairly recent expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America provides such an opportunity. Rapid increases in energy development in North America have caught the attention of managers and scientists as a potential stressor for wildlife and their habitats. Of particular concern in the Northern Great Plains of the U.S. is the potential for chloride-rich produced water associated with unconventional oil and gas development to alter the water chemistry of wetlands. We describe a landscape scale modeling approach designed to examine the relationship between potential chloride contamination in wetlands and patterns of oil and gas development. We used a spatial Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to assess multiple models explaining chloride concentrations in wetlands. These models included effects related to oil and gas wells (e.g. age of wells, number of wells) and surficial geology (e.g. glacial till, outwash). We found that the model containing the number of wells and the surficial geology surrounding a wetland best explained variation in chloride concentrations. Our spatial predictions showed regions of localized high chloride concentrations. Given the spatiotemporal variability of regional wetland water chemistry, we do not regard our results as predictions of contamination, but rather as a way to identify locations that may require more intensive sampling or further investigation. We suggest that an approach like the one outlined here could easily be extended to more of an adaptive monitoring approach to answer questions about chloride contamination risk that are of interest to managers. PMID

  18. Relationship between soil erodibility and modeled infiltration rate in different soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Fang, Qingqing; Wu, Binbin; Yang, Huicai; Xu, Zongxue

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between soil erodibility, which is hard to measure, and modeled infiltration rate were rarely researched. Here, the soil erodibility factors (K and Ke in the USLE, Ki and K1 in the WEPP) were calculated and the infiltration rates were modeled based on the designed laboratory simulation experiments and proposed infiltration model, in order to build their relationship. The impacts of compost amendment on the soil erosion characteristics and relationship were also studied. Two contrasting agricultural soils (bare and cultivated fluvo-aquic soils) were used, and different poultry compost contents (control, low and high) were applied to both soils. The results indicated that the runoff rate, sediment yield rate and soil erodibility of the bare soil treatments were generally higher than those of the corresponding cultivated soil treatments. The application of composts generally decreased sediment yield and soil erodibility but did not always decrease runoff. The comparison of measured and modeled infiltration rates indicated that the model represented the infiltration processes well with an N-S coefficient of 0.84 for overall treatments. Significant negative logarithmic correlations have been found between final infiltration rate (FIR) and the four soil erodibility factors, and the relationship between USLE-K and FIR demonstrated the best correlation. The application of poultry composts would not influence the logarithmic relationship between FIR and soil erodibility. Our study provided a useful tool to estimate soil erodibility.

  19. A comparison of persistence-time estimation for discrete and continuous stochastic population models that include demographic and environmental variability.

    PubMed

    Allen, Edward J; Allen, Linda J S; Schurz, Henri

    2005-07-01

    A discrete-time Markov chain model, a continuous-time Markov chain model, and a stochastic differential equation model are compared for a population experiencing demographic and environmental variability. It is assumed that the environment produces random changes in the per capita birth and death rates, which are independent from the inherent random (demographic) variations in the number of births and deaths for any time interval. An existence and uniqueness result is proved for the stochastic differential equation system. Similarities between the models are demonstrated analytically and computational results are provided to show that estimated persistence times for the three stochastic models are generally in good agreement when the models satisfy certain consistency conditions. PMID:15946709

  20. A Mechanistic Model of Botrytis cinerea on Grapevines That Includes Weather, Vine Growth Stage, and the Main Infection Pathways.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Elisa; Caffi, Tito; Ciliberti, Nicola; Rossi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for Botrytis cinerea on grapevine was developed. The model, which accounts for conidia production on various inoculum sources and for multiple infection pathways, considers two infection periods. During the first period ("inflorescences clearly visible" to "berries groat-sized"), the model calculates: i) infection severity on inflorescences and young clusters caused by conidia (SEV1). During the second period ("majority of berries touching" to "berries ripe for harvest"), the model calculates: ii) infection severity of ripening berries by conidia (SEV2); and iii) severity of berry-to-berry infection caused by mycelium (SEV3). The model was validated in 21 epidemics (vineyard × year combinations) between 2009 and 2014 in Italy and France. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to: i) evaluate the ability of the model to predict mild, intermediate, and severe epidemics; and ii) assess how SEV1, SEV2, and SEV3 contribute to epidemics. The model correctly classified the severity of 17 of 21 epidemics. Results from DFA were also used to calculate the daily probabilities that an ongoing epidemic would be mild, intermediate, or severe. SEV1 was the most influential variable in discriminating between mild and intermediate epidemics, whereas SEV2 and SEV3 were relevant for discriminating between intermediate and severe epidemics. The model represents an improvement of previous B. cinerea models in viticulture and could be useful for making decisions about Botrytis bunch rot control. PMID:26457808

  1. A Mechanistic Model of Botrytis cinerea on Grapevines That Includes Weather, Vine Growth Stage, and the Main Infection Pathways

    PubMed Central

    González-Domínguez, Elisa; Caffi, Tito; Ciliberti, Nicola; Rossi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for Botrytis cinerea on grapevine was developed. The model, which accounts for conidia production on various inoculum sources and for multiple infection pathways, considers two infection periods. During the first period (“inflorescences clearly visible” to “berries groat-sized”), the model calculates: i) infection severity on inflorescences and young clusters caused by conidia (SEV1). During the second period (“majority of berries touching” to “berries ripe for harvest”), the model calculates: ii) infection severity of ripening berries by conidia (SEV2); and iii) severity of berry-to-berry infection caused by mycelium (SEV3). The model was validated in 21 epidemics (vineyard × year combinations) between 2009 and 2014 in Italy and France. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to: i) evaluate the ability of the model to predict mild, intermediate, and severe epidemics; and ii) assess how SEV1, SEV2, and SEV3 contribute to epidemics. The model correctly classified the severity of 17 of 21 epidemics. Results from DFA were also used to calculate the daily probabilities that an ongoing epidemic would be mild, intermediate, or severe. SEV1 was the most influential variable in discriminating between mild and intermediate epidemics, whereas SEV2 and SEV3 were relevant for discriminating between intermediate and severe epidemics. The model represents an improvement of previous B. cinerea models in viticulture and could be useful for making decisions about Botrytis bunch rot control. PMID:26457808

  2. Bidirectional Relationship between Chronic Kidney Disease and Periodontal Disease: Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.; West, Brady T.; McCarthy, Ellen T.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is associated with diabetes, heart disease, and chronic kidney disease (CKD), an effect postulated to be due in part to endovascular inflammation. While a bidirectional relationship between CKD and periodontal disease is plausible, it has not been previously reported in the literature. Over 11 200 adults 18 years or older were identified in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Analyses were conducted in two stages. First, multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to test the hypothesis that periodontal disease was independently associated with CKD. Given the potential that the periodontal disease and CKD relationship may be bidirectional, a two-step analytic approach was used that involved 1) tests for mediation, and 2) structural equation models to examine more complex direct and indirect effects of periodontal disease on CKD, and vice versa. In two separate models periodontal disease (ORAdj =1.62 (95% CI: 1.17-2.26) and edentulism (ORAdj = 1.83 (1.31-2.55) and periodontal disease score (ORAdj = 1.01 (1.01-1.02) were associated with CKD, when simultaneously adjusting for 14 other factors. Three of four structural equation models were most plausible suggesting bidirectional relationships. Collectively, these analyses provide for the first time empirical support for a bidirectional relationship between CKD and periodontal disease, and mediation of that relationship by diabetes duration and hypertension. PMID:20927035

  3. Three-dimensional digital models for rating dental arch relationships in unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Chawla, O; Atack, N E; Deacon, S A; Leary, S D; Ireland, A J; Sandy, J R

    2013-03-01

    Objective : To determine the reliability and reproducibility of using three-dimensional digital models as an alternative to plaster models for rating dental arch relationships in patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Design : Reliability and reproducibility study. Methods : Study models of 45 patients born with unilateral cleft lip and palate were made available in plaster and three-dimensional digital models. Records were scored a week apart by three examiners using the 5-year-olds' index reference models in the same two formats as the patient models. To assess reproducibility the study was repeated 4 weeks later under similar conditions to minimize the influence of memory bias on the results. The reliability of using the three-dimensional digital models was determined by comparing the scores for each examiner with the plaster model scores. Results : Weighted kappa statistics indicated repeatability for the plaster models was very good (.83 to .87). For the three-dimensional digital models it was good to very good (.74 to .83). Overall, the use of the three-dimensional digital models showed good agreement with the plaster model scores on both occasions. Conclusion : Three-dimensional digital models appear to be a good alternative to plaster models for assessing dental arch relationships using the 5-year-olds' index. PMID:22420605

  4. An Examination of Three Models of the Relationships between Parental Attachments and Adolescents' Social Functioning and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yih-Lan

    2008-01-01

    Three models of attachment relationships--the hierarchy model, the integrative model and the independent model--were compared in order to elucidate which best described the relationship between attachments to fathers versus mothers and its developmental consequences among 1,289 eighth grade students in Taiwan. These consequences included…

  5. Species-environment relationships and potential for distribution modelling in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snickars, M.; Gullström, M.; Sundblad, G.; Bergström, U.; Downie, A.-L.; Lindegarth, M.; Mattila, J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing pressure on the marine environment there is a growing need to understand species-environment relationships. To provide background for prioritising among variables (predictors) for use in distribution models, the relevance of predictors for benthic species was reviewed using the coastal Baltic Sea as a case-study area. Significant relationships for three response groups (fish, macroinvertebrates, macrovegetation) and six predictor categories (bottom topography, biotic features, hydrography, wave exposure, substrate and spatiotemporal variability) were extracted from 145 queried peer-reviewed field-studies covering three decades and six subregions. In addition, the occurrence of interaction among predictors was analysed. Hydrography was most often found in significant relationships, had low level of interaction with other predictors, but also had the most non-significant relationships. Depth and wave exposure were important in all subregions and are readily available, increasing their applicability for cross-regional modelling efforts. Otherwise, effort to model species distributions may prove challenging at larger scale as the relevance of predictors differed among both response groups and regions. Fish and hard bottom macrovegetation have the largest modelling potential, as they are structured by a set of predictors that at the same time are accurately mapped. A general importance of biotic features implies that these need to be accounted for in distribution modelling, but the mapping of most biotic features is challenging, which currently lowers the applicability. The presence of interactions suggests that predictive methods allowing for interactive effects are preferable. Detailing these complexities is important for future distribution modelling.

  6. Transient Turbulent Flow in a Liquid-Metal Model of Continuous Casting, Including Comparison of Six Different Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, R.; Ji, C.; Thomas, B. G.; Vanka, S. P.

    2011-10-01

    Computational modeling is an important tool to understand and stabilize transient turbulent fluid flow in the continuous casting of steel to minimize defects. The current work combines the predictions of two steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, a "filtered" unsteady RANS model, and two large eddy simulation (LES) models with ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry (UDV) measurements in a small-scale liquid GaInSn model of the continuous casting mold region fed by a bifurcated well-bottom nozzle with horizontal ports. Both mean and transient features of the turbulent flow are investigated. LES outperformed all models while matching the measurements, except in locations where measurement problems are suspected. The LES model also captured high-frequency fluctuations, which the measurements could not detect. Steady RANS models were the least accurate methods. Turbulent velocity variation frequencies and energies decreased with distance from the nozzle port regions. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis, instantaneous velocity patterns, and Reynolds stresses reveal that velocity fluctuations and flow structures associated with the alternating-direction swirl in the nozzle bottom lead to a wobbling jet exiting the ports into the mold. These turbulent flow structures are responsible for patterns observed in both the time average flow and the statistics of their fluctuations.

  7. An integrated mathematical model for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) including predation and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Marta; Galán, Berta; Viguri, Javier R

    2016-07-01

    An integrated mathematical model is proposed for modelling a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) under aerobic conditions. The composite model combines the following: (i) a one-dimensional biofilm model, (ii) a bulk liquid model, and (iii) biological processes in the bulk liquid and biofilm considering the interactions among autotrophic, heterotrophic and predator microorganisms. Depending on the values for the soluble biodegradable COD loading rate (SCLR), the model takes into account a) the hydrolysis of slowly biodegradable compounds in the bulk liquid, and b) the growth of predator microorganisms in the bulk liquid and in the biofilm. The integration of the model and the SCLR allows a general description of the behaviour of COD removal by the MBBR under various conditions. The model is applied for two in-series MBBR wastewater plant from an integrated cellulose and viscose production and accurately describes the experimental concentrations of COD, total suspended solids (TSS), nitrogen and phosphorous obtained during 14 months working at different SCLRs and nutrient dosages. The representation of the microorganism group distribution in the biofilm and in the bulk liquid allow for verification of the presence of predator microorganisms in the second reactor under some operational conditions. PMID:27085154

  8. Rat Models of Acute and/or Chronic Peritoneal Injuries Including Peritoneal Fibrosis and Peritoneal Dialysis Complications.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masashi; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal injury is a major cause of discontinuation from long-term peritoneal dialysis. However, the precise mechanisms underlying such injury remain unclear. Suitable animal models of peritoneal injury may be useful to analyze pathogenic mechanisms and facilitate the development of therapeutic approaches. We describe herein two rat models of peritoneal injury that we have recently proposed. PMID:26676125

  9. The visualization of DHSI based on the relationship model of CL and SA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Guo, Huijuan; Xue, Chengqi

    2013-03-01

    The source and cause of cognitive load (CL) and situation awareness (SA) in digital human-system interface (DHSI) is explained. Based on the analysis of cognitive procedure and the relation of CL and SA, The relationship model of CL and SA in DHSI is put forward. Using the association target and the relationship model of CL and SA, the method and strategy of information visualization of DHSI is presented which is based on the cognitive psychology. Selecting the Boeing 757 autopilot as the case, the comparison of design is shown.

  10. A revised dosimetric characterization of the model S700 electronic brachytherapy source containing an anode-centering plastic insert and other components not included in the 2006 model

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, Jessica R.; Davis, Stephen D.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source by Xoft, Inc., was characterized by Rivard et al. in 2006. Since then, the source design was modified to include a new insert at the source tip. Current study objectives were to establish an accurate source model for simulation purposes, dosimetrically characterize the new source and obtain its TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters, and determine dose differences between the original simulation model and the current model S700 source design. Methods: Design information from measurements of dissected model S700 sources and from vendor-supplied CAD drawings was used to aid establishment of an updated Monte Carlo source model, which included the complex-shaped plastic source-centering insert intended to promote water flow for cooling the source anode. These data were used to create a model for subsequent radiation transport simulations in a water phantom. Compared to the 2006 simulation geometry, the influence of volume averaging close to the source was substantially reduced. A track-length estimator was used to evaluate collision kerma as a function of radial distance and polar angle for determination of TG-43 dosimetry parameters. Results for the 50 kV source were determined every 0.1 cm from 0.3 to 15 cm and every 1° from 0° to 180°. Photon spectra in water with 0.1 keV resolution were also obtained from 0.5 to 15 cm and polar angles from 0° to 165°. Simulations were run for 10{sup 10} histories, resulting in statistical uncertainties on the transverse plane of 0.04% at r = 1 cm and 0.06% at r = 5 cm. Results: The dose-rate distribution ratio for the model S700 source as compared to the 2006 model exceeded unity by more than 5% for roughly one quarter of the solid angle surrounding the source, i.e., θ ≥ 120°. The radial dose function diminished in a similar manner as for an {sup 125}I seed, with values of 1.434, 0.636, 0.283, and 0.0975 at 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 cm, respectively. The radial dose

  11. A unified statistical model for hydrological variables including the selection of threshold for the peak over threshold method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, S.; Losada, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    This paper explores the use of a mixture model for determining the marginal distribution of hydrological variables, consisting of a truncated central distribution that is representative of the central or main-mass regime, which for the cases studied is a lognormal distribution, and of two generalized Pareto distributions for the maximum and minimum regimes, representing the upper and lower tails, respectively. The thresholds defining the limits between these regimes and the central regime are parameters of the model and are calculated together with the remaining parameters by maximum likelihood. After testing the model with a simulation study we concluded that the upper threshold of the model can be used when applying the peak over threshold method. This will yield an automatic and objective identification of the threshold presenting an alternative to existing methods. The model was also applied to four hydrological data series: two mean daily flow series, the Thames at Kingston (United Kingdom), and the Guadalfeo River at Orgiva (Spain); and two daily precipitation series, Fort Collins (CO, USA), and Orgiva (Spain). It was observed that the model improved the fit of the data series with respect to the fit obtained with the lognormal (LN) and, in particular, provided a good fit for the upper tail. Moreover, we concluded that the proposed model is able to accommodate the entire range of values of some significant hydrological variables.

  12. Modifications to the steady-state 41-node thermoregulatory model including validation of the respiratory and diffusional water loss equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    After the simplified version of the 41-Node Stolwijk Metabolic Man Model was implemented on the Sigma 3 and UNIVAC 1110 computers in batch mode, it became desirable to make certain revisions. First, the availability of time-sharing terminals makes it possible to provide the capability and flexibility of conversational interaction between user and model. Secondly, recent physiological studies show the need to revise certain parameter values contained in the model. Thirdly, it was desired to make quantitative and accurate predictions of evaporative water loss for humans in an orbiting space station. The result of the first phase of this effort are reported.

  13. Analytical modeling of AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures including effects of distributed surface donor states

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Nitin; Fjeldly, Tor A.

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, a physics based analytical model is presented for calculation of the two-dimensional electron gas density and the bare surface barrier height of AlGaN/AlN/GaN material stacks. The presented model is based on the concept of distributed surface donor states and the self-consistent solution of Poisson equation at the different material interfaces. The model shows good agreement with the reported experimental data and can be used for the design and characterization of advanced GaN devices for power and radio frequency applications.

  14. The relationship between market orientation and performance in the hospital industry: a structural equations modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Raju, P S; Lonial, S C; Gupta, Y P; Ziegler, C

    2000-06-01

    There is general consensus in the research literature that market orientation is related to organizational performance. This study examines this relationship in the hospital industry. One unique feature of this study is that both market orientation and performance are conceptualized as being multi-dimensional constructs. Hence the technique of Structural Equations Modeling (SEM) is used to examine the relationship. Analyses were based on market orientation and performance data obtained from 175 hospitals in a five-state region of the United States. The SEM results confirm the multi-dimensional nature of both market orientation and performance, and the strong relationship between the constructs. Interestingly, this relationship is found to be much stronger for smaller hospitals than for larger hospitals. Implications for the hospital industry are discussed. PMID:10907326

  15. Measuring and Modeling Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material: Interpreting the Relationship Between the Natural Radionuclides Present

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, A.J.; Mucha, A.F.

    2008-07-01

    The regulatory release of sites and facilities (property) for restricted or unrestricted use has evolved beyond prescribed levels to model-derived dose and risk based limits. Dose models for deriving corresponding soil and structure radionuclide concentration guidelines are necessarily simplified representations of complex processes. A conceptual site model is often developed to present a reasonable and somewhat conservative representation of the physical and chemical properties of the impacted material. Dose modeling software is then used to estimate resulting dose and/or radionuclide specific acceptance criteria (activity concentrations). When the source term includes any or all of the uranium, thorium or actinium natural decay series radionuclides the interpretation of the relationship between the individual radionuclides of the series is critical to a technically correct and complete assessment of risk and/or derivation of radionuclide specific acceptance criteria. Unlike man-made radionuclides, modeling and measuring naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) source terms involves the interpretation of the relationship between the radionuclide present, e.g., secular equilibrium, enrichment, depletion or transient equilibrium. Isotopes of uranium, radium, and thorium occur in all three natural decay series. Each of the three series also produces a radon gas isotope as one of its progeny. In nature, the radionuclides in the three natural decay series are in a state that is approaching or has achieved secular equilibrium, in which the activities of all radionuclides within each series are nearly equal. However, ores containing the three natural decay series may begin in approximate secular equilibrium, but after processing, equilibrium may be broken and certain elements (and the radioactive isotopes of that element) may be concentrated or removed. Where the original ore may have contained one long chain of natural

  16. Understanding the relationship between audiomagnetotelluric data and models, and borehole data in a hydrological environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, D.K.; Pellerin, L.

    2008-01-01

    Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data and resulting models are analyzed with respect to geophysical and geological borehole logs in order to clarify the relationship between the two methodologies of investigation of a hydrological environment. Several profiles of AMT data collected in basins in southwestern United States are being used for groundwater exploration and hydrogeological framework studies. In a systematic manner, the AMT data and models are compared to borehole data by computing the equivalent one-dimensional AMT model and comparing with the two-dimensional (2-D) inverse AMT model. The spatial length is used to determine if the well is near enough to the AMT profile to quantify the relationship between the two datasets, and determine the required resolution of the AMT data and models. The significance of the quality of the borehole data when compared to the AMT data is also examined.

  17. A generalized approach to the modeling of the species-area relationship.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Katiane Silva; Ulrich, Werner; Diniz, Carlos Alberto Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Francisco Aparecido; de Andrade, Marinho Gomes

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a statistical generalized species-area model (GSAM) to represent various patterns of species-area relationship (SAR), which is one of the fundamental patterns in ecology. The approach enables the generalization of many preliminary models, as power-curve model, which is commonly used to mathematically describe the SAR. The GSAM is applied to simulated data set of species diversity in areas of different sizes and a real-world data of insects of Hymenoptera order has been modeled. We show that the GSAM enables the identification of the best statistical model and estimates the number of species according to the area. PMID:25171161

  18. Application of MARS for modeling local nonlinear relationships in data on ultraviolet copper ion lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocheva-Ilieva, Snezhana Georgieva; Voynikova, Desislava Stoyanova; Iliev, Iliycho Petkov

    2012-11-01

    When analyzing experiment data, the main statistical procedure is finding relationships in the data and developing models to describe them. Modeling is a powerful means of estimation, simulation, and prediction of the experiment and an indispensable tool in practical engineering. This paper considers the use of the multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) method to describe local relationships in the experiment data for several types of metal vapor lasers. The investigated data has been collected from patented UV ion lasers developed at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in the last ten years. A short description of MARS is provided. Specific MARS models have been developed describing the efficiency of an ultraviolet ion copper bromide vapor laser dependent on the change of 9 main input physical laser characteristics. The models are of linear and nonlinear type. It has been established that the best statistical indices and model fit are those of nonlinear models which contain second order local terms. The models account for about 95% of the data. The models are used to analyze the local behavior of the efficiency of various devices from the types of lasers under investigation. Graphs illustrating the established relationships are provided. The ability to predict future experiments is demonstrated.

  19. Coopetitive Supply Chain Relationship Model: Application to the Smartphone Manufacturing Network

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Jeremy Jie Ming; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-01-01

    Previous researches for understanding supply chain relationship have mostly focused on its vertical collaboration between buyers and suppliers. However, there have been some instances of volatile and stable collaborative relationships amongst competitors such as Apple-Samsung product manufacturer-component supplier relationship and airline alliances, respectively, which is recognized as coopetition. Even though there have been several qualitative studies and a number of game theory models on coopetition, it is rare to find any attempts on quantitative characterization of such coopetitive dynamic behavior in supply chain relationship. Hence, in this work, we formulated a MINLP model mathematically representing coopetitive relationships in a cost efficient supply chain network. In particular, the coopetition factor was newly introduced to measure the degree of coopetition among supply chain players and determine the optimal level of coopetition to engage in. The utility and practicality of the model were strongly demonstrated using a case study of a hypothetical smartphone supply chain network under different scenarios, thus proposing their strategically viable optimal interactions. Therefore, this exploratory study can herald a new era of global coopetitive business. PMID:26186227

  20. Coopetitive Supply Chain Relationship Model: Application to the Smartphone Manufacturing Network.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Jeremy Jie Ming; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-01-01

    Previous researches for understanding supply chain relationship have mostly focused on its vertical collaboration between buyers and suppliers. However, there have been some instances of volatile and stable collaborative relationships amongst competitors such as Apple-Samsung product manufacturer-component supplier relationship and airline alliances, respectively, which is recognized as coopetition. Even though there have been several qualitative studies and a number of game theory models on coopetition, it is rare to find any attempts on quantitative characterization of such coopetitive dynamic behavior in supply chain relationship. Hence, in this work, we formulated a MINLP model mathematically representing coopetitive relationships in a cost efficient supply chain network. In particular, the coopetition factor was newly introduced to measure the degree of coopetition among supply chain players and determine the optimal level of coopetition to engage in. The utility and practicality of the model were strongly demonstrated using a case study of a hypothetical smartphone supply chain network under different scenarios, thus proposing their strategically viable optimal interactions. Therefore, this exploratory study can herald a new era of global coopetitive business. PMID:26186227

  1. Functional relationships for the estimation of van Genuchten parameter values in landfill processes models.

    PubMed

    White, Jim; Zardava, Kiriaki; Nayagum, Dharumarajen; Powrie, William

    2015-04-01

    Numerical models of landfill processes need to be able to estimate the capillary pressure and relative permeability of waste as a function of moisture content using analytical equations such as the van Genuchten equations. The paper identifies the range of van Genuchten parameter values for use in models and proposes a formulaic relationship between these parameter values and saturated moisture content. The concept of porous material, its behaviour under unsaturated conditions and Mualem's integral transform equation that estimates relative permeability from capillary pressure are reviewed. The application of the algebraic form of the capillary pressure function proposed by van Genuchten and its application using Mualem's transform to obtain the van Genuchten algebraic functions for relative permeability are discussed. Functional relationships are identified between saturated moisture content and the van Genuchten parameters using a database of results from other sources. These relationships may be used in numerical modelling of unsaturated flow in landfilled waste where the saturated moisture content varies significantly as the result of compression, settlement and degradation. A 2D numerical model simulation of leachate recirculation is used to investigate the sensitivity of the simulation to the introduction of these functional relationships. It is found that the transient liquid and gas flows across the model boundaries appear to be insensitive to whether or not the functions are incorporated into the model algorithm. However it is observed that using the relationships does have some impact on the distribution of the degree of saturation throughout the model and on the transient behaviour of the way in which the recirculation recharges the waste. However it is not thought that this impact would be sufficient to influence the design of a leachate recirculation system. PMID:25573738

  2. The influence of inhomogeneity in architecture on the modelled force-length relationship of muscles.

    PubMed

    Savelberg, H H; Schamhardt, H C

    1995-02-01

    In this study a model has been developed to assess the length-force relationship of skeletal muscle, accounting for inhomogeneity in the muscular architecture. The muscle was modelled as a number of parallelepipeds parallel to but geometrically different from each other. For each of the parallelepipeds the force at a given length was calculated. The force-length relationship of the whole muscle was obtained by summing the forces of each of the parallelepipeds. Four kinds of inhomogeneities were simulated using this model: (i) variation of the aponeuroses lengths over the parallel parallelepipeds; (ii) variation of the muscle fibre lengths; (iii) variation of the pennation angles; (iv) variation of the fibre lengths keeping the pennation angle constant. By varying geometry parameters a total of 1000 inhomogeneous muscles was created. The force-length relationships were also calculated neglecting the inhomogeneities, by taking the extreme, or the median of the inhomogeneous parameter value, as descriptive for a homogeneous model. It was found that an inhomogeneity of the aponeuroses length has only minimal influence on the calculated force-length relationship. In the cases of the three other inhomogeneities simulated considerable differences were found. Especially when in the model neglecting inhomogeneities one of the extreme architectural variables was used, unacceptable large differences with the model considering the inhomogeneities occurred. The model was also applied to the equine M. flexor carpi radialis. Considerable differences in the calculated force-length relationship were found after incorporating inhomogeneity. These appeared to depend largely on the pennation angles, either being kept constant, or changing with varying fibre lengths over the parallel parallelepipeds. PMID:7896861

  3. Comparing the relationships between aerosol optical depth and cloud properties in observations and global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols impact the climate both directly, through their interaction with radiation and indirectly, via their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties. The influence of aerosols on cloud properties is highly uncertain. Many relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties have been observed using satellite data, but previous work has shown that some of these relationships are the product of the strong AOD-cloud fraction (CF) relationship. The confounding influence of local meteorology obscures the magnitude of any aerosol impact on CF, and so also the impact of aerosol on other cloud properties. For example, both AOD and CF are strongly influenced by relative humidity, which can generate a correlation between them. Previous studies have used reanalysis data to account for confounding meteorological variables. This requires knowledge of the relevant meteorological variables and is limited by the accuracy of the reanalysis data. Recent work has shown that by using the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) to mediate the AOD-CF relationship, the impact of relative humidity can be significantly reduced. This method removes the limitations imposed by the finite accuracy of reanalysis data. In this work we investigate the impact of the CDNC mediation on the AOD-CF relationship and on the relationship between AOD and other cloud properties in global atmospheric models. By comparing pre-industrial and present day runs, we investigate the success of the CDNC mediated AOD-CF relationship to predict the change in CF from the pre-industrial to the present day using only observations of the present day relationships between clouds and aerosol properties. This helps to determine whether the satellite-derived relationship provides a constraint on the aerosol indirect forcing due to changes in CF.

  4. A 1-D Size Specific Numerical Model for Gravel Transport That Includes Sediment Exchange with a Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Wesley; Viparelli, Enrica; Piegay, Herve

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentary deposits adjacent to rivers can represent important sources and sinks for bed material sediment, particularly on decadal and longer timescales. The Morphodynamics and Sediment Tracers in 1-D model (MAST-1D) is a size-specific sediment transport model that allows for active exchange between channel and floodplain sediment on river reaches of tens to hundreds of kilometers in length. The model is intended to provide a mechanism for performing a first-order assessment of the likely importance of off-channel sediment exchange in controlling decadal-scale geomorphic trends, thereby helping plan and/or prioritize field data collection and higher resolution modeling work. The model develops a sediment budget for short segments of an alluvial valley. Each segment encompasses several active river bends. In each segment, a sediment transport capacity computation is performed to determine the downstream flux of bed material sediment, following the approach of most other 1-D sediment transport models. However, the model differs from most other bed evolution models in that sediment can be exchanged with the floodplain in each segment, and mass conservation is applied to both the active layer and floodplain sediment storage reservoirs. The potential for net imbalances in overall exchange as well as the size specific nature of the computations allows the model to simulate reach-scale aggradation/degradation and/or changes in bed texture. The inclusion of fine sediment in the model allows it to track geochemical tracer material and also provides a mechanism to simulate, to first order, the effects of changes in the supply of silt and clay on overall channel hydraulic capacity. The model is applied to a ~40 km reach of the Ain River, a tributary of the Rhône River in eastern France that has experienced a significant sediment deficit as a result of the construction of several dams between 1920 and 1970. MAST-1D simulations result in both incision and the formation of a

  5. A new test statistic for climate models that includes field and spatial dependencies using Gaussian Markov random fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nosedal-Sanchez, Alvaro; Jackson, Charles S.; Huerta, Gabriel

    2016-07-20

    A new test statistic for climate model evaluation has been developed that potentially mitigates some of the limitations that exist for observing and representing field and space dependencies of climate phenomena. Traditionally such dependencies have been ignored when climate models have been evaluated against observational data, which makes it difficult to assess whether any given model is simulating observed climate for the right reasons. The new statistic uses Gaussian Markov random fields for estimating field and space dependencies within a first-order grid point neighborhood structure. We illustrate the ability of Gaussian Markov random fields to represent empirical estimates of fieldmore » and space covariances using "witch hat" graphs. We further use the new statistic to evaluate the tropical response of a climate model (CAM3.1) to changes in two parameters important to its representation of cloud and precipitation physics. Overall, the inclusion of dependency information did not alter significantly the recognition of those regions of parameter space that best approximated observations. However, there were some qualitative differences in the shape of the response surface that suggest how such a measure could affect estimates of model uncertainty.« less

  6. A new test statistic for climate models that includes field and spatial dependencies using Gaussian Markov random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosedal-Sanchez, Alvaro; Jackson, Charles S.; Huerta, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    A new test statistic for climate model evaluation has been developed that potentially mitigates some of the limitations that exist for observing and representing field and space dependencies of climate phenomena. Traditionally such dependencies have been ignored when climate models have been evaluated against observational data, which makes it difficult to assess whether any given model is simulating observed climate for the right reasons. The new statistic uses Gaussian Markov random fields for estimating field and space dependencies within a first-order grid point neighborhood structure. We illustrate the ability of Gaussian Markov random fields to represent empirical estimates of field and space covariances using "witch hat" graphs. We further use the new statistic to evaluate the tropical response of a climate model (CAM3.1) to changes in two parameters important to its representation of cloud and precipitation physics. Overall, the inclusion of dependency information did not alter significantly the recognition of those regions of parameter space that best approximated observations. However, there were some qualitative differences in the shape of the response surface that suggest how such a measure could affect estimates of model uncertainty.

  7. A Solution Strategy to Include the Opening of the Opercular Slits in Moving-Mesh CFD Models of Suction Feeding.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenbergh, Sam

    2015-07-01

    The gill cover of fish and pre-metamorphic salamanders has a key role in suction feeding by acting as a one-way valve. It initially closes and avoids an inflow of water through the gill slits, after which it opens to allow outflow of the water that was sucked through the mouth into the expanded buccopharyngeal cavity. However, due to the inability of analytical models (relying on the continuity principle) to calculate the flow of fluid through a cavity with two openings and that was changing in shape and size, stringent boundary conditions had to be used in previously developed mathematical models after the moment of the valve's opening. By solving additionally for the conservation of momentum, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has the capacity to dynamically simulate these flows, but this technique also faces complications in modeling a transition from closed to open valves. Here, I present a relatively simple solution strategy to incorporate the opening of the valves, exemplified in an axisymmetrical model of a suction-feeding sunfish in ANSYS Fluent software. By controlling viscosity of a separately defined fluid entity in the region of the opercular cavity, early inflow can be blocked (high viscosity assigned) and later outflow can be allowed (changing viscosity to that of water). Finally, by analyzing the CFD solution obtained for the sunfish model, a few new insights into the biomechanics of suction feeding are gained. PMID:25936359

  8. Modeling and simulation of centroid and inversion charge density in cylindrical surrounding gate MOSFETs including quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimala, P.; Balamurugan, N. B.

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model for surrounding gate metal—oxide—semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) considering quantum effects is presented. To achieve this goal, we have used a variational approach for solving the Poissonand Schrodinger equations. This model is developed to provide an analytical expression for the inversion charge distribution function for all regions of the device operation. This expression is used to calculate the other important parameters like the inversion charge centroid, threshold voltage and inversion charge density. The calculated expressions for the above parameters are simple and accurate. The validity of this model was checked for the devices with different device dimensions and bias voltages. The calculated results are compared with the simulation results and they show good agreement.

  9. Poroviscoelastic finite element model including continuous fiber distribution for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Taffetani, M; Griebel, M; Gastaldi, D; Klisch, S M; Vena, P

    2014-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a soft hydrated tissue that facilitates proper load transfer in diarthroidal joints. The mechanical properties of articular cartilage derive from its structural and hierarchical organization that, at the micrometric length scale, encompasses three main components: a network of insoluble collagen fibrils, negatively charged macromolecules and a porous extracellular matrix. In this work, a constituent-based constitutive model for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage is presented: it accounts for the multi-constituent, non-linear, porous, and viscous aspects of articular cartilage mechanics. In order to reproduce the articular cartilage response under different loading conditions, the model considers a continuous distribution of collagen fibril orientation, swelling, and depth-dependent mechanical properties. The model's parameters are obtained by fitting published experimental data for the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation unconfined compression test on adult bovine articular cartilage. Then, model validation is obtained by simulating three independent experimental tests: (i) the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation confined compression test, (ii) the drained response of a flat punch indentation test and (iii) the depth-dependence of effective Poisson's ratio in a unconfined compression test. Finally, the validated constitutive model has been used to simulate multiload spherical nanoindentation creep tests. Upon accounting for strain-dependent tissue permeability and intrinsic viscoelastic properties of the collagen network, the model accurately fits the drained and undrained curves and time-dependent creep response. The results show that depth-dependent tissue properties and glycosaminoglycan-induced tissue swelling should be accounted for when simulating indentation experiments. PMID:24389384

  10. Uncertainty of streamwater solute fluxes in five contrasting headwater catchments including model uncertainty and natural variability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbach, B. T.; Burns, D. A.; Shanley, J. B.; Yanai, R. D.; Bae, K.; Wild, A.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    There are many sources of uncertainty in estimates of streamwater solute flux. Flux is the product of discharge and concentration (summed over time), each of which has measurement uncertainty of its own. Discharge can be measured almost continuously, but concentrations are usually determined from discrete samples, which increases uncertainty dependent on sampling frequency and how concentrations are assigned for the periods between samples. Gaps between samples can be estimated by linear interpolation or by models that that use the relations between concentration and continuously measured or known variables such as discharge, season, temperature, and time. For this project, developed in cooperation with QUEST (Quantifying Uncertainty in Ecosystem Studies), we evaluated uncertainty for three flux estimation methods and three different sampling frequencies (monthly, weekly, and weekly plus event). The constituents investigated were dissolved NO3, Si, SO4, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), solutes whose concentration dynamics exhibit strongly contrasting behavior. The evaluation was completed for a 10-year period at five small, forested watersheds in Georgia, New Hampshire, New York, Puerto Rico, and Vermont. Concentration regression models were developed for each solute at each of the three sampling frequencies for all five watersheds. Fluxes were then calculated using (1) a linear interpolation approach, (2) a regression-model method, and (3) the composite method - which combines the regression-model method for estimating concentrations and the linear interpolation method for correcting model residuals to the observed sample concentrations. We considered the best estimates of flux to be derived using the composite method at the highest sampling frequencies. We also evaluated the importance of sampling frequency and estimation method on flux estimate uncertainty; flux uncertainty was dependent on the variability characteristics of each solute and varied for

  11. Resolution-independent modelling of environmental effects in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include ram-pressure stripping of both hot and cold gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Kang, Xi; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The quenching of star formation in satellite galaxies is observed over a wide range of dark matter halo masses and galaxy environments. In the recent Guo et al. and Fu et al. semi-analytic + N-body models, the gaseous environment of the satellite galaxy is governed by the properties of the dark matter subhalo in which it resides. This quantity depends of the resolution of the N-body simulation, leading to a divergent fraction of quenched satellites in high- and low-resolution simulations. Here, we incorporate an analytic model to trace the subhaloes below the resolution limit. We demonstrate that we then obtain better converged results between the Millennium I and II simulations, especially for the satellites in the massive haloes (log Mhalo = [14, 15]). We also include a new physical model for the ram-pressure stripping of cold gas in satellite galaxies. However, we find very clear discrepancies with observed trends in quenched satellite galaxy fractions as a function of stellar mass at fixed halo mass. At fixed halo mass, the quenched fraction of satellites does not depend on stellar mass in the models, but increases strongly with mass in the data. In addition to the overprediction of low-mass passive satellites, the models also predict too few quenched central galaxies with low stellar masses, so the problems in reproducing quenched fractions are not purely of environmental origin. Further improvements to the treatment of the gas-physical processes regulating the star formation histories of galaxies are clearly necessary to resolve these problems.

  12. Including the adjoint model of the moist physics in the 4D-Var in NASA's GEOS-5 Global Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, D. R.; Errico, R.

    2011-12-01

    Inherent in the minimization process in the 4D-Var data assimilation system is the need for the model's adjoint. It is straightforward to obtain the exact adjoint by linearizing the code in a line by line sense; however it only provides an accurate overall representation of the physical processes if the model behaviour is linear. Moist processes in the atmosphere, and thus the models that represent them, are intrinsically highly non-linear and can contain discrete switches. The adjoint that is required in the data assimilation system needs to provide an accurate representation of the physical behaviour for perturbation sizes of the order of the analysis error, so an exact adjoint of the moist physics model is likely to be inaccurate. Instead a non-exact adjoint model, which is accurate for large enough perturbations, must be developed. The constraint on the development is that the simplified adjoint be consistent with the actual trajectory of the model. Previous attempts to include the moist physics in the 4D-Var have emphasized the need for redevelopment of the actual moist scheme to a simpler version. These schemes are designed to be linear in the limit of realistic perturbation size but also capture the essence of the physical behaviour, making the adjoint version of the scheme suitable for use in the 4D-Var. A downside to this approach is that it can result in an over simplification of the physics and represent a larger departure from the true model trajectory than necessary. The adjoint is just the transpose of the tangent linear model, which is the differential of the model operator. This differential of the operator can be constructed from Jacobian matrices. Examining the structures of the Jacobians as perturbations of varying size are added to the state vector can help determine whether the adjoint model - be it of actual or simplified physics - will be suitable for use in the assimilation algorithm. If Jacobian structures change considerably when the

  13. Exploring the Social Impact of Being a Typical Peer Model for Included Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, Jill; Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; Kasari, Connie

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the social impact of being a typical peer model as part of a social skills intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were drawn from a randomized-controlled-treatment trial that examined the effects of targeted interventions on the social networks of 60 elementary-aged children with ASD.…

  14. A depth-averaged debris-flow model that includes the effects of evolving dilatancy. I. physical basis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.; George, David L.

    2014-01-01

    To simulate debris-flow behaviour from initiation to deposition, we derive a depth-averaged, two-phase model that combines concepts of critical-state soil mechanics, grain-flow mechanics and fluid mechanics. The model's balance equations describe coupled evolution of the solid volume fraction, m, basal pore-fluid pressure, flow thickness and two components of flow velocity. Basal friction is evaluated using a generalized Coulomb rule, and fluid motion is evaluated in a frame of reference that translates with the velocity of the granular phase, vs. Source terms in each of the depth-averaged balance equations account for the influence of the granular dilation rate, defined as the depth integral of ∇⋅vs. Calculation of the dilation rate involves the effects of an elastic compressibility and an inelastic dilatancy angle proportional to m−meq, where meq is the value of m in equilibrium with the ambient stress state and flow rate. Normalization of the model equations shows that predicted debris-flow behaviour depends principally on the initial value of m−meq and on the ratio of two fundamental timescales. One of these timescales governs downslope debris-flow motion, and the other governs pore-pressure relaxation that modifies Coulomb friction and regulates evolution of m. A companion paper presents a suite of model predictions and tests.

  15. Radiative decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model including hyperfine mixing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Oexl, Bettina; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-06-01

    We study flavor-conserving radiative decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit. We discuss in some detail hyperfine mixing effects.

  16. Robust semicoherent searches for continuous gravitational waves with noise and signal models including hours to days long transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keitel, David

    2016-04-01

    The vulnerability to single-detector instrumental artifacts in standard detection methods for long-duration quasimonochromatic gravitational waves from nonaxisymmetric rotating neutron stars [continuous waves (CWs)] was addressed in past work [D. Keitel et al., Phys. Rev. D 89, 064023 (2014).] by a Bayesian approach. An explicit model of persistent single-detector disturbances led to a generalized detection statistic with improved robustness against such artifacts. Since many strong outliers in semicoherent searches of LIGO data are caused by transient disturbances that last only a few hours, we extend the noise model to cover such limited-duration disturbances, and demonstrate increased robustness in realistic simulated data. Besides long-duration CWs, neutron stars could also emit transient signals which, for a limited time, also follow the CW signal model (tCWs). As a pragmatic alternative to specialized transient searches, we demonstrate how to make standard semicoherent CW searches more sensitive to transient signals. Considering tCWs in a single segment of a semicoherent search, Bayesian model selection yields a new detection statistic that does not add significant computational cost. On simulated data, we find that it increases sensitivity towards tCWs, even of varying durations, while not sacrificing sensitivity to classical CW signals, and still being robust to transient or persistent single-detector instrumental artifacts.

  17. Should a water colour parameter be included in lake total phosphorus prediction models used for the Water Framework Directive?

    PubMed

    Vinogradoff, Susan I; Oliver, Ian W

    2015-01-01

    Under the Water Framework Directive (WFD) lakes are classified according to a variety of criteria. This classification facilitates state of the environment assessments and helps identify work needed to achieve the objectives of the WFD, which are broadly to maintain and/or restore water quality and ecological status at a level recognised as good or high. To achieve high or good status, lakes must meet a criterion for total phosphorus (TP) that is linked to a predicted reference condition value that is derived by various models. Lakes which fail to meet good status may require expensive remedial actions to be undertaken, thus accurate identification of the reference condition TP concentration is vital for effective environmental management. However, the models currently employed could be improved for some regions, particularly those with carbon rich soils. By examining 19 reference condition lakes (i.e. lakes essentially non-impacted by humans) in peaty areas of Scotland, we found that a simple parameter linked to water colour and humic substances was a better predictor of TP than the currently employed models (R(2) 0.585 vs R(2) < 0.01). Therefore, for Scotland and elsewhere, in regions with carbon rich soils and lakes with humic waters the TP predictive models could be improved by development and incorporation of a parameter related to water colour and humic components. PMID:25262390

  18. Topological model of the solar event including a flare and coronal mass ejection on October 19, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. I.; Yazev, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Based on the analysis of a strong solar flare X1.6/2B on October 19, 2001 in the active region 9661, accompanied by a coronal mass ejection (CME) of the halo type, a topological model of development of this solar event is suggested. The model considers a unified process of development of CME and a chromosphere flare. According to the model, this process has a common source of energy supply: the turbulent current layer lying between the arcade of flare loops and the surface of CME going away. The structures on the ends of flare bands (SEFB) represent in this model chromosphere feet of the system of large-scale coronal magnetic arches at the initial stage of the dynamic processes whose evolution results in CME. Peripheral structures (PS) of the flare (elongated double bright emission strips beyond the limits of the active region) are interpreted as chromosphere bases of magnetic field lines that form an external shell (braid) of the CME at the late stage of the flare.

  19. Numerical Modeling of the Hydrothermal System at East Pacific Rise 9°50'N Including Anhydrite Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolandaivelu, K. P.; Lowell, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the effects of anhydrite precipitation on mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems, we conducted 2-D numerical simulations of two-phase hydrothermal circulation in a NaCl-H2O fluid at the East Pacific Rise 9°50'N. The simulations were constrained by key observational thermal data and seismicity that suggests the fluid flow is primarily along axis with recharge focused into a small zone near a 4th order discontinuity. The simulations considered an open-top square box with a fixed seafloor pressure of 25 MPa, and nominal seafloor temperature of 10 °C. The sides of the box were assumed to be impermeable and insulated. We considered two models: a homogeneous model with a permeability of 10-13 m2 and a heterogeneous model in which layer 2A extrusives were given a higher permeability. Both models had a fixed bottom temperature distribution and initial porosity of 0.1. Assuming that anhydrite precipitation resulted from the decrease in solubility with increasing temperature as downwelling fluid gets heated, we calculated the rate of porosity decrease and sealing times in each cell at certain time snapshots in the simulations. The results showed that sealing would occur most rapidly in limited regions near the base of the high-temperature plumes, where complete sealing could occur on decadal time scales. Though more detailed analysis is needed, it appeared that the areas of rapid sealing would likely have negligible impact on the overall circulation pattern and hydrothermal vent temperatures. The simulations also indicated that sealing due to anhydrite precipitation would occur more slowly at the margins of the ascending plumes. The sealing times in the deep recharge zone determined in these simulations were considerably greater than estimated from 1D analytical calculations, suggesting that with a 2D model, focused recharge at the EPR 9°50'N site may occur, at least on a decadal time scale.

  20. Leadership models with an emphasis on relationships and the completion of the project in information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaskinou, Aikaterini I.; Drivas, Ioannis C.; Sakas, Damianos P.

    2015-02-01

    While attempting decision-making in leadership, one of the criteria that should be considered is the actual behavior of the leader towards the work group. The object of this study is the prevalence of two key leadership models, the Task Behavior and the Relationship Behavior. Firstly, the leader's behavior is focused on completing the project combined with a leadership style which is more interventionist and less conciliatory. The second leadership model focuses on working relationships, developed between leaders and employees. In this case, the character of the model is associated with a leadership behavior more supportive, motivating and participative. This article refers to the characteristics of the two models and the mechanisms and strategies that can be adopted in both leadership behaviors. Furthermore, through the research which took place, we have come to conclusions regarding the public's views about the different leadership behaviors and, also, the possibility of combining the two styles of leadership.